WorldWideScience

Sample records for defect model dogs

  1. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Anzai

    Full Text Available The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT. After FGF-2 (0.3% or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological

  2. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Jun; Nagayasu-Tanaka, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Yamada, Satoru; Nozaki, Takenori; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT). After FGF-2 (0.3%) or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological healing process.

  3. Experimental reconstruction of cervical esophageal defect with artificial esophagus made of polyurethane in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Cui, Y; Ma, K; Gong, M; Chang, D; Wang, T

    2016-01-01

    The defect of esophagus after surgical excision in patients is usually replaced by autologous stomach, jejunum, or colon. The operation brings severe trauma and complications. Using artificial esophagus to replace the defect in situ can reduce the operative trauma, simplify the operative procedures, and decrease the influence to digestive function. A variety of experiments have been designed for developing a practical artificial esophagus. Nevertheless, a safe and reliable artificial esophagus is not yet available. The objective is to evaluate the possibility of the artificial esophagus made of non-degradable polyurethane materials being used in reconstruction of the segmental defect of cervical esophagus in beagles, observe the regeneration of esophageal tissue, and gather experience for future study. The cervical esophageal defects in 13 beagles were designed to 2-cm long and were constructed by the artificial esophagus made of non-degradable polyurethane materials. Nutrition supports were given after the operation. The operative mortality, anastomotic leakage, migration of artificial esophagus, and dysphagia were followed up. The regeneration of the esophageal tissues was evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemical labeled streptavidin-biotin method. The surgical procedures were successfully completed in all beagles, and 12-month follow-ups were done. Only one beagle died of severe infection, and all others survived until being killed. The anastomotic leakage occurred in nine beagles, most of them (8/9) were cured after supportive therapy. The migration of artificial esophagus occurred in all 12 surviving beagles, and one artificial esophagus stayed in situ after migration. All 12 surviving beagles showed dysphagia with taking only fluid or soft food. No beagle died of malnutrition. The neo-esophagus was composed of granulation tissue, and the inner surface was covered by epithelium in 2-3 months completely. But the inner surface of neo-esophagus with

  4. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, Jun, E-mail: anzai_jun@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitamura, Masahiro, E-mail: kitamura@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nozaki, Takenori, E-mail: tnozaki@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagayasu, Toshie, E-mail: nagayasu_toshie@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Terashima, Akio, E-mail: terashima_akio@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Asano, Taiji, E-mail: asano_taiji@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. {yields} FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via {beta}-TCP at the defects. {yields} In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. {yields} Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. {yields} This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus {beta}-TCP or {beta}-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with {beta}-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal

  5. New bone formation in a bone defect associated to dental implant using absorbable or non-absorbable membrane in a dog model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Maria de Almeida; Olate, Sergio; Lanata-Flores, Antonio; Pozzer, Leandro; Cavalieri-Pereira, Lucas; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; de Albergaria-Barbosa, José

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the bone formation capacity in fenestration defects associated with dental implants using absorbable and non-absorbable membranes. Six dogs were used in the study. In both tibias of each animal 3 implants were installed, and around these 5 mm circular defects were created. The defects were covered with absorbable membranes (experimental group 1), non-absorbable membranes (experimental group 2), and the third defect was not covered (control group). At 3 and 8 weeks post-surgery, the animals were euthanized and the membranes with the bone tissue around the implants were processed for histological analysis. The statistical analysis was conducted with Tukey’s test, considering statistical significance when p0.1). In the defects without membrane, continuous connective tissue invasions and bone repair deficiency were observed. There were no significant differences in the characteristics and volume of the neoformed bone in the defects around the implants covered by the different membranes, whereas the control defects produced significantly less bone. The use of biological membranes contributes to bone formation in three-wall defects. PMID:24228090

  6. Artificial periodontal defects and frequency of tooth brushing in beagle dogs (I). Clinical findings after creation of the defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corba, N H; Jansen, J; Fidler, V

    1986-02-01

    This investigation was designed to determine the influence of different frequencies of tooth brushing on artificial periodontal defects in the beagle dog shortly after creation. In 12 beagle dogs, periodontal defects were created using elastic bands placed in the sulci below the gingival margin after having cut the dento-gingival fibres to the level of the alveolar bone. This active phase of creating defects lasted for 6 weeks. 6 premolars in the lower jaw were used (2P2, 3P3, 4P4). After removal of the elastic bands, the 12 dogs were distributed into 3 groups of 4 dogs each. Each group was brushed with a certain frequency, i.e., 7 times, 3 times or once a week. Plaque index, gingival index and probing depth, using a constant force probe, were assessed interproximally. The experiment lasted for 24 weeks. For hypothesis testing, a brushing effect was calculated for each dog. Furthermore, an analysis was performed based on the absolute scores at week 24. From the statistical analysis, it was concluded that in artificially-induced periodontal defects in beagle dogs immediately after creation, brushing 7 times a week is superior to brushing 3 times a week to establish and maintain gingival health.

  7. Dog models of naturally occurring cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Jennie L; McCarthy, Donna O; Alvarez, Carlos E

    2011-07-01

    Studies using dogs provide an ideal solution to the gap in animal models for natural disease and translational medicine. This is evidenced by approximately 400 inherited disorders being characterized in domesticated dogs, most of which are relevant to humans. There are several hundred isolated populations of dogs (breeds) and each has a vastly reduced genetic variation compared with humans; this simplifies disease mapping and pharmacogenomics. Dogs age five- to eight-fold faster than do humans, share environments with their owners, are usually kept until old age and receive a high level of health care. Farseeing investigators recognized this potential and, over the past decade, have developed the necessary tools and infrastructure to utilize this powerful model of human disease, including the sequencing of the dog genome in 2005. Here, we review the nascent convergence of genetic and translational canine models of spontaneous disease, focusing on cancer.

  8. Rhomboid cutaneous flap for defect correction after resection of trichoblastoma on dogs' face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Bartolomeu de Araújo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Surgical excision of neoplasms usually requires a large incision with safety margin, resulting in large cutaneous defects. Skin flaps permit closure of extensive cutaneous defects that would not be closed directly. The rhomboid cutaneous flap can be used in places of the body where a rhomboid defect with internal angles of 60 and 120 degrees can be made. The aim of this paper is to report the her use for reconstruction of the defect created after resection of a tumor on dogs' face . Total removal of the tumor and a safety margin was performed, and then the surgical defect was reconstructed with a rhomboid cutaneous flap. The final result was satisfactory, with an esthetically and functional acceptable scar, a without deformities to the oral commissure or eye. The cutaneous flap was considered a viable alternative for reconstruction of large surgical defects, of relatively simple execution and good functional and cosmetic results.

  9. Artificial periodontal defects and frequency of tooth brushing in beagle dogs (II). Clinical findings after a period of healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corba, N H; Jansen, J; Pilot, T

    1986-03-01

    This investigation was designed to determine the influence of different frequencies of tooth brushing on artificial periodontal defects in the beagle dog after a period of healing. In 12 beagle dogs, periodontal defects were created using elastic bands placed in the sulci below the gingival margin after having cut the dento-gingival fibres to the level of the alveolar bone crest. This active phase of creating defects lasted for 6 weeks. After removal of the elastic bands, the created defects were left undisturbed during the remainder of the pre-experimental period (12 weeks). 6 premolars in the lower jaw were used (2P2, 3P3, 4P4). After the pre-experimental period, the 12 dogs were distributed into 3 groups of 4 dogs each. Each group was brushed with a certain frequency, i.e., 7 times, 3 times or once a week. Registrations of plaque index, gingival index and probing depth using a constant force probe were carried out on approximal surfaces. The experiment lasted for 24 weeks. A brushing effect was calculated for each dog to include information on all within-dog and between-dog variations. It was shown in relation to artificially-induced periodontal defects in beagle dogs that after a period of healing, brushing 7 times a week is superior to brushing 3 times a week in establishing and maintaining gingival health.

  10. Comparison of techniques for transdiaphragmatic thoracic drainage after diaphragmatic defect closure in dogs: a cadaveric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hun-Young; Mann, F. A.; Lee, Suhwon

    2013-01-01

    Four thoracic evacuation techniques for pneumothorax elimination after diaphragmatic defect closure were compared in 40 canine cadavers. After creating a defect in the left side of the diaphragm, thoracic drainage was performed by thoracostomy tube insertion through the defect and a small (DD-SP) or large (DD-LP) puncture created in the caudal mediastinum, or through both the diaphragmatic defect and intact contralateral diaphragm with a small (DI-SP) or large (DI-LP) puncture in made in the caudal mediastinum. Differences in intrapleural pressure (IPP) between the right and left hemithoraxes after air evacuation along with differences in IPP before making a defect and after air evacuation in each hemithorax were calculated. A difference (p ≤ 0.0011) in IPP between the left and right hemithoraxes after air evacuation as well as before making a defect and after air evacuation in the right hemithorax was detected for the DD-SP group. No significant differences (p ≥ 0.0835) were observed for the DI-LP, DD-LP, or DI-SP groups. Creation of a large mediastinal puncture or thoracic evacuation through both a diaphragmatic defect and intact contralateral diaphragm can facilitate proper pneumothorax elimination bilaterally after diaphragmatic defect closure in dogs with a small puncture in the caudal mediastinum. PMID:23814472

  11. Dogs as a Model for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Heather L; Fenger, Joelle M; London, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers in client-owned dogs closely recapitulate their human counterparts with respect to clinical presentation, histological features, molecular profiles, and response and resistance to therapy, as well as the evolution of drug-resistant metastases. In several instances the incorporation of dogs with cancer into the preclinical development path of cancer therapeutics has influenced outcome by helping to establish pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics relationships, dose/regimen, expected clinical toxicities, and ultimately the potential for biologic activity. As our understanding regarding the molecular drivers of canine cancers has improved, unique opportunities have emerged to leverage this spontaneous model to better guide cancer drug development so that therapies likely to fail are eliminated earlier and therapies with true potential are optimized prior to human studies. Both pets and people benefit from this approach, as it provides dogs with access to cutting-edge cancer treatments and helps to insure that people are given treatments more likely to succeed.

  12. [The influence of chemically-modified SLA on bone defect healing around implants in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-fei; Zhuang, Long-fei; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Zhi-yong; Lai, Hong-chang

    2010-06-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effect of surface chemical modification on the process of bone defect healing around implants in dogs. Six Beagle dogs were used in this study. The mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted bilaterally. Three months after tooth extraction the procedure of implant placement was performed. Four canals with a diameter of 2.8 mm and 10 mm in depth were prepared at the third premolar (P3) and the first molar (M1) sites of both sides of the mandible, of which the coronal 5 mm portion were further widened with the 5.3 mm diameter twist drill. In each side of the mandible one modSLA (chemically-modified SLA) implant and one SLA (sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched) implant with a diameter of 3.3 mm and 10 mm in length were installed, respectively. Thus, the circumferential defect that was 5mm deep and 1mm wide created between the implant surface and the bony wall. Four implants placed in both sides of the mandible were allowed for non-submerged healing. Two dogs were sacrificed at the week 2, 4 and 8 following implant placement, respectively, and the specimens were prepared and stained with trinitrophenol- fuchsin for histological and histomorphometric analyses to acquire the bone-to-implant contact (BIC%), new bone fill (NBF%) and the distance between the most coronal level of bone-to-implant contact and the bottom of the surgically created bone defect(B-D). Statistical analysis was conducted with SPSS13.0 software package. No implant was loosen or lost during the study. The histomorphometric results demonstrated that new bone formation was observed in the defect region around both groups of implants at all time points and the newly formed bone occurred initially from the apical and lateral bony wall of the defect region, the bone defect almost was filled at week 8. At 2 and 4 weeks of healing, the BIC%, NBF% and B-D values were significantly higher for modSLA implants (P0.05). The SLA implants processed by means of

  13. Bone regeneration by octacalcium phosphate collagen composites in a dog alveolar cleft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, K; Matsui, A; Handa, T; Kawai, T; Suzuki, O; Kamakura, S; Echigo, S

    2010-12-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and porcine atelocollagen sponge composites (OCP/Col) markedly enhanced bone regeneration in a rat cranial defect model. To assess clinical application, the authors examined whether OCP/Col would enhance bone regeneration in an alveolar cleft model in an adult dog, which was assumed to reflect patients with alveolar cleft. Disks of OCP/Col or collagen were implanted into the defect and bone regeneration by OCP/Col or collagen was investigated 4 months after implantation. Macroscopically, the OCP/Col-treated alveolus was obviously augmented and occupied by radio-opacity, and the border between the original bone and the defect was indistinguishable. Histological analysis revealed it was filled and bridged with newly formed bone; a small quantity of the remaining implanted OCP was observed. X-ray diffraction patterns of the area of implanted OCP/Col indicated no difference from those of dog bone. In the collagen-treated alveolus, the hollowed alveolus was mainly filled with fibrous connective tissue, and a small amount of new bone was observed at the defect margin. These results suggest that bone was obviously repaired when OCP/Col was implanted into the alveolar cleft model in a dog, and OCP/Col would be a significant bone regenerative material to substitute for autogeneous bone.

  14. Evaluation of a model for induction of periodontal disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo V. Sepúlveda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several methods for inducing periodontal disease in animal models, being the bone defect one of the most reported. This study aimed to evaluate this model, through clinical, radiographic, tomographic and histological analyzes, thus providing standardized data for future regenerative works. Twelve dogs were subjected to the induction protocol. In a first surgical procedure, a mucoperiosteal flap was made on the buccal aspect of the right third and fourth premolars and a defect was produced exposing the furcation and mesial and distal roots, with dimensions: 5mm coronoapical, 5mm mesiodistal, and 3mm buccolingual. Periodontal ligament and cementum were curetted and the defect was filled with molding polyester, which was removed after 21 days on new surgical procedure. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed after the two surgeries and before the collection of parts for dental tomography and histological analysis. All animals showed grade II furcation exposure in both teeth. Clinical attachment level increased after induction. Defect size did not change for coronoapical and buccolingual measurements, while mesiodistal size was significantly higher than at the time of defect production. Radiographic analysis showed decreased radiopacity and discontinuity of lamina dura in every tooth in the furcation area. The horizontal progression of the disease was evident in micro-computed tomography and defect content in the histological analysis. Therefore, it is concluded that this method promotes the induction of periodontal disease in dogs in a standardized way, thus being a good model for future work.

  15. Effect of biphasic calcium phosphate nanocomposite on healing of surgically created alveolar bone defects in beagle dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lanlei; Guan, Aizhong; Shi, Han; Chen, Yangxi; Liao, Yunmao

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of porous biphasic calcium phosphate nanocomposite (nanoBCP) scaffolds bioceramic. Alveolar bone defects were surgically created bilaterally at the buccal aspects of the upper second premolar in fourteen beagle dogs. After root conditioning with ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), nanoBCP was randomly filled in the defects and nothing was put into the contralaterals as controls. Dogs were killed at the 12th weeks. Histological observations were processed through a light microscopy. The results revealed that a great amount of functional periodontal fissures formed in the defects in the nanoBCP groups while minimal bone took shape in the controls. In this study, nanoBCP has proved to work well as a biocompatible and osteoconductive scaffold material to promote periodontal regeneration effectively.

  16. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in the repair of osteochondral defects in dogs - clinical-radiographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Barros Eleotério

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the proposed treatments to repair lesions of degenerative joint disease (DJD, chondroprotective nutraceuticals composed by glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are a non-invasive theraphy with properties that favors the health of the cartilage. Although used in human, it is also available for veterinary use with administration in the form of nutritional supplement independent of prescription, since they have registry only in the Inspection Service, which does not require safety and efficacy testing. The lack of such tests to prove efficacy and safety of veterinary medicines required by the Ministry of Agriculture and the lack of scientific studies proving its benefits raises doubts about the efficiency of the concentrations of such active substances. In this context, the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a veterinary chondroprotective nutraceutical based on chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the repair of osteochondral defects in lateral femoral condyle of 48 dogs, through clinical and radiographic analysis. The animals were divided into treatment group (TG and control group (CG, so that only the TG received the nutraceutical every 24 hours at the rate recommended by the manufacturer. The results of the four treatment times (15, 30, 60 and 90 days showed that the chondroprotective nutraceutical, in the rate, formulation and administration at the times used, did not improve clinical signs and radiologically did not influence in the repair process of the defects, since the treated and control groups showed similar radiographic findings at the end of the treatments.

  17. Managing Dog Waste: Campaign Insights from the Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typhina, Eli; Yan, Changmin

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to help municipalities develop effective education and outreach campaigns to reduce stormwater pollutants, such as pet waste, this study applied the Health Belief Model (HBM) to identify perceptions of dog waste and corresponding collection behaviors from dog owners living in a small U.S. city. Results of 455 online survey responses…

  18. Generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity in juvenile dogs caused by a defective DIRAS family GTPase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielaender, Franziska; Sarviaho, Riika; James, Fiona; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Cortez, Miguel A.; Kluger, Gerhard; Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Arumilli, Meharji; Kornberg, Marion; Bathen-Noethen, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea; Rentmeister, Kai; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Hülsmeyer, Velia; Boettcher, Irene C.; Tästensen, Carina; Flegel, Thomas; Leeb, Tosso; Matiasek, Kaspar; Fischer, Andrea; Lohi, Hannes

    2017-01-01

    The clinical and electroencephalographic features of a canine generalized myoclonic epilepsy with photosensitivity and onset in young Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs (6 wk to 18 mo) are described. A fully penetrant recessive 4-bp deletion was identified in the DIRAS family GTPase 1 (DIRAS1) gene with an altered expression pattern of DIRAS1 protein in the affected brain. This neuronal DIRAS1 gene with a proposed role in cholinergic transmission provides not only a candidate for human myoclonic epilepsy but also insights into the disease etiology, while establishing a spontaneous model for future intervention studies and functional characterization. PMID:28223533

  19. An exploratory model of dog disciplining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Michael-Steinberg, Judith; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Vossen, J.M.H.; Felling, A.J.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the possible relationships among dog owners' perceptions of, and emotional and behavioral responses to, problematic situations involving their dogs, and investigates differences in these in different subgroups of owners. The dominant sequence of the interaction is defined as perc

  20. Effects of a tetracycline blended polylactic and polyglycolic acid membrane on the healing of one-wall intrabony defects in beagle dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il-Young [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ui-Won [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoo-Sung [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jung-Kiu [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong-Kwan [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752l (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the regenerative effects of a tetracycline blended polylactic and polyglycolic acid (TC-PLGA) and non-blended polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLGA) barrier membrane on one-wall intrabony defects in beagle dogs. It can be concluded that when used for guided tissue regeneration TC-PLGA membranes show a beneficial effect on one-wall intrabony defects in beagle dogs.

  1. Kinetic study of the replacement of porcine small intestinal submucosa grafts and the regeneration of meniscal-like tissue in large avascular meniscal defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Arnoczky, S P; Fox, D B; Reeves Cook, C; Kreeger, J M

    2001-06-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was used to replace large, avascular defects in the medial menisci of dogs. Twelve dogs received SIS grafts and 3 dogs were left untreated as controls. Dogs were evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks by means of lameness scoring and ultrasonography. Dogs were sacrificed at 1, 6, or 12 weeks after implantation, and the tissue at the site of meniscal resection was evaluated for gross and histologic appearance, cross-sectional and surface area, and collagen types I and II. The femoral and tibial condyles were assessed for articular cartilage damage. Control dogs were significantly more lame than grafted dogs 8 and 12 weeks after instrumentation. Grafted dogs' replacement tissue appeared meniscal-like when evaluated grossly and ultrasonographically 12 weeks after instrumentation. The amount of replacement tissue was significantly greater in both cross-sectional and surface area for grafted dogs than for controls at all time points. Histologically, the SIS biomaterial could be identified in all grafted dogs at 1 week post-implantation, but in none at 6 weeks post-implantation. Subjectively, grafted dogs' replacement tissue was histologically superior to that of controls with respect to tissue type, organization, and architecture. Collagen types I and II immunoreactivity in grafted menisci were similar to that of normal menisci. Control dogs had significantly more articular cartilage damage than grafted dogs. SIS appears to induce regeneration of meniscal-like tissue in large, avascular meniscal defects in dogs, resulting in superior clinical function and articular cartilage protection compared to ungrafted controls.

  2. Expression of biologically active atrial natriuretic factor following intrahepatic injection of a replication-defective adenoviral vector in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetboul, V; Adam, M; Deprez, I; Ambriovic, A; Rosenberg, D; Crespeau, F; Saana, M; Pham, I; Eloit, M; Adnot, S; Pouchelon, J L

    1999-01-20

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasoactive hormone produced and released by atrial cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether adenovirus-mediated ANF gene delivery to dogs leads to a sustained increase in circulating ANF levels resulting in long-lasting biological effects. An adenoviral vector containing the canine ANF cDNA under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus 3' long terminal repeat (AdRSV-ANF) was injected via the intrahepatic route to nonvaccinated 2-month-old dogs. In the first group of four dogs injected with AdRSV-ANF (10(10.2) TCID50), a short-lived increase in plasma ANF concentrations not associated with biological effects occurred 8-10 days after the injection, as compared with four control dogs injected with an adenovirus encoding a luciferase reporter gene (AdRSV-luc). In a second series of experiments, six dogs received AdRSV-ANF at a dose of 10(10) TCID50 and a replication-defective type 5 adenovirus harboring a modified VAI gene (Ad-VAr) at the same dose. Sustained increases in plasma ANF concentrations and urinary cGMP excretion starting on day 2 and persisting until day 20 were seen, as well as concomitant elevations in natriuresis and diuresis, a transient increase in cardiac output, and a delay in body weight gain, as compared with control dogs injected with AdRSV-luc/Ad-VAr. These results show that adenovirus-mediated ANF gene expression can lead to systemic biological effects in dogs, a finding of potential relevance for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and sodium-retaining disorders.

  3. Platelet-rich plasma plus bioactive glass in the treatment of intra-bony defects: a study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Diniz Carvalho

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate, histomorphometrically, the association of platelet-rich plasma (PRP and bioactive glass (BG in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine mongrel dogs were included in the study. Three-wall intrabony defects were surgically created at the mesial and distal aspect of first mandibular molar and exposed to plaque accumulation for 1 month. The defects were randomly assigned to the groups: control, BG, PRP, PRP+BG. Dogs were sacrificed 90 days after the surgeries. The histometric parameters evaluated were: length of sulcular and junctional epithelium, connective tissue adaptation, new cementum, new bone, defect extension and area of new bone filling the defect. RESULTS: A superior area of new bone was observed in PRP+BG and BG (13.80±2.32 mm² and 15.63±2.64 mm², respectively when compared to the other groups (8.19±1.46 mm² and 8.81±1.47 mm² for control and PRP, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed in the remaining parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limits of this study, it may be concluded that PRP failed to provide statistically significant improvements in the histometric parameters.

  4. Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dogs Farm Animals Backyard Poultry Ferrets Fish Horses Reptiles and Amphibians Turtles Kept as Pets Key Messages ... transmitted by sandflies and is uncommon in North America. The two forms of the disease are visceral ...

  5. Comparison of platelet pellet with or without guided tissue regeneration in the treatment of class II furcation defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Gonca Cayir; Cetinkaya, Burcu Ozkan; Baris, Sancar; Albayrak, Davut; Simsek, Selen Burcak

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare histological effectiveness of platelet pellet (PP), which has higher platelet content than platelet-rich plasma, and the combination of PP/guided tissue regeneration (GTR) for class II furcation defects in dogs. The mandibular second, third, and fourth premolars of both sides in four dogs were used. Class II furcation defects (5 mm in height and 2 mm in depth) were surgically created. Five weeks after the first operation, second premolars were treated with scaling and root planing (group 1); right third and fourth premolars received PP (group 2), and left premolars received the combination of PP/GTR (group 3). Percentage of cementum and alveolar bone formation were evaluated by histometric analysis after a healing period of 12 weeks. There was new cementum along with periodontal ligament and coronal growth of alveolar bone in all groups. Cementum formation was significantly higher in groups 2 and 3 compared to the control group (P 0.05). It is concluded that both PP and the combination of PP/GTR are effective in the treatment of class II furcation defects in dogs. PP thus appears to be a suitable alternative material in the regenerative periodontal therapy.

  6. Modeling of Powder Bed Manufacturing Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, H.-W.; Desmaison, O.; Megahed, M.; Peralta, A.; Neumann, J.

    2017-09-01

    Powder bed additive manufacturing offers unmatched capabilities. The deposition resolution achieved is extremely high enabling the production of innovative functional products and materials. Achieving the desired final quality is, however, hampered by many potential defects that have to be managed in due course of the manufacturing process. Defects observed in products manufactured via powder bed fusion have been studied experimentally. In this effort we have relied on experiments reported in the literature and—when experimental data were not sufficient—we have performed additional experiments providing an extended foundation for defect analysis. There is large interest in reducing the effort and cost of additive manufacturing process qualification and certification using integrated computational material engineering. A prerequisite is, however, that numerical methods can indeed capture defects. A multiscale multiphysics platform is developed and applied to predict and explain the origin of several defects that have been observed experimentally during laser-based powder bed fusion processes. The models utilized are briefly introduced. The ability of the models to capture the observed defects is verified. The root cause of the defects is explained by analyzing the numerical results thus confirming the ability of numerical methods to provide a foundation for rapid process qualification.

  7. Model Tests of Pile Defect Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The pile, as an important foundation style, is being used in engineering practice. Defects of different types and damages of different degrees easily occur during the process of pile construction. So,dietecting defects of the pile is very important. As so far, there are some difficult problems in pile defect detection. Based on stress wave theory, some of these typical difficult problems were studied through model tests. The analyses of the test results are carried out and some significant results of the low-strain method are obtained, when a pile has a gradually-decreasing crosssection part, the amplitude of the reflective signal originating from the defect is dependent on the decreasing value of the rate of crosssection β. No apparent signal reflected from the necking appeares on the velocity response curve when the value of β is less than about 3.5 %.

  8. Platelet-rich plasma and autogenous bone graft combined with guided tissue regeneration in periodontal fenestration defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskiner, Ilker; Alkan, Arzu; Acikgoz, Gokhan; Arpak, Nejat; Kaplan, Suleyman; Arslan, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), autogenous bone (AB), and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) combination therapy compared to GTR therapy alone on healing of bone and cementum in fenestration-type periodontal defects in dogs. Six dogs were included in this study. Fenestration-type defects were created, and the following treatment groups were established: a control group treated with GTR alone and experimental groups treated with a combination of GTR + PRP, GTR + AB, and GTR + AB + PRP. The defects were evaluated by stereologic method and histomorphometric analysis, which were performed 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. The results showed a significant increase in trabecular bone area in the GTR + PRP group as compared with the control at 4 and 8 weeks (P < .05). The GTR + AB + PRP group showed significantly more trabecular bone area than both GTR and GTR + PRP groups at all time intervals (P < .05). The 8- and 12-week results in terms of cementum area revealed a significant difference between the GTR + AB + PRP group and the control in favor of the former (P < .05). Cementum area in the GTR + AB group was significantly greater than that in the GTR group at all time intervals (P < .05). Within the limitations of this study, PRP and AB, when used under barrier membrane, resulted in significant improvement in bone and cementum formation compared to GTR alone in periodontal fenestration defects; AB, rather than PRP, was responsible for this outcome.

  9. Transplantation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth for bone regeneration in the dog mandibular defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali; Behnia; Abbas; Haghighat; Ardeshir; Talebi; Nosrat; Nourbakhsh; Fariba; Heidari

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth(SHED) transplanted for bone regeneration in the dog mandibular defect.METHODS: In this prospective comparative study, SHEDs had been isolated 5 years ago from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. The undifferentiated stem cells were seeded into mandibular bone through-andthrough defects of 4 dogs. Similar defects in control group were filled with cell-free collagen scaffold. After 12 wk, biopsies were taken and morphometric analysis was performed. The percentage of new bone formation and foreign body reaction were measured in each case. The data were subject to statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskalwalis statistical tests. Differences at P < 0.05 was considered as significant level.RESULTS: There were no significant differences between control and SHED-seeded groups in connective tissue(P = 0.248), woven bone(P = 0.248) and compact bone(P = 0.082). There were not any side effects in transplanted SHED group such as teratoma or malignancy and abnormalities in this period.CONCLUSION: SHEDs which had been isolated and characterized 5 years ago and stored with cryopreservation banking were capable of proliferation and osteogenesis after 5 years, and no immune response was observed after three months of seeded SHEDs.

  10. Platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of Class II furcation defects: a histometrical study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrícia Ferreira Suaid

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate the potential adjunctive benefits of platelet-rich plasma (PRP when used with guided-tissue regeneration (GTR and bioactive glass (BG in the treatment of Class II furcation lesions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bilateral Class II furcation lesions were surgically created and allowed to become chronic in the mandibular third premolars of 9 dogs. The defects were randomly assigned to: A GTR+BG and B GTR+BG+PRP. Similar defects were created in the maxillary third premolars and received the same treatments after 45 days. Dogs were sacrificed 90 days after the first treatment. The histometric parameters evaluated were: connective tissue adaptation, new cementum, new bone, mineralized bone area, non-mineralized bone area, and residual BG particle area. RESULTS: Data analysis showed a superior length of new cementum and a greater mineralized bone area for group B in both periods (p<0.05. The non-mineralized bone area was greater in the control group (p<0.05 in both periods. CONCLUSION: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the use of PRP in the treatment of Class II furcation defects may enhance the amount of new cementum and provide a more mineralized bone in a shorter period of time.

  11. Performance model to predict overall defect density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Venkatesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Management by metrics is the expectation from the IT service providers to stay as a differentiator. Given a project, the associated parameters and dynamics, the behaviour and outcome need to be predicted. There is lot of focus on the end state and in minimizing defect leakage as much as possible. In most of the cases, the actions taken are re-active. It is too late in the life cycle. Root cause analysis and corrective actions can be implemented only to the benefit of the next project. The focus has to shift left, towards the execution phase than waiting for lessons to be learnt post the implementation. How do we pro-actively predict defect metrics and have a preventive action plan in place. This paper illustrates the process performance model to predict overall defect density based on data from projects in an organization.

  12. Effect of platelet-rich plasma and platelet-rich fibrin on peri-implant bone defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyung-In; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; Lee, Sung-Yong; Cho, Young-Seung; Yang, Sung-Soo; Park, Seung-Cheol; You, Jae-Seek; Lim, Sung-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Ae; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Young

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth ash and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) grafts into bone defects around implants on bone formation. Six adult dogs were used as experimental subjects. Graft materials were used to create a particulate material. Forty-eight tapered-type implants, 3.7 mm in diameter, 10 mm in length, and with surface treated with hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, were used as implant fixtures. Using a trephine bur, four bone defects were formed and implants were placed in the femurs of the adult dogs. Bone grafts were not performed in the control group. Tooth ash was grafted into the defects in group 1. In group 2, a mixture of tooth ash and PRP (1:1 ratio by volume) was grafted into the defects. In group 3, a mixture of tooth ash and PRF (ratio of 1:1) was grafted in the defect area. Animals were sacrificed after 4 or 8 weeks. Based on histopathological examination, the amount and rate of new bone formation were evaluated. Histomorphometric examination revealed that the rate of new bone formation in group 3 of the 4-week group was significantly higher than that in the control group. In addition, in the 8-week group, a significant increase in new bone formation was confirmed in group 3. In this study, a bone graft method using a mixture of tooth ash and PRF was found to increase new bone formation compared to the method using PRP. In addition, it was confirmed that this effect was more prominent in the initial stage of the bone graft.

  13. The influence of a biomaterial on the closure of a marginal hard tissue defect adjacent to implants. An experimental study in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticelli, Daniele; Berglundh, Tord; Lindhe, Jan

    2004-06-01

    The present experiment was performed to determine the influence of Bio-Oss on hard tissue formation at sites that, following implant installation, presented a 1-1.25 mm wide marginal defect. Four Labrador dogs were used. The premolars and first molars on both sides of the mandible were extracted. After 3 months, mucoperiosteal flaps were elevated and three experimental sites were prepared for implant installation in each side of the mandible. A step drill was used to widen the marginal 5 mm of the canal. Thus, following the placement of the implant (3.3 x 10 mm, SLA surface, Straumann AG, Waldenburg, Switzerland) a circumferential gap, about 1-1.25 wide and 5 mm deep, remained lateral to the titanium rod. The test sites in the left side of the mandible were first filled with a deproteinized cancellous bone mineral (Bio-Oss). The defect sites in the right side of the mandible (control sites) were left for spontaneous healing. A resorbable barrier membrane (Bio-Gide) was placed to cover the implant and the bone tissue in two sites of each quadrant, while the third site was left without membrane placement. The flaps were repositioned to cover all defect sites and were sutured. After 4 months of healing, block biopsies of each implant site were dissected and processed for ground sectioning. It was demonstrated that at 4 months, all types of defects were filled with newly formed bone and that the biomaterial placed in the marginal defect in conjunction with implant installation during healing became incorporated in the newly formed bone tissue. A high degree of contact was established between the Bio-Oss particles and the newly formed bone. Bio-Oss became integrated with the newly formed bone. In the model used, Bio-Oss did not enhance the process of bone formation and defect closure.

  14. Sutureless choledochoduodenostomy with an intraluminal degradable stent in dog model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ling-hua; LIANG Xiao; LIN Hui; WANG Yi-fan; ZHU Yi-ping; CAI Xiu-jun

    2011-01-01

    Background It is difficult and time-consuming for carrying out conventional hand-sewn bilioenteric anastomosis, especially for small bile duct anastomosis and laparoscopic procedure. In order to simplify it, we have developed a novel procedure of sutureless bilioenteric anastomosis with an intraluminal degradable stent. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique with cholangioduodenostomy in dog model.Methods A patent intraluminal degradable stent tube for sutureless choledochoduodenostomy in dog model was made with polylactic acid in diameter of 3 mm or 4 mm. Thirty-eight dogs were randomly divided into to a stent group (SG, n=20) and a control group (CG, n=18). Dogs in the SG underwent sutureless choledochoduodenostomy with intraluminal stent, while the CG underwent conventional choledochoduodenostomy (single layer discontinuous anastomosis with absorbable suture). Dogs of each group were divided into 4 subgroups according to time of death (1,3,6, and 12 months postoperatively) to evaluate the healing of anastomosis. Operation time, intraoperative tolerance pressure of anastomosis, rate of postoperative bile leakage, bursting pressure of anastomosis were compared between the two groups. Anastomosis tissue was observed afterwards by pathology evaluation, hydroxyproline content, serum bilirubin, liver enzyme level and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) to assess the stricture.Results All procedures were completed successfully. The surgical time of the SG was significantly less than the CG (SG: (19.2±4.3) minutes, vs. CG: (29.2±7.1) minutes, P=0.000). One bile leakage was occurred in either group. No significant difference of intraoperative tolerance pressure of anastomosis, rate of bile leakage and postoperative bursting pressure of anastomosis, anastomotic stricture, hydroxyproline content, serum bilirubin and liver enzyme level was found between the two groups. MRCP showed no anastomosis stricture and obstruction

  15. Microprocessor-controlled colonic peristalsis: dynamic parametric modeling in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashev, Peter Z; Amaris, Manuel; Bowes, Kenneth L; Mintchev, Martin P

    2002-05-01

    The study aimed at completing a model of functional colonic electric stimulation and testing it for artificial recreation of peristalsis in dogs. Dynamic measurements of invoked single contractions obtained from two unconscious dogs as well as previously reported static contraction properties were utilized to suggest the optimal stimulation parameters of: (1) length of the stimulating electrodes, (2) separation between the successive electrode sets, (3) duration, and (4) phase lag between the stimuli sequentially applied to the electrode sets. The derived electrode configuration and stimulation pattern were adjusted for different anatomical dimensions and tested in distended colon full of viscous content. Forward and backward propagating peristaltic waves were invoked in two other unconscious dogs, indicating that the recreation of colonic peristalsis under microprocessor control is feasible.

  16. N=1 super sinh-Gordon model with defects revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A R; Spano, N I; Zimerman, A H

    2014-01-01

    The Lax pair formalism is considered to discuss the integrability of the N=1 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model with a defect. We derive associated defect matrix for the model and construct the generating functions of the modified conserved quantities. The corresponding defect contributions for the modified energy and momentum of the model are explicitly computed.

  17. Compound soft regenerated skull material for repairing dog skull defects using bone morphogenetic protein as an inductor and nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhidong Shi; Mingwang Liu; Zhongzong Qin; Qinmei Wang; Ying Guo; Haiyong He; Zhonghe Yu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In previous studies of skull defects and regeneration, bone morphogenetic protein as an inductor and nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold have been cocultured with osteoblasts.OBJECTIVE: To verify the characteristics of the new skull regenerated material after compound soft regenerated skull material implantatiom.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The self-control and inter-group control animal experiment was perfurmed at the Sun Yat-sen University, China from February to July 2007.MATERIALS: Twenty-tour healthy adult dogs of both genders weighing 15-20 kg were used in this study. Nanohydroxyapatite as a scaffold was cocultured with osteoblasts. Using demineralized canine bone matrix as a carrier, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 was employed to prepare compound soft regenerated skull material. Self-designed compound soft regenerated skull material was implanted in models of skull defects.METHODS: Animals were randomly assigned into two groups, Group A (n = 16) and Group B (n = 8).Bilateral 2.5-cm-diameter full-thickness parietal skull defects were made in all animals. In Group A, the right side was reconstructed with calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, and nanomcter bone meal composite;the left side was reconstructed with calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, nanometer bone meal and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite. In Group B, the right side was kept as a simple skull detect, and the left side was reconstructed with calcium alginate gel, osteoblasts, nanometer bone meal and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 composite.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bone regeneration and histopathological changes at the site of the skull defect were observed with an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope after surgery.The ability to form bone was measured by alizarin red S staining. In vitro cultured osteoblasts were observed for morphology.RESULTS: One month following surgery, newly formed bone trabeculae mostly covered the

  18. The genetic defect of fragmented coronoid process in Labrador retrievers and other skeletal diseases in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temwichitr, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848298

    2009-01-01

    Fragmented medial coronoid process (FCP) is the main component of elbow dysplasia (ED) in dogs, which also includes osteochondrosis of the humeral condyle (OCD), elbow incongruity (INC), and ununited anconeal process (UAP). FCP is recognized as a hereditary disease in many breeds and is a major

  19. Effect of platelet-rich plasma on the healing of mandibular defects treated with fresh frozen bone allograft: a radiographic study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messora, Michel R; Nagata, Maria J H; Fucini, Stephen E; Pola, Natália M; Campos, Natália; de Oliveira, Guillermo C V; Bosco, Alvaro F; Garcia, Valdir G; Furlaneto, Flávia A C

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to radiographically analyze the effect of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) on the healing of fresh frozen bone allograft (FFBA) placed in surgically created resection defects in mandibles of dogs. Bilateral resection defects measuring 1.5 cm × 1 cm were surgically created on the inferior border of the mandible in 10 adult male dogs. The defects were randomly divided into three groups: C, FFBA, and FFBA/PRP. In Group C, the defect was filled by blood clot only. In Group FFBA, the defect was filled with particulate fresh frozen bone allograft. In Group FFBA/PRP, it was filled with particulate fresh frozen bone allograft combined with PRP. At 90 days postoperative, standardized radiographs of the mandibles were obtained and results were quantitatively evaluated. Analysis of digitized radiographs indicated that non-PRP grafts were significantly less dense than the PRP grafts. Group FFBA/PRP also presented a statistically greater mineralized tissue area than Groups C and FFBA. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that PRP enhanced the healing of FFBA in resection defects in mandibles of dogs.

  20. Periodontal regeneration in intrabony defects after application of enamel matrix proteins with guided tissue regeneration: an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Hiroko; Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Sugito, Hiroki; Ota, Mikio; Yamada, Satoru

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of enamel matrix proteins (EMP) at the early stage of wound healing in the periodontal tissues by a combination treatment with guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Intrabony defects were produced surgically at the distal aspects of both mandibles in six beagle dogs. At 12 weeks following the surgery, the defects were exposed using a full thickness mucoperiosteal flap procedure. Subsequently, the defects were treated by the following treatments: a control group treated with GTR alone, and an experimental group treated with a combination of GTR and EMP. After one, two, four and eight weeks of the treatment, the animals were sacrificed, and sections of the tissue were stained and evaluated microscopically. After one and two weeks, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cell ratios of the experimental group were significantly greater than that of the control group. After 2 and 4 weeks, new bone and new cementum formation in the experimental group were significantly greater than those in the control group (P periodontal ligament cells might contribute, during the early stage of periodontal healing, to stimulate a proliferation of periodontal ligament cells.

  1. POROUS POLYMER IMPLANTS FOR REPAIR OF FULL-THICKNESS DEFECTS OF ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE - AN EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY IN RABBIT AND DOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, HWB; VETH, RPH; NIELSEN, HKL; DEGROOT, JH; PENNINGS, AJ

    1992-01-01

    Full-thickness defects of articular cartilage were repaired by implantation of porous polymer implants in rabbits and dogs. The quality of the repair tissue was determined by collagen typing with antibodies. Implants with varying pore sizes and chemical composition were used. The effect of loading

  2. Testing and analysis of internal hardwood log defect prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The severity and location of internal defects determine the quality and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. Models have been developed to predict the size and position of internal defects based on external defect indicator measurements. These models were shown to predict approximately 80% of all internal knots based on external knot indicators. However, the size...

  3. 2D Ising Model with a Defect Line

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C

    1994-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ising model with a defect line and evaluate multipoint energy correlation functions using non-perturbative field-theoretical methods. We also discuss the evaluation of the two spin correlator on the defect line.

  4. Modelling of defects in ingot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter

    experimentally by utilizing downscaled lead model ingots (billets) being compressed by a tool with different lower die angles. Centreline defects, occurring due to the ingot casting processes, are modelled by drilling holes through the centreline of the cast billets. The experiments showed a marked influence...... are in closer agreement with the general understanding of the ingot forging process. Therefore porous metal plasticity should not be used solely when evaluating the soundness of the final, forged ingot based on FEM simulations. Based on an analysis of forming fracture limit diagrams combined with uncoupled...... ductile damage criteria, it is found that the normalized Cockcroft & Latham criterion is most suited for modelling damage in bulk metal forming, if the forming fracture limit diagram can be described by a straight line having a slope of -1/2. A damage criterion independent of slope is presented. Often...

  5. Ontological Modeling of Transformation in Heart Defect Diagrams

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanath, Venkatesh; Tong, Tuanjie; Dinakarpandian, Deendayal; Lee, Yugyung

    2006-01-01

    The accurate portrayal of a large volume data of variable heart defects is crucial to providing good patient care in pediatric cardiology. Our research aims to span the universe of congenital heart defects by generating illustrative diagrams that enhance data interpretation. To accommodate the range and severity of defects to be represented, we base our diagrams on transformation models applied to a normal heart rather than a static set of defects. These models are based on a domain-specific ...

  6. Metabolic encephalopathy and lipid storage myopathy associated with a presumptive mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defect in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa R Biegen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A 1-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu presented for episodic abnormalities of posture and mentation. Neurologic examination was consistent with a bilaterally symmetric multifocal encephalopathy. The dog had a waxing-and-waning hyperlactemia and hypoglycemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilaterally symmetric cavitated lesions of the caudate nuclei with less severe abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Empirical therapy was unsuccessful and the patient was euthanized. Post-mortem histopathology revealed bilaterally symmetric necrotic lesions of the caudate and cerebellar nuclei and multi-organ lipid accumulation, including a lipid storage myopathy. Malonic aciduria and ketonuria were found on urinary organic acid screen. Plasma acylcarnitine analysis suggested a fatty acid oxidation defect. Fatty acid oxidation disorders are inborn errors of metabolism documented in humans, but poorly described in dogs. Although neurologic signs have been described in humans with this group of diseases, descriptions of advanced imaging and histopathology are severely lacking. This report suggests that abnormalities of fatty acid metabolism may cause severe, bilateral gray matter necrosis and lipid accumulation in multiple organs including the skeletal muscles, liver, and kidneys. Veterinarians should be aware that fatty acid oxidation disorders, although potentially fatal, may be treatable. A timely definitive diagnosis is essential in guiding therapy.

  7. Supersymmetric defect models and mirror symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2013-11-01

    We study supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions doped by various configurations of electric charges or magnetic fluxes. These are supersymmetric avatars of impurity models. In the presence of additional sources such configurations are shown to preserve half of the supersymmetries. Mirror symmetry relates the two sets of configurations. We discuss the implications for impurity models in 3d NN = 4 QED with a single charged hypermultiplet (and its mirror, the theory of a free hypermultiplet) as well as 3d NN = 2 QED with one flavor and its dual, a supersymmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Mirror symmetry allows us to find backreacted solutions for arbitrary arrays of defects in the IR limit of NN = 4 QED. Our analysis, complemented with appropriate string theory brane constructions, sheds light on various aspects of mirror symmetry, the map between particles and vortices and the emergence of ground state entropy in QED at finite density.

  8. Supersymmetric Defect Models and Mirror Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    We study supersymmetric field theories in three space-time dimensions doped by various configurations of electric charges or magnetic fluxes. These are supersymmetric avatars of impurity models. In the presence of additional sources such configurations are shown to preserve half of the supersymmetries. Mirror symmetry relates the two sets of configurations. We discuss the implications for impurity models in 3d N=4 QED with a single charged hypermultiplet (and its mirror, the theory of a free hypermultiplet) as well as 3d N=2 QED with one flavor and its dual, a supersymmetric Wilson-Fisher fixed point. Mirror symmetry allows us to find backreacted solutions for arbitrary arrays of defects in the IR limit of N=4 QED. Our analysis, complemented with appropriate string theory brane constructions, sheds light on various aspects of mirror symmetry, the map between particles and vortices and the emergence of ground state entropy in QED at finite density.

  9. Regenerative effect of hOPG gene-modified autologous PDLs in combination with cell transplantation on periodontal defection in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Su; Tang, Kunqi; Chen, Bin; Yan, Fuhua

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the ability of human osteoprotegerin gene-modified autologous periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) in combination with cell transplantation to promote periodontal regeneration in beagle dogs. Adenovirus Ad5-hOPG-EGFP-transfected PDLCs and BME-10X collagen membranes were fabricated and used for periodontal repair. Buccal periodontal defects (mesiodistal width × depth: 5 × 5 mm) were created on the second, third, and fourth mandibular premolars in six normal beagle dogs, and the defects were histologically and histomorphometrically assessed for periodontal regeneration in the following four groups: (1) hOPG-PDLCs + BME-10X, (2) mock-PDLCs + BME-10X, (3) PDLCs + BME-10X, and (4) BME-10X. The radiographic and histological results suggested that hOPG-PDLCs significantly promoted periodontal defect repair. This study demonstrates the potential of hOPG-modified PDLCs for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  10. Validation of an internal hardwood log defect prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The type, size, and location of internal defects dictate the grade and value of lumber sawn from hardwood logs. However, acquiring internal defect knowledge with x-ray/computed-tomography or magnetic-resonance imaging technology can be expensive both in time and cost. An alternative approach uses prediction models based on correlations among external defect indicators...

  11. Modeling of casting microstructures and defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.B.; Summers, L.T.; Eckels, D.J.; Sahai, V.

    1997-09-26

    Casting is an ancient art that has been a trial-and-error process for more than 4000 years. To predict the size, shape, and quality of a cast product, casting manufacturers typically cast full-size prototypes. If one part of the process is done incorrectly, the entire process is repeated until an acceptable product is achieved. One way to reduce the time, cost, and waste associated with casting is to use computer modeling to predict not only the quality of a product on the macro- scale, such as distortion and part shape, but also on the micro-scale such as grain defects. Modeling of solidification is becoming increasingly feasible with the advent of parallel computers. There are essentially two approaches to solidification modeling.The first is that of macro-modeling where heat transfer codes model latent heat release during solidification as a constant and based solely on the local temperature. This approach is useful in predicting large scale distortion and final part shape. The second approach, micro-modeling, is more fundamental. The micro-models estimate the latent heat release during solidification using nucleation and grain growth kinetics. Micro-models give insight into cast grain morphology and show promise in the future to predict engineering properties such as tensile strength. The micro-model solidification kinetics can be evaluated using first principles or they can be evaluated using experiments. This work describes an implementation of a micro-model for uranium which uses experimental results to estimate nucleation and growth kinetics.

  12. Determination of Critical Size Defects in the Mandibles and Calvaria of Mongrel Dogs and Cynomolgus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-10

    subnandibular incision by the investigators may have alleviated this problem. eli.... -". IO1 Hjortlng-Hansen and Andreasen 2 6 created 9m, 6nm, and 8 mm...all been implicated as contributing factors in predisposing to nonunions in mandibular fractures and maxillofacial trauma .1 2𔃾 2 However, in...Normal and Retrograde Blood Supply to the Body of the Mandible in the Dog.III. Int. J. Oral Surg. I:31, 1981. 26. Hjorting-Ransen, E. and Andreasen

  13. Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) collagen composites enhance bone healing in a dog tooth extraction socket model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iibuchi, S; Matsui, K; Kawai, T; Sasaki, K; Suzuki, O; Kamakura, S; Echigo, S

    2010-02-01

    The authors have reported that a scaffold constructed of synthetic octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and porcine atelocollagen sponge (OCP/Col) enhanced bone regeneration more than sintered beta-tricalcium phosphate collagen composite or sintered hydroxyapatite collagen composite with a rat calvarial defect model. To aim for clinical application, the present study investigated whether OCP/Col would enhance bone healing in a dog tooth extraction socket model. Six adult, male, beagle dogs were used. The tooth extraction socket model was made by extracting bilateral third maxillary incisors and the subsequent removal of buccal bone. Disks of OCP/Col were implanted into one side of the model and the other side was untreated. The specimens were fixed 1 or 3 months after implantation. In radiographic analysis, the OCP/Col-treated group showed a wider range of radiopacity than the untreated control. Histologically, the OCP/Col-treated group showed more abundant newly formed bone than untreated control, and the implanted OCP was gradually resorbed. In morphometrical analysis, enlargement of the buccal alveolus in the OCP/Col group was significantly greater than in the untreated control. This study showed that implanted OCP/Col would be replaced by newly formed bone and OCP/Col implantation would enhance bone healing in a tooth socket model.

  14. Healing response to anorganic bone implantation in periodontal intrabony defects in dogs. Part I. Bone regeneration. A microradiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clergeau, L P; Danan, M; Clergeau-Guérithault, S; Brion, M

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the regenerative potential of anorganic bone plus collagen (AB-C) in experimental intrabony defects. Eight healthy female beagle dogs, 3 to 4 years old and weighing 15 to 16 kilos, were used. After extraction of the mandibular third premolars (P3), surgical defects were created and inflammation induced by placement of cotton and steel braids. Eight weeks later, the braids were removed. The experimental lesions thus obtained were either treated by plain flap curettage (group 1: control) or were, in addition, implanted with AB-C (group 2: experimental). Blocks of AB-C alone were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the surface of the particles have the characteristics of a bone tissue. These particles are gathered together with a fibrillar network. Six, 18, and 36 weeks postoperative (PO), non-decalcified specimens from both groups were examined histologically by contact microradiography. In group 1, no significant bone regeneration was observed at 6, 18, or 36 weeks PO. In group 2, trabeculae undergoing mineralization and circumscribing dense particles above the reference notch were seen at 6 weeks PO; 18 and 36 week specimens showed significant bone regeneration with more or less dense remaining particles. The periodontal ligament space was always clear and the only signs of ankylosis noticed were deep in the notch on one 18 week group 2 specimen and on one 36 week group 1 specimen.

  15. Bone regeneration at implants with turned or rough surfaces in self-contained defects. An experimental study in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticelli, Daniele; Berglundh, Tord; Persson, Leif G; Lindhe, Jan

    2005-05-01

    Marginal hard tissue defects present at implants with a rough surface can heal with a high degree of bone fill and osseointegration. The healing of similar defects adjacent to implants with a smooth surface appears to be less predictable. The aim was to compare bone healing at implants with turned or rough surface topographies placed in self-contained defects using either a submerged or non-submerged installation technique. Six dogs were used. Three months after tooth extraction four experimental sites were prepared for implant installation in both sides of the mandible. The marginal 5 mm of the canal prepared for the implant was widened. Thus, following implant placement a circumferential gap occurred between the bone tissue and the implant surface that was between 1 and 1.25 mm wide. In each side of the mandible two implants with a turned surface and two implants with a rough surface were installed. The implants in the right side were fully submerged, while a non-submerged technique was applied in the left side. The animals were sacrificed 4 months later, block biopsies of each implant site were dissected and ground as well as paraffin sections were prepared. The marginal defects around rough surface implants exhibited after 4 months of healing substantial bone fill and a high degree of osseointegration following either the submerged or the non-submerged installation technique. Healing at turned implants was characterized by incomplete bone fill and the presence of a connective tissue zone between the implant and the newly formed bone. The distance between the implant margin (M) and the most coronal level of bone-to-implant contact (B) at implants with a rough surface was 0.84+/-0.37 mm at submerged and 0.90+/-0.39 mm at non-submerged sites. The distance M-B at implants with a turned surface was 3.39+/-0.52 mm at submerged and 3.23+/-0.68 mm at non-submerged sites. The differences between the rough and turned implants regarding the length of distance M-B were

  16. Software Defect Prediction Models for Quality Improvement: A Literature Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Singh Rawat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of meticulous planning, well documentation and proper process control during software development, occurrences of certain defects are inevitable. These software defects may lead to degradation of the quality which might be the underlying cause of failure. In todays cutting edge competition its necessary to make conscious efforts to control and minimize defects in software engineering. However, these efforts cost money, time and resources. This paper identifies causative factors which in turn suggest the remedies to improve software quality and productivity. The paper also showcases on how the various defect prediction models are implemented resulting in reduced magnitude of defects.

  17. The avalanche process of the fiber bundle model with defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xia, Hui; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Han, Kui

    2017-04-01

    In order to explore the impacts of defect on the tensile fracture process of materials, the fiber bundle model with defect is constructed based on the classical fiber bundle model. In the fiber bundle model with defect, the two key parameters are the mean size and the density of defects. In both uniform and Weibull threshold distributions, the mean size and density all bring impacts on the threshold distribution of fibers. By means of analytical approximation and numerical simulation, we show that the two key parameters of the model have substantial effects on the failure process of the bundle. From macroscopic view, the defect described by the altering of threshold distribution of fibers will has a significant impact on the mechanical properties of the bundle. While in microscopic scale, the statistical properties of the model are still harmonious with the classical fiber bundle model.

  18. Elastic models of defects in two-dimensional crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, A. L.; Orlova, T. S.; Hussainova, I.; Romanov, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Elastic models of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals are presented in terms of continuum mechanics. The models are based on the classification of defects, which is founded on the dimensionality of the specification region of their self-distortions, i.e., lattice distortions associated with the formation of defects. The elastic field of an infinitesimal dislocation loop in a film is calculated for the first time. The fields of the center of dilatation, dislocation, disclination, and circular inclusion in planar 2D elastic media, namely, nanofilms and graphenes, are considered. Elastic fields of defects in 2D and 3D crystals are compared.

