WorldWideScience

Sample records for defect clusters formed

  1. Size of Defect Clusters in Lithium Niobate Single Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the Li-site vacancy model, the non-stoichiometric defects in LN crystals, i.e., anti-site defects NbLi and corresponding lithium vacancy defects VLi, were investigated by the bond valence model. According to the valence sum rule, 4 VLi sites must emerge in the nearest lattices of NbLi, and thus form a neutral cluster with the center, NbLi(VLi)4Nb5O15. The bond graph of the defect cluster was given, which reveals the ideal chemical bonding characteristics of defect clusters. Combining the possible configuration of defect clusters and the ideal bond lengths in the bond graph, the size of defect clusters in the LN crystallographic frame is estimated as 0.9~1.2 nm in diameter.

  2. Ordering Quantum Dot Clusters via Nematic Liquid Crystal Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodarte, Andrea; Pandolfi, R.; Hirst, L. S.; Ghosh, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nematic liquid crystal (LC) materials can be used to create ordered clusters of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) from a homogeneous isotropic dispersion. At the phase transition, the ordered domains of nematic LC expel the majority of dispersed QDs into the isotropic domains. The final LC phase produces a series of QD clusters that are situated at the defect points of the liquid crystal texture. Lower concentrations of QDs are organized in a network throughout the LC matrix that originates from the LC phase transition. Inside the QD clusters the inter-particle distance enables efficient energy transfer from high energy dots to lower energy dots. Because the QD clusters form at defect sites, the location of the clusters can be preselected by seeding the LC cell with defect nucleation points.

  3. Fuzzy Logic Connectivity in Semiconductor Defect Clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleason, S.S.; Kamowski, T.P.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-01-24

    In joining defects on semiconductor wafer maps into clusters, it is common for defects caused by different sources to overlap. Simple morphological image processing tends to either join too many unrelated defects together or not enough together. Expert semiconductor fabrication engineers have demonstrated that they can easily group clusters of defects from a common manufacturing problem source into a single signature. Capturing this thought process is ideally suited for fuzzy logic. A system of rules was developed to join disconnected clusters based on properties such as elongation, orientation, and distance. The clusters are evaluated on a pair-wise basis using the fuzzy rules and are joined or not joined based on a defuzzification and threshold. The system continuously re-evaluates the clusters under consideration as their fuzzy memberships change with each joining action. The fuzzy membership functions for each pair-wise feature, the techniques used to measure the features, and methods for improving the speed of the system are all developed. Examples of the process are shown using real-world semiconductor wafer maps obtained from chip manufacturers. The algorithm is utilized in the Spatial Signature Analyzer (SSA) software, a joint development project between Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) and SEMATECH.

  4. Fuzzy Logic Connectivity in Semiconductor Defect Clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleason, S.S.; Kamowski, T.P.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-01-24

    In joining defects on semiconductor wafer maps into clusters, it is common for defects caused by different sources to overlap. Simple morphological image processing tends to either join too many unrelated defects together or not enough together. Expert semiconductor fabrication engineers have demonstrated that they can easily group clusters of defects from a common manufacturing problem source into a single signature. Capturing this thought process is ideally suited for fuzzy logic. A system of rules was developed to join disconnected clusters based on properties such as elongation, orientation, and distance. The clusters are evaluated on a pair-wise basis using the fuzzy rules and are joined or not joined based on a defuzzification and threshold. The system continuously re-evaluates the clusters under consideration as their fuzzy memberships change with each joining action. The fuzzy membership functions for each pair-wise feature, the techniques used to measure the features, and methods for improving the speed of the system are all developed. Examples of the process are shown using real-world semiconductor wafer maps obtained from chip manufacturers. The algorithm is utilized in the Spatial Signature Analyzer (SSA) software, a joint development project between Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) and SEMATECH.

  5. Annealing study of a bistable cluster defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.junkes@desy.d [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Eckstein, Doris [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Pintilie, Ioana [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); NIMP Bucharest-Margurele (Romania); Makarenko, Leonid F. [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus); Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-01-11

    This work deals with the influence of neutron and proton induced cluster related defects on the properties of n-type silicon detectors. Defect concentrations were obtained by means of Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) technique, while the full depletion voltage and the reverse current were extracted from capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The annealing behaviour of the reverse current can be correlated with the annealing of the cluster related defect levels labeled E4a and E4b by making use of their bistability. This bistability was characterised by isochronal and isothermal annealing studies and it was found that the development with increasing annealing temperature is similar to that of divacancies. This supports the assumption that E4a and E4b are vacancy related defects. In addition we observe an influence of the disordered regions on the shape and height of the DLTS or TSC signals corresponding to point defects like the vacancy-oxygen complex.

  6. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  7. Theoretical study on the interaction of pristine, defective and strained graphene with Fen and Nin (n = 13, 38, 55) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Jiao, Menggai; Li, Kai; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian

    2013-11-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Fen and Nin (n = 13, 38, 55) clusters interacting with pristine, defective and strained graphene are investigated by means of self-consistent charge density-functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method. The cluster size dependence, defect influence, and strain effect are discussed. We found that the defects play an important role in stabilizing metal clusters by forming metal-carbon σ bonds. Large charge redistribution of Fen compared to Nin lead to stronger interaction in Fen@graphene. The results suggested that tuning the morphological level of the substrate defect and cluster size could affect the catalytic activity of the metal cluster.

  8. The spatial evaluation of neighborhood clusters of birth defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, J.D.

    1990-04-16

    Spatial statistics have recently been applied in epidemiology to evaluate clusters of cancer and birth defects. Their use requires a comparison population, drawn from the population at risk for disease, that may not always be readily available. In this dissertation the plausibility of using data on all birth defects, available from birth defects registries, as a surrogate for the spatial distribution of all live births in the analysis of clusters is assessed. Three spatial statistics that have been applied in epidemiologic investigations of clusters, nearest neighbor distance, average interpoint distance, and average distance to a fixed point, were evaluated by computer simulation for their properties in a unit square, and in a zip code region. Comparison of spatial distributions of live births and birth defects was performed by drawing samples of live births and birth defects from Santa Clara County, determining the street address at birth, geocoding this address and evaluating the resultant maps using various statistical techniques. The proposed method was then demonstrated on a previously confirmed cluster of oral cleft cases. All live births for the neighborhood were geocoded, as were all birth defects. Evaluation of this cluster using the nearest neighbor and average interpoint distance statistics was performed using randomization techniques with both the live births population and the birth defect population as comparison groups. 113 refs., 36 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Effects of stoichiometry on the defect clustering in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngayam-Happy, Raoul; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the on-going topic of point defects and point defect clusters in uranium dioxide. Molecular statics simulation using an extended pair potential model that accounts for disproportionation equilibrium as charge compensation has been applied to assess the effect of disproportionation on structural properties and clustering in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The defective structures are scanned in minute detail using a powerful and versatile analysing tool, called ASTRAM, developed in-house for the purpose. Unlike pair potential models ignoring disproportionation effects, our model reproduces volume changes observed experimentally in non-stoichiometric ~\\text{U}{{\\text{O}}\\text{2-\\text{x}}} and ~\\text{U}{{\\text{O}}\\text{2+x}} . The oxygen defect energetics computed is in good agreement with data in the literature. The model is used to assess the clustering that occurs in bulk samples of non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. This study confirms the generation of split-interstitial clusters as the dominant defect type in non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. A new key mechanism for defect clustering in hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide is proposed that is based on the progressive aggregation of primitive blocks identified as 1-vacancy split-interstitial clusters.

  10. Subcascade formation and defect cluster size scaling in high-energy collision events in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; Sand, A. E.; Nordlund, K.; Luneville, L.; Simeone, D.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    It has been recently established that the size of the defects created under ion irradiation follows a scaling law (Sand A. E. et al., EPL, 103 (2013) 46003; Yi X. et al., EPL, 110 (2015) 36001). A critical constraint associated with its application to phenomena occurring over a broad range of irradiation conditions is the limitation on the energy of incident particles. Incident neutrons or ions, with energies exceeding a certain energy threshold, produce a complex hierarchy of collision subcascade events, which impedes the use of the defect cluster size scaling law derived for an individual low-energy cascade. By analyzing the statistics of subcascade sizes and energies, we show that defect clustering above threshold energies can be described by a product of two scaling laws, one for the sizes of subcascades and the other for the sizes of defect clusters formed in subcascades. The statistics of subcascade sizes exhibits a transition at a threshold energy, where the subcascade morphology changes from a single domain below the energy threshold, to several or many sub-domains above the threshold. The number of sub-domains then increases in proportion to the primary knock-on atom energy. The model has been validated against direct molecular-dynamics simulations and applied to W, Fe, Be, Zr and sixteen other metals, enabling the prediction of full statistics of defect cluster sizes with no limitation on the energy of cascade events. We find that populations of defect clusters produced by the fragmented high-energy cascades are dominated by individual Frenkel pairs and relatively small defect clusters, whereas the lower-energy non-fragmented cascades produce a greater proportion of large defect clusters.

  11. Topological defect motifs in two-dimensional Coulomb clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Radzvilavičius, A; 10.1088/0953-8984/23/38/385301

    2012-01-01

    The most energetically favourable arrangement of low-density electrons in an infinite two-dimensional plane is the ordered triangular Wigner lattice. However, in most instances of contemporary interest one deals instead with finite clusters of strongly interacting particles localized in potential traps, for example, in complex plasmas. In the current contribution we study distribution of topological defects in two-dimensional Coulomb clusters with parabolic lateral confinement. The minima hopping algorithm based on molecular dynamics is used to efficiently locate the ground- and low-energy metastable states, and their structure is analyzed by means of the Delaunay triangulation. The size, structure and distribution of geometry-induced lattice imperfections strongly depends on the system size and the energetic state. Besides isolated disclinations and dislocations, classification of defect motifs includes defect compounds --- grain boundaries, rosette defects, vacancies and interstitial particles. Proliferatio...

  12. A theoretical study of intrinsic point defects and defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C A; Smith, R; Kenny, S D; Murphy, S T; Grimes, R W; Ball, J A

    2009-07-08

    Point and small cluster defects in magnesium aluminate spinel have been studied from a first principles viewpoint. Typical point defects that occur during collision cascade simulations are cation anti-site defects, which have a small formation energy and are very stable, O and Mg split interstitials and vacancies. Isolated Al interstitials were found to be energetically unfavourable but could occur as part of a split Mg-Al pair or as a three atom-three vacancy Al 'ring' defect, previously observed in collision cascades using empirical potentials. The structure and energetics of the defects were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the results compared to simulations using empirical fixed charge potentials. Each point defect was studied in a variety of supercell sizes in order to ensure convergence. It was found that empirical potential simulations significantly overestimate formation energies, but that the type and relative stability of the defects are well predicted by the empirical potentials both for point defects and small defect clusters.

  13. Properties of hierarchically forming star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Maschberger, Th; Bonnell, I A; Kroupa, P

    2010-01-01

    We undertake a systematic analysis of the early (< 0.5 Myr) evolution of clustering and the stellar initial mass function in turbulent fragmentation simulations. These large scale simulations for the first time offer the opportunity for a statistical analysis of IMF variations and correlations between stellar properties and cluster richness. The typical evolutionary scenario involves star formation in small-n clusters which then progressively merge; the first stars to form are seeds of massive stars and achieve a headstart in mass acquisition. These massive seeds end up in the cores of clusters and a large fraction of new stars of lower mass is formed in the outer parts of the clusters. The resulting clusters are therefore mass segregated at an age of 0.5 Myr, although the signature of mass segregation is weakened during mergers. We find that the resulting IMF has a smaller exponent (alpha=1.8-2.2) than the Salpeter value (alpha=2.35). The IMFs in subclusters are truncated at masses only somewhat larger th...

  14. Lithopanspermia in star-forming clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Fred C; Spergel, David N

    2005-08-01

    This paper considers the lithopanspermia hypothesis in star-forming groups and clusters, where the chances of biological material spreading from one solar system to another is greatly enhanced (relative to action in the field) because of the close proximity of the systems and lower relative velocities. These effects more than compensate for the reduced time spent in such crowded environments. This paper uses approximately 300,000 Monte Carlo scattering calculations to determine the cross sections for rocks to be captured by binaries and provides fitting formulae for other applications. We assess the odds of transfer as a function of the ejection speed v (eject) and number N(.) of members in the birth aggregate. The odds of any given ejected meteoroid being recaptured by another solar system are relatively low, about 1:10(3)-10(6) over the expected range of ejection speeds and cluster sizes. Because the number of ejected rocks (with mass m > 10 kg) per system can be large, N (R) approximately 10(16), virtually all solar systems are likely to share rocky ejecta with all of the other solar systems in their birth cluster. The number of ejected rocks that carry living microorganisms is much smaller and less certain, but we estimate that N (B) approximately 10(7) rocks can be ejected from a biologically active solar system. For typical birth environments, the capture of life-bearing rocks is expected to occur N (bio) asymptotically equal to 10-16,000 times (per cluster), depending on the ejection speeds. Only a small fraction (f (imp) approximately 10(4)) of the captured rocks impact the surfaces of terrestrial planets, so that N (lps) asymptotically equal to 10(3)-1.6 lithopanspermia events are expected per cluster (under favorable conditions). Finally, we discuss the question of internal versus external seeding of clusters and the possibility of Earth seeding young clusters over its biologically active lifetime.

  15. Line-defect mediated formation of hole and Mo clusters in monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Na Yeon; Lee, Yeongdong; Kim, Youngchan; Kim, Moon J.; Lee, Changgu; Lee, Zonghoon

    2016-03-01

    The production of hole and Mo cluster by electron beam irradiation in molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which consists of S-Mo-S layers, is monitored over time using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. S vacancies are firstly formed due to knocking off of S atoms and then line defects are induced due to accumulation of S vacancies in MoS2 sheet instead of forming a hole. The line defects tend to be merged at a point and a hole is formed subsequently at the point. Mo atoms tend to be clustered discretely as a nano sheet along the edge of the hole due to difference in displacement threshold energy between Mo and S atoms under electron irradiation. After Mo clusters are nearly separated from MoS2 sheet, the clusters are transformed into body-centered cubic nanocrystal of Mo during prolonged electron beam irradiation. The line defect mediated formation of hole and Mo cluster only occurs within a single grain of monolayer MoS2 sheet.

  16. Emerging Diluted Ferromagnetism in High-Tc Superconductors Driven by Point Defect Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazquez, Jaume; Guzman, Roger; Mishra, Rohan; Bartolomé, Elena; Salafranca, Juan; Magén, Cesar; Varela, Maria; Coll, Mariona; Palau, Anna; Valvidares, S Manuel; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Pellegrin, Eric; Herrero-Martin, Javier; Pennycook, Stephen J; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Defects in ceramic materials are generally seen as detrimental to their functionality and applicability. Yet, in some complex oxides, defects present an opportunity to enhance some of their properties or even lead to the discovery of exciting physics, particularly in the presence of strong correlations. A paradigmatic case is the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123), in which nanoscale defects play an important role as they can immobilize quantized magnetic flux vortices. Here previously unforeseen point defects buried in Y123 thin films that lead to the formation of ferromagnetic clusters embedded within the superconductor are unveiled. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission microscopy has been used for exploring, on a single unit-cell level, the structure and chemistry resulting from these complex point defects, along with density functional theory calculations, for providing new insights about their nature including an unexpected defect-driven ferromagnetism, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism for bearing evidence of Cu magnetic moments that align ferromagnetically even below the superconducting critical temperature to form a dilute system of magnetic clusters associated with the point defects.

  17. Influence of radiation induced defect clusters on silicon particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junkes, Alexandra

    2011-10-15

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) addresses some of today's most fundamental questions of particle physics, like the existence of the Higgs boson and supersymmetry. Two large general-purpose experiments (ATLAS, CMS) are installed to detect the products of high energy protonproton and nucleon-nucleon collisions. Silicon detectors are largely employed in the innermost region, the tracking area of the experiments. The proven technology and large scale availability make them the favorite choice. Within the framework of the LHC upgrade to the high-luminosity LHC, the luminosity will be increased to L=10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. In particular the pixel sensors in the innermost layers of the silicon trackers will be exposed to an extremely intense radiation field of mainly hadronic particles with fluences of up to {phi}{sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The radiation induced bulk damage in silicon sensors will lead to a severe degradation of the performance during their operational time. This work focusses on the improvement of the radiation tolerance of silicon materials (Float Zone, Magnetic Czochralski, epitaxial silicon) based on the evaluation of radiation induced defects in the silicon lattice using the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and the Thermally Stimulated Current methods. It reveals the outstanding role of extended defects (clusters) on the degradation of sensor properties after hadron irradiation in contrast to previous works that treated effects as caused by point defects. It has been found that two cluster related defects are responsible for the main generation of leakage current, the E5 defects with a level in the band gap at E{sub C}-0.460 eV and E205a at E{sub C}-0.395 eV where E{sub C} is the energy of the edge of the conduction band. The E5 defect can be assigned to the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}) defect. Furthermore, isochronal annealing experiments have shown that the V{sub 3} defect

  18. Emerging Diluted Ferromagnetism in High‐T c Superconductors Driven by Point Defect Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Roger.; Mishra, Rohan; Bartolomé, Elena; Salafranca, Juan; Magén, Cesar; Varela, Maria; Coll, Mariona; Palau, Anna; Valvidares, S. Manuel; Gargiani, Pierluigi; Pellegrin, Eric; Herrero‐Martin, Javier.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Defects in ceramic materials are generally seen as detrimental to their functionality and applicability. Yet, in some complex oxides, defects present an opportunity to enhance some of their properties or even lead to the discovery of exciting physics, particularly in the presence of strong correlations. A paradigmatic case is the high‐temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7‐δ (Y123), in which nanoscale defects play an important role as they can immobilize quantized magnetic flux vortices. Here previously unforeseen point defects buried in Y123 thin films that lead to the formation of ferromagnetic clusters embedded within the superconductor are unveiled. Aberration‐corrected scanning transmission microscopy has been used for exploring, on a single unit‐cell level, the structure and chemistry resulting from these complex point defects, along with density functional theory calculations, for providing new insights about their nature including an unexpected defect‐driven ferromagnetism, and X‐ray magnetic circular dichroism for bearing evidence of Cu magnetic moments that align ferromagnetically even below the superconducting critical temperature to form a dilute system of magnetic clusters associated with the point defects. PMID:27812469

  19. Textural defect detect using a revised ant colony clustering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chao; Xiao, Li; Wang, Bingwen

    2007-11-01

    We propose a totally novel method based on a revised ant colony clustering algorithm (ACCA) to explore the topic of textural defect detection. In this algorithm, our efforts are mainly made on the definition of local irregularity measurement and the implementation of the revised ACCA. The local irregular measurement defined evaluates the local textural inconsistency of each pixel against their mini-environment. In our revised ACCA, the behaviors of each ant are divided into two steps: release pheromone and act. The quantity of pheromone released is proportional to the irregularity measurement; the actions of the ants to act next are chosen independently of each other in a stochastic way according to some evaluated heuristic knowledge. The independency of ants implies the inherent parallel computation architecture of this algorithm. We apply the proposed method in some typical textural images with defects. From the series of pheromone distribution map (PDM), it can be clearly seen that the pheromone distribution approaches the textual defects gradually. By some post-processing, the final distribution of pheromone can demonstrate the shape and area of the defects well.

  20. Advanced defect detection algorithm using clustering in ultrasonic NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongzhang, Rui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    A range of materials used in industry exhibit scattering properties which limits ultrasonic NDE. Many algorithms have been proposed to enhance defect detection ability, such as the well-known Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) technique. Scattering noise usually cannot be fully removed and the remaining noise can be easily confused with real feature signals, hence becoming artefacts during the image interpretation stage. This paper presents an advanced algorithm to further reduce the influence of artefacts remaining in A-scan data after processing using a conventional defect detection algorithm. The raw A-scan data can be acquired from either traditional single transducer or phased array configurations. The proposed algorithm uses the concept of unsupervised machine learning to cluster segmental defect signals from pre-processed A-scans into different classes. The distinction and similarity between each class and the ensemble of randomly selected noise segments can be observed by applying a classification algorithm. Each class will then be labelled as `legitimate reflector' or `artefacts' based on this observation and the expected probability of defection (PoD) and probability of false alarm (PFA) determined. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, a 5MHz linear array transducer is used to collect A-scans from both austenitic steel and Inconel samples. Each pulse-echo A-scan is pre-processed using SSP and the subsequent application of the proposed clustering algorithm has provided an additional reduction to PFA while maintaining PoD for both samples compared with SSP results alone.

  1. Cluster as a Form of Strategic Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Godlewska

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theory of clusters that are treated as natural elements of European model of economic development. There are highlighted Polish Forum of Lisbon Strategy point of view that indicated clusters as one of fundamental ideas recommended for Polish economy. In based on literature and observation of articles authors the concept, examples of Polish clusters and their role in strategic alliance are presented.

  2. Point-Defect Mediated Bonding of Pt Clusters on (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J. G.; Lv, Y. A.; Li, X. N.;

    2009-01-01

    The adhesion of various sizes of Pt clusters on the metallic (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with and without the point defect has been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). The calculations show that the binding energies of Pt-n (n = 1-6) clusters on the defect free CNTs are more......). The stronger orbital hybridization between the Pt atom and the carbon atom shows larger charge transfers on the defective CNTs than on the defect free CNTs, which allows the strong interaction between Pt clusters and CNTs. On the basis of DFT calculations, CNTs with point defect can be used as the catalyst...

  3. On the performance limiting behavior of defect clusters in commercial silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Chen, W.; Jones, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors report the observation of defect clusters in high-quality, commercial silicon solar cell substrates. The nature of the defect clusters, their mechanism of formation, and precipitation of metallic impurities at the defect clusters are discussed. This defect configuration influences the device performance in a unique way--by primarily degrading the voltage-related parameters. Network modeling is used to show that, in an N/P junction device, these regions act as shunts that dissipate power generated within the cell.

  4. How did the Virgo cluster form?

    CERN Document Server

    Sorce, Jenny G; Hoffman, Yehuda; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    While the Virgo cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster and therefore the best observed one, little is known about its formation history. In this paper, a set of cosmological simulations that resemble the Local Universe is used to shed the first light on this mystery. The initial conditions for these simulations are constrained with galaxy peculiar velocities of the second catalog of the Cosmicflows project using algorithms developed within the Constrained Local UniversE Simulation project. Boxes of 500 Mpc/h on a side are set to run a series of dark matter only constrained simulations. In each simulation, a unique dark matter halo can be reliably identified as Virgo's counterpart. The properties of these Virgo halos are in agreement at a 10-20% level with the global properties of the observed Virgo cluster. Their zero-velocity masses agree at one-sigma with the observational mass estimate. In all the simulations, the matter falls onto the Virgo objects along a preferential direction that corresponds to the obs...

  5. Evidence for a size-dependent transition between noncrystalline structures and crystalline structures with defects in frozen Lennard-Jones clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, W

    2008-03-01

    Liquid Lennard-Jones clusters of 14 different sizes from N=55-923 atoms were cooled down in Monte Carlo simulations (40 runs for each size) to the reduced temperature T* = 0.05 . Structural analysis and visualization were applied for classification of the internal structure of all 560 final clusters. Small clusters revealed the presence of the multishell icosahedra or regular polyicosahedra. In larger clusters, beginning from N=309 , the noncrystalline atom ordering is often replaced by the formation of defected crystalline clusters in the form of layered face-centered cubic-hexagonal close-packed (fcc-hcp) clusters or defected layered clusters with some additional nonparallel hcp overlayers. The presence of regular polyicosahedral clusters, relatively numerous even at the largest analyzed sizes, is attributed to kinetic effects in structure formation.

  6. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  7. Platinum Clusters on Vacancy-Type Defects of Nanometer-Sized Graphene Patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayoshi Kobayashi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations found that spin density distributions of platinum clusters adsorbed on nanometer-size defective graphene patches with zigzag edges deviate strongly from those in the corresponding bare clusters, due to strong Pt-C interactions. In contrast, platinum clusters on the pristine patch have spin density distributions similar to the bare cases. The different spin density distributions come from whether underlying carbon atoms have radical characters or not. In the pristine patch, center carbon atoms do not have spin densities, and they cannot influence radical characters of the absorbed cluster. In contrast, radical characters appear on the defective sites, and thus spin density distributions of the adsorbed clusters are modulated by the Pt-C interactions. Consequently, characters of platinum clusters adsorbed on the sp2 surface can be changed by introducing vacancy-type defects.

  8. Organizational and legal aspects of regional transport cluster forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Lyfar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The objective of the work is to define the organizational and legal aspects of transport cluster forming transport, in particular its maintenance, form and intercommunications of participants. The results of the analysis. In the article on the basis of comparative analysis of determination of clusters and interpretation of their essence by other scientists, authorial determination of transport cluster is given, its maintenance, structure and legal form, are also determined. In basis of transport cluster the forming of transport-logistic system lies, and the center of such cluster can be a transport-logistic center. The legal framework of creation of cluster can be an agreement about joint activity. At the same time a cluster can have organizational and legal registration as a contractual association of legal entities with preservation of their self-dependence and independence. Management of transport cluster forming must take place at the level of regional state administration on condition of support of branch organs of management and have a complex character. The offered structure of transport cluster includes three basic blocks: business, science, power. Between the blocks of cluster the high degree of co-ordination must be attained. The center of cluster mostly is formed by the few powerful transport companies of region, which constitute the «kernel». Round this kernel the significant amount of small and middle firms which also co-operate and compete between each other is concentrated. The enterprises of region or regions, uniting in a cluster, obtain the possibility to defend their interests more effectively at the level of local authorities and local self-government, and also to participate in the large investment projects. Ultimately transport cluster is determined as an integration form of menage which will allow uniting transport organizations and pointing all resources at development of a transport and logistic

  9. Comparison of defect cluster accumulation and pattern formation in irradiated copper and nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the contrasting behavior of defect cluster formation in neutron-irradiated copper and nickel specimens. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the density and spatial distribution of defect clusters produced in copper and nickel as the result of fission neutron irradiation to damage levels of 0.01 to 0.25 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperature between 50 and 230{degrees}C. A comparison with published results in the literature indicates that defect cluster wall formation occurs in nickel irradiated at 0.2 to 0.4 T{sub M} in a wide variety of irradiation spectra. Defect cluster wall formation apparently only occurs in copper during low temperature irradiation with electrons and light ions. These results are discussed in terms of the thermal spike model for energetic displacement cascades.

  10. The effect of defect cluster size and interpolation on radiographic image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Karin; Yip, Kwok L.