  19. Effect of locally injected autologous platelet-rich plasma on second intention wound healing of acute full-thickness skin defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannopoulou, M; Psalla, D; Kazakos, G; Loukopoulos, P; Giannakas, N; Savvas, I; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, M; Chantes, A; Papazoglou, L G

    2015-01-01

    Second intention wound healing may be impaired by wound and host factors and thus more advanced therapies are required for a fast and satisfactory outcome. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), rich in growth factors and cytokines essential for tissue repair, could improve wound healing. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of locally injected autologous PRP on second intention healing of acute full-thickness skin defects in dogs. Three 2 x 2 cm full-thickness skin defects were created bilaterally on the dorsolateral area of the trunk of six Beagle dogs. The wounds of one randomly selected side received PRP treatment, whereas the contralateral wounds were left untreated (controls). Wound healing was evaluated by planimetry, laser-Doppler flowmetry measurements of tissue perfusion, and histologically. The rate of wound healing did not differ significantly between the two groups. Tissue perfusion was significantly higher in the PRP-treated group (p = 0.008) compared to controls on day 10. Histological evaluation revealed a trend towards greater collagen production and a significantly better collagen orientation (p = 0.019) in PRP-treated wounds on day 20. Locally injected autologous PRP does not accelerate the healing process, but increases tissue perfusion and may promote the formation of organized collagen bundles in acute full-thickness skin defects in dogs.

  20. Histomorphometric Analysis of Periodontal Tissue Regeneration by the Use of High Density Polytetrafluoroethylen Membrane in Grade II Furcation Defects of Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoofi S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are limited histomorphometric studies on biologic efficacy of high density tetrafluoroethylen (d-PTFE membrane. Objectives: To investigate the healing of surgically induced grade II furcation defects in dogs following the use of dense polytetrafluoroethylene as the barrier membrane and to compare the results with the contra lateral control teeth without the application of any membrane. Materials andMethods: Mandibular and maxillary 3rd premolar teeth of 18 young adult male mongrel dogs were used for the experiment. The furcation defects were created during the surgery. 5 weeks later, regenerative surgery was performed. The third premolar teeth were assigned randomly to control and test groups. In the test group, after a full thickness flap reflection, the d-PTFE membrane was placed over furcation defects. In the control group, no membrane was placed over the defect. 37 tissue blocks containing the teeth and surrounding hard and soft tissues were obtained three months post-regenerative surgery. The specimens were demineralized, serially sectioned, mounted and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin staining technique. From each tissue block, 35-45 sections of 10 μm thickness within 60μm interval captured the entire surgically created defect. The histological images were transferred to computer and then the linear measurement ranges of the defects area, interadicular alveolar bone, epithelial attachment and coronal extension of the new cementum were done. Then, the volume and area of aforementioned parameters were calculated considering the thickness and interval of the sections. To compare the parameters between the control and test teeth, we calculated the amount of each one proportionally to the original amount of defects. Results: The mean interradicular root surface areas of original defects covered with new cementum was 74.46% and 29.59% for the membrane and control defects, respectively (p < 0.0001. Corresponding

  1. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D.; Green, Martin; England, Gary C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided. PMID:28804710

  2. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D; Green, Martin; England, Gary C W

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  3. MODEL OF GEOMEDIA CONTAINING DEFECTS: COLLECTIVE EFFECTS OF DEFECTS EVOLUTION DURING FORMATION OF POTENTIAL EARTHQUAKE FOCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Panteleev

    2015-09-01

    transition is manifested by localized cataclastic deformation (i.e. a set of weak earthquakes, which migrates in space at a velocity several orders of magnitude lower than the speed of sound, as a ‘slow’ deformation wave (Fig. 3. Further reduction of the structural scaling parameter leads to degeneracy of the orientation meta-stability and formation of localized dissipative defect structures in the medium. Once the critical stress is reached, such structures develop in the blow-up regime, i.e. the mode of avalanche-unstable growth of defects in the localized area that is shrinking eventually. At the scale of observation, this process is manifested as brittle fracturing that causes formation of a deformation zone, which size is proportional to the scale of observation, and corresponds to occurrence of a strong earthquake.On the basis of the proposed model showing the behavior of the geomedium containing defects in the field of external stresses, it is possible to describe main ways of stress relaxation in the rock massives – brittle large-scale destruction and cataclastic deformation as consequences of the collective behavior of defects, which is determined by the structural scaling parameter.Results of this study may prove useful for estimation of critical stresses and assessment of the geomedium status in seismically active regions and be viewed as model representations of the physical hypothesis about the uniform nature of deve­lopment of discontinuities/defects in a wide range of spatial scales. 

  4. Wrapped omentum with periosteum concurrent with adipose derived adult stem cells for bone tissue engineering in dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh, Amin Bigham; Basiri, Ehsan; Oryan, Ahmad; Mirshokraei, Pezhman

    2014-03-01

    Adipose derived adult stem cells (ASCs) are multipotent cells that are able to differentiate into osteoblasts in presence of certain factors. The histological characteristics of periosteum makes it a specific tissue with a unique capacity to be engineered. Higher flexibility of the greater omentum is useful for reconstructive surgery. These criteria make it suitable for tissue engineering. The present study was designed to evaluate bone tissue engineering with periosteal free graft concurrent with ASCs and pedicle omentum in dog model. Twelve young female indigenous dogs were used in this experiment. In omental group (n = 4), end of omentum was wrapped by periosteum of the radial bone in abdomen of each dog. In omental-autogenously ASCs group (n = 4), 1 ml of ASCs was injected into the wrapped omentum with periosteum while in omental-allogenously ASCs group (n = 4), 1 ml of allogenous ASCs was injected. Lateral view radiographs were taken from the abdominal cavity postoperatively at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks post-surgery. Eight weeks after operation the dogs were re-anesthetized and the wrapped omenum by periosteum in all groups was found and removed for histopathological evaluation. Our results showed that omentum-periosteum, omental-periosteum-autogenous ASCs and omental-periosteum-allogenous ASCs groups demonstrated bone tissue formation in the abdominal cavity in dog model. The radiological, macroscopical and histological findings of the present study by the end of 8 weeks post-surgery indicate bone tissue engineering in all three groups in an equal level. The present study has shown that the wrapped omentum with periosteum concurrent with ASCs (autogenous or allogenous ASCs) lead to a favorable bone tissue formation. We suggested that it may be useful when pedicle graft omentum used concurrent with periosteum in the bone defect reconstruction, and this phenomenon should be studied in future.

  5. Defects in the tri-critical Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, Isao; Watts, Gérard M. T.

    2017-09-01

    We consider two different conformal field theories with central charge c = 7 /10. One is the diagonal invariant minimal model in which all fields have integer spins; the other is the local fermionic theory with superconformal symmetry in which fields can have half-integer spin. We construct new conformal (but not topological or factorised) defects in the minimal model. We do this by first constructing defects in the fermionic model as boundary conditions in a fermionic theory of central charge c = 7 /5, using the folding trick as first proposed by Gang and Yamaguchi [1]. We then act on these with interface defects to find the new conformal defects. As part of the construction, we find the topological defects in the fermionic theory and the interfaces between the fermionic theory and the minimal model. We also consider the simpler case of defects in the theory of a single free fermion and interface defects between the Ising model and a single fermion as a prelude to calculations in the tri-critical Ising model.

  6. Computer modeling during flexion and extension on dog elbow joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatko Ilieski

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have investigated 2-D images in order to create 3-D visualization and animation of movement of dog forelimb. The aim of study was to present the possibilities and advantages on softer design for displaying 2-D images in animated 3-D motion picture. For that purpose we have prepared animation with refer to modern 3-D modeling by using high developed software - Avid Softimage XSI. For precise reconstruction of forelimb bones we used 3-D scan witch was performed with color laser for scanning a different objects. Based of data obtained from CT and MR images there are a possibility that computer modeling can be used as a toll for recognition of special anatomical features on images prepared with Computer Tomography (CT or Magnet Resonance (MR

  7. Process Setting Models for the Minimization of Costs Defectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Process Setting Models for the Minimization of Costs Defectives. ... Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (1991) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Abstract. The economy of production controls all manufacturing activities. In the ...

  8. Topological defects on the lattice: I. The Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger S. K.; Fendley, Paul

    2016-09-01

    In this paper and its sequel, we construct topologically invariant defects in two-dimensional classical lattice models and quantum spin chains. We show how defect lines commute with the transfer matrix/Hamiltonian when they obey the defect commutation relations, cousins of the Yang-Baxter equation. These relations and their solutions can be extended to allow defect lines to branch and fuse, again with properties depending only on topology. In this part I, we focus on the simplest example, the Ising model. We define lattice spin-flip and duality defects and their branching, and prove they are topological. One useful consequence is a simple implementation of Kramers-Wannier duality on the torus and higher genus surfaces by using the fusion of duality defects. We use these topological defects to do simple calculations that yield exact properties of the conformal field theory describing the continuum limit. For example, the shift in momentum quantization with duality-twisted boundary conditions yields the conformal spin 1/16 of the chiral spin field. Even more strikingly, we derive the modular transformation matrices explicitly and exactly.

  9. Developmental enamel and anatomical tooth defects in dogs – Experience from veterinary dental referral practice and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Catharina Boy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developmental tooth abnormalities in dogs are uncommon in general veterinary practice but understanding thereof is important for optimal management in order to maintain gnathic function through conservation of the dentition. The purpose of this review is to discuss abnormalities of enamel structure and macroscopic tooth anatomy in dogs encountered in veterinary dental referral practice in South Africa and the United Kingdom. The basis of the pathogenesis, resultant clinical appearance and the management principles of each anomaly will be considered. Future research should aim to provide a detailed individual tooth mineralization schedule for dogs.

  10. Healing of periodontal defects treated with enamel matrix proteins and root surface conditioning--an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallioğlu, Umur; Açikgöz, Gökhan; Ayas, Bülent; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul; Sakallioğlu, Eser

    2004-05-01

    Application of enamel matrix proteins has been introduced as an alternative method for periodontal regenerative therapy. It is claimed that this approach provides periodontal regeneration by a biological approach, i.e. creating a matrix on the root surfaces that promotes cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone regeneration, thus mimicking the events occurring during tooth development. Although there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating periodontal regeneration, acellular cementum formation and clinical outcomes via enamel matrix proteins usage, their effects on the healing pattern of soft and hard periodontal tissues are not well-established and compared with root conditioning alone. In the present study, the effects of Emdogain (Biora, Malmö, Sweden), an enamel matrix derivative mainly composed of enamel matrix proteins (test), on periodontal wound healing were evaluated and compared with root surface conditioning (performed with 36% orthophosphoric acid) alone (control) histopathologically and histomorphometrically by means of the soft and hard tissue profile of periodontium. An experimental periodontitis model performed at premolar teeth of four dogs were used in the study and the healing pattern of periodontal tissues was evaluated at days 7, 14, 21, 28 (one dog at each day), respectively. At day 7, soft tissue attachment evaluated by means of connective tissue and/or epithelial attachment to the root surfaces revealed higher connective tissue attachment rate in the test group and the amount of new connective tissue proliferation in the test group was significantly greater than the control group (p0.05). A firm attachment of acellular cementum to the root dentin with functional organization of its collagen fibers was noted, and, the accumulation and organization of cellular cementum in the control group was more irregular than the cellular cementum formed in the test group. The amount of new bone was 2.41+/-0.75 mm in

  11. Excess Secretion of Gel-Forming Mucins and Associated Innate Defense Proteins with Defective Mucin Un-Packaging Underpin Gallbladder Mucocele Formation in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesimer, Mehmet; Cullen, John; Cao, Rui; Radicioni, Giorgia; Mathews, Kyle G; Seiler, Gabriela; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal protection of the gallbladder is vital yet we know very little about the mechanisms involved. In domestic dogs, an emergent syndrome referred to as gallbladder mucocele formation is characterized by excessive secretion of abnormal mucus that results in obstruction and rupture of the gallbladder. The cause of gallbladder mucocele formation is unknown. In these first mechanistic studies of this disease, we investigated normal and mucocele-forming dog gallbladders to determine the source, identity, biophysical properties, and protein associates of the culprit mucins with aim to identify causes for abnormal mucus behavior. We established that mucocele formation involves an adoptive excess secretion of gel forming mucins with abnormal properties by the gallbladder epithelium. The mucus is characterized by a disproportionally significant increase in Muc5ac relative to Muc5b, defective mucin un-packaging, and mucin-interacting innate defense proteins that are capable of dramatically altering the physical and functional properties of mucus. These findings provide an explanation for abnormal mucus behavior and based on similarity to mucus observed in the airways of people with cystic fibrosis, suggest that abnormal mechanisms for maintenance of gallbladder epithelial hydration may be an instigating factor for mucocele formation in dogs.

  12. Influence of Autologus Adipose Derived Stem Cells and PRP on Regeneration of Dehiscence-Type Defects in Alveolar Bone: A Comparative Histochemical and Histomorphometric Study in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; El- Menoufy, Hala; Hassan, Amal; Ragae, Alyaa; Atta, Hazem Mahmoud; Roshdy, Nagwa Kamal; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Autogenous bone grafts is considered to be the best choice for reconstructive surgery. Adipose Derived Stromal Cells (ASCs) represents a promising tool for new clinical concepts in supporting cellular therapy. The goal of our study was to investigate bone regeneration following application of autologous ASCs with or without Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) at dehiscence-type defects in alveolar bone in dogs. Methods and Results: Standardized buccal dehiscence defects (4× 3×3 mm) were surgically created in eighteen dogs, the defects were grafted with either ASCs -PRP, ASCs alone, or without grafting material. Three months later; a bone core was harvested from grafted and non grafted sites for histological, histochemical and histomorphometric assessment. There was no evidence of inflammation or adverse tissue reaction with either treatment. Defects grafted with ASCs-PRP showed a significantly higher result (p≤ 0.05), with a mean area % of spongy bone and compact bone of (64.96±5.37 and 837.62±24.95), compared to ASCs alone (47.65±1.43 and 661.92±12.65) and without grafting (33.55± 1.74 and 290.85±7.27) respectively. The area % of lamellated bone increased significantly reaching its highest level in group A followed by group B. Also a significant increase in area % of neutral mucopolysaccharides and calcified reactivity of Masson|s Trichrome stain in groups A and B compared to group C was obtained. Conclusions: Our results suggest that, the addition of PRP to ASCs enhances bone formation after 3 months and may be clinically effective in accelerating postsurgical healing in both periodontal and maxillofacial surgical applications. PMID:24298335

  13. Experimental Infection of Dogs with Leishmania and Saliva as a Model to Study Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dirceu Joaquim; Carvalho, Rayssa M. de Araujo; Abbehusen, Melissa; Teixeira, Clarissa; Pitombo, Maiana; Trigo, Joelma; Nascimento, Flávia; Amorim, Lucilene; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lucia; do Socorro Pires Cruz, Maria; Miranda, José Carlos; Fukutani, Kyoshi; de Oliveira, Camila I.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL) is a zoonotic disease caused by Leishmania infantum, transmitted by the bite of Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies. Dogs are the main domestic reservoir of the parasite. The establishment of an experimental model that partially reproduces natural infection in dogs is very important to test vaccine candidates, mainly regarding those that use salivary proteins from the vector and new therapeutical approaches. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we describe an experimental infection in dogs, using intradermal injection of Leishmania infantum plus salivary gland homogenate (SGH) of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Thirty-five dogs were infected with 1×107 parasites combined with five pairs of Lutzomyia longipalpis salivary glands and followed for 450 days after infection and clinical, immunological and parasitological parameters were evaluated. Two hundred and ten days after infection we observed that 31,4% of dogs did not display detectable levels of anti-Leishmania antibodies but all presented different numbers of parasites in the lymph nodes. Animals with a positive xenodiagnosis had at least 3,35×105 parasites in their lymph nodes. An increase of IFN-γ and IL-10 levels was detected during infection. Twenty two percent of dogs developed symptoms of CVL during infection. Conclusion The infection model described here shows some degree of similarity when compared with naturally infected dogs opening new perspectives for the study of CVL using an experimental model that employs the combination of parasites and sand fly saliva both present during natural transmission. PMID:23577121

  14. Predictive model for the detection of pulmonary hypertension in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikawa, Shoma; Miyagawa, Yuichi; Toda, Noriko; Tominaga, Yoshinori; Takemura, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) often occurs due to a left heart disease, such as myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD), in dogs and is diagnosed using Doppler echocardiography and estimated pulmonary arterial pressure. Diagnosis of PH in dogs requires expertise in echocardiography: however, the examination for PH is difficult to perform in a clinical setting. Thus, simple and reliable methods are required for the diagnosis of PH in dogs. The purpose of this study was to develop models using multiple logistic regression analysis to detect PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. The medical records of dogs with MMVD were retrospectively reviewed, and 81 dogs were included in this study and classified into PH and non-PH groups. Bivariate analysis was performed to compare all parameters between the groups, and variables with P values of 5.2 v, and a length of sternal contact of >3.3 v was considered suitable for the detection of PH. The predictive accuracy of this model (85.9%) was judged statistically adequate, and therefore, this model may be useful to screen for PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography.

  15. Resolution of bone defects of varying dimension and configuration in the marginal portion of the peri-implant bone. An experimental study in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticelli, Daniele; Berglundh, Tord; Lindhe, Jan

    2004-04-01

    It was demonstrated that a marginal defect of about 1 mm between the bone wall and the metal surface after implant installation can heal with a high degree of bone fill and osseointegration. The aim of the present animal experiment was to study bone healing at implant sites with hard tissue defects of varying dimensions and configuration. Four Labrador dogs were used. All mandibular premolars and first molars were extracted. After 3 months of healing, five experimental sites, two control (C1, C2) and three test (T1, T2, T3) sites, were identified. In all five sites, custom-made implants with a sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface and with an outer dimension of 3.3x10 mm, were used. In site C1, traditional implant installation was performed. In site C2, the marginal 5 mm of the canal, prepared for the implant, was widened to 5.3 mm using a step-drill. Thus, following the installation of the implant, a circumferential gap occurred between the bone tissue and the metal rod that was 5 mm deep and between 1 and 1.25 mm wide. In test site T1, the canal was widened to establish a marginal gap of 2-2.25 mm. In test sites T2 and T3, the marginal 5 mm of the canal was first widened to 5.3 mm (T2) or 7.3 mm (T3). The buccal bone wall opposite the defect was subsequently removed. Following the placement of a cover screw in sites C2, T1, T2, and T3, a resorbable membrane was placed over the defect. All implants were submerged. After 4 months of healing, block biopsies of each implant site were dissected and processed for ground sectioning. The observations disclosed that four-wall defects of different dimensions (1-2.25 mm wide) that occurred in the marginal portion of the recipient sites following implant installation were resolved during healing. Further, at sites where the buccal bone wall during defect preparation was intentionally removed, healing resulted in defect resolution at the mesial, distal, and lingual aspects. At the buccal aspects, healing was

  16. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  17. Developmental Structural Tooth Defects in Dogs – Experience From Veterinary Dental Referral Practice and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Sonja; Crossley, David; Steenkamp, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Developmental tooth abnormalities in dogs are uncommon in general veterinary practice but understanding thereof is important for optimal management in order to maintain masticatory function through preservation of the dentition. The purpose of this review is to discuss clinical abnormalities of the enamel and general anatomy of dog teeth encountered in veterinary dental referral practice and described in the literature. More than 900 referral cases are seen annually between the two referral practices. The basis of the pathogenesis, resultant clinical appearance, and the principles of management for each anomaly will be described. Future research should be aimed toward a more detailed analysis of these conditions so rarely described in the literature. PMID:26904551

  18. Photon defects in noncommutative standard model candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, S.A.; Khoze, V.V. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Center for Particle Theory; Jaeckel, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Restrictions imposed by gauge invariance in noncommutative spaces together with the effects of ultraviolet/infrared mixing lead to strong constraints on possible candidates for a noncommutative extension of the Standard Model. We study a general class of noncommutative models consistent with these restrictions. Specifically we consider models based upon a gauge theory with the gauge group U(N{sub 1}) x U(N{sub 2}) x.. x U(N{sub m}) coupled to matter fields transforming in the (anti)-fundamental, bi-fundamental and adjoint representations. We pay particular attention to overall trace-U(1) factors of the gauge group which are affected by the ultraviolet/infrared mixing. Typically, these trace-U(1) gauge fields do not decouple sufficiently fast in the infrared, and lead to sizable Lorentz symmetry violating effects in the low-energy effective theory. In a 4-dimensional theory on a continuous space-time making these effects unobservable would require making the effects of noncommutativity tiny, M{sub NC} >> M{sub P}. This severely limits the phenomenological prospects of such models. However, adding additional universal extra dimensions the trace-U(1) factors decouple with a power law and the constraint on the noncommutativity scale is weakened considerably. Finally, we briefly mention some interesting properties of the photon that could arise if the noncommutative theory is modified at a high energy scale. (Orig.)

  19. A comparision of two types of decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft in treatment of dehiscence defects around implants in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Moghareh Abed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA may have the potential to enhance bone formation around dental implants. Our aim in this study was the evaluation and comparison of two types of DFDBA in treatment of dehiscence defects around Euroteknika® implants in dogs. Methods : In this prospective clinical trial animal study, all mandibular premolars of three Iranian dogs were extracted. After 3 months of healing, fifteen SLA type Euroteknika® dental implants (Natea with 4.1mm diameter and 10mm length were placed in osteotomy sites with dehiscence defects of 5mm length, 4 mm width, and 3mm depth. Guided bone regeneration (GBR procedures were performed using Cenobone and collagen membrane for six implants, the other six implants received Dembone and collagen membrane and the final three implants received only collagen membrane. All implants were submerged. After 4 months of healing, implants were uncovered and stability (Implant Stability Quotient of all implants was measured. Then, block biopsies of each implant site were taken and processed for ground sectioning and histomorphometric analysis. The data was analyzed by ANOVA and Pearson tests. P value less than 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: All implants osseointegrated after 4 months. The mean values of bone to implant contact for histomorphometric measurements of Cenobone, Denobone, and control groups were 77.36 ± 9.96%, 78.91 ± 11.9% and 71.56 ± 5.61% respectively, with no significant differences among the various treatment groups. The correlation of Implant Stability Quotient and histomorphometric techniques was 0.692. Conclusion: In treating of dehiscence defects with GBR technique in this study, adding DFDBA did not significantly enhance the percentages of bone-to-implant contact measurements; and Implant Stability Quotient Resonance Frequency Analysis appeared to be a precise technique.

  20. Free-roaming dog populations: a cost-benefit model for different management options, applied to Abruzzo, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgåsen, H R; Er, C; Di Nardo, A; Dalla Villa, P

    2013-11-01

    Since 1991, Italian free-roaming dogs have been under government protection and euthanasia is restricted by law. Management measures are regulated at the regional level and include: kennelling, adoptions, conversion of stray dogs into block dogs, and population control of owned dogs. "Block dogs" are free-roaming dogs that have been collected by the veterinary services, microchipped, sterilised, vaccinated, and released under the responsibility of the local municipalities. The present paper describes a cost-benefit model for different management options and applies it to two provinces in Abruzzo, central Italy. The model considers welfare, nuisance and direct costs to the municipality. Welfare is quantified based on the expert opinions of 60 local veterinarians, who were asked to assign a score for each dog category according to the five freedoms: freedom from pain, physical discomfort, disease, fear, and freedom to express normal behaviour. Nuisance was assessed only for comparisons between management options, using the number of free-roaming dogs per inhabitant as a proxy indicator. A community dog population model was constructed to predict the effect of management on the different subpopulations of dogs during a ten-year period. It is a user-friendly deterministic model in Excel, easily adaptable to different communities to assess the impact of their dog management policy on welfare, nuisance and direct monetary cost. We present results for Teramo and Pescara provinces. Today's management system is compared to alternative models, which evaluate the effect of specific interventions. These include either a 10% yearly increase in kennel capacity, an increase in adoptions from kennels, a doubling of the capture of stray dogs, or a stabilisation of the owned dog population. Results indicate that optimal management decisions are complex because welfare, nuisance and monetary costs may imply conflicting interventions. Nevertheless, they clearly indicate that

  1. Translational value of animal models of obesity-Focus on dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osto, Melania; Lutz, Thomas A

    2015-07-15

    A prolonged imbalance between a relative increase in energy intake over a decrease in energy expenditure results in the development of obesity; extended periods of a positive energy balance eventually lead to the accumulation of abnormally high amounts of fat in adipose tissue but also in other organs. Obesity is considered a clinical state of impaired general heath in which the excessive increase in adipose tissue mass may be associated with metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. This review discusses briefly the use of animal models for the study of obesity and its comorbidities. Generally, most studies are performed with rodents, such as diet induced obesity and genetic models. Here, we focus specifically on two different species, namely dogs and cats. Obese dogs and cats show many features of human obesity. Interestingly, however, dogs and cats differ from each other in certain aspects because even though obese dogs may become insulin resistant, this does not result in the development of diabetes mellitus. In fact, diabetes in dogs is typically not associated with obesity because dogs present a type 1 diabetes-like syndrome. On the other hand, obese cats often develop diabetes mellitus which shares many features with human type 2 diabetes; feline and human diabetes are similar in respect to their pathophysiology, underlying risk factors and treatment strategies. Our review discusses genetic and endocrine factors in obesity, discusses obesity induced changes in lipid metabolism and includes some recent findings on the role of gut microbiota in obesity. Compared to research in rodent models, the array of available techniques and tools is unfortunately still rather limited in dogs and cats. Hence, even though physiological and pathophysiological phenomena are well described in dogs and cats, the underlying mechanisms are often not known and studies investigating causality specifically are

  2. Defects in the discrete non-linear Schroedinger model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doikou, Anastasia, E-mail: adoikou@upatras.gr [University of Patras, Department of Engineering Sciences, Physics Division, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)

    2012-01-01

    The discrete non-linear Schroedinger (NLS) model in the presence of an integrable defect is examined. The problem is viewed from a purely algebraic point of view, starting from the fundamental algebraic relations that rule the model. The first charges in involution are explicitly constructed, as well as the corresponding Lax pairs. These lead to sets of difference equations, which include particular terms corresponding to the impurity point. A first glimpse regarding the corresponding continuum limit is also provided.

  3. Model based defect detection for free stator of ultrasonic motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Mojallali, Hamed; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh;

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of admittance magnitude and phase are used to identify the complex values of equivalent circuit model for free stator of an ultrasonic motor. The model is used to evaluate the changes in the admittance and relative changes in the values of equivalent circuit elements....... This method identifies the damages and categorizes them. The validity of the method is verified by using free stator measurements of defect free stators of a recently developed multilayer piezoelectric motor....

  4. Urinary bladder cancer in dogs, a naturally occurring model for cancer biology and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Deborah W; Ramos-Vara, José A; Moore, George E; Dhawan, Deepika; Bonney, Patty L; Young, Kirsten E

    2014-01-01

    Each year more than 65,000 people are diagnosed with urinary bladder cancer, and more than 14,000 people die from the disease in the United States. Studies in relevant animal models are essential to improve the management of bladder cancer. Naturally occurring bladder cancer in dogs very closely mimics human invasive bladder cancer, specifically high-grade invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; also referred to as invasive urothelial carcinoma) in cellular and molecular features; biological behavior, including sites and frequency of metastasis; and response to therapy. Canine bladder cancer complements experimentally induced rodent tumors in regard to animal models of bladder cancer. Results of cellular and molecular studies and -omics analyses in dogs are expected to lead to improved detection of TCC and preneoplastic lesions, earlier intervention, better prediction of patient outcome, and more effective TCC management overall. Studies in dogs are being used to help define heritable risks (through very strong breed-associated risk) and environment risks and to evaluate prevention and treatment approaches that benefit humans as well as dogs. Clinical treatment trials in pet dogs with TCC are considered a win-win scenario by clinician scientists and pet owners. The individual dog benefits from effective treatment, the results are expected to help other dogs, and the findings are expected to ultimately help humans with TCC. This article provides an overview of canine TCC, a summary of the similarities and differences between canine and human invasive TCC, and examples of the types of valuable translational research that can be done using dogs with naturally occurring TCC.

  5. Hydroxyapatite/b-tricalcium Phosphate Composite for Guiding Bone Tissue Growth into a Titanium Tube in 8 mm Dog Tibia Cavity Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jixiang; CHEN Xiaoming; WANG Jing; CHEN Weimin

    2016-01-01

    We developed a ifxation method and evaluate bone regrowth in the cavities of af4 mm× 8 mm titanium (Ti) tube through porous hydroxyapatite (HAP)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composite filling (group A), chitosan/calcium phosphate composite filling (group B), and HAP particle modification (group C). After 2 and 5 months of implantation in dog tibia defects, new bone formation in the three groups was studied by histology and histomorphometry. Group A displayed the most bone regenerated area in both 2 and 5 months post-operation. The chitosan/calcium phosphate composite in group B mostly degraded 2 months after implantation, leading to ifbrous tissue invasion after 5 months. By contrast, less bone formation was observed in group C. These results indicated that filling the cavities of metal prostheses with a porous HAP/β-TCP composite can be used for stable long-term ifxation in clinical settings.

  6. Restoration of Vision in the pde6β-deficient Dog, a Large Animal Model of Rod-cone Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Lhériteau, Elsa; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Guihal, Caroline; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the β subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6β) are associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a childhood blinding disease with early retinal degeneration and vision loss. To date, there is no treatment for this pathology. The aim of this preclinical study was to test recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene addition therapy in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency that strongly resembles the human pathology. A total of eight rcd1 dogs were injected subretinally with AAV2/5RK.cpde6β (n = 4) or AAV2/8RK.cpde6β (n = 4). In vivo and post-mortem morphological analysis showed a significant preservation of the retinal structure in transduced areas of both AAV2/5RK.cpde6β- and AAV2/8RK.cpde6β-treated retinas. Moreover, substantial rod-derived electroretinography (ERG) signals were recorded as soon as 1 month postinjection (35% of normal eyes) and remained stable for at least 18 months (the duration of the study) in treated eyes. Rod-responses were undetectable in untreated contralateral eyes. Most importantly, dim-light vision was restored in all treated rcd1 dogs. These results demonstrate for the first time that gene therapy effectively restores long-term retinal function and vision in a large animal model of autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy, and provide great promise for human treatment. PMID:22828504

  7. Dogs with cognitive dysfunction as a spontaneous model for early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schütt, Trine; Helboe, Lone; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    Aged companion dogs with canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) spontaneously develop varying degrees of progressive cognitive decline and particular neuropathological features correspondent to the changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. The aim of the present study was to charact......Aged companion dogs with canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) spontaneously develop varying degrees of progressive cognitive decline and particular neuropathological features correspondent to the changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. The aim of the present study...... was to characterize certain aspects of neuropathology and inflammatory markers related to aging and CCD in dogs in comparison with human AD. Fifteen brains from aged dogs with normal cognitive function, mild cognitive impairment, or CCD were investigated and compared with two control brains from young dogs and brain...... support the senescent dog with spontaneous cognitive dysfunction as a valuable non-transgenic model for further investigations of the molecular events involved in the neurodegenerative processes associated with aging and early stage AD, especially the Aβ-related pathology....

  8. The Chihuahua dog: A new animal model for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis CLN7 disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Kiterie M E; Bras, Jose; Sharpe, Samuel J; Anderson, Glenn W; Darwent, Lee; Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Alroy, Joseph; Penderis, Jacques; Mole, Sara E; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Guerreiro, Rita J

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of incurable lysosomal storage disorders characterized by neurodegeneration and accumulation of lipopigments mainly within the neurons. We studied two littermate Chihuahua dogs presenting with progressive signs of blindness, ataxia, pacing, and cognitive impairment from 1 year of age. Because of worsening of clinical signs, both dogs were euthanized at about 2 years of age. Postmortem examination revealed marked accumulation of autofluorescent intracellular inclusions within the brain, characteristic of NCL. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on one of the affected dogs. After sequence alignment and variant calling against the canine reference genome, variants were identified in the coding region or splicing regions of four previously known NCL genes (CLN6, ARSG, CLN2 [=TPP1], and CLN7 [=MFSD8]). Subsequent segregation analysis within the family (two affected dogs, both parents, and three relatives) identified MFSD8:p.Phe282Leufs13*, which had previously been identified in one Chinese crested dog with no available ancestries, as the causal mutation. Because of the similarities of the clinical signs and histopathological changes with the human form of the disease, we propose that the Chihuahua dog could be a good animal model of CLN7 disease.

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function in mitral regurgitation: is the dog a useful model of man?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Pedersen, Henrik D; Häggström, Jens

    2014-01-01

    yxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most common cause of primary mitral regurgitation in humans and the most common cardiac disease in dogs. Many similarities have been described and, therefore, the dog is considered to be a suitable natural model for MMVD in humans. Accurate identificat...... limit the usefulness of dogs as a model for LV function in MMVD.......yxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) is the most common cause of primary mitral regurgitation in humans and the most common cardiac disease in dogs. Many similarities have been described and, therefore, the dog is considered to be a suitable natural model for MMVD in humans. Accurate...... identification of incipient myocardial deterioration is crucial to optimally time interventional surgery. Nonetheless, this issue is still an object of controversy. In this respect, studies of left ventricular (LV) function in dogs with MMVD could potentially be useful. The present review compares the results...

  10. Accuracy of virtual models in the assessment of maxillary defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamburoglu, Kivanc [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Kursun, Sebnem [Division of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, Ministry of Health, Oral and Dental Health Center, Bolu (Turkmenistan); Kilic, Cenk; Eozen, Tuncer [Gealhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, (Turkmenistan)

    2015-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of measurements performed on three-dimensional (3D) virtual models of maxillary defects obtained using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D optical scanning. Mechanical cavities simulating maxillary defects were prepared on the hard palate of nine cadavers. Images were obtained using a CBCT unit at three different fields-of-views (FOVs) and voxel sizes: 1) 60 X 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 60}); 2) 80 X 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 80}); and 3) 100 X 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm{sup 3} (FOV{sub 100}). Superimposition of the images was performed using software called VRMesh Design. Automated volume measurements were conducted, and differences between surfaces were demonstrated. Silicon impressions obtained from the defects were also scanned with a 3D optical scanner. Virtual models obtained using VRMesh Design were compared with impressions obtained by scanning silicon models. Gold standard volumes of the impression models were then compared with CBCT and 3D scanner measurements. Further, the general linear model was used, and the significance was set to p=0.05. A comparison of the results obtained by the observers and methods revealed the p values to be smaller than 0.05, suggesting that the measurement variations were caused by both methods and observers along with the different cadaver specimens used. Further, the 3D scanner measurements were closer to the gold standard measurements when compared to the CBCT measurements. In the assessment of artificially created maxillary defects, the 3D scanner measurements were more accurate than the CBCT measurements.

  11. Modeling the relationships among internal defect features and external Appalachian hardwood log defect indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a hardwood tree grows and develops, surface defects such as branch stubs and wounds are overgrown. Evidence of these defects remain on the log surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. As the tree grows the defect is encapsulated or grown over by new wood. During this process the appearance of the defect in the tree's bark changes. The...

  12. Lee-Yang Model in Presence of Defects

    CERN Document Server

    Deeb, Omar El

    2015-01-01

    I choose the Lee-Yang model and go through different approaches to analyze it using the form factor approach and the bootstrap program, the lattice description and the lattice TBA equations for a full understanding of the model. The bootstrap program aims to explicitly solve 1+1 dimensional integrable quantum field theories. In the first step, called the S-matrix bootstrap, the scattering matrix, is determined from its properties. In developing a defect form factor program the first step is the T-matrix bootstrap. Interacting integrable defect theories are purely transmitting and topological. We analyze both operators localized in the bulk and also on the defect. By finding their solutions, the spectral representation of any correlator can be determined. Next we consider the model on the lattice. The lattice approach allows to obtain both massive and massless excited TBA equations by studying the continuum scaling limit of the associated integrable lattice models. The most important input from the lattice app...

  13. Rolling Process Modeling Report: Finite-Element Prediction of Roll Separating Force and Rolling Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Paxton, Dean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-04-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate-type fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors. This work supports the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative. This report documents modeling results of PNNL’s efforts to perform finite-element simulations to predict roll separating forces and rolling defects. Simulations were performed using a finite-element model developed using the commercial code LS-Dyna. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel have been conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll-pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. This report discusses various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., dog-boning and thickness non-uniformity).

  14. Experimental infection of dogs with Leishmania and saliva as a model to study Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Joaquim Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL is a zoonotic disease caused by Leishmania infantum, transmitted by the bite of Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies. Dogs are the main domestic reservoir of the parasite. The establishment of an experimental model that partially reproduces natural infection in dogs is very important to test vaccine candidates, mainly regarding those that use salivary proteins from the vector and new therapeutical approaches. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we describe an experimental infection in dogs, using intradermal injection of Leishmania infantum plus salivary gland homogenate (SGH of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Thirty-five dogs were infected with 1×10(7 parasites combined with five pairs of Lutzomyia longipalpis salivary glands and followed for 450 days after infection and clinical, immunological and parasitological parameters were evaluated. Two hundred and ten days after infection we observed that 31,4% of dogs did not display detectable levels of anti-Leishmania antibodies but all presented different numbers of parasites in the lymph nodes. Animals with a positive xenodiagnosis had at least 3,35×10(5 parasites in their lymph nodes. An increase of IFN-γ and IL-10 levels was detected during infection. Twenty two percent of dogs developed symptoms of CVL during infection. CONCLUSION: The infection model described here shows some degree of similarity when compared with naturally infected dogs opening new perspectives for the study of CVL using an experimental model that employs the combination of parasites and sand fly saliva both present during natural transmission.

  15. Ultrasonic wave-based defect localization using probabilistic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M. D.; Flynn, E. B.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Croxford, A. J.; Kessler, S.

    2012-05-01

    This work presents a new approach rooted in maximum likelihood estimation for defect localization in sparse array guided wave ultrasonic interrogation applications. The approach constructs a minimally-informed statistical model of the guided wave process, where unknown or uncertain model parameters are assigned non-informative Bayesian prior distributions and integrated out of the a posteriori probability calculation. The premise of this localization approach is straightforward: the most likely defect location is the point on the structure with the maximum a posteriori probability of actually being the location of damage (i.e., the most probable location given a set of sensor measurements). The proposed approach is tested on a complex stiffened panel against other common localization approaches and found to have superior performance in all cases.

  16. MATERIAL ELEMENT MODEL FOR EXTRINSIC SEMICONDUCTORS WITH DEFECTS OF DISLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Mazzeo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper we outlined a geometric model for the thermodynamic description of extrinsic semiconductors with defects of dislocation.Applying a geometrization technique, within the rationalextended irreversible thermodynamics with internal variables, the dynamical system for simple material elements of these media, the expressions of the entropy function and the entropy 1-form were obtained. In this contribution we deepen the study of this geometric model. We give a detailed description of the defective media under consideration and of the dislocation core tensor, we introduce the transformation induced by the process and, applying the closure conditions for the entropy 1-form, we derive the necessary conditions for the existence of the entropy function. These and other results are new in the paper.The derivation of the relevant entropy 1-form is the starting point to introduce an extended thermodynamical phase space.

  17. REPLACEMENT ANALYSIS FOR DEFECTED PRODUCTS: A SYSTEM DYNAMIC MODELING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Mall

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The current growth in present time due to globalization of markets means more competition for companies especially those in developing economies that have limited analytical tools for business decisions. Market demand uncertainty affects the performance and behavior of the planning processes used by production to satisfy sales. This uncertainty and the resulting instability in the production schedules affect the relationships with the suppliers from whom the company purchases raw materials and component parts. In order to solve the problem, this research developed a SCM system dynamics model that helps business managers and researchers in SCM make better and informed decisions for close life cycle products. The work is focused on the study of behavior of replacement in a supply chain related to closed life-cycle products by system dynamics, that are goods produced and sold and if any defect is found the product is replaced. This study includes the effect of replacement in profit and other variables. This work also includes the development of a model in the system and validation of the model. In this model the relation of the variables like customer, demand, cost, price is studied and the work is focused that what will be the optimum value of the defected product. It has been assumed that if we want to decrease the defected product the cost of the production will increase and that will reduce the profit and if we want to increase the defect the no of customers will decrease and their demand will decrease and this will decrease the profit.

  18. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.

  19. Detailed analysis of an experimental challenge model for Leishmania infantum (JPC strain) in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, Jacqueline; Rogers, Matthew E; Bates, Paul A; Vermeulen, Arno

    2005-06-10

    In this study, disease progression after intravenous or subdermal infection of dogs with Leishmania infantum JPC strain was monitored. A challenge performed on 14 dogs via the intravenous route with 5 x 10(7) stationary phase promastigotes of the L. infantum JPC strain was 100% successful. During a follow up period of 1.5 years, several parameters were evaluated in order to find the most reliable disease markers. Parasite detection by culture and histology were found to be very sensitive (100%). Additionally, regular physical examination, serology and serum gamma-globulin levels were found to be useful parameters in the evaluation of disease severity and are recommended for inclusion in vaccination-challenge experiments. Although this intravenous challenge model has practical limitations, the data set confirms it is the best experimental model currently available for vaccine development. Two intravenously infected dogs were treated with corticosteroids for 5 months. This treatment was shown to enhance all aspects of a Leishmania infection. Five more dogs were infected by sub-dermal injection of promastigotes mixed with a proteophosphoglycan-matrix (PSG) secreted by Leishmania that assists in transmission and infection by sand fly bite. The resulting parasite burdens were low and the animals remained asymptomatic during a 2-year follow up period. However, this procedure did result in infection in 80% of the dogs and is appealing for future development as a natural challenge model in vaccine development.

  20. Compact Models for Defect Diffusivity in Semiconductor Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan F.; Modine, Normand A.; Lee, Stephen R.; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2017-09-01

    Predicting transient effects caused by short - pulse neutron irradiation of electronic devices is an important part of Sandia's mission. For example , predicting the diffusion of radiation - induced point defects is needed with in Sandia's Qualification Alternative to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor (QASP R) pro gram since defect di ffusion mediates transient gain recovery in QASPR electronic devices. Recently, the semiconductors used to fabricate radiation - hard electronic devices have begun to shift from silicon to III - V compounds such as GaAs, InAs , GaP and InP . An advantage of this shift is that it allows engineers to optimize the radiation hardness of electronic devices by us ing alloy s such as InGaAs and InGa P . However, the computer codes currently being used to simulate transient radiation effects in QASP R devices will need to be modified since they presume that defect properties (charge states, energy levels, and diffusivities) in these alloys do not change with time. This is not realistic since the energy and properties of a defect depend on the types of atoms near it and , therefore, on its location in the alloy. In particular, r adiation - induced defects are created at nearly random locations in an alloy and the distribution of their local environments - and thus their energies and properties - evolves with time as the defects diffuse through the alloy . To incorporate these consequential effects into computer codes used to simulate transient radiation effects, we have developed procedures to accurately c ompute the time dependence of defect ener gies and properties and then formulate them within compact models that can be employed in these computer codes. In this document, we demonstrate these procedures for the case of the highly mobile P interstitial (I P ) in an InGaP alloy. Further disseminatio n only as authorized to U.S. Government agencies and their contr actors; other requests shall be approved by the originating facility or higher

  1. A New Estimation Model of IC Interconnect Lifetime Based on Uniform Defect Distribution Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOTianxu; DUANXuchao; HAOYue; MAPeijun

    2004-01-01

    Defect, which exists throughout IC manufacturing process, is one of the important factors affecting IC interconnection lifetime. In this paper, a new failure model of IC interconnection is proposed based on analysis of the awdlable lifetime estimation models of IC interconnect lifetime. Many factors, such as the sizes of the defect, wire width, wire length and so on, are considered in this new model. The simulation results show that defect has a great influence on IC's interconnect lifetime, and the larger the defect size, the greater the influence. The new model can be used in an IC design to estimate electromigration loss related to the IC missing material defect and to some other factors.

  2. Modeling of defect formation in silicon carbide during PVT growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachev, Roman Victorovich

    2002-01-01

    The improvement of PVT grown SiC structural quality is crucial for the wide commercialization of SiC devices that feature superior characteristics for power conditioning and control. This is why, this dissertation is devoted to investigation and development of comprehensive models that can help to explain, understand and, then, suppress (eliminate) formation of various defects in SiC during PVT growth. The dissertation consists of six chapters. The first chapter is introductory. The second chapter considers in detail the general principles and physical bases of the SiC PVT growth technique along with the temperature dependence of pressure, composition and stoichiometry of the SiC gaseous phase. Questions related to the diffusive mass transport in the SiC growth cell are also discussed. The growth velocity as a function of the mass transport rate, the heat balance at the surface of crystallization and the growth front-crystal backside temperature difference is analyzed. Also the graphitization processes and instability of the sublimation temperature in the source material region are addressed. Chapter number three concerns generation of silicon and carbon second phase precipitates at the front of SiC crystallization. The comprehensive models concerning these phenomena are developed. The fourth chapter considers defect formation in SiC caused by the presence of carbon and/or silicon second phase particles at the growth front. Generation mechanisms of such structural defects as heterogeneous inclusions, point and planar defects, and filamentary voids are discussed in detail. Chapter number five deals with the defects caused by thermal stresses in the growing boule of SiC. Analytical estimations of the axially symmetric temperature field distribution and shear stress radial distribution in plane strain approximation are employed in order to estimate the extent to which such phenomena cause the generation of dislocations and micropipe formation in the growing ingot. The

  3. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Gasenzer, Thomas; Pawlowski, Jan M; Sexty, Dénes

    2013-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appear in the gauge field which are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signalled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these r...

  4. Modelling of transport phenomena and defects in crystal growth processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pendurti; H Zhang; V Prasad

    2001-02-01

    A brief review of single crystal growth techniques and the associated problems is presented. Emphasis is placed on models for various transport and defect phenomena involoved in the growth process with the ultimate aim of integrating them into a comprehensive numerical model. The sources of dislocation nucleation in the growing crystal are discussed, and the propagation and multiplication of these under the action of thermal stresses is discussed. A brief description of a high-level numerical technique based on multiple adaptive grid generation and finite volume discretization is presented, followed by the result of a representative numerical simulation.

  5. Assessing climate model software quality: a defect density analysis of three models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pipitone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A climate model is an executable theory of the climate; the model encapsulates climatological theories in software so that they can be simulated and their implications investigated. Thus, in order to trust a climate model, one must trust that the software it is built from is built correctly. Our study explores the nature of software quality in the context of climate modelling. We performed an analysis of defect reports and defect fixes in several versions of leading global climate models by collecting defect data from bug tracking systems and version control repository comments. We found that the climate models all have very low defect densities compared to well-known, similarly sized open-source projects. We discuss the implications of our findings for the assessment of climate model software trustworthiness.

  6. Rag defects and thymic stroma: lessons from animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eMarrella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs cross-talk is essential to support T-cell development and preserve thymic architecture and maturation of TECs and Foxp3+ natural regulatory T (nTreg cells. Accordingly, disruption of thymic lymphostromal cross-talk may have major implications on the thymic mechanisms that govern T cell tolerance. Several genetic defects have been described in humans that affect early stages of T cell development (leading to Severe Combined Immune Deficiency, SCID or late stages in thymocyte maturation (resulting in combined immunodeficiency. Hypomorphic mutations in SCID-causing genes may allow for generation of a limited pool of T lymphocytes with a restricted repertoire. These conditions are often associated with infiltration of peripheral tissues by activated T cells and immune dysregulation, as best exemplified by Omenn syndrome (OS. In this review, we will discuss our recent findings on abnormalities of thymic microenvironment in OS with a special focus of defective maturation of TECs, altered distribution of thymic dendritic cells (DCs and impairment of deletional and non-deletional mechanisms of central tolerance. Here, taking advantage of mouse models of OS and atypical SCID, we will discuss how modifications in stromal compartment impact and shape lymphocyte differentiation, and vice versa how inefficient T cell signalling results in defective stromal maturation. These findings are instrumental to understand the extent to which novel therapeutic strategies should act on thymic stroma to achieve full immune reconstitution.

  7. Model Based Defect Detection in Multi-Dimensional Vector Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Toshifumi; Obara, Kenji; Harada, Minoru; Igarashi, Hajime

    A highly sensitive inspection algorithm is proposed that extracts defects in multidimensional vector spaces from multiple images. The proposed algorithm projects subtraction vectors calculated from test and reference images to control the noise by reducing the dimensionality of vector spaces. The linear projection vectors are optimized using a physical defect model, and the noise distribution is calculated from the images. Because the noise distribution varies with the intensity or texture of the pixels, the target image is divided into small regions and the noise distribution of the subtraction images are calculated for each divided region. The bidirectional local perturbation pattern matching (BD-LPPM) which is an enhanced version of the LPPM, is proposed to increase the sensitivity when calculating the subtraction vectors, especially when the reference image contains more high-frequency components than the test image. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using defect samples for three different scanning electron microscopy images. The results reveal that the proposed algorithm increases the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 1.32 relative to that obtained using the Mahalanobis distance algorithm.

  8. Assistance dogs provide a useful behavioral model to enrich communicative skills of assistance robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gácsi, Márta; Szakadát, Sára; Miklósi, Ádám

    2013-01-01

    These studies are part of a project aiming to reveal relevant aspects of human–dog interactions, which could serve as a model to design successful human-robot interactions. Presently there are no successfully commercialized assistance robots, however, assistance dogs work efficiently as partners for persons with disabilities. In Study 1, we analyzed the cooperation of 32 assistance dog–owner dyads performing a carrying task. We revealed typical behavior sequences and also differences depending on the dyads' experiences and on whether the owner was a wheelchair user. In Study 2, we investigated dogs' responses to unforeseen difficulties during a retrieving task in two contexts. Dogs displayed specific communicative and displacement behaviors, and a strong commitment to execute the insoluble task. Questionnaire data from Study 3 confirmed that these behaviors could successfully attenuate owners' disappointment. Although owners anticipated the technical competence of future assistance robots to be moderate/high, they could not imagine robots as emotional companions, which negatively affected their acceptance ratings of future robotic assistants. We propose that assistance dogs' cooperative behaviors and problem solving strategies should inspire the development of the relevant functions and social behaviors of assistance robots with limited manual and verbal skills. PMID:24399986

  9. A comparative approach to computer aided design model of a dog femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turamanlar, O; Verim, O; Karabulut, A

    2016-01-01

    Computer assisted technologies offer new opportunities in medical imaging and rapid prototyping in biomechanical engineering. Three dimensional (3D) modelling of soft tissues and bones are becoming more important. The accuracy of the analysis in modelling processes depends on the outline of the tissues derived from medical images. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the accuracy of 3D models of a dog femur derived from computed tomography data by using point cloud method and boundary line method on several modelling software. Solidworks, Rapidform and 3DSMax software were used to create 3D models and outcomes were evaluated statistically. The most accurate 3D prototype of the dog femur was created with stereolithography method using rapid prototype device. Furthermore, the linearity of the volumes of models was investigated between software and the constructed models. The difference between the software and real models manifests the sensitivity of the software and the devices used in this manner.

  10. Developmental Defects in Trisomy 21 and Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Maurice Delabar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidies have diverse phenotypic consequences, ranging from mental retardation and developmental abnormalities to susceptibility to common phenotypes and various neoplasms. This review focuses on the developmental defects of murine models of a prototype human aneuploidy: trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS, T21. Murine models are clearly the best tool for dissecting the phenotypic consequences of imbalances that affect single genes or chromosome segments. Embryos can be studied freely in mice, making murine models particularly useful for the characterization of developmental abnormalities. This review describes the main phenotypic alterations occurring during the development of patients with T21 and the developmental abnormalities observed in mouse models, and investigates phenotypes common to both species.

  11. A Simulation Model of Focus and Radial Servos in Compact Disc Players with Disc Surface Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2004-01-01

    Compact Disc players have been on the market in more than two decades.As a consequence most of the control servo problems have been solved. A large remaining problem to solve is the handling of Compact Discs with severe surface defects like scratches and fingerprints. This paper introduces a method...... for making the design of controllers handling surface defects easier. A simulation model of Compact Disc players playing discs with surface defects is presented. The main novel element in the model is a model of the surface defects. That model is based on data from discs with surface defects. This model...

  12. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  13. Early Bone Formation at a Femur Defect Using CGF and PRF Grafts in Adult Dogs: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Chun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lim, Sung-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Ae; Kim, Jin-Son; Jung, Chan; Kwon, Young-Sun; Ji, Hyeok

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predictability of new bone formation using an autologous concentrated growth factor (CGF) graft alone and platelet graft alone. Four bony defects of 8 mm were formed, and 3.7- × 10-mm implants were placed in the right femur. The platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), CGF, and synthetic bone were grafted to the bone defect area. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay quantitative analysis and microscopic analysis of the fibrinogen structure were performed. At 4 weeks, the comparisons of each experimental group showed a significant difference between the CGF group and the synthetic bone graft group. When comparing the CGF and allograft material groups, the allograft group showed significantly more new bone formation. In the case of vascular endothelial growth factor, CGF had 1.5 times more than PRF. CGF showed a fibrinogen structure with a constant diameter. When applied to a clinical case, CGF is predicted to show better results than PRF.

  14. Skull defects in finite element head models for source reconstruction from magnetoencephalography signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eLau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors.A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects.The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals.We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery.

  15. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  16. The effects of hydroxyapatite/calcium phosphate glass scaffold and its surface modification with bovine serum albumin on 1-wall intrabony defects of beagle dogs: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Yoo-Jung; Jung, Ui-Won; Chae, Gyung-Joon; Kim, Chang-Sung; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chong-Kwan; Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 l (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: shchoi726@yuhs.ac

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of biphasic hydroxyapatite/calcium phosphate glass (HA/CPG) scaffold and its surface modification with bovine serum albumin (BSA) on periodontal regeneration. 1-wall intrabony defects were surgically created on five beagle dogs. HA/CPG scaffolds, with a hydroxyapatite (HA)/calcium phosphate glass (CPG) ratio of 95:5 by weight (%) and surface modification done by 2% bovine serum albumin, were used. The control group received surgical flap operation, and the experimental groups were filled with HA/CPG scaffolds and HA/CPG(BSA) scaffolds. The animals were sacrificed eight weeks after surgery. Histological findings revealed better space maintenance in the experimental groups than the control group, and showed new bone formation intermittently in between the residual material particles. The newly formed bone was mostly woven bone and the residual particles were undergoing resorption. Cementum regeneration was observed with limited root resorption in all the groups. Histometric analysis also revealed greater mean values in new bone formation, cementum regeneration and bone area than the control group in both experimental groups. However, similar findings were presented between HA/CPG and HA/CPG(BSA). The result of the present study revealed the newly fabricated HA/CPG scaffold to have a potential use as a bone substitute material.