    2011-03-01

    For digital X-ray detectors, the need to control factory yield and cost invariably leads to the presence of some defective pixels. Recently, a standard procedure was developed to identify such pixels for industrial applications. However, no quality standards exist in medical or industrial imaging regarding the maximum allowable number and size of detector defects. While the answer may be application specific, the minimum requirement for any defect specification is that the diagnostic quality of the images be maintained. A more stringent criterion is to keep any changes in the images due to defects below the visual threshold. Two highly sensitive image simulation and evaluation methods were employed to specify the fraction of allowable defects as a function of defect cluster size in general radiography. First, the most critical situation of the defect being located in the center of the disease feature was explored using image simulation tools and a previously verified human observer model, incorporating a channelized Hotelling observer. Detectability index d' was obtained as a function of defect cluster size for three different disease features on clinical lung and extremity backgrounds. Second, four concentrations of defects of four different sizes were added to clinical images with subtle disease features and then interpolated. Twenty observers evaluated the images against the original on a single display using a 2-AFC method, which was highly sensitive to small changes in image detail. Based on a 50% just-noticeable difference, the fraction of allowed defects was specified vs. cluster size.

  11. Geographic clustering of firms and urban form: a multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoh, Hanna; Kanaroglou, Pavlos

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides an empirical framework that applies spatial statistics methods to assess the relation between the change in the geographical clustering of firms and the emergence of urban form. We contend that where firms locate and eventually cluster give rise to the way commercial and industrial land uses are organized over space, which in turn defines the shape of urban form. Accordingly, the objectives of our work are twofold: (1) to identify the extent and shape of firm clustering and co-location at the intra-metropolitan level, and (2) examine how the change in the geographic clustering of different industries contributes to decentralization and the evolution of urban form. Spatial statistics methods and tools were vital and helped to fulfill these objectives.

  12. Black hole binaries dynamically formed in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dawoo; Kim, Chunglee; Lee, Hyung Mok; Bae, Yeong-Bok; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    We investigate properties of black hole (BH) binaries formed in globular clusters via dynamical processes, using directN-body simulations. We pay attention to effects of BH mass function on the total mass and mass ratio distributions of BH binaries ejected from clusters. First, we consider BH populations with two different masses in order to learn basic differences from models with single-mass BHs only. Secondly, we consider continuous BH mass functions adapted from recent studies on massive star evolution in a low metallicity environment, where globular clusters are formed. In this work, we consider only binaries that are formed by three-body processes and ignore stellar evolution and primordial binaries for simplicity. Our results imply that most BH binary mergers take place after they get ejected from the cluster. Also, mass ratios of dynamically formed binaries should be close to 1 or likely to be less than 2:1. Since the binary formation efficiency is larger for higher-mass BHs, it is likely that a BH mass function sampled by gravitational-wave observations would be weighed towards higher masses than the mass function of single BHs for a dynamically formed population. Applying conservative assumptions regarding globular cluster populations such as small BH mass fraction and no primordial binaries, the merger rate of BH binaries originated from globular clusters is estimated to be at least 6.5 yr-1 Gpc-3. Actual rate can be up to more than several times of our conservative estimate.

  13. Atomistic Simulation of He Clustering and Defects Produced in Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ti-Jiang; WANG Yue-Xia; PAN Zheng-Ying; JIANG Xiao-Mei; ZHOU Liang; ZHU Jing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the molecular dynamics method, the stability of small He-vacancy clusters is studied under the condition of the high He and low vacancy densities. The result shows that there is a competition between He atoms detrapped and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) emitted during the clustering of He atoms. When the He number is above a critical value of 9, the SIA emission is predominant. The SIA emission can result in deep capture of He atoms since the binding energy of He to a He-vacancy cluster is increased with the number of SIAs created. The cluster thus grows up. In addition, more SIAs are created when the temperature is elevated. The average volume of a He atom is increased. The cluster expansion takes place at high temperature.

  14. Forming Globular Cluster Systems in a Semi-analytic Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Beasley, Michael A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Sharples, Ray M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2002-01-01

    We apply the semi-analytical galaxy formation code of Cole et al. to investigate the formation of globular cluster (GC) systems in hierarchical clustering scenarios. The nature of the model allows us to investigate the properties of GC systems and their parent galaxies within a cosmological framework, over a wide dynamic range of mass and time resolution. Assuming GCs form during mergers of gaseous systems, the metal-rich peak of the classical 'bimodal' metallicity distribution of GCs natural...

  15. Formation and properties of defects and small vacancy clusters in SiC: Ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.; Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, Xiaotao T.

    2009-09-11

    Large-scale ab initio simulation methods have been employed to investigate the configurations and properties of defects in SiC. Atomic structures, formation energies and binding energies of small vacancy clusters have also been studied as a function of cluster size, and their relative stabilities are determined. The calculated formation energies of point defects are in good agreement with previously theoretical calculations. The results show that the most stable configuration of a di-vacancy cluster consists of two C vacancies located at second nearest neighbor sites, while a di-vacancy with two Si vacancies is not stable and may dissociate at room temperature. In general, the formation energies of small vacancy clusters increase with size, but the formation energies for clusters with a Si vacancy and n C vacancies (VSi-nVC) are much smaller than those with a C vacancy and n Si vacancies (VC-nVSi). These results demonstrate that the VSi-nVC clusters are more stable than the VC-nVSi clusters in SiC, and provide possible nucleation sites for larger vacancy clusters or voids to grow. For these small vacancy clusters, the binding energy decreases with increasing cluster size, and ranges from 2.5 to 4.6 eV. These results indicate that the small vacancy clusters in SiC are stable at temperatures up to 1900 K, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  16. Formation and properties of defects and small vacancy clusters in SiC: Ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, F.; Weber, W. J.; Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, X. T.

    2009-09-01

    Large-scale ab initio simulation methods have been employed to investigate the configurations and properties of defects in SiC. Atomic structures, formation energies and binding energies of small vacancy clusters have also been studied as a function of cluster size, and their relative stabilities are determined. The calculated formation energies of point defects are in good agreement with previously theoretical calculations. The results show that the di-vacancy cluster consists of two C vacancies located at the second nearest neighbor sites is stable up to 1300 K, while a di-vacancy with two Si vacancies is not stable and may dissociate at room temperature. In general, the formation energies of small vacancy clusters increase with size, but the formation energies for clusters with a Si vacancy and nC vacancies (VSi-nVC) are much smaller than those with a C vacancy and nSi vacancies (VC-nVSi). These results demonstrate that the VSi-nVC clusters are more stable than the VC-nVSi clusters in SiC, and provide possible nucleation sites for larger vacancy clusters or voids to grow. For these small vacancy clusters, the binding energy decreases with increasing cluster size, and ranges from 2.5 to 4.6 eV. These results indicate that the small vacancy clusters in SiC are stable at temperatures up to 1900 K, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  17. Genome Sequences of Newly Isolated Mycobacteriophages Forming Cluster S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Monique L; Bragg, Judd; Bruce, Asri; Dehn, Ari; Drouin, Jordan; Hefner, Morgan; Katon, Dylan; McHugh, Dustin; Zeba, Franck; Bowman, Charles A; Cresawn, Steven G; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Russell, Daniel A; Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F; Dunbar, David A; Zegers, Gerard P; Page, Shallee T

    2016-09-29

    We describe the genomes of two mycobacteriophages, MosMoris and Gattaca, newly isolated on Mycobacterium smegmatis The two phages are very similar to each other, differing in 61 single nucleotide polymorphisms and six small insertion/deletions. Both have extensive nucleotide sequence similarity to mycobacteriophage Marvin and together form cluster S. Copyright © 2016 Mills et al.

  18. The effects of self-interstitial clusters on cascade defect evolution beyond the primary damage state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The intracascade evolution of the defect distributions of cascades in copper is investigated using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated with molecular dynamics (MD). The temperature and energy dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are determined for individual cascades. The annealing simulation results illustrate the strong influence on intracascade evolution of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state. Another factor significantly affecting the evolution of the defect distribution is the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. This phenomenon introduces a cascade energy dependence of defect evolution that is apparent only beyond the primary damage state, amplifying the need for further study of the annealing phase of cascade evolution and for performing many more MD cascade simulations at higher energies.

  19. Annealing studies of cluster defects in ion-implanted silicon using high resolution DLTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gad, M.A. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Evans-Freeman, J.H. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: j.evans-freeman@shu.ac.uk

    2006-12-15

    High resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) has been applied to investigate the annealing behaviour of small cluster defects in n-type Si. The Si was implanted with either Ge or Si, with energies 1500 keV and 850 keV respectively, and doses of 1 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. The low dose ensured that there was a minimum of carrier removal due to deep defect states after implantation. Defect states in the as-implanted samples were attributed to VO pairs, divacancies and very small interstitial cluster defects, after detailed depth profiling. LDLTS of Ge{sup +} and Si{sup +} implanted silicon shows that there are three closely spaced deep levels associated with these clusters, with energies in the region of E {sub c}-400 meV. Samples were then isochronally annealed in very small temperature intervals up to 560 K, in situ in our high temperature measurement cryostat, and the LDLTS re-examined as a function of annealing temperature. A new deeper energy level emerges as the cluster-related signal reduces, and it is suggested that this new trap is a major recombination centre, by comparison with current-voltage data.

  20. Annealing studies of cluster defects in ion-implanted silicon using high resolution DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, M. A.; Evans-Freeman, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    High resolution Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy (LDLTS) has been applied to investigate the annealing behaviour of small cluster defects in n-type Si. The Si was implanted with either Ge or Si, with energies 1500 keV and 850 keV respectively, and doses of 1 × 10 10 cm -2. The low dose ensured that there was a minimum of carrier removal due to deep defect states after implantation. Defect states in the as-implanted samples were attributed to VO pairs, divacancies and very small interstitial cluster defects, after detailed depth profiling. LDLTS of Ge + and Si + implanted silicon shows that there are three closely spaced deep levels associated with these clusters, with energies in the region of Ec-400 meV. Samples were then isochronally annealed in very small temperature intervals up to 560 K, in situ in our high temperature measurement cryostat, and the LDLTS re-examined as a function of annealing temperature. A new deeper energy level emerges as the cluster-related signal reduces, and it is suggested that this new trap is a major recombination centre, by comparison with current-voltage data.

  1. Cation-interlinking network cluster approach in application to extended defects in covalent-bonded glassy semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, Oleh [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC, Lviv (Ukraine); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa (Poland); Boyko, Vitaliy [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC, Lviv (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University (Ukraine); Hyla, Malgorzata [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa (Poland)

    2009-08-15

    A principally new cation-interlinking network cluster approach (CINCA) was proposed to describe different types of glass-forming structural units in network covalent-bonded solids like to chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. Within this approach, two (or three) interconnected cation-centered polyhedra form more stretched structural fragments conditionally named atomic clusters, reflecting in such a way whole backbone of covalent-bonded semiconductor multiply duplicated in a space. The probability of possible atomic clusters is estimated with numerical parameter giving average formation energy in respect to the number of atoms involved in the cluster and average coordination number. This approach was probed at the example of regular network clusters based on AsS{sub 3/2} pyramids mutually-interconnected through bridge -S- atom contrasted with irregular double-bond-based quasi-tetrahedral structural S=AsS{sub 3} defects within binary As-S system. The corresponding mathematical calculations confirming a preference of regularly-linked structural units over irregular ones was performed using HyperChem 7.5 program. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Efficient defect pixel cluster detection and correction for Bayer CFA image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Touraj

    2011-01-01

    Image sensor arrays may have defect pixels, either originating from manufacturing or being developed over the lifetime of the image sensor array. Continuous defect pixel detection and correction performing during camera runtime is desirable. On-the-fly detection and correction is challenging since edges and high-frequency image content might get identified as defect pixel regions and intact pixels become corrupted during defect pixel replacement. We propose a table-based detection and correction method which by and by fills the non-volatile table during normal camera operation. In this work we model defect pixels and pixel clusters to be stuck to fixed values or at least fixed to a narrow value range whereas the local neighborhood of these pixels indicate a normal behavior. The idea is to temporally observe the value ranges of small group of pixels (e.g. 4x4 pixel blocks) and to decide about their defective condition depending on their variability with respect to their neighbor pixels. Our method is computationally efficient, requires no frame buffer, requires modest memory, and therefore is appropriate to operate in line-buffer based image signal processing (ISP) systems. Our results indicate high reliability in terms of detection rates and robustness against high-frequency image content. As part of the defect pixel replacement system we also propose a simple and efficient defect pixel correction method based on the mean of medians operating on the Bayer CFA image domain.

  3. FOX gene cluster defects in alveolar capillary dysplasia associated with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Daniela; Malan, Valérie; Bajolle, Fanny; Boudjemline, Younes; Amiel, Jeanne; Bonnet, Damien

    2013-10-01

    The objective was to report two new patients with the diagnosis of alveolar capillary dysplasia and congenital heart disease, to describe the associated cardiac defects seen in these cases and in the literature, and to consider recent genetic advances concerning the FOX transcription factor gene cluster in chromosome 16q24.1q24.2. We retrospectively analysed the records of all patients with congenital heart disease and alveolar capillary dysplasia seen in the Pediatric Cardiology Department between 2005 and 2010. We reviewed all literature published in the English language relating to cases of alveolar capillary dysplasia and congenital heart disease. Two infants with alveolar capillary dysplasia and cardiac malformation were identified: one had an atrioventricular septal defect and a de novo balanced reciprocal translocation t(1;16)(q32;q24), the second infant had a ventricular septal defect. Analysis of 31 cases of the literature including these new cases showed a predominant association of alveolar capillary dysplasia with obstructive left heart disease (35%), as well as an atrioventricular septal defect (29%). FOX gene cluster defects were identified in eight of these patients. Genetic background of alveolar capillary dysplasia is discussed in the light of the balanced reciprocal translocation t(1;16)(q32;q24) identified in the first child of this report. Alveolar capillary dysplasia should be suspected in neonates with congenital heart disease and unexpectedly elevated pulmonary vascular resistances, especially in cases of obstructive left heart disease or atrioventricular septal defect. Detecting FOX gene cluster defects should be considered in infants with alveolar capillary dysplasia with or without congenital heart disease.

  4. On the rotation of nuclear star clusters formed by cluster inspirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsi, Athanasia; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; van de Ven, Glenn; Perets, Hagai B.; Bianchini, Paolo; Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are commonly observed in the centres of most galactic nuclei, including our own Milky Way (MW). While their study can reveal important information about the build-up of the innermost regions of galaxies, the physical processes that regulate their formation are still poorly understood. NSCs might have been formed through gas infall and subsequent in situ star formation, and/or through the infall and merging of multiple star clusters into the centre of the galaxy. Here, we investigate the viability of the latter, by studying direct N-body simulations of inspiralling clusters to the centre of an MW-like nuclear bulge that hosts a massive black hole. We find that the NSC formed through this process can show both morphological and kinematical properties that make it comparable with observations of the MW NSC, including significant rotation - a fact that has so far been attributed mainly to gas infall. We explore its kinematic evolution to see if and how the merger history can imprint fossil records on its dynamical structure. Moreover, we study the effect of stellar foreground contamination in the line-of-sight kinematics of the NSC. Our study shows that no fine tuning of the orientation of the infalling globular clusters is necessary to result in a rotating NSC. We suggest that cluster inspiral is a viable mechanism for the formation of rotating NSCs.

  5. Forming Globular Cluster Systems in a Semi-analytic Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Beasley, M A; Forbes, D A; Sharples, R M; Frenk, C S; Beasley, Michael A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Sharples, Ray M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2002-01-01

    We apply the semi-analytical galaxy formation code of Cole et al. to investigate the formation of globular cluster (GC) systems in hierarchical clustering scenarios. The nature of the model allows us to investigate the properties of GC systems and their parent galaxies within a cosmological framework, over a wide dynamic range of mass and time resolution. Assuming GCs form during mergers of gaseous systems, the metal-rich peak of the classical 'bimodal' metallicity distribution of GCs naturally falls out of our model, where such merging occurs over a wide range of redshifts. The physical origin of old, metal-poor GCs (the metal-poor peak) is harder to understand, since their formation must be decoupled from the ongoing star formation in these systems at high redshift (z~5). Within the context of semi-analytic models in general, a possible solution lies in a cut-off in the GC formation efficiency at a characteristic local star formation rate.

  6. Defects formed during ion beam modification of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.W.; Prawer, S.; Dooley, S.P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Raman spectroscopy was found to be sensitive to the presence of these specific defects and also to the overall level of damage produced in the sample when diamond was implanted with doses in the range of 10{sup 16}-10{sup l8} ions/cm{sup 2} H or He with energies greater than 1 MeV. The main series of experiments discussed herein used 1x10{sup 16} -3x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} of 3.5 MeV He{sup +}. Use of a geometry in which ions were implanted into the edge of a diamond slab allowed the damage to be measured as a function of distance along the ion track by both Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM) and Raman spectroscopy. 1 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  8. Stability and mobility of defect clusters and dislocation loops in metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osetsky, Y.N.; Bacon, D.J.; Serra, A.;

    2000-01-01

    has been observed in the computer simulation of small vacancy loops in alpha-Fe. In the present paper we summarise results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations of defect clusters and small dislocation loops in alpha-Fe(bcc) and Cu(fcc). The structure and stability of vacancy and interstitial...... loops are reviewed, and the dynamics of glissile clusters assessed. The relevance and importance of these results in establishing a better understanding of the observed differences in the damage accumulation behaviour between bcc and fee metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions are pointed out...

  9. Structural and Optical Properties of Point Defects in α-SiO2 Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Lu, Peng-Fei; Yang, Yang; Wu, Li-Yuan; Su, Rui; Chen, Jun

    2015-08-01

    First-principles methods based on the density functional theory (DFT) are used in order to calculate the structural and optical properties of α-SiO2 cluster with the non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) and NBOHC-E' defects. We clarify the stable structure of the NBOHC-E' point defects for the first time using the functional B3LYP, which is also tested to investigate the influence of electronic properties. The calculation is carried out for cluster configurations extracted from supercell. The results of optical absorption peak for Si2O7H6 and Si5O16H12 with NBOHC-E' defects are found at 2.66 eV, which is higher than the often observed OA peak at 2.0 eV for the NBOHC defect in α-SiO2. The overall absorption spectra are in qualitative agreement with the experiment. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) under Grant No. 2014CB643900, the Open Fund of IPOC (BUPT), the Open Program of State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61440061

  10. Defective fullerenes as catalyst for dehydrogenation from NaAlH4 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Deepak; Meenakshi, Sharma, Hitesh

    2015-06-01

    In the present work we have shown that C60 with defect can act as an effective catalyst for dehydrogenation from NaAlH4 clusters. The investigations have been performed using density functional theory calculations. The NaAlH4 interact weakly with the C60 with vacancy defect with binding energy of 0.26eV. The hydrogen release energy shows sharp decrease in magnitude from 3.82eV in NaAlH4 to 1.97 eV in C59NaAlH4 and 1.63eV in C58BNaAlH4. The results may be explained on the basis of change in the net charge at Na and AlH4 resulting in weaker ionic interaction due to interaction between NaAlH4 cluster and C60 with defect. The present results may provide valued insights of experimental work for exploring the catalytic potential of C60 with various defects.

  11. On the rotation of nuclear star clusters formed by cluster-inspirals

    CERN Document Server

    Tsatsi, Athanasia; van de Ven, Glenn; Perets, Hagai B; Bianchini, Paolo; Neumayer, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Star Clusters (NSCs) are commonly observed in the centres of most galactic nuclei, including our own Milky Way. While their study can reveal important information about the build-up of the innermost regions of galaxies, the physical processes that regulate their formation are still poorly understood. NSCs might have been formed through gas infall and subsequent in situ star formation, and/or through the infall and merging of multiple star clusters into the centre of the galaxy. Here, we investigate the viability of the latter, by studying direct N-body simulations of inspiralling clusters to the centre of a Milky-Way-like nuclear bulge that hosts a massive black hole. We find that the NSC that forms through this process can show both morphological and kinematical properties that make it comparable with observations of the Milky Way NSC, including significant rotation- a fact that has been so far attributed mainly to gas infall. We explore its kinematic evolution, to see if and how the merger history c...

  12. External Defect classification of Citrus Fruit Images using Linear Discriminant Analysis Clustering and ANN classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Vijayarekha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA is one technique for transforming raw data into a new feature space in which classification can be carried out more robustly. It is useful where the within-class frequencies are unequal. This method maximizes the ratio of between-class variance to the within-class variance in any particular data set and the maximal separability is guaranteed. LDA clustering models are used to classify object into different category. This study makes use of LDA for clustering the features obtained for the citrus fruit images taken in five different domains. Sub-windows of size 40x40 are cropped from the citrus fruit images having defects such as pitting, splitting and stem end rot. Features are extracted in four domains such as statistical features, fourier transform based features, discrete wavelet transform based features and stationary wavelet transform based features. The results of clustering and classification using LDA and ANN classifiers are reported

  13. Oxygen transport in off-stoichiometric uranium dioxide mediated by defect clustering dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianguo, E-mail: jianguo.yu@inl.gov; Bai, Xian-Ming [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); El-Azab, Anter [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States); Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Oxygen transport is central to many properties of oxides such as stoichiometric changes, phase transformation, and ionic conductivity. In this paper, we report a mechanism for oxygen transport in uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) in which the kinetics is mediated by defect clustering dynamics. In particular, the kinetic Monte Carlo method has been used to investigate the kinetics of oxygen transport in UO{sub 2} under the condition of creation and annihilation of oxygen vacancies and interstitials as well as oxygen interstitial clustering, with variable off-stoichiometry and temperature conditions. It is found that in hypo-stoichiometric UO{sub 2−x}, oxygen transport is well described by the vacancy diffusion mechanism while in hyper-stoichiometric UO{sub 2+x}, oxygen interstitial cluster diffusion contributes significantly to oxygen transport kinetics, particularly at high temperatures and high off-stoichiometry levels. It is also found that di-interstitial clusters and single interstitials play dominant roles in oxygen diffusion while other larger clusters have negligible contributions. However, the formation, coalescence, and dissociation of these larger clusters indirectly affects the overall oxygen diffusion due to their interactions with mono and di-interstitials, thus providing an explanation of the experimental observation of saturation or even drop of oxygen diffusivity at high off-stoichiometry.

  14. Galectin-4 and small intestinal brush border enzymes form clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; van Deurs, B

    1997-01-01

    Detergent-insoluble complexes prepared from pig small intestine are highly enriched in several transmembrane brush border enzymes including aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase, indicating that they reside in a glycolipid-rich environment in vivo. In the present work galectin-4, an animal lectin...... lacking a N-terminal signal peptide for membrane translocation, was discovered in these complexes as well, and in gradient centrifugation brush border enzymes and galectin-4 formed distinct soluble high molecular weight clusters. Immunoperoxidase cytochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy showed...... by a nonclassical pathway, and the brush border enzymes represent a novel class of natural ligands for a member of the galectin family. Newly synthesized galectin-4 is rapidly "trapped" by association with intracellular structures prior to its apical secretion, but once externalized, association with brush border...

  15. Formation, migration, and clustering of point defects in CuInSe2 from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikkonen, L. E.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    The electronic properties of high-efficiency CuInSe2 (CIS)-based solar cells are affected by the microstructural features of the absorber layer, such as point defect types and their distribution. Recently, there has been controversy over whether some of the typical point defects in CIS—VCu, VSe, InCu, CuIn—can form stable complexes in the material. In this work, we demonstrate that the presence of defect complexes during device operational time can be justified by taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces acting behind defect microstructure formation. Our conclusions are backed up by thorough state-of-the-art calculations of defect interaction potentials as well as the activation barriers surrounding the complexes. Defect complexes such as InCu-2VCu, InCu-CuIn, and VSe-VCu are shown to be stable against thermal dissociation at device operating temperatures, but can anneal out within tens of minutes at temperatures higher than 150-200 °C (VCu-related complexes) or 400 °C (antisite pair). Our results suggest that the presence of these complexes can be controlled via growth temperatures, which provides a mechanism for tuning the electronic activity of defects and the device altogether.

  16. Process induced disorder in crystalline materials: differentiating defective crystals from the amorphous form of griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Pinal, Rodolfo; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2008-08-01

    This research investigates milling induced disorder in crystalline griseofulvin. Griseofulvin was subjected to cryogenic milling for various lengths of time. For comparison, the amorphous form of griseofulvin was also prepared by the quench melt method. Different analytical techniques were used to study the differences between the cryomilled, amorphous and crystalline forms of the drug. Cryogenic milling of griseofulvin progressively reduces the crystallinity of the drug by inducing crystal defects, rather than amorphous materials. Raman analysis provides evidence of structural differences between the two. The differences between the defective crystals produced by milling and the amorphous form are significant enough as to be measurable in their bulk thermal properties. Defective crystals show significant decrease in the heat of fusion as a function of milling time but do not exhibit a glass transition nor recrystallization from the amorphous form. Crystal defects undergo recrystallization upon heating at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T(g)) in a process that is separate and completely independent from the crystallization of the amorphous griseofulvin, observed above T(g). Physical mixtures of defective crystals and amorphous drug demonstrate that the thermal events associated with each form persist in the mixtures, unaffected by the presence of the other form.

  17. Identification of machining defects by Small Displacement Torsor and form parameterization method

    CERN Document Server

    Sergent, Alain; Favreliere, Hugues; Duret, Daniel; Samper, Serge; Villeneuve, François

    2011-01-01

    In the context of product quality, the methods that can be used to estimate machining defects and predict causes of these defects are one of the important factors of a manufacturing process. The two approaches that are presented in this article are used to determine the machining defects. The first approach uses the Small Displacement Torsor (SDT) concept [BM] to determine displacement dispersions (translations and rotations) of machined surfaces. The second one, which takes into account form errors of machined surface (i.e. twist, comber, undulation), uses a geometrical model based on the modal shape's properties, namely the form parameterization method [FS1]. A case study is then carried out to analyze the machining defects of a batch of machined parts.

  18. The Young Cluster and Star Forming Region NGC 2264

    OpenAIRE

    Dahm, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    NGC 2264 is a young Galactic cluster and the dominant component of the Mon OB1 association lying approximately 760 pc distant within the local spiral arm. The cluster is hierarchically structured, with subclusters of suspected members spread across several parsecs. Associated with the cluster is an extensive molecular cloud complex spanning more than two degrees on the sky. Star formation is ongoing within the region as evidenced by the presence of numerous embedded clusters of protostars, mo...

  19. Methods of regional innovative clusters forming and development programs elaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Marchuk, Olha

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article is to select programmes for the formation and development of innovative cluster structures. The analysis of the backgrounds of formation of innovative clusters was made in the regions of Ukraine. Two types of programmes were suggested for the implamentation of cluster policy at the regional level.