  17. Ab initio modelling of boron related defects in amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tiago A.; Torres, Vitor J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    We have modeled boron related point defects in amorphous silicon, using an ab initio method, the Density functional theory-pseudopotential code Aimpro. The boron atoms were embedded in 64 atom amorphous silicon cubic supercells. The calculations were performed using boron defects in 15 different supercells. These supercells were developed using a modified Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond switching mechanism. In average, the properties of the 15 supercells agree with the observed radial and bond angle distributions, as well the electronic and vibrational density of states and Raman spectra. In amorphous silicon it has been very hard to find real self-interstitials, since for almost all the tested configurations, the amorphous lattice relaxes overall. We found that substitutional boron prefers to be 4-fold coordinated. We find also an intrinsic hole-trap in the non-doped amorphous lattice, which may explain the low efficiency of boron doping. The local vibrational modes are, in average, higher than the correspondent crystalline values (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Use of Biomaterials Associated or not to the Platelet-Rich Plasma in Cranial Bone Defects. Microscopical Study in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edevaldo Tadeu CAMARINI

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was to evaluate a possible accelerating activity of the bone repair process through the use platelet-rich plasma (PRP, associated to biomaterials in sockets produced in cranial skull of dogs. Method: Six animals of indefinite race has been selected, females, approach weight of 8 kg, being carried through six sockets of 8 mm with trefine drill that had been divided in six groups: each group it filled with the following materials: Group I: blood (control group; Group II: blood and PRP; Group III: Biogran® (bioactive glass and blood; Group IV: Biogran®, blood and PRP; Group V: Bio-Oss® (natural hidroxiapatite of bovine origin and blood; Group VI: Bio-Oss®, blood and PRP. Thirty and sixty days after procedure the animals had sacrificed themselves and the parts had been fixed in formol 10%, demineralized in EDTA solution, processed and follow to Hematoxilin and Eosin (HE technique. Results: It did not have significant difference between the control groups (Groups I and II. To the 30 days, it had development of the hard tissue repair, however, if it did not observe significant differences between the two biomaterials (Biogran and Bio-Oss. In 60 days, was observed a bone is in mature state, however, if it microscopically did not evidence significant differences between the use or not of the PRP influencing in the tissue repairing. Conclusion: Carried through the microscopical analysis, concluded that the materials had presented osteoconduction property and absence of inflammatory reaction. The presence or not of PRP did not intervene with the evolution of the repair and is necessity the continuity of new scientific inquiries involving the PRP and its applications.

  19. Evaluating Printability of Buried Native EUV Mask Phase Defects through a Modeling and Simulation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Mihir; Jindal, Vibhu; Basavalingappa, Adarsh; Herbol, Henry; Harris-Jones, Jenah; Jang, Il-Yong; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Marokkey, Sajan; Demmerle, Wolfgang; Pistor, Thomas V.; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2015-03-16

    The availability of defect-free masks is considered to be a critical issue for enabling extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as the next generation technology. Since completely defect-free masks will be hard to achieve, it is essential to have a good understanding of the printability of the native EUV mask defects. In this work, we performed a systematic study of native mask defects to understand the defect printability caused by them. The multilayer growth over native substrate mask blank defects was correlated to the multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects having similar profiles in terms of their width and height. To model the multilayer growth over the defects, a novel level-set multilayer growth model was used that took into account the tool deposition conditions of the Veeco Nexus ion beam deposition tool. The same tool was used for performing the actual deposition of the multilayer stack over the characterized native defects, thus ensuring a fair comparison between the actual multilayer growth over native defects, and modeled multilayer growth over regular-shaped defects. Further, the printability of the characterized native defects was studied with the SEMATECH-Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT), an EUV mask-imaging microscope at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Printability of the modeled regular-shaped defects, which were propagated up the multilayer stack using level-set growth model was studied using defect printability simulations implementing the waveguide algorithm. Good comparison was observed between AIT and the simulation results, thus demonstrating that multilayer growth over a defect is primarily a function of a defect’s width and height, irrespective of its shape. This would allow us to predict printability of the arbitrarily-shaped native EUV mask defects in a systematic and robust manner.

  20. The preparation of patent foramen ovale model in dogs%卵圆孔未闭动物模型的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高力明; 宗书峰; 游晓华; 徐荣良; 秦永文

    2012-01-01

    puncturing the atrial septa the mean pressure of the right atrium was (1.9 ± 0.8) mmHg, which was increased to (2.5 ± 0.7) mmHg after puncturing the atrial septa. Gross examination of the heart samples from the two sacrificed dogs showed that the cardiac pericardium was intact. The size of the fossa ovalis defect in the two dogs was 5 mm x 6 mm and 6 mm x 6 mm respectively. A little amount of ecchymosis was observed around the fossa ovalis defect, and no attached thrombus formation was observed. The rest part of the endocardium was well intact. Conclusion It is feasible to establish PFO model in dogs by percutaneous atrial septal puncture and balloon dilation.

  1. Using canine osteosarcoma as a model to assess efficacy of novel therapies: can old dogs teach us new tricks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos O

    2014-01-01

    Since its domestication more than 10,000 years ago, the dog has been the animal that most intimately shares our work and homelife. Interestingly, the dog also shares many of our diseases including cancer such as osteosarcoma. Like the human, osteosarcoma is the most common bone malignancy of the dog and death from pulmonary metastasis is the most common outcome. The incidence of this spontaneous bone neoplasm occurs ten times more frequently that it does so in children with about 8,000-10,000 cases estimated to occur in dogs in the USA. Because there is no "standard of care" in veterinary medicine, the dog can also serve us by being a model for this disease in children. Although the most common therapy for the dog with osteosarcoma is amputation followed by chemotherapy, not all owners choose this route. Consequently, novel therapeutic interventions can be attempted in the dog with or without chemotherapy that could not be done in humans with osteosarcoma due to ethical concerns. This chapter will focus on the novel therapies in the dog that have been reported or are in veterinary clinical trials at the author's institution. It is hoped that collaboration between veterinary oncologists and pediatric oncologists will lead to the development of novel therapies for (micro- or macro-) metastatic osteosarcoma that improve survival and might ultimately lead to a cure in both species.

  2. No Dog Left Behind: A Hedonic Pricing Model for Animal Shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Laura A; Skidmore, Mark; Dyar, William; Rosebrook, Erika

    2017-01-01

    Companion animal overpopulation is a growing problem in the United States. In addition to strays, an average of 324,500 nonhuman animals are relinquished to shelters yearly by their caregivers due to family disruption (divorce, death), foreclosure, economic problems, or minor behavioral issues. As a result, estimates of animals in shelters range from 3 million to 8 million, and due to overcrowding, euthanasia is common. This analysis seeks to determine the appropriate pricing mechanisms to clear animal shelters of dogs in the manner most desirable-that is, through adoption. Based on a survey of Michigan residents, it is clear there are a number of correlations between the traits of dogs and the individuals who care for them. Hedonic pricing models indicate that animal shelters need to proactively vary their pricing systems to discount particular traits, specifically for mixed-breed, older, and black dogs. Premiums can be charged for puppies, purebred dogs, and those who have received specific services such as microchipping.

  3. A detailed model for defect concentration and dopant activation in GaAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak; N Lakshminarayana

    2001-04-01

    Defects in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs are especially critical in determining the properties of devices in which dopants are introduced by ion-implantation. The defects in GaAs are native to the material and their concentrations are subsequently modified after ion-implantation and annealing. In this work, we have extended the existing models in the literature by incorporating a large set of defects and using the most recent values for formation energies of these defects. The model includes eight types of point defects, the vacancy of Ga and As, their antisites and interstitials of Ga and As on both sub-lattices, along with carbon related defects always present in SI–GaAs. We have also included Si and related defects when this element is implanted as an -type dopant. All these defects are considered in several charge states allowed by their stability conditions. The model assumes thermodynamic equilibrium between the point defects at an anneal temperature. Then the GaAs wafer is quenched so that the number of defects remain the same as those at the anneal temperature, but redistribution of charges occurs in various charge states. We find that the defect concentrations are extremely sensitive to the crystal stoichiometry, and good agreement with experimental data is shown. However, when we calculate the dopant activation in implanted GaAs, the quantitative agreement with experiments is not adequate. This discrepancy is explained on the basis of available formation energies for the defects.

  4. Integrating the landscape epidemiology and genetics of RNA viruses: rabies in domestic dogs as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, K; Hampson, K; Horton, D L; Biek, R

    2012-12-01

    Landscape epidemiology and landscape genetics combine advances in molecular techniques, spatial analyses and epidemiological models to generate a more real-world understanding of infectious disease dynamics and provide powerful new tools for the study of RNA viruses. Using dog rabies as a model we have identified how key questions regarding viral spread and persistence can be addressed using a combination of these techniques. In contrast to wildlife rabies, investigations into the landscape epidemiology of domestic dog rabies requires more detailed assessment of the role of humans in disease spread, including the incorporation of anthropogenic landscape features, human movements and socio-cultural factors into spatial models. In particular, identifying and quantifying the influence of anthropogenic features on pathogen spread and measuring the permeability of dispersal barriers are important considerations for planning control strategies, and may differ according to cultural, social and geographical variation across countries or continents. Challenges for dog rabies research include the development of metapopulation models and transmission networks using genetic information to uncover potential source/sink dynamics and identify the main routes of viral dissemination. Information generated from a landscape genetics approach will facilitate spatially strategic control programmes that accommodate for heterogeneities in the landscape and therefore utilise resources in the most cost-effective way. This can include the efficient placement of vaccine barriers, surveillance points and adaptive management for large-scale control programmes.

  5. Phase field modeling of the defect evolution and failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuesong

    The plastic recovery processes in ultrafine and nano grained metals and the yield criteria and failure mechanisms in polymer matrix composite are the two major topics in this work. In the first part of the work, a phase field dislocation dynamics (PFDD) approach is introduced, which tracks the evolution of the dislocations in ultrafine and nano grained metals and takes into account the elastic interaction between dislocations, obstacles and the applied resolved shear stress on a single slip plane. Two phenomena, the reverse plastic strain during cyclic loading and plastic strain recovery upon unloading, are studied. One major finding of our simulations is that these two plastic recovery processes are related to the formation of dislocation structures during loading, and additional grain size inhomogeneity will increase the amount of plastic strain recovered. In the second part of the work, a phase field damage model (PFDM) is presented to study the onset of yielding and crack propagation in polymer matrix composite. The effect of two damage parameters, the fracture toughness Gc and crack length scale parameter l0, are first investigated. The former is shown to determine the energy needed during crack propagation and the latter is observed to control the crack nucleation process. Moreover, two asymmetric damage models are compared regarding their yield surfaces and it is found that the model of Miehe et al. leads to a linear pressure modified von Mises relation. Next, the PFDM reveals that the yield criterion in amorphous polymers should be described in terms of local stress and strains fields and cannot be extended directly from applied stress field values. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the same damage model can be used to study the failure under shear yielding and crazing conditions. And if local defects in the samples such as voids are included explicitly in the simulations, the PFDM is able to explain the breakdown of the pressure modified von Mises

  6. In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous Prostate Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma , ing for smoking exposure, non-tumorous lung tissue melanoma); oropharyngeal; hepatocellular carcinoma ; of women...supplementation on cancer incidence in a randomized clinical squamous cell carcinoma of the skin in relation to plasma trial: a summary report of the...invasive carcinoma . In vivo screening of promising chemopreventive agents using the dog model of spontaneous prostate carcinogenesis represents a novel

  7. Sporadic naturally occurring melanoma in dogs as a preclinical model for human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R Mark; Bastian, Boris C; Michael, Helen T; Webster, Joshua D; Prasad, Manju L; Conway, Catherine M; Prieto, Victor M; Gary, Joy M; Goldschmidt, Michael H; Esplin, D Glen; Smedley, Rebecca C; Piris, Adriano; Meuten, Donald J; Kiupel, Matti; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Ward, Jerrold M; Dwyer, Jennifer E; Davis, Barbara J; Anver, Miriam R; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Hoover, Shelley B; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma represents a significant malignancy in humans and dogs. Different from genetically engineered models, sporadic canine melanocytic neoplasms share several characteristics with human disease that could make dogs a more relevant preclinical model. Canine melanomas rarely arise in sun-exposed sites. Most occur in the oral cavity, with a subset having intra-epithelial malignant melanocytes mimicking the in situ component of human mucosal melanoma. The spectrum of canine melanocytic neoplasia includes benign lesions with some analogy to nevi, as well as invasive primary melanoma, and widespread metastasis. Growing evidence of distinct subtypes in humans, differing in somatic and predisposing germ-line genetic alterations, cell of origin, epidemiology, relationship to ultraviolet radiation and progression from benign to malignant tumors, may also exist in dogs. Canine and human mucosal melanomas appear to harbor BRAF, NRAS, and c-kit mutations uncommonly, compared with human cutaneous melanomas, although both species share AKT and MAPK signaling activation. We conclude that there is significant overlap in the clinical and histopathological features of canine and human mucosal melanomas. This represents opportunity to explore canine oral cavity melanoma as a preclinical model.

  8. The effect of oversized occluder on endothelialization after percutaneous closure of experimental atrial septal defect in dogs%过大房间隔缺损封堵器对犬术后内皮化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷婷; 张玉顺; 万陈; 成革胜; 王军; 和旭梅; 杜亚娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨过大房间隔缺损封堵器对术后封堵器表面内皮化的影响。方法在经胸超声心动图的引导下,在18只实验犬中建立直径为(6.0±0.2)mm的房间隔缺损模型。采用完全随机化方法将实验犬分为正常组及过大组(每组各9只实验犬),正常组置入直径8 mm封堵器,过大组置入直径12 mm封堵器。术后3、6、14个月分别处死实验犬,通过扫描电镜观察各组封堵器表面的内皮化进程。结果4只实验犬在术后1个月左右死亡。正常组术后3个月封堵器表面已基本内皮化,术后6和14个月均为完全内皮化;过大组术后3个月封堵器表面内皮化程度不佳,术后6个月基本内皮化,术后14个月才完全内皮化。结论采用过大封堵器治疗实验犬房间隔缺损,术后6个月封堵器表面尚未完全内皮化。%Objective To observe the effect of oversized occluder on endothelialization post percutaneous closure of experimental atrial septal defect ( ASD) in dogs.Methods ASD was established with the help of transthoracic echocardiography in 18 dogs.ASD size was ( 6.0 ±0.2 ) mm.Dogs were randomly divided into normal size group ( implanted with 8 mm occlude , n =9 ) and oversized group (implanted with 12 mm occluder, n =9).Dogs were randomly killed at 3, 6 and 14 months after percutaneous closure.The endothelialization process on device surface was observed by scanning electron microscope.Results Four animals died around 1 month post procedure.Microscopic sections from normal group showed nearly complete endothelialization at 3 months after device implantation and complete endothelialization at 6 and 14 months after device implantation.While microscopic sections showed lack of endothelialization at 3 months post implantation , nearly endothelialization at 6 months, and complete endothelialization at 14 months after device implantation in oversized group.Conclusion Incomplete endothelialization of

  9. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shu-Kun; Guo, Jin-Hai; Wang, Zhu-le; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Yun-Hu; Wu, Shi-Zhou; Huang, Fu-Guo; Xie, Hui-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  10. Penta-hepta defect chaos in a model for rotating hexagonal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Yuan-Nan; Riecke, Hermann

    2003-04-01

    In a model for rotating non-Boussinesq convection with mean flow, we identify a regime of spatiotemporal chaos that is based on a hexagonal planform and is sustained by the induced nucleation of dislocations by penta-hepta defects. The probability distribution function for the number of defects deviates substantially from the usually observed Poisson-type distribution. It implies strong correlations between the defects in the form of density-dependent creation and annihilation rates of defects. We extract these rates from the distribution function and also directly from the defect dynamics.

  11. The dog as a model for comparative studies of lymphoma and leukemia in humans 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Pawlak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Dogs have accompanied humankind for thousands of years. They share the same environment, and thus are exposed to the same environmental factors such as air pollution, tobacco smoke, and various chemicals. Recent development of veterinary care has led to a significant extension of dogs’ lifespan and allowed the diagnosis and treatment of a growing number of different diseases in this species. Among all diseases in dogs, cancer is considered the main cause of mortality, with lymphoproliferative disorders accounting for up to 30�0of all canine cancers. Some of them, such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL and lymphocytic leukemia, are very similar in the etiology, pathogenesis and response to treatment to the diseases occurring in humans. Due to anatomical and physiological similarities to humans, the dog is a useful model for the study of new therapeutic strategies for humans. Studies on the canine neoplasia are currently limited by the lack of well-characterized and widely available cell lines; thus, recently obtained canine NHL cell lines may become a valuable model for such studies. Investigation of their sensitivity to the antiproliferative effects of different factors should allow the creation of a database similar to the existing classification of human leukemias and lymphomas. This should enable quick and accurate diagnosis and selection of appropriate treatment based on phenotypic analysis and histopathological examination of clinical samples. The cooperation between human and veterinary oncologists gives the opportunity to use the dog as a model for the study of certain types of cancers presenting a challenge for modern medicine.

  12. MD modeling of defects in Fe and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Jaime; Wirth, Brian D.; Schäublin, Robin; Odette, G. R.; Perlado, J. Manuel

    2003-12-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels considered as candidate first-wall materials for fusion reactors experience significant radiation hardening at temperatures below ˜400 °C. A number of experimental studies in ferritic alloys, performed at higher temperatures, have shown the existence of large interstitial loops with Burgers vector {1}/{2} and in the bulk, which may provide a significant contribution to the hardening caused during irradiation at lower temperatures. Hardening arises from a high number density of loops, voids and small precipitates, which pin system dislocations, impeding their free glide. In this work, we review the nature of the different interstitial dislocation loops observed in α-Fe and ferritic materials, assess the effect of substitutional impurities on migrating {1}/{2} clusters, and apply atomistic modeling to investigate the mechanisms of formation and growth of loops from smaller cascade-produced {1}/{2} clusters. The proposed mechanism reconciles experimental observations with continuum elasticity theory and recent MD modeling of defect production in displacement cascades. In addition, the interaction of screw dislocations, known to control the low-temperature plastic response of b.c.c. materials to external stress, with dislocation loops is investigated with MD, where the main physical mechanisms are identified, cutting angles estimated and a first-order estimation of the induced hardening is provided.

  13. Cardiopulmonary values in dogs with artificial model of caval syndrome in heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Y; Kitagawa, H; Sasaki, Y; Ishihara, K

    1991-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary values were determined in dogs with an artificial model of heartworm caval syndrome, which was produced by insertion of heartworm-like silicone tubes into the tricuspid valve orifice and right atrium. Fifteen to 25 tubes with some knots were inserted in 6 dogs (knot group), and 7 to 11 tubes (small-number group) or 29 to 37 tubes (large-number group) without a knot in 3 dogs, respectively. After tube insertion, angiographic contrast medium infused into the right ventricle regurgitated to the right atrium in all cases, and the regurgitation was the most severe in the large-number group. On electrocardiographic findings, the atrial and/or ventricular premature beat developed. The height of a- and v-wave of right atrial pressure curves elevated in all groups. The elevation in v-wave was obvious in the large-number group. The pulmonary arterial pressure tended to fall or to elevate slightly, and total pulmonary resistance increased in all groups. The right cardiac output decreased significantly in all cases. The right heart hemodynamics of the model might resemble those in spontaneous cases without disturbed pulmonary circulation.

  14. Musculoskeletal modelling in dogs: challenges and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dries, Billy; Jonkers, Ilse; Dingemanse, Walter; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Vander Sloten, Jos; van Bree, Henri; Gielen, Ingrid

    2016-05-18

    Musculoskeletal models have proven to be a valuable tool in human orthopaedics research. Recently, veterinary research started taking an interest in the computer modelling approach to understand the forces acting upon the canine musculoskeletal system. While many of the methods employed in human musculoskeletal models can applied to canine musculoskeletal models, not all techniques are applicable. This review summarizes the important parameters necessary for modelling, as well as the techniques employed in human musculoskeletal models and the limitations in transferring techniques to canine modelling research. The major challenges in future canine modelling research are likely to centre around devising alternative techniques for obtaining maximal voluntary contractions, as well as finding scaling factors to adapt a generalized canine musculoskeletal model to represent specific breeds and subjects.

  15. Gear Defect Modeling of a Multiple-Stage Gear Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the transient and steady state dynamic loading on teeth within a two-stage gear transmission arising from backlash and geometric manufacturing errors by utilizing a nonlinear multibody dynamics software model. Backlash between gear teeth which is essential to provide better lubrication on tooth surfaces and to eliminate interference is included as a defect and a necessary part of transmission design. Torsional vibration is shown to cause teeth separation and double-sided impacts in unloaded and lightly loaded gearing drives. Vibration and impact force distinctions between backlash and combinations of transmission errors are demonstrated under different initial velocities and load conditions. The backlash and manufacturing errors in the first stage of the gear train are distinct from those of the second stage. By analyzing the signal at a location between the two stages, the mutually affected impact forces are observed from different gear pairs, a phenomenon not observed from single pair of gears. Frequency analysis shows the appearance of side band modulations as well as harmonics of the gear mesh frequency. A joint time-frequency response analysis during startup illustrates the manner in which contact forces increase during acceleration.

  16. Defective membrane remodeling in neuromuscular diseases: insights from animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda S Cowling

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1, and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. In addition to centronuclear myopathy, dynamin 2 is also mutated in a dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. While several proteins from these different families are implicated in similar diseases, mutations in close homologues or in the same protein in the case of dynamin 2 lead to diseases affecting different tissues. This suggests (1 a common molecular pathway underlying these different neuromuscular diseases, and (2 tissue-specific regulation of these proteins. This review discusses the pathophysiology of the related neuromuscular diseases on the basis of animal models developed for proteins of the myotubularin, amphiphysin, and dynamin families. A better understanding of the common mechanisms between these neuromuscular disorders will lead to more specific health care and therapeutic approaches.

  17. A model of study for human cancer: Spontaneous occurring tumors in dogs. Biological features and translation for new anticancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, G; Gadaleta, C D; Patruno, R; Zizzo, N; Daidone, M G; Hansson, M G; Paradiso, A; Ribatti, D

    2013-10-01

    Murine cancer models have been extremely useful for analyzing the biology of pathways involved in cancer initiation, promotion, and progression. Interestingly, several murine cancer models also exhibit heterogeneity, genomic instability and an intact immune system. However, they do not adequately represent several features that define cancer in humans, including long periods of latency, the complex biology of cancer recurrence and metastasis and outcomes to novel therapies. Therefore, additional models that better investigate the human disease are needed. In the pet population, with special references to the dog, cancer is a spontaneous disease and dogs naturally develop cancers that share many characteristics with human malignancies. More than 40 years ago, optimization of bone marrow transplantation protocols was undertaken in dogs and recently novel targeted therapies such as liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine and several tyrosine kinase inhibitors, namely masitinib (AB1010) and toceranib phosphate (SU11654), have been developed to treat dog tumors which have then been translated to human clinical trials. In this review article, we will analyze biological data from dog tumors and comparative features with human tumors, and new therapeutic approaches translated from dog to human cancer.

  18. Transport-reaction model for defect and carrier behavior within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell,

    2014-02-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Charging of the defects can produce high electric fields within the cluster which may influence transport and reaction of carriers and defects, and which may enhance carrier recombination through band-to-trap tunneling. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to pulsed neutron irradiation.

  19. Changes in the Welfare of an Injured Working Farm Dog Assessed Using the Five Domains Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Littlewood

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present structured, systematic and comprehensive welfare evaluation of an injured working farm dog using the Five Domains Model is of interest in its own right. It is also an example for others wanting to apply the Model to welfare evaluations in different species and contexts. Six stages of a fictitious scenario involving the dog are considered: (1 its on-farm circumstances before one hind leg is injured; (2 its entanglement in barbed wire, cutting it free and transporting it to a veterinary clinic; (3 the initial veterinary examination and overnight stay; (4 amputation of the limb and immediate post-operative recovery; (5 its first four weeks after rehoming to a lifestyle block; and (6 its subsequent life as an amputee and pet. Not all features of the scenario represent average-to-good practice; indeed, some have been selected to indicate poor practice. It is shown how the Model can draw attention to areas of animal welfare concern and, importantly, to how welfare enhancement may be impeded or facilitated. Also illustrated is how the welfare implications of a sequence of events can be traced and evaluated, and, in relation to specific situations, how the degrees of welfare compromise and enhancement may be graded. In addition, the choice of a companion animal, contrasting its welfare status as a working dog and pet, and considering its treatment in a veterinary clinical setting, help to highlight various welfare impacts of some practices. By focussing attention on welfare problems, the Model can guide the implementation of remedies, including ways of promoting positive welfare states. Finally, wider applications of the Five Domains Model are noted: by enabling both negative and positive welfare-relevant experiences to be graded, the Model can be applied to quality of life assessments and end-of-life decisions and, with particular regard to negative experiences, the Model can also help to strengthen expert witness testimony during

  20. Dog leukocyte antigen class II-associated genetic risk testing for immune disorders of dogs: simplified approaches using Pug dog necrotizing meningoencephalitis as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Niels; Liu, Hongwei; Millon, Lee; Greer, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    A significantly increased risk for a number of autoimmune and infectious diseases in purebred and mixed-breed dogs has been associated with certain alleles or allele combinations of the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex containing the DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 genes. The exact level of risk depends on the specific disease, the alleles in question, and whether alleles exist in a homozygous or heterozygous state. The gold standard for identifying high-risk alleles and their zygosity has involved direct sequencing of the exon 2 regions of each of the 3 genes. However, sequencing and identification of specific alleles at each of the 3 loci are relatively expensive and sequencing techniques are not ideal for additional parentage or identity determination. However, it is often possible to get the same information from sequencing only 1 gene given the small number of possible alleles at each locus in purebred dogs, extensive homozygosity, and tendency for disease-causing alleles at each of the 3 loci to be strongly linked to each other into haplotypes. Therefore, genetic testing in purebred dogs with immune diseases can be often simplified by sequencing alleles at 1 rather than 3 loci. Further simplification of genetic tests for canine immune diseases can be achieved by the use of alternative genetic markers in the DLA class II region that are also strongly linked with the disease genotype. These markers consist of either simple tandem repeats or single nucleotide polymorphisms that are also in strong linkage with specific DLA class II genotypes and/or haplotypes. The current study uses necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs as a paradigm to assess simple alternative genetic tests for disease risk. It was possible to attain identical necrotizing meningoencephalitis risk assessments to 3-locus DLA class II sequencing by sequencing only the DQB1 gene, using 3 DLA class II-linked simple tandem repeat markers, or with a small single nucleotide polymorphism array

  1. Canonical quantization of the WZW model with defects and Chern-Simons theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkissian, Gor

    2010-01-01

    We perform canonical quantization of the WZW model with defects and permutation branes. We establish symplectomorphism between phase space of WZW model with $N$ defects on cylinder and phase space of Chern-Simons theory on annulus times $R$ with $N$ Wilson lines, and between phase space of WZW mo...

  2. Comparison of Ventricular Electrophysiological Effects of Amiodarone in Canine Models With Congestive Heart Failure and Normal Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuxian Zhou; Yuling Zhang; Juan Lei; Wei Wu; Xuming Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the effects of amiodarone on ventricular electrophysiological properties in normal dogs and CHF dogs.Methods Dogs(n=44) were randomized into four groups:Group 1(n=10)was the control.Group 2(n=10) was given amiodarone orally 300 mg·d-1 for4 to 5 weeks.Group 3(n=12)was the congestive heart failure(CHF)models induced by right ventricular rapid pacing(240 pulses·rain-1 for 4 to 5 weeks).Group 4 (n=12) was the CHF models given amiodarone orally 300 mg·d-1 for 4 to 5 weeks.The ventricular electrophysiological variables were evaluated by standard electric stimulation and monophasic action potential(MAP)recording.Results Amiodarone prolonged sinus cycle length(SCL),intra-ventricular conduction time(IVCT),MAP duration(MAPD90),ventricular effective period(VERP),ventricular activation time(VAT)and ventficular recovery time(VRT)without significant effects on the ratio of VERP to MAPD90 (VERP/MAPD90),ventricular fibrillation threshold(VFT),the dispersion of VRT(VRTD),and ventricular late repolarization duration(VLRD)in normal dogs.However,amiodarone did not further prolong the prolonged SCL,MAPD90,VERP,VAT and VRT,but further prolonged IVCT in CHF dogs.Amiodarone normalized the abnormal ventficular electrophysiological properties in CHF dogs as manifested by increasing the decreased VERP/MAPD90 and VFT,shortening the prolonged VLRD,and decreasing the increased VRTD.Amiodarone did not worsen the hemodynamic parameters in normal and CHF dogs.Conclusions Amiodarone had different effects on ventricular electrophysiological properties in normal and CHF dogs.The favorable effects of amiodarone in normalizing some abnormal cardiac electrophysiological properties in CHF models may have potential value on the prevention and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in CHF.

  3. Guided bone regeneration at a dehiscence-type defect using chitosan/collagen membranes in dogs%壳聚糖-胶原膜引导种植体颊侧骨缺损再生的实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓静; 王新木; 苗滪汶; 杨国利; 高波; 董研

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare a developed absorbable chitosan/collagen membrane (CCM) with a standard biodegradable collagen membrane for the treatment of implant dehiscence-type defect in dog model.Methods The right four mandibular premolars and the first molar were extracted in each of 10 beagle dogs.Four months later,acute buccal dehiscence-type defects were surgically created following implant site preparation in each dog.Using self-control,defects were randomly assigned to four different groups:CCM-1 (with the ratio of chitosan and collagen of 40∶1),CCM-2 (with the ratio of chitosan and collagen of 20∶1),Bio-Gide collagen membrane (BG collagen),control.The animals were sacrificed after 4 (3 animals),8 (3 animals) and 12 (4 animals) weeks of healing interval for histological observation and histomorphometrical analysis including defect length(DL),new bone height (NBH),bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and area of new bone fill (BA).Results Newly formed bone was observed in all the groups and became mature with time.At 8 weeks,increased mean NBH and BIC values were obtained for all the groups,the mean NBH values of the CCM-1,CCM-2 and BG groups[(1.1 0 ±0.11) ~ (1.48 ±0.07) mm] were significantly higher than that of the control [(0.74 ± 0.12)mm] (P < 0.05).At 12 weeks,the membranes treated groups obtained more mean NBH,BIC and BA values compared with the control.The CCM-1 groups showed the highest mean NBH value [(1.91 ± 0.25)mm],which was significantly higher than the control [(1.20 ± 0.34) mm] (P < 0.05).However,no statistically significant differences in BIC and BA were found between membrane groups and control and among the membranes treated groups.Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated that the developed CCM can enhance bone regeneration and obtaine similar amounts of newly formed bone compared with defects regenerated with a standard collagen membrane.%目的 研究用壳聚糖-胶原膜(chitosan-collagen membrane,CCM)引导种植体颊侧裂

  4. Genetics of Adiposity in Large Animal Models for Human Obesity-Studies on Pigs and Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, M; Szczerbal, I; Switonski, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of domestic mammals in the development of human biomedical sciences has been widely documented. Among these model species the pig and dog are of special importance. Both are useful for studies on the etiology of human obesity. Genome sequences of both species are known and advanced genetic tools [eg, microarray SNP for genome wide association studies (GWAS), next generation sequencing (NGS), etc.] are commonly used in such studies. In the domestic pig the accumulation of adipose tissue is an important trait, which influences meat quality and fattening efficiency. Numerous quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for pig fatness traits were identified, while gene polymorphisms associated with these traits were also described. The situation is different in dog population. Generally, excessive accumulation of adipose tissue is considered, similar to humans, as a complex disease. However, research on the genetic background of canine obesity is still in its infancy. Between-breed differences in terms of adipose tissue accumulation are well known in both animal species. In this review we show recent advances of studies on adipose tissue accumulation in pigs and dogs, and their potential importance for studies on human obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of Immunosuppressive Activity of Demethylzeylasteral in a Beagle Dog Kidney Transplantation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Huimin; Zhu, Yu; Xu, Wenping; Liu, Yujun; Zhang, Jianping; Lin, Zongming

    2015-12-01

    Several monomers isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f. (Celastraceae) have attracted worldwide interest. In this study, we established a simple and reliable kidney transplantation model in beagle dog to evaluate the immunosuppressive activity of demethylzeylasteral (T-96), an immunosuppressive monomer isolated from the root xylem of T. wilfordii. Recipient and donor male beagle dogs were obtained from two different breeders to ensure MHC mismatching. All dogs were randomly divided into six groups following kidney transplantation, and different doses of T-96 or cyclosporine A (CsA) were administered to each group during 14 days of observation. The results showed that T-96 alone at a dosage of 10 or 20 mg/kg/day prolonged graft survival up to 10.83 ± 1.47 or 11.17 ± 1.47 days. A combination of T-96 and CsA significantly prolonged the survival time to 13.33 ± 1.75 days. The results demonstrated that T-96 can inhibit acute rejection in kidney transplantation, and the inhibitory effect of T-96 was enhanced when combined with CsA, which suggests the possible use in organ transplantation to prevent immune rejection.

  6. Acute cerebral and pulmonary edema induced by hemodialysis in a dog model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zhen-wei; WANG Zhi-gang

    2008-01-01

    Background The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is characterized by neurologic deterioration and cerebral edema which occurs after hemodialysis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathogenesis of acute cerebral and pulmonary edema induced by hemodialysis.Methods We evaluated the effects of hemodialysis on the biochemical and hemodynamic parameters of the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, including the intracranial pressure, dry/wet ratio, and pulmonary edema index, and we also examined the pathological changes of the brain and lung tissue in dogs suffering from uremia.Results Seventy-two hours after bilateral ureteral ligation, 10 uremic dogs were hemodialyzed for 2 hours, yielding a 73.6% and 60.1% decrease in the plasma urea and creatinine, respectively, a decrease in the plasma osmolality from (359±18) mOsm/kgH2O to (304±6) mOsm/kgH2O (P <0.01 ), a decrease in the dry/wet ratio of the lung and brain tissue,and an increase in the hemodynamic parameters (right atrial pressure, right ventricular pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and central venous pressure), intracranial pressure, total pulmonary resistance index, and pulmonary edema index. Moreover, the pathological examination revealed lung and brain edema in the dialyzed dogs. This group was compared to 3 control groups: 6 uremic dogs which were sham dialyzed without dialysate so that no fall in the plasma urea occurred, and 12 uremic and 12 nonuremic animals that were not dialyzed.However, the parameters mentioned above were not significantly changed among these 3 control groups.Conclusions The acute brain and lung edema in our model appeared to be primarily due to a large osmotic gradient between the plasma and the brain and lung. This is the "urea reverse effect" which promoted the osmotically-induced lung and brain swelling.

  7. Multisymplectic approach to integrable defects in the sine-Gordon model

    CERN Document Server

    Caudrelier, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Ideas from the theory of multisymplectic systems, introduced recently in integrable systems by the author and Kundu to discuss Liouville integrability in classical field theories with a defect, are applied to the sine-Gordon model. The key ingredient is the introduction of a second Poisson bracket in the theory that allows for a Hamiltonian description of the model that is completely equivalent to the standard one, in the absence of a defect. In the presence of a defect described by frozen B\\"acklund transformations, our approach based on the new bracket unifies the various tools used so far to attack the problem. It also gets rid of the known issues related to the evaluation of the Poisson brackets of the defect matrix which involve fields at coinciding space point (the location of the defect). The original Lagrangian approach also finds a nice reinterpretation in terms of the canonical transformation representing the defect conditions.

  8. Protein and amino acid bioavailability of extruded dog food with protein meals of different quality using growing mink (Neovison vison) as a model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjernsbekk, M. T.; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Matthiesen, Connie Frank

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated growing mink (Neovison vison) as a model for dietary protein quality assessment of protein meals used in extruded dog foods. Three foods with similar CP content but of different protein quality were produced using different protein meals. The protein meals varied...... by the European Pet Food Industry Federation. It was concluded that growth studies with mink kits can provide valuable information in protein quality assessment of extruded dog foods. Furthermore, the study showed that to ensure nutritional adequacy of dog food and to be able to compare protein quality of dog...... of protein and AA bioavailability in growing mink. Standardized ileal digestibility (SID) was used to measure protein and AA bioavailability in adult dogs (Canis familiaris). The mink study (3 × 3 Latin square design) included 12 kits aged 8 to 11 wk. The dog study included 12 dogs divided in 3 groups...

  9. Using occupancy models to investigate the prevalence of ectoparasitic vectors on hosts: an example with fleas on prairie dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.; Doherty, Paul F.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Huyvaert, Kathryn P.; Long, Dustin H.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Ectoparasites are often difficult to detect in the field. We developed a method that can be used with occupancy models to estimate the prevalence of ectoparasites on hosts, and to investigate factors that influence rates of ectoparasite occupancy while accounting for imperfect detection. We describe the approach using a study of fleas (Siphonaptera) on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). During each primary occasion (monthly trapping events), we combed a prairie dog three consecutive times to detect fleas (15 s/combing). We used robust design occupancy modeling to evaluate hypotheses for factors that might correlate with the occurrence of fleas on prairie dogs, and factors that might influence the rate at which prairie dogs are colonized by fleas. Our combing method was highly effective; dislodged fleas fell into a tub of water and could not escape, and there was an estimated 99.3% probability of detecting a flea on an occupied host when using three combings. While overall detection was high, the probability of detection was always dogs, flea occupancy was heightened in old/natural colonies of prairie dogs, and on hosts that were in poor condition. Occupancy was initially low in plots with high densities of prairie dogs, but, as the study progressed, the rate of flea colonization increased in plots with high densities of prairie dogs in particular. Our methodology can be used to improve studies of ectoparasites, especially when the probability of detection is low. Moreover, the method can be modified to investigate the co-occurrence of ectoparasite species, and community level factors such as species richness and interspecific interactions.

  10. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  11. Characterisation and modelling of defect formation in direct-chill cast AZ80 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, D.; Robson, J.D.; Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Turski, M. [Magnesium Elektron UK, Rake Lane, Manchester, M27 8BF (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Wrought magnesium alloys for demanding structural applications require high quality defect free cast feedstock. The aim of this study was to first identify and characterise typical defects in direct chill cast magnesium–aluminium–zinc (AZ) alloy billet and then use modelling to understand the origins of these defects so they can be prevented. Defects were first located using ultrasonic inspection and were then characterised using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and serial sectioning, establishing the presence of oxide films and intermetallic particles Al{sub 8}Mn{sub 5} in all defects. A model was developed to predict the flow patterns and growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases during casting, which influence the formation of defects. Simulation of the growth of the intermetallic particles demonstrated that precipitation from the liquid occurs in the mould. The combination of the entrained oxide films and intermetallic particles recirculates in the liquid metal and continues to grow, until large enough to settle, which is predicted to occur at the centre of the mould where the flow is the slowest. Based on these predictions, strategies to reduce the susceptibility to defect formation are suggested. - Highlights: • Casting defects in magnesium direct chill casting have been imaged and characterised in 3-dimensions. • The occurrences of co-located clusters of particles and oxide films have been characterised and explained. • A coupled model has been developed to help interpret the observed trend for defects located towards the centre of billets.

  12. Modelling water vapour permeability through atomic layer deposition coated photovoltaic barrier defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elrawemi, Mohamed, E-mail: Mohamed.elrawemi@hud.ac.uk [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Blunt, Liam; Fleming, Leigh [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Bird, David, E-mail: David.Bird@uk-cpi.com [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Robbins, David [Centre for Process Innovation Limited, Sedgefield, County Durham (United Kingdom); Sweeney, Francis [EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology, School of Computing and Engineering, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-03

    Transparent barrier films such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} used for prevention of oxygen and/or water vapour permeation are the subject of increasing research interest when used for the encapsulation of flexible photovoltaic modules. However, the existence of micro-scale defects in the barrier surface topography has been shown to have the potential to facilitate water vapour ingress, thereby reducing cell efficiency and causing internal electrical shorts. Previous work has shown that small defects (≤ 3 μm lateral dimension) were less significant in determining water vapour ingress. In contrast, larger defects (≥ 3 μm lateral dimension) seem to be more detrimental to the barrier functionality. Experimental results based on surface topography segmentation analysis and a model presented in this paper will be used to test the hypothesis that the major contributing defects to water vapour transmission rate are small numbers of large defects. The model highlighted in this study has the potential to be used for gaining a better understanding of photovoltaic module efficiency and performance. - Highlights: • A model of water vapour permeation through barrier defects is presented. • The effect of the defects on the water vapour permeability is investigated. • Defect density correlates with water vapour permeability. • Large defects may dominate the permeation properties of the barrier film.

  13. Teratogens inducing congenital abdominal wall defects in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorp, Dennis R; Malleis, John M; Sullivan, Brian P; Klein, Michael D

    2010-02-01

    Congenital abdominal wall defects are common anomalies which include gastroschisis, omphalocele and umbilical cord hernia. Recent reports indicate that gastroschisis is increasing in prevalence, whereas omphalocele has remained steady, suggesting that environmental factors may play a part in their pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to review animal teratogen studies resulting in abdominal wall defects to investigate their possible causes. Each report was examined not only for the teratogens causing the defects, but also to carefully identify the defect occurring and its correlation with the known clinical anomalies. We found many discrepancies between the nomenclature used by animal teratology investigators and that used by clinicians. We were able to confirm the induction of gastroschisis by 22 teratogens, omphalocele by 9 teratogens and umbilical cord hernia by 8. There is no doubt that environmental factors may be responsible, at least in part, for all three of the clinical abdominal wall defects. Future studies should take care to appreciate the differences between these anomalies and describe them in detail, so that accurate and meaningful conclusions can be obtained.

  14. Familial anthropophobia in pointer dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, R A; Murphree, O D; Reese, W G

    1979-08-01

    This article assesses a dog model in terms of a proposed cross-species definition of phobia, the model referring to a strain of unstable dogs that has been produced by selection and inbreeding. The unstable dogs are contrasted with a strain of stable dogs. New findings are presented on approach and activity behavior toward three stimulus objects (man, another dog, and a sheet-covered chair) in a naturalistic setting. The fear response of unstable dogs to objects other than man habituates gradually, whereas the fear response to the sight of man is far more enduring, suggesting a relatively specific fear of man.

  15. Models wagging the dog: are circuits constructed with disparate parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, Thomas; Szücs, Attila; Levi, Rafael; Selverston, Allen I

    2007-08-01

    In a recent article, Prinz, Bucher, and Marder (2004) addressed the fundamental question of whether neural systems are built with a fixed blueprint of tightly controlled parameters or in a way in which properties can vary largely from one individual to another, using a database modeling approach. Here, we examine the main conclusion that neural circuits indeed are built with largely varying parameters in the light of our own experimental and modeling observations. We critically discuss the experimental and theoretical evidence, including the general adequacy of database approaches for questions of this kind, and come to the conclusion that the last word for this fundamental question has not yet been spoken.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of the Enterohepatic Recirculation of Fimasartan in Rats, Dogs, and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Shin, Soyoung; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Chi, Yong Ha; Paik, Soo Heui; Myung, Jayhyuk; Yadav, Rajbharan; Horkovics-Kovats, Stefan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Shin, Beom Soo

    2015-09-01

    Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) can greatly enhance plasma drug exposures and therapeutic effects. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model that can simultaneously characterize the extent and time-course of EHC in three species using fimasartan, a novel angiotensin II receptor blocker, as a model drug. All fimasartan plasma concentration profiles in 32 rats (intravenous doses, 0.3-3 mg/kg; oral doses, 1-10 mg/kg), 34 dogs (intravenous doses, 0.3-1 mg/kg; oral doses, 1-10 mg/kg), and 42 healthy volunteers (single or multiple oral doses, 20-480 mg) were determined via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and simultaneously modeled in S-ADAPT. The proposed model quantitatively characterized EHC in three species after oral and intravenous dosing. The median (range) fraction of drug undergoing recirculation was 76.3% (64.9-88.7%) in rats, 33.3% (24.0-45.9%) in dogs, and 65.6% (56.5-72.0%) in humans. In the presence compared with the absence of EHC, the area under the curve in plasma was predicted to be 4.22-fold (2.85-8.85) as high in rats, 1.50-fold (1.32-1.85) in dogs, and 2.91-fold (2.30-3.57) in humans. The modeled oral bioavailability in rats (median (range), 38.7% (20.0-59.8%)) and dogs (median, 7.13% to 15.4%, depending on the formulation) matched the non-compartmental estimates well. In humans, the predicted oral bioavailability was 25.1% (15.1-43.9%) under fasting and 18.2% (12.2-31.0%) under fed conditions. The allometrically scaled area under the curve predicted from rats was 420 ng·h/mL for 60 mg fimasartan compared with 424 ± 63 ng·h/mL observed in humans. The developed population pharmacokinetic model can be utilized to characterize the impact of EHC on plasma drug exposure in animals and humans.

  17. Monkeypox disease transmission in an experimental setting: prairie dog animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Hutson

    Full Text Available Monkeypox virus (MPXV is considered the most significant human public health threat in the genus Orthopoxvirus since the eradication of variola virus (the causative agent of smallpox. MPXV is a zoonotic agent endemic to forested areas of Central and Western Africa. In 2003, MPXV caused an outbreak in the United States due to the importation of infected African rodents, and subsequent sequential infection of North American prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus and humans. In previous studies, the prairie dog MPXV model has successfully shown to be very useful for understanding MPXV since the model emulates key characteristics of human monkeypox disease. In humans, percutaneous exposure to animals has been documented but the primary method of human-to-human MPXV transmission is postulated to be by respiratory route. Only a few animal model studies of MPXV transmission have been reported. Herein, we show that MPXV infected prairie dogs are able to transmit the virus to naive animals through multiple transmission routes. All secondarily exposed animals were infected with MPXV during the course of the study. Notably, animals secondarily exposed appeared to manifest more severe disease; however, the disease course was very similar to those of experimentally challenged animals including inappetence leading to weight loss, development of lesions, production of orthopoxvirus antibodies and shedding of similar levels or in some instances higher levels of MPXV from the oral cavity. Disease was transmitted via exposure to contaminated bedding, co-housing, or respiratory secretions/nasal mucous (we could not definitively say that transmission occurred via respiratory route exclusively. Future use of the model will allow us to evaluate infection control measures, vaccines and antiviral strategies to decrease disease transmission.

  18. Tissue specific mutagenic and carcinogenic responses in NER defective mouse models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Waard, Harm de; Horst, Gijsbertus T J van der; Steeg, Harry van

    2007-01-01

    Several mouse models with defects in genes encoding components of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway have been developed. In NER two different sub-pathways are known, i.e. transcription-coupled repair (TC-NER) and global-genome repair (GG-NER). A defect in one particular NER protein can le

  19. Bone defect animal models for testing efficacy of bone substitute biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Large bone defects are serious complications that are most commonly caused by extensive trauma, tumour, infection, or congenital musculoskeletal disorders. If nonunion occurs, implantation for repairing bone defects with biomaterials developed as a defect filler, which can promote bone regeneration, is essential. In order to evaluate biomaterials to be developed as bone substitutes for bone defect repair, it is essential to establish clinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing models for investigating their biocompatibility, mechanical properties, degradation, and interactional with culture medium or host tissues. The results of the in vitro experiment contribute significantly to the evaluation of direct cell response to the substitute biomaterial, and the in vivo tests constitute a step midway between in vitro tests and human clinical trials. Therefore, it is essential to develop or adopt a suitable in vivo bone defect animal model for testing bone substitutes for defect repair. This review aimed at introducing and discussing the most available and commonly used bone defect animal models for testing specific substitute biomaterials. Additionally, we reviewed surgical protocols for establishing relevant preclinical bone defect models with various animal species and the evaluation methodologies of the bone regeneration process after the implantation of bone substitute biomaterials. This review provides an important reference for preclinical studies in translational orthopaedics.

  20. Growth hormone stimulates bone healing in a critical-sized bone defect model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theyse, L. F. H.; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M. A.; van Doorn, J.; Dhert, W. J. A.; Hazewinkel, H. A. W.

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone plays an important role in bone metabolism. Treating bone deficits is a major topic in orthopaedic surgery. Our hypothesis was that local continuous growth hormone administration stimulates bone healing in a canine critical-sized bone defect model. Bone formation in the defects was qu

  1. Use of the pentagastrin dog model to explore the food effects on formulations in early drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, P; Guo, Z; MacGerorge, D; Vicat, P; Ollier, C

    2014-06-16

    The ability to extrapolate dosage performance from in vitro to in vivo situations has an important role in early drug development. In parallel, the Beagle dog has come to represent a useful animal model for extrapolation to humans especially when drugs formulated for humans are to be tested. In this article, the pentagastrin-induced Beagle dog model was validated internally to show that in the colony the dogs were generally responsive to known doses of pentagastrin that produces effects similar to gastrin in the stomach, i.e., increasing gastric acid production and lowering gastric pH. The effect was observed with a short time course, maximum pH lowering was observed between 0.5 and 1h with return to baseline at 2-4h. The dog stomach pH is a better representative of the human fasted stomach with this pretreatment. The ultimate goal was to use these animals in a food effect studies to predict the behavior of formulations in humans. The results for 4 compounds were provided in the dog and a clear relationship between the effect of food in the dog and the effect of food in humans was observed. While the directionality (positive or negative) of the effect could be adequately predicted, the extent of the effect could not be predicted for all the tested formulations of the 4 compounds. The data will be used to generate a database of known compounds from which a correlation can be drawn to make future predictions using the pentagastrin dog model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Double-bond defect modelling in As-S glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, V; Shpotyuk, O; Hyla, M, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Ab initio calculations with the RHF/6-311G* basis set are used for geometrical optimization of regular pyramidal and defect quasi-tetrahedral clusters in binary As-S glasses. It is shown that quasi-tetrahedral S=AsS{sub 3/2} structural units are impossible as main network-building blocks in these glasses.

  3. Dog as a model in studies on human hereditary diseases and their gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switonski, Marek

    2014-03-01

    During the last 15 years spectacular progress has been achieved in knowledge on the dog genome organization and the molecular background of hereditary diseases in this species. A majority of canine genetic diseases have their counterparts in humans and thus dogs are considered as a very important large animal model in human biomedicine. Among canine monogenic diseases with known causative gene mutations there are two large groups classified as retinal dystrophies and lysosomal storage diseases. Specific types of these diseases are usually diagnosed in a single or several breeds. A well known disorder, restricted to a single breed, is congenital stationary night blindness described in Briards. This disease is a counterpart of Leber amaurosis in children. On the other hand, one of the most common monogenic human diseases (Duchenne muscular dystrophy), has its canine counterparts in several breeds (e.g., the Golden retriever, Beagle and German short-haired pointer). For some of the canine diseases gene therapy strategy was successfully applied, e.g., for congenital stationary night blindness, rod-cone dystrophy and muccopolysaccharydoses type I, IIIB and VII. Since phenotypic variability between the breeds is exceptionally high, the dog is an interesting model to study the molecular background of congenital malformations (e.g., dwarfism and osteoporosis imperfecta). Also disorders of sexual development (DSD), especially testicular or ovotesticular DSD (78,XX; SRY-negative), which is widely distributed across dozens of breeds, are of particular interest. Studies on the genetic background of canine cancers, a major health problem in this species, are also quite advanced. On the other hand, genetic studies on canine counterparts of major human complex diseases (e.g., obesity, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus) are still in their infancy.

  4. Finite-element model to predict roll-separation force and defects during rolling of U-10Mo alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Burkes, Douglas E.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean

    2017-10-01

    A major goal of the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is to enable high-performance research reactors to operate with low-enriched uranium rather than the high-enriched uranium currently used. To this end, uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) represents an ideal candidate because of its stable gamma phase, low neutron caption cross section, acceptable swelling response, and predictable irradiation behavior. However, because of the complexities of the fuel design and the need for rolled monolithic U-10Mo foils, new developments in processing and fabrication are necessary. This study used a finite-element code, LS-DYNA, as a predictive tool to optimize the rolling process. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel were conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. The study reported here discussed various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., waviness and thickness non-uniformity like dog-boning). To investigate the influence of the cladding material on these rolling defects, other cases were simulated: hot rolling with alternative can materials, namely, 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2, and bare-rolling. Simulation results demonstrated that reducing the mismatch in strength between the coupon and can material improves the quality of the rolled sheet. Bare-rolling simulation results showed a defect-free rolled coupon. The finite-element model developed and presented in this study can be used to conduct parametric studies of several process parameters (e.g., rolling speed, roll diameter, can material, and reduction).

  5. Defect Detection and Localization of Nonlinear System Based on Particle Filter with an Adaptive Parametric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust particle filter (PF and its application to fault/defect detection of nonlinear system are investigated in this paper. First, an adaptive parametric model is exploited as the observation model for a nonlinear system. Second, by incorporating the parametric model, particle filter is employed to estimate more accurate hidden states for the nonlinear stochastic system. Third, by formulating the problem of defect detection within the hypothesis testing framework, the statistical properties of the proposed testing are established. Finally, experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed detector on real defect detection and localization in images.

  6. Trifocal distraction osteogenesis for reconstruction of skull defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Ke; Hai-Song Xu; Zhi-Hong Fan

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To apply trifocal distraction osteogenesis in canine model of skull segmental defects and to provide reference for clinical treatment. Methods:Six labrador dogs were selected in this study and divided into observation group and control group randomly. Each group contained 3 dogs. Skull segmental defects models were established by surgery, and dogs in bservation group received trifocal distraction osteogenesis treatment. Bone density was observed and compared between two groups during treatment. Results: There were no significant difference in bone density between two groups on th 1st day (P>0.05). The bone density of observation group on the 30th day, and 60th day were higher than that of control group (P<0.01). Conclusions: Trifocal distraction osteogenesis has significant clinical effect, and it would be widely used in clinical treatment.

  7. Critical Casimir forces between defects in the 2D Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, P.; Maciołek, A.; Dietrich, S.

    2016-12-01

    An exact statistical mechanical derivation is given of the critical Casimir interactions between two defects in a planar lattice-gas Ising model. Each defect is a finite group of nearest-neighbor spins with modified coupling constants. Such a system can be regarded as a model of a binary liquid mixture with the molecules confined to a membrane and the defects mimicking protein inclusions embedded into the membrane. As suggested by recent experiments, certain cellular membranes appear to be tuned to the proximity of a critical demixing point belonging to the two-dimensional Ising universality class. Therefore one can expect the emergence of critical Casimir forces between membrane inclusions. These forces are governed by universal scaling functions, which we derive for simple defects. We prove that the scaling law appearing at criticality is the same for all types of defects considered here.

  8. Defective Membrane Remodeling in Neuromuscular Diseases: Insights from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Cowling, Belinda S; Anne Toussaint; Jean Muller; Jocelyn Laporte

    2012-01-01

    Proteins involved in membrane remodeling play an essential role in a plethora of cell functions including endocytosis and intracellular transport. Defects in several of them lead to human diseases. Myotubularins, amphiphysins, and dynamins are all proteins implicated in membrane trafficking and/or remodeling. Mutations in myotubularin, amphiphysin 2 (BIN1), and dynamin 2 lead to different forms of centronuclear myopathy, while mutations in myotubularin-related proteins cause Charcot-Marie-Too...

  9. Finite-element model to predict roll-separation force and defects during rolling of U-10Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soulami, Ayoub; Burkes, Douglas E.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean

    2017-10-01

    This study used a finite element code, LSDYNA, as a predictive tool to optimize the rolling process. Simulations of the hot rolling of U-10Mo coupons encapsulated in low-carbon steel were conducted following two different schedules. Model predictions of the roll-separation force and roll pack thicknesses at different stages of the rolling process were compared with experimental measurements. The study reported here discussed various attributes of the rolled coupons revealed by the model (e.g., waviness and thickness non-uniformity like dog boning). To investigate the influence of the cladding material on these rolling defects, other cases were simulated:  hot rolling with alternative can materials, namely, 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2, and bare-rolling.

  10. The use of bovine screws to promote bone formation using a tibia model in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Marco Aurélio; Pontual, Marco Antônio B; Bez, Leonardo; Benfatti, César Augusto M; Boabaid, Fernanda; Somerman, Martha J; Magini, Ricardo S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a unique resorbable bovine bone screw, to stimulate bone formation. Bovine bone screws were inserted in the tibia beagle dogs. Each animal received 8 screws, divided into Groups A (screws + no membranes), B (screws + titanium reinforced membranes) and C (bone defects treated with autogenous bone grafts). Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 6 months. New bone was measured with a periodontal probe and reported an average of 7.4 mm in vertical bone gain for Group B, 3.6 mm for Group A and 1.7 mm for Group C. Submission to Kruskal-Wallis test showed statistical differences between groups (p<0,05). Histological examination revealed an intimate contact between the newly formed bone and the resorbing bone screws. Conclusion: Bovine bone screws provide environment for new bone formation and thus may provide an alternative therapy for enhancing bone formation vertically, including for regenerative procedures as well as prior to implant therapy. PMID:23058228

  11. Efficient Finite Element Modeling of Elastodynamic Scattering from Near Surface and Surface-Breaking Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    A robust and efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect which is located near a free surface in an otherwise homogeneous anisotropic half-space is presented that can be implemented in a commercial FE package. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the defect is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. Example results for 2D wave scattering in isotropic material are presented.

  12. Cross–Project Defect Prediction With Respect To Code Ownership Model: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Jureczko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of 83 versions of industrial, open-source and academic projects. We have empirically evaluated whether those project types constitute separate classes of projects with regard to defect prediction. Statistical tests proved that there exist significant differences between the models trained on the aforementioned project classes. This work makes the next step towards cross-project reusability of defect prediction models and facilitates their adoption, which has been very limited so far.

  13. Bone tissue ultrastructural defects in a mouse model for osteogenesis imperfecta: a Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsoching; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2004-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is genetic defect in which the genes that code for the α1(I) or α2(I) chains of type I collagen are defective. The defects often result in substitution of a bulky amino acid for glycine, causing formation of collagen that can not form the normal triple helix. Depending on the details of the defects, the outcomes range from controllable to lethal. This study focuses on OI type IV, a more common and moderately severe form of the disease. People with the disease have a substantial increase in the risk and rate of fracture. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of these defects, using a mouse model (BRTL) that mimics OI type IV. We compare Raman images from tibial cortical tissue of wild-type mice and BRTL mice with single copy of mutation and show that both mineral to matrix ratios and collagen inter-fibril cross-links are different in wild-type and mutant mice.

  14. Modeling anterior development in mice: diet as modulator of risk for neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    Head morphogenesis is a complex process that is controlled by multiple signaling centers. The most common defects of cranial development are craniofacial defects, such as cleft lip and cleft palate, and neural tube defects, such as anencephaly and encephalocoele in humans. More than 400 genes that contribute to proper neural tube closure have been identified in experimental animals, but only very few causative gene mutations have been identified in humans, supporting the notion that environmental influences are critical. The intrauterine environment is influenced by maternal nutrition, and hence, maternal diet can modulate the risk for cranial and neural tube defects. This article reviews recent progress toward a better understanding of nutrients during pregnancy, with particular focus on mouse models for defective neural tube closure. At least four major patterns of nutrient responses are apparent, suggesting that multiple pathways are involved in the response, and likely in the underlying pathogenesis of the defects. Folic acid has been the most widely studied nutrient, and the diverse responses of the mouse models to folic acid supplementation indicate that folic acid is not universally beneficial, but that the effect is dependent on genetic configuration. If this is the case for other nutrients as well, efforts to prevent neural tube defects with nutritional supplementation may need to become more specifically targeted than previously appreciated. Mouse models are indispensable for a better understanding of nutrient-gene interactions in normal pregnancies, as well as in those affected by metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

  15. Modelling Defects Acceptors And Determination Of Electric Model From The Nyquist Plot And Bode In Thin Film CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demba Diallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of the chalcopyrite material CuInGaSe2 CIGS used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. Multivalent defects e.g. double acceptors or simple acceptor are important immaterial used in solar cell production in general and in chalcopyrite materials in particular. We used the thin film solar cell simulation software SCAPS to enable the simulation of multivalent defects with up to five different charge states.Algorithms enabled us to simulate an arbitrary number of possible states of load. The presented solution method avoids numerical inaccuracies caused by the subtraction of two almost equal numbers. This new modelling facility is afterwards used to investigate the consequences of the multivalent character of defects for the simulation of chalcopyrite based CIGS. The capacitance increase with the evolution of the number of defects C- f curves have found to have defect dependence.

  16. Exome sequencing reveals a nebulin nonsense mutation in a dog model of nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Cox, Melissa L; Huska, Jonathan; Li, Frank; Gaitero, Luis; Guo, Ling T; Casal, Margaret L; Granzier, Henk L; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2016-10-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital muscle disorder associated with muscle weakness, hypotonia, and rod bodies in the skeletal muscle fibers. Mutations in 10 genes have been implicated in human NM, but spontaneous cases in dogs have not been genetically characterized. We identified a novel recessive myopathy in a family of line-bred American bulldogs (ABDs); rod bodies in muscle biopsies established this as NM. Using SNP profiles from the nuclear family, we evaluated inheritance patterns at candidate loci and prioritized TNNT1 and NEB for further investigation. Whole exome sequencing of the dam, two affected littermates, and an unaffected littermate revealed a nonsense mutation in NEB (g.52734272 C>A, S8042X). Whole tissue gel electrophoresis and western blots confirmed a lack of full-length NEB in affected tissues, suggesting nonsense-mediated decay. The pathogenic variant was absent from 120 dogs of 24 other breeds and 100 unrelated ABDs, suggesting that it occurred recently and may be private to the family. This study presents the first molecularly characterized large animal model of NM, which could provide new opportunities for therapeutic approaches.

  17. Transient elastodynamic model for beam defect interaction: application to non-destructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raillon; Lecoeur-Taibi

    2000-03-01

    Modeling tools have been developed at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) for the simulation of ultrasonic non-destructive testing inspections. In this paper the model for the prediction of echoes arising from defects within a piece (Mephisto) is presented and some examples are given and compared with experimental results. The model for computing wave defect interaction is based on Kirchhoff's approximation, and uses the principle of reciprocity and a mode-by-mode (between the transducer and the defect) calculation of the echoes. It accounts for possible mode conversions. These approximations and other approximations for the radiated field incident on the defect allow us to obtain a formulation of the echo received at the transducer, which is able to be computed rapidly.

  18. An automated microcomputer-based system for determining canine paw pressure quantitatively in the dog synovitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R P; Datko, L J; Welch, T M; Purvis, W F; Shaw, G W; Thompson, J L; Brunner, T R

    1986-04-01

    The automated system for measuring canine paw pressure is a very useful tool for the evaluation of nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs such as indomethacin and ibuprofen in the dog synovitis model. The apparatus has been designed to give the operator control over the dog's posture while measuring hind-paw pressure. The stability of the measuring platform permits reproducible measurement of paw pressures. The software package performs direct data recording and data reduction and eliminates tedious manual calculations. Subsequently, the software produces a printout summarizing the experimental results in tabular and graphic form.

  19. Spectrum of variations in dog-1/FANCJ and mdf-1/MAD1 defective Caenorhabditis elegans strains after long-term propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Wong, Tammy; Qin, Zhaozhao; Flibotte, Stephane; Taylor, Jon; Moerman, Donald G; Rose, Ann M; Chen, Nansheng

    2015-03-18

    Whole and partial chromosome losses or gains and structural chromosome changes are hallmarks of human tumors. Guanine-rich DNA, which has a potential to form a G-quadruplex (G4) structure, is particularly vulnerable to changes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, faithful transmission of G-rich DNA is ensured by the DOG-1/FANCJ deadbox helicase. To identify a spectrum of mutations, after long-term propagation, we combined whole genome sequencing (WGS) and oligonucleotide array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (oaCGH) analysis of a C. elegans strain that was propagated, in the absence of DOG-1 and MDF-1/MAD1, for a total of 470 generations, with samples taken for long term storage (by freezing) in generations 170 and 270. We compared the genomes of F170 and F470 strains and identified 94 substitutions, 17 InDels, 3 duplications, and 139 deletions larger than 20 bp. These homozygous variants were predicted to impact 101 protein-coding genes. Phenotypic analysis of this strain revealed remarkable fitness recovery indicating that mutations, which have accumulated in the strain, are not only tolerated but also cooperate to achieve long-term population survival in the absence of DOG-1 and MDF-1. Furthermore, deletions larger than 20 bp were the only variants that frequently occurred in G-rich DNA. We showed that 126 of the possible 954 predicted monoG/C tracts, larger than 14 bp, were deleted in unc-46 mdf-1 such-4; dog-1 F470 (JNC170). Here, we identified variants that accumulated in C. elegans' genome after long-term propagation in the absence of DOG-1 and MDF-1. We showed that DNA sequences, with G4-forming potential, are vulnerable to deletion-formation in this genetic background.

  20. Modeling the defect distribution and degradation of CdTe ultrathin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorji, Nima E.

    2014-12-01

    The defect distribution across an ultrathin film CdTe layer of a CdS/CdTe solar cell is modelled by solving the balance equation in steady state. The degradation of the device parameters due to the induced defects during ion implantation is considered where the degradation rate is accelerated if the defect distribution is considerable. The defect concentration is maximum at the surface of the CdTe layer where implantation is applied and it is minimum at the junction with the CdS layer. It shows that ultrathin devices degrade faster if the defect concentration is high at the junction rather than the back region (CdTe/Metal). Since the front and back contacts of the device are close in ultrathin films and the electric field is strong to drive the defects into the junction, the p-doping process might be precisely controlled during ion implantation. The modeling results presented here are in agreement with the few available experimental reports in literature about the degradation and defect configuration of the ultrathin CdTe films.

  1. 3D modeling of missing pellet surface defects in BWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.W., E-mail: Benjamin.Spencer@inl.gov; Williamson, R.L.; Stafford, D.S.; Novascone, S.R.; Hales, J.D.; Pastore, G.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A global/local analysis procedure for missing pellet surface defects is proposed. • This is applied to defective BWR fuel under blade withdrawal and high power ramp conditions. • Sensitivity of the cladding response to key model parameters is studied. - Abstract: One of the important roles of cladding in light water reactor fuel rods is to prevent the release of fission products. To that end, it is essential that the cladding maintain its integrity under a variety of thermal and mechanical loading conditions. Local geometric irregularities in fuel pellets caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) can in some circumstances lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. The BISON nuclear fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory can be used to simulate the global thermo-mechanical fuel rod behavior, as well as the local response of regions of interest, in either 2D or 3D. In either case, a full set of models to represent the thermal and mechanical properties of the fuel, cladding and plenum gas is employed. A procedure for coupling 2D full-length fuel rod models to detailed 3D models of the region of the rod containing a MPS defect is detailed here. The global and local model each contain appropriate physics and behavior models for nuclear fuel. This procedure is demonstrated on a simulation of a boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rod containing a pellet with an MPS defect, subjected to a variety of transient events, including a control blade withdrawal and a ramp to high power. The importance of modeling the local defect using a 3D model is highlighted by comparing 3D and 2D representations of the defective pellet region. Parametric studies demonstrate the effects of the choice of gaseous swelling model and of the depth and geometry of the MPS defect on the response of the cladding

  2. Animal models of disease: classification and etiology of diabetes in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard W; Reusch, Claudia E

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease in dogs and cats. The most common form of diabetes in dogs resembles type 1 diabetes in humans. Studies suggest that genetics, an immune-mediated component, and environmental factors are involved in the development of diabetes in dogs. A variant of gestational diabetes also occurs in dogs. The most common form of diabetes in cats resembles type 2 diabetes in humans. A major risk factor in cats is obesity. Obese cats have altered expression of several insulin signaling genes and glucose transporters and are leptin resistant. Cats also form amyloid deposits within the islets of the pancreas and develop glucotoxicity when exposed to prolonged hyperglycemia. This review will briefly summarize our current knowledge about the etiology of diabetes in dogs and cats and illustrate the similarities among dogs, cats, and humans. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Multi-scale model for point defects behaviour in uranium mononitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, S.; Kuksin, A.; Smirnova, D.

    2017-01-01

    A multiscale approach was used to study the properties of point defects in uranium mononitride (UN). In this work we used combination of several methods: ab initio calculations; molecular dynamics simulations with a new interatomic potential; thermodynamic model. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used for fitting of the parameters of the angular-dependent interatomic potential, as well as for evaluation of the defects formation and migration energies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are applied to analyze what migration/formation mechanisms are activated at finite temperatures and to calculate diffusion coefficients of point defects. The thermodynamic model for description of concentrations and diffusivities for point defects in non-stoichiometric UN1+x is proposed.

  4. Population red blood cell folate concentrations for prevention of neural tube defects: bayesian model

    OpenAIRE

    MOLLOY, ANNE

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED OBJECTIVE: To determine an optimal population red blood cell (RBC) folate concentration for the prevention of neural tube birth defects. DESIGN: Bayesian model. SETTING: Data from two population based studies in China. PARTICIPANTS: 247,831 participants in a prospective community intervention project in China (1993-95) to prevent neural tube defects with 400 μg/day folic acid supplementation and 1194 participants in a population based randomized trial (20...

  5. Maternal diet modulates the risk for neural tube defects in a mouse model of diabetic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kappen, Claudia; Kruger, Claudia; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Salbaum, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancies complicated by maternal diabetes have long been known to carry a higher risk for congenital malformations, such as neural tube defects. Using the FVB inbred mouse strain and the Streptozotocin-induced diabetes model, we tested whether the incidence of neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies can be modulated by maternal diet. In a comparison of two commercial mouse diets, which are considered nutritionally replete, we found that maternal consumption of the unfavorable diet was ...

  6. Characterization and modelling of the boron-oxygen defect activation in compensated n-type silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schön, J.; Niewelt, T.; Broisch, J.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    A study of the activation of the light-induced degradation in compensated n-type Czochralski grown silicon is presented. A kinetic model is established that verifies the existence of both the fast and the slow components known from p-type and proves the quadratic dependence of the defect generation rates of both defects on the hole concentration. The model allows for the description of lifetime degradation kinetics in compensated n-type silicon under various intensities and is in accordance with the findings for p-type silicon. We found that the final concentrations of the slow defect component in compensated n-type silicon only depend on the interstitial oxygen concentration and on neither the boron concentration nor the equilibrium electron concentration n{sub 0}. The final concentrations of the fast defect component slightly increase with increasing boron concentration. The results on n-type silicon give new insight to the origin of the BO defect and question the existing models for the defect composition.

  7. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katherine A; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-11-15

    When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs' scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher's Exact p dogs (Fisher's Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  8. Solution-diffusion with defects model for pressure-assisted forward osmosis

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Jintang

    2014-11-01

    An osmosis transport model is presented that combines the standard internal and external concentration polarization equations in the forward osmosis (FO) field with the selective layer transport equations first proposed by Sherwood in 1967. The Sherwood model describes water flux as the sum of a solute-selective, diffusive component driven by the sum of osmotic pressure and hydraulic pressure differences, and a nonselective, convective component driven by hydraulic pressure difference only. This solution-diffusion with defects (SDWD) model and the solution-diffusion (SD) model were compared against data collected using polyamide thin-film-composite (PA-TFC) and integrally-skinned asymmetric cellulose triacetate (CTA) membranes, evaluated in various configurations. When tested with pure water on the porous support side and 1.5. M (π=72.7. bar) sodium chloride solution on the selective layer side, applying 1.25. bar of hydraulic pressure to the porous support side increased water flux by an order of magnitude for PA-TFC membranes, but had negligible effect on CTA membrane flux. These large flux variations can be explained by the SDWD model, but not the SD model. To confirm the existence of defects, a PA-TFC membrane was coated with a uniform, highly water-permeable, nonselective polymer. After coating to block convection through defects, the influence of hydraulic pressure on water flux through this membrane essentially disappeared. Water flux through these defects is low (<1% of total water flux for PA-TFC membranes) and of little consequence in practical FO or reverse osmosis (RO) applications. But in pressure-assisted forward osmosis (PAFO) or pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO), convective transport through defects affects the solute concentration difference across the membrane selective layer, increasing or decreasing water flux through defect-free regions. The presence of defects may explain why membrane power density in PRO is lower than that predicted based on

  9. Establishment of dog pelvic floor hernia model%犬盆底疝动物模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨硕; 陈杰; 申英末; 刘素君; 王明刚; 田茂霖

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility of establishing animal model of pelvic floor hernia by experimental dog.Methods Eight dogs involved in the experiment,and the pelvic floor muscle fascia tissue space among external anal sphincter,ischiococcygeus,levator ani muscle and internal obturator muscle was dissected by surgical operation.Meanwhile,constipation was induced peri-operatively to increase intra-abdominal pressure for establishing animal model of pelvic tloor hernia in experimental dogs.Successful establishment of animal model of pelvic floor hernia was validated by observing and dissecting the pelvic floor hernia in experimental dogs.Results All of the 8 dogs' operative incisions achieved primary healing in 1 week,3 dogs had local red swelling of the skin and disappeared in 2 weeks,and all pelvic floor prolapse appeared in 1 month after operation (3rd day to 18th day).Successful establishment of animal model of pelvic floor hernia was validated by the operation of anatomy.Condusion The method explored above to establish animal model of pelvic floor hernia by experimental dog is simple and feasible.%目的 探讨以实验犬为平台建立盆底疝的动物模型的可行性.方法 人组8条犬,通过外科操作打开犬盆底肌肉筋膜组织间隙(肛门外括约肌、坐骨尾骨肌和肛提肌、闭孔内肌间的间隙),再通过围手术期诱导便秘提高实验犬腹内压以制备犬盆底疝的动物模型,解剖并观察实验犬盆底疝的发生,以验证盆底疝动物模型的成功建立.结果 8条犬术后1周伤口均愈合,3例术后出现局部红肿,2周后消退,8条犬术后1个月内(最短术后3d,最长术后18 d)均出现盆底膨出,解剖操作证实盆底疝模型制备成功.结论 该方法制备犬盆底疝模型的方法简单、易行.

  10. An evidence-based decision assistance model for predicting training outcome in juvenile guide dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigon, Peter J.; Blythe, Simon A.; England, Gary C. W.; Asher, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Working dog organisations, such as Guide Dogs, need to regularly assess the behaviour of the dogs they train. In this study we developed a questionnaire-style behaviour assessment completed by training supervisors of juvenile guide dogs aged 5, 8 and 12 months old (n = 1,401), and evaluated aspects of its reliability and validity. Specifically, internal reliability, temporal consistency, construct validity, predictive criterion validity (comparing against later training outcome) and concurrent criterion validity (comparing against a standardised behaviour test) were evaluated. Thirty-nine questions were sourced either from previously published literature or created to meet requirements identified via Guide Dogs staff surveys and staff feedback. Internal reliability analyses revealed seven reliable and interpretable trait scales named according to the questions within them as: Adaptability; Body Sensitivity; Distractibility; Excitability; General Anxiety; Trainability and Stair Anxiety. Intra-individual temporal consistency of the scale scores between 5–8, 8–12 and 5–12 months was high. All scales excepting Body Sensitivity showed some degree of concurrent criterion validity. Predictive criterion validity was supported for all seven scales, since associations were found with training outcome, at at-least one age. Thresholds of z-scores on the scales were identified that were able to distinguish later training outcome by identifying 8.4% of all dogs withdrawn for behaviour and 8.5% of all qualified dogs, with 84% and 85% specificity. The questionnaire assessment was reliable and could detect traits that are consistent within individuals over time, despite juvenile dogs undergoing development during the study period. By applying thresholds to scores produced from the questionnaire this assessment could prove to be a highly valuable decision-making tool for Guide Dogs. This is the first questionnaire-style assessment of juvenile dogs that has shown value in

  11. Effect of calcium citrate on bone integration in a rabbit femur defect model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Peng-Fei Nie; Xiu-Cui Li; Ferdinand An Rompis; Hang Huang; Hua Zhang; Zhong-Lin Mu; Lei Peng; Wei Wang; Qing-Yu Chen; Zhong-Qin Lin; Shao-Wen Cheng; Dong-Quan Kou; Xiao-Zhou Ying; Yue Shen; Xiao-Jie Cheng

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To explore effect of calcium citrate on bone integration in a rabbit femur defect model, and to compare the bone formation with different sizes by radiological and histological study. Methods:Twenty-four male Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (GroupA, B, C) in this study. Under anesthesia, defects of four sizes (1.2, 1.5, 2.0 and2.5 mm) were created in each of the rabbits. Commercially pure calcium citrate powder was placed inside the medullary compartment of the femur (Experimental), while in the contralateral femur (Control) nothing was implanted. The defects were analyzed using radiography and histological analysis by using Imagepro-Plus6.0 software after animal was sacrificed at 4th(GroupA), 6th(GroupB) and8th(GroupC) weeks postoperatively. Four samples were analyzed for each size of defect and each healing period.Results:The histological and the radiologic evaluation were performed after sacrification of all rabbits on postoperative4th and6th weeks, It showed significant difference between the experimental group and the control group when these defects were less than or equal to2.0 mm. No statistical difference was observed when these defects were larger than2.0 mm at all healing periods except at the4th week.Conclusions: Calcium citrate affects the early periods of bone defects healing mechanism in Japanese white rabbits positively, especially when the defect is not too large. We suggest further studies on calcium citrate to determine the effects of various dosages, administration ways and the experimental time on the bone defects.

  12. Software for browsing sectioned images of a dog body and generating a 3D model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seo; Jung, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to provide accessible and instructive browsing software for sectioned images and a portable document format (PDF) file that includes three-dimensional (3D) models of an entire dog body and (2) to develop techniques for segmentation and 3D modeling that would enable an investigator to perform these tasks without the aid of a computer engineer. To achieve these goals, relatively important or large structures in the sectioned images were outlined to generate segmented images. The sectioned and segmented images were then packaged into browsing software. In this software, structures in the sectioned images are shown in detail and in real color. After 3D models were made from the segmented images, the 3D models were exported into a PDF file. In this format, the 3D models could be manipulated freely. The browsing software and PDF file are available for study by students, for lecture for teachers, and for training for clinicians. These files will be helpful for anatomical study by and clinical training of veterinary students and clinicians. Furthermore, these techniques will be useful for researchers who study two-dimensional images and 3D models.

  13. Incomplete ossification of the atlas in dogs with cervical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Smith, Christopher M R; Kneissl, Sibylle; Benigni, Livia; Kenny, Patrick J; Lamb, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    Osseous defects affecting the atlas were identified in computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of five dogs with cervical signs including pain, ataxia, tetraparesis, or tetraplegia. Osseous defects corresponded to normal positions of sutures between the halves of the neural arch and the intercentrum, and were compatible with incomplete ossification. Alignment between the portions of the atlas appeared relatively normal in four dogs. In these dogs the bone edges were smooth and rounded with a superficial layer of relatively compact cortical bone. Displacement compatible with unstable fracture was evident in one dog. Concurrent atlantoaxial subluxation, with dorsal displacement of the axis relative to the atlas, was evident in four dogs. Three dogs received surgical treatment and two dogs were treated conservatively. All dogs improved clinically. Incomplete ossification of the atlas, which may be associated with atlantoaxial subluxation, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dogs with clinical signs localized to the cranial cervical region.

  14. Determining the critical size of a rabbit rib segmental bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengzhen; Chen, Kun; Hou, Lei; Li, Keyi; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xiumei

    2016-10-01

    In order to establish and standardize the rabbit rib segmental bone defect model, it is of vital importance to determine rabbit rib critical size defect (CSD). According to the general time needed for spontaneous long-bone regeneration, three-month observation period was set to determine the CSD. The rabbit rib segmental bone defects with different sizes from 1 to 5 cm with or without periosteum were performed in the eighth rib of 4-month-old male New Zealand rabbits and underwent X-ray examinations at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks postoperatively. The gross and histological examinations at postoperative week 12 were evaluated, which showed that the critical sizes in the rabbit rib models with and without periosteum were 5 and 2 cm, respectively. This study provides prerequisite data for establishing rabbit rib CSD model and evaluating bone materials using this model.

  15. Resource selection models are useful in predicting fine-scale distributions of black-footed ferrets in prairie dog colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A.; Jachowski, David S.; Biggins, Dean E.; Livieri, Travis M.; Matchett, Marc R.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships are often conceptualized as resource selection functions (RSFs)—models increasingly used to estimate species distributions and prioritize habitat conservation. We evaluated the predictive capabilities of 2 black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) RSFs developed on a 452-ha colony of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in the Conata Basin, South Dakota. We used the RSFs to project the relative probability of occurrence of ferrets throughout an adjacent 227-ha colony. We evaluated performance of the RSFs using ferret space use data collected via postbreeding spotlight surveys June–October 2005–2006. In home ranges and core areas, ferrets selected the predicted "very high" and "high" occurrence categories of both RSFs. Count metrics also suggested selection of these categories; for each model in each year, approximately 81% of ferret locations occurred in areas of very high or high predicted occurrence. These results suggest usefulness of the RSFs in estimating the distribution of ferrets throughout a black-tailed prairie dog colony. The RSFs provide a fine-scale habitat assessment for ferrets that can be used to prioritize releases of ferrets and habitat restoration for prairie dogs and ferrets. A method to quickly inventory the distribution of prairie dog burrow openings would greatly facilitate application of the RSFs.

  16. A time series model of the occurrence of gastric dilatation-volvulus in a population of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore George E

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV is a life-threatening condition of mammals, with increased risk in large breed dogs. The study of its etiological factors is difficult due to the variety of possible living conditions. The association between meteorological events and the occurrence of GDV has been postulated but remains unclear. This study introduces the binary time series approach to the investigation of the possible meteorological risk factors for GDV. The data collected in a population of high-risk working dogs in Texas was used. Results Minimum and maximum daily atmospheric pressure on the day of GDV event and the maximum daily atmospheric pressure on the day before the GDV event were positively associated with the probability of GDV. All of the odds/multiplicative factors of a day being GDV day were interpreted conditionally on the past GDV occurrences. There was minimal difference between the binary and Poisson general linear models. Conclusion Time series modeling provided a novel method for evaluating the association between meteorological variables and GDV in a large population of dogs. Appropriate application of this method was enhanced by a common environment for the dogs and availability of meteorological data. The potential interaction between weather changes and patient risk factors for GDV deserves further investigation.

  17. Electromagnetic field modeling for defect detection in 7 nm node patterned wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinlong; Zhang, Kedi; Davoudzadeh, Nima; Wang, Xiaozhen; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2016-03-01

    By 2017, the critical dimension in patterned wafers will shrink down to 7 nm, which brings great challenges to optics-based defect inspection techniques, due to the ever-decreasing signal to noise ratio with respect to defect size. To continue pushing forward the optics-based metrology technique, it is of great importance to analyze the full characteristics of the scattering field of a wafer with a defect and then to find the most sensitive signal type. In this article, the vector boundary element method is firstly introduced to calculate the scattering field of a patterned wafer at a specific objective plane, after which a vector imaging theory is introduced to calculate the field at an image plane for an imaging system with a high numerical aperture objective lens. The above methods enable the effective modeling of the image for an arbitrary vectorial scattering electromagnetic field coming from the defect pattern of the wafer.

  18. Experimental challenge models for canine leishmaniasis in hamsters and dogs, optimization and application in vaccine research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    In dogs, leishmaniasis caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum is a serious and potentially fatal disease. This parasite can also cause zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in children and immunocompromised adults. A vaccine for dogs would not only be of great value in veterinary medicine bu

  19. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Saito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  20. Antisense PMO found in dystrophic dog model was effective in cells from exon 7-deleted DMD patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takashi; Nakamura, Akinori; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Yokota, Toshifumi; Okada, Takashi; Osawa, Makiko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2010-08-18

    Antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping is a promising approach for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have systemically administered an antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) targeting dystrophin exons 6 and 8 to a dog with canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan (CXMD(J)) lacking exon 7 and achieved recovery of dystrophin in skeletal muscle. To date, however, antisense chemical compounds used in DMD animal models have not been directly applied to a DMD patient having the same type of exon deletion. We recently identified a DMD patient with an exon 7 deletion and tried direct translation of the antisense PMO used in dog models to the DMD patient's cells. We converted fibroblasts of CXMD(J) and the DMD patient to myotubes by FACS-aided MyoD transduction. Antisense PMOs targeting identical regions of dog and human dystrophin exons 6 and 8 were designed. These antisense PMOs were mixed and administered as a cocktail to either dog or human cells in vitro. In the CXMD(J) and human DMD cells, we observed a similar efficacy of skipping of exons 6 and 8 and a similar extent of dystrophin protein recovery. The accompanying skipping of exon 9, which did not alter the reading frame, was different between cells of these two species. Antisense PMOs, the effectiveness of which has been demonstrated in a dog model, achieved multi-exon skipping of dystrophin gene on the FACS-aided MyoD-transduced fibroblasts from an exon 7-deleted DMD patient, suggesting the feasibility of systemic multi-exon skipping in humans.

  1. Modeling equilibrium concentrations of Bjerrum and molecular point defects and their complexes in ice I(h)

    OpenAIRE

    de Koning, Maurice; Antonelli, Alex

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for the determination of the thermal equilibrium concentrations of Bjerrum defects, molecular point defects, and their aggregates in ice I(h). First, using a procedure which minimizes the free energy of an ice crystal with respect to the numbers of defect species, we derive a set of equations for the equilibrium concentrations of free Bjerrum and point defects, as well their complexes. Using density-functional-theory calculations, we then evaluate the binding energies of Bj...

  2. Fenestration defects in the rabbit jaw: an inadequate model for studying periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oortgiesen, Daniel A W; Meijer, Gert J; Bronckers, Antonius L J J; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2010-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting the support of the teeth, eventually leading to loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Effective procedures for periodontal tissue engineering or regeneration require preclinical models before market introduction. Research has been performed in either small or large animals. Unfortunately, there is no intermediate-sized in vivo model available for periodontal regeneration studies, such as, for instance, rabbits. The objective of this study was to evaluate the rabbit as a new experimental model to study periodontal regeneration. In 12 rabbits, periodontal defects were created in a 4 x 6 mm bone window. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks. Up to 6 weeks, the fenestration defects healed partly by repair and partly by regeneration. After 6 weeks the root had erupted to such an extent that the original root defect shifted into the oral cavity. This signifies that the periodontal ligament (PDL) bordering the original bone defect site is newly formed during the natural eruption process and not locally regenerated. Apparently, the new PDL originates from mesenchymal cells that arise from the apical part (sheath of Hertwig) and subsequently developed into PDL fibroblasts. At 12 weeks, no signs of surgery were present anymore. On the basis of our observation that the defect of the PDL was replaced rather than restored, we conclude that the rabbit model has disadvantages and is less suitable for studies of regeneration of PDL.

  3. The Need for Market Segmentation in Buy-Till-You-Defect Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Korkmaz (Evsen); D. Fok (Dennis); R. Kuik (Roelof)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBuy-till-you-defect [BTYD] models are built for companies operating in a non- contractual setting to predict customers’ transaction frequency, amount and timing as well as customer lifetime. These models tend to perform well, although they often predict unrealistically long lifetimes for

  4. DEFECT MONITORING IN IRON CASTING USING RESIDUES OF AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanusa Andrea Casarin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to monitor the index of general waste irons forecasting nodular and gray using the residues originated from the methodology Box & Jenkins by means of X-bar and R control charts. Search is to find a general class of model ARIMA (p, d, q but as data have autocorrelation is found to the number of residues which allowed the application of charts. The found model was the model SARIMA (0,1,1(0,1,1 . In step of checking the stability of the model was found that some comments are out of control due to temperature and chemical composition.

  5. Predicting Defects Using Information Intelligence Process Models in the Software Technology Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Manjula Gandhi; Jayabal, Devi Shree; Srinivasan, Thenmozhi; Balasubramanie, Palanisamy

    2015-01-01

    A key differentiator in a competitive market place is customer satisfaction. As per Gartner 2012 report, only 75%-80% of IT projects are successful. Customer satisfaction should be considered as a part of business strategy. The associated project parameters should be proactively managed and the project outcome needs to be predicted by a technical manager. There is lot of focus on the end state and on minimizing defect leakage as much as possible. Focus should be on proactively managing and shifting left in the software life cycle engineering model. Identify the problem upfront in the project cycle and do not wait for lessons to be learnt and take reactive steps. This paper gives the practical applicability of using predictive models and illustrates use of these models in a project to predict system testing defects thus helping to reduce residual defects.

  6. A Thermal Runaway Failure Model for Low-Voltage BME Ceramic Capacitors with Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Reliability of base metal electrode (BME) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) that until recently were used mostly in commercial applications, have been improved substantially by using new materials and processes. Currently, the inception of intrinsic wear-out failures in high quality capacitors became much greater than the mission duration in most high-reliability applications. However, in capacitors with defects degradation processes might accelerate substantially and cause infant mortality failures. In this work, a physical model that relates the presence of defects to reduction of breakdown voltages and decreasing times to failure has been suggested. The effect of the defect size has been analyzed using a thermal runaway model of failures. Adequacy of highly accelerated life testing (HALT) to predict reliability at normal operating conditions and limitations of voltage acceleration are considered. The applicability of the model to BME capacitors with cracks is discussed and validated experimentally.

  7. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atienzar, Franck A., E-mail: franck.atienzar@ucb.com [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Novik, Eric I. [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Gerets, Helga H. [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Parekh, Amit [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); MacDonald, James [Chrysalis Pharma Consulting, LLC, 385 Route 24, Suite 1G, Chester, NJ 07930 (United States); Yarmush, Martin L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dhalluin, Stéphane [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  8. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Miller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs’ scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher’s Exact p < 0.001 than female dogs (Fisher’s Exact p = 0.05. Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  9. Incorporation of composite defects from ultrasonic NDE into CAD and FE models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Onur Rauf; Schiefelbein, Bryan; Grandin, Robert J.; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2017-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in aerospace industry due to their combined properties of high strength and low weight. However, owing to their complex structure, it is difficult to assess the impact of manufacturing defects and service damage on their residual life. While, ultrasonic testing (UT) is the preferred NDE method to identify the presence of defects in composites, there are no reasonable ways to model the damage and evaluate the structural integrity of composites. We have developed an automated framework to incorporate flaws and known composite damage automatically into a finite element analysis (FEA) model of composites, ultimately aiding in accessing the residual life of composites and make informed decisions regarding repairs. The framework can be used to generate a layer-by-layer 3D structural CAD model of the composite laminates replicating their manufacturing process. Outlines of structural defects, such as delaminations, are automatically detected from UT of the laminate and are incorporated into the CAD model between the appropriate layers. In addition, the framework allows for direct structural analysis of the resulting 3D CAD models with defects by automatically applying the appropriate boundary conditions. In this paper, we show a working proof-of-concept for the composite model builder with capabilities of incorporating delaminations between laminate layers and automatically preparing the CAD model for structural analysis using a FEA software.

  10. COMMD1-deficient dogs accumulate copper in hepatocytes and provide a good model for chronic hepatitis and fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Favier

    Full Text Available New therapeutic concepts developed in rodent models should ideally be evaluated in large animal models prior to human clinical application. COMMD1-deficiency in dogs leads to hepatic copper accumulation and chronic hepatitis representing a Wilson's disease like phenotype. Detailed understanding of the pathogenesis and time course of this animal model is required to test its feasibility as a large animal model for chronic hepatitis. In addition to mouse models, true longitudinal studies are possible due to the size of these dogs permitting detailed analysis of the sequence of events from initial insult to final cirrhosis. Therefore, liver biopsies were taken each half year from five new born COMMD1-deficient dogs over a period of 42 months. Biopsies were used for H&E, reticulin, and rubeanic acid (copper staining. Immunohistochemistry was performed on hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation marker (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA, proliferation (Ki67, apoptosis (caspase-3, and bile duct and liver progenitor cell (LPC markers keratin (K 19 and 7. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blots were performed on gene products involved in the regenerative and fibrotic pathways. Maximum copper accumulation was reached at 12 months of age, which coincided with the first signs of hepatitis. HSCs were activated (α-SMA from 18 months onwards, with increasing reticulin deposition and hepatocytic proliferation in later stages. Hepatitis and caspase-3 activity (first noticed at 18 months increased over time. Both HGF and TGF-β1 gene expression peaked at 24 months, and thereafter decreased gradually. Both STAT3 and c-MET showed an increased time-dependent activation. Smad2/3 phosphorylation, indicative for fibrogenesis, was present at all time-points. COMMD1-deficient dogs develop chronic liver disease and cirrhosis comparable to human chronic hepatitis, although at much higher pace. Therefore they represent a genetically-defined large animal model to test clinical

  11. Yield Improvement and Advanced Defect Control——Driving Forces for Modeling of Bulk Crystal Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Yield improvement and advanced defect control can be identified as the driving forces for modeling of industrial bulk crystal growth. Yield improvement is mainly achieved by upscaling of the whole crystal growth apparatus and increased processing windows with more tolerances for parameter variations. Advanced defect control means on one hand a reduction of the number of deficient crystal defects and on the other hand the formation of beneficial crystal defects with a uniform distribution and well defined concentrations in the whole crystal. This "defect engineering" relates to the whole crystal growth process as well as the following cooling and optional annealing processes, respectively. These topics were illustrated in the paper by examples of modeling and experimental results of bulk growth of silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium phosphide (InP) and calcium fluoride (CaF2). These examples also involve the state of the art of modeling of the most important melt growth techniques, crystal pulling (Czochralski methods) and vertical gradient freeze (Bridgman-type methods).

  12. An Inventory Model with Price and Quality Dependent Demand Where Some Items Produced Are Defective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes an inventory system for joint determination of product quality and selling price where a fraction of items produced are defective. It is assumed that only a fraction of defective items can be repaired/reworked. The demand rate depends upon both the quality and the selling price of the product. The production rate, unit price, and carrying cost depend upon the quality of the items produced. Quality index is used to determine the quality of the product. An algorithm is provided to solve the model with given values of model parameters. Sensitivity analysis has also been performed.

  13. Open die forging of large shafts with porosity defects – physical and numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    The aim and scope of this paper is centered to analyze the influence of the geometry of V-shaped dies on the closure of internal centerline porosity defects in ingots during multistep open-die forging. The investigation is performed with small scale physical models made from lead using V-shaped d...... conditions. The presentation is supported by finite element modelling using an in-house developed computer program and the overall investigation shows that better results in closure of centerline defects are obtained with a V-shaped die with 120º die angle....

  14. Intrathecal resiniferatoxin in a dog model: efficacy in bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dorothy C; Agnello, Kimberly; Iadarola, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is the most potent among all known endogenous and synthetic agonists for the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor, which is a calcium-permeable nonselective cation channel, expressed on the peripheral and central terminals of small-diameter sensory neurons. Prolonged calcium influx induced by RTX causes cytotoxicity and death of only those sensory neurons that express the TRPV1 ion channel leading to selective targeting and permanent deletion of the TRPV1-expressing C-fiber neuronal cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia. The goal of this project was to provide preclinical efficacy data, that intrathecal RTX could provide effective pain relief and improve function in dogs with bone cancer without significant long-term side effects. In a single-blind, controlled study, 72 companion dogs with bone cancer pain were randomized to standard of care analgesic therapy alone (control, n = 36) or 1.2 μg/kg intrathecal RTX in addition to standard of care analgesic therapy (treated, n = 36). Significantly more dogs in the control group (78%) required unblinding and adjustment in analgesic protocol or euthanasia within 6 weeks of randomization, than dogs that were treated with RTX (50%; P dogs in the control group required unblinding significantly sooner than dogs that had been treated with RTX (P dogs without any evidence of development of deafferentation pain syndrome that can be seen with neurolytic therapies.

  15. Methods for the development and assessment of atrial fibrillation and heart failure dog models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jon F Urban; Renee L Gerhart; Jason R Krzeszak; Corey R Leet; Linnea R Lentz; Carolyn B McClay

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report Medtronic experiences with the development of animal models for atrial fibrillation(AF)and chronic heart failure(CHF)using high-rate pacing for AF and microemboli for CHF.Methods For the AF model,an atrial lead was attached to a Medtronic Synergy neurostimulator,which was programmed to stimulate at 50 Hz in an on-off duty cycle.Atrial natnuretic peptide(ANP),brain natriuretic peptide(BNP)and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide(NT-proBNP)wen; assayed at select time points.For CHF model,a serial injection of 90 μm polystyrene microspheres at 62,400 beads/mL(Polybead,Polysciences,Inc.)was performed to induce global ischemia,either with weekly monitoring and embolization schedule(group 1,n = 25)or with biweekly monitoring and emboliation schedule (group 2,n=36).Echocardiograms were used along with ventriculograms and magnetic resonance imaging scans weekly to assess cardiac function and ANP,BNP and NT-proBNP were monitored.Results For the AF model,the days to sustained AF for four animals following surgery were 7,25,21 and 19,respectively; For the CHF model,the days to meet CHF endpoints were 116 in group 1 and 89 in group 2.For both AF and CHF models,NT-proBNP correlated well with the development of disease states.Conclusion Our experience for the development and assessment of AF and CHF dog models may help researchers who are in search for animal model for assessing the safety and efficacy of a device-based therapy.

  16. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals.

  17. Mechanics of dog walking compared with a passive, stiff-limbed, 4-bar linkage model, and their collisional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, James R; Williams, Sarah B; Wilson, Alan M

    2007-02-01

    Here, we present a simple stiff-limbed passive model of quadrupedal walking, compare mechanics predicted from the model with those observed from forceplate measurements of walking dogs and consider the implications of deviation from model predictions, especially with reference to collision mechanics. The model is based on the geometry of a 4-bar linkage consisting of a stiff hindleg, back, foreleg and the ground between the hind and front feet. It uses empirical morphological and kinematic inputs to determine the fluctuations in potential and kinetic energy, vertical and horizontal forces and energy losses associated with inelastic collisions at each foot placement. Using forceplate measurements to calculate centre of mass motions of walking dogs, we find that (1) dogs may, but are not required to, spend periods of double support (one hind- and one forefoot) agreeing with the passive model; (2) legs are somewhat compliant, and mechanical energy fluctuates during triple support, with mechanical energy being lost directly after hindfoot placement and replaced following forefoot placement. Footfall timings and timing of mechanical energy fluctuations are consistent with strategies to reduce collisional forces, analogous to the suggested role of ankle extension as an efficient powering mechanism in human walking.

  18. Assisting Handlers Following Attacks on Dog Guides: Implications for Dog Guide Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Cheryl A.; Gillard, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Attacks by dogs on dog guides are traumatic for dog guide teams. One variable that affects a team's recovery is how handlers cope with emotional responses to the attack. This article presents a three-stage model for assisting handlers that is useful for handlers and dog guide instructors.

  19. Stochastic Models of Defects in Wind Turbine Drivetrain Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafsanjani, Hesam Mirzaei; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2013-01-01

    of the drivetrain will lead to substantial economic losses such as cost of lost energy production, cost of repairs, cost of crew and cost of transportation. For offshore wind turbines, the marine environment affects the repair & maintenance process and in some case because of the rush environment, the maintenance...... team cannot operate properly and the wind turbine does not work for several days and consequently the cost of lost energy increases drastically. In this paper is presented stochastic models for fatigue failure based on test data and the accuracy of the models are compared....

  20. Biphasic calcium phosphate nano-composite scaffolds reinforced with bioglass provide a synthetic alternative to autografts in a canine tibiofibula defect model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Dezhi; Xu Guohua; Yang Zhou; Holz Jonathan; Ye Xiaojian; Cai Shu; Yuan Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone grafting is commonly used to repair bone defects.As the porosity of the graft scaffold increases,bone formation increases,but the strength decreases.Early attempts to engineer materials were not able to resolve this problem.In recent years,nanomaterials have demonstrated the unique ability to improve the material strength and toughness while stimulating new bone formation.In our previous studies,we synthesized a nano-scale material by reinforcing a porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramic scaffold with Na2O-MgO-P2O5-CaO bioglass (β-TCP/BG).However,the in vivo effects of the β-TCP/BG scaffold on bone repair remain unknown.Methods We investigated the efficacy of β-TCP/BG scaffolds compared to autografts in a canine tibioflbula defect model.The tibioflbula defects were created in the right legs of 12 dogs,which were randomly assigned to either the scaffold group or the autograft group (six dogs per group).Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0,4,8,and 12 weeks post-surgery.The involved tibias were extracted at 12 weeks and were tested to failure via a three-point bending.After the biomechanical analysis,specimens were subsequently processed for scanning electron microscopy analysis and histological evaluations.Results Radiographic evaluation at 12 weeks post-operation revealed many newly formed osseous calluses and bony unions in both groups.Both the maximum force and break force in the scaffold group (n=6) were comparable to those in the autograft group (n=6,P >0.05),suggesting that the tissue-engineered bone repair achieved similar biomechanical properties to autograft bone repair.At 12 weeks post-operation,obvious new bone and blood vessel formations were observed in the artificial bone of the experimental group.Conclusions The results demonstrated that new bone formation and high bone strength were achieved in the β-TCP/ BG scaffold group,and suggested that the β-TCP/BG scaffold could be used as a synthetic alternative to

  1. Modeling Finite Deformations in Trigonal Ceramic Crystals with Lattice Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    plasticity and fracture in high density polycrystals: constitutive modeling and numerical simulation. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53, 261– 301 . Clayton, J.D...Horstemeyer, M.F., Korellis, J.S., Grishabar, R.B., Mosher, D., 1998. High temperature sensitivity of notched AISI 304L stainless steel tests. Theor

  2. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A MacDiarmid

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers.EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973. No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs.Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of

  3. Dogs with Cognitive Dysfunction as a Spontaneous Model for Early Alzheimer's Disease: A Translational Study of Neuropathological and Inflammatory Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Trine; Helboe, Lone; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Waldemar, Gunhild; Berendt, Mette; Pedersen, Jan Torleif

    2016-03-15

    Aged companion dogs with canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD) spontaneously develop varying degrees of progressive cognitive decline and particular neuropathological features correspondent to the changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. The aim of the present study was to characterize certain aspects of neuropathology and inflammatory markers related to aging and CCD in dogs in comparison with human AD. Fifteen brains from aged dogs with normal cognitive function, mild cognitive impairment, or CCD were investigated and compared with two control brains from young dogs and brain sections from human AD subjects. The neuropathological investigations included evaluation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque deposition (N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamyl-modified Aβ included), tau pathology, and inflammatory markers in prefrontal cortex. Cortical Aβ deposition was found to be only of the diffuse subtype as no dense-core or neuritic plaques were found. The Aβ deposition followed a progressive pattern in four maturation stages. Accumulation of the Aβ peptide was also observed in the vessel walls. Both immunohistochemically and biochemically measured levels of Aβ pathology in prefrontal cortex showed a consistent positive correlation to age but not to cognitive deficit severity. No evidence of neurofibrillary tau pathology was found. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokines was generally low and showed no significant association to cognitive status. The findings of the present study support the senescent dog with spontaneous cognitive dysfunction as a valuable non-transgenic model for further investigations of the molecular events involved in the neurodegenerative processes associated with aging and early stage AD, especially the Aβ-related pathology.

  4. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A.; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T.; Pattison, Stacey L.; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R.; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N.; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T.; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B.; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A.; Kiss, Debra L.; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L.; Gallia, Gary L.; Graham, Robert M.; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Conclusions/Significance Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On

  5. Long bone defect models for tissue engineering applications: criteria for choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Elizabeth A; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Smith, Mark; Thomson, Brian; Yang, Xuebin B

    2010-04-01

    The replacement and repair of bone lost due to trauma, cancer, or congenital defects is a major clinical challenge. Skeletal tissue engineering is a potentially powerful strategy in modern regenerative medicine, and research in this field has increased greatly in recent years. Tissue engineering strategies seek to translate research findings in the fields of materials science, stem cell biology, and biomineralization into clinical applications, demanding the use of appropriate in vivo models to investigate bone regeneration of the long bone. However, identification of the optimal in vivo segmental bone defect model from the literature is difficult due to the use of different animal species (large and small mammals), different bones (weight-bearing and nonweight bearing), and multiple protocols, including the use of various scaffolds, cells, and bioactives. The aim of this review is to summarize the available animal models for evaluating long bone regeneration in vivo. We highlight the differences not only in species and sites but also in defect size, means of defect creation, duration of study, and fixation method. A critical evaluation of the most clinically relevant models is addressed to guide the researcher in his/her choice of the most appropriate model to use in future hypothesis-driven investigations.

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Point and Line Defects in Cubic Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    and discli- nations with finite micropolar elastoplasticity . Int. J. Plasticity. 22:210–256, 2006. 56. Menzel, A., and Steinmann, P., On the contin...Voyiadjis, G. Z., A finite strain plastic- damage model for high velocity impact using combined viscosity and gradient localization limiters: Part I...Theoretical for- mulation. Int. J. Damage Mech. 15:293–334, 2006. 58. Milstein, F., and Chantasiriwan, S,. Theoretical study of the response of 12 cubic

  7. Modeling of Defects in Transparent Ceramics for Improving Military Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    on a transparent magnesium aluminate spinel, MgAl2O4, striking-ply backed by polycarbonate. Finite element modelling is used to predict unsuccessful...edge-form-growth sapphire, magnesium aluminate spinel, aluminium oxynitride — one was selected for the current pursuit, magnesium aluminate spinel...ballistic testing to validate armor designs based on a transparent magnesium aluminate spinel, MgAl2O4, striking-ply backed by polycarbonate

  8. Extended defects in the Potts-percolation model of a solid: renormalization group and Monte Carlo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, H T; Kaufman, Miron

    2009-09-01

    We extend the model of a 2d solid to include a line of defects. Neighboring atoms on the defect line are connected by springs of different strength and different cohesive energy with respect to the rest of the system. Using the Migdal-Kadanoff renormalization group we show that the elastic energy is an irrelevant field at the bulk critical point. For zero elastic energy this model reduces to the Potts model. By using Monte Carlo simulations of the three- and four-state Potts model on a square lattice with a line of defects, we confirm the renormalization-group prediction that for a defect interaction larger than the bulk interaction the order parameter of the defect line changes discontinuously while the defect energy varies continuously as a function of temperature at the bulk critical temperature.

  9. Evaluation of docosahexaenoic acid in a dog model of hypertension induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William C; Cox, James W; Asemu, Girma; O'Connell, Kelly A; Dabkowski, Erinne R; Xu, Wenhong; Ribeiro, Rogerio F; Shekar, Kadambari C; Hoag, Stephen W; Rastogi, Sharad; Sabbah, Hani N; Daneault, Caroline; des Rosiers, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alter cardiac phospholipids and prevent cardiac pathology in rodents subjected to pressure overload. This approach has not been evaluated in humans or large animals with hypertension-induced pathological hypertrophy. We evaluated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in old female dogs with hypertension caused by 16 weeks of aldosterone infusion. Aldosterone-induced hypertension resulted in concentric left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and impaired diastolic function in placebo-treated dogs. DHA supplementation increased DHA and depleted arachidonic acid in cardiac phospholipids, but did not improve LV parameters compared to placebo. Surprisingly, DHA significantly increased serum aldosterone concentration and blood pressure compared to placebo. Cardiac mitochondrial yield was decreased in placebo-treated hypertensive dogs compared to normal animals, which was prevented by DHA. Extensive analysis of mitochondrial function found no differences between DHA and placebo groups. In conclusion, DHA did not favorably impact mitochondrial or LV function in aldosterone hypertensive dogs.

  10. Cardiac defects contribute to the pathology of spinal muscular atrophy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shababi, Monir; Habibi, Javad; Yang, Hsiao T; Vale, Spencer M; Sewell, Will A; Lorson, Christian L

    2010-10-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder, which is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. SMA is the most common inherited motor neuron disease and occurs in approximately 1:6000 live births. The gene responsible for SMA is called Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). Interestingly, a human-specific copy gene is present on the same region of chromosome 5q, called SMN2. Motor neurons are the primary tissue affected in SMA. Although it is clear that SMA is a neurodegenerative disease, there are clinical reports that suggest that other tissues contribute to the overall phenotype, especially in the most severe forms of the disease. In severe SMA cases, a growing number of congenital heart defects have been identified upon autopsy. The most common defect is a developmental defect referred to as hypoplastic left heart. The purpose of this report is to determine whether cardiac tissue is altered in SMA models and whether this could contribute to SMA pathogenesis. Here we identified early-stage developmental defects in a severe model of SMA. Additionally, pathological responses including fibrosis and oxidative stress markers were observed shortly after birth in a less severe model of disease. Similarly, functional differences were detected between wild-type and early-stage SMA animals. Collectively, this work demonstrates the importance of cardiac development and function in these severe models of SMA.

  11. Fusing defect for the N=2 super sinh-Gordon model

    CERN Document Server

    Spano, N I; Gomes, J F; Zimerman, A H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we derive the type-II integrable defect for the N = 2 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon (sshG) model by using the fusing procedure. In particular, we show explicitly the conservation of the modified energy, momentum and supercharges.

  12. Fusing defect for the N = 2 super sinh-Gordon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, N. I.; Aguirre, A. R.; Gomes, J. F.; Zimerman, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we derive the type-II integrable defect for the N =2 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon (sshG) model by using the fusing procedure. In particular, we show explicitly the conservation of the modified energy, momentum and supercharges.

  13. Diffusion model of the formation of growth microdefects: A new approach to defect formation in crystals (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanin, V. I.; Talanin, I. E.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical studies of defect formation in semiconductor silicon play an important role in the creation of breakthrough ideas for next-generation technologies. A brief comparative analysis of modern theoretical approaches to the description of interaction of point defects and formation of the initial defect structure of dislocation-free silicon single crystals has been carried out. Foundations of the diffusion model of the formation of structural imperfections during the silicon growth have been presented. It has been shown that the diffusion model is based on high-temperature precipitation of impurities. The model of high-temperature precipitation of impurities describes processes of nucleation, growth, and coalescence of impurities during cooling of a crystal from 1683 to 300 K. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion model of defect formation provides a unified approach to the formation of a defect structure beginning with the crystal growth to the production of devices. The possibilities of using the diffusion model of defect formation for other semiconductor crystals and metals have been discussed. It has been shown that the diffusion model of defect formation is a platform for multifunctional solution of many key problems in modern solid state physics. Fundamentals of practical application of the diffusion model for engineering of defects in crystals with modern information technologies have been considered. An algorithm has been proposed for the calculation and analysis of a defect structure of crystals.

  14. Type-II super-Bäcklund transformation and integrable defects for the N=1 super sinh-Gordon model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, A.R.; Gomes, J.F.; Spano, N.I.; Zimerman, A.H. [Instituto de Física Teórica - IFT/UNESP,Rua Doutor Bento Teobaldo Ferraz, 271, Bloco II, 01140-070, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-06-18

    A new super-Bäcklund transformation for the N=1 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon equation is constructed. Based on this construction we propose a type-II integrable defect for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model consistent with this new transformation through the Lagrangian formalism. Explicit expressions for the modified conserved energy, momentum and supercharges are also computed. In addition, we show for the model that the type-II defect can also been regarded as a pair of fused defects of a previously introduced type. The explicit derivation of the associated defect matrices is also presented as a necessary condition for the integrability of the model.

  15. Type-II super-Backlund transformation and integrable defects for the N=1 super sinh-Gordon model

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A R; Spano, N I; Zimerman, A H

    2015-01-01

    A new super-Backlund transformation for the N=1 supersymmetric sinh-Gordon equation is constructed. Based on this construction we propose a type-II integrable defect for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model consistent with this new transformation through the Lagrangian formalism. Explicit expressions for the modified conserved energy, momentum and supercharges are also computed. In addition, we show for the model that the type-II defect can also been regarded as a pair of fused defects of a previously introduced type. The explicit derivation of the associated defect matrices is also presented as a necessary condition for the integrability of the model.