  20. Small Scale Clustering of Late Forming Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Shankar; Das, Subinoy; Rasera, Yann

    2014-01-01

    We perform a study of the non-linear clustering of matter in the Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM) scenario in which dark matter results from the transition of non-minimally coupled scalar field from radiation to collisionless matter. A distinct feature of this model is the presence of a damped oscillatory cut-off in the linear matter power spectrum at small scales. We use a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations to study the imprints of LFDM on the non-linear matter power spectrum, the halo mass function and the halo density profiles. The model satisfies high-redshift matter power spectrum constraints from Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest measurements. We find suppressed abundance of low mass halos ($\\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_\\odot$) at all redshifts compared to a vanilla $\\Lambda$CDM model. Furthermore, in this mass range we find significant deviations with respect to predictions from the Sheth-Tormen mass function. Halos with mass $M\\gtrsim 10^{11}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_\\odot$ show minor departures of the density pr...

  1. Dynamic Scaling of Ramified Clusters Formed on Liquid Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng-Min; XU You-Sheng; LI Qiao-Wen

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive simulation model -deposition,diffusion, rotation, reaction and aggregation model is presented to simulate the formation processes of ramified clusters on liquid surfaces, where clusters can diffuse and rotate easily. The mobility (including diffusion and rotation) of clusters is related to its mass, which is given by Dm = Dos-γD and θm =′θos-γθ, respectively. The influence of the reaction probability on the kinetics and structure formation is included in the simulation model. We concentrate on revealing dynamic scaling during ramified cluster formation. For this purpose, the time evolution of the cluster density and the weight-average cluster size as well as the cluster-size distribution scaling function at different time are determined for various conditions. The dependence of the cluster density on the deposition flux and time-dependence of fractal dimension are also investigated. The obtained results are helpful in understanding the formation of clusters or thin film growth on liquid surfaces.

  2. Automatic Clustering of Rolling Element Bearings Defects with Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, M.; Faglia, R.; Pedersoli, M.; Tiboni, M.

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents the optimization of a methodology for automatic clustering based on Artificial Neural Networks to detect the presence of defects in rolling bearings. The research activity was developed in co-operation with an Italian company which is expert in the production of water pumps for automotive use (Industrie Saleri Italo). The final goal of the work is to develop a system for the automatic control of the pumps, at the end of the production line. In this viewpoint, we are gradually considering the main elements of the water pump, which can cause malfunctioning. The first elements we have considered are the rolling bearing, a very critic component for the system. The experimental activity is based on the vibration measuring of rolling bearings opportunely damaged; vibration signals are in the second phase elaborated; the third and last phase is an automatic clustering. Different signal elaboration techniques are compared to optimize the methodology.

  3. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope snapped these two views of the heart of the galaxy M82. The image at left was taken in visible light; the picture at right, in infrared light. In the infrared view, the telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer peered through thick dust lanes to find some of the galaxy's more than 100 super star clusters. The clusters are the larger pink and yellow dots scattered throughout the picture. They were formed during a violent collision with the galaxy M81 about 600 million years ago. The galaxy is 12 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. The pictures were taken Sept. 15, 1997. Credits: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, UK) NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information, please contact Richard de Grijs, Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK, +44(0)1223-337528 (phone), +44(0)1223-337523 (fax), grijs@ast.cam.ac.uk (e-mail). The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). This image is issued jointly by NASA and ESA. Electronic images, animation and additional information are available at: http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/08 and via links in http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/latest.html http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pictures.html http://hubble.stsci.edu/go/news http://hubble.esa.int To receive STScI press releases electronically, send an Internet electronic mail message to public-request@stsci.edu. Leave the subject line blank, and type the word subscribe in the body of the message. The system will respond with a confirmation of the subscription, and you will receive new press releases as they are issued. Please subscribe using the email account

  4. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarfs in a cluster environment

    CERN Document Server

    Grossi, M; Madden, S C; Hughes, T M; Auld, R; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Bianchi, S; Bizzocchi, L; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Clemens, M; Corbelli, E; Cortese, L; Davies, J; De Looze, I; Alighieri, S di Serego; Fritz, J; Pappalardo, C; Pierini, D; Rémy-Ruyer, A; Smith, M W L; Verstappen, J; Viaene, S; Vlahakis, C

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the FIR-submm properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf (SFD) galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body (MBB) function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than $m_B$ = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by $\\beta$=1.5, with a median dust temperature $T_d$ = 22.4 K. Assuming $\\beta$=1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 $\\mu$m in excess of the MBB model. The excess is inversely correlated ...

  5. In Situ Studies on Twin-Thickness-Dependent Distribution of Defect Clusters in Heavy Ion-Irradiated Nanotwinned Ag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chen, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that twin boundaries are effective defect sinks in heavy ion irradiated nanotwinned (nt) metals. Prior in situ radiation studies on nt Ag at room temperature indicate that the accumulative defect concentration is higher in center areas in the 60-nm-thick twins, and twin boundaries are distorted and self-heal during the absorption of different types of defect clusters. In this follow-up study, we show that the spatial distribution of accumulative defect concentrations in nt metals has a clear dependence on twin thickness, and in certain cases, the trend of spatial distribution is reversed. Potential mechanisms for the counterintuitive findings are discussed.

  6. Probing the Microscopic with the Macroscopic: from Properties of Star Cluster Systems to Properties of Cluster-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, G.

    To understand how systems of star clusters have reached their presently observed properties constitutes a powerful probe into the physics of cluster formation, without needing to resort to high spatial resolution observations of individual cluster-forming regions (CFRg) in distant galaxies. In this contribution I focus on the mass-radius relation of CFRgs, how it can be uncovered by studying the gas expulsion phase of forming star clusters, and what the implications are. I demonstrate that, through the tidal field impact upon exposed star clusters, the CFRg mass-radius relation rules cluster infant weight-loss in dependence of cluster mass. The observational constraint of a time-invariant slope for the power-law young cluster mass function is robustly satisfied by CFRgs with a constant mean volume density. In contrast, a constant mean surface density would be conducive to the preferential destruction of high-mass clusters. A purely dynamical line-of-reasoning leads therefore to a conclusion consistent with star formation a process driven by a volume density threshold. Developing this concept further, properties of molecular clumps and CFRgs naturally get dissociated. This allows to understand: (i) why the star cluster mass function is steeper than the molecular cloud/clump mass function; (ii) the presence of a massive star formation limit in the mass-size space of molecular structures.

  7. On defects at nanoscale formed in Al-Cu matrix composites fabricated by pressure infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgueiro, W. [Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Garbellini, O. [Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Calle 526 Entre 10 y 11, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Morando, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H. [Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Calle 526 Entre 10 y 11, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Somoza, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina) and Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Calle 526 Entre 10 y 11, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar

    2006-11-05

    To study the defects structure at nanometric scale in the composites obtained, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was used. Specifically, in the materials studied preforms of Saffil alumina short fibers with a fiber content of 12 vol.% were infiltrated by gas pressure with liquid alloys containing Al-5Cu, Al-15Cu and Al-33Cu (wt.%). From the experimental results, information on the nanoporosities remaining in the different samples after the fabrication process was obtained. Furthermore, the presence of an important amount of microvoid-like defects or small vacancy-clusters in the composites was also revealed. Specifically, it was found that these microvoids have almost the same size, within the experimental scatter, but their volume fraction depends on the solute content of the matrix.

  8. Glass forming ability of Zr-Al-Ni(Co,Cu) understood via cluster sharing model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jixiang Chen; Yi Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Clusters are shared atoms in different ways with their neighboring clusters in the crystalline phases. Cluster formula [effective cluster]1(glue atom)x can be used to describe crystalline phases, and the effective cluster means the true cluster composition due to cluster overlapping in the phase structure. Degree of cluster sharing of Zr6Al2Ni (InMg2), Zr2Co (Al2Cu) and Zr2Cu (MoSi2) phases is investigated in this paper. Ni3Zr9, Co3Zr8 and Cu5Zr10 clusters are highlighted because they have the least degree of sharing and can best represent the local atomic short-range order features of the formed phases. It is pointed out that the least sharing clusters are correlated with metallic glass formation and are verified by experiments.

  9. The effects of cation-anion clustering on defect migration in MgAl2O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Richard J; Voter, Arthur F; Perez, Danny; Perriot, Romain; Uberuaga, Blas P

    2016-07-20

    Magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4), like many other ceramic materials, offers a range of technological applications, from nuclear reactor materials to military body armor. For many of these applications, it is critical to understand both the formation and evolution of lattice defects throughout the lifetime of the material. We use the Speculatively Parallel Temperature Accelerated Dynamics (SpecTAD) method to investigate the effects of di-vacancy and di-interstitial formation on the mobility of the component defects. From long-time trajectories of the state-to-state dynamics, we characterize the migration pathways of defect clusters, and calculate their self-diffusion constants across a range of temperatures. We find that the clustering of Al and O vacancies drastically reduces the mobility of both defects, while the clustering of Mg and O vacancies completely immobilizes them. For interstitials, we find that the clustering of Mg and O defects greatly reduces O interstitial mobility, but has only a weak effect on Mg. These findings illuminate important new details regarding defect kinetics relevant to the application of MgAl2O4 in extreme environments.

  10. Metal-Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffe, Matthew J; Castillo-Martínez, Elizabeth; Wu, Yue; Lee, Jeongjae; Forse, Alexander C; Firth, Francesca C N; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Gaultois, Michael W; Hill, Joshua A; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Slater, Ben; Goodwin, Andrew L; Grey, Clare P

    2017-04-19

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed "double cluster" (Hf12O8(OH)14), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal-organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal-organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials.

  11. Defect creation by MeV clusters in LiNbO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canut, B. [Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France). Dept. de Phys. des Mater.; Ramos, S. [Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France). Dept. de Phys. des Mater.; Bonardi, N. [Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France). Dept. de Phys. des Mater.; Chaumont, J. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Bernas, H. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Cottereau, E. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    1997-02-01

    Single crystals of LiNbO{sub 3} (Y-cut orientation) were irradiated at room temperature with 3 MeV C{sub 6}{sup +} and 2.4 MeV C{sub 8}{sup +} clusters provided by CSNSM ``ARAMIS`` accelerator. The electronic stopping power was about 6.5 keV nm{sup -1} in both cases. The fluences extended from 10{sup 10} to 4 x 10{sup 12} C{sub 6}{sup +} or C{sub 8}{sup +}cm{sup -2}. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/C) revealed the presence of extended defects, which cannot be due solely to nuclear stopping and which we ascribe to the high density of electronic energy associated with the correlated electronic stopping of the cluster components. The RBS/C analysis, providing a lattice disorder profile, confirms this interpretation: the damaged thickness closely corresponds to the cluster components correlation length (between 50 and 100 nm). The fluence evolutions of the disorder ratio, measured at the sample surface for C{sub 6} and C{sub 8} projectiles, correspond to damage cross sections close to 1.8 x 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2} in the two cases. (orig.).

  12. Stellar Clusters in the NGC 6334 Star Forming Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Feigelson, Eric D; McNeill, Collin J; Broos, Patrick S; Garmire, Gordon P

    2009-01-01

    The full stellar population of NGC 6334, one of the most spectacular regions of massive star formation in the nearby Galaxy, have not been well-sampled in past studies. We analyze here a mosaic of two Chandra X-ray Observatory images of the region using sensitive data analysis methods, giving a list of 1607 faint X-ray sources with arcsecond positions and approximate line-of-sight absorption. About 95 percent of these are expected to be cluster members, most lower mass pre-main sequence stars. Extrapolating to low X-ray levels, the total stellar population is estimated to be 20-30,000 pre-main sequence stars. The X-ray sources show a complicated spatial pattern with about 10 distinct star clusters. The heavily-obscured clusters are mostly associated with previously known far-infrared sources and radio HII regions. The lightly-obscured clusters are mostly newly identified in the X-ray images. Dozens of likely OB stars are found, both in clusters and dispersed throughout the region, suggesting that star formati...

  13. Star clusters in a nuclear star-forming ring: The disappearing string of pearls

    CERN Document Server

    Vaisanen, Petri; Randriamanakoto, Zara

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the star cluster population in a low-luminosity early type galaxy, NGC 2328, is presented. The clusters are found in a tight star-forming nuclear spiral/ring pattern and we also identify a bar from structural 2D decomposition. These massive clusters are forming very efficiently in the circum-nuclear environment, they are young, possibly all less than 30 Myr of age. The clusters indicate an azimuthal age gradient, consistent with a "pearls-on-a-string" formation scenario suggesting bar driven gas inflow. The cluster mass function has a robust down-turn at low masses at all age bins. Assuming clusters are born with a power-law distribution, this indicates extremely rapid disruption at time-scales of just several Myr. If found to be typical, it means that clusters born in dense circum-nuclear rings do not survive to become old globular clusters in non-interacting systems.

  14. High-Redshift Clusters form NVSS: The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croft, S; Rawlings, S; Hill, G J

    2003-02-11

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z {approx} 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targeted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  15. Generation of self-clusters of galectin-1 in the farnesyl-bound form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kazumi; Niwa, Yusuke; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2016-09-01

    Ras protein is involved in a signal transduction cascade in cell growth, and cluster formation of H-Ras and human galectin-1 (Gal-1) complex is considered to be crucial to achieve its physiological roles. It is considered that the complex is formed through interactions between Gal-1 and the farnesyl group (farnesyl-dependent model), post-translationally modified to the C-terminal Cys, of H-Ras. We investigated the role of farnesyl-bound Gal-1 in the cluster formation by analyzing the structure and properties of Gal-1 bound to farnesyl thiosalicylic acid (FTS), a competitive inhibitor of the binding of H-Ras to Gal-1. Gal-1 exhibited self-cluster formation upon interaction with FTS, and small- and large-size clusters were formed depending on FTS concentration. The galactoside-binding pocket of Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form was found to play an important role in small-size cluster formation. Large-size clusters were likely formed by the interaction among the hydrophobic sites of Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form. The present results indicate that Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form has the ability to form self-clusters as well as intrinsic lectin activity. Relevance of the self-clustering of FTS-bound Gal-1 to the cluster formation of the H-Ras-Gal-1complex was discussed by taking account of the farnesyl-dependent model and another (Raf-dependent) model.

  16. The Hierarchical Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in Six Local Star-forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasha, K.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Kim, H.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Dale, D. A.; Fumagalli, M.; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Kahre, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Messa, M.; Pellerin, A.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Shabani, F.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.

    2017-05-01

    We present a study of the hierarchical clustering of the young stellar clusters in six local (3-15 Mpc) star-forming galaxies using Hubble Space Telescope broadband WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey). We identified 3685 likely clusters and associations, each visually classified by their morphology, and we use the angular two-point correlation function to study the clustering of these stellar systems. We find that the spatial distribution of the young clusters and associations are clustered with respect to each other, forming large, unbound hierarchical star-forming complexes that are in general very young. The strength of the clustering decreases with increasing age of the star clusters and stellar associations, becoming more homogeneously distributed after ˜40-60 Myr and on scales larger than a few hundred parsecs. In all galaxies, the associations exhibit a global behavior that is distinct and more strongly correlated from compact clusters. Thus, populations of clusters are more evolved than associations in terms of their spatial distribution, traveling significantly from their birth site within a few tens of Myr, whereas associations show evidence of disruption occurring very quickly after their formation. The clustering of the stellar systems resembles that of a turbulent interstellar medium that drives the star formation process, correlating the components in unbound star-forming complexes in a hierarchical manner, dispersing shortly after formation, suggestive of a single, continuous mode of star formation across all galaxies.

  17. The Spatial Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in the Star-forming Galaxy NGC 628

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasha, K.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Kim, H.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Aloisi, A.; Bright, S. N.; Christian, C.; Cignoni, M.; Dale, D. A.; Dobbs, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Fumagalli, M.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Lee, J. C.; Messa, M.; Smith, L. J.; Ryon, J. E.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.; Wofford, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution of the stellar cluster populations in the star-forming galaxy NGC 628. Using Hubble Space Telescope broadband WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), we have identified 1392 potential young (≲ 100 Myr) stellar clusters within the galaxy using a combination of visual inspection and automatic selection. We investigate the clustering of these young stellar clusters and quantify the strength and change of clustering strength with scale using the two-point correlation function. We also investigate how image boundary conditions and dust lanes affect the observed clustering. The distribution of the clusters is well fit by a broken power law with negative exponent α. We recover a weighted mean index of α ∼ -0.8 for all spatial scales below the break at 3.″3 (158 pc at a distance of 9.9 Mpc) and an index of α ∼ -0.18 above 158 pc for the accumulation of all cluster types. The strength of the clustering increases with decreasing age and clusters older than 40 Myr lose their clustered structure very rapidly and tend to be randomly distributed in this galaxy, whereas the mass of the star cluster has little effect on the clustering strength. This is consistent with results from other studies that the morphological hierarchy in stellar clustering resembles the same hierarchy as the turbulent interstellar medium.

  18. Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Coty N.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to deprotonate and thus chemically ionize the clusters. In this study, we compare cluster concentrations measured using either nitrate or acetate. Clusters were formed in a flow reactor from vapors of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine). These comparisons show that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with high base content. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe ion processes which include proton-transfer, ion-molecule clustering, and decomposition of ions. Ion decomposition upon deprotonation by acetate/nitrate was observed. More studies are needed to quantify to what extent ion decomposition affects observed cluster content and concentrations, especially those chemically ionized with acetate since it deprotonates more types of clusters than nitrate.Model calculations of the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways are also presented to better identify the cluster types that are not efficiently deprotonated by nitrate. Comparison of model and measured clusters indicate that sulfuric acid dimers with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimers with two or more base molecules are not efficiently chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that acetate CI provides better information on cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  19. Thermography and k-means clustering methods for anti-reflective coating film inspection: scratch and bubble defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xunfei; Wang, Hongjin; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen (Tony)

    2016-05-01

    Anti-reflective coating is widely used on telescopes, eyeglasses and screens to effectively enhance the transmission of light. However, the presence of defects such as bubbles or scratches lowers the usability and functionality of optical film. Optical cameras are often used for coating inspection, but their accuracy relies heavily on the illumination source, camera viewing angles and defect location. This paper describes an active thermography approach that can potentially overcome this issue. Eighteen scratch and bubble defects were located on AR film with dimensions ranging from 0.03mm to 4.4 mm. An infrared camera was used to capture thermal images of those defects over 65 seconds of heating. After the thermal images were acquired, time-domain analysis and space-domain analysis were conducted and k-means clustering methodology was used to highlight the defective area. Results suggest active thermography can be used to detect scratch defects with widths of 0.03mm to 4.40 mm and bubble defects with diameters ranging from 0.08 to 4 mm. For defects with dimensions larger than 0.4 mm, our algorithm can estimate the dimension with less than 15% bias. However, for defects with dimensions less than 0.4mm, the algorithm estimation error ranged from 68% to 900% due to camera resolution limitations. It should be noted that our algorithm can still distinguish a scratch defect with a width of less than one pixel. This study also suggests active thermography can detect scratch and bubble defects regardless of the location of the illumination source.

  20. Prediction and control of pillow defect in single point incremental forming using numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isidore, B. B. Lemopi [Eastern Mediterranean University, Gazimagusa (Turkmenistan); Hussain, G.; Khan, Wasim A. [GIK Institute of Engineering, Swabi (Pakistan); Shamachi, S. Pourhassan [University of Minho, Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2016-05-15

    Pillows formed at the center of sheets in Single point incremental forming (SPIF) are fabrication defects which adversely affect the geometrical accuracy and formability of manufactured parts. This study is focused on using FEA as a tool to predict and control pillowing in SPIF by varying tool size and shape. 3D Finite element analysis (FEA) and experiments are carried out using annealed Aluminum 1050. From FEA, it is found out that the stress/strain state in the immediate vicinity of the forming tool in the transverse direction plays a determinant role on sheet pillowing. Furthermore, pillow height increases as compression in the sheet-plane increases. The nature of in-plane stresses in the transverse direction varies from compressive to tensile as the tool-end geometry is changed from spherical to flat. Additionally, the magnitude of corresponding in-plane stresses decreases as the tool radius increases. According to measurements from the FEA model, flat end tools and large radii both retard pillow formation. However, the influence of changing tool end shape from hemispherical to flat is observed to be more important than the effect of varying tool radius, because the deformation zone remains in tension in the transverse direction while forming with flat end tools. These findings are verified by conducting a set of experiments. A fair agreement between the FEM and empirical results show that FEM can be employed as a tool to predict and control the pillow defect in SPIF.

  1. Vacancy defects and defect clusters in alkali metal ion-doped MgO nanocrystallites studied by positron annihilation and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellaiyan, S.; Uedono, A. [University of Tsukuba, Division of Applied Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sivaji, K.; Janet Priscilla, S. [University of Madras, Department of Nuclear Physics, Chennai (India); Sivasankari, J. [Anna University, Department of Physics, Chennai (India); Selvalakshmi, T. [National Institute of Technology, Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tiruchirappalli (India)

    2016-10-15

    Pure and alkali metal ion (Li, Na, and K)-doped MgO nanocrystallites synthesized by solution combustion technique have been studied by positron lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy methods. Positron lifetime analysis exhibits four characteristic lifetime components for all the samples. Doping reduces the Mg vacancy after annealing to 800 C. It was observed that Li ion migrates to the vacancy site to recover Mg vacancy-type defects, reducing cluster vacancies and micropores. For Na- and K-doped MgO, the aforementioned defects are reduced and immobile at 800 C. Coincidence Doppler broadening studies show the positron trapping sites as vacancy clusters. The decrease in the S parameter is due to the particle growth and reduction in the defect concentration at 800 C. Photoluminescence study shows an emission peak at 445 nm and 498 nm, associated with F{sub 2} {sup 2+} and recombination of higher-order vacancy complexes. Further, annealing process is likely to dissociate F{sub 2} {sup 2+} to F{sup +} and this F{sup +} is converted into F centers at 416 nm. (orig.)

  2. Long-lived "critters" formed by hydrodynamic clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Donev, Aleksandar; Chaikin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Self-assembly in colloidal systems often requires finely tuning the interactions between particles. When colloids are active, or moving due to an external drive, the assembly is even harder to achieve. Here we show that long-lived compact motile structures, called "critters", can be formed just with hydrodynamic interactions. They naturally emerge from a recently discovered fingering instability in a system of microrollers near a floor. Our 3D large-scale simulations show that these critters are a stable state of the system, move much faster than individual rollers, and quickly respond to a changing drive. The formation of critters is robust to any initial condition and our experiments suggest that similar structures are formed even in a thermal colloidal system. We believe the critters are a promising tool for microscopic transport, flow, aggregation and mixing.

  3. Nano-clustered Pd catalysts formed on GaN surface for green chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Motoi; Ueta, Yukiko; Konishi, Tomoya; Tsukamoto, Shiro

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in observing Pd nano-clusters, catalytic prime elements, on a GaN(0 0 0 1) surface by a scanning tunneling microscope for the first time. After the sample was reused, we found that nano-clusters (width: 11 nm, height: 2.2 nm) existed on the surface which still kept the catalytic activity, resulting that the neutral Pd atoms formed the nano-cluster. Moreover, the S-termination contributed to the formation of the dense and flat structure consisting of the Pd nano-clusters.

  4. The Evolution of the Globular Cluster System in a Triaxial Galaxy Can a Galactic Nucleus Form by Globular Cluster Capture?

    CERN Document Server

    Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R

    1993-01-01

    Dynamical friction due to field stars and tidal disruption caused by a central nucleus are crucial in determining the evolution of the globular cluster system in an elliptical galaxy. In this paper I examine the possibility that some of galactic nuclei have been formed by frictionally decayied globular clusters moving in a triaxial potential. The initial rapid growth of the nucleus, due mainly to massive clusters on box orbits falling in a short time scale into the galactic centre, is found to be later slowed by tidal disruption induced by the nucleus itself on less massive clusters in the way described by Ostriker, Binney & Saha. The efficiency of dynamical friction is such to carry to the centre of the galaxy enough globular cluster mass available to form a compact nucleus, but the actual modes of its collisionless formation remains to be investigated. The mass of the resulting nucleus is determined by the mutual feedback of the two mentioned processes, together with the knowlegde of the initial spatial...

  5. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  6. The E. coli Monothiol Glutaredoxin GrxD Forms Homodimeric and Heterodimeric FeS Cluster Containing Complexes †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, N.; Gold, B.; Liu, N. L.; Prathapam, R.; Sterling, H. J.; Willams, E. R.; Butland, G.

    2011-01-01

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (mono-Grx) represent a highly evolutionarily conserved class of proteins present in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. Mono-Grxs have been implicated in iron sulfur (FeS) cluster biosynthesis as potential scaffold proteins and in iron homeostasis via an FeS-containing complex with Fra2p (homolog of E. coli BolA) in yeast, and are linked to signal transduction in mammalian systems. However, the function of the mono-Grx in prokaryotes and the nature of an interaction with BolA-like proteins have not been established. Recent genome-wide screens for E. coli genetic interactions reported the synthetic lethality (combination of mutations leading to cell death; mutation of only one of these genes does not) of a grxD mutation when combined with strains defective in FeS cluster biosynthesis (isc operon) functions [Butland, G. et al. (2008) Nature Methods 5, 789–795]. These data connected the only E. coli mono-Grx, GrxD, to a potential role in FeS cluster biosynthesis. We investigated GrxD to uncover the molecular basis of this synthetic lethality and observed that GrxD can form FeS-bound homodimeric and BolA containing heterodimeric complexes. These complexes display substantially different spectroscopic and functional properties, including the ability to act as scaffold proteins for intact FeS cluster transfer to the model [2Fe-2S] acceptor protein E. coli apo-ferredoxin (Fdx), with the homodimer being significantly more efficient. In this work, we functionally dissect the potential cellular roles of GrxD as a component of both homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes, to ultimately uncover if either of these complexes perform functions linked to FeS cluster biosynthesis. PMID:21899261

  7. Derivative fluorimetry analysis of new cluster structures formed by ethanol and Water molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wu; Ying Liu; Caiqin Han; Xiaosen Luo; Jian Lu; Xiaowu Ni

    2009-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) light excited fluorescence spectra of ethanol-water mixture with different concentra-tions are investigated by derivative fluorimetry. It is found that there are 8 types of luminescent cluster molecules, formed by ethanol and water molecules in different ways, existing in the solution. The peak wavelengths of all these clusters' fluorescence spectra are measured and their contents are obtained by measuring the peak values in the second derivative fluorescence spectra. The spectra corresponding to the 8 types of clusters are obtained by Gaussian decomposition. It is found that two kinds of cluster molecules whose peak wavelengths are 330 and 345 nm have an optimal excitation wavelength located at (236±3) nm. This research contributes to the study of ethanol-water cluster structures and their physical and chemical characteristics.

  8. Defect complexes formed with Ag atoms in CDTE, ZnTe, and ZnSe

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, H; Ostheimer, V; Hamann, J; Lany, S; Wichert, T

    2000-01-01

    Using the radioactive acceptor $^{111}\\!$Ag for perturbed $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$-angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy for the first time, defect complexes formed with Ag are investigated in the II-VI semiconductors CdTe, ZnTe and ZnSe. The donors In, Br and the Te-vacancy were found to passivate Ag acceptors in CdTe via pair formation, which was also observed in In-doped ZnTe. In undoped or Sb-doped CdTe and in undoped ZnSe, the PAC experiments indicate the compensation of Ag acceptors by the formation of double broken bond centres, which are characterised by an electric field gradient with an asymmetry parameter close to h = 1. Additionally, a very large electric field gradient was observed in CdTe, which is possibly connected with residual impurities.

  9. Implications of transmutation on the defect chemistry in crystalline waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uberuaga, B.P., E-mail: blas@lanl.go [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Jiang, C.; Stanek, C.R.; Sickafus, K.E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Marks, N.A. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology, P.O. Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Carter, D.J.; Rohl, A.L. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology, P.O. Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); iVEC, Technology Park, Kensington, WA 6151 (Australia)

    2010-10-01

    Radioactive decay within the solid state creates chemical environments which are typically incommensurate with the initial host structure. Using a combined theoretical and computational approach, we discuss this 'transmutation problem' in the context of the short-lived fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90. We show how a Kroeger-Vink treatment is insufficient for understanding defects arising from transmutation, and present density functional theory data for chemical evolution within two prototypical hosts, CsCl and SrTiO{sub 3}. While the latter has a strong driving force for phase separation with increasing Zr content, the Cs(Ba)Cl system is surprisingly stable. The sharp difference between these two findings points to the need for better understanding of novel chemistry in nuclear waste forms.

  10. Submillimeter View of Gas and Dust in the Forming Super Star Cluster in NGC 5253

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Jean L

    2015-01-01

    A giant molecular cloud has been detected surrounding the supernebula in NGC 5253, revealing details of the formation and feedback process in a very massive star cluster. "Cloud D" was recently mapped in CO J=3-2 with the Submillimeter Array. The cloud surrounds a currently forming massive cluster of mass ~10$^6$ $\\rm M_\\odot$ and luminosity ~10$^9$ $\\rm L_\\odot$. Cloud D is hot, clearly associated with the cluster, yet kinematically relatively quiescent. The dust mass is ~15,000 $\\rm M_\\odot$, giving a gas-to-dust ratio of ~50, nearly an order of magnitude lower than expected for this low metallicity galaxy. We posit that enrichment by the cluster, leading to a stalled cluster wind, has created the unusual conditions in Cloud D. The absence of current mechanical impact of the young cluster on the cloud, in spite of the presence of thousands of O stars, may permit future generations of stars to form near the massive cluster.

  11. Fen (n=1–6) clusters chemisorbed on vacancy defects in graphene: Stability, spin-dipole moment, and magnetic anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Haldar, Soumyajyoti

    2014-05-09

    In this work, we have studied the chemical and magnetic interactions of Fen (n=1–6) clusters with vacancy defects (monovacancy to correlated vacancies with six missing C atoms) in a graphene sheet by ab initio density functional calculations combined with Hubbard U corrections for correlated Fe-d electrons. It is found that the vacancy formation energies are lowered in the presence of Fe, indicating an easier destruction of the graphene sheet. Due to strong chemical interactions between Fe clusters and vacancies, a complex distribution of magnetic moments appear on the distorted Fe clusters which results in reduced averaged magnetic moments compared to the free clusters. In addition to that, we have calculated spin-dipole moments and magnetic anisotropy energies. The calculated spin-dipole moments arising from anisotropic spin density distributions vary between positive and negative values, yielding increased or decreased effective moments. Depending on the cluster geometry, the easy axis of magnetization of the Fe clusters shows in-plane or out-of-plane behavior.

  12. The Spatial Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in the Star Forming Galaxy NGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Grasha, K; Adamo, A; Kim, H; Elmegreen, B G; Gouliermis, D A; Aloisi, A; Bright, S N; Christian, C; Cignoni, M; Dale, D A; Dobbs, C; Elmegreen, D M; Fumagalli, M; Gallagher, J S; Grebel, E K; Johnson, K E; Lee, J C; Messa, M; Smith, L J; Ryon, J E; Thilker, D; Ubeda, L; Wofford, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution of the stellar cluster populations in the star forming galaxy NGC 628. Using Hubble Space Telescope broad band WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), we have identified 1392 potential young (<100 Myr) stellar clusters within the galaxy, identified from a combination of visual inspection and automatic selection. We investigate the clustering of these young stellar clusters and quantify the strength and change of clustering strength with scale using the two-point correlation function. We also investigate how image boundary conditions and dust lanes affect the observed clustering. The distribution of the clusters is well fit by a broken power law with negative exponent $\\alpha$. We recover a weighted mean index of $\\alpha$ ~ -0.8 for all spatial scales below the break at 3".3 (158 pc at a distance of 9.9 Mpc) and an index of $\\alpha$ ~ -0.18 above 158 pc for the accumulation of all cluster types. The stre...

  13. The Clustering and Halo Masses of Star Forming Galaxies at z<1

    CERN Document Server

    Dolley, Tim; Weiner, Benjamin J; Brodwin, Mark; Kochanek, C S; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Palamara, David P; Jannuzi, Buell T; Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W; Beare, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star forming galaxies at 0.2 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L_TIR > 10^11 Lsun) and is comprised entirely of LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L_TIR > 10^12 Lsun) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r_0 = 3-6 Mpc/h for almost all of our star forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L_TIR at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L_TIR (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M_halo ~ 10^12.9 Msun/h. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star forming galaxies at z 10^11.7 Lsun) at 0.6

  14. Vibration impact acoustic emission technique for identification and analysis of defects in carbon steel tubes: Part B Cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Zakiah Abd [Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (Malaysia); Jamaludin, Nordin; Junaidi, Syarif [Faculty of Engineering and Built, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi (Malaysia); Yahya, Syed Yusainee Syed [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-04-15

    Current steel tubes inspection techniques are invasive, and the interpretation and evaluation of inspection results are manually done by skilled personnel. Part A of this work details the methodology involved in the newly developed non-invasive, non-destructive tube inspection technique based on the integration of vibration impact (VI) and acoustic emission (AE) systems known as the vibration impact acoustic emission (VIAE) technique. AE signals have been introduced into a series of ASTM A179 seamless steel tubes using the impact hammer. Specifically, a good steel tube as the reference tube and four steel tubes with through-hole artificial defect at different locations were used in this study. The AEs propagation was captured using a high frequency sensor of AE systems. The present study explores the cluster analysis approach based on autoregressive (AR) coefficients to automatically interpret the AE signals. The results from the cluster analysis were graphically illustrated using a dendrogram that demonstrated the arrangement of the natural clusters of AE signals. The AR algorithm appears to be the more effective method in classifying the AE signals into natural groups. This approach has successfully classified AE signals for quick and confident interpretation of defects in carbon steel tubes.

  15. Relationship between optical coherence tomography sector peripapillary angioflow-density and Octopus visual field cluster mean defect values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the relationship of Octopus perimeter cluster mean-defect (cluster MD) values with the spatially corresponding optical coherence tomography (OCT) sector peripapillary angioflow vessel-density (PAFD) and sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) values. Methods High quality PAFD and RNFLT images acquired on the same day with the Angiovue/RTVue-XR Avanti OCT (Optovue Inc., Fremont, USA) on 1 eye of 27 stable early-to-moderate glaucoma, 22 medically controlled ocular hypertensive and 13 healthy participants were analyzed. Octopus G2 normal visual field test was made within 3 months from the imaging. Results Total peripapillary PAFD and RNFLT showed similar strong positive correlation with global mean sensitivity (r-values: 0.6710 and 0.6088, P<0.0001), and similar (P = 0.9614) strong negative correlation (r-values: -0.4462 and -0.4412, P≤0.004) with global MD. Both inferotemporal and superotemporal sector PAFD were significantly (≤0.039) lower in glaucoma than in the other groups. No significant difference between the corresponding inferotemporal and superotemporal parameters was seen. The coefficient of determination (R2) calculated for the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD (0.5141, P<0.0001) was significantly greater than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD (0.2546, P = 0.0001). The R2 values calculated for the relationships between superotemporal sector PAFD and RNFLT, and inferotemporal cluster MD were similar (0.3747 and 0.4037, respectively, P<0.0001). Conclusion In the current population the relationship between inferotemporal sector PAFD and superotemporal cluster MD was strong. It was stronger than that between inferotemporal sector RNFLT and superotemporal cluster MD. Further investigations are necessary to clarify if our results are valid for other populations and can be usefully applied for glaucoma research. PMID:28152106

  16. A model for thermal annealing on forming In—N clusters in InGaNP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO ChuanZhen; CHEN Lei; LI NaNa; ZHANG HuanHuan; CHEN YaFei; WEI Tong; TANG ChunXiao; XIE ZiLi

    2012-01-01

    We develop a model for the effect of thermal annealing on forming In—N clusters in GaInNP according to thermodynamics.The average energy variation for forming an In—N bond in the model is estimated according to the theoretical calculation.Using the model,the added number of In—N bonds per mol of InGaNP,the added number of nearest-neighbor In atoms per N atom and the average number of nearest-neighbor In atoms per N atom after annealing are calculated.The different function of In—N clusters in InGaNP and InGaN is also discussed,which is due to the different environments around the In—N clusters.

  17. Effect of Defects Distribution on Fatigue Life of Wind Turbine Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafsanjani, Hesam Mirzaei; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    by a Poisson process / field where the defects form clusters that consist of a parent defect and related defects around the parent defect. The fatigue life is dependent on the number, type, location and size of the defects in the component and is therefore quite uncertain and needs to be described...

  18. Modelling defect cavities formed in inverse three-dimensional rod-connected diamond photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverne, M. P. C.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Zheng, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, L.-F.; Lopez-Garcia, M.; Rarity, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Defect cavities in 3D photonic crystal can trap and store light in the smallest volumes allowable in dielectric materials, enhancing non-linearities and cavity QED effects. Here, we study inverse rod-connected diamond (RCD) crystals containing point defect cavities using plane-wave expansion and finite-difference time domain methods. By optimizing the dimensions of the crystal, wide photonic bandgaps are obtained. Mid-bandgap resonances can then be engineered by introducing point defects in the crystal. We investigate a variety of single spherical defects at different locations in the unit cell focusing on high-refractive-index-contrast (3.3:1) inverse RCD structures; quality factors (Q-factors) and mode volumes of the resonant cavity modes are calculated. By choosing a symmetric arrangement, consisting of a single sphere defect located at the center of a tetrahedral arrangement, mode volumes < 0.06 cubic wavelengths are obtained, a record for high-index cavities.

  19. Modelling Defect Cavities Formed in Inverse Three-Dimensional Rod-Connected Diamond Photonic Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Taverne, M P C; Zheng, X; Liu, S; Chen, L -F; Lopez-Garcia, M; Rarity, J G

    2016-01-01

    Defect cavities in 3D photonic crystal can trap and store light in the smallest volumes allowable in dielectric materials, enhancing non-linearities and cavity QED effects. Here, we study inverse rod-connected diamond (RCD) crystals containing point defect cavities using plane-wave expansion and finite-difference time domain methods. By optimizing the dimensions of the crystal, wide photonic band gaps are obtained. Mid-bandgap resonances can then be engineered by introducing point defects in the crystal. We investigate a variety of single spherical defects at different locations in the unit cell focusing on high-refractive-index contrast (3.3:1) inverse RCD structures; quality factors (Q-factors) and mode volumes of the resonant cavity modes are calculated. By choosing a symmetric arrangement, consisting of a single sphere defect located at the center of a tetrahedral arrangement, small mode volumes are obtained.

  20. METAL DEFICIENCY IN CLUSTER STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT Z = 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentino, F.; Daddi, E.; Strazzullo, V.; Gobat, R.; Bournaud, F.; Juneau, S.; Zanella, A. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Onodera, M.; Carollo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zürich Wolfgang-Pauli-strasse 27, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Renzini, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Arimoto, N., E-mail: francesco.valentino@cea.fr [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the environmental effect on the metal enrichment of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the farthest spectroscopically confirmed and X-ray-detected cluster, CL J1449+0856 at z = 1.99. We combined Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 G141 slitless spectroscopic data, our thirteen-band photometry, and a recent Subaru/Multi-object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up to constrain the physical properties of SFGs in CL J1449+0856 and in a mass-matched field sample. After a conservative removal of active galactic nuclei, stacking individual MOIRCS spectra of 6 (31) sources in the cluster (field) in the mass range 10 ≤ log(M/M{sub ⊙}) ≤ 11, we find a ∼4σ lower [N ii]/Hα ratio in the cluster than in the field. Stacking a subsample of 16 field galaxies with Hβ and [O iii] in the observed range, we measure an [O iii]/Hβ ratio fully compatible with the cluster value. Converting these ratios into metallicities, we find that the cluster SFGs are up to 0.25 dex poorer in metals than their field counterparts, depending on the adopted calibration. The low metallicity in cluster sources is confirmed using alternative indicators. Furthermore, we observe a significantly higher Hα luminosity and equivalent width in the average cluster spectrum than in the field. This is likely due to the enhanced specific star formation rate; even if lower dust reddening and/or an uncertain environmental dependence on the continuum-to-nebular emission differential reddening may play a role. Our findings might be explained by the accretion of pristine gas around galaxies at z = 2 and from cluster-scale reservoirs, possibly connected with a phase of rapid halo mass assembly at z > 2 and of a high galaxy merging rate.

  1. A Novel Octanuclear Molecular Loop Formed by Linkage of Oxo-centered Triruthenium Cluster Units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Lin CHEN; Li Yi ZHANG; Zhong Ning CHEN

    2005-01-01

    A novel dimeric complex [Ru3Ⅲ,Ⅲ,Ⅱ(μ3-O)(μ-CH3COO)(CO)]2(μ-dppf)(μ-odppf) (dppf =1, l′-bis(diphenylphosphio)ferrocene, odppf = 1, 1′-bis(oxodiphenylphosphoranyl)ferrocene) (1) of oxo-centered triruthenium-aectate cluster units was synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Compound 1 exhibits a cyclic structure formed by linkages of two triruthenium cluster units Ru3Ⅲ,Ⅲ, Ⅱ (μ3-O)(μ-CH3COO)6(CO) through dppf and odppf ligands, respectively. The diameter of the molecular loop is ca. 1.0 nm.

  2. Multiple Images of a Highly Magnified Supernova Formed by an Early-Type Cluster Galaxy Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Patrick L; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of the first multiply-imaged gravitationally-lensed supernova. The four images form an Einstein cross with over 2" diameter around a z=0.544 elliptical galaxy that is a member of the cluster MACSJ1149.6+2223. The supernova appeared in Hubble Space Telescope exposures taken on 3-20 November 2014 UT, as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space. The images of the supernova coincide with the strongly lensed arm of a spiral galaxy at z=1.491, which is itself multiply imaged by the cluster potential. A measurement of the time delays between the multiple images and their magnification will provide new unprecedented constraints on the distribution of luminous and dark matter in the lensing galaxy and in the cluster, as well as on the cosmic expansion rate.

  3. Investigation of defect cavities formed in three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Taverne, Mike P C; Rarity, J G

    2014-01-01

    We report the optimisation of optical properties of single defects in threedimensional (3D) face-centred-cubic (FCC) woodpile photonic crystal (PC) cavities by using plane-wave expansion (PWE) and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods. By optimising the dimensions of a 3D woodpile PC wide photonic band gaps (PBG) are created. Optical cavities with resonances in the bandgap arise when point defects are introduced in the crystal. Three types of single defects are investigated in high refractive index contrast (Gallium Phosphide-Air) woodpile structures and Q-factors and mode volumes (Veff) of the resonant cavity modes are calculated. We show that, by introducing an air buffer around a single defect, smaller mode volumes can be obtained. The estimates of Q and Veff are then used to quantify the enhancement of spontaneous emission and the possibility of achieving strong coupling with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond.

  4. Direct quantitation of peptide mixtures without standards using clusters formed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Ryan D; Flick, Tawnya G; Williams, Evan R

    2009-05-15

    In electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, ion abundances depend on a number of different factors, including analyte surface activity, competition between analytes for charge, analyte concentration, as well as instrumental factors, including mass-dependent ion transmission and detection. Here, a novel method for obtaining quantitative information about solution-phase concentrations of peptide mixtures is described and demonstrated for five different peptide mixtures with relative concentrations ranging from 0.05% to 50%. In this method, the abundances of large clusters containing anywhere from 0 to 13 impurity molecules are measured and directly related to the relative solution-phase concentration of the peptides. For clusters containing approximately 15 or more peptides, the composition of the clusters approaches the statistical value indicating that these clusters are formed nonspecifically and that any differences in ion detection or ionization efficiency are negligible at these large cluster sizes. This method is accurate to within approximately 20% or better, even when the relative ion intensities of the protonated monomers can differ by over an order of magnitude compared to their solution-phase concentrations. Although less accurate than other quantitation methods that employ internal standards, this method does have the key advantages of speed, simplicity, and the ability to quantitate components in solution even when the identities of the components are unknown.

  5. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  6. The behaviour of entrainment defects formed in commercial purity Mg alloy cast under a cover gas of SF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Griffiths, W. D.

    2016-03-01

    In the casting of light alloys, the oxidised film on the melt surface can be folded due to surface turbulence, thus forming entrainment defects that have a significant negative effect on the mechanical properties of castings. Previous researchers reported that the surface film of Mg alloys formed in an atmosphere containing SF6 had a complicated structure composed of MgO and MgF2. The work reported here aims to investigate the behaviour of entrainment defects formed in magnesium alloys protected by SF6-containing atmospheres. Tensile test bars of commercial purity Mg were cast in an unsealed environment under a cover gas of pure SF6. 34Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surface of the test bars indicated entrainment defects that consisted of symmetrical films containing MgO, but also sulphur and fluorine. The results of these examinations of the symmetrical films were used to infer the potential formation and development of entrainment defects in commercial purity Mg alloy.

  7. Accretion and Dynamical Interactions in Small-N Star-Forming Clusters I. N=5 case

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado-Donate, E J; Bate, M R

    2003-01-01

    We present results from high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations which explore the effects of small scale clustering in star-forming regions. A large ensemble of small-N clusters with 5 stellar seeds have been modelled and the resulting properties of stars and brown dwarfs statistically derived and compared with observational data. Close dynamical interactions between the protostars and competitive accretion driven by the cloud collapse are shown to produce a distribution of final masses which is bimodal, with most of the mass residing in the binary components. When convolved with a suitable core mass function, the final distribution of masses resembles the observed IMF, both in the stellar and sub-stellar regime. Binaries and single stars are found to constitute two kinematically distinct populations, with about half of the singles attaining velocities > 2 km/s, which might deprive low mass star-forming regions of their lightest members in a few crossing times. The eccentricity distribution of binaries and...

  8. Effect of mesoscopic fluctuations on equation of state in cluster-forming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ciach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Equation of state for systems with particles self-assembling into aggregates is derived within a mesoscopic theory combining density functional and field-theoretic approaches. We focus on the effect of mesoscopic fluctuations in the disordered phase. The pressure - volume fraction isotherms are calculated explicitly for two forms of the short-range attraction long-range repulsion potential. Mesoscopic fluctuations lead to an increased pressure in each case, except for very small volume fractions. When large clusters are formed, the mechanical instability of the system is present at much higher temperature than found in mean-field approximation. In this case phase separation competes with the formation of periodic phases (colloidal crystals. In the case of small clusters, no mechanical instability associated with separation into dilute and dense phases appears.

  9. A Detailed Analysis of Visible Defects Formed in Commercial Silicon Thin-Film Modules During Outdoor Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Andreas; Johnston, Steve; Olivera-Pimentel, Guillermo; Siegloch, Max; Pieters, Bart; Rau, Uwe

    2016-11-21

    We analyzed defects in silicon thin-film tandem (a-Si:H/..mu..c-Si:H) modules from an outdoor installation in India. The inspection of several affected modules reveals that most of the defects -- which optically appear as bright spots -- were formed primarily nearby the separation and series connection laser lines. Cross-sectional SEM analysis reveals that the bright spots emerge due to electrical isolation, caused by a delamination of the cell from the front TCO in the affected area. In addition, the morphology of the a-Si:H top cell differs in the delaminated area compared to the surrounding unaffected area. We propose that these effects are potentially caused by an explosive and thermally triggered liberation of hydrogen from the a-Si:H layer. Electrical and thermal measurements reveal that these defects can impact the cell performance significantly.

  10. Si3O cluster: excited properties under external electric field and oxygen-deficient defect models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Guo-Liang; Liu Xue-Feng; Xie Hui-Xiang; Zhang Xian-Zhou; Liu Yu-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the excited states of Si3O molecule by using the single-excitation configuration interaction and density functional theory. It finds that the visible light absorption spectrum of SisO molecule comprises the yellow and the purple light without external electric field, however all the visible light is included except the green light under the action of external electric field. Oxygen-deficient defects, which also can be found in Si3O molecule, have been used to explain the luminescence from silicon-based materials but the microstrnctures of the materials are still uncertain.Our results accord with the experimental values perfectly, this fact suggests that the structure of Si3O molecule is expected to be one of the main basic structures of the materials, so the oxygen-deficient defect structural model for Si3O molecule also has been provided to research the structures of materials.

  11. Structural and Vibrational Study on Monomer and Dimer Forms and Water Clusters of Acetazolamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysen E. Ozel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental IR and Raman spectra of solid acetazolamide have been analysed by computing the molecular structures and vibrational spectra of monomer and dimer forms and water clusters of acetazolamide. The possible stable conformers of free acetazolamide molecule in the ground state were obtained by scanning the potential energy surface through the dihedral angles, D1 (1S-2C-6S-9N, D2 (4N-5C-12N-14C, and D3 (5C-12N-14C-16C. The final geometry parameters for the obtained stable conformers were determined by means of geometry optimization, carried out at DFT/B3LYP/6-31G++(d,p theory level. Afterwards the possible dimer forms of the molecule and acetazolamide-H2O clusters were formed and their energetically preferred conformations were investigated using the same method and the same level of theory. The effect of BSSE on the structure and energy of acetazolamide dimer has been investigated. The assignment of the vibrational modes was performed based on the potential energy distribution of the vibrational modes, calculated by using GAR2PED program. The experimental vibrational wavenumbers of solid acetazolamide are found to be in better agreement with the calculated wavenumbers of dimer form of acetazolamide than those of its monomeric form. NBO analysis has been performed on both monomer and dimer geometries.

  12. THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolley, Tim; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Palamara, David P.; Beare, Richard [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weiner, Benjamin J.; Jannuzi, Buell T. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W., E-mail: Tim.Dolley@monash.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 μm sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Boötes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ≈ 3-6 h {sup –1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.9} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ≲ 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ≳ 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ☉}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.

  13. Young open clusters in the galactic star forming region NGC 6357

    CERN Document Server

    Massi, Fabrizio; di Carlo, Elisa; Brand, Jan; Beltrán, Maria Teresa; Marconi, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    NGC6357 is an active star forming region with very young massive open clusters (OC). These clusters contain some of the most massive stars in the Galaxy and strongly interact with nearby giant molecular clouds (GMC). We study the young stellar populations of the region and of the OC Pismis24, focusing on their relationship with the nearby GMCs. We seek evidence of triggered star formation propagating from the clusters. We used new deep JHKs photometry, along with unpublished deep IRAC/Spitzer MIR photometry, complemented with optical HST/WFPC2 high spatial resolution photometry and X-ray Chandra observations, to constrain age, initial mass function, and star formation modes in progress. We carefully examine and discuss all sources of bias (saturation, confusion, different sensitivities, extinction). NGC6357 hosts three large young stellar clusters, of which Pismis24 is the most prominent. We found that Pismis24 is a very young (~1-3 Myr) OC with a Salpeter-like IMF and a few thousand members. A comparison bet...

  14. Cluster approach to forming innovative model of developing mineral resources base of Russia’s regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Gennad'evich Shelomentsev

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the necessity of applying innovative model of developing mineral resources base of Russia’s regions and relevance of cluster approach for forming this model are proved. Components of process of clustering in the case of innovative developing mineral raw complex are proposed and analyzed: consolidation of socioeconomic potential of region, consolidation of potential of different branches of people’s activities, consolidation of processes of primary (wining sector in the single chain. In particular, the first component implies concentration of population in certain centers of gravitation. The second component implies consolidation of education, fundamental as well as applying science and production. The creating of administrative nets is necessary for that. For the realization of the first and the second components, the availability of clustering organization is necessary. The third component of process of clustering implies in prospect the adding of increasing amount of stages of product manufacturing. Eventually, the multi-stage structure of innovative process is analyzed.

  15. Searching for star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Antlia cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Vaduvescu, O; Bassino, L P; Castelli, A V Smith; Calderon, J P

    2014-01-01

    The formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in clusters need to be understood, and this requires large aperture telescopes. In this sense, we selected the Antlia cluster to continue our previous work in the Virgo, Fornax, and Hydra clusters and in the Local Volume (LV). Because of the scarce available literature data, we selected a small sample of five blue compact dwarf (BCD) candidates in Antlia for observation. Using the Gemini South and GMOS camera, we acquired the Halpha imaging needed to detect star-forming regions in this sample. With the long-slit spectroscopic data of the brightest seven knots detected in three BCD candidates, we derived their basic chemical properties. Using archival VISTA VHS survey images, we derived K_S magnitudes and surface brightness profile fits for the whole sample to assess basic physical properties. FS90-98, FS90-106, and FS90-147 are confirmed as BCDs and cluster members, based on their morphology, K_S surface photometry, oxygen abundance, and velocity redshift. FS90-15...

  16. Enhancing competitiveness of small and medium enterprises and entrepreneurs through forming of clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters, as a form of self-organization of enterprises and associated institutions, help increase levels of competitiveness of its members by inspiring competition and cooperation. The question of increasing the popularity of clusters is especially important at the present moment when creators of economical politics are focused on finding the leading multinational companies, who's involvement on Serbia's market and starting of production, with a possibility to export it, would create opportunities to take over some of their suppliers by Serbia's SMEs. The analysis of selected European clusters has shown that joining of SMEs into clusters increases their productivity, competitiveness and export capability. Dynamic development of SMEs in Serbia will not be possible without intensified efforts in overcoming the main limitations and impediments, perhaps most importantly insufficient competitiveness and quality of products, poor organization on territorial and branch levels and prolonged amounting of unpaid bills. That is why the government has a defining role to play in creating a healthy competitive ambient, because of all the factors involved on the market, often non-economical factors, as well, and often many elements and institutions, and if the government does not take proper measures it'll create a bad business ambient in which SMEs can't use their full potential.

  17. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster Forming Regions from Combining Ground and Space Based Bolometric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yuxin; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhiyu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, IRAM-30m) and space telescopes (Herschel, Planck). For the seven luminous ($L$$>$10$^{6}$ $L_{\\odot}$) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified black-body fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The $\\sim$10$"$ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radia...