  16. Type-II super-Bäcklund transformation and integrable defects for the N = 1 super sinh-Gordon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, A. R.; Gomes, J. F.; Spano, N. I.; Zimerman, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    A new super-Bäcklund transformation for the N = 1 supersymmetric sinhGordon equation is constructed. Based on this construction we propose a type-II integrable defect for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon model consistent with this new transformation through the Lagrangian formalism. Explicit expressions for the modified conserved energy, momentum and supercharges are also computed. In addition, we show for the model that the type-II defect can also been regarded as a pair of fused defects of a previously introduced type. The explicit derivation of the associated defect matrices is also presented as a necessary condition for the integrability of the model.

  17. Model-based defect detection on structured surfaces having optically unresolved features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daniel; Henning, Andrew J; Sherlock, Ben; Leach, Richard K; Coupland, Jeremy; Giusca, Claudiu L

    2015-10-20

    In this paper, we demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, a method for the detection of defects on structured surfaces having optically unresolved features. The method makes use of synthetic reference data generated by an observational model that is able to simulate the response of the selected optical inspection system to the ideal structure, thereby providing an ideal measure of deviation from nominal geometry. The method addresses the high dynamic range challenge faced in highly parallel manufacturing by enabling the use of low resolution, wide field of view optical systems for defect detection on surfaces containing small features over large regions.

  18. Interface delocalization in the three-dimensional Ising model with a defect plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.

    1993-02-01

    Using mean-field theory, the finite-cluster approximation, and the real-space renormalization group, we study the spin-1/2 Ising model on a cubic lattice with a defect plane that divides the system into two semi-infinite ones. The phase diagrams, which represent the connection between defect-plane order and wetting phenomena, are given in the case of two equivalent semi-infinite systems (the same coupling) and in the case of different semi-infinite systems. These phase diagrams are in agreement with those conjectured qualitatively by Igloi and Indekeu.

  19. Nature of defects and gap states in GeTe model phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Robertson, J.

    2012-03-01

    The electrical storage mechanism in GeSbTe phase change materials is discussed in terms of their gap states using GeTe as a model system. The lowest energy defect in crystalline rhombohedral GeTe phase is the Ge vacancy, because it reconstructs along the resonant bonding directions. The lowest energy in amorphous GeTe is the divalent Te atom, which creates overlapping band-tail states that pin Fermi level EF near midgap. In contrast, the lowest cost defect in disordered phase in GeSbTe superlattices is the Te interstitial whose negative correlation energy pins EF near midgap.

  20. Echocardiographic assessment of coronary artery flow in normal canines and model dogs with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nohwon; Kim, Jaehwan; Lee, Miyoung; Lee, Soyun; Song, Sunhye; Lee, Seungjun; Kim, Soyoung; Park, Yangwoo; Eom, Kidong

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the usefulness of coronary arterial profiles from normal dogs (11 animals) and canines (six dogs) with experimental myocardial infarction (MI) induced by ligation of the left coronary artery (LCA). Blood velocity of the LCA and right coronary artery (RCA) were evaluated following transthoracic pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography. The LCA was observed as an infundibular shape, located adjacent to the sinus of Valsalva. The RCA appeared as a tubular structure located 12 o'clock relative to the aorta. In normal dogs, the LCA and RCA mean peak diastolic velocities were 20.84 ± 3.24 and 19.47 ± 2.67 cm/sec, respectively. The LCA and RCA mean diastolic deceleration times were 0.91 ± 0.14 sec and 1.13 ± 0.20 sec, respectively. In dogs with MI, the LCA had significantly (p < 0.01) lower peak velocities (14.82 ± 1.61 cm/sec) than the RCA (31.61 ± 2.34 cm/sec). The RCA had a significantly (p < 0.01) rapid diastolic deceleration time (0.71 ± 0.06 sec) than that found in the LCA (1.02 ± 0.22 sec) of MI dogs. In conclusion, these profiles may serve as a differential factor for evaluating cardiomyopathy in dogs.

  1. Magnesium Alloy for Repair of Lateral Tibial Plateau Defect in Minipig Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Zhang; Xiao Lin; Zhengrong Qi; Lili Tan; Ke Yang; Zhuangqi Hu; Yan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft substitutes are widely-studied as alternatives to bone grafts in the clinic.The currently available products are mostly ceramics and polymers.Considerable progress has been made in the study of the biodegradable magnesium alloys,which possess the necessary attributions of a suitable substitute,including an excellent mechanical property.In the present study,a minipig model of a lateral tibial plateau defect was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a magnesium alloy in the repair of a critical-sized defect.The micro-arc oxidation (MAO)-coated ZK60 alloy tablets and medical-grade calcium sulfate pellets were used as the test and control materials,respectively.Bone morphology was monitored by computed tomography after the implantation for 2 and 4 months.It was found that the bone morphology in minipigs following magnesium treatment was similar to that of the normal bone,whereas an abnormal and concave morphology was displayed following the calcium sulfate treatment.The average bone healing rate for the magnesium-treated defects was higher than that of the calcium sulfate-treated defects at the first 4 months following the implantation.Overall,magnesium treatment appeared to improve the defect repair as compared with the calcium sulfate treatment.Thus,the MAO-coated ZK60 alloy appears to be a useful biocompatible bone graft substitute,and further research on its biological activity in vivo is needed.

  2. From 3D topological quantum field theories to 4D models with defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcamp, Clement; Dittrich, Bianca

    2017-06-01

    (2 + 1) dimensional topological quantum field theories (TQFTs) with defect excitations are by now quite well understood, while many questions are still open for (3 + 1) dimensional TQFTs. Here we propose a strategy to lift states and operators of a (2 + 1) dimensional TQFT to states and operators of a (3 + 1) dimensional theory with defects. The main technical tool is Heegaard splittings, which allow us to encode the topology of a three-dimensional manifold with line defects into a two-dimensional Heegaard surface. We apply this idea to the example of BF theory which describes locally flat connections. This shows in particular how the curvature excitation generating surface operators of the (3 + 1) dimensional theory can be obtained from closed ribbon operators of the (2 + 1) dimensional BF theory. We hope that this technique allows the construction and study of more general models based on unitary fusion categories.

  3. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease.

  4. VIRTUAL 3-D MODELLING OF AIRWAYS IN CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Speggiorin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimentional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardio-vascualr structure. Unfortunately IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modelling (CM of has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship.. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the pre-surgical assessment. We report 4 cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures : ascending aorta in 1, left pulmonary artery sling in 1, Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in 1 and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in 1. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  5. Virtual population pharmacokinetic using physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for evaluating bioequivalence of oral lacidipine formulations in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate virtual population pharmacokinetic using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for evaluating bioequivalence of oral lacidipine formulations in dogs. The dissolution behaviors of three lacidipine formulations including one commercial product and two self-made amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs capsules were determined in 0.07% Tween 80 media. A randomized 3-period crossover design in 6 healthy beagle dogs after oral administration of the three formulations at a single dose of 4 mg was conducted. The PBPK modeling was utilized for the virtual bioequivalence study. In vitro dissolution experiment showed that the dissolution behaviors of lacidipine amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs capsules, which was respectively prepared by HPMC-E5 or Soluplus, as polymer displayed similar curves compared with the reference formulation in 0.07% Tween 80 media. In vivo pharmacokinetics experiments showed that three formulations had comparable maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax, and the time (Tmax to reach Cmax of lacidipine tablet, which was prepared by Soluplus, as polymer was slower than other two formulations in consistency with the in vitro dissolution rate. The 90% confidence interval (CI for the Cmax, AUC0–24 h and AUC0–∞ of the ratio of the test drug to the referencedrug exceeded the acceptable bioequivalence (BE limits (0.80–1.25. However, the 90% CI of the AUC0–24 h, AUC0–∞ and Cmax of the ratio of test to reference drug were within the BE limit, calculated using PBPK modeling when the virtual subjects reached 24 dogs. The results all demonstrated that virtual bioequivalence study can overcome the inequivalence caused by inter-subject variability of the 6 beagle dogs involved in in vivo experiments.

  6. Aorticopulmonary septal defect in a dog: case report Defeito do septo aórtico-pulmonar em um cão: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P.E. Pascon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A 10-month-old intact female mixed breed dog was referred for evaluation of exercise-induced dyspnea and a low grade II/VI systolic murmur was detected. The communication between ascending aortic and pulmonary trunk was observed by detecting a continuous flow just above the semilunar valves on echoDopplercardiography and attested by surgery. After the surgical procedure, the dog was presented in good clinical conditions without exercise-induced dyspnea, reflecting the importance of an early and accurate diagnostic for the therapeutic success. This is the first Brazilian report of this rare congenital disease and the unique well succeed surgery in the veterinary literature.Na avaliação da dispneia pós-exercício em uma cadela de 10 meses de idade, não castrada e sem raça definida, foi detectado sopro sistólico leve grau II/VI. A comunicação entre a aorta ascendente e o tronco pulmonar, observada pela presença de fluxo contínuo logo abaixo das valvas semilunares, à ecoDopplercardiografia, foi confirmada pela cirurgia. Após o procedimento cirúrgico, a cadela apresentou boa condição clínica e ausência de dispneia mesmo ao exercício. Ressalta-se a importância do diagnóstico precoce e preciso para o sucesso terapêutico. Este é o primeiro relato brasileiro dessa rara doença e a única cirurgia, bem sucedida, descrita na literatura veterinária consultada.

  7. A modified rabbit ulna defect model for evaluating periosteal substitutes in bone engineering: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M El Backly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work defines a modified critical size rabbit ulna defect model for bone regeneration in which a non-resorbable barrier membrane was used to separate the radius from the ulna to create a valid model for evaluation of tissue-engineered periosteal substitutes. Eight rabbits divided into two groups were used. Critical defects (15 mm were made in the ulna completely eliminating periosteum. For group I, defects were filled with a nanohydroxyapatite poly(ester urethane scaffold soaked in PBS and left as such (group Ia or wrapped with a tissue-engineered periosteal substitute (group Ib. For group II, an e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane was inserted around the radius then the defects received either scaffold alone (group IIa or scaffold wrapped with periosteal substitute (group IIb. Animals were euthanized after 12-16 weeks, and bone regeneration was evaluated by radiography, computed microtomography (µCT, and histology. In the first group, we observed formation of radio-ulnar synostosis irrespective of the treatment. This was completely eliminated upon placement of the e-PTFE (GORE-TEX® membrane in the second group of animals. In conclusion, modification of the model using a non-resorbable e-PTFE membrane to isolate the ulna from the radius was a valuable addition allowing for objective evaluation of the tissue-engineered periosteal substitute.

  8. Reactive flow models of the Anarraaq Zn-Pb-Ag deposit, Red Dog district, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, C.; Garven, G.; Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Red Dog ore deposit district in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska is host to several high-grade, shale-hosted Zn + Pb deposits. Due to the complex history and deformation of these ore deposits, the geological and hydrological conditions at the time of formation are poorly understood. Using geological observations and fluid inclusion data as constraints, numerical heat and fluid flow simulations of the Anarraaq ore deposit environment and coupled reactive flow simulations of a section of the ore body were conducted to gain more insight into the conditions of ore body formation. Results suggest that the ore body and associated base metal zonation may have formed by the mixing of oxidized, saline, metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids (source. Forward modeling results also predict the distribution of pyrite and quartz in agreement with field observations and indicate a reaction front moving from the initial mixing interface into the radiolarite rocks. Heuristic mass calculations suggest that ore grades and base metal accumulation comparable to those found in the field (18% Zn, 5% Pb) are predicted to be reached after about 0.3 My for initial conditions (30 ppm Zn, 3 ppm Pb; 20% deposition efficiency). ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  9. Reactive flow models of the Anarraaq Zn-Pb-Ag deposit, Red Dog district, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Christian; Garven, Grant; Kelley, Karen D.; Leach, David L.

    2008-09-01

    The Red Dog ore deposit district in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska is host to several high-grade, shale-hosted Zn + Pb deposits. Due to the complex history and deformation of these ore deposits, the geological and hydrological conditions at the time of formation are poorly understood. Using geological observations and fluid inclusion data as constraints, numerical heat and fluid flow simulations of the Anarraaq ore deposit environment and coupled reactive flow simulations of a section of the ore body were conducted to gain more insight into the conditions of ore body formation. Results suggest that the ore body and associated base metal zonation may have formed by the mixing of oxidized, saline, metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids (<200°C) with reducing, HS-rich pore fluids within radiolarite-rich host rocks. Sphalerite and galena concentrations and base metal sulfide distribution are primarily controlled by the nature of the pore fluids, i.e., the extent and duration of the HS- source. Forward modeling results also predict the distribution of pyrite and quartz in agreement with field observations and indicate a reaction front moving from the initial mixing interface into the radiolarite rocks. Heuristic mass calculations suggest that ore grades and base metal accumulation comparable to those found in the field (18% Zn, 5% Pb) are predicted to be reached after about 0.3 My for initial conditions (30 ppm Zn, 3 ppm Pb; 20% deposition efficiency).

  10. Rank-Defect Adjustment Model for Survey-Line Systematic Errors in Marine Survey Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,the structure of systematic and random errors in marine survey net are discussed in detail and the adjustment method for observations of marine survey net is studied,in which the rank-defect characteristic is discovered first up to now.On the basis of the survey-line systematic error model,the formulae of the rank-defect adjustment model are deduced according to modern adjustment theory.An example of calculations with really observed data is carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of this adjustment model.Moreover,it is proved that the semi-systematic error correction method used at present in marine gravimetry in China is a special case of the adjustment model presented in this paper.

  11. The gauging of two-dimensional bosonic sigma models on world-sheets with defects

    CERN Document Server

    Gawedzki, Krzysztof; Waldorf, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    We extend our analysis of the gauging of rigid symmetries in bosonic two-dimensional sigma models with Wess-Zumino terms in the action to the case of world-sheets with defects. A structure that permits a non-anomalous coupling of such sigma models to world-sheet gauge fields of arbitrary topology is analysed, together with obstructions to its existence, and the classification of its inequivalent choices.

  12. Effects of calcium phosphate coating to SLA surface implants by the ion-beam-assisted deposition method on self-contained coronal defect healing in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heun-Joo; Song, Ji-Eun; Um, Yoo-Jung; Chae, Gyung Joon; Chung, Sung-Min; Lee, In-Seop; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of self-contained coronal defects on a sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface implant, which had a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating applied by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD). We also evaluated the effect of heating the coating to different temperatures. The CaP-coated SLA implants exhibited a slightly larger bone healing capacity in the self-contained coronal defect than SLA implants, indicating that combining SLA surface implants and a CaP coating by the IBAD method had synergistic effects on bone healing. There was no difference in the healing capacity between 350 degrees C and 450 degrees C heat treatment of the coating layer.

  13. Effects of calcium phosphate coating to SLA surface implants by the ion-beam-assisted deposition method on self-contained coronal defect healing in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Heun-Joo; Song, Ji-Eun; Um, Yoo-Jung; Chae, Gyung Joon; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Choi, Seong-Ho [Department of Periodontology, Research Institute for Periodontal Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sung-Min [Dentium Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In-Seop, E-mail: shchoi726@yuhs.a [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Atomic-scale Surface Science Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of self-contained coronal defects on a sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) surface implant, which had a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating applied by ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD). We also evaluated the effect of heating the coating to different temperatures. The CaP-coated SLA implants exhibited a slightly larger bone healing capacity in the self-contained coronal defect than SLA implants, indicating that combining SLA surface implants and a CaP coating by the IBAD method had synergistic effects on bone healing. There was no difference in the healing capacity between 350 deg. C and 450 deg. C heat treatment of the coating layer.

  14. Reconstruction with latissimus dorsi, external abdominal oblique and cranial sartorius muscle flaps for a large defect of abdominal wall in a dog after surgical removal of infiltrative lipoma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This animal was presented with a large-sized infiltrative lipoma in the abdominal wall that had been noted for 4 years. This lipoma was confirmed by histological examination from a previous biopsy, and the infiltrative features were identified by a computerized tomography scan. The surgical removal created a large-sized abdominal defect that was closed by a combination of latissimus dorsi and external abdominal oblique muscle flaps in a pedicle pattern. A small dehiscence at the most distal e...

  15. MYD88 and functionally related genes are associated with multiple infections in a model population of Kenyan village dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necesankova, Michaela; Vychodilova, Leona; Albrechtova, Katerina; Kennedy, Lorna J; Hlavac, Jan; Sedlak, Kamil; Modry, David; Janova, Eva; Vyskocil, Mirko; Horin, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to seek associations between immunity-related molecular markers and endemic infections in a model population of African village dogs from Northern Kenya with no veterinary care and no selective breeding. A population of village dogs from Northern Kenya composed of three sub-populations from three different areas (84, 50 and 55 dogs) was studied. Canine distemper virus (CDV), Hepatozoon canis, Microfilariae (Acantocheilonema dracunculoides, Acantocheilonema reconditum) and Neospora caninum were the pathogens studied. The presence of antibodies (CDV, Neospora), light microscopy (Hepatozoon) and diagnostic PCR (Microfilariae) were the methods used for diagnosing infection. Genes involved in innate immune mechanisms, NOS3, IL6, TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9, LY96, MYD88, and three major histocompatibility genes class II genes were selected as candidates. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were detected by Sanger sequencing, next generation sequencing and PCR-RFLP. The Fisher´s exact test for additive and non-additive models was used for association analyses. Three SNPs within the MYD88 gene and one TLR4 SNP marker were associated with more than one infection. Combined genotypes and further markers identified by next generation sequencing confirmed associations observed for individual genes. The genes associated with infection and their combinations in specific genotypes match well our knowledge on their biological role and on the role of the relevant biological pathways, respectively. Associations with multiple infections observed between the MYD88 and TLR4 genes suggest their involvement in the mechanisms of anti-infectious defenses in dogs.

  16. The domestic dog and cat as models for understanding the regulation of ovarian follicle development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songsasen, N; Comizzoli, P; Nagashima, J; Fujihara, M; Wildt, D E

    2012-12-01

    The culture of ovarian follicles is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms controlling follicle development and differentiation of the oocyte. The benefit of recovering meiotically and developmentally competent oocytes from early stage follicles (primordial, primary, pre-antral and early antral) also would be significant, ranging from rescue of genomes from endangered species to preserving fertility in women facing cancer treatments. This research field is at an early stage of scientific discovery. To-date, live offspring from cultured primordial follicles that produced fertilizable oocytes has occurred only in the mouse. Progress in other more complex species has been limited because larger animals have longer durations of natural folliculogenesis, thereby requiring more culture time to generate fully grown follicles and oocytes. We believe the dog and cat are excellent models for understanding more about folliculogenesis in vitro. This review highlights what is known about this topic for these two species as well as future priorities. We have discovered that it is more challenging to maintain viability of primordial follicles within ovarian tissues in vitro in the dog than the cat. Nonetheless, it is possible to grow both isolated cat and dog pre-antral follicles in culture. Although the follicles of both species have the capacity to increase in size and produce steroids, only cat oocytes appear morphologically normal. The reason for this striking difference between these two species is an area of high research priority. While much more fundamental data are required, we envision advanced technology that will allow harvesting oocytes from the vast, unused follicle stores sequestered within carnivore ovaries. These gametes have utility for reproducing genetically valuable dogs and cats that are 'companions' or biomedical models for investigating human disorders as well as for salvaging the genomes of rare canid and felid species that die before

  17. Preventive efficacy of Frontline® Combo and Certifect® against Dipylidium caninum infestation of cats and dogs using a natural flea (Ctenocephalides felis infestation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beugnet Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of two monthly topical anti-flea products for the prevention of Dipylidium caninum infestations in cats and dogs. A single treatment with Frontline® Combo spot-on for cats (fipronil-(S-methoprene and two successive monthly treatments of Certifect® for dogs (fipronil-amitraz-(S-methoprene were assessed for the prevention of D. caninum infestations following weekly challenges of treated cats or dogs with metacestode naturally-infected fleas. The rate of infestations using the model in cats versus dogs explains the choice of a 1-month trial in cats and a 2-month trial in dogs. The experimental flea-infection model resulted in a range of 22–53% of the fleas being infected by Dipylidium cysticercoids. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated cats ranged from 51.2 to 68. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Frontline Combo treated cats differed significantly (p < 0.05 from those of the untreated control cats on all assessment days. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated dogs ranged from 166.6 to 238.6. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Certifect treated dogs differed significantly (p < 0.001 from those of the untreated group on all assessment days. Frontline Combo treatment on cats provided ≥99.8% persistent anti-flea efficacy throughout the 30-day treatment period. In the dog study, the two Certifect treatments provided ≥97% persistent efficacy throughout the 60-day study. Based on the collection of expelled D. caninum proglottids by cats, 100% (6/6 of the control cats and 0% (0/6 of Frontline Combo treated cats were infested with D. caninum. Frontline Combo spot-on for cats was therefore 100% effective in preventing infection with D. caninum. In dogs, 7 out of the 8 control group dogs (87.5% produced proglottids following infestation of infected fleas, whereas 0 out of 8 dogs (0% in the treated group were infected. The

  18. Preventive efficacy of Frontline® Combo and Certifect® against Dipylidium caninum infestation of cats and dogs using a natural flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugnet, Frederic; Delport, Peet; Luus, Hermann; Crafford, Dione; Fourie, Josephus

    2013-01-01

    Two studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of two monthly topical anti-flea products for the prevention of Dipylidium caninum infestations in cats and dogs. A single treatment with Frontline® Combo spot-on for cats (fipronil-(S)-methoprene) and two successive monthly treatments of Certifect® for dogs (fipronil-amitraz-(S)-methoprene) were assessed for the prevention of D. caninum infestations following weekly challenges of treated cats or dogs with metacestode naturally-infected fleas. The rate of infestations using the model in cats versus dogs explains the choice of a 1-month trial in cats and a 2-month trial in dogs. The experimental flea-infection model resulted in a range of 22–53% of the fleas being infected by Dipylidium cysticercoids. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated cats ranged from 51.2 to 68. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Frontline Combo treated cats differed significantly (p cats on all assessment days. The arithmetic mean flea counts recorded for the untreated dogs ranged from 166.6 to 238.6. The geometric mean flea counts recorded for the Certifect treated dogs differed significantly (p cats provided ≥99.8% persistent anti-flea efficacy throughout the 30-day treatment period. In the dog study, the two Certifect treatments provided ≥97% persistent efficacy throughout the 60-day study. Based on the collection of expelled D. caninum proglottids by cats, 100% (6/6) of the control cats and 0% (0/6) of Frontline Combo treated cats were infested with D. caninum. Frontline Combo spot-on for cats was therefore 100% effective in preventing infection with D. caninum. In dogs, 7 out of the 8 control group dogs (87.5%) produced proglottids following infestation of infected fleas, whereas 0 out of 8 dogs (0%) in the treated group were infected. The infection rates of the two groups were significantly different. The percent effectiveness for the Certifect treatment group for the prevention of D

  19. Cooking skyrmions: modeling temperature dependence of defect textures in cholesteric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afghah, Sajedeh; Konya, Andrew; Selinger, Jonathan; Selinger, Robin

    Using 3-d simulations and analytical calculations, we study temperature dependence of defect structures in liquid crystals in confined geometries. We model a cholesteric liquid crystal confined in a microchannel with homeotropic anchoring, and investigate resulting defect structures--skyrmions, alone or in periodic arrays (bubble domains), and striped textures --as a function of microchannel dimensions, cholesteric pitch, and surface anchoring strength. We model temperature dependence by varying Frank constants and pitch using functions fit to experimental values. Experiments by the Qihuo Wei group show that skyrmion arrays in a microchannel appear to ``pop'' at a threshold temperature, transforming into elongated defects that span the microchannel's width. We explore this behavior using simulation and show that skyrmions elongate when their spacing is below a critical distance. Implementation of the simulation code in CUDA for a GPU-equipped computer produces highly efficient performance. We also carry out analytical calculations of free energy to determine optimal/stable structures for skyrmions and other defect textures in thin cells. Both simulation and analytical results are compared to recent experiments by the Qihuo Wei group. Supported by NSF CMMI-1436565. Acknowledgment is made to the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for partial support of this research.

  20. Effects of Untreated Periodontitis on Osseointegration of Dental Implants in a Beagle Dog Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehyun; Sohn, Byungjin; Kim, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Sungtae; Koo, Ki-Tae; Kim, Tae-Il; Seol, Yang-Jo; Lee, Yong-Moo; Rhyu, In-Chul; Ku, Young

    2016-10-01

    There have been previous studies on the relationship between periodontitis and peri-implantitis, but limited information is available on how periodontitis affects osseointegration and wound healing of newly placed dental implants adjacent to natural teeth. The objective of the present experiment is to evaluate healing around dental implants adjacent to teeth with untreated experimental periodontitis. The study included six male beagle dogs. Scaling and plaque control procedures were performed on three dogs (control group). In the other three dogs (experimental group), retraction cords and ligature wires were placed subgingivally around all premolars and the first molars. Induced experimental periodontitis was confirmed after 3 months. Each control or experimental group was divided into two subgroups depending on the timing of implant placement (immediate/delayed). Twelve dental implants (two implants for each dog) were placed immediately, and the other 12 dental implants (two implants for each dog) were placed 2 months after extraction. The animals were sacrificed 2 months after implant placement. Histologic and histometric analyses were performed. Four implants (three from the immediate placement group and one from the delayed placement group) failed in the experimental group. There were significant differences in the percentage of bone-to-implant contact and marginal bone volume density between the control and experimental groups. Both parameters were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P implants is associated with a higher failure rate compared with delayed placement. Untreated experimental periodontitis was correlated with compromised osseointegration in the implants with delayed placement.

  1. An optimal control model for beta defective and gamma deteriorating inventory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaiban, Ali Khaleel; Baten, Md. Azizul; Aziz, Nazrina

    2014-12-01

    We studied the optimal control of an inventory-production system with deterioration and defective items. Our objective is to develop an optimal inventory control model with Gamma distributed deterioration and beta distributed defective item. The explicit solution of the inventory-production model is derived under continuous review policy using the Pontryagin maximum principle. The optimality conditions are derived from the dynamic of the inventory-production level. Moreover, the simulation and sensitivity analysis results are illustrated numerically in this optimal control model with different demand patterns. The results of the inventory system are analyzed against different parametric values of Beta and Gamma distributions. As a result, the optimal total production strategy is increasing with increase the value of the Beta distribution parameter and decreasing with an increase in the value of the Gamma distribution parameter.

  2. Structure simulation in unidirectionally solidified turbine blade by dendrite envelope tracking model (Ⅱ): model validation and defects prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tong-min; SU Yan-qing; GUO Jing-jie; I. OHNAKA; H. YASUDA

    2006-01-01

    The developed model was validated by the checking of grain preferential growth orientation and the solidification experiment with low melting point alloy of Sn-21%Bi(mole fraction). It was also applied to predict the structure defects (e.g. stray grain) of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade. The results show that the developed model is reliable and has the following abilities: 1) reduce the misorientation caused by the orthogonal mesh used in simulation; 2) well reproduce the growth competition among the different-preferential-direction grains with less than 10% relative error; 3) predict the structure defect of stray grain with the accuracy over 80%; 4) optimize the grain selector to better obtain a single crystal avoiding the multigrain defect; 5) simulate the structure evolution (nucleation and growth) of the directional and single crystal turbine blade.

  3. Regenerative approach to bilateral rostral mandibular reconstruction in a case series of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz eArzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Extensive rostral mandibulectomy in dogs typically results in instability of the mandibles that may lead to malocclusion, difficulty in eating and drinking, food prehension, and pain of the temporomandibular joint. Large rostral mandibular defects are challenging to reconstruct due to the complex geometry of this region. In order to restore mandibular continuity and stability following extensive rostral mandibulectomy, we developed a surgical technique using a combination of intraoral and extraoral approaches, a locking titanium plate and a compression resistant matrix (CRM infused with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, surgical planning that consisted of computed tomographic (CT scanning and 3D model printing were utilized. We describe a regenerative surgical technique for immediate or delayed reconstruction of critical-size rostral mandibular defects in 5 dogs. Three dogs had healed with intact gingival covering over the mandibular defect and had immediate return to normal function and occlusion. Two dogs had the complication of focal plate exposure and dehiscence, which was corrected with mucosal flaps and suturing; these dogs have since healed with intact gingival covering over the mandibular defect. Mineralized tissue formation was palpated clinically within 2 weeks and solid bone formation within 3 months. Computed tomography findings at 6 months postoperatively demonstrated that the newly regenerated mandibular bone had increased in mineral volume with evidence of integration between the native bone, new bone and CRM compared to the immediate postoperative CT. We conclude that rostral mandibular reconstruction using a regenerative approach provides an excellent solution for restoring mandibular continuity and preventing mandibular instability in dogs.

  4. A Dog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩选文

    2004-01-01

    A dog can't speak words, but it can "talk", It has feelings just as you do. At times it may feel angry or afraid. Watching a dog closely, you can find out what it feels. You can see what it is trying to tell you.

  5. Modeling of the role of defects in sintered FeCrAIY foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Kepets; T. J. Lu; A. P. Dowling

    2007-01-01

    The metal sintering approach offers a cost-effective means for the mass-production of open-cell foams from a range of materials, including high-temperature steel alloys, which offer novel mechanical and acoustic properties.In a separate experimental study, the mechanical properties of open-celled steel alloy (FeCrAlY) foams have been characterized under uniaxial compression and shear loading. Compared to predictions from established models, a significant knockdown in material properties was observed. This knockdown was attributed to the presence of defects throughout the microstructure that result from the unique fabrication process. In the present paper, the microstructure of sintered FeCrAlY foams was modeled by using a finite element (FE)model. In particular, microstructural variations were introduced to a base lattice, and the effects on the strength and stiffness calculated. A range of defects identified under scanning electronic microscope (SEM) imaging were considered including broken ligaments, thickness variations, and pore blockages, which are the three primary imperfections observed in sintered foams. The corresponding levels of defect present in the material were subsequently input into the FE model, with the resulting predictions correlating well withexperimental data.

  6. Stringy Models of Modified Gravity: Space-time defects and Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2013-01-01

    Starting from microscopic models of space-time foam, based on brane universes propagating in bulk space-times populated by D0-brane defects ("D-particles"), we arrive at effective actions used by a low-energy observer on the brane world to describe his/her observations of the Universe. These actions include, apart from the metric tensor field, also scalar (dilaton) and vector fields, the latter describing the interactions of low-energy matter on the brane world with the recoiling point-like space-time defect (D-particle). The vector field is proportional to the recoil velocity of the D-particle and as such it satisfies a certain constraint. The vector breaks locally Lorentz invariance, which however is assumed to be conserved on average in a space-time foam situation, involving the interaction of matter with populations of D-particle defects. In this paper we demonstrate that, already at the end of the radiation era, the (constrained) vector field associated with the recoil of the defects provides the seeds f...

  7. Effects of Hydroxyapatite on Bone Graft Resorption in an Experimental Model of Maxillary Alveolar Arch Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Pilanci

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly used treatments use autologous bone grafts to address bony defects in patients with cleft palate. Major disadvantages of autogenous bone grafts include donor site morbidity and resorption. Suggestions to overcome such problems include biomaterials that can be used alone or in combination with bone. We examined the effect of hydroxyapatite cement on bone graft resorption in a rabbit maxillary alveolar defect model. We divided 16 young adult albino New Zealand rabbits into two groups. A defect 1 cm wide was created in each rabbit's maxillary arch. In Group 1, the removed bone was disrupted, and the pieces were replaced in the defect. In the other group, the pieces were replaced after mixing (1:1 with hydroxyapatite cement. Quantitative computed tomographic evaluation of these grafts was performed in axial and coronal planes for each rabbit at 2 and 12 weeks. In axial images at 12 weeks, the group without cement showed mean bone resorption of 15%. In the cement group, a mean volumetric increase of 68% was seen. No resorption occurred when bone grafts were mixed with hydroxyapatite cement. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(3.000: 170-175

  8. Modelling of parasitic effects induced by electrically active defects in a SiGe HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhdara, M.; Latreche, S.; Gontrand, C.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical modelling of a NPN SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) realized in an industrial 0.35 μ m BiCMOS process, using our own software simulator “SIBIDIF”, taking into account some electrically active defects in the HBT device. The electric performances of this device can be penalized by the presence of defects inherent to the complex structure shrinking. For our devices, most of these relevant defects are located at the vertical interface between the spacers and the polysilicon emitter, due to the Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process step. Nevertheless, their localization, as well as theirs effective density or their capture section, have an influence on the electric characteristics of the HBT's. As a check, we find some good agreement between our simulated results and some experimental ones. Our work is focused on the identification of defects responsible for the current fluctuations at the origin of low frequency noise or Random Telegraphic Signals in industrial submicronic BiCMOS technologies. Gummel characteristics are simulated in order to identify generation-recombination or trap assisted tunnelling process in the base current. We have shown that devices having an excess base current present random discrete fluctuations on the base current.

  9. Quantitative assessment of bone defect healing by multidetector CT in a pig model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegger, Carolin; Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S.; Miese, Falk R.; Antoch, Gerald; Scherer, Axel [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Jungbluth, Pascal; Hakimi, Mohssen; Wild, Michael [University Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hakimi, Ahmad R. [Universtity Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Oral Surgery, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    To evaluate multidetector CT volumetry in the assessment of bone defect healing in comparison to histopathological findings in an animal model. In 16 mini-pigs, a circumscribed tibial bone defect was created. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the tibia was performed on a 64-row scanner 42 days after the operation. The extent of bone healing was estimated quantitatively by MDCT volumetry using a commercially available software programme (syngo Volume, Siemens, Germany).The volume of the entire defect (including all pixels from -100 to 3,000 HU), the nonconsolidated areas (-100 to 500 HU), and areas of osseous consolidation (500 to 3,000 HU) were assessed and the extent of consolidation was calculated. Histomorphometry served as the reference standard. The extent of osseous consolidation in MDCT volumetry ranged from 19 to 92% (mean 65.4 {+-} 18.5%). There was a significant correlation between histologically visible newly formed bone and the extent of osseous consolidation on MDCT volumetry (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001). A significant negative correlation was detected between osseous consolidation on MDCT and histological areas of persisting defect (r = -0.9, P < 0.0001). MDCT volumetry is a promising tool for noninvasive monitoring of bone healing, showing excellent correlation with histomorphometry. (orig.)

  10. Understanding the causes and prevention of neural tube defects: Insights from the splotch mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Massa, Valentina; Copp, Andrew J

    2009-04-01

    Splotch mutant mice develop neural tube defects (NTDs), comprising exencephaly and/or spina bifida, as well as neural crest-related defects and abnormalities of limb musculature. Defects in splotch mice result from mutations in Pax3, and some human NTDs may also result from mutations in the human PAX3 gene. Pax3 encodes a transcription factor whose function may influence expression of multiple downstream genes associated with a variety of cellular properties (including apoptosis, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation), that could be important for neural tube closure. The frequency of NTDs varies between mutant alleles and is also influenced by genetic background and environmental factors. Notably, splotch provides a model for folic acid-preventable NTDs, and conversely, dietary folate deficiency exacerbates NTDs. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of splotch NTDs, as well as the mechanisms by which the frequency of defects is influenced by genetic and environmental factors (such as sub-optimal folate status), may provide insight into the causation of these severe congenital malformations in humans.

  11. First-principles modelling of radiation defects in advanced nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotomin, E. A.; Gryaznov, D.; Grimes, R. W.; Parfitt, D.; Zhukovskii, Yu. F.; Mastrikov, Yu. A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V. V.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2008-06-01

    We present and discuss the results of the first-principles calculations of Frenkel defects and O impurities in uranium mononitride (UN) perspective for fast reactor nuclear fuels. Special attention is paid to the calculation of defect migration energies. We demonstrate that the interstitialcy mechanism (with the formation of a N-N dumbbell along the [1 1 1] axis) is energetically more favorable than the direct [1 0 0] hops. As a result, for the interstitial N ions we predict a diffusion mechanism similar to that known in isostructural fcc materials with a different chemical nature (KCl, MgO). The calculated effective N charge considerably depends on the ion position and environment (a host lattice site, interstitial or saddle point) which strongly limits the applicability of classical defect modelling based on formal invariant charges. Lastly, the calculated migration energy for the interstitial impurity O ions is quite low (2.84 eV), which indicates their high mobility and ability for reactions with other defects.

  12. Site-specific analysis of gene expression in early osteoarthritis using the Pond-Nuki model in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroki Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive and debilitating disease that often develops from a focal lesion and may take years to clinically manifest to a complete loss of joint structure and function. Currently, there is not a cure for OA, but early diagnosis and initiation of treatment may dramatically improve the prognosis and quality of life for affected individuals. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of analyzing changes in gene expression of articular cartilage using the Pond-Nuki model two weeks after ACL-transection in dogs, and to characterize the changes observed at this time point. Methods The ACL of four dogs was completely transected arthroscopically, and the contralateral limb was used as the non-operated control. After two weeks the dogs were euthanatized and tissues harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles of both limbs. Two dogs were used for histologic analysis and Mankin scoring. From the other two dogs the surface of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau were divided into four regions each, and tissues were harvested from each region for biochemical (GAG and HP and gene expression analysis. Significant changes in gene expression were determined using REST-XL, and Mann-Whitney rank sum test was used to analyze biochemical data. Significance was set at (p Results Significant differences were not observed between ACL-X and control limbs for Mankin scores or GAG and HP tissue content. Further, damage to the tissue was not observed grossly by India ink staining. However, significant changes in gene expression were observed between ACL-X and control tissues from each region analyzed, and indicate that a unique regional gene expression profile for impending ACL-X induced joint pathology may be identified in future studies. Conclusion The data obtained from this study lend credence to the research approach and model for the characterization of OA, and the identification and validation of

  13. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  14. Development of Mathematical Models for Detecting Micron Scale Volumetric Defects in Thin Film Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaigals G.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the present research is to investigate possibilities of volumetric defect detection in thin film coatings on glass substrates by means of high definition imaging with no complex optical systems, such as lenses, and to determine development and construction feasibility of a defectoscope employing the investigated methods. Numerical simulations were used to test the proposed methods. Three theoretical models providing various degrees of accuracy and feasibility were studied.

  15. Duality and confinement in D=3 models driven by condensation of topological defects

    CERN Document Server

    Wotzasek, P G C; Wotzasek, Patricio and Gaete Clovis

    2005-01-01

    We study the interplay of duality and confinement in certain three-dimensional models induced by the condensation of topological defects. To this end we check for the confinement phenomenon, in both sides of the duality, using the static quantum potential within the framework of the gauge-invariant but path-dependent variables formalism. Our calculations show that the interaction energy contains a linear term leading to the confinement of static probe charges.

  16. Computational modelling of ovine critical-sized tibial defects with implanted scaffolds and prediction of the safety of fixator removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Heather; Lohfeld, Stefan; Dürselen, Lutz; McHugh, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Computational model geometries of tibial defects with two types of implanted tissue engineering scaffolds, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL)/β-TCP, are constructed from µ-CT scan images of the real in vivo defects. Simulations of each defect under four-point bending and under simulated in vivo axial compressive loading are performed. The mechanical stability of each defect is analysed using stress distribution analysis. The results of this analysis highlights the influence of callus volume, and both scaffold volume and stiffness, on the load-bearing abilities of these defects. Clinically-used image-based methods to predict the safety of removing external fixation are evaluated for each defect. Comparison of these measures with the results of computational analyses indicates that care must be taken in the interpretation of these measures.

  17. Structure defect prediction of single crystal turbine blade by dendrite envelope tracking model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tong-min; Itsuo OHNAKA; Hideyuki YASUDA; SU Yan-qing; GUO Jing-jie

    2006-01-01

    The structure defects such as stray grains during unidirectional solidification can severely reduce the performance of single crystal turbine blades. A dendrite envelope tracking model is developed for predicting the structure defects of unidirectional solidification turbine blade. The normal vector of dendrite envelope is estimated by the gradient of dendrite volume fraction,and the growth velocity of the dendrite envelope (dendrite tips) is calculated with considering the anisotropy of grain growth. The solute redistribution at dendrite envelope is calculated by introducing an effective solute partition coefficient. Simulation tests show that the solute-build-up due to the rejection at envelope greatly affects grain competition and consequently solidification structure. The model is applied to predict the structure defects (e.g. stray grain) of single crystal turbine blade during unidirectional solidification. The results show that the developed model is reliable and has the following abilities: reproduce the growth competition among the different-preferential-direction grains:predict the stray grain formation:simulate the structure evolution (single crystal or dendrite grains).

  18. Sustained Release of Vancomycin from Polyurethane Scaffolds Inhibits Infection of Bone Wounds in a Rat Femoral Segmental Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    a one shot two component reaction between the triisocyanate and the hardener comprising polyester triol, water, TEGOAMIN33 tertiary amine catalyst ...Sustained release of vancomycin from polyurethane scaffolds inhibits infection of bone wounds in a rat femoral segmental defect model Bing Li a,b...2010 Keywords: Polyurethane Vancomycin Sustained release Infection control Rat femoral segmental defect Bone tissue engineering Infection is a common

  19. Calcium signaling, excitability, and synaptic plasticity defects in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Jie; Sun, Suya; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Popugaeva, Elena; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and aging result in impaired ability to store memories, but the cellular mechanisms responsible for these defects are poorly understood. Presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations are responsible for many early-onset familial AD (FAD) cases. The phenomenon of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely used in studies of memory formation and storage. Recent data revealed long-term LTP maintenance (L-LTP) is impaired in PS1-M146V knock-in (KI) FAD mice. To understand the basis for this phenomenon, in the present study we analyzed structural synaptic plasticity in hippocampal cultures from wild type (WT) and KI mice. We discovered that exposure to picrotoxin induces formation of mushroom spines in both WT and KI cultures, but the maintenance of mushroom spines is impaired in KI neurons. This maintenance defect can be explained by an abnormal firing pattern during the consolidation phase of structural plasticity in KI neurons. Reduced frequency of neuronal firing in KI neurons is caused by enhanced calcium-induced calcium release (CICR), enhanced activity of calcium-activated potassium channels, and increased afterhyperpolarization. As a result, "consolidation" pattern of neuronal activity converted to "depotentiation" pattern of neuronal activity in KI neurons. Consistent with this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibitors of CICR (dantrolene), of calcium-activated potassium channels (apamin), and of calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (FK506) are able to rescue structural plasticity defects in KI neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that incubation with dantrolene or apamin also rescued L-LTP defects in KI hippocampal slices, suggesting a role for a similar mechanism. This proposed mechanism may be responsible for memory defects in AD but also for age-related memory decline.

  20. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Mongelli, Vanesa; Blanc, Hervé; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Saleh, Maria-Carla; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator) polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV), which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  1. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Rozen-Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV, which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  2. Polyactive as a bone-filler in a beagle dog model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.; Dooren, van A.; Gallard, M.L.; Dalmeijer, R.; Putter, de C.; Koole, R.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Calcification is a crucial step in the bone-bonding mechanism of PEO/PBT hydrogel copolymers (Polyactive®), a new generation of bone-fillers. A beagle dog study was conducted to determine whether the preoperative presence of a calcium phosphate layer (precalcification) on a PEO/PBT 80/20 copolymer w

  3. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  4. Comparison of the Frequency-dependent Effects of Amiodarone on Ventricular Electrophysiology in Congestive Heart Failure Canine Models and Normal Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Shuxian; Zhang Yuling; Lei Juan; Wu Wei; Zhang Xuming

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To compare the frequency-dependent effects of amiodarone (Ami) on ventricular electrophysiology in right ventricular rapid pacing-induced congestive heart failure (CHF) canine models.Methods Thirty-two dogs were randomized into four groups: the control group, the Ami group in which the normal dogs were given Ami orally 300 mg a day for 4~5 weeks, the CHF group induced by right ventricular rapid pacing ( 240 pulses. min -1 for 4 ~ 5 weeks), and the group of CHF dogs fed with Ami orally 300 mg a day for 4 ~ 5 weeks. The techniques of electrical stimulation and monophasic action potential (MAP) recording were used in the electrophysiology studies. Results The effects of Ami on ventricular MAP duration(MAPD90) and effective refractory period (VERP)were not frequency-dependent in CHF dogs. There was also no frequency-dependent effect on the increase in the ratio of VERP to MAPD90 (VERP/MAPD90). The prolongation of ventricular conduction time was frequencydependent. Conclusions The frequency-dependent effects of Ami on ventricular electrophysiology in CHF dogs were similar to that in normal dogs.

  5. First-Principles Point Defect Models for Zr7Ni10 and Zr2Ni7 Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana F. Wong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synergetic effects in multi-phased AB2 Laves-phase-based metal hydride (MH alloys enable the access of high hydrogen storage secondary phases, despite the lower absorption/desorption kinetics found in nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH batteries. Alloy design strategies to further tune the electrochemical properties of these secondary phases include the use of additives and processing techniques to manipulate the chemical nature and the microstructure of these materials. It is also of particular interest to observe the engineering of constitutional point defects and how they may affect electrochemical properties and performance. The Zr7Ni10 phase appears particularly prone to point defects, and we use density functional theory (DFT calculations coupled with a statistical mechanics model to study the theoretical point defects. The Zr2Ni7 phase appears less prone to point defects, and we use the Zr2Ni7 point defect model, as well as experimental lattice parameters, with Zr7Ni10 phases from X-ray diffraction (XRD as points of comparison. The point defect models indicate that anti-site defects tend to form in the Zr7Ni10 phase, and that these defects form more easily in the Zr7Ni10 phase than the Zr2Ni7 phase, as expected.

  6. Intrinsic point defects in zinc oxide. Modeling of structural, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erhart, P.

    2006-07-01

    The present dissertation deals with the modeling of zinc oxide on the atomic scale employing both quantum mechanical as well as atomistic methods. The first part describes quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory of intrinsic point defects in ZnO. To begin with, the geometric and electronic structure of vacancies and oxygen interstitials is explored. In equilibrium oxygen interstitials are found to adopt dumbbell and split interstitial configurations in positive and negative charge states, respectively. Semi-empirical self-interaction corrections allow to improve the agreement between the experimental and the calculated band structure significantly; errors due to the limited size of the supercells can be corrected by employing finite-size scaling. The effect of both band structure corrections and finite-size scaling on defect formation enthalpies and transition levels is explored. Finally, transition paths and barriers for the migration of zinc as well as oxygen vacancies and interstitials are determined. The results allow to interpret diffusion experiments and provide a consistent basis for developing models for device simulation. In the second part an interatomic potential for zinc oxide is derived. To this end, the Pontifix computer code is developed which allows to fit analytic bond-order potentials. The code is subsequently employed to obtain interatomic potentials for Zn-O, Zn-Zn, and O-O interactions. To demonstrate the applicability of the potentials, simulations on defect production by ion irradiation are carried out. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of the bone healing process in an experimental tibial bone defect model in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Tim, Carla Roberta; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antônio; da Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Malavazi, Iran; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of postmenopausal bone loss (induced by ovariectomy) in the process of bone healing in a tibial bone defect model in rats by means of histological evaluation of bone defects and the analysis of the expression of genes and proteins involved in bone consolidation. Twenty female Wistar rats (12 weeks old, weighing ±250 g) were randomly divided into two groups: control group (CG) and ovariectomized group (OG). Rats of OG were submitted to ovariectomy and after 8 weeks post-surgery, all animals were submitted to the tibial bone defect model. The main histological finding analysis revealed that ovariectomized animals showed a higher amount of granulation tissue and immature newly formed bone compared to CG. Furthermore, quantitative histological analysis showed that OG presented a significant decrease in the amount of newly formed bone (p = 0.0351). RT-PCR analysis showed no difference in Runx2, ALP, RANK, RANKL and Osterix gene expression 14-day post-surgery. Interestingly, immunohistochemical evaluation showed that Runx2 was down expressed (p = 0.0001) and RANKL was up expressed (p = 0.0022) in the OG. In conclusion, these data highlight that bone loss induced by ovariectomy causes an impairment in the capacity of bone to heal mainly probably because of alterations in the imbalance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts activities.

  8. Unique Challenges for Modeling Defect Dynamics in Concentrated Solid-Solution Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shijun; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2017-07-01

    Recently developed concentrated solid solution alloys (CSAs) are shown to have improved performance under irradiation that depends strongly on the number of alloying elements, alloying species, and their concentrations. In contrast to conventional dilute alloys, CSAs are composed of multiple principal elements situated randomly in a simple crystalline lattice. As a result, the intrinsic disorder has a profound influence on energy dissipation pathways and defect evolution when these CSAs are subjected to energetic particle irradiation. Extraordinary irradiation resistance, including suppression of void formation by two orders of magnitude at an elevated temperature, has been achieved with increasing compositional complexity in CSAs. Unfortunately, the loss of translational invariance associated with the intrinsic chemical disorder poses great challenges to theoretical modeling at the electronic and atomic levels. Based on recent computer simulation results for a set of novel Ni-containing, face-centered cubic CSAs, we review theoretical modeling progress in handling disorder in CSAs and underscore the impact of disorder on defect dynamics. We emphasize in particular the unique challenges associated with the description of defect dynamics in CSAs.

  9. Modeling comparison of graphene nanoribbon field effect transistors with single vacancy defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Atefeh; Faez, Rahim; Shamloo, Hassan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, some important circuit parameters of a monolayer armchair graphene nanoribbon (GNR) field effect transistor (GNRFET) in different structures are studied. Also, these structures are Ideal with no defect, 1SVGNRFET with one single vacancy defect, and 3SVsGNRFET with three SV defects. Moreover, the circuit parameters are extracted based on Semi Classical Top of Barrier Modeling (SCTOBM) method. The I-V characteristics simulations of Ideal GNRFET, 1SVGNRFET and 3SVsGNRFET are used for comparing with SCTOBM method. These simulations are solved with Poisson-Schrodinger equation self-consistently by using Non- Equilibrium Green Function (NEGF) and in the real space approach. The energy band structure of nanoribbon is obtained by using nearest-neighbour interactions within an approximation tight-binding method. The modeling results show that 3SVsGNRFET in comparison to 1SVGNRFET has higher transconductance, cut-off frequency, electron average velocity, mobile charge, and quantum capacitance. Also, 3SVsGNRFET has smaller gate, drain and source capacitances than Ideal GNRFET. Furthermore, Drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and sub-threshold swing (SS) of 3SVsGNRFET are smaller than 1SVGNRFET.

  10. Metamizole Sodium Induces Neural Tube Defects in a Chick Embryo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Yahya; Billur, Deniz; Aydin, Sevim; Ozeren, Ersin; Demirci, Adnan; Alagoz, Fatih; Dalgic, Ali; Belen, Deniz

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of metamizole sodium on neural tube development in the early stage chick embryo model that complies with the first month of embryonic development in mammals. A total of 40 fertilized chicken eggs were divided into 4 equal groups. The eggs were incubated in the incubator at a temperature of 37.8±2°C with 60±5% humidity. Group A was the control, Group B was administered physiological saline, Group C was administered 30 mg/kg metamizole sodium (based on the therapeutic index range of it used in humans) and Group D was administered 90 mg/kg metamizole sodium. All embryos were removed from the egg at the 48th hour and morphologically and histologically examined. Normal development was seen and the neural tube was closed in 17 embryos in Groups A and B. A neural tube defect was seen in 2 embryos in group A and in 1 embryo in group B. A neural tube closure defect was seen in all embryos in group C and 9 embryos in group D. There was 1 dead embryo in Group D. Metamizole sodium was seen to produce a neural tube defect in the chicken embyro model.

  11. Analysis of arbitrary defects in photonic crystals by use of the source-model technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Alon; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2004-07-01

    A novel method derived from the source-model technique is presented to solve the problem of scattering of an electromagnetic plane wave by a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab that contains an arbitrary defect (perturbation). In this method, the electromagnetic fields in the perturbed problem are expressed in terms of the field due to the periodic currents obtained from a solution of the corresponding unperturbed problem plus the field due to yet-to-be-determined correction current sources placed in the vicinity of the perturbation. Appropriate error measures are suggested, and a few representative structures are presented and analyzed to demonstrate the versatility of the proposed method and to provide physical insight into waveguiding and defect coupling mechanisms typical of finite-thickness photonic crystal slabs.

  12. The valley filter efficiency of monolayer graphene and bilayer graphene line defect model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-guang; Zhou, Jiaojiao; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2016-10-01

    In addition to electron charge and spin, novel materials host another degree of freedom, the valley. For a junction composed of valley filter sandwiched by two normal terminals, we focus on the valley efficiency under disorder with two valley filter models based on monolayer and bilayer graphene. Applying the transfer matrix method, valley resolved transmission coefficients are obtained. We find that: (i) under weak disorder, when the line defect length is over about 15 {nm}, it functions as a perfect channel (quantized conductance) and valley filter (totally polarized); (ii) in the diffusive regime, combination effects of backscattering and bulk states assisted intervalley transmission enhance the conductance and suppress the valley polarization; (iii) for very long line defect, though the conductance is small, polarization is indifferent to length. Under perpendicular magnetics field, the characters of charge and valley transport are only slightly affected. Finally we discuss the efficiency of transport valley polarized current in a hybrid system.

  13. The Electronic States of a Double Carbon Vacancy Defect in Pyrene: A Model Study for Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, Francisco B C; Lischka, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The electronic states occurring in a double vacancy defect for graphene nanoribbons have been calculated in detail based on a pyrene model. Extended ab initio calculations using the MR configuration interaction (MRCI) method have been performed to describe in a balanced way the manifold of electronic states derived from the dangling bonds created by initial removal of two neighboring carbon atoms from the graphene network. In total, this study took into account the characterization of 16 electronic states (eight singlets and eight triplets) considering unrelaxed and relaxed defect structures. The ground state was found to be of 1Ag character with around 50% closed shell character. The geometry optimization process leads to the formation of two five-membered rings in a pentagon octagon pentagon structure. The closed shell character increases thereby to ~70%, the analysis of unpaired density shows only small contributions confirming the chemical stability of that entity. For the unrelaxed structure the first fi...

  14. Osteogenic Activity of Locally Applied Small Molecule Drugs in a Rat Femur Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Cottrell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term success of arthroplastic joints is dependent on the stabilization of the implant within the skeletal site. Movement of the arthroplastic implant within the bone can stimulate osteolysis, and therefore methods which promote rigid fixation or bone growth are expected to enhance implant stability and the long-term success of joint arthroplasty. In the present study, we used a simple bilateral bone defect model to analyze the osteogenic activity of three small-molecule drug implants via microcomputerized tomography (micro-CT and histomorphometry. In this study, we show that local delivery of alendronate, but not lovastatin or omeprazole, led to significant new bone formation at the defect site. Since alendronate impedes osteoclast-development, it is theorized that alendronate treatment results in a net increase in bone formation by preventing osteoclast mediated remodeling of the newly formed bone and upregulating osteoblasts.

  15. Si3O cluster: excited properties under external electric field and oxygen-deficient defect models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Guo-Liang; Liu Xue-Feng; Xie Hui-Xiang; Zhang Xian-Zhou; Liu Yu-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the excited states of Si3O molecule by using the single-excitation configuration interaction and density functional theory. It finds that the visible light absorption spectrum of SisO molecule comprises the yellow and the purple light without external electric field, however all the visible light is included except the green light under the action of external electric field. Oxygen-deficient defects, which also can be found in Si3O molecule, have been used to explain the luminescence from silicon-based materials but the microstrnctures of the materials are still uncertain.Our results accord with the experimental values perfectly, this fact suggests that the structure of Si3O molecule is expected to be one of the main basic structures of the materials, so the oxygen-deficient defect structural model for Si3O molecule also has been provided to research the structures of materials.

  16. Utilisation of three-dimensional printed heart models for operative planning of complex congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejník, Peter; Nosal, Matej; Havran, Tomas; Furdova, Adriana; Cizmar, Maros; Slabej, Michal; Thurzo, Andrej; Vitovic, Pavol; Klvac, Martin; Acel, Tibor; Masura, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) printing of cardiovascular structures. To explore whether utilisation of 3D printed heart replicas can improve surgical and catheter interventional planning in patients with complex congenital heart defects. Between December 2014 and November 2015 we fabricated eight cardiovascular models based on computed tomography data in patients with complex spatial anatomical relationships of cardiovascular structures. A Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the accuracy of 3D printing by comparing dimension measurements at analogous anatomical locations between the printed models and digital imagery data, as well as between printed models and in vivo surgical findings. The contribution of 3D printed heart models for perioperative planning improvement was evaluated in the four most representative patients. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the high accuracy of 3D cardiovascular printing. Each printed model offered an improved spatial anatomical orientation of cardiovascular structures. Current 3D printers can produce authentic copies of patients` cardiovascular systems from computed tomography data. The use of 3D printed models can facilitate surgical or catheter interventional procedures in patients with complex congenital heart defects due to better preoperative planning and intraoperative orientation.

  17. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the excision repair system. The number of mismatches as a result of translesion synthesis is calculated for both wild-type and mutant cells. The effect of temporal modulation of the number of single-stranded DNA during postreplication repair has been predicted. A comparison of effectiveness of different repair systems has been conducted.

  18. Application of mobile blood purification system in the treatment of acute renal failure dog model in the field environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-min ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the stability, safety and efficacy of mobile blood purification system in the treatment of acute renal failure dog model in the field environment. Methods The acute renal failure model was established in 4 dogs by bilateral nephrectomy, which was thereafter treated with the mobile blood purification system. The evaluation of functional index of the mobile blood purification system was performed after a short-time (2 hours and conventional (4 hours dialysis treatment. Results The mobile blood purification system ran stably in the field environment at a blood flow of 150-180ml/min, a dialysate velocity of 2000ml/h, a replacement fluid velocity of 2000ml/h, and ultrafiltration rate of 100-200ml/h. All the functions of alarming system worked well, including static upper limit alarm of ultrafiltration pressure (>100 mmHg, upper limit alarm of ambulatory arterial pressure (>400mmHg, upper limit alarm of ambulatory venous pressure (>400mmHg, bubble alarm of vascular access, bubble alarm during the infusion of solutions, pressure alarm at the substitution pump segment and blood leaking alarm. The vital signs of the 4 dogs with acute renal failure kept stable during the treatment. After the treatment, a remarkable decrease was seen in the levels of serum urea nitrogen, creatinine and serum potassium (P0.05. Conclusions The mobile blood purification system runs normally even in a field environment. It is a flexible and portable device with a great performance in safety and stability in the treatment of acute renal failure. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.12.15

  19. Determination of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  20. Analysis of Experimental Fuel Rod Parameters using 3D Modelling of PCMI with MPS Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casagranda, Albert [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-06-01

    An in-reactor experiment is being designed in order to validate the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) behavior of the BISON fuel performance code. The experimental parameters for the test rod being placed in the Halden Research Reactor are being determined using BISON simulations. The 3D model includes a missing pellet surface (MPS) defect to generate large local cladding deformations, which should be measureable after typical burnup times. The BISON fuel performance code is being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is built on the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. BISON supports both 2D and 3D finite elements and solves the fully coupled equations for solid mechanics, heat conduction and species diffusion. A number of fuel performance effects are included using models for swelling, densification, creep, relocation and fission gas production & release. In addition, the mechanical and thermal contact between the fuel and cladding is explicitly modelled using a master-slave based contact algorithm. In order to accurately predict PCMI effects, the BISON code includes the relevant physics involved and provides a scalable and robust solution procedure. The depth of the proposed MPS defect is being varied in the BISON model to establish an optimum value for the experiment. The experiment will be interrupted approximately every 6 months to measure cladding radial deformation and provide data to validate BISON. The complete rodlet (~20 discrete pellets) is being simulated using a 180° half symmetry 3D model with MPS defects at two axial locations. In addition, annular pellets will be used at the top and bottom of the pellet stack to allow thermocouples within the rod to measure the fuel centerline temperature. Simulation results will be presented to illustrate the expected PCMI behavior and support the chosen experimental design parameters.

  1. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Pets and AnimalsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share Cat and Dog Bites Cat and dog bites are ...

  2. Allegheny County Dog Licenses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A list of dog license dates, dog breeds, and dog name by zip code. Currently this dataset does not include City of Pittsburgh dogs.

  3. Telomere Lengths and Telomerase Activity in Dog Tissues: A Potential Model System to Study Human Telomere and Telomerase Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Nasir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on telomere and telomerase biology are fundamental to the understanding of aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. However, human studies have been hindered by differences in telomere biology between humans and the classical murine animal model system. In this paper, we describe basic studies of telomere length and telomerase activity in canine normal and neoplastic tissues and propose the dog as an alternative model system. Briefly, telomere lengths were measured in normal canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, a range of normal canine tissues, and in a panel of naturally occurring soft tissue tumours by terminal restriction fragment (TRF analysis. Further, telomerase activity was measured in canine cell lines and multiple canine tissues using a combined polymerase chain reaction/enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. TRF analysis in canine PBMCs and tissues demonstrated mean TRF lengths to range between 12 and 23 kbp with heterogeneity in telomere lengths being observed in a range of normal somatic tissues. In soft tissue sarcomas, two subgroups were identified with mean TRFs of 22.2 and 18.2 kbp. Telomerase activity in canine tissue was present in tumour tissue and testis with little or no activity in normal somatic tissues. These results suggest that the dog telomere biology is similar to that in humans and may represent an alternative model system for studying telomere biology and telomerase-targeted anticancer therapies.

  4. Dehydrothermally Cross-Linked Collagen Membrane with a Bone Graft Improves Bone Regeneration in a Rat Calvarial Defect Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin-Zhe An; Young-Ku Heo; Jung-Seok Lee; Ui-Won Jung; Seong-Ho Choi

    2017-01-01

    ...) material was evaluated in a critical-sized rat model. An 8-mm-diameter defect was created in the calvaria of 40 rats, which were randomized into four groups: (1) control; (2) DHT; (3) BG; and, (4) DHT + BG...

  5. Eddy Current Inversion Models for Estimating Dimensions of Defects in Multilayered Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In eddy current nondestructive evaluation, one of the principal challenges is to determine the dimensions of defects in multilayered structures from the measured signals. It is a typical inverse problem which is generally considered to be nonlinear and ill-posed. In the paper, two effective approaches have been proposed to estimate the defect dimensions. The first one is a partial least squares (PLS regression method. The second one is a kernel partial least squares (KPLS regression method. The experimental research is carried out. In experiments, the eddy current signals responding to magnetic field changes are detected by a giant magnetoresistive (GMR sensor and preprocessed for noise elimination using a wavelet packet analysis (WPA method. Then, the proposed two approaches are used to construct the inversion models of defect dimension estimation. Finally, the estimation results are analyzed. The performance comparison between the proposed two approaches and the artificial neural network (ANN method is presented. The comparison results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed two methods. Between them, the KPLS regression method gives a better prediction performance than the PLS regression method at present.

  6. Coralline hydroxyapatite is a suitable bone graft substitute in an intra-articular goat defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koëter, S; Tigchelaar, S J; Farla, P; Driessen, L; van Kampen, A; Buma, P

    2009-07-01

    Intra-articular defects can be filled with an autologous bone graft taken from the iliac crest. This can be indicated after trauma or following correcting osteotomy. Patients may encounter donor site morbidity after this procedure. In this in vivo study, we studied if coralline hydroxyapatite (CHA) is a suitable material to replace autologous bone graft to fill a defect in the femoral trochlea of goats. CHA did not evoke any negative reaction in the synovium, and the articular cartilage was comparable to controls. In the bone graft group, we found scattered areas of (enchondral formed) bone. Most bone graft had been resorbed or remodeled, and the scarce remnants were incorporated into new bone. Resorption of CHA was limited or absent and most CHA was surrounded by new bone. In areas with fragmented CHA, close to the joint surface, numerous giant cells were found. The study shows that in this animal model, CHA inserted in a defect that directly communicates with the joint space incorporates into bone. This study did not show any negative effects of CHA in a joint environment.

  7. Antisite Defects of the L12 Structure Determined by the Phase Field Microelasticity Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; CHEN Zheng; LU Yan-Li; WANG Yong-Xin; ZHAO Yan

    2009-01-01

    A phase field microelasticity simulation is performed to examine the antisite defect of L12-Ni3Al in Ni75Al5.3 V19.7 ternary alloy.Combinimg strain energy with the phase field model leads to an atom conflguration change as time proceeds.For the Ni sublattice,the antisite defect AlNi,the equilibrium occupancy probability (OP) of which declines,precedes NiNi and VNi in reaching equilibrium;subsequently,NiNi and VNi present a phenomenon of symmetrical rise and decline individuaily.Similarly,for the Al sublattice,the antisite defect NiAl,the OP of which eventually rises,takes fewer time steps than AlAl and VAl to attain equilibrium.Thereafter,AlAl rises while VAl declines symmetrically at the axes of the NiAl curve.Furthermore,the OP for the Al sublattice is much more sensitive to strain energy than that for the Ni sublattice.%$Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 50671084 and 50875217,the Doctoral Foundation of Northwestcrn Polytechnical University under Grant No CX200806,the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Programme of Higher Education of China under Grant No 20070420218,and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province.

  8. Protein and amino acid bioavailability of extruded dog food with protein meals of different quality using growing mink () as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjernsbekk, M T; Tauson, A-H; Matthiesen, C F; Ahlstrøm, Ø

    2016-09-01

    The present study evaluated growing mink () as a model for dietary protein quality assessment of protein meals used in extruded dog foods. Three foods with similar CP content but of different protein quality were produced using different protein meals. The protein meals varied with respect to CP digestibility and AA composition and included lamb meal (LBM), poultry meal (PM), and fish meal (FM) with low, intermediate, and high protein quality, respectively. Nitrogen balance, BW gain, protein efficiency ratio (PER), and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) were used as measures of protein and AA bioavailability in growing mink. Standardized ileal digestibility (SID) was used to measure protein and AA bioavailability in adult dogs (). The mink study (3 × 3 Latin square design) included 12 kits aged 8 to 11 wk. The dog study included 12 dogs divided in 3 groups allocated to 1 of the experimental diets. The growing mink responded in accordance with the different AA supply between diets, as determined by the first limiting AA. The LBM diet deviated from the other diets with lower ( dogs, SID of CP and AA differed ( ≤ 0.017) between diets and was generally lowest for the LBM diet, intermediate for the PM diet, and greatest for the FM diet. For CP, SID was 71.5, 80.2, and 87.0% for the LBM, PM, and FM diets, respectively. The contents of digestible CP and AA (based on SID) covered the minimal requirement for adult dogs set by the NRC for all diets, except for the content of digestible Met + Cys in the LBM diet. Despite this, dietary content of Met + Cys in the LBM diet agreed with the recommended level set by the NRC and the Association of American Feed Control Officials for adult dogs but was below the level recommended by the European Pet Food Industry Federation. It was concluded that growth studies with mink kits can provide valuable information in protein quality assessment of extruded dog foods. Furthermore, the study showed that to ensure nutritional

  9. Ordering Cost Reduction in Inventory Model with Defective Items and Backorder Price Discount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppuchamy Annadurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the real market, as unsatisfied demands occur, the longer the length of lead time is, the smaller the proportion of backorder would be. In order to make up for the inconvenience and even the losses of royal and patient customers, the supplier may offer a backorder price discount to secure orders during the shortage period. Also, ordering policies determined by conventional inventory models may be inappropriate for the situation in which an arrival lot contains some defective items. To compensate for the inconvenience of backordering and to secure orders, the supplier may offer a price discount on the stockout item. The purpose of this study is to explore a coordinated inventory model including defective arrivals by allowing the backorder price discount and ordering cost as decision variables. There are two inventory models proposed in this paper, one with normally distributed demand and another with distribution free demand. A computer code using the software Matlab 7.0 is developed to find the optimal solution and present numerical examples to illustrate the models. The results in the numerical examples indicate that the savings of the total cost are realized through ordering cost reduction and backorder price discount.

  10. Partial restoration of cardio-vascular defects in a rescued severe model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shababi, Monir; Habibi, Javad; Ma, Lixin; Glascock, Jacqueline J; Sowers, James R; Lorson, Christian L

    2012-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infantile death. Loss of a gene called Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) and, as a result, reduced levels of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein leads to SMA development. SMA is characterized by the loss of functional motor neurons in the spinal cord. However, accumulating evidence suggests the contribution of other organs to the composite SMA phenotype and disease progression. A growing number of congenital heart defects have been identified in severe SMA patients. Consistent with the clinical cases, we have recently identified developmental and functional heart defects in two SMA mouse models, occurring at embryonic stage in a severe SMA model and shortly after birth in a less severe model (SMN∆7). Our goal was to examine the late stage cardiac abnormalities in untreated SMN∆7 mice and to determine whether gene replacement therapy restores cardiac structure/function in rescued SMN∆7 model. To reveal the extent of the cardiac structural/functional repair in the rescued mice, we analyzed the heart of untreated and treated SMN∆7 model using self-complementary Adeno-associated virus (serotype 9) expressing the full-length SMN cDNA. We examined the characteristics of the heart failure such as remodeling, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and vascular integrity in both groups. Our results clearly indicate that fibrosis, oxidative stress activation, vascular remodeling, and a significant decrease in the number of capillaries exist in the SMA heart. The cardiac structural defects were improved drastically in the rescued animals, however, the level of impairment was still significant compared to the age-matched wildtype littermates. Furthermore, functional analysis by in vivo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the heart of the treated SMA mice still exhibits functional defects. In conclusion, cardiac abnormalities are only partially rescued in post-birth treated SMA animals and these

  11. Dog Ecology and Dog Rabies Control

    OpenAIRE

    Wandeler, A I; Budde, A.; Capt, S.; Kappeler, A.; Matter, H.

    2017-01-01

    Dog populations, like other populations, depend on the availability of resources (food, water, and shelter). Humans either make available or deliberately withhold resources for varying proportions of dog populations. Dog-keeping practices and the duties of responsible ownership vary with the cultural setting. Dog populations often attain densities that allow the species to be a main host of rabies. The epidemiology of dog rabies is not well understood, despite the easy access to dog populatio...

  12. Determination of Electrochemical Performance and Thermo-Mechanical-Chemical Stability of SOFCs from Defect Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2006-09-30

    This research was focused on two distinct but related issues. The first issue concerned using defect modeling to understand the relationship between point defect concentration and the electrochemical, thermo-chemical and mechano-chemical properties of typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) materials. The second concerned developing relationships between the microstructural features of SOFC materials and their electrochemical performance. To understand the role point defects play in ceramics, a coherent analytical framework was used to develop expressions for the dependence of thermal expansion and elastic modulus on point defect concentration in ceramics. These models, collectively termed the continuum-level electrochemical model (CLEM), were validated through fits to experimental data from electrical conductivity, I-V characteristics, elastic modulus and thermo-chemical expansion experiments for (nominally pure) ceria, gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with consistently good fits. The same values for the material constants were used in all of the fits, further validating our approach. As predicted by the continuum-level electrochemical model, the results reveal that the concentration of defects has a significant effect on the physical properties of ceramic materials and related devices. Specifically, for pure ceria and GDC, the elastic modulus decreased while the chemical expansion increased considerably in low partial pressures of oxygen. Conversely, the physical properties of YSZ remained insensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure within the studied range. Again, the findings concurred exactly with the predictions of our analytical model. Indeed, further analysis of the results suggests that an increase in the point defect content weakens the attractive forces between atoms in fluorite-structured oxides. The reduction treatment effects on the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of pure ceria were also evaluated at

  13. Evaluation of Osteoconductive and Osteogenic Potential of a Dentin-Based Bone Substitute Using a Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the osteoconductive and osteogenic properties of processed bovine dentin using a robust rabbit calvarial defect model. In total, 16 New Zealand White rabbits were operated to create three circular defects in the calvaria. One defect was left unfilled, one filled with collected autogenous bone, and the third defect was filled with the dentin-based bone substitute. Following surgery and after a healing period of either 1 or 6 weeks, a CT scan was obtained. Following sacrificing, the tissues were processed for histological examination. The CT data showed the density in the area grafted with the dentin-based material was higher than the surrounding bone and the areas grafted with autologous bone after 1 week and 6 weeks of healing. The area left unfilled remained an empty defect after 1 week and 6 weeks. Histological examination of the defects filled with the dentin product after 6 weeks showed soft tissue encapsulation around the dentin particles. It can be concluded that the rabbit calvarial model used in this study is a robust model for the assessment of bone materials. Bovine dentin is a biostable material; however, it may not be suitable for repairing large 4-wall defects.

  14. Quantitative comparison of mathematical models to measure surface area of canine teeth prepared to receive full veneer crowns in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn eCollins

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed in order to determine if mathematical modeling of the canine teeth in dogs could be utilized to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of crown surface area that could be used in both a research and clinical setting.Materials and methods: Actual surface area (aSA calculations for 32 stone dies of clinical crown preparations were acquired utilizing a tridimensional (3D laser scanner and 3D computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM software applications. These calculations were used as a control. Seventeen unique mathematical models from 8 geometric shapes were used to calculate estimated surface area (eSA of each stone die. Linear association and agreement between eSA and aSA calculations were assessed with multiple statistical methods. Results: All methods of eSA showed a significant linear association with aSA. Five of the mathematical models [right elliptical frustum (H3, right elliptical cone (G3, right pyramidal cone (A3, right circular frustum (F2 and right circular cone (E1] were superior to the other 12 models.Conclusions: The H3 mathematical model based on the right elliptical frustum provided the most accurate estimate of crown surface area of dog teeth. However, H3 requires the use of laser scans and a 3D CAD software program. As a result, this model would be recommended for research applications. The E1 mathematical model was similar in accuracy to H3 and, given it requires only two measurements and a comparatively simple equation for calculation, this method would be recommended for clinical chair-side use.

  15. In silico Mechano-Chemical Model of Bone Healing for the Regeneration of Critical Defects: The Effect of BMP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico O Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The healing of bone defects is a challenge for both tissue engineering and modern orthopaedics. This problem has been addressed through the study of scaffold constructs combined with mechanoregulatory theories, disregarding the influence of chemical factors and their respective delivery devices. Of the chemical factors involved in the bone healing process, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 has been identified as one of the most powerful osteoinductive proteins. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a mechano-chemical regulatory model to study the effect of BMP-2 on the healing of large bone defects in silico. We first collected a range of quantitative experimental data from the literature concerning the effects of BMP-2 on cellular activity, specifically proliferation, migration, differentiation, maturation and extracellular matrix production. These data were then used to define a model governed by mechano-chemical stimuli to simulate the healing of large bone defects under the following conditions: natural healing, an empty hydrogel implanted in the defect and a hydrogel soaked with BMP-2 implanted in the defect. For the latter condition, successful defect healing was predicted, in agreement with previous in vivo experiments. Further in vivo comparisons showed the potential of the model, which accurately predicted bone tissue formation during healing, bone tissue distribution across the defect and the quantity of bone inside the defect. The proposed mechano-chemical model also estimated the effect of BMP-2 on cells and the evolution of healing in large bone defects. This novel in silico tool provides valuable insight for bone tissue regeneration strategies.

  16. Comparison of nanoparticular hydroxyapatite pastes of different particle content and size in a novel scapula defect model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruschka, Veronika; Tangl, Stefan; Ryabenkova, Yulia; Heimel, Patrick; Barnewitz, Dirk; Möbus, Günter; Keibl, Claudia; Ferguson, James; Quadros, Paulo; Miller, Cheryl; Goodchild, Rebecca; Austin, Wayne; Redl, Heinz; Nau, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) has good biocompatibility and the potential to support bone formation. It represents a promising alternative to autologous bone grafting, which is considered the current gold standard for the treatment of low weight bearing bone defects. The purpose of this study was to compare three bone substitute pastes of different HA content and particle size with autologous bone and empty defects, at two time points (6 and 12 months) in an ovine scapula drillhole model using micro-CT, histology and histomorphometry evaluation. The nHA-LC (38% HA content) paste supported bone formation with a high defect bridging-rate. Compared to nHA-LC, Ostim® (35% HA content) showed less and smaller particle agglomerates but also a reduced defect bridging-rate due to its fast degradation The highly concentrated nHA-HC paste (48% HA content) formed oversized particle agglomerates which supported the defect bridging but left little space for bone formation in the defect site. Interestingly, the gold standard treatment of the defect site with autologous bone tissue did not improve bone formation or defect bridging compared to the empty control. We concluded that the material resorption and bone formation was highly impacted by the particle-specific agglomeration behaviour in this study. PMID:28233833

  17. A management model applied in two ‘no-kill’ dog shelters in central Italy: use of population medicine for three consecutive years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Dalla Villa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The principal tools currently used in Italy to limit stray dog populations are dog registration and identification, birth control and increasing public awareness. Since 1991, national legislation does not permit euthanasia of unwanted roaming dogs unless they have an incurable condition or are proven to be dangerous. Unattended dogs are placed in long-term shelters in questionable conditions where they often remain for most of their lives. Kennel management is one of the most critical aspects of animal welfare, particularly as the number of stray dogs is rising faster than the current rate of adoption. The Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell’Abruzzo e del Molise ‘G. Caporale’ (IZS A&M manages two kennels in Teramo and uses standard management procedures that include regular behavioural and physical examinations. All results recorded in a computer database were analysed to identify production goals and improve welfare, in line with a population medicine model. Prevalence and incidence of different pathologies were recorded and analysed to improve veterinary management and organisation. No new dogs were admitted from 2005 onwards, thereby producing an ideal ‘closed system’ where the effects of rational management can be studied in the absence of unpredictable risks from introduced pathologies. Statistical evaluations revealed major differences between 2006 and 2007. The use of the ‘population medicine’ management system resulted in improved dog health and welfare, as indicated by the significant reduction in both the prevalence and incidence of major pathologies between 2006 and 2007. A significant improvement was also seen in the control of the incidence of leishmaniasis which reduced sharply during this period.

  18. Passivity of Metals in the Point Defect Model: Effect of Chloride [Part-III

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel, Bosco

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of addition of chloride on the stability of the compact oxide layer pre-existing on a metal surface at a given impressed potential and . The variant of the point defect model (PDM)advanced by us recently is used to construct a theory for the chloride-induced build-up of metal vacancies at the metal-film interface and the chloride-induced dissolution of the compact oxide layer. Under the quasi-steady-state approximation the relevant moving boundary value probl...

  19. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, E G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries.

  20. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Radiant Heat Transfer in Mirror Systems Considering Deep Reflecting Surface Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing large-sized mirror concentrating systems (MCS for high-temperature solar power plants, one must have at disposal reasonably reliable and economical methods and tools, making it possible to analyze its characteristics, to predict them depending on the operation conditions and accordingly to choose the most suitable system for the solution of particular task.Experimental determination of MCS characteristics requires complicated and expensive experimentation, having significant limitations on interpretation of the results, as well as limitations imposed due to the size of the structure. Therefore it is of particular interest to develop a mathematical model capable of estimating power characteristics of MCS considering the influence of operating conditions, design features, roughness and other surface defects.For efficient solution of the tasks the model must ensure simulation of solar radiant flux as well as simulation of geometrical and optical characteristics of reflection surface and their interaction. In this connection a statistical mathematical model of radiation heat exchange based on use of Monte Carlo methods and Finite Element Method was developed and realized in the software complex, making it possible to determine main characteristics of the MCS.In this paper the main attention is given to definition of MCS radiation characteristics with account for deep reflecting surface defects (cavities, craters. Deep cavities are not typical for MCS, but their occurrence is possible during operation as a result of erosion or any physical damage. For example, for space technology it is primarily micrometeorite erosion.

  2. Engraftment of Prevascularized, Tissue Engineered Constructs in a Novel Rabbit Segmental Bone Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Kaempfen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard treatment of large segmental bone defects is autologous bone transfer, which suffers from low availability and additional morbidity. Tissue engineered bone able to engraft orthotopically and a suitable animal model for pre-clinical testing are direly needed. This study aimed to evaluate engraftment of tissue-engineered bone with different prevascularization strategies in a novel segmental defect model in the rabbit humerus. Decellularized bone matrix (Tutobone seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells was used directly orthotopically or combined with a vessel and inserted immediately (1-step or only after six weeks of subcutaneous “incubation” (2-step. After 12 weeks, histological and radiological assessment was performed. Variable callus formation was observed. No bone formation or remodeling of the graft through TRAP positive osteoclasts could be detected. Instead, a variable amount of necrotic tissue formed. Although necrotic area correlated significantly with amount of vessels and the 2-step strategy had significantly more vessels than the 1-step strategy, no significant reduction of necrotic area was found. In conclusion, the animal model developed here represents a highly challenging situation, for which a suitable engineered bone graft with better prevascularization, better resorbability and higher osteogenicity has yet to be developed.

  3. A New Coated Nitinol Occluder for Transcatheter Closure of Ventricular Septal Defects in a Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study evaluated feasibility and safety of implanting the polyester-coated nitinol ventricular septal defect occluder (pcVSDO in the canine model. Methods and Results. VSD models were successfully established by transseptal ventricular septal puncture via the right jugular vein in 15 out of 18 canines. Two types of VSDOs were implanted, either with pcVSDOs (n=8 as the new type occluder group or with the commercial ventricular septal defect occluders (VSDOs, n=7, Shanghai Sharp Memory Alloy Co. Ltd. as the control group. Sheath size was 10 French (10 Fr in two groups. Then the general state of the canines was observed after implantation. ECG and TTE were performed, respectively, at 7, 30, 90 days of follow-up. The canines were sacrificed at these time points for pathological and scanning electron microscopy examination. The devices were successfully implanted in all 15 canines and were retrievable and repositionable. There was no thrombus formation on the device or occurrence of complete heart block. The pcVSDO surface implanted at day 7 was already covered with neotissue by gross examination, and it completed endothelialization at day 30, while the commercial VSDO was covered with the neotissue in 30th day and the complete endothelialization in 90th day. Conclusion. The study shows that pcVSDO is feasible and safe to close canine VSD model and has good biocompatibility and shorter time of endothelialization.

  4. Ball bearing defect models: A study of simulated and experimental fault signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, C.; Samantaray, A. K.; Chakraborty, G.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical model based virtual prototype of a system can serve as a tool to generate huge amount of data which replace the dependence on expensive and often difficult to conduct experiments. However, the model must be accurate enough to substitute the experiments. The abstraction level and details considered during model development depend on the purpose for which simulated data should be generated. This article concerns development of simulation models for deep groove ball bearings which are used in a variety of rotating machinery. The purpose of the model is to generate vibration signatures which usually contain features of bearing defects. Three different models with increasing level-of-complexity are considered: a bearing kinematics based planar motion block diagram model developed in MATLAB Simulink which does not explicitly consider cage and traction dynamics, a planar motion model with cage, traction and contact dynamics developed using multi-energy domain bond graph formalism in SYMBOLS software, and a detailed spatial multi-body dynamics model with complex contact and traction mechanics developed using ADAMS software. Experiments are conducted using Spectra Quest machine fault simulator with different prefabricated faulted bearings. The frequency domain characteristics of simulated and experimental vibration signals for different bearing faults are compared and conclusions are drawn regarding usefulness of the developed models.

  5. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinckley, C. Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  6. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects After Oncologic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Garcia-Tutor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction in such cases, and demonstrate 3D haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning.Methods: Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600cm2. Latissimus dorsi-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland. An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. Results: The clinical series of latissimus dorsi free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the subcostal artery as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead-space.Conclusion: Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead-space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of

  7. Model calculations of edge dislocation defects and vacancies in {alpha}-Iron lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, L; Troev, T; Nankov, N; Popov, E, E-mail: lpetrov@inrne.bas.b [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-01-01

    Two models of defects in perfect {alpha}-iron lattice were discussed. In the perfect bcc iron lattice 42x42x42 a{sub o} (a{sub o} = 2,87 A) an edge dislocation was created, moving the second half of the bulk on one a{sub o} distance. This action generates a little volume in the middle of the bulk witch increases of the positron lifetime (PLT) calculated using the superimposed-atom method of Puska and Nieminen [1]. The result of 118 ps PLT in simple edge dislocation's model is in a good concurrence with earlier publications and experimental data [2]. Through the dislocation line one, two and three vacancies were localized. These models give the results for PLT of 146, 157 and 167 ps respectively. The computer simulations were performed using Finnis-Sinclair (FS) N-body potential.

  8. Spiral-defect chaos: Swift-Hohenberg model versus Boussinesq equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Rainer; Pesch, Werner; Zimmermann, Walter

    2002-03-01

    Spiral-defect chaos (SDC) in Rayleigh-Bénard convection is a well-established spatio-temporal complex pattern, which competes with stationary rolls near the onset of convection. The characteristic properties of SDC are accurately described on the basis of the standard three-dimensional Boussinesq equations. As a much simpler and attractive two-dimensional model for SDC generalized Swift-Hohenberg (SH) equations have been extensively used in the literature from the early beginning. Here, we show that the description of SDC by SH models has to be considered with care, especially regarding its long-time dynamics. For parameters used in previous SH simulations, SDC occurs only as a transient in contrast to the experiments and the rigorous solutions of the Boussinesq equations. The small-scale structure of the vorticity field at the spiral cores, which might be crucial for persistent SDC, is presumably not perfectly captured in the SH model.

  9. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  10. The effect of service level constraint on EPQ model with random defective rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of service level constraint on the economic production quantity (EPQ model with random defective rate. We first prove that the expected overall cost for imperfect quality EPQ model with backlogging permitted is less than or equal to that of the same model without backlogging. Secondly, the relationship between “imputed backorder cost” and maximal shortage level is derived for decision-making on whether the required service level is achievable. Then an equation is proposed for calculating the intangible backorder cost for the situation when the required service level is not attainable. By including this intangible backorder cost in the mathematical analysis, one can derive a new optimal lot-size policy that minimizes expected total costs as well as satisfies the service level constraint. Numerical example is provided to demonstrate its practical usage.

  11. Defect evolution in cosmology and condensed matter quantitative analysis with the velocity-dependent one-scale model

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, C J A P

    2016-01-01

    This book sheds new light on topological defects in widely differing systems, using the Velocity-Dependent One-Scale Model to better understand their evolution. Topological defects – cosmic strings, monopoles, domain walls or others - necessarily form at cosmological (and condensed matter) phase transitions. If they are stable and long-lived they will be fossil relics of higher-energy physics. Understanding their behaviour and consequences is a key part of any serious attempt to understand the universe, and this requires modelling their evolution. The velocity-dependent one-scale model is the only fully quantitative model of defect network evolution, and the canonical model in the field. This book provides a review of the model, explaining its physical content and describing its broad range of applicability.

  12. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models.

  13. Implantation of tetrapod-shaped granular artificial bones or β-tricalcium phosphate granules in a canine large bone-defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Liu, I-Li; Yamamoto, Kenichi; Honnami, Muneki; Sakai, Takamasa; Ohba, Shinsuke; Echigo, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Shigeki; Nishimura, Ryouhei; Chung, Ung-Il; Sasaki, Nobuo; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2014-03-01

    We investigated biodegradability and new bone formation after implantation of tetrapod-shaped granular artificial bone (Tetrabone®) or β-tricalcium phosphate granules (β-TCP) in experimental critical-size defects in dogs, which were created through medial and lateral femoral condyles. The defect was packed with Tetrabone® (Tetrabone group) or β-TCP (β-TCP group) or received no implant (control group). Computed tomography (CT) was performed at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. Micro-CT and histological analysis were conducted to measure the non-osseous tissue rate and the area and distribution of new bone tissue in the defect at 8 weeks after implantation. On CT, β-TCP was gradually resorbed, while Tetrabone® showed minimal resorption at 8 weeks after implantation. On micro-CT, non-osseous tissue rate of the control group was significantly higher compared with the β-TCP and Tetrabone groups (Pbone tissue of the β-TCP group was significantly greater than those of the Tetrabone and control groups (Pbone distribution of the Tetrabone group was significantly greater than those of the β-TCP and control groups (Pbone defects in dogs.

  14. Applying Ant Colony Algorithm and Neural Network Model to Color Deviation Defect Detection in Liquid Crystal Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Dar Lin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin Film Transistor Liquid Crystal Display (TFT-LCD has excellent properties such as lower voltage to start and less occupied space if comparing with traditional Cathode-Ray Tube (CRT. But screen flaw points and display color deviation defects on image display exist in TFT-LCD products. This research proposes a new automated visual inspection method to solve the problems. We first use multivariate Hotelling T2 statistic for integrating coordinates of color models to construct a T2 energy diagram for inspecting defects and controlling patterns in TFT-LCD display images. An Ant Colony based approach that integrates computer vision techniques is developed to detect the flaw point defects. Then, Back Propagation Network (BPN model is proposed to inspect small deviation defects of the LCD display colors. Experimental results show the proposed system can provide good effects and practicality.

  15. Changes in expression of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75NTR in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, R.; S.R. Duan; Zhao, J.W.; Wang, C Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption can produce learning and memory deficits. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors affect the pathogenesis of alcoholism. In this study, we examined the expression of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence. Twenty domestic dogs (9-10 months old, 15-20 kg; 10 males and 10 females) were obtained from Harbin Medical University. A stable a...

  16. A seasonal SIR metapopulation model with an Allee effect with application to controlling plague in prairie dog colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, A J; Ekanayake, D B

    2015-01-01

    For wildlife species living among patchy habitats, disease and the Allee effect (reduced per capita birth rates at low population densities) may together drive a patch's population to extinction, particularly if births are seasonal. Yet local extinction may not be indicative of global extinction, and a patch may become recolonized by migrating individuals. We introduce deterministic and stochastic susceptible, infectious, and immune epidemic models with vector species to study disease in a metapopulation with an Allee effect and seasonal birth and dispersal. We obtain conditions for the existence of a strong Allee effect and existence and stability of a disease-free positive periodic solution. These general models have application to many wildlife diseases. As a case study, we apply them to evaluate dynamics of the sylvatic plague in prairie dog colonies interconnected through dispersal. We further evaluate the effects of control of the vector population and control by immunization on plague eradication.

  17. New composite patches and biologic patches for repair of contaminated abdominal wall defect in dogs: A comparative study%污染环境下新型复合补片和生物补片修补犬腹壁缺损的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑亚杰; 田文; 丁国飞; 姚京; 马冰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the characteristics of two compound patches made of collagen and polypropylene(PP) and the feasibility of their application in repair of contaminated wounds. Methods Twenty-four adult male dogs, weighing 16-20kg, were included in this study. A dog model with 3 contaminated defects at the upper, left and right abdominal wall was established. The 3 abdominal wall defects were repaired by implanting 3 kinds of patches into them. The patches were divided into PP and collagen compound patch group(group A), porcine cross-linked biologic patch group(group B), and cattle cross-linked biologic patch group(group C). A dog abdominal hernia model was established. A segment of small intestine was removed, into which 10ml 0.9% sodium chloride solution was injected and then aspirated to contaminate the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and patches. The abdominal wall defects were closed with 5cm × 5cm patches. The dogs were killed on day 90 after operation to observe the adhesion of organs in abdominal cavity. The patches and their adjacent tissue were cut into sections for histological study. Results No death occurred while patch and omentum adhesion was observed in different groups 90 days after operation. Histological study showed that the scores of proliferating fibroblasts, inflammatory reaction and formation of new blood vessels were higher in group A than in groups B and C. Conclusion The effect of PP and collagen compound patch and biological patch is similar in preventing adhesion under contaminated environment. However, it leads to severer proliferation of fibroblasts, inflammatory reaction and formation of new blood vessels than biologic patch.%目的 比较胶原蛋白与聚丙烯(polypropylene,PP) 制作的复合补片和两种生物补片的特点及其应用于污染伤口一期修补的可行性.方法 成年雄性普通犬24 只,体质量16-20kg,在同一只动物上、左、右腹部建立三个污染缺损模型,将3 种补

  18. Oxygen Nonstoichiometry and Defect Chemistry Modeling of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2010-01-01

    The oxygen nonstoichiometry (delta) of Ce0.8Pr0.2O2−delta has been measured as a function of PO2 at temperatures between 600 and 900°C by coulometric titration and thermogravimetry. An ideal solution defect model, a regular solution model, and a defect association model, taking into account...... the association of reduced dopant species and oxygen vacancies, were unable to reproduce the experimental results. However, excellent agreement with the experimentally determined oxygen nonstoichiometry could be achieved when using either a nonideal solution model with an excess enthalpic term linear in delta...... (DeltaHPrexc=aHdelta) and a completely random distribution of defects (referred to as “delta-linear”), or a “generalized delta-linear” solution model, where the excess Gibbs energy change in the reduction reaction of the dopant linearly varies with delta (DeltaGPrexc=aGdelta). A comparison of the partial...

  19. Systemic and local reactions of a water-soluble copolymer bone on a bony defect of rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tao-Chen; Chang, Nyuk-Kong; Su, Feng-Wen; Yang, Yu-Lin; Su, Thung-Ming; Lin, Yu-Jun; Lin, Wan-Ching; Huang, Hsiu-Yu

    2009-12-01

    Ostene, a synthetic water-soluble bone hemostatic agent, is commercially available. In the current study, we evaluated the systemic and local effects of this copolymer in a rabbit model. Eighteen rabbits underwent creation of a bony defect at right iliac crest. These rabbits were then evenly divided into 3 groups. In group 1, the defect surfaces were treated with bone wax; in group 2, the defect surfaces were treated with Ostene; in group 3, the defect surfaces were not treated with anything. Then, the animals underwent blood examinations, including WBC count, CRP, and ESR at 0, 1, 3, and 6 weeks, and were killed at 6 weeks for histologic examination. Another 6 rabbits (group 4) underwent the same surgical treatment of group 2 animals but had blood examinations of BUN and creatinine. The blood examinations showed that the WBC count, CRP, and ESR of all the animals in the first 3 groups were within normal limits in the postoperative periods. Microscopic examinations demonstrated residual bone wax and fibrotic tissue at the defect surfaces in group 1 animals. However, there was no Ostene at the defect surfaces in group 2 animals. The groups 2 and 3 animals showed no fibrotic tissue at the defect surfaces. The group 4 animals showed normal serum levels of BUN and creatinine in the postoperative periods. Ostene is absorbable and induces no systemic inflammation (including acute renal damage) and local inflammation in animal bodies.

  20. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  1. Development and characterization of a rabbit alveolar bone nonhealing defect model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, S.; Bashoura, A.G.; Borden, T.; Baggett, L.S.; Jansen, J.A.; Wong, M.; Mikos, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an easily accessible and reproducible, nonhealing alveolar bone defect in the rabbit mandible. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand white rabbits underwent unilateral mandibular defect surgery. Two types of defect in the premolar/molar region were compared: (1) a 1

  2. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  3. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  4. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  5. Monte Carlo Study of Topological Defects in the 3D Heisenberg Model

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C; Holm, Christian; Janke, Wolfhard

    1994-01-01

    We use single-cluster Monte Carlo simulations to study the role of topological defects in the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model on simple cubic lattices of size up to $80^3$. By applying reweighting techniques to time series generated in the vicinity of the approximate infinite volume transition point $K_c$, we obtain clear evidence that the temperature derivative of the average defect density $d\\langle n \\rangle/dT$ behaves qualitatively like the specific heat, i.e., both observables are finite in the infinite volume limit. This is in contrast to results by Lau and Dasgupta [{\\em Phys. Rev.\\/} {\\bf B39} (1989) 7212] who extrapolated a divergent behavior of $d\\langle n \\rangle/dT$ at $K_c$ from simulations on lattices of size up to $16^3$. We obtain weak evidence that $d\\langle n \\rangle/dT$ scales with the same critical exponent as the specific heat.As a byproduct of our simulations, we obtain a very accurate estimate for the ratio $\\alpha/\

  6. Defective craniofacial development and brain function in a mouse model for depletion of intracellular inositol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Murata, Takuya; Watanabe, Akiko; Hida, Akiko; Ohba, Hisako; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Mishima, Kazuo; Gondo, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2014-04-11

    myo-Inositol is an essential biomolecule that is synthesized by myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) from inositol monophosphate species. The enzymatic activity of IMPase is inhibited by lithium, a drug used for the treatment of mood swings seen in bipolar disorder. Therefore, myo-inositol is thought to have an important role in the mechanism of bipolar disorder, although the details remain elusive. We screened an ethyl nitrosourea mutant mouse library for IMPase gene (Impa) mutations and identified an Impa1 T95K missense mutation. The mutant protein possessed undetectable enzymatic activity. Homozygotes died perinatally, and E18.5 embryos exhibited striking developmental defects, including hypoplasia of the mandible and asymmetric fusion of ribs to the sternum. Perinatal lethality and morphological defects in homozygotes were rescued by dietary myo-inositol. Rescued homozygotes raised on normal drinking water after weaning exhibited a hyper-locomotive trait and prolonged circadian periods, as reported in rodents treated with lithium. Our mice should be advantageous, compared with those generated by the conventional gene knock-out strategy, because they carry minimal genomic damage, e.g. a point mutation. In conclusion, our results reveal critical roles for intracellular myo-inositol synthesis in craniofacial development and the maintenance of proper brain function. Furthermore, this mouse model for cellular inositol depletion could be beneficial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effect of lithium and myo-inositol-mediated skeletal development.

  7. Defective Craniofacial Development and Brain Function in a Mouse Model for Depletion of Intracellular Inositol Synthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Murata, Takuya; Watanabe, Akiko; Hida, Akiko; Ohba, Hisako; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Mishima, Kazuo; Gondo, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    myo-Inositol is an essential biomolecule that is synthesized by myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) from inositol monophosphate species. The enzymatic activity of IMPase is inhibited by lithium, a drug used for the treatment of mood swings seen in bipolar disorder. Therefore, myo-inositol is thought to have an important role in the mechanism of bipolar disorder, although the details remain elusive. We screened an ethyl nitrosourea mutant mouse library for IMPase gene (Impa) mutations and identified an Impa1 T95K missense mutation. The mutant protein possessed undetectable enzymatic activity. Homozygotes died perinatally, and E18.5 embryos exhibited striking developmental defects, including hypoplasia of the mandible and asymmetric fusion of ribs to the sternum. Perinatal lethality and morphological defects in homozygotes were rescued by dietary myo-inositol. Rescued homozygotes raised on normal drinking water after weaning exhibited a hyper-locomotive trait and prolonged circadian periods, as reported in rodents treated with lithium. Our mice should be advantageous, compared with those generated by the conventional gene knock-out strategy, because they carry minimal genomic damage, e.g. a point mutation. In conclusion, our results reveal critical roles for intracellular myo-inositol synthesis in craniofacial development and the maintenance of proper brain function. Furthermore, this mouse model for cellular inositol depletion could be beneficial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effect of lithium and myo-inositol-mediated skeletal development. PMID:24554717

  8. Levels of inflammation and oxidative stress, and a role for taurine in dystropathology of the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy dog model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Terrill

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a fatal skeletal muscle wasting disease presenting with excessive myofibre necrosis and increased inflammation and oxidative stress. In the mdx mouse model of DMD, homeostasis of the amino acid taurine is altered, and taurine administration drastically decreases muscle necrosis, dystropathology, inflammation and protein thiol oxidation. Since the severe pathology of the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD dog model more closely resembles the human DMD condition, we aimed to assess the generation of oxidants by inflammatory cells and taurine metabolism in this species. In muscles of 8 month GRMD dogs there was an increase in the content of neutrophils and macrophages, and an associated increase in elevated myeloperoxidase, a protein secreted by neutrophils that catalyses production of the highly reactive hypochlorous acid (HOCl. There was also increased chlorination of tyrosines, a marker of HOCl generation, increased thiol oxidation of many proteins and irreversible oxidative protein damage. Taurine, which functions as an antioxidant by trapping HOCl, was reduced in GRMD plasma; however taurine was increased in GRMD muscle tissue, potentially due to increased muscle taurine transport and synthesis. These data indicate a role for HOCl generated by neutrophils in the severe dystropathology of GRMD dogs, which may be exacerbated by decreased availability of taurine in the blood. These novel data support continued research into the precise roles of oxidative stress and taurine in DMD and emphasise the value of the GRMD dogs as a suitable pre-clinical model for testing taurine as a therapeutic intervention for DMD boys.

  9. Application of an Artificial Stomach-Duodenum Reduced Gastric pH Dog Model for Formulation Principle Assessment and Mechanistic Performance Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Ming; Luner, Paul E; Locke, Karen; Briggs, Katherine

    2017-02-23

    The objective of this study was to develop an artificial stomach-duodenum (ASD) dissolution model as an in vitro evaluation tool that would simulate the gastrointestinal physiology of gastric pH-reduced dogs as a method to assess formulations for a poorly soluble free acid compound with ng/mL solubility. After establishing the ASD model with well controlled duodenum pH, five formulations each applying different solubilization principles were developed and their performance in the ASD model and in vivo in dogs was evaluated. Excellent correlations were obtained between dog AUC and ASD AUC of five formulations evaluated with SIF (r(2) = 0.987) and FaSSIF (r(2) = 0.989) as the duodenum dissolution medium, indicating that the approach of infusing NaOH into duodenum compartment to maintain duodenum pH of an ASD worked properly in simulating gastric pH-reduced dog. Raman spectroscopy was used to study drug dissolution kinetics associated with different solubilization principles and the results suggested that the solubilization principles performed as designed. Spectroscopic results also identified that the compound formed a gel during dissolution and HPMC maintained the drug gelled state to avoid further solid form conversion. The implication of the compound physical gelation to drug dissolution kinetics and in vivo exposure are discussed.

  10. The novel antiepileptic drug imepitoin compares favourably to other GABA-mimetic drugs in a seizure threshold model in mice and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Katrin; Twele, Friederike; Potschka, Heidrun; Töllner, Kathrin

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the imidazolinone derivative imepitoin has been approved for treatment of canine epilepsy. Imepitoin acts as a low-affinity partial agonist at the benzodiazepine (BZD) site of the GABAA receptor and is the first compound with such mechanism that has been developed as an antiepileptic drug (AED). This mechanism offers several advantages compared to full agonists, including less severe adverse effects and a lack of tolerance and dependence liability, which has been demonstrated in rodents, dogs, and nonhuman primates. In clinical trials in epileptic dogs, imepitoin was shown to be an effective and safe AED. Recently, seizures in dogs have been proposed as a translational platform for human therapeutic trials on new epilepsy treatments. In the present study, we compared the anticonvulsant efficacy of imepitoin, phenobarbital and the high-affinity partial BZD agonist abecarnil in the timed i.v. pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold test in dogs and, for comparison, in mice. Furthermore, adverse effects of treatments were compared in both species. All drugs dose-dependently increased the PTZ threshold in both species, but anticonvulsant efficacy was higher in dogs than mice. At the doses selected for this study, imepitoin was slightly less potent than phenobarbital in increasing seizure threshold, but markedly more tolerable in both species. Effective doses of imepitoin in the PTZ seizure model were in the same range as those suppressing spontaneous recurrent seizures in epileptic dogs. The study demonstrates that low-affinity partial agonists at the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor, such as imepitoin, offer advantages as a new category of AEDs.

  11. Hero Dog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1997-01-01

    Today a dog in the neighborhood is getting showered with packages of beefsteak!He deserves every bite, too! He is a hero. He rescued his family from a terrible fire. Do you remember looking over my balcony at the rowhouses down on Spruce

  12. Etiology of patent ductus arteriosus in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, James W; Patterson, Donald F

    2003-01-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is the most common congenital heart disease in dogs and usually causes heart failure and death unless corrected at a young age. Previous histologic studies in a line of dogs derived from Miniature Poodles with hereditary PDA identified varying degrees of hypoplasia and asymmetry of ductus-specific smooth muscle and the presence of aortalike elastic tissue in the ductus wall sufficient to cause patency. To determine if similar structural abnormalities cause PDA in other dogs, serial-section, 3-dimensional histology of ductal architecture was studied in 8 non-Poodle purebred dogs with PDA with no immediate family history of PDA. Morphologic abnormalities were observed in 7 of 8 dogs with PDA and essentially were the same as those in dogs known to have a hereditary form of PDA. These findings suggest that apparently sporadic PDA in these breeds is caused by a genetic defect in the structure of the ductus arteriosus that is similar or identical to that in the Poodle. The relatives of dogs with PDA, particularly parents, offspring, and siblings, should be screened for evidence of PDA. Dogs with PDA should not be used for breeding, regardless of breed.

  13. Application of a Four-dimensional Mathematical Model in the Establishment of an Early Post-burn Cerebral Oedema Model in Severely Burned Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Haitao, L.; Dajun, Y.; Kaifa, W.; Xiuwu, B.; Jiansen, S.; Zongchen, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the spatiotemporal development of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn (50% TBSA, third degree), using a four-dimensional (4D) mathematical model. Twenty-six male mongrel dogs were randomly divided into control and 6, 12, 18, and 24 post-burn hour (PBH) groups. The manifestation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology, changes of brain water content, and intracranial pressure were observed in each group respectively. A 4D mathem...

  14. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  15. An EMQ inventory model for defective products involving rework and sales team's initiatives-dependent demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyan, S.; Uthayakumar, R.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the issue of an economic manufacturing quantity model for defective products involving imperfect production processes and rework. We consider that the demand is sensitive to promotional efforts/sales teams' initiatives as well as the setup cost can be reduced through further investment. It also assumes that fixed quantity multiple installments of the finished batch are delivered to customers at a fixed interval of time. The long-run average cost function is derived and its convexity is proved via differential calculus. An effective iterative solution procedure is developed to achieve optimal replenishment lot-size, setup cost and the initiatives of sales teams so that the total cost of system is minimized. Numerical and sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate the outcome of the proposed solution procedure presented in this research.

  16. Stability of string defects in models of non-Abelian symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Thatcher, M J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new type of topological defect, called a homilia string, which is stabilized via interactions with the string network. Using analytical and numerical techniques, we investigate the stability and dynamics of homilia strings, and their implications for cosmology. In SU(N) models of symmetry breaking, monopoles are identified with the intersection of two homilia strings. Due to repulsive forces, the homilia strings seperate, resulting in monopole annihilation. Homilia string loops cannot stabilize as vortons, which circumvents the adverse cosmological consequences of stable loops. In principle, measurments of the cosmic microwave background can distinguish between the smaller fluctuations induced by a homilia string network and those due to primordial cosmic strings.

  17. Long-range interactions, wobbles, and phase defects in chains of model cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Douglas R.; Bruot, Nicolas; Kotar, Jurij; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Cicuta, Pietro; Polin, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are chemo-mechanical oscillators capable of generating long-range coordinated motions known as metachronal waves. Pair synchronization is a fundamental requirement for these collective dynamics, but it is generally not sufficient for collective phase-locking, chiefly due to the effect of long-range interactions. Here we explore experimentally and numerically a minimal model for a ciliated surface: hydrodynamically coupled oscillators rotating above a no-slip plane. Increasing their distance from the wall profoundly affects the global dynamics, due to variations in hydrodynamic interaction range. The array undergoes a transition from a traveling wave to either a steady chevron pattern or one punctuated by periodic phase defects. Within the transition between these regimes the system displays behavior reminiscent of chimera states.

  18. Zebrafish models of idiopathic scoliosis link cerebrospinal fluid flow defects to spine curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D T; Boswell, C W; Morante, N F C; Henkelman, R M; Burdine, R D; Ciruna, B

    2016-06-10

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) affects 3% of children worldwide, yet the mechanisms underlying this spinal deformity remain unknown. Here we show that ptk7 mutant zebrafish, a faithful developmental model of IS, exhibit defects in ependymal cell cilia development and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. Transgenic reintroduction of Ptk7 in motile ciliated lineages prevents scoliosis in ptk7 mutants, and mutation of multiple independent cilia motility genes yields IS phenotypes. We define a finite developmental window for motile cilia in zebrafish spine morphogenesis. Notably, restoration of cilia motility after the onset of scoliosis blocks spinal curve progression. Together, our results indicate a critical role for cilia-driven CSF flow in spine development, implicate irregularities in CSF flow as an underlying biological cause of IS, and suggest that noninvasive therapeutic intervention may prevent severe scoliosis.

  19. Electrospun biodegradable microfibers induce new collagen formation in a rat abdominal wall defect model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Menglin; Glindtvad, Cecilie; Vinge Nygaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Half of the female population over age 50 years will experience pelvic organ prolapse. We suggest a new approach based on tissue engineering principles to functionally reconstruct the anatomical structures of the pelvic floor. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanical performance...... and effect on collagen and elastin production of a degradable mesh releasing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Implantation of biodegradable mesh with or without bFGF in their core has been conducted in 40 rats in an abdominal wall defect model. Samples were explanted after 4, 8, and 24 weeks...... after 4 weeks with bFGF but signs of elastin fibers were seen at 24 weeks. The investigation showed that a biodegradable mesh promotes tissue formation with a promising strength. The mesh with bFGF did not represent any advantage on either long or short term in comparison to the mesh without b...

  20. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhance Cartilage Repair in in vivo Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Hopper

    Full Text Available This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC's were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD90, CD106, CD105, CD146 and CD166 cell surface markers. Osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC of 24 Welsh mountain sheep and evaluated at a six month time point. Four cell treatment groups were evaluated in combination with collagen-GAG-scaffold: (1 MSC alone; (2 MSCs and PBMCs at a ratio of 20:1; (3 MSCs and PBMC at a ratio of 2:1 and (4 PBMCs alone. Samples from the surgical site were evaluated for mechanical properties, ICRS score and histological repair. Fresh PBMC samples were 90% positive for hematopoietic cell surface markers and negative for the MSC antibody panel (<1%, p = 0.006. However, the adherent PBMC population expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers in hypoxic culture and lacked CD34/45 positive cells (<0.2%. This finding demonstrated that the adherent cells had acquired an MSC-like phenotype and transformed in hypoxia from their original hematopoietic lineage. Four key genes in muskuloskeletal biology were significantly upregulated in adherent PBMCs by hypoxia: BMP2 4.2-fold (p = 0.0007, BMP6 10.7-fold (p = 0.0004, GDF5 2.0-fold (p = 0.002 and COL1 5.0-fold (p = 0.046. The monolayer multilineage analysis confirmed the trilineage mesenchymal potential of the adherent PBMCs. PBMC cell therapy was equally good as bone marrow MSC therapy for defects in the ovine large animal model. Our results show that PBMCs support cartilage healing and oxygen tension of the environment was found to have a key

  1. Orally administered DTPA di-ethyl ester for decorporation of (241)Am in dogs: Assessment of safety and efficacy in an inhalation-contamination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, James E; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Agha, Bushra J; Susick, Robert L; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for decorporation of (241)Am; however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The di-ethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Single-dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-h post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a (241)Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased (241)Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of (241)Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of (241)Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies.