  18. Study of the interplay between N-graphene defects and small Pd clusters for enhanced hydrogen storage via a spill-over mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, E; Sansores, E; Vallejo, E; Hernández-Hernández, A; López-Pérez, P A

    2016-12-07

    The hydrogen spill-over mechanism was studied by applying Density Functional Theory. We used small palladium clusters to act as the catalyst supported on the substrate (comprised of pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen doped graphene), in order to study hydrogen dissociation, migration and diffusion. Charge transfer and strong binding between the catalyst and the substrate lead to dissociated states of H2 and prevent clusters from detaching and coalescing. In dissociated cases of H2 on Pd clusters, energy barriers below 0.6 eV were found. Likewise, concerning hydrogen migration from the catalyst to the substrate, energy barrier values of 0.8 eV (pyridinic defect) and 0.5 eV (pyrrolic defect) were apparent in the case of the Pd4 cluster at full hydrogen saturation. This indicates that hydrogen dissociation and migration may occur spontaneously at room temperature. This result shows that the interaction between the defects and the small metal clusters may explain the role that defects play in hydrogen migration from the catalyst to the substrate. Subsequently, it was found that thermal desorption does not limit chemisorbed hydrogen diffusion on the substrate. This work may thus help to determine experimental strategies with the capacity to enhance hydrogen storage.

  19. Forming Mechanism of Gaseous Defect in Ti-48A1-2Cr-2Nb Exhaust Valves Formed with Permanent Mold Centrifugal Casting Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A method combining theoretical analysis with experiment is adopted and the flowing process of Ti-48AI-2Cr-2Nb alloy melt poured in a permanent mould during the centrifugal casting process has been analyzed. A mathematical model of the filling process is established and the forming mechanism of internal gaseous defect is summarized. The results of calculation show that the melt fills the mould with varying cross-section area and inclined angle. The filling speed of the cross-section is a function of filling time. The cross-section area is directly proportional to the filling speed and the inclined angle is inversely proportional to the filling speed at a given rotating speed of the platform. Both of them changes more obvious near the mould entrance.The gaseous defect can be formed in several ways and the centrifugal field has an important influence on the formation of the defect. In addition, the filling process in centrifugal field has been verified by wax experiments and the theoretical analysis are consistent with experimental results.

  20. The Hercules Cluster Environment Impact on the Chemical History of Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, V.; VíLchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.

    In this work we study the effects of the Hercules cluster environment on the chemical history of star-forming (SF) galaxies. For this purpose we have derived the gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and the luminosities of our sample of galaxies. We have found that our Hercules SF galaxies are either chemically evolved spirals with nearly flat oxygen gradients, or less metal-rich dwarf galaxies which appear to be the "newcomers" in the cluster. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well defined mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity sequences; nevertheless significant outliers to these relations have been identified, illustrating how environmental effects can provide a physical source of dispersion in these fundamental relations.

  1. Preliminary Comparison of Reaction Rate theory and Object Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Defect Cluster Dynamics under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Becquart, C. S. [Universite de Lille; Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Clamart, France

    2006-09-01

    The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory (RT), Monte Carlo (MC), or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales ( m to >mm), and timescales from diffusion (~ s) to long-term microstructural evolution (~years). Phenomena at this scale have the most direct impact on mechanical properties in structural materials of interest to nuclear energy systems, and are also the most accessible to direct comparison between the results of simulations and experiments. Recent advances in computational power have substantially expanded the range of application for MC models. Although the RT and MC models can be used simulate the same phenomena, many of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. A direct comparison of the RT and MC descriptions has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to both the nucleation and evolution of radiation-induced defect structures. The relative merits and limitations of the two approaches are discussed, and the predictions of the two approaches are compared for specific irradiation conditions.

  2. Reconstruction of cranial defects with individually formed cranial prostheses made of polypropylene polyester knitwear: an analysis of 48 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Grzegorz; Kotwica, Zbigniew; Kwinta, Borys; Zwoliński, Jerzy

    2012-04-10

    This article presents a new method of cranioplasty in which polypropylene polyester knitwear was used as the filling material. The basis for prosthesis shaping was a three-dimensional model of the defect made according to the patient's CT scans. Previously, such material has never been a subject of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) individual forming. The process of the prosthesis design included CT bone scans and mold preparation for each patient. Such prostheses were implanted in 48 patients with cranial defects. The total number of prostheses applied was 51. The follow-up time was at least 6 months up to 36 months. The group of treated patients is described here, and sample pictures are shown to illustrate the results. The smallest defect had a size of 15 cm(2); the biggest, 178 cm(2). The coverage and the aesthetic results were very good in all cases. Two patients had postoperative complications. The cranioplastic solution described here is a valuable addition to the existing reconstructive methods, because of the low cost of the implant, the ease of its adjustment to the shape of the defect, and the short time of preparation.

  3. An Investigation of the Loss of Planet-Forming Potential in Intermediate Sized Young Embedded Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Lisa; Spitzig, Jeremy; Adams, Fred C

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction of stars forming in our galaxy are born within clusters embedded in giant molecular clouds. In these environments, the background UV radiation fields impinging upon circumstellar disks can often dominate over the radiation fields produced by each disk's central star. As a result, this background radiation can drive the evaporation of circumstellar disks and lead to the loss of planet forming potential within a cluster. This paper presents a detailed analysis of this process for clusters whose stellar membership falls within the range $100 \\le N \\le 1000$. For these intermediate-sized clusters, the background UV field is often dominated by the most massive stellar member. Due to the steep slope of the initial mass function, the amount of background UV light that bathes clusters of similar size displays significant variance. As a result, we perform a statistical analysis of this problem by calculating distributions of FUV flux values impinging upon star/disk systems for several cluster scenario...

  4. Searching for star-forming galaxies in the Fornax and Hydra clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduvescu, O.; Kehrig, C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Unda-Sanzana, E.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies is relatively difficult to understand because of their faint emission in all regimes that require large aperture telescopes. Aims: We intend to study the evolution of star-forming dwarf galaxies in clusters. We selected Fornax and Hydra clusters to complement our previous study of Virgo. On the basis of available literature data, we selected ten star-forming candidates in Fornax and another ten objects in Hydra. Methods: We used Gemini South with GMOS to acquire Hα images necessary to detect star-forming regions in the two galaxy samples. We then performed long-slit spectroscopy for the brightest six candidates, to derive their chemical properties. Finally, we employed the VLT with HAWK-I to observe all galaxies in the K' band to derive their main physical properties. Results: We studied the morphology of our two samples, finding five objects in Fornax and six in Hydra with structures consistent with those of star-forming dwarfs, i.e., dwarf irregulars (dIs) or blue compact dwarfs (BCDs). About four other objects are probably dwarf spirals, while three objects remained undetected in both visible and near infrared. On the basis of visible bright emission lines, we derived oxygen abundances for ten star-forming candidates with values between 8.00 ≤ 12+log(O/H) ≤8.78. Conclusions: Most fundamental properties of star-forming galaxies in Fornax and Hydra appear similar to corresponding properties of dIs and BCDs from Virgo and the local volume (LV). The luminosity-metallicity and metallicity-gas fraction relations in the LV and Virgo appear to be followed by Fornax and Hydra samples, suggesting that the chemical evolution of the two clusters seems consistent with the predictions from the closed box model, although larger samples are needed to investigate the role of possible environmental effects. Star-forming dwarfs (dIs and BCDs) in different environments appear to follow different mass-metallicity relations

  5. Fragmentation of neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision; Fragmentation d'agregats de carbone neutres formes par collision atomique a haute vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, G

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the fragmentation of small neutral carbon clusters formed by high velocity atomic collision on atomic gas. In this experiment, the main way of deexcitation of neutral clusters formed by electron capture with ionic species is the fragmentation. To measure the channels of fragmentation, a new detection tool based on shape analysis of current pulse delivered by semiconductor detectors has been developed. For the first time, all branching ratios of neutral carbon clusters are measured in an unambiguous way for clusters size up to 10 atoms. The measurements have been compared to a statistical model in microcanonical ensemble (Microcanonical Metropolis Monte Carlo). In this model, various structural properties of carbon clusters are required. These data have been calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT-B3LYP) to find the geometries of the clusters and then with Coupled Clusters (CCSD(T)) formalism to obtain dissociation energies and other quantities needed to compute fragmentation calculations. The experimental branching ratios have been compared to the fragmentation model which has allowed to find an energy distribution deposited in the collision. Finally, specific cluster effect has been found namely a large population of excited states. This behaviour is completely different of the atomic carbon case for which the electron capture in the ground states predominates. (author)

  6. Compact star forming galaxies as the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies: Clustering result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaozhi; Fan, Lulu; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen

    2017-02-01

    We present a measurement of the spatial clustering of massive compact galaxies at 1.2 ≤ z ≤ 3 in CANDELS/3D-HST fields. We obtain the correlation length for compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at z ∼ 1.6 of r0 = 7.1-2.6+2.3 h-1 Mpc and compact star forming galaxies (cSFGs) at z ∼ 2.5 of r0 = 7.7-2.9+2.7 h-1 Mpc assuming a power-law slope γ = 1.8 . The characteristic dark matter halo masses MH of cQGs at z ∼ 1.6 and cSFGs at z ∼ 2.5 are ∼ 7.1 ×1012h-1M⊙ and ∼ 4.4 ×1012h-1M⊙ , respectively. Our clustering result suggests that cQGs at z ∼ 1.6 are possibly the progenitors of local luminous ETGs and the descendants of cSFGs and SMGs at z > 2. Thus an evolutionary connection involving SMGs, cSFGs, QSOs, cQGs and local luminous ETGs has been indicated by our clustering result.

  7. Compact star forming galaxies as the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies: clustering result

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Xiaozhi; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the spatial clustering of massive compact galaxies at $1.2\\le z \\le 3$ in CANDELS/3D-HST fields. We obtain the correlation length for compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z\\sim1.6$ of $r_{0}=7.1_{-2.6}^{+2.3}\\ h^{-1}Mpc$ and compact star forming galaxies (cSFGs) at $z\\sim2.5$ of $r_{0}=7.7_{-2.9}^{+2.7}\\ h^{-1}Mpc$ assuming a power-law slope $\\gamma =1.8$. The characteristic dark matter halo masses $M_H$ of cQGs at $z\\sim1.6$ and cSFGs at $z\\sim2.5$ are $\\sim7.1\\times 10^{12}\\ h^{-1} M_\\odot$ and $\\sim4.4\\times10^{12}\\ h^{-1} M_\\odot$, respectively. Our clustering result suggests that cQGs at $z\\sim1.6$ are possibly the progenitors of local luminous ETGs and the descendants of cSFGs and SMGs at $z>2$. Thus an evolutionary connection involving SMGs, cSFGs, QSOs, cQGs and local luminous ETGs has been indicated by our clustering result.

  8. Electron beam-formed ferromagnetic defects on MoS2 surface along 1 T phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Park, Youngsin; Hwang, Young Hun; Jekal, Soyoung; Kang, Manil; Lee, Wang G.; Yang, Woochul; Lee, Gun-Do; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2016-12-01

    1 T phase incorporation into 2H-MoS2 via an optimal electron irradiation leads to induce a weak ferromagnetic state at room temperature, together with the improved transport property. In addition to the 1T-like defects, the electron irradiation on the cleaved MoS2 surface forms the concentric circle-type defects that are caused by the 2 H/1 T phase transition and the vacancies of the nearby S atoms of the Mo atoms. The electron irradiation-reduced bandgap is promising in vanishing the Schottky barrier to attaining spintronics device. The simple method to control and improve the magnetic and electrical properties on the MoS2 surface provides suitable ways for the low-dimensional device applications.

  9. Controlling Smectic Liquid Crystal Defect Patterns by Physical Stamping-Assisted Domain Separation and Their Use as Templates for Quantum Dot Cluster Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Jong Min; Kim, Yun Ho; Lee, Tae Yong; Yoo, Hae-Wook; Kwon, Kiok; Jung, Woo-Bin; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2016-12-20

    Controlling the organization of self-assembling building blocks over a large area is crucial for lithographic tools based on the bottom-up approach. However, the fabrication of liquid crystal (LC) defect patterns with a particular ordering still remains a challenge because of the limited close-packed morphologies of LC defects. Here, we introduce a multiple-stamping domain separation method for the control of the dimensions and organization of LC defect structures. Prepatterns with various grid shapes on planar polyimide (PI) surfaces were fabricated by pressing a line-shaped stamp into the PI surfaces in two different directions, and then these surfaces were used to prepare LC defect structures confined to these grid domains. The dimensions of the LC defect structures, namely, the equilibrium diameter and the center to center spacing, are controlled by varying the line spacing of the stamps and the film thickness. A variety of arrangements of LC defects, including square, rhombic, hexagonal, and other oblique lattices, can be obtained by simply varying the stamping angle (Ω) between the first and second stamping directions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the resulting controllable LC defect arrays can be used as templates for generating various patterns of nanoparticle clusters by trapping quantum dots (QDs) within the cores of the LC defects.

  10. On the Onset of Secondary Stellar Generations in Giant Star Forming Regions and Massive Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Palouš, Jan; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate, and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T $\\sim$ 10$^4$ K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in s...

  11. The clustered nature of star formation. Pre--main-sequence clusters in the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Dolphin, Andrew E; Gennaro, Mario; Tognelli, Emanuele; Moroni, Pier Giorgio Prada

    2012-01-01

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC602/N90 is characterized by the HII nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre--main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main sequence stars NGC602. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with HST/ACS camera in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster, low-mass PMS stars are congregated in thirteen additional small compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC602. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction (~60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the inter-cluster area. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age-difference of ~2.5Myr between NGC602 and the compact sub-clusters which appear younger. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally conc...

  12. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kirk, Helen

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ∼ 2-4 pc and densities of n ∼ 400-1000 cm-3 with Alfvén Mach numbers near unity. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyse the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DISPERSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that our simulated clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic field depends on the virial parameter. Sub-virial clumps undergo strong gravitational collapse and magnetic field lines are dragged with the accretion flow. We see evidence of filament-aligned flow and accretion flow on to the filament in the sub-virial cloud. Magnetic fields oriented more parallel in the sub-virial cloud and more perpendicular in the denser, marginally bound cloud. Radiative feedback from a 16 M⊙ star forming in a cluster in one of our simulation's ultimately results in the destruction of the main filament, the formation of an H II region, and the sweeping up of magnetic fields within an expanding shell at the edges of the H II region.

  13. The turbulent structures around clusters formed under a range of armoring shear stresses and grain size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, J. C.; Tan, L.

    2011-12-01

    In gravel bed rivers, low flows generate shear stresses less than what is needed to entrain the largest particles but large enough to transport the fines. During sustained low flows, fine sediment winnows from the bed surface and an armored surface layer forms. As the surface armor forms, a surface structure develops that increases bed roughness and flow resistance and can be characterized by the presence of clusters. Individual clusters are known to exert a significant influence over the spatial and temporal flow processes acting in the vicinity of the bed. A series of flume experiments investigated the turbulent structures formed around clusters naturally developed during bed armoring. The series of experiments created armored beds using four different flow rates and four different bulk grain size distributions which progressively increased in the percent sand in the bed sediment. Following an initial run segment that established equilibrium sediment transport and full bed mobility, the flow rate in the flume was reduced and the bed surface fully armored. Once armored, clusters were identified using a combination of bed DEM, vertical profile, and visual analysis. Instantaneous three-dimensional flow velocities were measured around the clusters using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, and these values were used to calculate Reynolds shear stresses, turbulence intensities, and turbulent kinetic energy in the flow field. Results show a significant change in the flow profiles over a cluster when compared to an open area of the armored bed. Reynolds shear stresses doubled over the cluster and turbulence intensity reached a peak value right above the single cluster. The results also suggest the effects of the single cluster on the surrounding flow dynamics are quite localized and limited to 30cm in lateral orientation. Quadrant analysis showing large ejection and sweep events around clusters indicates vortex formation at the cluster crest. The magnitude of the coherent

  14. Integrin-Matrix Clusters Form Podosome-like Adhesions in the Absence of Traction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-han Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-activated integrins can form different adhesion structures. We report that nontransformed fibroblasts develop podosome-like adhesions when spread on fluid Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD-lipid surfaces, whereas they habitually form focal adhesions on rigid RGD glass surfaces. Similar to classic macrophage podosomes, the podosome-like adhesions are protrusive and characterized by doughnut-shaped RGD rings that surround characteristic core components including F-actin, N-WASP, and Arp2/Arp3. Furthermore, there are 18 podosome markers in these adhesions, though they lack matrix metalloproteinases that characterize invadopodia and podosomes of Src-transformed cells. When nontransformed cells develop force on integrin-RGD clusters by pulling RGD lipids to prefabricated rigid barriers (metal lines spaced by 1–2 μm, these podosomes fail to form and instead form focal adhesions. The formation of podosomes on fluid surfaces is mediated by local activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the production of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3 in a FAK/PYK2-dependent manner. Enrichment of PIP3 precedes N-WASP activation and the recruitment of RhoA-GAP ARAP3. We propose that adhesion structures can be modulated by traction force development and that production of PIP3 stimulates podosome formation and subsequent RhoA downregulation in the absence of traction force.

  15. Spectroscopic and functional characterization of iron-sulfur cluster-bound forms of Azotobacter vinelandii (Nif)IscA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapolelo, Daphne T; Zhang, Bo; Naik, Sunil G; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2012-10-16

    The mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on A-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins, in general, and the specific role of (Nif)IscA in the maturation of nitrogen fixation proteins are currently unknown. To address these questions, in vitro spectroscopic studies (UV-visible absorption/CD, resonance Raman and Mössbauer) have been used to investigate the mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on Azotobacter vinelandii(Nif)IscA, and the ability of (Nif)IscA to accept clusters from NifU and to donate clusters to the apo form of the nitrogenase Fe-protein. The results show that (Nif)IscA can rapidly and reversibly cycle between forms containing one [2Fe-2S](2+) and one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster per homodimer via DTT-induced two-electron reductive coupling of two [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters and O(2)-induced [4Fe-4S](2+) oxidative cleavage. This unique type of cluster interconversion in response to cellular redox status and oxygen levels is likely to be important for the specific role of A-type proteins in the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic growth or oxidative stress conditions. Only the [4Fe-4S](2+)-(Nif)IscA was competent for rapid activation of apo-nitrogenase Fe protein under anaerobic conditions. Apo-(Nif)IscA was shown to accept clusters from [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound NifU via rapid intact cluster transfer, indicating a potential role as a cluster carrier for delivery of clusters assembled on NifU. Overall the results support the proposal that A-type proteins can function as carrier proteins for clusters assembled on U-type proteins and suggest that they are likely to supply [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] for the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic or oxidative stress growth conditions.

  16. The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey I. Star Forming Molecular Gas in Virgo Cluster Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C D; Israel, F P; Serjeant, S; Bendo, G; Brinks, E; Clements, D; Courteau, S; Irwin, J; Knapen, J H; Leech, J; Matthews, H E; Muehle, S; Mortier, A M J; Petitpas, G; Sinukoff, E; Spekkens, K; Tan, B K; Tilanus, R P J; Usero, A; Van der Werf, P P; Wiegert, T; Zhu, M

    2008-01-01

    We present large-area maps of the CO J=3-2 emission obtained at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope for four spiral galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. We combine these data with published CO J=1-0, 24 micron, and Halpha images to measure the CO line ratios, molecular gas masses, and instantaneous gas depletion times. For three galaxies in our sample (NGC 4254, NGC4321, and NGC 4569), we obtain molecular gas masses of 7E8-3E9 Msun and disk-averaged instantaneous gas depletion times of 1.1-1.7 Gyr. We argue that the CO J=3-2 line is a better tracer of the dense star forming molecular gas than the CO J=1-0 line, as it shows a better correlation with the star formation rate surface density both within and between galaxies. NGC 4254 appears to have a larger star formation efficiency(smaller gas depletion time), perhaps because it is on its first passage through the Virgo Cluster. NGC 4569 shows a large-scale gradient in the gas properties traced by the CO J=3-2/J=1-0 line ratio, which suggests that its interaction with ...

  17. Nitrate assimilation gene cluster from the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, J E; Flores, E; Herrero, A

    1997-01-01

    A region of the genome of the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that contains a cluster of genes involved in nitrate assimilation has been identified. The genes nir, encoding nitrite reductase, and nrtABC, encoding elements of a nitrate permease, have been cloned. Insertion of a gene cassette into the nir-nrtA region impaired expression of narB, the nitrate reductase structural gene which together with nrtD is found downstream from nrtC in the gene cluster. This indicates that the nir-nrtABCD-narB genes are cotranscribed, thus constituting an operon. Expression of the nir operon in strain PCC 7120 is subjected to ammonium-promoted repression and takes place from an NtcA-activated promoter located 460 bp upstream from the start of the nir gene. In the absence of ammonium, cellular levels of the products of the nir operon are higher in the presence of nitrate than in the absence of combined nitrogen.

  18. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeja, Stefan [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States); Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' , Universita di Pisa, largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  19. On the Extreme Positive Feedback Star-Forming Mode from Massive and Compact Superstar Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Munoz-Tunon, A R; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Munoz-Tunon, Ary Rodriguez Gonzalez & Casiana

    2005-01-01

    The force of gravity acting within the volume occupied by young, compact and massive superstar clusters, is here shown to drive in situ all the matter deposited by winds and supernovae into several generations of star formation. These events are promoted by radiative cooling which drains the thermal energy of the ejected gas causing its accumulation to then rapidly exceed the gravitational instability criterion. A detailed account of the integrated ionizing radiation and mechanical luminosity as a function of time is here shown to lead to a new stationary solution. In this, the mass deposition rate $\\dot M$, instead of causing a wind as in the adiabatic solution, turns into a positive feedback star-forming mode equal to the star formation rate. Some of the implications of this extreme positive feedback mode are discussed.

  20. Glass Transitions in Monodisperse Cluster-Forming Ensembles: Vortex Matter in Type-1.5 Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Méndez, Rogelio; Mezzacapo, Fabio; Lechner, Wolfgang; Cinti, Fabio; Babaev, Egor; Pupillo, Guido

    2017-02-01

    At low enough temperatures and high densities, the equilibrium configuration of an ensemble of ultrasoft particles is a self-assembled, ordered, cluster crystal. In the present Letter, we explore the out-of-equilibrium dynamics for a two-dimensional realization, which is relevant to superconducting materials with multiscale intervortex forces. We find that, for small temperatures following a quench, the suppression of the thermally activated particle hopping hinders the ordering. This results in a glass transition for a monodispersed ensemble, for which we derive a microscopic explanation in terms of an "effective polydispersity" induced by multiscale interactions. This demonstrates that a vortex glass can form in clean systems of thin films of "type-1.5" superconductors. An additional setup to study this physics can be layered superconducting systems, where the shape of the effective vortex-vortex interactions can be engineered.

  1. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Klassen, Mikhail; Kirk, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ~ 2-4 pc and densities of n ~ 400-1000 cm^-3. Many molecular clouds have Alfven Mach numbers near unity, a regime insufficiently explored by numerical simulations. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyze the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DisPerSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that in our trans-Alfvenic clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic fi...

  2. Properties of dense cores in clustered massive star-forming regions at high angular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Busquet, Gemma; Juarez, Carmen; Estalella, Robert; Tan, Jonathan C; Sepulveda, Inma; Ho, Paul T P; Zhang, Qizhou; Kurtz, Stan

    2013-01-01

    We aim at characterising dense cores in the clustered environments associated with massive star-forming regions. For this, we present an uniform analysis of VLA NH3(1,1) and (2,2) observations towards a sample of 15 massive star-forming regions, where we identify a total of 73 cores, classify them as protostellar, quiescent starless, or perturbed starless, and derive some physical properties. The average sizes and ammonia column densities are 0.06 pc and 10^15 cm^-2, respectively, with no significant differences between the starless and protostellar cores, while the linewidth and rotational temperature of quiescent starless cores are smaller, 1.0 km/s and 16 K, than those of protostellar (1.8 km/s, 21 K), and perturbed starless (1.4 km/s, 19 K) cores. Such linewidths and temperatures for these quiescent starless cores in the surroundings of massive stars are still significantly larger than the typical values measured in starless cores of low-mass star-forming regions, implying an important non-thermal compone...

  3. Far-ultraviolet morphology of star-forming filaments in cool core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, G. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Mittal, R.; McDonald, M. A.; Combes, F.; Li, Y.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.; Clarke, T. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Hamer, S. L.; Hogan, M. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Salomé, P.; Voit, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star-forming clouds and filaments in the central (≲50 kpc) regions of 16 low-redshift (z atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot (˜107-8 K) and warm ionized (˜104 K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend towards and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed in situ by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star-forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to-free-fall time ratio is tcool/tff ˜ 10. This condition is roughly met at the maximal projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.

  4. The sensory histidine kinases TorS and EvgS tend to form clusters in Escherichia coli cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Sommer

    Full Text Available Microorganisms use multiple two-component sensory systems to detect changes in their environment and elicit physiological responses. Despite their wide spread and importance, the intracellular organization of two-component sensory proteins in bacteria remains little investigated. A notable exception is the well-studied clustering of the chemoreceptor-kinase complexes that mediate chemotaxis behaviour. However, these chemosensory complexes differ fundamentally from other systems, both structurally and functionally. Therefore, studying the organization of typical sensory kinases in bacteria is essential for understanding the general role of receptor clustering in bacterial sensory signalling. Here, by studying mYFP-tagged sensory kinases in Escherichia coli, we show that the tagged TorS and EvgS sensors have a clear tendency for self-association and clustering. These sensors clustered even when expressed at a level of a few hundred copies per cell. Moreover, the mYFP-tagged response regulator TorR showed clear TorS-dependent clustering, indicating that untagged TorS sensors also tend to form clusters. We also provide evidence for the functionality of these tagged sensors. Experiments with truncated TorS or EvgS proteins suggested that clustering of EvgS sensors depends on the cytoplasmic part of the protein, whereas clustering of TorS sensors can be potentially mediated by the periplasmic/transmembrane domain. Overall, these findings support the notion that sensor clustering plays a role in bacterial sensory signalling beyond chemotaxis.

  5. Metal–Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal–Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed “double cluster” (Hf12O8(OH)14), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal–organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal–organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials. PMID:28343394

  6. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Li, Zhi-Yun; /Virginia U., Astron. Dept.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys.Dept.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication

  7. Product defect compensation by robust optimization of a cold roll forming process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiebenga, J.H.; Weiss, M.; Rolfe, B.; Boogaard, van den A.H.