  2. Orally Administered DTPA Di-ethyl Ester for Decorporation of 241Am in dogs: Assessment of Safety and Efficacy in an Inhalation-Contamination Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, James E.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Agha, Bushra J.; Susick, Robert L.; Mumper, Russell J.; Jay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for decorporation of 241Am, however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The diethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Materials and methods Single dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-hours post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a 241Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Results Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased 241Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of 241Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. Conclusions The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of 241Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies. PMID:25912343

  3. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  4. Feeding FIDO : development, validation and application of a dynamic, in vitro model of the gastrointestinal tract of the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets-Peeters, M.

    2000-01-01

    To produce a complete and balanced dog diet it is necessary to know the nutritional needs of the dog as well as the availability of nutrients from the diet. Petfood manufacturers are restricted in performing (invasive) studies with animals for ethical reasons. Therefore, it is necessary to

  5. Validation of a finite element model of a unilateral external fixator in a rabbit tibia defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunratanakul, Kavin; Kerckhofs, Greet; Lammens, Johan; Vanlauwe, Johan; Schrooten, Jan; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2013-07-01

    In case of large segmental defects in load-bearing bones, an external fixator is used to provide mechanical stability to the defect site. The overall stiffness of the bone-fixator system is determined not only by the fixator design but also by the way the fixator is mounted to the bone. This stiffness is an important factor as it will influence the biomechanical environment to which tissue engineering scaffolds and regenerating tissues are exposed. A finite element (FE) model can be used to predict the system stiffness. The goal of this study is to develop and validate a 3D anatomical FE model of a bone-fixator system which includes a previously developed unilateral external fixator for a large segmental defect model in the rabbit tibia. It was hypothesized that the contact interfaces between bone and fixator screws play a major role for the prediction of the stiffness. In vitro mechanical testing was performed in order to measure the axial stiffness of cortical bone from mid-shaft rabbit tibiae and of the tibia-fixator system, as well as the bending stiffness of individual fixator screws, inserted in bone. μCT-based case-specific FE models of cortical bone and SCREW-BONE specimens were created to simulate the corresponding mechanical test set-ups. The Young's modulus of rabbit cortical bone as well as appropriate screw-bone contact settings were derived from those FE models. We then used the derived settings in an FE model of the tibia-fixator system. The difference between the FE predicted and measured axial stiffness of the tibia-fixator system was reduced from 117.93% to 7.85% by applying appropriate screw-bone contact settings. In conclusion, this study shows the importance of screw-bone contact settings for an accurate fixator stiffness prediction. The validated FE model can further be used as a tool for virtual mechanical testing in the design phase of new tissue engineering scaffolds and/or novel patient-specific external fixation devices.

  6. The appropriateness of the mouse model for ataxia-telangiectasia: neurological defects but no neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Martin F

    2013-08-01

    Patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are characterised by genome instability, cancer predisposition and a progressive neurodegeneration. A number of model systems have been developed for A-T but none recapitulate all the phenotype. The majority of these models have been generated in mice. While Atm deficient mouse models exhibit much of the phenotype described in patients with A-T, the broad consensus is that they do not display the most debilitating aspect of A-T, i.e. neurodegeneration. Cerebellar atrophy is one of the neuronal characteristics of A-T patients due to defects in neuronal development and progressive loss of Purkinje and granule cells. This is not evident in Atm-deficient mutants but there are multiple reports on neurological abnormalities in these mice. The focus of this review is to evaluate the appropriateness of Atm mutant mouse models for A-T, particularly with reference to neurological abnormalities and how they might relate to neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dog Bite Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  8. Molecular dynamics modeling of defect formation in many-layer hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephani, Kelly A., E-mail: ksteph@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to examine lattice defect formation in a hexagonal boron nitride lattice by high-energy xenon ion impact. This work seeks to characterize the production of defects which occur under ion irradiation. Lattice defect formation is first examined in single-layer hexagonal boron nitride. Energetic xenon ions over a range of 10 eV–10 keV are used to randomly impact the central lattice at an angle of 90° (orthogonal to the lattice basal plane). The resulting defects are analyzed for 5000 ion impacts, and results are reported for average single and double vacancy formation per impact. A similar study is conducted for a many-layer hexagonal boron nitride lattice, to assess the influence of additional layers in the formation of point defects as a function of incident ion energy. Ion impacts at both 90° and 45° are examined. The defects formed in the top layer of the many-layer lattice are qualitatively similar to the single layer results, but the presence of the bulk lattice is found to reduce the single vacancy probability in the top-most layer. Point defects are prominent in the lattice sub-layers with increasing ion energy. Orthogonal ion impacts are found to cause the most damage, as measured by the number of vacancy defects produced; the number of vacancies increases linearly with energy, while the number of defects in the oblique impact configuration reaches an asymptotic limit with increasing energy.

  9. Topological defect with nonzero Hopf invariant in Yang–Mills–Higgs model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a topological defect or instanton solution with nonzero Hopf invariant to the 3+1D non-Abelian gauge theory coupled with scalar fields. This solution, which we call Hopf defect, represents a spacetime event that makes a 2π rotation of vacuum manifold of the monopole. Although the action of this Hopf defect is logarithmically divergent, it may still give relevant contributions in a finite-sized system. Since the Chern–Simons term for the unbroken U(1 gauge field may appear in the low energy effective theory, the Hopf defect may possibly generate a phase factor change for the monopoles.

  10. Care for Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙犁

    2015-01-01

    <正>I choose dog issue as the starting point of my paper,for I have seen many stray dogs everywhere and also some domestic dogs have no suitable place to live,enjoy little care and have little rights.As to those stray dogs,there are many stray dogs one can see on the street.These dogs are running across roads,sidewalks even highways.Many stray dogs’dead bodies are seen on the

  11. Arrhythmia and cardiac defects are a feature of spinal muscular atrophy model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Christopher R; Satta, Rosalba; Lutz, Cathleen; DiDonato, Christine J

    2010-10-15

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Traditionally, SMA has been described as a motor neuron disease; however, there is a growing body of evidence that arrhythmia and/or cardiomyopathy may present in SMA patients at an increased frequency. Here, we ask whether SMA model mice possess such phenotypes. We find SMA mice suffer from severe bradyarrhythmia characterized by progressive heart block and impaired ventricular depolarization. Echocardiography further confirms functional cardiac deficits in SMA mice. Additional investigations show evidence of both sympathetic innervation defects and dilated cardiomyopathy at late stages of disease. Based upon these data, we propose a model in which decreased sympathetic innervation causes autonomic imbalance. Such imbalance would be characterized by a relative increase in the level of vagal tone controlling heart rate, which is consistent with bradyarrhythmia and progressive heart block. Finally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, a drug known to benefit phenotypes of SMA model mice, produces prolonged maturation of the SMA heartbeat and an increase in cardiac size. Treated mice maintain measures of motor function throughout extended survival though they ultimately reach death endpoints in association with a progression of bradyarrhythmia. These data represent the novel identification of cardiac arrhythmia as an early and progressive feature of murine SMA while providing several new, quantitative indices of mouse health. Together with clinical cases that report similar symptoms, this reveals a new area of investigation that will be important to address as we move SMA therapeutics towards clinical success.

  12. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung W; Gerencser, Akos A; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R; Gibson, Bradford W; Nicholls, David G; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D

    2012-11-21

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months, and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to age-matched controls. No consistent bioenergetic deficiencies were detected in synaptosomes from the three models; only APP/PS cortical synaptosomes from 14-month-old mice showed an increase in respiration associated with proton leak. J20 mice were chosen for a highly stringent investigation of mitochondrial function and content. There were no significant differences in the quality of the synaptosomal preparations or the mitochondrial volume fraction. Furthermore, respiratory variables, calcium handling, and membrane potentials of synaptosomes from symptomatic J20 mice under calcium-imposed stress were not consistently impaired. The recovery of marker proteins during synaptosome preparation was the same, ruling out the possibility that the lack of functional bioenergetic defects in synaptosomes from J20 mice was due to the selective loss of damaged synaptosomes during sample preparation. Our results support the conclusion that the intrinsic bioenergetic capacities of presynaptic nerve terminals are maintained in these symptomatic AD mouse models.

  13. Classical defects in higher-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to nonlinear σ -models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Ilham; Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2017-09-01

    We construct solutions of higher-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to nonlinear σ -model with cosmological constant. The σ -model can be perceived as exterior configuration of a spontaneously-broken SO(D-1) global higher-codimensional "monopole". Here we allow the kinetic term of the σ -model to be noncanonical; in particular we specifically study a quadratic-power-law type. This is some possible higher-dimensional generalization of the Bariola-Vilenkin (BV) solutions with k-global monopole studied recently. The solutions can be perceived as the exterior solution of a black hole swallowing up noncanonical global defects. Even in the absence of comological constant its surrounding spacetime is asymptotically non-flat; it suffers from deficit solid angle. We discuss the corresponding horizons. For Λ >0 in 4 d there can exist three extremal conditions (the cold, ultracold, and Nariai black holes), while in higher-than-four dimensions the extremal black hole is only Nariai. For Λ <0 we only have black hole solutions with one horizon, save for the 4 d case where there can exist two horizons. We give constraints on the mass and the symmetry-breaking scale for the existence of all the extremal cases. In addition, we also obtain factorized solutions, whose topology is the direct product of two-dimensional spaces of constant curvature (M_2, dS_2, or AdS_2) with (D-2)-sphere. We study all possible factorized channels.

  14. A Bayesian spatio-temporal model for forecasting Anaplasma species seroprevalence in domestic dogs within the contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Watson, Stella C; Gettings, Jenna R; Lund, Robert B; Nordone, Shila K; Yabsley, Michael J; McMahan, Christopher S

    2017-01-01

    This paper forecasts the 2016 canine Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence in the United States from eight climate, geographic and societal factors. The forecast's construction and an assessment of its performance are described. The forecast is based on a spatial-temporal conditional autoregressive model fitted to over 11 million Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence test results for dogs conducted in the 48 contiguous United States during 2011-2015. The forecast uses county-level data on eight predictive factors, including annual temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, county elevation, forestation coverage, surface water coverage, population density and median household income. Non-static factors are extrapolated into the forthcoming year with various statistical methods. The fitted model and factor extrapolations are used to estimate next year's regional prevalence. The correlation between the observed and model-estimated county-by-county Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence for the five-year period 2011-2015 is 0.902, demonstrating reasonable model accuracy. The weighted correlation (accounting for different sample sizes) between 2015 observed and forecasted county-by-county Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence is 0.987, exhibiting that the proposed approach can be used to accurately forecast Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence. The forecast presented herein can a priori alert veterinarians to areas expected to see Anaplasma spp. seroprevalence beyond the accepted endemic range. The proposed methods may prove useful for forecasting other diseases.

  15. Student attitudes regarding the educational value and welfare implications in the use of model eyes and live dogs in teaching practical fundus examination: evaluation of responses from 40 students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L. Williams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to document student opinions on the educational value and welfare implications of use of artificial model eyes and live dogs in the training of veterinary students in examination of the canine fundus. Forty students who had undertaken a practical class on canine fundoscopy involving both use of artificial model eyes and live dogs were asked to complete a short questionnaire using a Likert scale to gauge their opinion on whether the use of live dogs and artificial eyes was very valuable (scoring 2, valuable (1, a neutral response (0, not particularly valuable (-1 or not at all valuable (-2 and to write a free text response on their views of the educational value and welfare implications of using artificial model eyes or live dogs in training for ophthalmic examination of the canine ocular fundus. Likert responses were 1.84±0.37 for using live greyhounds and 0.58±0.79 for using simulator eyes (p<0.0001. Thematic analysis of the written responses showed that while the artificial eyes were considered somewhat valuable in initial training, the live dogs were significantly preferred for their realism and the opportunity to examine the eye while handling a live animal. In conclusion, while model eyes are valuable initial training in use of the ophthalmoscope for funduscopic examination, students consider that examining the eye in the live dog is significantly more valuable and that the welfare of dogs thus used is not in their view unduly compromised.

  16. Skinny Dog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢贵贤

    2007-01-01

    <正>I’ve been saving money for a new guitar.It took me over a year,but now I have enough to buy the one I want.Nothside Music has a Pindari Super Twanger on sale this week and I’m going to buy one tomorrow.I can hardly wait! I think the guitar is really going to help the sound of our band.We call the band Skinny Dog because of the skinny dog that lives near our practice hall.Our band sounds very good now.Mr Walton,the music teacher,heard us practicing today at school,and he came in to listen for a while.He seemed to enjoy it.When we finished,he said we should try to have a gig at a party or something.

  17. PK/PD Modelling of the QT Interval: a Step Towards Defining the Translational Relationship Between In Vitro, Awake Beagle Dogs, and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marostica, Eleonora; Van Ammel, Karel; Teisman, Ard; Gallacher, David; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; De Ridder, Filip; Boussery, Koen; Vermeulen, An

    2016-07-01

    Inhibiting the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded potassium ion channel is positively correlated with QT-interval prolongation in vivo, which is considered a risk factor for the occurrence of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed for four compounds that reached the clinic, to relate drug-induced QT-interval change in awake dogs and humans and to derive a translational scaling factor a 1. Overall, dogs were more sensitive than humans to QT-interval change, an a 1 of 1.5 was found, and a 10% current inhibition in vitro produced a higher percent QT-interval change in dogs as compared to humans. The QT-interval changes in dogs were predictive for humans. In vitro and in vivo information could reliably describe the effects in humans. Robust translational knowledge is likely to reduce the need for expensive thorough QT studies; therefore, expanding this work to more compounds is recommended.

  18. How Modelling of Crystal Defects at the Atomic Scale can Provide Information on Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Goryaeva, A.; Gouriet, K.; Hirel, P.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy represents one of the few sources of information about flow in the mantle that takes place at timescales that are barely accessible at human timescales. Seismic waves travelling through rocks at the speed of sound can reveal flow lines frozen in rocks over hundreds of million years. The interpretation of seismic anisotropy also needs to bridge length-scales since crystal defects are responsible for the plastic anisotropy that align crystals in a deforming rock thus revealing elastic anisotropy at the macroscopic scale. Knowing the easiest slip systems for a given crystal structure is thus the fundamental information needed. To obtain it we propose the following approach based on multiscale numerical modeling. As a first approach, we calculate generalized stacking faults which inform us about the easiest shear paths imposed by the crystal chemistry. This leads to a short list of potential slip systems for which lattice friction will be calculated. A further selection will be done by modeling the core structures of screw dislocations. The tendency for core spreading of screw dislocations impose a selection on potential glide planes which is further validated by modeling corresponding edge dislocations and their respective mobilities. Finally, we model the mobility of these dislocations under the conjugate influence of stress and temperature using the kink-pair model which is based on the activation enthalpy of the critical configuration which allows a dislocation to glide from one stable position to the next. The output of this model is the so-called critical resolved shear stress which is the onset of plastic glide at a given temperature and strain rate. Comparison between slip systems provides constraints on the plastic anisotropy. Examples are presented among the major phases of the Earth's mantle.

  19. Prevalence of congenital hereditary sensorineural deafness in Australian Cattle Dogs and associations with coat characteristics and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommerlad Susan F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital hereditary sensorineural deafness (CHSD occurs in many dog breeds, including Australian Cattle Dogs. In some breeds, CHSD is associated with a lack of cochlear melanocytes in the stria vascularis, certain coat characteristics, and potentially, abnormalities in neuroepithelial pigment production. This study investigates phenotypic markers for CHSD in 899 Australian Cattle Dogs. Results Auditory function was tested in 899 Australian Cattle Dogs in family groups using brainstem auditory evoked response testing. Coat colour and patterns, facial and body markings, gender and parental hearing status were recorded. Deafness prevalence among all 899 dogs was 10.8% with 7.5% unilaterally deaf, and 3.3% bilaterally deaf, and amongst pups from completely tested litters (n = 696 was 11.1%, with 7.5% unilaterally deaf, and 3.6% bilaterally deaf. Univariable and multivariable analyses revealed a negative association between deafness and bilateral facial masks (odds ratio 0.2; P ≤ 0.001. Using multivariable logistic animal modelling, the risk of deafness was lower in dogs with pigmented body spots (odds ratio 0.4; P = 0.050. No significant associations were found between deafness and coat colour. Within unilaterally deaf dogs with unilateral facial masks, no association was observed between the side of deafness and side of mask. The side of unilateral deafness was not significantly clustered amongst unilaterally deaf dogs from the same litter. Females were at increased risk of deafness (odds ratio from a logistic animal model 1.9; P = 0.034 after adjusting for any confounding by mask type and pigmented body spots. Conclusions Australian Cattle Dogs suffer from CHSD, and this disease is more common in dogs with mask-free faces, and in those without pigmented body patches. In unilaterally deaf dogs with unilateral masks, the lack of observed association between side of deafness and side of mask suggests that if CHSD is due to

  20. Multiscale modeling of polycrystalline graphene: A comparison of structure and defect energies of realistic samples from phase field crystal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Petri; Ervasti, Mikko M.; Fan, Zheyong; Jalalvand, Morteza; Seymour, Matthew; Vaez Allaei, S. Mehdi; Provatas, Nikolas; Harju, Ari; Elder, Ken R.; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2016-07-01

    We extend the phase field crystal (PFC) framework to quantitative modeling of polycrystalline graphene. PFC modeling is a powerful multiscale method for finding the ground state configurations of large realistic samples that can be further used to study their mechanical, thermal, or electronic properties. By fitting to quantum-mechanical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that the PFC approach is able to predict realistic formation energies and defect structures of grain boundaries. We provide an in-depth comparison of the formation energies between PFC, DFT, and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The DFT and MD calculations are initialized using atomic configurations extracted from PFC ground states. Finally, we use the PFC approach to explicitly construct large realistic polycrystalline samples and characterize their properties using MD relaxation to demonstrate their quality.

  1. Model for Electron-Beam-Induced Current Analysis of mc-Si Addressing Defect Contrast Behavior in Heavily Contaminated PV Material: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrey, H.; Gorman, B.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2012-06-01

    Much work has been done to correlate electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) contrast behavior of extended defects with the character and degree of impurity decoration. However, existing models fail to account for recently observed contrast behavior of defects in heavily contaminated mc-Si PV cells. We have observed large increases in defect contrast with decreasing temperature for all electrically active defects, regardless of their initial contrast signatures at ambient temperature. This negates the usefulness of the existing models in identifying defect character and levels of impurity decoration based on the temperature dependence of the contrast behavior. By considering the interactions of transition metal impurities with the silicon lattice and extended defects, we attempt to provide an explanation for these observations. Our findings will enhance the ability of the PV community to understand and mitigate the effects of these types of defects as the adoption of increasingly lower purity feedstocks for mc-Si PV production continues.

  2. [Visco-elastic characteristics of the aorta in conscious dogs in a model of experimental calcinosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, R; Levenson, J; Cabrera, E; Pichel, R; Simon, A

    1989-07-01

    Effects of experimental calcinosis induced by daily overdose of 500.000 IU Vit D3 during 10 days were studied in 6 mongrel conscious dogs chronically instrumented with intra-aortic Konigsberg microtransducer and two ultrasonic piezo-electric crystals diametrically opposed in the adventitia of the descending thoracic aorta. Simultaneous recording of instantaneous aortic pressure and diameter waves in basal state and during transient acute hypertension induced by intravenous angiotensin bolus (0.1 microgram/kg) allowed to obtain the pressure (y) diameter (x) relationship of the aorta according to an exponential regression: P = expo (beta D + A), with a highly significant correlation coefficient in all animals (r greater than 0.99). (table; see text) Anatomopathological studies of aortas revealed abnormal calcium deposition, ruptures of elastic fibers and disorganization of collagen. Thus, a striking decrease in aortic rigidity is observed after calcinosis in relation with structural changes of elastic materials and responsible in part for a reduction in pulsatile pressure; moreover this unexpected phenomena might represent an initiative process of development of aortic aneurysms.

  3. Pedicled prelaminated capsular flaps for coverage of skin defect in a rat model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, M.C.; Hartman, E.H.M.; Ruhe, P.Q.; Jansen, J.A.; Spauwen, P.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY: In reconstructive surgery defects are closed using pedicled or free flaps. By raising these flaps the reconstructive surgeon creates new defects, which in turn are closed primarily or with the use of skin grafts. Inevitably, this results in extra scars that may be visible and may also lead

  4. Point defect absorption by grain boundaries in α -iron by atomic density function modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapikranian, O.; Zapolsky, H.; Patte, R.; Pareige, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the atomic density function theory (ADFT), we examine the point defect absorption at [110] symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in body-centered cubic iron. It is found that the sink strength strongly depends on misorientation angle. We also show that the ADFT is able to reproduce reasonably well the elastic properties and the point defect formation volume in α -iron.

  5. Limited integrative repair capacity of native cartilage autografts within cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelse, Kolja; Riedel, Dominic; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Trattnig, Siegfried; Welsch, Götz H

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate integration and cellular outgrowth of native cartilage autografts transplanted into articular cartilage defects. Native cartilage autografts were applied into chondral defects in the femoral condyle of adult sheep. Within the defects, the calcified cartilage layer was either left intact or perforated to induce bone marrow stimulation. Empty defects served as controls. The joints were analyzed after 6 and 26 weeks by macroscopic and histological analysis using the ICRS II Score and Modified O'Driscoll Scores. Non-treated defects did not show any endogenous regenerative response and bone marrow stimulation induced fibrous repair tissue. Transplanted native cartilage grafts only insufficiently integrated with the defect borders. Cell death and loss of proteoglycans were present at the margins of the grafts at 6 weeks, which was only partially restored at 26 weeks. Significant cellular outgrowth from the grafts or defect borders could not be observed. Bonding of the grafts could be improved by additional bone marrow stimulation providing ingrowing cells that formed a fibrous interface predominantly composed of type I collagen. Transplanted native cartilage grafts remain as inert structures within cartilage defects and fail to induce integrative cartilage repair which rather demands additional cells provided by additional bone marrow stimulation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modelling defect cavities formed in inverse three-dimensional rod-connected diamond photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverne, M. P. C.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Zheng, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, L.-F.; Lopez-Garcia, M.; Rarity, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Defect cavities in 3D photonic crystal can trap and store light in the smallest volumes allowable in dielectric materials, enhancing non-linearities and cavity QED effects. Here, we study inverse rod-connected diamond (RCD) crystals containing point defect cavities using plane-wave expansion and finite-difference time domain methods. By optimizing the dimensions of the crystal, wide photonic bandgaps are obtained. Mid-bandgap resonances can then be engineered by introducing point defects in the crystal. We investigate a variety of single spherical defects at different locations in the unit cell focusing on high-refractive-index-contrast (3.3:1) inverse RCD structures; quality factors (Q-factors) and mode volumes of the resonant cavity modes are calculated. By choosing a symmetric arrangement, consisting of a single sphere defect located at the center of a tetrahedral arrangement, mode volumes < 0.06 cubic wavelengths are obtained, a record for high-index cavities.

  7. Modelling Defect Cavities Formed in Inverse Three-Dimensional Rod-Connected Diamond Photonic Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Taverne, M P C; Zheng, X; Liu, S; Chen, L -F; Lopez-Garcia, M; Rarity, J G

    2016-01-01

    Defect cavities in 3D photonic crystal can trap and store light in the smallest volumes allowable in dielectric materials, enhancing non-linearities and cavity QED effects. Here, we study inverse rod-connected diamond (RCD) crystals containing point defect cavities using plane-wave expansion and finite-difference time domain methods. By optimizing the dimensions of the crystal, wide photonic band gaps are obtained. Mid-bandgap resonances can then be engineered by introducing point defects in the crystal. We investigate a variety of single spherical defects at different locations in the unit cell focusing on high-refractive-index contrast (3.3:1) inverse RCD structures; quality factors (Q-factors) and mode volumes of the resonant cavity modes are calculated. By choosing a symmetric arrangement, consisting of a single sphere defect located at the center of a tetrahedral arrangement, small mode volumes are obtained.

  8. A review of mouse critical size defect models in weight bearing bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jonathan S; Bemenderfer, Thomas B; Wessel, Alexander R; Kacena, Melissa A

    2013-07-01

    Current and future advances in orthopedic treatment are aimed at altering biological interactions to enhance bone healing. Currently, several clinical scenarios exist for which there is no definitive treatment, specifically segmental bone loss from high-energy trauma or surgical resection - and it is here that many are aiming to find effective solutions. To test experimental interventions and better understand bone healing, researchers employ critical size defect (CSD) models in animal studies. Here, an overview of CSDs is given that includes the specifications of varying models, a discussion of current scaffold and bone graft designs, and current outcome measures used to determine the extent of bone healing. Many promising graft designs have been discovered along with promising adjunctive treatments, yet a graft that offers biomechanical support while allowing for neovascularization with eventual complete resorption and remodeling remains to be developed. An overview of this important topic is needed to highlight current advances and provide a clear understanding of the ultimate goal in CSD research--develop a graft for clinical use that effectively treats the orthopedic conundrum of segmental bone loss.

  9. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eKonya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Progranulin-Deficient Frontotemporal Dementia Uncover Specific Reversible Neuronal Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Almeida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic mechanisms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD remain poorly understood. Here we generated multiple induced pluripotent stem cell lines from a control subject, a patient with sporadic FTD, and an FTD patient with a novel heterozygous GRN mutation (progranulin [PGRN] S116X. In neurons and microglia differentiated from PGRN S116X induced pluripotent stem cells, the levels of intracellular and secreted PGRN were reduced, establishing patient-specific cellular models of PGRN haploinsufficiency. Through a systematic screen of inducers of cellular stress, we found that PGRN S116X neurons, but not sporadic FTD neurons, exhibited increased sensitivity to staurosporine and other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, the serine/threonine kinase S6K2, a component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, was specifically downregulated in PGRN S116X neurons. Both increased sensitivity to kinase inhibitors and reduced S6K2 were rescued by PGRN expression. Our findings identify cell-autonomous, reversible defects in patient neurons with PGRN deficiency, and provide a compelling model for studying PGRN-dependent pathogenic mechanisms and testing potential therapies.

  11. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konya, Andrew; Gimenez-Pinto, Vianney; Selinger, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  12. Dog Ownership and Dog Walking: The Relationship With Exercise, Depression, and Hopelessness in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Susan L; Sit, Michael; DeVon, Holli A; Makidon, Devynn; Tintle, Nathan L

    2017-05-09

    Dog ownership has been associated with increased physical activity in the general adult population. The objective of this study was to examine dog ownership and dog walking and their relationship with home-based and phase II cardiac rehabilitation exercise, depression, and hopelessness in patients with ischemic heart disease. A total of 122 patients with ischemic heart disease were included in this prospective observational study. Patients completed dog ownership/walking questions during their hospitalization. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Participation Tool, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and State-Trait Hopelessness Scale were completed by mail at 3, 8, or 12 months later. Regression modeling was used to evaluate the significance of dog ownership/walking on exercise, depression and hopelessness. The sample was 34.4% female and had a mean age of 64.7 ± 9.1 years. Forty-two patients (34.4%) reported owning a dog. Patients who owned but did not walk their dog reported significantly lower levels of home exercise compared with patients who walked their dogs at least 1 day per week (36.8% for non-dog walkers vs 73.9% for dog walkers, P = .019). The odds of participating in home exercise were significantly higher for dog walkers compared with non-dog walkers (odds ratio, 8.1 [1.7, 38.5] vs 1.0). There were no differences in phase II cardiac rehabilitation exercise, depression, or hopelessness between dog owners and non-dog owners or between dog walkers and non-dog walkers. These findings show a beneficial effect on home-based exercise for those who dog-walk at least 1 day per week. Healthcare professionals should encourage dog walking to increase dog owners' physical activity levels.

  13. Restore a 9 mm diameter osteochondral defect with gene enhanced tissue engineering followed mosaicplasty in a goat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sun

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Gene enhanced tissue engineering followed mosaicplasty could restore a 9 mm diameter osteochondral defects in a goat model effectively. With the reduction of covering area of the graft, the advantages of the combined gene enhanced tissue engineering method can be better reflected.

  14. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35: 296-30

  15. Repair of osteochondral defects with biodegradable hydrogel composites encapsulating marrow mesenchymal stem cells in a rabbit model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, X.; Park, H.; Young, S.; Kretlow, J.D.; Beucken, J.J.J.P. van den; Baggett, L.S.; Tabata, Y.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated the delivery of marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), with or without the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), from biodegradable hydrogel composites on the repair of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model. Three formulations of oligo(poly(ethylene glyc

  16. Increasing the persistence of a heterogeneous behavior chain: Studies of extinction in a rat model of search behavior of working dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Kacelnik, Alex; Porritt, Fay; Bouton, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    Dogs trained to search for contraband perform a chain of behavior in which they first search for a target and then make a separate response that indicates to the trainer that they have found one. The dogs often conduct multiple searches without encountering a target and receiving the reinforcer (i.e., no contraband is present). Understanding extinction (i.e., the decline in work rate when reinforcers are no longer encountered) may assist in training dogs to work in conditions where targets are rare. We therefore trained rats on a search-target behavior chain modeled on the search behavior of working dogs. A discriminative stimulus signaled that a search response (e.g., chain pull) led to a second stimulus that set the occasion for a target response (e.g., lever press) that was reinforced by a food pellet. In Experiment 1 training with longer search durations and intermittent (partial) reinforcement of searching (i.e. some trials had no target present) both led to more persistent search responding in extinction. The loss of search behavior in extinction was primarily dependent on the number of non-reinforced searches rather than time searching without reinforcement. In Experiments 2 and 3, delivery of non-contingent reinforcers during extinction increased search persistence provided they had also been presented during training. Thus, results with rats suggest that the persistence of working dog performance (or chained behavior generally) may be improved by training with partial reinforcement of searching and non-contingent reinforcement during both training and work (extinction).

  17. Selecting shelter dogs for service dog training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Emily

    2002-01-01

    Service dogs are an essential aid to persons with disabilities, providing independence, mobility, and improved self-esteem. Because of these proven benefits, the growing se of service dogs is creating a demand and supply crisis. One major cause is the 50% verage dropout rate for dogs selected for training. Weiss and Greenber (1997) re-cently found that a dog, successful on the most commonly used selection test items, was as likely to be either a poor or a good candidate for service work. The experiment presented here evaluated test items developed by the author in 15 years of experience with dogs. The test items were administered to 75 dogs from the Kansas Humane So-ciety. Once tested, the dogs received obedience and retrieval training. The experiment assessed each dog on behavior over 5 weeks of training versus performance on each selection test item. A subset of the selection items, combined in a regression analysis, accounted for 36.4% of the variance with R = 0.603. This research also revealed a reli-able test for dog aggression without risking injury to dog or tester. Items for testing in-cluded fear, motivation, and submission. Another set of selection items reliably pre-dicted the trait of "high energy" commonly described as "high strung." Future research should involve investigating the effectiveness of both cortisol levels and blood pressure in predicting traits to help strengthen the predictive value of the tool and then testing on dogs trained to be full service dogs.

  18. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  19. Integrated Supply Chain Cooperative Inventory Model with Payment Period Being Dependent on Purchasing Price under Defective Rate Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Feng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In most commercial transactions, the buyer and vendor may usually agree to postpone payment deadline. During such delayed period, the buyer is entitled to keep the products without having to pay the sale price. However, the vendor usually hopes to receive full payment as soon as possible, especially when the transaction involves valuable items; yet, the buyer would offer a higher purchasing price in exchange of a longer postponement. Therefore, we assumed such permissible delayed period is dependent on the purchasing price. As for the manufacturing side, defective products are inevitable from time to time, and not all of those defective products can be repaired. Hence, we would like to add defective production and repair rate to our proposed model and discuss how these factors may affect profits. In addition, holding cost, ordering cost, and transportation cost will also be considered as we develop the integrated inventory model with price-dependent payment period under the possible condition of defective products. We would like to find the maximum of the joint expected total profit for our model and come up with a suitable inventory policy accordingly. In the end, we have also provided a numerical example to clearly illustrate possible solutions.

  20. The dog as a naturally-occurring model for insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor-overexpressing breast cancer: an observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Jaillardon, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérome; Godard, Tiffanie; Campone, Mario; Loussouarn, Delphine; Siliart, Brigitte; Nguyen, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Background Dogs spontaneously develop invasive mammary carcinoma with a high prevalence of the triple-negative (TN) subtype (lack of ER-Estrogen Receptor and PR-Progesterone Receptor expression, lack of HER2-Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 overexpression), making this animal model relevant for investigating new therapeutic pathways. Insulin-like growth factor Type-1 receptor (IGF1R) is frequently overexpressed in primary human breast cancers, with a growing role in the TN phenotype. ...

  1. Skeletal and cardiac muscle defects in a murine model of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, M J; Kondo, C; Thurston, J; Alakija, P; Burke, B J; Stewart, C; Syme, D; Giles, W R

    2005-01-01

    Previous histological findings, physiological data, and behavioral observations on the A-type lamin knockout mouse (Lmna(-/-)) suggest that important aspects of this model resemble the human Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) phenotype. The main goal of our experiments was to study skeletal and cardiac muscle function in this murine model to obtain the semiquantitative data needed for more detailed comparisons with human EDMD defects. Measurements of the mechanical properties of preparations from two different skeletal muscle groups, the soleus and the diaphragm, were made in vitro. In addition, records of the electrocardiogram, and measurements of heart rate variability were obtained; and phasic contractions (unloaded shortening) of enzymatically isolated ventricular myocytes were monitored. Soleus muscles from Lmna(-/-) mice produced less force and work than control preparations. In contrast, force and work production in strips of diaphragm were not changed significantly. Lead II electrocardiograms from conscious, restrained Lmna(-/-) mice revealed slightly decreased heart rates, with significant prolongations of PQ, QRS, and 'QT' intervals compared with those from control recordings. These ECG changes resemble some aspects of the ECG records from humans with EDMD; however, the cardiac phenotype in this Lmna(-/-) mouse model appears to be less well-defined/developed. Ventricular myocytes isolated from Lmna(-/-) mice exhibited impaired contractile responses, particularly when superfused with the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (1 microM). This deficit was more pronounced in myocytes isolated from the left ventricle(s) than in myocytes from the right ventricle(s). In summary, tissues from the Lmna(-/-) mouse exhibit a number of skeletal and cardiac muscle deficiencies, some of which are similar to those which have been reported in studies of human EDMD.

  2. Topological Defects and nano-Hz Gravitational Waves in Aligned Axion Models

    CERN Document Server

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Kitajima, Naoya; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of topological defects in an aligned axion model with multiple Peccei-Quinn scalars, where the QCD axion is realized by a certain combination of the axions with decay constants much smaller than the conventional Peccei-Quinn breaking scale. When the underlying U(1) symmetries are spontaneously broken, the aligned structure in the axion field space exhibits itself as a complicated string-wall network in the real space. We find that the string-wall network likely survives until the QCD phase transition if the number of the Peccei-Quinn scalars is greater than two. The string-wall system collapses during the QCD phase transition, producing a significant amount of gravitational waves in the nano-Hz range at present. The typical decay constant is constrained to be below O(100) TeV by the pulsar timing observations, and the constraint will be improved by a factor of 2 in the future SKA observations.

  3. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-03-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+. A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+-content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations.

  4. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  5. Vortex with fourfold defect lines in a simple model of self-propelled particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed-Allaei, Hamid; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-03-01

    We study the formation of a vortex with fourfold symmetry in a minimal model of self-propelled particles, confined inside a squared box, using computer simulations and also theoretical analysis. In addition to the vortex pattern, we observe five other regimes in the system: a homogeneous gaseous phase, band structures, moving clumps, moving clusters, and vibrating rings. All six regimes emerge from controlling the strength of noise and from the contribution of repulsion and alignment interactions. We study the shape of the vortex and its symmetry in detail. The pattern shows exponential defect lines where incoming and outgoing flows of particles collide. We show that alignment and repulsion interactions between particles are necessary to form such patterns. We derive hydrodynamical equations with an introduction of the "small deviation" technique to describe the vortex phase. The method is applicable to other systems as well. Finally, we compare the theory with the results of both computer simulations and an experiment using Quincke rotors. A good agreement between the three is observed.

  6. Topological defects and nano-Hz gravitational waves in aligned axion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Jeong, Kwang Sik; Kitajima, Naoya; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2016-08-01

    We study the formation and evolution of topological defects in an aligned axion model with multiple Peccei-Quinn scalars, where the QCD axion is realized by a certain combination of the axions with decay constants much smaller than the conventional Peccei-Quinn breaking scale. When the underlying U(1) symmetries are spontaneously broken, the aligned structure in the axion field space exhibits itself as a complicated string-wall network in the real space. We find that the string-wall network likely survives until the QCD phase transition if the number of the Peccei-Quinn scalars is greater than two. The string-wall system collapses during the QCD phase transition, producing a significant amount of gravitational waves in the nano-Hz range at present. The typical decay constant is constrained to be below O(100) TeV by the pulsar timing observations, and the constraint will be improved by a factor of 2 in the future SKA observations.

  7. Models of electronic defects and self-trapped excitons in Li sub 2 O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shluger, Alexander; Itoh, Noriaki (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-05-01

    The semi-empirical INDO method and the embedded-molecular-cluster model have been applied to calculate the atomic structures and electronic transition energies of the F{sup +}, F and F{sub 2} centres in Li{sub 2}O and to simulate the self-trapping process of a triplet exciton. Using the parameters of the Slater-type floating orbitals adjusted to the experimental transition energy (4.13 eV) and hyperfine splitting parameters of the F{sup +} centre, the transition energies of the F and F{sub 2} centres were obtained to be 4.82 eV and 3.31 eV, respectively. The lattice relaxation accompanied by formation of a triplet exciton and by two neighbouring triplet excitons are also simulated. The results indicate that a triplet exciton is self-trapped by a shift of an oxygen ion by 0.34 A along a <100> direction, while defect formation as a consequence of the relaxation of a triplet exciton is very improbable. We found that two excitons at the nearest neighbour relax into a more stable relaxed state including an O{sub 2}{sup -} bond, and further to a vacancy-interstitial pair. The results of the simulation were compared with experimental observation of the effects of neutron irradiation and of heavy-ion irradiation of Li{sub 2}O. (author).

  8. Our Friends—Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Many people love keeping dogs.They feed and clean their dogs every day,and they even build comfortable houses for them.In their eyes,dogs are not different from their family members.What’s more,dogs can understand theirs owners and usually listen to their instructions.

  9. Dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Leyva, Felipe; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Although no official data exists for Colombia, dog bites are not infrequent consults to the emergency department on a global scale. In the urban or rural setting, it is likely that Colombian emergency department physicians face patients with such consults in their clinical practice. It is imperative that those physicians become familiar with the current national guidelines and protocols for the attention of such patients, since he/she must act pertinently according to the resour...

  10. Dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Leyva, Felipe; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Although no official data exists for Colombia, dog bites are not infrequent consults to the emergency department on a global scale. In the urban or rural setting, it is likely that Colombian emergency department physicians face patients with such consults in their clinical practice. It is imperative that those physicians become familiar with the current national guidelines and protocols for the attention of such patients, since he/she must act pertinently according to the resour...

  11. My Dog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡任

    2004-01-01

    My favorite animal is a dog.Its name is Dolly.Dolly has white fur.It has two big eyes and two small ears.My mother knits a blue "sweater" for it.Dolly likes eating meat and bones.It likes playing ball on the grassland.I often play with Dolly on Sundays.Dolly is very naughty.I "hate" and love it.One day,I didmy homework.It was very dirty.It came here and tread my notebook.I was angry

  12. Repair of bile duct defect with degradable stent and autologous tissue in a porcine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Long Liang; Yi-Chen Yu; Kun Liu; Wei-Jia Wang; Jiang-Bo Ying; Yi-Fan Wang; Xiu-Jun Cai

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To introduce and evaluate a new method to repair bile duct defect with a degradable stent and autologous tissues.METHODS:Eight Ba-Ma mini-pigs were used in this study.Experimental models with common bile duct (CBD) defect (0.5-1.0 cm segment of CBD resected) were established and then CBD was reconstructed by duct to duct anastomosis with a novel degradable stent made of poly [sebacic acid-co-(1,3-propanediol)-co-(1,2-propanediol)].In addition,a vascularized greater omentum was placed around the stent and both ends of CBD.Cholangiography via gall bladder was performed for each pig at postoperative months 1 and 3 to rule out stent translocation and bile duct stricture.Complete blood count was examined pre-and post-operatively to estimate the inflammatory reaction.Liver enzymes and serum bilirubin were examined pre-and post-operatively to evaluate the liver function.Five pigs were sacrificed at month 3 to evaluate the healing of anastomosis.The other three pigs were raised for one year for long-term observation.RESULTS:All the animals underwent surgery successfully.There was no intraoperative mortality and no bile leakage during the observation period.The white blood cell counts were only slightly increased on day 14 and month 3 postoperatively compared with that before operation,the difference was not statistically significant (P =0.652).The plasma level of alanine aminotransferase on day 14 and month 3 postoperatively was also not significantly elevated compared with that before operation (P =0.810).Nevertheless,the plasma level of γ-glutamyl transferase was increased after operation in both groups (P =0.004),especially 2 wk after operation.The level of serum total bilirubin after operation was not significantly elevated compared with that before operation (P =0.227),so did the serum direct bilirubin (P =0.759).By cholangiography via gall bladder,we found that the stent maintained its integrity of shape and was still in situ at month 1,and it disappeared

  13. Osteogenic Effects of Dedifferentiated Fat Cell Transplantation in Rabbit Models of Bone Defect and Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuta, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Kazama, Tomohiko; Kazama, Minako; Kano, Koichiro; Ryu, Junnosuke; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Matsumoto, Taro

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells have a high proliferative activity and the potential to differentiate into lineages of mesenchymal tissue similar to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we examined the effects of autologous DFAT cell transplantation on bone regeneration in a rabbit bone defect model and an ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model. The formation of tissue-engineered bone (TEB) was obser...

  14. DogPulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Christoffer; Thomsen, Josephine Raun; Verdezoto, Nervo;

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DogPulse, an ambient awareness system to support the coordination of dog walking among family members at home. DogPulse augments a dog collar and leash set to activate an ambient shape-changing lamp and visualize the last time the dog was taken for a walk. The lamp gradually...... changes its form and pulsates its lights in order to keep the family members aware of the dog walking activity. We report the iterative prototyping of DogPulse, its implementation and its preliminary evaluation. Based on our initial findings, we present the limitations and lessons learned as well...

  15. Bovine Calcined Bone for the Repair of Radial Defect in a Rabbit Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the bovine calcined bone's ability of repairing segmental bone defect and seek a new artificial bone substitute material, the bovine calcined bone (450℃,32 h) was implanted into the 10-mm middle radial defect of rabbits with tricalcium phosphate ceramics as the control. By using the methods of histology, radiology and biomechanics their osteogenic ability were measured. It was found that the bovine calcined bone's ability of repairing bone defect was better than that of tricalcium phosphate ceramics. The histological Nilsson′s scores at 3rd, 5th, 9th week after operation were significantly increased (P<0.01). At 12th week after operation the bending strength of radius in experimental group was much higher than that of control group and turned normal. It was suggested that bovine calcined bone is an ideal artificial bone substitute material with good ability of repairing segmental bone defect and some degree of mechanical strength.

  16. Comparison of two models for phonon assisted tunneling field enhanced emission from defects in Ge measured by DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienaar, J., E-mail: jac_pienaar@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Coelho, S.M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to measure the field enhanced emission rate from a defect introduced in n-type Ge. The defect was introduced through low energy ({+-}80 eV) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching using Ar. The defect, named EP{sub 0.31}, had an energy level 0.31 eV below the conduction band. Models of Pons and Makram-Ebeid (1979) and Ganichev and Prettl (1997) , which describe emission due to phonon assisted tunneling, were fitted to the observed electric field dependence of the emission rate. The model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid fitted the measured emission rate more accurately than Ganichev and Prettl. However the model of Ganichev and Prettl has only two parameters, while the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid has four. Both models showed a transition in the dominant emission mechanism from a weak electron-phonon coupling below 152.5 K to a strong electron-phonon coupling above 155 K. After the application of a {chi}{sup 2} goodness of fit test, it was determined that the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid describes the data well, while that of Ganichev and Prettl does not.

  17. Comparison of two models for phonon assisted tunneling field enhanced emission from defects in Ge measured by DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, J.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Coelho, S. M. M.

    2012-05-01

    Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to measure the field enhanced emission rate from a defect introduced in n-type Ge. The defect was introduced through low energy (±80 eV) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching using Ar. The defect, named EP0.31, had an energy level 0.31 eV below the conduction band. Models of Pons and Makram-Ebeid (1979) [2] and Ganichev and Prettl (1997) [3], which describe emission due to phonon assisted tunneling, were fitted to the observed electric field dependence of the emission rate. The model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid fitted the measured emission rate more accurately than Ganichev and Prettl. However the model of Ganichev and Prettl has only two parameters, while the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid has four. Both models showed a transition in the dominant emission mechanism from a weak electron-phonon coupling below 152.5 K to a strong electron-phonon coupling above 155 K. After the application of a χ2 goodness of fit test, it was determined that the model of Pons and Makram-Ebeid describes the data well, while that of Ganichev and Prettl does not.

  18. Sudden cardiac death in dogs with remodeled hearts is associated with larger beat-to-beat variability of repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Truin, Michiel; van Opstal, Jurren M

    2005-01-01

    Increased proarrhythmia in dogs with chronic AV block (AVB) has been explained by ventricular remodeling causing a decrease in repolarization reserve. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) has been suggested to reflect repolarization reserve, in which high variability represents...... diminished reserve and larger propensity for repolarization-dependent ventricular arrhythmia. A subset of chronic AVB dogs (10%) suffers sudden cardiac death (SCD). With the assumption that repolarization defects constitute a potentially lethal proarrhythmic substrate, we hypothesized that BVR in SCD dogs...... are larger than in matched control chronic AVB dogs. From a population of 200 chronic AVB dogs, initially two groups were chosen retrospectively: 8 dogs that died suddenly (SCD) and 8 control dogs. Control dogs had a longer lifespan after AVB (10 to 18 weeks) than SCD dogs (5 to 10 weeks). All dogs had...

  19. Coordinated movement, neuromuscular synaptogenesis and trans-synaptic signaling defects in Drosophila galactosemia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Parkinson, William M; Kopke, Danielle L; Broadie, Kendal

    2016-09-01

    The multiple galactosemia disease states manifest long-term neurological symptoms. Galactosemia I results from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which converts galactose-1-phosphate + UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate + UDP-galactose. Galactosemia II results from loss of galactokinase (GALK), phosphorylating galactose to galactose-1-phosphate. Galactosemia III results from the loss of UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase (GALE), which interconverts UDP-galactose and UDP-glucose, as well as UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) alternatively makes UDP-galactose from uridine triphosphate and galactose-1-phosphate. All four UDP-sugars are essential donors for glycoprotein biosynthesis with critical roles at the developing neuromuscular synapse. Drosophila galactosemia I (dGALT) and II (dGALK) disease models genetically interact; manifesting deficits in coordinated movement, neuromuscular junction (NMJ) development, synaptic glycosylation, and Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. Similarly, dGALE and dUGP mutants display striking locomotor and NMJ formation defects, including expanded synaptic arbours, glycosylation losses, and differential changes in Wnt trans-synaptic signalling. In combination with dGALT loss, both dGALE and dUGP mutants compromise the synaptomatrix glycan environment that regulates Wnt trans-synaptic signalling that drives 1) presynaptic Futsch/MAP1b microtubule dynamics and 2) postsynaptic Frizzled nuclear import (FNI). Taken together, these findings indicate UDP-sugar balance is a key modifier of neurological outcomes in all three interacting galactosemia disease models, suggest that Futsch homolog MAP1B and the Wnt Frizzled receptor may be disease-relevant targets in epimerase and transferase galactosemias, and identify UGP as promising new potential therapeutic target for galactosemia neuropathology.

  20. Using Mouse and Zebrafish Models to Understand the Etiology of Developmental Defects in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; MUTO, AKIHIKO; LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SCHILLING, THOMAS F.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.; CALOF, ANNE L.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem birth defects disorder that affects every tissue and organ system in the body. Understanding the factors that contribute to the origins, prevalence, and severity of these developmental defects provides the most direct approach for developing screens and potential treatments for individuals with CdLS. Since the majority of cases of CdLS are caused by haploinsufficiency for NIPBL (Nipped-B-like, which encodes a cohesin-associated protein), we have developed mouse and zebrafish models of CdLS by using molecular genetic tools to create Nipbl-deficient mice and zebrafish (Nipbl+/− mice, zebrafish nipbl morphants). Studies of these vertebrate animal models have yielded novel insights into the developmental etiology and genes/gene pathways that contribute to CdLS-associated birth defects, particularly defects of the gut, heart, craniofacial structures, nervous system, and limbs. Studies of these mouse and zebrafish CdLS models have helped clarify how deficiency for NIPBL, a protein that associates with cohesin and other transcriptional regulators in the nucleus, affects processes important to the emergence of the structural and physiological birth defects observed in CdLS: NIPBL exerts chromosome position-specific effects on gene expression; it influences long-range interactions between different regulatory elements of genes; and it regulates combinatorial and synergistic actions of genes in developing tissues. Our current understanding is that CdLS should be considered as not only a cohesinopathy, but also a “transcriptomopathy,” that is, a disease whose underlying etiology is the global dysregulation of gene expression throughout the organism. PMID:27120001

  1. [Affective behavioural responses by dogs to tactile human-dog interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhne, Franziska; Hössler, Johanna C; Struwe, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The communication of dogs is based on complex, subtle body postures and facial expressions. Some social interaction between dogs includes physical contact. Humans generally use both verbal and tactile signals to communicate with dogs. Hence, interaction between humans and dogs might lead to conflicts because the behavioural responses of dogs to human-dog interaction may be misinterpreted and wrongly assessed. The behavioural responses of dogs to tactile human-dog interactions and human gestures are the focus of this study. The participating dogs (n = 47) were privately owned pets.They were of varying breed and gender.The test consisted of nine randomised test sequences (e. g. petting the dog's head or chest). A test sequence was performed for a period of 30 seconds. The inter-trial interval was set at 60 seconds and the test-retest interval was set at 10 minutes. The frequency and duration of the dogs'behavioural responses were recorded using INTERACT. To examine the behavioural responses of the dogs, a two-way analysis of variance within the linear mixed models procedure of IBM SPSS Statistics 19 was conducted. A significant influence of the test-sequenc order on the dogs' behaviour could be analysed for appeasement gestures (F8,137 = 2.42; p = 0.018), redirected behaviour (F8,161 = 6.31; p = 0.012) and socio-positive behaviour (F8,148 = 6.28; p = 0.012). The behavioural responses of the dogs, which were considered as displacement activities (F8,109 = 2.5; p = 0.014) differed significantly among the test sequences. The response of the dogs, measured as gestures of appeasement, redirected behaviours, and displacement activities, was most obvious during petting around the head and near the paws.The results of this study conspicuously indicate that dogs respond to tactile human-dog interactions with gestures of appeasement and displacement activities. Redirected behaviours, socio-positive behaviours as well displacement activities are behavioural responses which dogs

  2. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  3. Breaches of the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Miao; Feng, Gang; Hu, Huaiyu; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-11-07

    A subset of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has central nervous system manifestations. There are good mouse models for these CMDs that include POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout and Large(myd) mice with all exhibiting defects in dentate gyrus. It is not known how the abnormal dentate gyrus is formed during the development. In this study, we conducted a detailed morphological examination of the dentate gyrus in adult and newborn POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout, and Large(myd) mice by immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses. We observed that the pial basement membrane overlying the dentate gyrus was disrupted and there was ectopia of granule cell precursors through the breached pial basement membrane. Besides these, the knockout dentate gyrus exhibited reactive gliosis in these mouse models. Thus, breaches in the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

  4. Self-ordered defect structures in two model F/M steels under in situ ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaoumi, D., E-mail: djamelkaoumi@gmail.com; Adamson, J.

    2014-05-01

    Two model F/M steels, 9Cr-model and 12Cr-model, were irradiated with 1 MeV Kr ions in situ in a TEM at temperatures between 20 K and 573 K to doses as high as 15 dpa. During the early stages of irradiation of the two F/M steels, defect clusters were rather uniformly distributed within grains, and a saturation density was quickly reached. However, at higher doses, self-ordering alignments of defect clusters were found in some grains. The regularly ordered arrays of small loops were observed in the two F/M steels along 〈1 1 0〉 directions with spacing about 30–50 nm. Once the aligned structure was created, it was stable under further irradiation. The possible mechanisms for the “self-organization”/“ordering” of the clusters were investigated. This paper describes the process and its temperature dependence, and the possible mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Phenomenological model of photoluminescence degradation and photoinduced defect formation in silicon nanocrystal ensembles under singlet oxygen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongalsky, Maxim B., E-mail: mgongalsky@gmail.com; Timoshenko, Victor Yu. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State M.V. Lomonosov University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-28

    We propose a phenomenological model to explain photoluminescence degradation of silicon nanocrystals under singlet oxygen generation in gaseous and liquid systems. The model considers coupled rate equations, which take into account the exciton radiative recombination in silicon nanocrystals, photosensitization of singlet oxygen generation, defect formation on the surface of silicon nanocrystals as well as quenching processes for both excitons and singlet oxygen molecules. The model describes well the experimentally observed power law dependences of the photoluminescence intensity, singlet oxygen concentration, and lifetime versus photoexcitation time. The defect concentration in silicon nanocrystals increases by power law with a fractional exponent, which depends on the singlet oxygen concentration and ambient conditions. The obtained results are discussed in a view of optimization of the photosensitized singlet oxygen generation for biomedical applications.

  6. Wetting on smooth micropatterned defects

    OpenAIRE

    Debuisson, Damien; Dufour, Renaud; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model which predicts the contact angle hysteresis introduced by smooth micropatterned defects. The defects are modeled by a smooth function and the contact angle hysteresis is explained using a tangent line solution. When the liquid micro-meniscus touches both sides of the defect simultaneously, depinning of the contact line occurs. The defects are fabricated using a photoresist and experimental results confirm the model. An important point is that the model is scale-independent,...

  7. Tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds for bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinku; McBride, Sean; Donovan, Amy; Darr, Aniq; Magno, Maria Hanshella R; Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2015-05-08

    The aim of the study was to determine bone regeneration in a rabbit radius critical-size defect (CSD) model using a specific polymer composition (E1001(1k)) from a library of tyrosine-derived polycarbonate scaffolds coated with a calcium phosphate (CP) formulation (E1001(1k) + CP) supplemented with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Specific doses of rhBMP-2 (0, 17, and 35 μg/scaffold) were used. E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds were implanted in unilateral segmental defects (15 mm length) in the radial diaphyses of New Zealand White rabbits. At 4 and 8 weeks post-implantation, bone regeneration was determined using micro-computed tomography (µCT), histology, and histomorphometry. The quantitative outcome data suggest that E1001(1k) + CP scaffolds with rhBMP-2 were biocompatible and promoted bone regeneration in segmental bone defects. Histological examination of the implant sites showed that scaffolds made of E1001(1k) + CP did not elicit adverse cellular or tissue responses throughout test periods up to 8 weeks. Noteworthy is that the incorporation of a very small amount of rhBMP-2 into the scaffolds (as low as 17 μg/defect site) promoted significant bone regeneration compared to scaffolds consisting of E1001(1k) + CP alone. This finding indicates that E1001(1k) + CP may be an effective platform for bone regeneration in a critical size rabbit radius segmental defect model, requiring only a minimal dose of rhBMP-2.