    2013-01-01

    The quality of roll formed products is known to be highly dependent on the process design. In addition, unavoidable variations of material properties during mass production can have a significant deteriorating effect on the product quality. This study focuses on the question how to compensate for pr

  8. Forming Early-type Galaxies in Groups Prior to Cluster Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Kautsch, Stefan J; Soto, Christian A; Tran, Kim-Vy H; Zaritsky, Dennis; Moustakas, John

    2008-01-01

    We study a unique proto-cluster of galaxies, the supergroup SG1120-1202. We quantify the degree to which morphological transformation of cluster galaxies occurs prior to cluster assembly in order to explain the observed early-type fractions in galaxy clusters at z=0. SG1120-1202 at z~0.37 is comprised of four gravitationally bound groups that are expected to coalesce into a single cluster by z=0. Using HST ACS observations, we compare the morphological fractions of the supergroup galaxies to those found in a range of environments. We find that the morphological fractions of early-type galaxies (~60 %) and the ratio of S0 to elliptical galaxies (0.5) in SG1120-1202 are very similar to clusters at comparable redshift, consistent with pre-processing in the group environment playing the dominant role in establishing the observed early-type fraction in galaxy clusters.

  9. Spectroscopic Constraints on the Form of the Stellar Cluster Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Bastian, N; Trancho, G; Weisz, D R; Larsen, S S; Fouesneau, M; Kaschinski, C B; Gieles, M

    2012-01-01

    This contribution addresses the question of whether the initial cluster mass function (ICMF) has a fundamental limit (or truncation) at high masses. The shape of the ICMF at high masses can be studied using the most massive young (<10 Myr) clusters, however this has proven difficult due to low-number statistics. In this contribution we use an alternative method based on the luminosities of the brightest clusters, combined with their ages. If a truncation is present, a generic prediction (nearly independent of the cluster disruption law adopted) is that the median age of bright clusters should be younger than that of fainter clusters. In the case of an non-truncated ICMF, the median age should be independent of cluster luminosity. Here, we present optical spectroscopy of twelve young stellar clusters in the face-on spiral galaxy NGC 2997. The spectra are used to estimate the age of each cluster, and the brightness of the clusters is taken from the literature. The observations are compared with the model exp...

  10. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster, based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O II] emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available, finding 7 systems with SFR > 100 Msun/yr. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 Msun/yr in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1-5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z > 1, this fraction increases to 92(+6)(-31)%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific star formation rate in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z > 0.6, the correlation between cluster central entropy and BCG star formation - which is well established at z ~ 0 - is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs using data from the Hubble Space Telescope, finding complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50-60 kpc. The high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy-galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  11. METHODS OF DETERMINATION OF POTENTIAL AREAS OF FORMING SOCIO-ECONOMIC INNOVATIVE CLUSTERS IN THE REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Donichev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the main problems of formation of innovation clusters in the regions, the role and the importance of government in these issues. The characteristics of the main socio-economic and innovative performances of the region are analyzed to determine its potential for creating innovative economic cluster. The methods for detecting possible potential areas of formation of such cluster are developed.

  12. HerMES: Cosmic Infrared Background Anisotropies and the Clustering of Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Viero, M P; Zemcov, M; Addison, G; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Bethermin, M; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Burgarella, D; Casey, C M; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; De Zotti, G; Dowell, C D; Farrah, D; Franceschini, A; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Heinis, S; Ibar, E; Ivision, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Peason, C P; Perez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Schulz, B; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Wardlow, J; Xu, C K

    2012-01-01

    We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency power spectra of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 250, 350, and 500um (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations totaling ~ 70 deg^2 made with the SPIRE instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. We measure a fractional anisotropy dI / I = 14 +- 4%, detecting signatures arising from the clustering of dusty star-forming galaxies in both the linear (2-halo) and non-linear (1-halo) regimes to unprecedented levels; and that the transition from the 2- to 1-halo terms, below which power originates predominantly from multiple galaxies within dark matter halos, occurs at k_theta ~ 0.1 arcmin^-1 (l ~ 2200). New to this paper is clear evidence of a dependence of the Poisson and 1-halo power on the flux-cut level of masked sources --- suggesting that some fraction of the more luminous sources occupy more massive halos as satellites. We measure the cross-correlation power spectra between bands, finding that bands which are farthest apart are the least...

  13. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using Enzo-based MHD simulations with accreting sink particles and effective resolution $2048^3$. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of $\\sim 1,600$ solar masses, along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized "core" that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which di...

  14. Synapse clusters are preferentially formed by synapses with large recycling pool sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Welzel

    Full Text Available Synapses are distributed heterogeneously in neural networks. The relationship between the spatial arrangement of synapses and an individual synapse's structural and functional features remains to be elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of the number of adjacent synapses on individual synaptic recycling pool sizes. When measuring the discharge of the styryl dye FM1-43 from electrically stimulated synapses in rat hippocampal tissue cultures, a strong positive correlation between the number of neighbouring synapses and recycling vesicle pool sizes was observed. Accordingly, vesicle-rich synapses were found to preferentially reside next to neighbours with large recycling pool sizes. Although these synapses with large recycling pool sizes were rare, they were densely arranged and thus exhibited a high amount of release per volume. To consolidate these findings, functional terminals were marked by live-cell antibody staining with anti-synaptotagmin-1-cypHer or overexpression of synaptopHluorin. Analysis of synapse distributions in these systems confirmed the results obtained with FM 1-43. Our findings support the idea that clustering of synapses with large recycling pool sizes is a distinct developmental feature of newly formed neural networks and may contribute to functional plasticity.

  15. The Spiderweb galaxy: a forming massive cluster galaxy at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G K; Zirm, A W; Ford, H C; Kurk, J D; Pentericci, L; Blakeslee, J P; Franx, M; Illingworth, G D; Postman, M; Rosati, P; Röttgering, H J A; Venemans, B P; Helder, E

    2006-01-01

    We present a deep image of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at a redshift of z = 2.2. The galaxy is known to have properties of a cD galaxy progenitor and be surrounded by a 3 Mpc-sized structure, identified with a protocluster. The morphology shown on the new deep HST/ACS image is reminiscent of a spider's web. More than 10 individual clumpy features are observed, apparently star-forming satellite galaxies in the process of merging with the progenitor of a dominant cluster galaxy 11 Gyr ago. There is an extended emission component, implying that star formation was occurring over a 50 times 40 kpc region at a rate of more than 100 M_sun/yr. A striking feature of the newly named ``Spiderweb galaxy'' is the presence of several faint linear galaxies within the merging structure. The dense environments and fast galaxy motions at the centres of protoclusters may stimulate the formation of these structures, which dominate the faint resolved galaxy populations in the Hubble U...

  16. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-06

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses.

  17. The K20 survey. II. The Different Spatial Clustering of z~1 Old and Dusty Star-Forming EROs

    CERN Document Server

    Daddi, E; Broadhurst, T J; Renzini, A; Zamorani, G; Mignoli, M; Saracco, P; Fontana, A; Pozzetti, L; Poli, F; Cristiani, S; D'Odorico, S; Giallongo, E; Gilmozzi, R; Menci, N

    2002-01-01

    We compare the 3D clustering of old passively-evolving and dusty star-forming z~1 EROs from the K20 survey. With detailed simulations of clustering, the comoving correlation length of dusty star-forming EROs is constrained to be less than r_0~2.5 Mpc/h. In contrast, the old EROs are much more positively correlated, with 5.5<~r_0/(Mpc/h)<~16, consistent with previous claims for z~1 field early-type galaxies based on analyses of ERO angular clustering. The low level of clustering of dusty star-forming EROs does not support these to be major mergers building up an elliptical galaxy, or typical counterparts of SCUBA sources, but it is instead consistent with the weak clustering of high redshift blue galaxies and of luminous local IRAS galaxies. Current hierarchical merging models can explain the large r_0 for z~1 field early-type galaxies, but fail in matching their high number density and overall old ages.

  18. Clusters as a Form of Spatial Organisation of Economic Activity: Theory and Practical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shastitko Andrey

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at explaining the clustering of economic activity using instruments of new institutional economics, taking into account well-known descriptive characteristics of the cluster, as well as recent developments in research on hybrid institutional agreements, primarily, the research conducted by Michael Porter, Claude Ménard and others.

  19. Clusters as a Form of Spatial Organisation of Economic Activity: Theory and Practical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shastitko A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at explaining the clustering of economic activity using instruments of new institutional economics, taking into account well-known descriptive characteristics of the cluster, as well as recent developments in research on hybrid institutional agreements, primarily, the research conducted by Michael Porter, Claude Ménard and others.

  20. Cluster headache - a symptom of different problems or a primary form? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrz, Izabela; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Maj, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Headache with severe, strictly one-sided unilateral attacks of pain in orbital, supraorbital, temporal localisation lasting 15-180 minutes occurring from once every two days to 8 times daily, typically with one or more autonomic symptoms, is recognized as cluster headache (CH). Headache with normal neurological examination and abnormal neuroimaging studies, mimicking cluster headache, is reported by several authors. We present an elderly woman with a cluster-like headache probably associated with other comorbidities. We differentiate between primary, but 'atypical' CH and symptomatic cluster headache due to frontal sinusitis, pontine venous angioma or vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root. This headache is not so rare in the general population and its secondary causes must be ruled out before the diagnosis of a primary headache as cluster headache is made.

  1. Rare missense variants in ATP1A2 in families with clustering of common forms of migraine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todt, U.; Dichgans, M.; Jurkat-Rott, K.; Heinze, A.; Zifarelli, G.; Koenderink, J.B.; Goebel, I.; Zumbroich, V.; Stiller, A.; Ramirez, A.; Friedrich, T.; Gobel, H.; Kubisch, C.

    2005-01-01

    Migraine is a recurrent neurovascular disease. Its two most common forms-migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA)-both show familial clustering and a complex pattern of inheritance. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare monogenic subform caused by mutations in the calcium channe

  2. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS) - V. The Active Star Forming Region SH 2-255-257

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Beomdu; Sung, Hwankyung; Hur, Hyeonoh; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Bessell, Michael S.; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Lee, Kang Hwan; Park, Byeong-Gon; Jeong, Gwanghui

    2015-12-01

    There is much observational evidence that active star formation is taking place in the H II regions Sh 2-255-257. We present a photometric study of this star forming region (SFR) using imaging data obtained in passbands from the optical to the mid-infrared, in order to study the star formation process. A total of 218 members were identified using various selection criteria based on their observational properties. The SFR is reddened by at least E(B-V) = 0.8 mag, and the reddening law toward the region is normal (R_V = 3.1). From the zero-age main sequence fitting method it is confirmed that the SFR is 2.1 ± 0.3 kpc from the Sun. The median age of the identified members is estimated to be about 1.3 Myr from a comparison of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) with stellar evolutionary models. The initial mass function (IMF) is derived from the HRD and the near-infrared (J, J-H) color-magnitude diagram. The slope of the IMF is about Γ = -1.6 ± 0.1, which is slightly steeper than that of the Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. It implies that low-mass star formation is dominant in the SFR. The sum of the masses of all the identified members provides the lower limit of the cluster mass (169 M_{⊙}). We also analyzed the spectral energy distribution (SED) of pre-main sequence stars using the SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al., and confirm that there is a significant discrepancy between stellar mass and age obtained from two different methods based on the SED fitting tool and the HRD.

  3. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-02-01

    Context: Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. Aims: We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects that are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. Methods: We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. Results: We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution of such star-forming haloes will be one of the most significant foregrounds in the high frequency channels of future CMB experiments, such as PLANCK, ACT and SPT. The correlation term, due to the clustering of multiple haloes at redshift z ~ 2-6, is dominant in the broad range of angular scales 200 ⪉ l ⪉ 3000. Poisson fluctuations due to bright sub-millimeter sources are more important at higher l, but since they are generated from the bright sources, such contribution could be strongly reduced if bright sources are excised from the sky maps. The contribution of the correlation term to the angular power spectrum depends strongly on the redshift evolution of the escape fraction of UV photons and the resulting temperature of the dust. The measurement of this signal will therefore give important information about the sub-millimeter emission and the escape fraction of UV photons from galaxies, in the early stage of their evolution.

  4. Theoretical prediction of novel ultrafine nanowires formed by Si12C12 cage-like clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Yongliang; Song, Bin; He, Pimo

    2014-02-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we predict that novel SiC ultrafine nanowires can be produced via the coalescence of stable Si12C12 clusters. For the isolated Si12C12 clusters, we find that the cage-like structure with a distinct segregation between Si and C atoms is energetically more favourable than the fullerene-like structure with alternating Si-C bonds. Via the coalescence of Si12C12 clusters, three novel stable nanowires have been characterised. The band structure reveals that these nanowires are semiconductors with narrow gap, indicating that they may be used as infrared detectors and thermoelectrics.

  5. Clusters of Financially Incentivized Chronic Pain Patients Using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguerrevere, Luis E; Calamia, Matthew R; Greve, Kevin W; Bianchini, Kevin J; Curtis, Kelly L; Ramirez, Veronica

    2017-06-19

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has been shown to have clinical utility in the assessment of individuals with chronic pain (e.g., predicting surgical outcomes). The purpose of this study was to explore the ability of the MMPI-2-RF Validity Scales in profiling patients with chronic pain who had external financial incentive (e.g., workers' compensation claims) and determine the associations between Validity Scale response patterns and important outcomes. Cluster analysis identified 2 similarly sized clusters of patients with very different MMPI-2-RF profiles. Cluster 1 was characterized by valid responding and showed mean elevations on the somatic and low positive emotion Restructured Clinical scales. Cluster 2 was characterized by patients overreporting on the MMPI-2-RF Validity Scales, who also demonstrated elevations on 7 of the 9 RC scales. Cluster membership was differentially associated with clinical variables: patients in Cluster 2 had greater self-reported pain and disability, were less likely to have spine-related findings on imaging and were more likely to be classified as probable or definite malingerers. These results support the utility of the MMPI-2-RF Validity scales in distinguishing between credible and noncredible responses from patients with chronic pain seen within a medico-legal context. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. The presence of multiple cellular defects associated with a novel G50E iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein (ISCU) mutation leads to development of mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Prasenjit Prasad; Kumar, S K Praveen; Srivastava, Shubhi; Sinha, Devanjan; Pareek, Gautam; D'Silva, Patrick

    2014-04-11

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are versatile cofactors involved in regulating multiple physiological activities, including energy generation through cellular respiration. Initially, the Fe-S clusters are assembled on a conserved scaffold protein, iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein (ISCU), in coordination with iron and sulfur donor proteins in human mitochondria. Loss of ISCU function leads to myopathy, characterized by muscle wasting and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition to the homozygous ISCU mutation (g.7044G→C), compound heterozygous patients with severe myopathy have been identified to carry the c.149G→A missense mutation converting the glycine 50 residue to glutamate. However, the physiological defects and molecular mechanism associated with G50E mutation have not been elucidated. In this report, we uncover mechanistic insights concerning how the G50E ISCU mutation in humans leads to the development of severe ISCU myopathy, using a human cell line and yeast as the model systems. The biochemical results highlight that the G50E mutation results in compromised interaction with the sulfur donor NFS1 and the J-protein HSCB, thus impairing the rate of Fe-S cluster synthesis. As a result, electron transport chain complexes show significant reduction in their redox properties, leading to loss of cellular respiration. Furthermore, the G50E mutant mitochondria display enhancement in iron level and reactive oxygen species, thereby causing oxidative stress leading to impairment in the mitochondrial functions. Thus, our findings provide compelling evidence that the respiration defect due to impaired biogenesis of Fe-S clusters in myopathy patients leads to manifestation of complex clinical symptoms.

  7. Rotational invariance and double frustration in the structures of gold clusters growing around the F(s)-defected MgO (100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcaro, Giovanni; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2006-10-26

    The interaction of small gold clusters (Au(n), n = 1-4, 20) and a gold monolayer with the MgO (100) surface surrounding a neutral oxygen vacancy (F(s) center) is investigated using density-functional (DF) calculations. It is found that the presence of the defect modifies the interaction of gold not only with the vacancy itself, but also with the oxygen and magnesium atoms around it by increasing both the adhesion energy and the equilibrium bond distances. This is at variance with the interaction of metal atoms with the regular MgO (100) surface or the F(s) defect itself, in which an increase of the adhesion energy is associated with a shortening of the metal-surface distance. The resulting double frustration and cylindrical invariance of the metal-surface interaction cause small gold clusters growing around an F(s) nucleation center to be highly fluxional in terms both of rotational freedom and of multiple competing structural motifs. Fragmentation energies of the gold clusters are also discussed, finding that the lowest-energy pathway corresponds to the detachment of a dimer.

  8. Form of the galactic globular cluster system and the distance to the Galactic Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C.S. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy); White, S.D.M. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Dept. of Astronomy)

    1982-01-01

    New quantitative methods are developed for analysing the structure of the galactic globular cluster system. Samples limited in galactic latitude which can be assumed complete are chosen, and the distance independent information contained in the positions of clusters on the sky, and the information contained in the apparent three-dimensional distribution, are considered separately. The cluster system is slightly flattened and there is no significant evidence for any variation in flattening as a function of metallicity. Its density is well described over the range 0.2 < r/Rsub(Sun) < 5 by a Hubble law, rho varies as r/sup -3/, or by a de Vaucouleurs law with rsub(e)/Rsub(Sun) = 0.50. Distance modulus errors of order one magnitude are required to explain the deviation of the apparent distribution of metal-rich clusters from axial symmetry. In addition a systematic difference in distance scale of about 0.5 magnitudes is necessary to reconcile the centroid of this distribution with that of the metal-poor clusters. This shift is in the same sense and of about the size predicted by theoretical pulsation models of RR Lyrae stars. If the standard distance scale is adopted for metal-poor clusters, the estimated distance from the Sun to the Galactic Centre is Rsub(Sun) = 6.8 +- 0.8 kpc.

  9. Metallurgical investigation of defects in super alloy 718 mill forms intended for aeroengine applications; Metallurgische Schadensanalyse an Halbzeugen aus der Superlegierung 718 fuer Triebwerksapplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopala Krishna, V.; Srinivas, M. [Defence Metallurgical Research Lab., Hyderabad (India); Janakiram, G.D. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Murty, C.H.V.S.; Venugopal Reddy. A. [Regional Center for Military Airworthiness (Materials), Hyderabad (India)

    2008-10-15

    Super alloy 718 finds extensive utilization, particularly in aero engine industry, due to its excellent strength, low cycle fatigue and creep resistance. The alloy was manufactured using vacuum induction melting followed by vacuum arc remelting techniques. The electrodes, after thermo-mechanical processing to hot rolled square bar and flat forms, were ultrasonically inspected prior to machining of aeroengine compressor blades. During machining, crack-like defects were noticed. Visual / Stereo microscopic examination revealed that the defect was along the length of airfoil and was located at mid airfoil width. The defects were filled with dark gray colored debris. Fractographic examination of the crack facets revealed flaky gray region containing number of cracks and bright region with dimpled rupture features covered with debris. Analysis of the debris indicated the presence of oxygen in addition to the elements present in the material, suggesting that the debris is essentially an oxide. These features were correlated with processing histories and defect morphologies. (orig.)

  10. Dynamic stabilities of icosahedral-like clusters and their ability to form quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaogang; Hamid, Ilyar; Duan, Haiming, E-mail: dhm@xju.edu.cn [College of Physics Science and Technology. Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The dynamic stabilities of the icosahedral-like clusters containing up to 2200 atoms are investigated for 15 metal elements. The clusters originate from five different initial structures (icosahedron, truncated decahedron, octahedron, closed-shell fragment of an HCP structure, and non-closed-shell fragment of an HCP structure). The obtained order of the dynamic stabilities of the icosahedral-like clusters can be assigned to three groups, from stronger to weaker, according to the size ranges involved: (Zr, Al, Ti) > (Cu, Fe, Co, Ni, Mg, Ag) > (Pb, Au, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir), which correspond to the predicted formation ability of the quasicrystals. The differences of the sequences can be explained by analyzing the parameters of the Gupta-type many-body inter-atomic potentials.

  11. Spherical cluster ensembles with fractal structure in LaSrMnO: New form of self-organization in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okunev, V. D.; Samoilenko, Z. A.; Burkhovetski, V. V. [Donetsk Physiko-Technical Institute, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, R.Luxemburg 72, 83114 Donetsk (Ukraine); Szymczak, H.; Szymczak, R.; Lewandowski, S. J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-04-28

    The growth of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} films in magnetron plasma, in special conditions, leads to the appearance of ensembles of micron-sized spherical crystalline clusters with fractal structure, which we consider to be a new form of self-organization in solids. Each ensemble contains 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} elementary clusters, 100-250 A in diameter. Interaction of the clusters in the ensemble is realized through the interatomic chemical bonds, intrinsic to the manganites. Integration of peripheral areas of interacting clusters results in the formation of common intercluster medium in the ensemble. We argue that the ensembles with fractal structure built into paramagnetic disordered matrix have ferromagnetic properties. Absence of sharp borders between elementary clusters and the presence of common intercluster medium inside each ensemble permits to rearrange magnetic order and to change the volume of the ferromagnetic phase, providing automatically a high sensitivity of the material to the external field.

  12. Impacts of thermal stress and doping on intrinsic point defect properties and clustering during single crystal silicon and germanium growth from a melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhellemont, Jan; Kamiyama, Eiji; Nakamura, Kozo; Śpiewak, Piotr; Sueoka, Koji

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews recent considerable progress made in the last few years in understanding the behavior and properties of intrinsic point defects close to moving melt/solid Si interfaces during single crystal Si growth from a melt. The so called Voronkov criterion allows to determine whether the grown Si crystal is interstitial I- or vacancy V-rich. This criterion is written as the ratio Γ of the pulling rate v over the thermal gradient G at the interface. Crystals pulled with Γ above a critical value Γcrit are vacancy-rich while below Γcrit, they are interstitial-rich. Various expressions based on the intrinsic point defect thermal equilibrium concentration and diffusivity have been proposed to calculate Γcrit and are briefly discussed in this paper. Recently it was shown that the thermal stress at the interface and heavy doping with neutral and/or electrically active impurities, have a considerable impact on the intrinsic point defect balance and thus also on Γcrit. Furthermore, high energy barriers of formation energies of I and V around three or four atom layers from (001) free surface support a model in which the boundary conditions of the point defect concentrations at the surface in simulations can be set at fixed values. The situation is quite different for Ge single crystal pulling where the vacancy is always the dominant intrinsic point defect so that the Voronkov criterion cannot be applied. Prediction of vacancy cluster concentration/size distributions as a function of the pulling conditions is however still possible. The possibility of reaching Voronkov criterion conditions for Ge by doping with specific impurities is also discussed. Finally, impacts of stress and doping on self-diffusion in Si and Ge are evaluated with comparing the previous experimental results.

  13. Star-forming galaxies in low-redshift clusters: Data and integrated galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, C F; James, P A; Bennett, S M; Aragón-Salamanca, A; Whittle, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of an ongoing study of the evolutionary processes affecting cluster galaxies. Both CCD R band and H alpha narrow-band imaging was used to determine photometric parameters (m_(r), r_(24), H alpha flux and equivalent width) and derive star formation rates for 227 CGCG galaxies in 8 low-redshift clusters. The galaxy sample is a subset of CGCG galaxies in an objective prism survey of cluster galaxies for H alpha emission. It is found that detection of emission-line galaxies in the OPS is 85%, 70%, and 50% complete at the mean surface brightness values of 1.25 x 10^(-19), 5.19 x 10^(-20), and 1.76 x 10^(-20) W m^(-2) arcsec^(-2), respectively, measured within the R band isophote of 24 mag arcsec^(-2) for the galaxy. The CCD data, together with matched data from a recent H alpha galaxy survey of UGC galaxies within 3000 km s^(-1), will be used for a comparative study of R band and H alpha surface photometry between cluster and field spirals.

  14. Tuning the charge states of CrW2O9 clusters deposited on perfect and defective MgO(001) surfaces with different color centers: A comprehensive DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Hui; Tong, Yawen; Wang, Chengxing; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Yongfan

    2016-05-07

    The structures and electronic properties of bimetallic oxide CrW2O9 clusters supported on the perfect and defective MgO(001) surfaces with three different color centers, FS (0), FS (+), and FS (2+) centers, respectively, have been investigated by density functional theory calculations. Our results show that the configurations, adsorption energies, charge transfers, and bonding modes of dispersed CrW2O9 clusters are sensitive to the charge states of the FS centers. Compared with the gas-phase configuration, the CrW2O9 clusters supported on the defective surfaces are distorted dramatically, which exhibit different chain structures. On the perfect MgO surface, the depositions of clusters do not involve obvious charge transfer, while the situation is quite different on the defective MgO(001) surfaces in which significant electron transfer occurs from the surface to the cluster. Interestingly, this effect becomes more remarkable for electron-rich oxygen vacancies (FS (0) center) than that for electron-poor oxygen vacancies (FS (+) and FS (2+) centers). Furthermore, our work reveals a progressive Brønsted acid sites where spin density preferentially localized around the Cr atoms not the W atoms for all kinds of FS-centers, indicating the better catalytic activities can be expected for CrW2O9 cluster on defective MgO(001) surfaces with respect to the W3O9 cluster.

  15. Tuning the charge states of CrW2O9 clusters deposited on perfect and defective MgO(001) surfaces with different color centers: A comprehensive DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Hui; Tong, Yawen; Wang, Chengxing; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Yongfan

    2016-05-01

    The structures and electronic properties of bimetallic oxide CrW2O9 clusters supported on the perfect and defective MgO(001) surfaces with three different color centers, FS0, FS+, and FS2+ centers, respectively, have been investigated by density functional theory calculations. Our results show that the configurations, adsorption energies, charge transfers, and bonding modes of dispersed CrW2O9 clusters are sensitive to the charge states of the FS centers. Compared with the gas-phase configuration, the CrW2O9 clusters supported on the defective surfaces are distorted dramatically, which exhibit different chain structures. On the perfect MgO surface, the depositions of clusters do not involve obvious charge transfer, while the situation is quite different on the defective MgO(001) surfaces in which significant electron transfer occurs from the surface to the cluster. Interestingly, this effect becomes more remarkable for electron-rich oxygen vacancies (FS0 center) than that for electron-poor oxygen vacancies (FS+ and FS2+ centers). Furthermore, our work reveals a progressive Brønsted acid sites where spin density preferentially localized around the Cr atoms not the W atoms for all kinds of FS-centers, indicating the better catalytic activities can be expected for CrW2O9 cluster on defective MgO(001) surfaces with respect to the W3O9 cluster.

  16. Clustering of O–X, X = (Ag, Al, Ga, Sn, Sc, Zn, Zr) point defects in hexagonal Ti: Formation mechanism and ductility variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwasniak, P., E-mail: piotr.kwasniak@inmat.pw.edu.pl; Muzyk, M.; Garbacz, H.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2015-03-15

    The interactions of prime interstitial and alloying elements in hexagonal Ti were investigated using a density functional theory calculations. The binding energies of oxygen with all substitution elements whose solubility limit in α-Ti is greater than 3 at% were calculated. The investigations performed reveal no attraction between Zn, Zr, Ag and O, and strong O–Sc and O–Sn binding. It was found that the O–X clustering mechanism is based on a direct and long-range O–X interaction, both controlled by valence structure and electronegativity of substitational elements. The single crystal and isotropic elastic constants together with Pugh's plasticity criterion were calculated for Ti with multiple point defects to evaluate their impact on mechanical properties. The results obtained reveal that a low concentration of O improves ductility in Ti + Sc solid solutions and increases the brittleness of Ti + Sn alloys. The diverse effect on ductility is due to different chemical bond types in the vicinity of O. The results show that the interstitial-substitational elements clustering effect may be used to optimize mechanical properties of α-Ti alloys. - Highlights: • DFT calculations were performed to investigate the point defects binding in α-Ti. • Sn and Sc exhibit the highest attraction to O in α-Ti lattice. • O–X interaction is controlled by short- and long range interactions. • Oxygen can suppress or enhance ductility of α-Ti-X solid solutions.

  17. Defects and phase change induced by giant electronic excitations with GeV ions and 30 MeV cluster beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevenard, P.; Beranger, M. Canut, B.; Ramos, S.M.M.; Bonardi, N.; Fuchs, G. [Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon I, Villeurbanne (France). Dept. de Physique des Materiaux

    1997-11-01

    MgO and LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals were bombarded with GeV swift heavy ions (Pb, Gd) and 30 MeV C{sub 60} clusters to study the damage production induced by giant electronic processes at stopping power up to 100 keV/nm. The defect creation was characterized by optical absorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS-C). In MgO point defects (F type centers) and extended defects (dislocation loops) were created by ionization processes in addition to those associated with nuclear collisions. The F-center concentration induced by electronic energy excitations was studied at different temperatures and as a function of the particle electronic energy losses. TEM revealed that dislocation loops were produced close to the particle trajectories and amorphization was never observed. On the opposite, in LiNbO{sub 3} continuous amorphous tracks were evidenced above a threshold near 5 keV/nm. The dependence of this effects with various solid state parameters will be discussed.

  18. Study of clustering point defects under irradiation in dilute iron alloys; Etude de la formation sous irradiation des amas de defauts ponctuels dans les alliages ferritiques faiblement allies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong-Hardouin Duparc, T.H.A

    1998-12-31

    In low copper steels for nuclear reactor pressure vessel, point defect clustering plays an important role in hardening. These clusters are very small and invisible by transmission electron microscopy. In order to study the hardening component which results from the clustering of freely migrating point defects, we irradiated in a high voltage electron microscope Fe, the FeCu{sub 0.13%}, FeP{sub 0.015%} and FeN{sub 33ppm} alloys and the complex FeMn{sub 1.5%}Ni{sub 0.8%}Cu{sub 0.13%}P{sub 0.01%} alloy the composition of which is close to the matrix of pressure vessel steel. We studied the nucleation of dislocation loops and their growth velocity. The observations and the analyses have shown that in the complex model alloy, the interstitial dislocation loops are smaller and their density is more important than for the others alloys. The diffusion coefficients of interstitials and vacancies are obtained with the help of a simplified model. The densities of dislocation loops and their growth velocities obtained experimentally are reproduced by means of a cluster dynamics model we have developed. This is achieved self-consistently by using as a first trial the approximated coefficients obtained with the simplified model. The results of calculations have shown that the binding energy of di-interstitials must be very important in the binary iron alloys and only 0.95 eV in iron. Copper, nitrogen and phosphorus stabilize di-interstitials in iron. Finally the distribution of interstitial loops at 290 deg C and at 2.10{sup -9} dpa/s is calculated with the diffusion coefficient of point defects adjusted in FeCu. A distribution of small loops appears which gives an increase of hardening estimated to 10 Hv instead of 33 Hv experimentally observed. This low value can be improved by assuming in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations that a little fraction of di-interstitials is created at 2.5 MeV. (author) 111 refs.

  19. A Photometrically Detected Forming Cluster of Galaxies at Redshift 1.6 in the GOODS Field

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Trevese, D; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Fiore, F; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Santini, P; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of a localized overdensity at z~1.6 in the GOODS-South Field, presumably a poor cluster in the process of formation. The three-dimensional galaxy density has been estimated on the basis of well calibrated photometric redshifts from the multiband photometric GOODS-MUSIC catalog using the (2+1)D technique. The density peak is embedded in the larger scale overdensity of galaxies known to exist at z=1.61 in the area. The properties of the member galaxies are compared to those of the surrounding field and we found that the two populations are significantly different supporting the reality of the structure. The reddest galaxies, once evolved according to their best fit models, have colors consistent with the red sequence of lower redshift clusters. The estimated M_200 total mass of the cluster is in the range 1.3 x 10^14 - 5.7x 10^14 Msun, depending on the assumed bias factor b. An upper limit for the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity, based on the 1Ms Chandra observations, is L_X=0.5 x 10^43 erg s^...

  20. THE STATE POLICY OF OF CLUSTER FORMS IN ORGANIZATION OF INTERACTION IN AGRARIAN FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govdya V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization issues of governance and the development of agriculture sector are particularly relevant in times of financial sanctions, implementation of the strategy of import substitution. Integration is the one of these mechanisms. In the article, we have discussed in detail the historical aspect of the appearance agroindustrial integration in Russia. The authors highlighted the negative aspects constraining the development of integration processes in the industry. The agro-industrial complex is considered as a set of regional and microcomplexes. The article identified three main areas of the industry. Its balance is able to provide dynamic and sustainable development of agriculture. Dynamics of the share of industry in the formation of the key indicators of the Russian economy are presented. It demonstrates the need to solve issues of increasing the efficiency of all agrarian formations. The authors proposed industrial and economic way out of the current crisis on the results of the research. The Government support of agriculture is the main instrument of agrarian policy, especially in times of economic crisis. The authors proposed a cluster approach to economic development as a priority. It allows reaching high competitiveness and stability of economic systems of cluster. In the article the advantages of creating clusters in the regional economic system are presented. We have summed up the implementation of the previously developed innovative, systemic management model

  1. Probing the Dragonfish star-forming complex: the ionizing population of the young massive cluster Mercer 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Borissova, J.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Hanson, M. M.; Trombley, C.; Figer, D. F.; Davies, B.; Garcia, M.; Kurtev, R.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Smith, L. C.; Lucas, P. W.; Herrero, A.

    2016-05-01

    It has recently been claimed that the nebula, Dragonfish, is powered by a superluminous but elusive OB association. However, systematic searches in near-infrared photometric surveys have found many other cluster candidates in this region of the sky. Among these, the first confirmed young massive cluster was Mercer 30, where Wolf-Rayet stars were found.We perform a new characterization of Mercer 30 with unprecedented accuracy, combining NICMOS/HST and VVV photometric data with multi-epoch ISAAC/VLT H- and K-band spectra. Stellar parameters for most of spectroscopically observed cluster members are found through precise non-LTE atmosphere modeling with the CMFGEN code. Our spectrophotometric study for this cluster yields a new, revised distance of d = (12.4 ± 1.7) kpc and a total of QHMc30 ≈ 6.70 × 1050 s-1 Lyman ionizing photons. A cluster age of (4.0 ± 0.8) Myr is found through isochrone fitting, and a total mass of (1.6 ± 0.6) × 104M⊙ is estimated, thanks to our extensive knowledge of the post-main-sequence population. As a consequence, membership of Mercer 30 to the Dragonfish star-forming complex is confirmed, allowing us to use this cluster as a probe for the whole complex, which turns out to be extremely large (~400 pc across) and located at the outer edge of the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm (~11 kpc from the Galactic center). The Dragonfish complex hosts 19 young clusters or cluster candidates (including Mercer 30 and a new candidate presented in this work) and an estimated minimum of nine field Wolf-Rayet stars. All these contributions account for, at least 73% of the ionization of the Dragonfish nebula and leaves little or no room for the alleged superluminous OB association; alternative explanations are discussed. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs IDs 179.B-2002, 081.D-0471, 083.D-0765, 087.D-0957, and 089.D-0989.

  2. Technique for writing of fiber Bragg gratings over or near preliminary formed macro-structure defects in silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, Alexander S.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Kafarova, Anastasia M.; Kazakov, Vadim S.; Kuznetzov, Artem A.; Minaeva, Alina Yu.; Sevruk, Nikita L.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Vasilets, Alexander A.; Andreev, Vladimir A.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Bourdine, Anton V.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents method for performing precision macro-structure defects "tapers" and "up-tapers" written in conventional silica telecommunication multimode optical fibers by commercially available field fusion splicer with modified software settings and following writing fiber Bragg gratings over or near them. We developed technique for macrodefect geometry parameters estimation via analysis of photo-image performed after defect writing and displayed on fusion splicer screen. Some research results of defect geometry dependence on fusion current and fusion time values re-set in splicer program are represented that provided ability to choose their "the best" combination. Also experimental statistical researches concerned with "taper" and "up-taper" diameter stability as well as their insertion loss values during their writing under fixed corrected splicer program parameters were performed. We developed technique for FBG writing over or near macro-structure defect. Some results of spectral response measurements produced for short-length samples of multimode optical fiber with fiber Bragg gratings written over and near macro-defects prepared by using proposed technique are presented.

  3. Demonstration for the Applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG Tube Wear Defects Formed at the Tube Support Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ki Seok; Cheon, Keun Young; Nam, Min Woo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyong Mahn [Universal Monitoring and Inspection Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 applied to the detection of tapered wear volumetric indications and depth sizing within the free span area, loose part not present was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation. The experiment to demonstrate the applicability of EPRI ETSS was performed by the employment of the newly prepared STD tube and resulted in ensuring the effectiveness and equivalency of the EPRI ETSS as well. The authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes. The testing results were reviewed with the influences of SG tube material and the support structure. The impact of the tube materials was insignificant and that of the tube support structure showed somewhat conservative results. The testing resulted in successful demonstration of applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG tube wear defects at the tube support. One of the major flaw mechanisms detected in the currently operating domestic OPR-1000 pressurized water reactors(PWR's) steam generator(SG) tubes is wear defect. In general, wear defect has been constantly detected in the upper tube bundle imposed to the flow induced vibration interaction between tube and its support structure, and the quantity of the affected tubes has also shown the tendency to increase as plant operation life is added. In order to take appropriate measures and maintain the structural integrity for the SG tubes, wear defect is currently categorized as active damage mechanism and the tubes containing 40% or greater wear depth of the nominal tube wall thickness shall be plugged per SGMP(SG Management Program) Recently, a fairly large amplitude of wear defects on the Batwing(BW), one of the upper tube support structures in the SG

  4. Star Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gieles, M.

    1993-01-01

    Star clusters are observed in almost every galaxy. In this thesis we address several fundamental problems concerning the formation, evolution and disruption of star clusters. From observations of (young) star clusters in the interacting galaxy M51, we found that clusters are formed in complexes of stars and star clusters. These complexes share similar properties with giant molecular clouds, from which they are formed. Many (70%) of the young clusters will not survive the fist 10 Myr, due to t...

  5. Asymmetrical clustering by sex in free-forming groups: an observational field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Moore, Daniela

    2010-08-01

    464 observations were carried out in public places of 3- or 4-person, mixed sex, free-forming groups who spontaneously divided into subgroups. An analysis of sex composition of the subgroups showed that significantly more single-sex subgroups were formed than expected by chance. This was significantly more pronounced among women than among men. Several explanations were considered.

  6. Stars and Star Clusters: A Look at Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Lau, Ryan M.

    2017-01-01

    Star-forming regions hosting intermediate-mass stars straddle the boundary separating the the low- and high-mass regimes. These intermediate-mass star-forming regions can be used to probe this transition from low- to high-mass star formation. Our team has assembled an all-sky catalog of 616 candidate intermediate-mass star forming regions (IMSFRs) selected by IRAS colors and refined by visual inspection of WISE imagery. We present here two outer-Galaxy star-forming regions, IRAS22451+6154 and IRAS23448+6010, that despite having similar IRAS colors and mid-infrared morphologies, have vastly different stellar content. We combine Gemini and IRTF NIR spectroscopy with WIYN and SOFIA imaging for a thorough look at the stellar content of these two regions.

  7. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  8. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy and Chemical History of Star-forming Galaxies in the Hercules Cluster: The Effects of the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, V.; Vílchez, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Cedrés, B.; Reverte, D.

    2011-06-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Hα survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be "newcomers" to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the local

  9. Depth distribution of Frank loop defects formed in ion-irradiated stainless steel and its dependence on Si addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongyue, E-mail: dychen@safety.n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta [The University of Tokyo, Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Dohi, Kenji; Nishida, Kenji; Soneda, Naoki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Li, Zhengcao, E-mail: zcli@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Li; Sekimura, Naoto [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Although heavy ion irradiation is a good tool to simulate neutron irradiation-induced damages in light water reactor, it produces inhomogeneous defect distribution. Such difference in defect distribution brings difficulty in comparing the microstructure evolution and mechanical degradation between neutron and heavy ion irradiation, and thus needs to be understood. Stainless steel is the typical structural material used in reactor core, and could be taken as an example to study the inhomogeneous defect depth distribution in heavy ion irradiation and its influence on the tested irradiation hardening by nano-indentation. In this work, solution annealed stainless steel model alloys are irradiated by 3 MeV Fe{sup 2+} ions at 400 °C to 3 dpa to produce Frank loops that are mainly interstitial in nature. The silicon content of the model alloys is also tuned to change point defect diffusion, so that the loop depth distribution influenced by diffusion along the irradiation beam direction could be discussed. Results show that in low Si (0% Si) and base Si (0.42% Si) samples the depth distribution of Frank loop density quite well matches the dpa profile calculated by the SRIM code, but in high Si sample (0.95% Si), the loop number density in the near-surface region is very low. One possible explanation could be Si’s role in enhancing the effective vacancy diffusivity, promoting recombination and thus suppressing interstitial Frank loops, especially in the near-surface region, where vacancies concentrate. By considering the loop depth distribution, the tested irradiation hardening is successfully explained by the Orowan model. A hardening coefficient of around 0.30 is obtained for all the three samples. This attempt in interpreting hardening results may make it easier to compare the mechanical degradation between different irradiation experiments.

  10. Multi-wavelength characterisation of z~2 clustered, dusty star forming galaxies discovered by Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Flores-Cacho, I; Soucail, G; Montier, L; Dole, H; Pointecouteau, E; Pello, R; Floch, E Le; Nesvadba, N; Lagache, G; Guery, D; Canameras, R

    2016-01-01

    (abridged) We report the discovery of PHz G95.5-61.6, a complex structure detected in emission in the Planck all-sky survey that corresponds to two over-densities of high-redshift galaxies. This is the first source from the Planck catalogue of high-z candidates that has been completely characterised with follow-up observations from the optical to the sub-millimetre domain. Herschel/SPIRE observations at 250, 350 and 500 microns reveal the existence of five sources producing a 500 microns emission excess that spatially corresponds to the candidate proto-clusters discovered by Planck. Further observations at CFHT in the optical bands (g and i) and in the near infrared (J, H and K_s), plus mid infrared observations with IRAC/Spitzer (at 3.6 and 4.5 microns) confirm that the sub-mm red excess is associated with an over-density of colour-selected galaxies. Follow-up spectroscopy of 13 galaxies with VLT/X-Shooter establishes the existence of two high-z structures: one at z~1.7 (three confirmed member galaxies), the...

  11. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  12. The clustering properties of radio-selected AGN and star-forming galaxies up to redshifts z ˜ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Popesso, P.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Laigle, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.

    2017-01-01

    We present the clustering properties of a complete sample of 968 radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz by the Very Large Array (VLA)-COSMOS survey with radio fluxes brighter than 0.15 mJy. 92 per cent have redshift determinations from the Laigle et al. catalogue. Based on their radio luminosity, these objects have been divided into 644 AGN and 247 star-forming galaxies. By fixing the slope of the autocorrelation function to γ = 2, we find r_0=11.7^{+1.0}_{-1.1} Mpc for the clustering length of the whole sample, while r_0=11.2^{+2.5}_{-3.3} Mpc and r_0=7.8^{+1.6}_{-2.1} Mpc (r_0=6.8^{+1.4}_{-1.8} Mpc for z ≤ 0.9) are, respectively, obtained for AGN and star-forming galaxies. These values correspond to minimum masses for dark matter haloes of M_min=10^{13.6^{+0.3}_{-0.6}} M⊙ for radio-selected AGN and M_min=10^{13.1^{+0.4}_{-1.6}} M⊙ for radio-emitting star-forming galaxies (M_min=10^{12.7^{+0.7}_{-2.2}} M⊙ for z ≤ 0.9). Comparisons with previous works imply an independence of the clustering properties of the AGN population with respect to both radio luminosity and redshift. We also investigate the relationship between dark and luminous matter in both populations. We obtain /Mhalo ≲ 10- 2.7 for AGN, and /Mhalo ≲ 10- 2.4 in the case of star-forming galaxies. Furthermore, if we restrict to z ≲ 0.9 star-forming galaxies, we derive /Mhalo ≲ 10- 2.1, result that clearly shows the cosmic process of stellar build-up as one moves towards the more local universe. Comparisons between the observed space density of radio-selected AGN and that of dark matter haloes show that about one in two haloes is associated with a black hole in its radio-active phase. This suggests that the radio-active phase is a recurrent phenomenon.

  13. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H+(H2O)n=2 – 28 Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-07-09

    In this Article, we review the role of gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H+(H2O)n, in the analysis of the microscopic mechanics responsible for the behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. We extend upon previous studies of the smaller, two-dimensional sheet-like structures to larger (n≥10) assemblies with three-dimensional cage morphologies which better mimic the bulk environment. Indeed, clusters in which a complete second solvation shell forms around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield vibrational spectra where the signatures of the proton defect display strikingly similar positions and breadth to those observed in dilute acids. We investigate effects of the local structure and intermolecular interactions on the large red shifts observed in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth using various theoretical methods. We show that, in addition to sizeable anharmonic couplings, the position of the excess proton vibration can be traced to large increases in the electric field exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. MAJ acknowledges support from the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02- 06ER15800 as well as the facilities and staff of the Yale University Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Center, and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS 08-21132 that partially funded acquisition of the facilities. SMK and SSX acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  14. Chemotaxis cluster 1 proteins form cytoplasmic arrays in Vibrio cholerae and are stabilized by a double signaling domain receptor DosM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briegel, Ariane; Ortega, Davi R; Mann, Petra

    2016-01-01

    motile bacteria contain one or more additional, sometimes purely cytoplasmic, chemoreceptor systems. Vibrio cholerae contains three chemotaxis clusters (I, II, and III). Here, using electron cryotomography, we explore V. cholerae's cytoplasmic chemoreceptor array and establish that it is formed...

  15. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe{sub 70}Cr{sub 20}Ni{sub 10}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, A., E-mail: aek_souidi@yahoo.fr [Université Dr. Tahar Moulay de Saida, Faculté des Sciences, Département de physique, En-nasr BP138, Saida 20000 (Algeria); Hou, M. [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Faculté des Sciences, CP 223, Bd du Triomphe, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207 Université Lille-1, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cédex (France); Domain, C. [EDF-R& D Département MMC, Les renardières, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cédex (France); De Backer, A. [CCFE, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe{sub 70}Cr{sub 20}Ni{sub 10} alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy–interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10–100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas–Fermi potential and the so-called “Universal” potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10{sup −7} dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe{sub 70}Cr{sub 20}Ni{sub 10.} The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Morphology of Star Forming Filaments in Cool Core Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tremblay, Grant R; Baum, Stefi A; Mittal, Rupal; McDonald, Michael; Combes, Françoise; Li, Yuan; McNamara, Brian; Bremer, Malcolm N; Clarke, Tracy E; Donahue, Megan; Edge, Alastair C; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen L; Hogan, Michael T; Oonk, Raymond; Quillen, Alice C; Sanders, Jeremy S; Salomé, Philippe; Voit, G Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star forming clouds and filaments in the central ($ 5$ \\Msol) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Ly$\\alpha$, narrowband H$\\alpha$, broadband optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot ($\\sim10^{7-8}$ K) and warm ionised ($\\sim 10^4$ K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright AGN outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend toward and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed {\\it in situ} by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations...

  17. Cluster of genes that encode positive and negative elements influencing filament length in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

  18. Multiple clusters of release sites formed by individual thalamic afferents onto cortical interneurons ensure reliable transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, Martha W; Hull, Court; Bushong, Eric A; Ellisman, Mark H; Scanziani, Massimo

    2011-07-14

    Thalamic afferents supply the cortex with sensory information by contacting both excitatory neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Interestingly, thalamic contacts with interneurons constitute such a powerful synapse that even one afferent can fire interneurons, thereby driving feedforward inhibition. However, the spatial representation of this potent synapse on interneuron dendrites is poorly understood. Using Ca imaging and electron microscopy we show that an individual thalamic afferent forms multiple contacts with the interneuronal proximal dendritic arbor, preferentially near branch points. More contacts are correlated with larger amplitude synaptic responses. Each contact, consisting of a single bouton, can release up to seven vesicles simultaneously, resulting in graded and reliable Ca transients. Computational modeling indicates that the release of multiple vesicles at each contact minimally reduces the efficiency of the thalamic afferent in exciting the interneuron. This strategy preserves the spatial representation of thalamocortical inputs across the dendritic arbor over a wide range of release conditions.

  19. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation on the diffusivity of a point defect in the passive film on formed Nb in 0.5 M HCl solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D G

    2015-11-01

    This work primarily focused on the influence of ultrasonic cavitation on the transport property of the point defect in the passive film on formed Nb in 0.5M HCl solution via electrochemical techniques based on the point defect model (PDM). The influence of ultrasonic cavitation on the composition and structure of the passive film was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The transport property of a point defect in the passive film was characterized by the diffusivity of the point defect (D0). The influences of the ultrasonic cavitation power, passivated time and the distance between horn bottom and sample surface on D0 were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the passive film formed on Nb was an n-type semiconductor with a donor density (ND) ranging from 10(19) cm(-3) to 10(20) cm(-3) in the case of static state, while the order of ND increased one to two times by applying ultrasonic cavitation during film formation. The diffusivity of the point defect (D0) in the passive film formed on Nb at 0.5 V for 1 h in a 0.5 M HCl solution in the static state was calculated to be 9.704×10(-18) cm(2) s(-1), and it increased to 1.255×10(-16) cm(2) s(-1), 7.259×10(-16) cm(2) s(-1) and 7.296×10(-15) cm(2) s(-1) when applying the 180 W, 270 W and 450 W ultrasonic cavitation powers during film formation. D0 increased with the increment of the ultrasonic cavitation power, and decreased with the increased in formation time and distance between the horn bottom and sample surface. AES results showed the film structure and composition were changed by applying the ultrasonic cavitation. XPS results revealed that the passive film was mainly composed of Nb2O5 in the static state, and the low valence Nb-oxide (NbO) appeared in the passive film except Nb2O5 in the case of applying a 270 W ultrasonic cavitation power.

  20. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster: the link between molecular gas, atomic gas, and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Grossi, M; Bizzocchi, L; Giovanardi, C; Bomans, D; Coelho, B; De Looze, I; Gonçalves, T S; Hunt, L K; Leonardo, E; Madden, S; Menéndez-Delmestre, K; Pappalardo, C; Riguccini, L

    2016-01-01

    We present $^{12}$CO(1-0) and $^{12}$CO(2-1) observations of a sample of 20 star-forming dwarfs selected from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey, with oxygen abundances ranging from 12 + log(O/H) ~ 8.1 to 8.8. CO emission is observed in ten galaxies and marginally detected in another one. CO fluxes correlate with the FIR 250 $\\mu$m emission, and the dwarfs follow the same linear relation that holds for more massive spiral galaxies extended to a wider dynamical range. We compare different methods to estimate H2 molecular masses, namely a metallicity-dependent CO-to-H2 conversion factor and one dependent on H-band luminosity. The molecular-to-stellar mass ratio remains nearly constant at stellar masses <~ 10$^9$ M$_{\\odot}$, contrary to the atomic hydrogen fraction, M$_{HI}$/M$_*$, which increases inversely with M$_*$. The flattening of the M$_{H_2}$/M$_*$ ratio at low stellar masses does not seem to be related to the effects of the cluster environment because it occurs for both HI-deficient and HI-normal dwa...

  1. Spatially resolved spectroscopy and chemical history of star-forming galaxies in the Hercules cluster: the effects of the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Petropoulou, V; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Papaderos, P; Magrini, L; Cedrés, B; Reverte, D

    2011-01-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Halpha survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT. We have obtained fundamental parameters of the stellar components, as the mean metallicity and age, and we have corrected the emission-line spectra for underlying stellar absorption. O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of galaxies and their existing HI data. We have found that our Hercules SF galaxies divide into three main subgroups: a) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and n...

  2. The clustering properties of radio-selected AGN and star-forming galaxies up to redshifts z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Magliocchetti, M; Brusa, M; Salvato, M; Laigle, C; McCracken, H J; Ilbert, O

    2016-01-01

    We present the clustering properties of a complete sample of 968 radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz by the VLA-COSMOS survey with radio fluxes brighter than 0.15 mJy. Ninety-two per cent have redshift determinations from the Laigle et al. (2016) catalogue. Based on their radio-luminosity, these objects have been divided into two populations of 644 AGN and 247 star-forming galaxies. We find r_0=11.7^{+1.0}_{-1.1} Mpc for the clustering length of the whole sample, while r_0=11.2^{+2.5}_{-3.3} Mpc and r_0=7.8^{+1.6}_{-2.1} Mpc (r_0=6.8^{+1.4}_{-1.8} Mpc if we restrict our analysis to z/M_halo/M_halo/M_halo<~10^{-2.1}, result which clearly indicates the cosmic process of stellar build-up as one moves towards the more local universe. Comparisons between the observed space density of radio-selected AGN and that of dark matter haloes shows that about one in two haloes is associated with a black hole in its radio-active phase. This suggests that the radio-active phase is a recurrent phenomenon.

  3. Sejong open cluster survey (SOS) - V. The active star forming region Sh 2-255 -- 257

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Beomdu; Hur, Hyeonoh; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Bessell, Michael S; Kim, Jinyoung S; Lee, Kang Hwan; Park, Byeong-Gon; Jeong, Gwanghui

    2015-01-01

    There is much observational evidence that active star formation is taking place in the HII regions Sh 2-255 -- 257. We present a photometric study of this star forming region (SFR) using imaging data obtained in passbands from the optical to the mid-infrared in order to study the star formation process. A total of 218 members were identified using various selection criteria based on their observational properties. The SFR is reddened by at least E(B-V) = 0.8 mag, and the reddening law toward the region is normal (R_V = 3.1). From the zero-age main sequence fitting method it is confirmed that the SFR is 2.1 +/- 0.3 kpc from the Sun. The median age of the identified members is estimated to be about 1.3 Myr from comparison of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) with stellar evolutionary models. The initial mass function (IMF) is derived from the HRD and the near-infrared (J, J-H) color-magnitude diagram. The slope of the IMF is about Gamma = -1.6 +/- 0.1, which is slightly steeper than that of the Salpeter/Kro...