  8. The Brazilian Zika virus strain causes birth defects in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugola, Fernanda R; Fernandes, Isabella R; Russo, Fabiele B; Freitas, Beatriz C; Dias, João L M; Guimarães, Katia P; Benazzato, Cecília; Almeida, Nathalia; Pignatari, Graciela C; Romero, Sarah; Polonio, Carolina M; Cunha, Isabela; Freitas, Carla L; Brandão, Wesley N; Rossato, Cristiano; Andrade, David G; Faria, Daniele de P; Garcez, Alexandre T; Buchpigel, Carlos A; Braconi, Carla T; Mendes, Erica; Sall, Amadou A; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Muotri, Alysson R; Beltrão-Braga, Patricia C B

    2016-05-11

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) and was first described in 1947 in Uganda following blood analyses of sentinel Rhesus monkeys. Until the twentieth century, the African and Asian lineages of the virus did not cause meaningful infections in humans. However, in 2007, vectored by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, ZIKV caused the first noteworthy epidemic on the Yap Island in Micronesia. Patients experienced fever, skin rash, arthralgia and conjunctivitis. From 2013 to 2015, the Asian lineage of the virus caused further massive outbreaks in New Caledonia and French Polynesia. In 2013, ZIKV reached Brazil, later spreading to other countries in South and Central America. In Brazil, the virus has been linked to congenital malformations, including microcephaly and other severe neurological diseases, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome. Despite clinical evidence, direct experimental proof showing that the Brazilian ZIKV (ZIKV(BR)) strain causes birth defects remains absent. Here we demonstrate that ZIKV(BR) infects fetuses, causing intrauterine growth restriction, including signs of microcephaly, in mice. Moreover, the virus infects human cortical progenitor cells, leading to an increase in cell death. We also report that the infection of human brain organoids results in a reduction of proliferative zones and disrupted cortical layers. These results indicate that ZIKV(BR) crosses the placenta and causes microcephaly by targeting cortical progenitor cells, inducing cell death by apoptosis and autophagy, and impairing neurodevelopment. Our data reinforce the growing body of evidence linking the ZIKV(BR) outbreak to the alarming number of cases of congenital brain malformations. Our model can be used to determine the efficiency of therapeutic approaches to counteracting the harmful impact of ZIKV(BR) in human neurodevelopment.

  9. The average local ionization energy as a tool for identifying reactive sites on defect-containing model graphene systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jane S; Shields, Zenaida Peralta-Inga; Lane, Pat; Macaveiu, Laura; Bulat, Felipe A

    2013-07-01

    In a continuing effort to further explore the use of the average local ionization energy [Formula: see text] as a computational tool, we have investigated how well [Formula: see text] computed on molecular surfaces serves as a predictive tool for identifying the sites of the more reactive electrons in several nonplanar defect-containing model graphene systems, each containing one or more pentagons. They include corannulene (C20H10), two inverse Stone-Thrower-Wales defect-containing structures C26H12 and C42H16, and a nanotube cap model C22H6, whose end is formed by three fused pentagons. Coronene (C24H12) has been included as a reference planar defect-free graphene model. We have optimized the structures of these systems as well as several monohydrogenated derivatives at the B3PW91/6-31G* level, and have computed their I(r) on molecular surfaces corresponding to the 0.001 au, 0.003 au and 0.005 au contours of the electronic density. We find that (1) the convex sides of the interior carbons of the nonplanar models are more reactive than the concave sides, and (2) the magnitudes of the lowest I(r) surface minima (the I S, min) correlate well with the interaction energies for hydrogenation at these sites. These I S, min values decrease in magnitude as the nonplanarity of the site increases, consistent with earlier studies. A practical benefit of the use of I(r) is that a single calculation suffices to characterize the numerous sites on a large molecular system, such as graphene and defect-containing graphene models.

  10. Effect of successive irrigation of subarachnoid cavity on body temperature and cerebrospinal fluid-related index in suppurative meningitis model dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Liu; Guohou He; Yuanyuan Wang; Xueqiang Chen; Qibin Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present, suppurative meningitis is mainly treated through anti-infection with antibiotics, depressing encephalic pressure with mannitol , lowering body temperature with drugs, supporting treatment,etc. However, it takes a long course of treatment and has poor therapeutic effect. Successive irrigation of subarachnoid cavity maybe have better effect on suppurative meningitis.OBJECTIVE: We compared the successive irrigation of subbarachnoid cavity with routine therapeutic methods to observe the effect of successive irrigation of subarachnoid cavity on the body temperature, cerebrospinal fluid pressure, the number of white blood cell and the level of protein of suppurative meningitis dogs.DESIGN: A randomized and controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Institute of Neuroscience, Taihe Hospital Affiliated to Yunyang Medical College.MATERIALS: Totally 17 healthy adult male Beagle dogs, of common grade, weighing 9 to 10 kg, were involved in the experiment, and raised in the 20 ℃ temperature with relative humidity of 50% for 1 week.They were randomized into 3 groups: normal group (n=5), control group (n=5) and irrigation group (n=6).Artificial cerebrospinal fluid was prepared according to the level of glucose and chloride of cerebrospinal fluid of normal dogs, and then it was sterilized with high pressure.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the experimental animal center of Yunyang Medical College from April to August 2001.① After the dogs were anesthetized,1 mL fresh staphylococcus aureus liquid [(1.5-1.6) ×109 L-1] was injected into medullary cistern to establish suppurative meningitis models.② After models were successfully established, intravenous drip infusion of 1.2 ×106 U/(kg.d), muscular injection of sulday were performed in the control group. The irrigation of subarachnoid meningitis was conducted in the irrigation group besides the routine treatments in the control group: Artificial cerebrospinal fluid was successively injected into

  11. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-12-29

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

  12. Type I integrable defects and finite-gap solutions for KdV and sine-Gordon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, E.; Parini, R.

    2017-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to extend results, which have been obtained previously to describe the classical scattering of solitons with integrable defects of type I, to include the much larger and intricate collection of finite-gap solutions defined in terms of generalised theta functions. In this context, it is generally not feasible to adopt a direct approach, via ansätze for the fields to either side of the defect tuned to satisfy the defect sewing conditions. Rather, essential use is made of the fact that the defect sewing conditions themselves are intimately related to Bäcklund transformations in order to set up a strategy to enable the calculation of the field on one side by suitably transforming the field on the other side. The method is implemented using Darboux transformations and illustrated in detail for the sine-Gordon and KdV models. An exception, treatable by both methods, indirect and direct, is provided by the genus 1 solutions. These can be expressed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions, which satisfy a number of useful identities of relevance to this problem. There are new features to the solutions obtained in the finite-gap context but, in all cases, if a (multi)soliton limit is taken within the finite-gap solutions previously known results are recovered.

  13. Detection of subsurface defects in metal materials using infrared thermography; Image processing and finite element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Infrared thermography is an emerging approach to non-contact, non-intrusive, and non-destructive inspection of various solid materials such as metals, composites, and semiconductors for industrial and research interests. In this study, data processing was applied to infrared thermography measurements to detect defects in metals that were widely used in industrial fields. When analyzing experimental data from infrared thermographic testing, raw images were often not appropriate. Thus, various data analysis methods were used at the pre-processing and processing levels in data processing programs for quantitative analysis of defect detection and characterization; these increased the infrared non-destructive testing capabilities since subtle defects signature became apparent. A 3D finite element simulation was performed to verify and analyze the data obtained from both the experiment and the image processing techniques.

  14. Efficient and accurate approach to modeling the microstructure and defect properties of LaCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, J.; Taylor, F. H.; Catlow, C. R. A.

    2016-04-01

    Complex perovskite oxides are promising materials for cathode layers in solid oxide fuel cells. Such materials have intricate electronic, magnetic, and crystalline structures that prove challenging to model accurately. We analyze a wide range of standard density functional theory approaches to modeling a highly promising system, the perovskite LaCoO3, focusing on optimizing the Hubbard U parameter to treat the self-interaction of the B-site cation's d states, in order to determine the most appropriate method to study defect formation and the effect of spin on local structure. By calculating structural and electronic properties for different magnetic states we determine that U =4 eV for Co in LaCoO3 agrees best with available experiments. We demonstrate that the generalized gradient approximation (PBEsol +U ) is most appropriate for studying structure versus spin state, while the local density approximation (LDA +U ) is most appropriate for determining accurate energetics for defect properties.

  15. Assessment of low-dose cisplatin as a model of nausea and emesis in beagle dogs, potential for repeated administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, Hannah; Pelligand, Ludovic; Elliott, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy agent, which is often used to induce nausea and emesis in animal models. The cytotoxic properties of cisplatin also cause adverse events that negatively impact on animal welfare preventing repeated administration of cisplatin. In this study, we assessed whether a low (subclinical) dose of cisplatin could be utilized as a model of nausea and emesis in the dog while decreasing the severity of adverse events to allow repeated administration. The emetic, nausea-like behavior and potential biomarker response to both the clinical dose (70 mg/m2) and low dose (15 mg/m2) of cisplatin was assessed. Plasma creatinine concentrations and granulocyte counts were used to assess adverse effects on the kidneys and bone marrow, respectively. Nausea-like behavior and emesis was induced by both doses of cisplatin, but the latency to onset was greater in the low-dose group. No significant change in plasma creatinine was detected for either dose groups. Granulocytes were significantly reduced compared with baseline (P = 0.000) following the clinical, but not the low-dose cisplatin group. Tolerability of repeated administration was assessed with 4 administrations of an 18 mg/m2 dose cisplatin. Plasma creatinine did not change significantly. Cumulative effects on the granulocytes occurred, they were significantly decreased (P = 0.03) from baseline at 3 weeks following cisplatin for the 4th administration only. Our results suggest that subclinical doses (15 and 18 mg/m2) of cisplatin induce nausea-like behavior and emesis but have reduced adverse effects compared with the clinical dose allowing for repeated administration in crossover studies.

  16. Selfish mothers indeed! Resource-dependent conflict over extended parental care in free-ranging dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Manabi; Majumder, Sreejani Sen; Nandi, Anjan K; Bhadra, Anindita

    2015-12-01

    Parent-offspring conflict (POC) theory provides an interesting premise for understanding social dynamics in facultatively social species. In free-ranging dogs, mothers increase conflict over extended parental care with their pups beyond the weaning stage. In this study, we investigated whether resource quality affects POC in the dogs that typically live in a highly competitive environment as scavengers. We built a theoretical model to predict the alternative options available to the mother in the context of food sharing with her pups when protein-rich food (meat) is provided, as compared to carbohydrate-rich food (biscuits). We fit the mothers' response from experimental data to the model and show that the mothers choose a selfish strategy, which can in turn ensure higher lifetime reproductive success, while depriving the current litter access to better resources. These results have interesting implications for understanding the social dynamics of the dogs, and the emergence of facultative sociality in a species that evolved from strongly social ancestors. We speculate that the tendency of increased conflict in resource-rich conditions might have driven the process of domestication in the ancestors of dogs which defected from their groups in favour of richer resources around human settlements.

  17. Sequencing and G-quadruplex folding of the canine proto-oncogene KIT promoter region: might dog be used as a model for human disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Da Ros

    Full Text Available Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2 were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations.

  18. Sequencing and G-Quadruplex Folding of the Canine Proto-Oncogene KIT Promoter Region: Might Dog Be Used as a Model for Human Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ros, Silvia; Zorzan, Eleonora; Giantin, Mery; Zorro Shahidian, Lara; Palumbo, Manlio; Dacasto, Mauro; Sissi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2) were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations. PMID:25084283

  19. Ab initio modeling of point defects, self-diffusion, and incorporation of impurities in thorium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daroca, D. Pérez

    2017-02-01

    Research on Generation-IV nuclear reactors has boosted the investigation of thorium as nuclear fuel. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, structural properties and phonon dispersion curves of Th are obtained. These results agreed very well with previous ones. The stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitial and divacancies are studied. It is found that vacancies are the energetically preferred defects. The incorporation energies of He, Xe, and Kr atoms in Th defects are analyzed. Self-diffusion, migration paths and activation energies are also calculated.

  20. Deletion of Porcn in mice leads to multiple developmental defects and models human focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH is a genetic disorder characterized by developmental defects in skin, skeleton and ectodermal appendages. FDH is caused by dominant loss-of-function mutations in X-linked PORCN. PORCN orthologues in Drosophila and mice encode endoplasmic reticulum proteins required for secretion and function of Wnt proteins. Wnt proteins play important roles in embryo development, tissue homeostasis and stem cell maintenance. Since features of FDH overlap with those seen in mouse Wnt pathway mutants, FDH likely results from defective Wnt signaling but molecular mechanisms by which inactivation of PORCN affects Wnt signaling and manifestations of FDH remain to be elucidated. RESULTS: We introduced intronic loxP sites and a neomycin gene in the mouse Porcn locus for conditional inactivation. Porcn-ex3-7flox mice have no apparent developmental defects, but chimeric mice retaining the neomycin gene (Porcn-ex3-7Neo-flox have limb, skin, and urogenital abnormalities. Conditional Porcn inactivation by EIIa-driven or Hprt-driven Cre recombinase results in increased early embryonic lethality. Mesenchyme-specific Prx-Cre-driven inactivation of Porcn produces FDH-like limb defects, while ectodermal Krt14-Cre-driven inactivation produces thin skin, alopecia, and abnormal dentition. Furthermore, cell-based assays confirm that human PORCN mutations reduce WNT3A secretion. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that Porcn inactivation in the mouse produces a model for human FDH and that phenotypic features result from defective WNT signaling in ectodermal- and mesenchymal-derived structures.

  1. A Simulation Model of Focus and Radial Servos in Compact Disc Players with Disc Surface Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle;

    2004-01-01

    Compact Disc players have been on the market in more than two decades.As a consequence most of the control servo problems have been solved. A large remaining problem to solve is the handling of Compact Discs with severe surface defects like scratches and fingerprints. This paper introduces a method...

  2. Recognition and defect detection of dot-matrix text via variation-model based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Wataru; Suzuki, Koushi; Wakabayashi, Tetsushi

    2017-03-01

    An algorithm for recognition and defect detection of dot-matrix text printed on products is proposed. Extraction and recognition of dot-matrix text contains several difficulties, which are not involved in standard camera-based OCR, that the appearance of dot-matrix characters is corrupted and broken by illumination, complex texture in the background and other standard characters printed on product packages. We propose a dot-matrix text extraction and recognition method which does not require any user interaction. The method employs detected location of corner points and classification score. The result of evaluation experiment using 250 images shows that recall and precision of extraction are 78.60% and 76.03%, respectively. Recognition accuracy of correctly extracted characters is 94.43%. Detecting printing defect of dot-matrix text is also important in the production scene to avoid illegal productions. We also propose a detection method for printing defect of dot-matrix characters. The method constructs a feature vector of which elements are classification scores of each character class and employs support vector machine to classify four types of printing defect. The detection accuracy of the proposed method is 96.68 %.

  3. Evaluation of antibiotic releasing porous polymethylmethacrylate space maintainers in an infected composite tissue defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Patrick P; Shah, Sarita R; Henslee, Allan M; Watson, Brendan M; Kinard, Lucas A; Kretlow, James D; Bevil, Kristin; Kattchee, Lauren; Bennett, George N; Demian, Nagi; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Jansen, John A; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo performance of antibiotic-releasing porous polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based space maintainers comprising a gelatin hydrogel porogen and a poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particulate carrier for antibiotic delivery. Colistin was released in vitro from either gelatin or PLGA microparticle loaded PMMA constructs, with gelatin-loaded constructs releasing colistin over approximately 7 days and PLGA microparticle-loaded constructs releasing colistin for up to 8 weeks. Three formulations with either burst release or extended release at different doses were tested in a rabbit mandibular defect inoculated with Acinetobacter baumannii (2×10(7) colony forming units ml(-1)). In addition, one material control that released antibiotic but was not inoculated with A. baumannii was tested. A. baumannii was not detectable in any animal after 12 weeks on culture of the defect, saliva, or blood. Defects with high dose extended release implants had greater soft tissue healing compared with defects with burst release implants, with 8 of 10 animals showing healed mucosae compared with 2 of 10 respectively. Extended release of locally delivered colistin via a PLGA microparticle carrier improved soft tissue healing compared with implants with burst release of colistin from a gelatin carrier. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Silicone Modeling of the Interior Spaces of Hollow Organs: Use in Dog and Manatee Respiratory Tract and in a Beef Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Grossman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The mechanism, by which the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris vocalizes, remains unknown because the manatee larynx does not contain true vocal cords. Since sound can be generated when air passes through a narrow respiratory structure we needed to visualize the internal anatomy of manatee respiratory tract to locate any candidate regions for study. Approach: To visualize the internal anatomy of upper and lower manatee respiratory tract we have developed a rapid but accurate method of modeling these structures using liquid silicone. We first tested this technique on the respiratory structure of a cadaver dog and then applied it to two small manatees which had died through natural causes. Incisions were made in the trachea of both dog and manatees and commercially available liquid silicone was then forced into the upper and lower respiratory tracts used a slightly modified common automobile grease gun. The animals were then refrigerated overnight and the silicone was allowed to cure for a period of 24 h. Results: In dog, we removed cured silicone model by applying mild force to it after surgically opening the nasal cavity. In the manatees some dissection was necessary for release of mold from the upper nasal cavity, but only mild force was necessary with no dissection to release silicone model from the lower tract. Because the models created exhibited great accuracy and fine structure, including presence of tertiary bronchi in the manatee respiratory tract, we realized that the technique was applicable for use in other hollow organs. We applied this method to the visualization of internal structure of a fresh beef heart and were pleased with the accuracy and detail of model produced. Conclusion: We suggest that this technique can be adopted for three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure and volume estimation of many hollow organs in a wide variety of organisms with both minimal

  5. A growing animal model for neonatal repair of large diaphragmatic defects to evaluate patch function and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyeux, Luc; Pranpanus, Savitree; Van der Merwe, Johannes; Verbeken, Eric; De Vleeschauwer, Stephanie; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deprest, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to develop a more representative model for neonatal congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair in a large animal model, by creating a large defect in a fast-growing pup, using functional pulmonary and diaphragmatic read outs. Background Grafts are increasingly used to repair congenital diaphragmatic hernia with the risk of local complications. Growing animal models have been used to test novel materials. Methods 6-week-old rabbits underwent fiberoptic intubation, left subcostal laparotomy and hemi-diaphragmatic excision (either nearly complete (n = 13) or 3*3cm (n = 9)) and primary closure (Gore-Tex patch). Survival was further increased by moving to laryngeal mask airway ventilation (n = 15). Sham operated animals were used as controls (n = 6). Survivors (90 days) underwent chest X-Ray (scoliosis), measurements of maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure and breathing pattern (tidal volume, Pdi). Rates of herniation, lung histology and right hemi-diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area was measured. Results Rabbits surviving 90 days doubled their weight. Only one (8%) with a complete defect survived to 90 days. In the 3*3cm defect group all survived to 48 hours, however seven (78%) died later (16–49 days) from respiratory failure secondary to tracheal stricture formation. Use of a laryngeal mask airway doubled 90-day survival, one pup displaying herniation (17%). Cobb angel measurements, breathing pattern, and lung histology were comparable to sham. Under exertion, sham animals increased their maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure 134% compared to a 71% increase in patched animals (p<0.05). Patched animals had a compensatory increase in their right hemi-diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area (p<0.0001). Conclusions A primarily patched 3*3cm defect in growing rabbits, under laryngeal mask airway ventilation, enables adequate survival with normal lung function and reduced maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure compared to controls. PMID:28358826

  6. Repair of large osteochondral defects with mix-mosaicplasty in a goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Ning

    2013-03-01

    Osteochondral defects in weight-bearing regions must be repaired with cartilage and subchondral bone support simultaneously, as well as the integration between the 2, particularly in young, active patients. In this study, a new method called mix-mosaicplasty was used to reconstruct large osteochondral defects (6-mm diameter) in the weight-bearing region of the femoral condyle of goats. Two periosteum-bone plugs and 1 osteochondral plug harvested from the proximal tibia and intertrochlea groove were assembled to fill the defects in a mosaic mode. The goats were euthanized 16 weeks postoperatively, and the result of the repair process was assessed using macroscopy, morphologic analysis, electron microscope observation, glycosaminoglycan assay, and magnetic resonance imaging. Sixteen weeks postoperatively, the superficial surface of the defective region was covered with regenerated cartilage, and the periosteum-bone plugs were combined with each other. However, cleavage between cartilage plugs was noted. The donor site, which was filled with periosteum-bone plugs, was regenerated with fibrocartilage-like tissue. The repaired tissue was composed of small chondrocyte-like cells arranged tightly within an evenly distributed extracellular matrix containing type II collagen. Cells of the regenerated tissue in periosteum-bone plugs were smaller and distributed more densely. Electron microscopy demonstrated regular matrix fibers and abundant organelles within the repaired tissue. No significant differences of glycosaminoglycan content were observed between reconstructed tissue and normal hyaline cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the healing process between plugs other than the control group. The new technique of mix-mosaicplasty can reconstruct full-thickness osteochondral compound defects in the weight-bearing region of the femoral condyle.

  7. Numerical modeling of mechanical behavior of multilayered composite plates with defects under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, V. V.; Serovaev, G. S.

    2017-06-01

    Evaluation of the mechanical state of a structure or its components in the process of operation based on detection of internal damages (damage detection) becomes especially important in such rapidly developing spheres of production as machine building, aerospace industry, etc. One of the most important features of these industries is the application of new types of materials among which polymer based composite materials occupy a significant position. Hence, they must have sufficient operational rigidity and strength. However, defects of various kinds may arise during the manufacture. Delamination is the most common defect in structures made from composite materials and represents a phenomenon that involves the complex fracture of layers and interlayer compounds. Among the reasons of delamination occurrence are: disposition of anti-adhesive lubricants, films; insufficient content of binder, high content of volatile elements; violation of the molding regime; poor quality of anti-adhesive coating on the surface of the tooling. One of the effective methods for analyzing the influence of defects is numerical simulation. With the help of numerical methods, it is possible to track the evolution of various parameters when the defect size and quantity change. In the paper, a multilayered plate of an equally resistant carbon fiber reinforced plastic was considered, with a thickness of each layer equal to 0.2 mm. Various static loading cases are studied: uniaxial tension, three and four-point bending. For each type of loading, a numerical calculation of the stress-strain state was performed for healthy and delaminated plates, with different number and size of the defects. Contact interaction between adjacent surfaces in the zone of delamination was taken into account.

  8. Evaluation in a Dog Model of Three Antimicrobial Glassy Coatings: Prevention of Bone Loss around Implants and Microbial Assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto López-Píriz

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate, in a ligature-induced peri-implantitis model, the efficacy of three antimicrobial glassy coatings in the prevention of biofilm formation, intrasulcular bacterial growth and the resulting peri-implant bone loss.Mandibular premolars were bilaterally extracted from five beagle dogs. Four dental implants were inserted on each hemiarch. Eight weeks after, one control zirconia abutment and three with different bactericidal coatings (G1n-Ag, ZnO35, G3 were connected. After a plaque control period, bacterial accumulation was allowed and biofilm formation on abutments was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Peri-implantitis was induced by cotton ligatures. Microbial samples and peri-implant crestal bone levels of all implant sites were obtained before, during and after the breakdown period.During experimental induce peri-implantitis: colony forming units counts from intrasulcular microbial samples at implants with G1n-Ag coated abutment remained close to the basal inoculum; G3 and ZnO35 coatings showed similar low counts; and anaerobic bacterias counts at control abutments exhibited a logarithmic increase by more than 2. Bone loss during passive breakdown period was no statistically significant. Additional bone loss occurred during ligature-induce breakdown: 0.71 (SD 0.48 at G3 coating, 0.57 (SD 0.36 at ZnO35 coating, 0.74 (SD 0.47 at G1n-Ag coating, and 1.29 (SD 0.45 at control abutments; and statistically significant differences (p<0.001 were found. The lowest bone loss at the end of the experiment was exhibited by implants dressing G3 coated abutments (mean 2.1; SD 0.42.Antimicrobial glassy coatings could be a useful tool to ward off, diminish or delay peri-implantitis progression.

  9. Measurements, modeling, and simulation of semiconductor/gate dielectric defects using random telegraph signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Mohamed

    Constructing an effective statistical model and a simulation tool that can predict the phenomenon of random telegraph signals (RTS) is the objective of this work. The continuous scaling down of metal oxide -- semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) makes charging/discharging traps(s) located at the silicon/silicon dioxide interface or deep in the oxide bulk by mobile charge(s) a more pronounced problem for both analog and digital applications. The intent of this work is to develop an RTS statistical model and a simulation tool based on first principles and supported by extensive experimental data. The newly developed RTS statistical model and its simulation tool should be able to replicate and predict the RTS in time and frequency domains. First, room temperature RTS measurements are performed which provide limited information about the trap. They yield the extraction of some trap and RTS characteristics such as average capture and emission times associated with RTS traces, trap position in the oxide with respect to the Si/SiO 2 interface and along the channel with respect to the source, capture cross section, and trap energies in the Si and SiO2 band -- gaps. Variable temperature measurements, on the other hand, yield much more valuable information. Variable temperature RTS measurements from room temperature down to 80 K were performed, with the MOSFET biased from threshold voltage to strong inversion, in the linear and saturation regions. Variable temperature RTS measurements yield the extraction of trap characteristics such as capture cross -- section prefactor, capture and emission activation energies, change in entropy and enthalpy, and relaxation energy associated with a trap from which the nature and origin of a defect center can be identified. The newly developed Random Telegraph Signals Simulation (RTSSIM) is based on several physical principles and mechanisms e.g. (1) capturing and emitting a mobile charge from and to the channel is governed by

  10. Experimental Chagas' disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Lana

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of experimental Chagas' disease in 64 out-bred young dogs. Twenty-nine animals were inoculated with the Be-62 and 35 with Be-78 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. Twenty-six were infected with blood trypomastigotes by different inoculation routes and 38 with metacyclic trypomastigotes from the vector via the conjunctival route. Twenty of the 26 dogs infected with blood trypomastigotes were autopsied during the acute phase. Eleven died spontaneously and nine were sacrificed. Six remained alive until they died suddenly (two or were autopsied (four. Twelve of the 38 dogs infected with metacyclic trypomastigotes evolved naturally to the chronic phase and remained alive for 24-48 months. The parasitemia, clinical aspects and serology (IgM and IgG as well as electrocardiogram, hemogram and heart anatomo-histopathologic patterns of acute and chronic cardiac forms of Chagas' disease as seen in human infections, were reproduced. The most important finding is the reproductibility of diffuse fibrosing chronic chagasic cardiopathy in all dogs infected with Be-78 T. cruzi strain autopsied between the 90th and 864th days of infection. Thus, the dog can be considered as a suitable experimental model to study Chagas' disease according to the requisites of the World Health Organization (1984. Futhermore the animal is easily obtained and easy to handle and maintain in experimental laboratory conditions.

  11. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallam, Brett, E-mail: brett.hallam@unsw.edu.au; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, Level 1 Tyree Energy Technologies Building, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-14

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation.

  12. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  13. Magnetic properties and interface delocalization in the three-dimensional Ising model with defect-plane amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyoussef, A.; El Amraoui, Y.; El Kenz, A.; Kaneyoshi, T.

    1994-02-01

    Magnetic properties and interface delocalization of the spin-1/2 Ising model on a cubic lattice with an amorphized defect plane that divides the system into two semi-infinite ones are investigated by the use of the effective-field theory. The global phase diagrams, which represent the connection between amorphized defect-plane order and wetting transitions (from partial to complete wetting), are given in the case of two equivalent semi-infinite systems (the same coupling) and in the case of different semi-infinite systems. The influence of the amorphization in these global phase diagrams is also studied. Moreover, magnetic properties which illustrate some interesting behavior for the amorphized systems are investigated.

  14. Prevention of Defective Placentation and Pregnancy Loss by Blocking Innate Immune Pathways in a Syngeneic Model of Placental Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, Shari E; Brent, Elyssa; Redecha, Patricia; Perino, Giorgio; Tomlinson, Stephen; Davisson, Robin L; Salmon, Jane E

    2015-08-01

    Defective placentation and subsequent placental insufficiency lead to maternal and fetal adverse pregnancy outcome, but their pathologic mechanisms are unclear, and treatment remains elusive. The mildly hypertensive BPH/5 mouse recapitulates many features of human adverse pregnancy outcome, with pregnancies characterized by fetal loss, growth restriction, abnormal placental development, and defects in maternal decidual arteries. Using this model, we show that recruitment of neutrophils triggered by complement activation at the maternal/fetal interface leads to elevation in local TNF-α levels, reduction of the essential angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, and, ultimately, abnormal placentation and fetal death. Blockade of complement with inhibitors specifically targeted to sites of complement activation, depletion of neutrophils, or blockade of TNF-α improves spiral artery remodeling and rescues pregnancies. These data underscore the importance of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of placental insufficiency and identify novel methods for treatment of pregnancy loss mediated by abnormal placentation.

  15. Osteogenic effects of dedifferentiated fat cell transplantation in rabbit models of bone defect and ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Kazama, Tomohiko; Kazama, Minako; Kano, Koichiro; Ryu, Junnosuke; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Matsumoto, Taro

    2013-08-01

    We have previously reported that mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells have a high proliferative activity and the potential to differentiate into lineages of mesenchymal tissue similar to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we examined the effects of autologous DFAT cell transplantation on bone regeneration in a rabbit bone defect model and an ovariectomy (OVX)-induced osteoporosis model. The formation of tissue-engineered bone (TEB) was observed when rabbit DFAT cells were loaded onto a β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/collagen sponge and cultured in an osteogenic differentiation medium for 3 weeks. Autologous implantation of DFAT cell-mediated TEB constructs promoted bone regeneration in a rabbit tibial defect model. Regenerated bone tissue induced by transplantation of DFAT cell-mediated TEB constructs was histologically well differentiated and exhibited higher bone strength in a three-point bending test compared to that induced by the β-TCP/collagen sponge alone. In OVX-induced osteoporosis model rabbits, DFAT cells were obtained with the osteogenic activity similar to cells from healthy rabbits. Intrabone marrow injection of autologous DFAT cells significantly increased the bone mineral density (BMD) at the injected site in the OVX rabbits. Transplanted DFAT cells remained mainly on the injection side of the bone marrow by at least 28 days after intrabone marrow injection and a part of them expressed osteocalcin. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that autologous implantation of DFAT cells contributed to bone regeneration in a rabbit bone defect model and an OVX-induced osteoporosis model. DFAT cells may be an attractive cell source for cell-based bone tissue engineering to treat nonunion fractures in all patients, including those with osteoporosis.

  16. Do dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) prefer family?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jennifer; Vonk, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Kin recognition requires the ability to discriminate between one's own genetic relatives and non-relatives. There are two mechanisms that aid in kin discrimination: phenotype matching and familiarity. Dogs may be a good model for assessing these mechanisms as dogs are a promiscuous social species with a keen sense of smell. Domestic dogs of both sexes were presented with two scents (close kin, distant-kin) and preference was assessed through three measures (latency to approach, number of visits, time spent). Experiment 1 explored the possibility of phenotype matching as subjects had no contact with sires, whose scent was presented alongside a control male's scent. Experiment 2 explored recognition of siblings raised with the subjects and then separated at seven weeks of age. Whereas female dogs in this experiment did not show a statistically significant preference, male dogs showed a preference for distant-kin when presented with sire and female sibling samples.

  17. An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, A; Kirkeby, S

    1990-01-01

    .4, type IM fibers react moderately, and type II fibers react strongly. Rat and mouse masseter muscles contained type II fibers only, as did some rabbit masseter muscles, whereas other rabbit masseter muscles possessed equal amounts of type I and II fibers. Cat and dog masseter muscles possessed both type...

  18. Unraveling energy conversion modeling in the intrinsic persistent upconverted luminescence of solids: a study of native point defects in antiferromagnetic Er2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bolong

    2016-05-11

    We investigated the mechanism of the intrinsic persistent luminescence of Er2O3 in the A-type lattice based on first-principles calculations. We found that the native point defects were engaged in mutual subtle interactions in the form of chemical reactions between different charge states. The release of energy related to lattice distortion facilitates the conversion of energy for electrons to be transported between the valence band and the trap levels or even between the deep trap levels so as to generate persistent luminescence. The defect transitions that take place along the zero-phonon line release energy to enable optical transitions, with the exact amount of negative effective correlation energy determined by the lattice distortions. Our calculations on the thermodynamic transition levels confirm that both the visible and NIR experimentally observed intrinsic persistent luminescence (phosphor or afterglow) are related to the thermodynamic transition levels of oxygen-related defects, and the thermodynamic transition levels within different charge states for these defects are independent of the chemical potentials of the given species. Lattice distortion defects such as anion Frenkel (a-Fr) pair defects play an important role in transporting O-related defects between different lattice sites. To obtain red persistent luminescence that matches the biological therapeutic window, it is suggested to increase the electron transition levels between high-coordinated O vacancies and related metastable a-Fr defects; a close-packed core-shell structure is required to quench low-coordinated O-related defects so as to reduce the green band luminescence. We further established a conversed chain reaction (CCR) model to interpret the energy conversion process of persistent luminescence in terms of the inter-reactions of native point defects between different charge states. It is advantageous to use the study of defect levels combined with formation energies to suggest limits

  19. Application of layered poly (L-lactic acid cell free scaffold in a rabbit rotator cuff defect model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Atsuyuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the application of a layered cell free poly (L-lactic acid (PLLA scaffold to regenerate an infraspinatus tendon defect in a rabbit model. We hypothesized that PLLA scaffold without cultivated cells would lead to regeneration of tissue with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus without tendon defects. Methods Layered PLLA fabric with a smooth surface on one side and a pile-finished surface on the other side was used. Novel form of layered PLLA scaffold was created by superimposing 2 PLLA fabrics. Defects of the infraspinatus tendon were created in 32 rabbits and the PLLA scaffolds were transplanted, four rabbits were used as normal control. Contralateral infraspinatus tendons were reattached to humeral head without scaffold implantation. Histological and mechanical evaluations were performed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after operation. Results At 4 weeks postoperatively, cell migration was observed in the interstice of the PLLA fibers. Regenerated tissue was directly connected to the bone composed mainly of type III collagen, at 16 weeks postoperatively. The ultimate failure load increased in a time-dependent manner and no statistical difference was seen between normal infraspinatus tendon and scaffold group at 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. There were no differences between scaffold group and reattach group at each time of point. The stiffness did not improve significantly in both groups. Conclusions A novel form of layered PLLA scaffold has the potential to induce cell migration into the scaffold and to bridge the tendon defect with mechanical properties similar to reattached infraspinatus tendon model.

  20. Patient-specific reconstruction utilizing computer assisted 3D modelling for partial bone flap defect in hybrid cranioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueh, Low Peh; Abdullah, Johari Yap; Abdullah, Abdul Manaf; Yahya, Suzana; Idris, Zamzuri; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2016-12-01

    Autologous cranioplasty using a patient's original bone flap remain the commonest practice nowadays. However, partial bone flap defect is commonly encountered. Replacing the bone flap with pre-moulded synthetic bone flap is costly and not affordable to many patients. Hence most of the small to medium size defect was topped up with alloplastic material on a free hand basis intra-operatively which often resulted in inaccurate implant approximation with unsatisfactory cosmetic result. This study aims to evaluate implant accuracy and cosmetic outcome of cranioplasty candidates who underwent partial bone flap reconstruction utilising computer assisted 3D modelling. 3D images of the skull were obtained from post-craniectomy axial 1-mm spiral computed tomography (CT) scans and a virtual 3D model was generated using the Materialise Mimics software. The Materialise 3-Matic was then utilised to design a patient-specific implant. Prefabrication of the implant was performed by the 3D Objet printer, and a negative gypsum mold was created with the prefabricated cranial implant. Intraoperatively, a hybrid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-autologous cranial implant was produced using the gypsum mold, and fit into the cranial defect. This study is still ongoing at the moment. To date, two men has underwent partial bone flap reconstruction utilising this technique and both revealed satisfactory implant alignment with favourable cosmesis. Mean implant size was 12cm2, and the mean duration of intraoperative reconstruction for the partial bone flap defect was 40 minutes. No significant complication was reported. As a conclusion, this new technique and approach resulted in satisfactory implant alignment and favourable cosmetic outcome. However, more study samples are needed to increase the validity of the study results.

  1. A general procedure to model and to analyze pipelines with real defects caused by corrosion measured in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Adriano D.M.; Souza, Antonio H.T. de; Willmersdorf, Ramiro B.; Lira, Paulo R.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Silvana, M.B. Afonso; Motta, Renato S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Andrade, Edmundo Q. de [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2009-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to present an automatic procedure to generate a geometric model and FE meshes from data provided by some field inspection. From the data provided a smooth geometry representation in the corroded area of the pipeline is generated. This generation is coupled with surface tools provided by MSC.Patran Soft-ware, pre and post-processing, program. To accomplish the generation of the whole model, discretization rules were coded for the corroded area and for the interfaces necessary to fulfill the discretization of the whole model. In this work, the module that automatized the generation of computer models of identified defects with irregular geometry is described in detail. These modules were implemented with functions written in the programming language PCL (Patran Command Language) and added to the program PIPEFLAW (Cabral, 2007) developed by the group PADMEC (High Perform Computing on Computational Mechanics) from UFPE. The program has a friendly and customized graphical interface which allows the user to provide the main parameters of the pipe and defect. A structural non-linear analysis was performed for some models to obtain the internal pressure that would cause rupture of the model, representing the mechanical failure of the pipeline. For the purpose of numerical analysis the commercial finite element program ANSYS was used, which were being managed by scripts written in Phyton. (author)

  2. Effect of a collagen membrane enriched with fibronectin on guided tissue regeneration in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtis, Bülent; Balos, Köksal; Oygür, Tülin

    2002-01-01

    The present study was planned to assess the capacity of a resorbable collagen membrane enriched with fibronectin to prevent the apical migration of epithelium and to facilitate new attachment and new bone. Experimental osseous dehiscence defects were produced on the bilateral labial aspect of mandibular 2nd, 3rd and 4th premolar teeth in six mongrel dogs. Guided tissue regeneration therapy using collagen membranes, which were rehydrated with fibronectin solution, was performed on one quadrant (group A). In the contralateral quadrant, the same collagen membranes, but rehydrated only with saline (group B), were placed over the bony defects. The third premolar teeth, which were treated by open-flap debridement, served as control (group C). Flaps were positioned slightly coronally and sutured; sutures were removed 10 days later. The dogs were killed 30 days after reconstructive therapy. Tissue blocks containing the experimental and control teeth were excised, demineralized in EDTA, and embedded in paraffin. Histological and histometric evaluation revealed that all groups demonstrated similar effects on preventing the down-growth of epithelium and formation of new cementum and new bone. Collagen membranes were tolerated well within the tissues, and membrane remnants were identified at 30 days. In summary, this study indicated that in this dog model similar healing results could be achieved with a bovine type I collagen membrane with or without fibronectin solution and open-flap debridement.

  3. Application of a Four-dimensional Mathematical Model in the Establishment of an Early Post-burn Cerebral Oedema Model in Severely Burned Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitao, L; Dajun, Y; Kaifa, W; Xiuwu, B; Jiansen, S; Zongchen, Y

    2005-06-30

    The aim of this study was to explore the spatiotemporal development of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn (50% TBSA, third degree), using a four-dimensional (4D) mathematical model. Twenty-six male mongrel dogs were randomly divided into control and 6, 12, 18, and 24 post-burn hour (PBH) groups. The manifestation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology, changes of brain water content, and intracranial pressure were observed in each group respectively. A 4D mathematical model was established on the basis of the results of MRI scanning. Two turning points (6 and 18 PBH) and three phases of pathological change were displayed by the 4D mathematical model of cerebral oedema in the early stage of severe burn. The first phase was in the subclinical period, and effective treatment should therefore be performed as quickly as possible in order to prevent deterioration of post-burn cerebral oedema. The second phase (6-18 PBH), with pathological characteristics of cytotoxic cerebral oedema, was in the apoptosis period. The third stage (18-24 PBH) was the danger period of cerebral oedema. Intracranial pressure increased rapidly owing to the limitation of the cranial cavity. As a result, cerebral hernia could easily occur. An S-shape curve in the pathological process of cerebral oedema occurred in the early post-burn stage following severe burn.

  4. Craniomandibular trauma and tooth loss in northern dogs and wolves: implications for the archaeological study of dog husbandry and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losey, Robert J; Jessup, Erin; Nomokonova, Tatiana; Sablin, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological dog remains from many areas clearly show that these animals suffered tooth fractures, tooth loss, trauma, and dental defects during their lives. Relatively little research has explored the meanings of these patterns, particularly for ancient dog remains from small-scale societies of the North. One limiting issue is the lack of comparative data on dental health and experiences of trauma among northern wolves and dogs. This paper examines tooth loss, tooth fracture, enamel hypoplasia, and cranial trauma in a large sample of historic dog and wolf remains from North America and Northern Russia. The data indicate that the dogs more commonly experienced tooth loss and tooth fracture than the wolves, despite reportedly being fed mostly soft foods such as blubber and fish. The higher rates observed in the dogs likely is a result of food stress and self-provisioning through scavenging. The ability to self-provision was likely important for the long-term history of dog use in the north. Dogs also more commonly experienced cranial fractures than wolves, particularly depression fractures on their frontal bones, which were likely the result of blows from humans. Hypoplastic lesions are rare in both wolves and dogs, and probably result from multiple causes, including food stress, disease, and trauma.

  5. Craniomandibular trauma and tooth loss in northern dogs and wolves: implications for the archaeological study of dog husbandry and domestication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Losey

    Full Text Available Archaeological dog remains from many areas clearly show that these animals suffered tooth fractures, tooth loss, trauma, and dental defects during their lives. Relatively little research has explored the meanings of these patterns, particularly for ancient dog remains from small-scale societies of the North. One limiting issue is the lack of comparative data on dental health and experiences of trauma among northern wolves and dogs. This paper examines tooth loss, tooth fracture, enamel hypoplasia, and cranial trauma in a large sample of historic dog and wolf remains from North America and Northern Russia. The data indicate that the dogs more commonly experienced tooth loss and tooth fracture than the wolves, despite reportedly being fed mostly soft foods such as blubber and fish. The higher rates observed in the dogs likely is a result of food stress and self-provisioning through scavenging. The ability to self-provision was likely important for the long-term history of dog use in the north. Dogs also more commonly experienced cranial fractures than wolves, particularly depression fractures on their frontal bones, which were likely the result of blows from humans. Hypoplastic lesions are rare in both wolves and dogs, and probably result from multiple causes, including food stress, disease, and trauma.

  6. Modeling of tensile testing on perfect and defective graphenylene nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, Saeed

    2017-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed here to study the mechanical properties of graphenylene nanotubes (NTs). The effects of different geometrical parameters, such as NT length and diameter, on the behavior of graphenylene NTs under tensile testing are investigated. Moreover, the tensile test is simulated at several temperatures, to obtain the stress-strain curves of both armchair and zigzag graphenylene NTs. It is shown that graphenylene NTs with larger diameter possess larger elastic moduli. The elastic modulus of graphenylene NTs is about one half that of carbon NTs. However, the maximum tolerable stress and strain of the graphenylene NTs decreases with increasing NT diameter. Investigating the effect of vacancy defects on the elastic properties of the graphenylene NTs, it is shown that Young’s modulus of armchair and zigzag graphenylene NTs decreases nonlinearly with increasing defect percentages.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of Wall Thinning Defects: Applications to Lamb Wave Generation and Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyun Jo; Kim, Tae Ho [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Seok; Kim, Young Kil [KRISS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    The generation of axisymmetric Lamb waves and interaction with wall thinning (corrosion) defects in hollow cylinders are simulated using the finite element method. Guided wave interaction with defects in cylinders is challenged by the multi-mode dispersion and the mode conversion. In this paper, two longitudinal, axisymmetric modes are generated using the concept of a time-delay periodic ring arrays (TDPRA), which makes use of the constructive/destructive interference concept to achieve the unidirectional emission and reception of guided waves. The axisymmetric scattering by the wall thinning extending in full circumference of a cylinder is studied with a two-dimensional FE simulation. The effect of wall thinning depth, axial extension, and the edge shape on the reflections of guided waves is discussed.

  8. Serum immunoglobulin A concentrations in normal and diseased dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, M J; Penhale, W J

    1988-11-01

    The normal level of serum IgA in Western Australian dogs was defined by single radial immunodiffusion using sera from 100 healthy randomly selected adult crossbred animals. Serum IgA values of 185 animals from six breeds were also determined. The mean and variance of serum IgA of these groups were similar to the crossbred dogs with the exception of German shepherd dogs where these values were statistically greater. In addition, 210 dogs with a range of chronic diseases (autoimmune, hypersensitivity, pyoderma, neoplasia, demodecosis, disseminated aspergillosis) were assayed and low values recorded in five cases. In all disease groups the mean serum IgA value was significantly greater than in the crossbred group and the variance significantly greater in most of these groups. The German shepherd group were the only normal dogs with a mean and variance similar to those of the clinical series suggesting that this breed may have a primary defect in IgA metabolism.

  9. Improved Healing of Large, Osseous, Segmental Defects by Reverse Dynamization: Evaluation in a Sheep Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202- 4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law...determined. Moreover, negligible inter-fragmentary movement differences of the fracture gap occurred during repeated load-cycling to mimic the projected...IFM) through the separated bone cortices ( fracture gap). In research funded by a CDMRP Idea Development Award, we used a rat segmental defect

  10. Modeling of point defects and rare gas incorporation in uranium mono-carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, A.; Van Brutzel, L.

    2007-02-01

    An embedded atom method (EAM) potential has been established for uranium mono-carbide. This EAM potential was fitted on structural properties of metallic uranium and uranium mono-carbide. The formation energies of point defects, as well as activation energies for self migration, have been evaluated in order to cross-check the suitability of the potential. Assuming that the carbon vacancies are the main defects in uranium mono-carbide compounds, the migration paths and energies are consistent with experimental data selected by Catlow[C.R.A. Catlow, J. Nucl. Mater. 60 (1976) 151]. The insertion and migration energies for He, Kr and Xe have also been evaluated with available inter-atomic potentials [H.H. Andersen, P. Sigmund, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 38 (1965) 238]. Results show that the most stable defect configuration for rare gases is within uranium vacancies. The migration energy of an interstitial Xe is 0.5 eV, in agreement with the experimental value of 0.5 eV [Hj. Matzke, Science of advanced LMFBR fuels, Solid State Physics, Chemistry and Technology of Carbides, Nitrides and Carbonitrides of Uranium and Plutonium, North-Holland, 1986].

  11. Long-term results following cranial hydroxyapatite prosthesis implantation in a large skull defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Lucia; Staffa, Guido; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Salamanna, Francesca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Serchi, Elena; Pressato, Daniele; Arcangeli, Elena; Fini, Milena

    2012-04-01

    A large skull defect may occur after different events such as trauma, tumor resection, and vascular injuries. There is still some doubt about the best material to use for reconstruction. Hydroxyapatite ceramic is one of the materials in use, and its biocompatibility and osteoconductivity are well established. This study evaluated the interaction of a commercial hydroxyapatite custom-made prosthesis implanted in a large skull defect, to assess its osteointegration and its habitability with newly formed bone over time. Ten sheep underwent craniectomy and reconstruction of the skull defect with a porous hydroxyapatite cranial prosthesis. The animals were divided into two groups: animals in group A were euthanized after 6 months and animals in group B were euthanized after 12 months. At the end of the experimental periods, each implant was evaluated macroscopically and radiologically, and analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histology, histomorphometry, and microhardness techniques. During the study, no adverse events occurred, and there was no evidence of inflammation or negative tissue reactions. Histology and histomorphometry showed new bone formation inside the implant in both experimental periods; newly formed bone had increased significantly (p < 0.05) by over 300 percent between 6 and 12 months. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomographic analysis showed new bone formation and material remodeling. Microhardness analysis indicated that the mineralization process and the mechanical properties of newly formed bone were not altered. The hydroxyapatite prosthesis showed its osteoconductivity and good biocompatibility. A low rate of fibrous tissue formation and a high rate of bony regeneration were found.

  12. TIBETANS WITH THEIR DOGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KALZANG; TSETEN

    2007-01-01

    Bring ethnic Tibetans and their dogs together and you will get an inextricable union. The earliest dogs descended from wild beasts of prey- being fierce,tough,strong,and prepared to fight to death against any rival.However,having been tamed by human beings,dogs became companions to mankind and could form a strong bond

  13. Whose Dog Is Smarter?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟文婧

    2007-01-01

    <正> Two dog owners are arguing about their dogs.First owner:My dog is so smart,every morning he waits for the pa-per boy to come around and then he takes the newspa-per and brings it to me.Second owner:I know ...First owner:How?

  14. Elevated endothelin-1 expression in dogs with heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Saida, Kaname

    2005-11-01

    We explored the involvement of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the pathophysiology of dog dirofilariasis (heartworm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis) by analyzing mRNA levels of preproendothelin-1 (PPET-1), the precursor form of ET-1, in cardiopulmonary organs as well as ET-1 peptide levels in plasma. To determine the cDNA sequence and primary protein structure of dog PPET-1, we performed molecular cloning of the full-length cDNA. Based on the determined sequence information, comparative expression analysis of PPET-1 mRNA was carried out by real-time polymerase chain reaction on cardiopulmonary organs from healthy (n=5) and filarial (n=5) dogs. Filarial dogs showed a significantly (p<0.05) higher mRNA expression level in the heart (about one hundred times) and lung (about ten times) than healthy dogs. Analysis of plasma ET-1 levels in healthy (n=10) and filarial (n=10) dogs showed that filarial dogs (6.9+/-2.7 pg/ml) have significantly (p<0.01) increased plasma ET-1 levels compared with healthy dogs (1.4+/-0.3 pg/ml). To assess the pathophysiological significance of ET-1 in dirofilariasis relative to other cardiopulmonary disorders, plasma ET-1 levels determined in dogs diagnosed with mitral regurgitation (n=10), tricuspid regurgitation (n=5), ventricular septal defect (n=5), and patent ductus arteriosus (n=5) were compared to plasma ET-1 levels in filarial dogs. Filarial dogs, which commonly develop serious pulmonary hypertension, exhibited by far the highest ET-1 levels of the disease states examined. Based on the fact that ET-1 is a potent bioactive mediator that induces vasoconstriction and promotes vascular remodeling, these findings suggest that ET-1 plays an important role in the pathophysiology of dog dirofilariasis as an aggravating factor by inducing pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Wetting on smooth micropatterned defects

    CERN Document Server

    Debuisson, Damien; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model which predicts the contact angle hysteresis introduced by smooth micropatterned defects. The defects are modeled by a smooth function and the contact angle hysteresis is explained using a tangent line solution. When the liquid micro-meniscus touches both sides of the defect simultaneously, depinning of the contact line occurs. The defects are fabricated using a photoresist and experimental results confirm the model. An important point is that the model is scale-independent, i.e. the contact angle hysteresis is dependent on the aspect ratio of the function, not on its absolute size; this could have implications for natural surface defects.

  16. Prediction of Deoxypodophyllotoxin Disposition in Mouse, Rat, Monkey and Dog by Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Model and the Extrapolation to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT is a potential anti-tumor candidate prior to its clinical phase. The aim of the study was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model consisting of 13 tissue compartments to predict DPT disposition in mouse, rat, monkey and dog based on in vitro and in silico inputs. Since large interspecies difference was found in unbound fraction of DPT in plasma, we assumed that Kt:pl,u (unbound tissue-to-plasma concentration ratio was identical across species. The predictions of our model were then validated by in vivo data of corresponding preclinical species, along with visual predictive checks. Reasonable matches were found between observed and predicted plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in all four animal species. The prediction in the related seven tissues of mouse was also desirable. We also attempted to predict human pharmacokinetic profile by both the developed PBPK model and interspecies allometric scaling across mouse, rat and monkey, while dog was excluded from the scaling. The two approaches reached similar results. We hope the study will help in the efficacy and safety assessment of DPT in future clinical studies and provide a reference to the preclinical screening of similar compounds by PBPK model.

  17. Early changes in experimental osteoarthritis using the Pond-Nuki dog model: technical procedure and initial results of in vivo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libicher, Martin [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ivancic, Mate; Hoffmann, Volker; Wenz, Wolfram [University of Heidelberg, Department of Orthopaedics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the feasibility of combining in vivo MR imaging with the Pond-Nuki animal model for the evaluation of osteoarthritis. In an experimental study, 24 beagle dogs underwent transection of the anterior cruciate ligament of the left leg (modified Pond-Nuki model). The dogs were randomly assigned into four groups and examined by MRI after 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks. MR imaging of both knees was performed under general anesthesia with the contralateral joint serving as control. In group 1 (6 weeks postoperatively), the first sign detected on MRI was subchondral bone marrow edema in the posteromedial tibia. After 12 weeks, erosion of the posteromedial tibial cartilage could be observed, followed by meniscus degeneration and osteophytosis after 24 and 48 weeks. The contralateral knee joint showed transient joint effusion, but no significant signs of internal derangement (P<0.001). By combining in vivo MR imaging with the Pond-Nuki model, it is possible to detect early signs of osteoarthritis. The first sign was posteromedial subchondral bone marrow edema in the tibia followed by progressive cartilage degeneration and joint derangement. The in vivo model therefore seems to be suitable for longitudinal studies or monitoring the therapeutic effects of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  18. Use of a Microsoft Excel based add-in program to calculate plasma sinistrin clearance by a two-compartment model analysis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Sarah M L; Sturgess, Christopher P; Dunning, Mark D; Neiger, Reto

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of renal function by means of plasma clearance of a suitable marker has become standard procedure for estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sinistrin, a polyfructan solely cleared by the kidney, is often used for this purpose. Pharmacokinetic modeling using adequate software is necessary to calculate disappearance rate and half-life of sinistrin. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of a Microsoft excel based add-in program to calculate plasma sinistrin clearance, as well as additional pharmacokinetic parameters such as transfer rates (k), half-life (t1/2) and volume of distribution (Vss) for sinistrin in dogs with varying degrees of renal function.

  19. Defects in skeletal muscle subsarcolemmal mitochondria in a non-obese model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Nicola; Kummitha, China; Hoppel, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle resistance to insulin is related to accumulation of lipid-derived products, but it is not clear whether this accumulation is caused by skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. Diabetes and obesity are reported to have a selective effect on the function of subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle. The current study investigated the role of the subpopulations of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the absence of obesity. A non-obese spontaneous rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, (Goto-Kakizaki), was used to evaluate function and biochemical properties in both populations of skeletal muscle mitochondria. In subsarcolemmal mitochondria, minor defects are observed whereas in interfibrillar mitochondria function is preserved. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria defects characterized by a mild decline of oxidative phosphorylation efficiency are related to ATP synthase and structural alterations of inner mitochondria membrane but are considered unimportant because of the absence of defects upstream as shown with polarographic and spectrophometric assays. Fatty acid transport and oxidation is preserved in both population of mitochondria, whereas palmitoyl-CoA increased 25% in interfibrillar mitochondria of diabetic rats. Contrary to popular belief, these data provide compelling evidence that mitochondrial function is unaffected in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle from T2DM non-obese rats.

  20. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration.

  1. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Alexander M; Kretlow, James D; Spicer, Patrick P; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A; Kasper, F Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material.

  2. Balloon dilation of congenital supravalvular pulmonic stenosis in a dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty is considered the standard of care for treatment of valvular pulmo