  4. Assignment of Soret MLCT band of reduced form of copper binuclear cluster in cytochrome c oxidase film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Low concentration of dithionite results in the reduction of Cu-Cu binuclear and heme a active sites of the cytochrome c oxidase thin solid film immersed in the acidic phosphate buffer, but Fe-Cu binuclear center keeps in the oxidation state. It manifests as a negative peak at 426 nm and a positive one at ~408 nm in the difference spectra induced by dithionite. The former implies decrease of the oxidized form of heme a center, that is, Fea3+→Fea2+. And the latter results from the contribution of metal-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition in the reduced binuclear Cu-Cu cluster, rather than from that of heme a center. This stronger Soret MLCT band must be helpful to overcoming the difficulty in distinguishing the weaker copper sign from the stronger one of iron when studying copper-iron protein.

  5. A Faint Star-Forming System Viewed Through the Lensing Cluster Abell 2218 First Light at z~5.6?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, R; Kneib, J P; Kuijken, K; Ellis, Richard; Santos, Mike; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kuijken, Konrad

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physical nature of a remarkably faint pair of Lyman alpha-emitting images discovered close to the giant cD galaxy in the lensing cluster Abell 2218 (z=0.18) during a systematic survey for highly-magnified star-forming galaxies beyond z=5. A well-constrained mass model suggests the pair arises via a gravitationally-lensed source viewed at high magnification. Keck spectroscopy confirms the lensing hypothesis and implies the unlensed source is a very faint (I~30) compact (<150 pc) and isolated object at z=5.576 whose optical emission is substantially contained within the Lyman alpha emission line; no stellar continuum is detectable. The available data suggest the source is a promising candidate for an isolated ~10^6 solar mass system seen producing its first generation of stars close to the epoch of reionization.

  6. Implications of gluten exposure period, CD clinical forms, and HLA typing in the association between celiac disease and dental enamel defects in children. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorana, Alessandra; Bardellini, Elena; Ravelli, Alberto; Plebani, Alessandro; Polimeni, Antonella; Campus, Guglielmo

    2010-03-01

    The association between coeliac disease (CD) and dental enamel defects (DED) is well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of DED in children with CD and to specifically find the association of DED and gluten exposure period, CD clinical forms, HLA class II haplotype. This study was designed as a matched case-control study: 250 children were enrolled (125 coeliac children - 79 female and 46 male, 7.2 +/- 2.8 years and 125 healthy children). Data about age at CD diagnosis, CD clinical form, and HLA haplotype were recorded. Dental enamel defects were detected in 58 coeliac subjects (46.4%) against seven (5.6%) controls (P < 0.005). We found an association between DED and gluten exposure period, as among CD subjects the mean age at CD diagnosis was significantly (P = 0.0004) higher in the group with DED (3.41 +/- 1.27) than without DED (1.26 +/- 0.7). DED resulted more frequent (100%) in atypical and silent CD forms than in the typical one (30.93%). The presence of HLA DR 52-53 and DQ7antigens significantly increased the risk of DED (P = 0.0017) in coeliac children. Our results confirmed a possible correlation between HLA antigens and DED.

  7. Cluster Forests

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Donghui; Jordan, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by Random Forests (RF) in the context of classification, we propose a new clustering ensemble method---Cluster Forests (CF). Geometrically, CF randomly probes a high-dimensional data cloud to obtain "good local clusterings" and then aggregates via spectral clustering to obtain cluster assignments for the whole dataset. The search for good local clusterings is guided by a cluster quality measure $\\kappa$. CF progressively improves each local clustering in a fashion that resembles the tree growth in RF. Empirical studies on several real-world datasets under two different performance metrics show that CF compares favorably to its competitors. Theoretical analysis shows that the $\\kappa$ criterion is shown to grow each local clustering in a desirable way---it is "noise-resistant." A closed-form expression is obtained for the mis-clustering rate of spectral clustering under a perturbation model, which yields new insights into some aspects of spectral clustering.

  8. Energetics and Concentration of Defects in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2ZrO7 Pyrochlore at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wang; F Zhang; J Lian; R Ewing; U Becker

    2011-12-31

    Using first-principles calculations and complementary experiments, the defect formation energies and defect concentrations were calculated as a function of pressure. The results show that at high pressure, the defect formation energies decrease with pressure for both systems. In Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the dominant defect type is cation anti-site defect, the local structure around a defect is highly distorted, and the energetically favorable defect-defect interactions at shorter distance suggest the possibility of defect clustering. In Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, anion Frenkel-pair defects are favored at all pressures and the dominant defect type involving a cation is a coupled defect of a cation anti-site and an anion Frenkel-pair defect. There are only minor distortions around the defects, and the defect-defect interactions are weak, which suggests almost-ideal non-interacting defect formation. Comparison of experimentally observed defect concentrations and those based on the calculated defect formation energies suggests that the defects formed at high pressure are better estimated with a concentrated limit approximation, while those formed at ambient pressure can be evaluated at a dilute limit approximation.

  9. The population of galaxies in the forming cluster around the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 at z=2.2

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Röttgering, H J A; Miley, G K; Venemans, B P

    2001-01-01

    We have recently discovered a forming cluster around the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262 at redshift 2.2. Besides the population of Ly alpha emitting galaxies that have been confirmed spectroscopically, we have detected many candidate H alpha emitters that seem to have a different spatial distribution from the other galaxies: they are more clustered towards the center of the cluster and seem to be distributed along the same direction as the radio source. We present here the characteristics of the Ly alpha and H alpha emitters and study the nature of these populations.

  10. Concurrent irradiation effects with ionization and displacement on the formation of defect clusters in magnesium aluminate spinel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Morisaki, Rieko; Kinoshita, Chiken [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Abe, Hiroaki; Naramoto, Hiroshi

    1997-03-01

    Single crystals of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} were irradiated concurrently with a homogeneous ion beam and a focused electron beam in TEM-accelerator facilities to get insight into the concurrent irradiation effects with ionization and displacements. Various kinds of 30 or 300 keV ions (He{sup +}, O{sup +}, Mg{sup +}, Ar{sup +} and Xe{sup +}) and 200 keV or 1 MeV electrons were used to provide a wide range of nuclear (S{sub n}) and ionizing (S{sub e}) stopping powers. Dislocation loops were formed both inside and outside the electron beam at 870 K under concurrent irradiation with 30 keV ions (He{sup +}, Ar{sup +} and Xe{sup +}) and 1 MeV electrons. In the case of irradiation with 300 keV ions and 200 keV electrons, on the other hand, a preferential formation of voids or bubbles and a suppressive formation of dislocation loops were observed inside the electron beam. On the basis of these results, we pointed out the importance of the nuclear stopping power which causes the diffusion of cations toward the outside of the focused electron beam. (author)

  11. Repairing critical-sized calvarial defects with BMSCs modified by a constitutively active form of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and a phosphate cement scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Duohong; Zhang, Zhiyuan; He, Jiacai; Zhu, Siheng; Wang, Shaoyi; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhou, Jian; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Yan; Wang, Yuanyin; Han, Wei; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Shuhong; You, Sulan; Jiang, Xinquan; Huang, Yuanliang

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy represents a promising approach for bone regeneration. The Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) gene is a pivotal regulator of vascular reactivity and angiogenesis. Our recent study has showed that HIF-1α could promote osteogenesis of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) using a gene point mutant technique. To optimize the function of HIF-1α on inducing stem cells, another constitutively active form of HIF-1α (CA5) was constructed with truncation mutant method and its therapeutic potential on critical-sized bone defects was evaluated with calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC) scaffold in a rat model. BMSCs were treated with Lenti (lentivirus) -CA5, Lenti-WT (wild-type HIF-1α), and Lenti-LacZ. These genetically modified BMSCs were then combined with CMPC scaffolds to repair critical-sized calvarial defects in rats. The results showed that the overexpression of HIF-1α obviously enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of osteogenic markers in vitro and robust new bone formation with the higher local bone mineral density (BMD) was found in vivo in the CA5 and WT groups. Furthermore, CA5 showed significantly greater stability and osteogenic activity in BMSCs compared with WT. These data suggest that BMSCs transduced with truncation mutanted HIF-1α gene can promote the overexpression of osteogenic markers. CMPC could serve as a potential substrate for HIF-1α gene modified tissue engineered bone to repair critical sized bony defects.

  12. On the onset of secondary stellar generations in giant star-forming regions and massive star clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Boční II 1401, 14131 Prague (Czech Republic); Tenorio-Tagle, G. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Optica y Electrónica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-09-10

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ∼ 10{sup 4} K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ∼ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  13. Displacement cascades and defects annealing in tungsten, Part I: Defect database from molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Wahyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nandipati, Giridhar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Roche, Kenneth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Heinisch, Howard L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to generate a comprehensive database of surviving defects due to displacement cascades in bulk tungsten. Twenty-one data points of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies ranging from 100 eV (sub-threshold energy) to 100 keV (~780×Ed, where Ed = 128 eV is the average displacement threshold energy) have been completed at 300 K, 1025 K and 2050 K. Within this range of PKA energies, two regimes of power-law energy-dependence of the defect production are observed. A distinct power-law exponent characterizes the number of Frenkel pairs produced within each regime. The two regimes intersect at a transition energy which occurs at approximately 250×Ed. The transition energy also marks the onset of the formation of large self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters (size 14 or more). The observed defect clustering behavior is asymmetric, with SIA clustering increasing with temperature, while the vacancy clustering decreases. This asymmetry increases with temperature such that at 2050 K (~0.5Tm) practically no large vacancy clusters are formed, meanwhile large SIA clusters appear in all simulations. The implication of such asymmetry on the long-term defect survival and damage accumulation is discussed. In addition, <100> {110} SIA loops are observed to form directly in the highest energy cascades, while vacancy <100> loops are observed to form at the lowest temperature and highest PKA energies, although the appearance of both the vacancy and SIA loops with Burgers vector of <100> type is relatively rare.

  14. How regional museums form a museum cluster and forge its identity: Take7 Shanghai Science & Technology Museum as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    At present, there are many cases of museum clusters around the world, such as Smithsonian Insti- tution, the Guggenheim Museums and Foundation, Science Museums Group, National Museum Liverpool and so on. Through the analysis, we found that they form clusters in different ways, but they are for the same pur- pose, which is to provide multiple services for the public from the different cultural environment, and to strengthen the local cultural expression and transmission. Shanghai Science & Technology Museum is a large-scale comprehensive museum which contains three venues: a science and technology museum, a natu- ral history museum and a planetarium. Through learns the experience of the international cases for museum clusters, also explore itself museum cluster road to meet the local cultural environment.

  15. Imaging and Analysis of Void-defects in Solder Joints Formed in Reduced Gravity using High-Resolution Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.; Rotella, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    As a part of efforts to develop an electronics repair capability for long duration space missions, techniques and materials for soldering components on a circuit board in reduced gravity must be developed. This paper presents results from testing solder joint formation in low gravity on a NASA Reduced Gravity Research Aircraft. The results presented include joints formed using eutectic tin-lead solder and one of the following fluxes: (1) a no-clean flux core, (2) a rosin flux core, and (3) a solid solder wire with external liquid no-clean flux. The solder joints are analyzed with a computed tomography (CT) technique which imaged the interior of the entire solder joint. This replaced an earlier technique that required the solder joint to be destructively ground down revealing a single plane which was subsequently analyzed. The CT analysis technique is described and results presented with implications for future testing as well as implications for the overall electronics repair effort discussed.

  16. The use of nanocrystalline and two other forms of calcium sulfate in the treatment of infrabony defects: A clinical and radiographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Nymphea; Sharma, Aditi; Jain, Ashish; Bali, Deepika; Malik, Rajvir; Gugnani, Shalini

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcium sulphate(CS) is one of the oldest alloplastic graft materials used because of its biocompatibility, handling characteristics, porosity, different rates of dissolution, chemico-physical resemblance to bone mineral, ability to induce release of growth factors and potentially unlimited supply at a modest cost. Aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of 3 forms of calcium sulphate i.e. Nanogen (nCS)(+), BoneGen(+) and Dentogen(+) in treatment of infrabony defects and to compare their efficacy as bone grafting substitutes. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized, double blind controlled study was conducted on 45 sites from 16 subjects having Moderate to Advanced Periodontitis who were divided into 3 groups i.e. Group I (Nanogen), Group II (Dentogen) and Group III (BoneGen) clinical along with radiographic measurements were taken at baseline, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Results: There was no significant inter-group difference in mean clinical attachment level (CAL) values at different time intervals whereas Intra-group changes in CAL at 6 and 12 months as compared to baseline were significant statistically. In Group I, changes in CAL between 6 and 12 months were found to be statistically significant in comparison with Group II and III. Conclusion: Both Nanogen and BoneGen TR can be considered valuable options in the treatment of infra-bony periodontal defects. The faster degradation of Dentogen may negatively affect its bone regeneration potential. PMID:26644722

  17. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  18. Various Oxygen-Centered Phosphanegold(I Cluster Cations Formed by Polyoxometalate (POM-Mediated Clusterization: Effects of POMs and Phosphanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Yoshida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Novel phosphanegold(I cluster cations combined with polyoxometalate (POM anions, i.e., intercluster compounds, [(Au{P(m-FPh3}4(μ4-O]2[{(Au{P(m-FPh3}2 (μ-OH}2][α-PMo12O40]2·EtOH (1, [(Au{P(m-FPh3}4(μ4-O]2[α-SiMo12O40]·4H2O (2, [(Au{P(m-MePh3}4(μ4-O]2[α-SiM12O40] (M = W (3, Mo (4 and [{(Au {P(p-MePh3}4(μ4-O}{(Au{P(p-MePh3}3(μ3-O}][α-PW12O40] (5 were synthesized by POM-mediated clusterization, and unequivocally characterized by elemental analysis, TG/DTA, FT-IR, X-ray crystallography, solid-state CPMAS 31P NMR and solution (1H, 31P{1H} NMR. Formation of the these gold(I cluster cations was strongly dependent upon the charge density and acidity of the POMs, and the substituents and substituted positions on the aryl group of triarylphosphane ligands. These gold(I cluster cations contained various bridged-oxygen atoms such as μ4-O, μ3-O and μ-OH groups.

  19. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales.

  20. Cluster-cluster clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.

    1985-08-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references.

  1. Energetics and concentration of defects in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore at high-pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Lian, Jie; Ewing, Rodney C.

    Using first-principles calculations and complementary experiments, the defect formation energies and defect concentrations were calculated as a function of pressure. The results show that at high pressure, the defect formation energies decrease with pressure for both systems. In Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the dominant defect type is cation anti-site defect, the local structure around a defect is highly distorted, and the energetically favorable defect–defect interactions at shorter distance suggest the possibility of defect clustering. In Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, anion Frenkel-pair defects are favored at all pressures and the dominant defect type involving a cation is a coupled defect of a cation anti-site and an anion Frenkel-pair defect. There are only minor distortions around the defects, and the defect–defect interactions are weak, which suggests almost-ideal non-interacting defect formation. Comparison of experimentally observed defect concentrations and those based on the calculated defect formation energies suggests that the defects formed at high pressure are better estimated with a concentrated limit approximation, while those formed at ambient pressure can be evaluated at a dilute limit approximation.

  2. Novel form of a single X-linked visual pigment gene in a unique dichromatic color-vision defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takaaki; Kubo, Akiko; Takeuchi, Tomokazu; Gekka, Tamaki; Goto-Omoto, Satoshi; Kitahara, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In normal trichromats, the long- (L) and middle-wavelength-sensitive (M) pigment genes are arranged in a head-to-tandem array on the X chromosome. Two amino acids at positions 277 and 285, encoded by exon 5 of the L and M genes, respectively, are essential for the spectral difference between L and M pigments whose spectral peaks are at approximately 560 and 530 nm. Intragenic or intergenic unequal crossing-over commonly occurs between the highly homologous L and M genes, resulting in red-green color vision deficiencies. The dichromacy is usually associated with a single L gene for deuteranopia or a single 5' L-M 3' hybrid gene with M-gene exon 5 for protanopia. We clinically diagnosed a total of 88 male dichromats using a Nagel model I anomaloscope, which included one unclassified subject in addition to 31 protanopes and 56 deuteranopes. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of the subject and to determine the genotype of his X-linked pigment genes. The subject accepted not only any red-green mixture but also an extended yellow-scale range at each matching point (i.e. 20 to 32 scale units at the green primary and 3.5 to 6 scale units at the red primary). The slopes of regression lines were in the range of -0.34 to -0.23, while the mean slopes for the protanopes and deuteranopes were -0.38 and -0.01, respectively. Spectral sensitivity tests showed that the subject's curve was shifted between the protanope and deuteranope curves. Molecular analysis revealed a novel form of a single pigment gene with a unique arrangement of exon 5 (Y277 from the L gene and A285 from the M gene). The predicted lambdamax (541 to 546 nm) of the unique pigment was closer to the M than to the L pigment. Our outcome suggests that intragenic unequal crossing-over may have occurred between amino acid positions 279 and 283.

  3. Importance of clustered 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) residues for the gene targeting activity of triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2004-02-10

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in living mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-linked TFOs with 2'-O-methyl and 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) (2'-AE) substitutions that are active in a gene knockout assay in cultured cells. The assay is based on mutagenesis by psoralen, a photoactive DNA cross-linker. Previous work showed that TFOs with three or four 2'-AE residues were disproportionately more active than those with one or two substitutions. Here we demonstrate that for optimal bioactivity the 2'-AE residues must be clustered rather than dispersed. We have further characterized bioactive and inactive TFOs in an effort to identify biochemical and biophysical correlates of biological activity. While thermal stability is a standard monitor of TFO biophysical activity, we find that T(m) values do not distinguish bioactive and inactive TFOs. In contrast, measurements of TFO association rates appear to correlate well with bioactivity, in that triplex formation occurs disproportionately faster with the TFOs containing three or four 2'-AE residues. We asked if extending the incubation time prior to photoactivation would enhance the bioactivity of a TFO with a slow on rate relative to the TFO with a faster association rate. However, there was no change in bioactivity differential. These results are compatible with a model in which TFO binding in vivo is followed by relatively rapid elution by cellular functions, similar to that described for transcription factors. Under these circumstances, TFOs with faster on rates would be favored because they would be more likely to be in triplexes at the time of photoactivation.

  4. The complete genomes of subgenotype IA hepatitis A virus strains from four different islands in Indonesia form a phylogenetic cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyanto; Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman; Suparyatmo, Joseph Benedictus; Amirudin, Rifai; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Despite the high endemicity of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Indonesia, genetic information on those HAV strains is limited. Serum samples obtained from 76 individuals during outbreaks of hepatitis A in Jember (East Java) in 2006 and Tangerang (West Java) in 2007 and those from 82 patients with acute hepatitis in Solo (Central Java), Denpasar on Bali Island, Mataram on Lombok Island, and Makassar on Sulawesi Island in 2003 or 2007 were tested for the presence of HAV RNA by reverse transcription PCR with primers targeting the VP1-2B region (481 nucleotides, primer sequences at both ends excluded). Overall, 34 serum samples had detectable HAV RNA, including at least one viremic sample from each of the six regions. These 34 strains were 96.3-100 % identical to each other and formed a phylogenetic cluster within genotype IA. Six representative HAV isolates from each region shared 98.3-98.9 % identity over the entire genome and constituted a IA sublineage with a bootstrap value of 100 %, consisting of only Indonesian strains. HAV strains recovered from Japanese patients who were presumed to have contracted HAV infection while visiting Indonesia were closest to the Indonesian IA HAV strains obtained in the present study, with a high identity of 99.5-99.7 %, supporting the Indonesian origin of the imported strains. These results indicate that genetic analysis of HAV strains indigenous to HAV-endemic countries, including Indonesia, are useful for tracing infectious sources in imported cases of acute hepatitis A and for defining the epidemiological features of HAV infection in that country.

  5. Acetylene hydrogenation on anatase TiO2(101) supported Pd4 cluster: oxygen deficiency effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Cao, Li-Xin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2012-07-01

    Acetylene hydrogenation on both the perfect and oxygen defective anatase TiO(2)(101) surfaces supported Pd(4) cluster has been studied using density functional theory calculations with a Hubbard U correction (DFT + U). The adsorbed Pd(4) cluster on the perfect surface prefers to form a tetrahedral structure, while it likely moves to the oxygen defective site to form a distorted tetrahedral structure by removing a bridging oxygen atom. For the defective surface, it exhibits a stronger ability to capture Pd(4) cluster as charge transfer is significantly performed due to the oxygen deficiency. Moreover, it is found that the oxygen defective surface shows higher activity for acetylene hydrogenation, and the possible reason may lie in the weaker adsorption strength between the Pd cluster and the adsorbed molecules on the defective surface as compared to the case on the perfect surface.

  6. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Bayliss, M; Allen, S W; Applegate, D E; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chiu, I; Desai, S; Gonzalez, A H; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Holzapfel, W L; Marrone, D P; Miller, E D; Reichardt, C L; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Schrabback, T; Stanford, S A; Stark, A A; Vieira, J D; Zenteno, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster, based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O II] emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available, finding 7 systems with SFR > 100 Msun/yr. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 Msun/yr in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 1, this fraction increases to 92(+6)(-31)%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific star formation rate in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z > 0.6, the correlation between cluster central entropy and BCG star formation - which is well established at z ~ 0 - i...

  7. Excess Secretion of Gel-Forming Mucins and Associated Innate Defense Proteins with Defective Mucin Un-Packaging Underpin Gallbladder Mucocele Formation in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesimer, Mehmet; Cullen, John; Cao, Rui; Radicioni, Giorgia; Mathews, Kyle G; Seiler, Gabriela; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal protection of the gallbladder is vital yet we know very little about the mechanisms involved. In domestic dogs, an emergent syndrome referred to as gallbladder mucocele formation is characterized by excessive secretion of abnormal mucus that results in obstruction and rupture of the gallbladder. The cause of gallbladder mucocele formation is unknown. In these first mechanistic studies of this disease, we investigated normal and mucocele-forming dog gallbladders to determine the source, identity, biophysical properties, and protein associates of the culprit mucins with aim to identify causes for abnormal mucus behavior. We established that mucocele formation involves an adoptive excess secretion of gel forming mucins with abnormal properties by the gallbladder epithelium. The mucus is characterized by a disproportionally significant increase in Muc5ac relative to Muc5b, defective mucin un-packaging, and mucin-interacting innate defense proteins that are capable of dramatically altering the physical and functional properties of mucus. These findings provide an explanation for abnormal mucus behavior and based on similarity to mucus observed in the airways of people with cystic fibrosis, suggest that abnormal mechanisms for maintenance of gallbladder epithelial hydration may be an instigating factor for mucocele formation in dogs.

  8. Probing the Dragonfish star-forming complex: the ionizing population of the young massive cluster Mercer 30

    CERN Document Server

    de la Fuente, D; Borissova, J; Alegría, S Ramírez; Hanson, M M; Trombley, C; Figer, D F; Davies, B; Garcia, M; Kurtev, R; Urbaneja, M A; Smith, L C; Lucas, P W; Herrero, A

    2016-01-01

    The Dragonfish Nebula has been recently claimed to be powered by a superluminous but elusive OB association. Instead, systematic searches in near-infrared photometric surveys have found many other cluster candidates on this sky region. Among these, the first confirmed young massive cluster was Mercer 30, where Wolf-Rayet stars were found. We perform a new characterization of Mercer 30 with unprecedented accuracy, combining NICMOS/HST and VVV photometric data with multi-epoch ISAAC/VLT H- and K-band spectra. Stellar parameters for most of spectroscopically observed cluster members are found through precise non-LTE atmosphere modeling with the CMFGEN code. Our spectrophotometric study for this cluster yields a new, revised distance of d = (12.4 +- 1.7) kpc and a total of Q = 6.70 x 10^50 Lyman ionizing photons. A cluster age of (4.0 +- 0.8) Myr is found through isochrone fitting, and a total mass of (1.6 +- 0.6) x 10^4 Msol is estimated thanks to our extensive knowledge of the post-main-sequence population. As ...

  9. Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Ancillary Pilin Subunit of the Streptococcus suis srtF Cluster Result in Pili Formed by the Major Subunit Only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittipaldi, Nahuel; Takamatsu, Daisuke; la Cruz Domínguez-Punaro, María de; Lecours, Marie-Pier; Montpetit, Diane; Osaki, Makoto; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Pili have been shown to contribute to the virulence of different Gram-positive pathogenic species. Among other critical steps of bacterial pathogenesis, these structures participate in adherence to host cells, colonization and systemic virulence. Recently, the presence of at least four discrete gene clusters encoding putative pili has been revealed in the major swine pathogen and emerging zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis. However, pili production by this species has not yet been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated the functionality of one of these pili clusters, known as the srtF pilus cluster, by the construction of mutant strains for each of the four genes of the cluster as well as by the generation of antibodies against the putative pilin subunits. Results revealed that the S. suis serotype 2 strain P1/7, as well as several other highly virulent invasive S. suis serotype 2 isolates express pili from this cluster. However, in most cases tested, and as a result of nonsense mutations at the 5′ end of the gene encoding the minor pilin subunit (a putative adhesin), pili were formed by the major pilin subunit only. We then evaluated the role these pili play in S. suis virulence. Abolishment of the expression of srtF cluster-encoded pili did not result in impaired interactions of S. suis with porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, non-piliated mutants were as virulent as the wild type strain when evaluated in a murine model of S. suis sepsis. Our results show that srtF cluster-encoded, S. suis pili are atypical compared to other Gram-positive pili. In addition, since the highly virulent strains under investigation are unlikely to produce other pili, our results suggest that pili might be dispensable for critical steps of the S. suis pathogenesis of infection. PMID:20052283

  10. Clustering effects and decay analysis of the light-mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems formed in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, BirBikram; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the clustering effects in light mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems *20Ne, *28Si, *40Ca and Ne,22*21, *39K, respectively, formed in low-energy heavy ion reactions at different excitation energies, within the collective clusterization approach of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and collaborators based on quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT). Considering quadrupole deformed and compact orientated nuclei, a comparative decay analysis of these systems has been undertaken for the emission of different intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) or clusters, specifically the IMFs having Z =3 , 4, and 5 (or Z =7 , 6, and 5 complimentary fragments from the *20Ne and Ne,22*21 composite systems) which are having the experimental data available for their Z distribution. Quite interestingly, the QMFT supports clustering in N =Z (*20Ne and *28Si) and N ≠Z (*21Ne and *22Ne) nuclear systems at excitation energies corresponding to their respective decay threshold or resonant-state energies for the 4 α , 16O cluster and non-α cluster 14C (more so in *22NeN ≠Z composite system), supported by the Ikeda diagrams, taking into account the proper pairing strength in the temperature-dependent liquid drop energies. Within the DCM, we notice that at higher excitation energies in addition to x α -type (where x is an integer) clusters from N =Z composite systems and x n -x α -type clusters from N ≠Z composite systems, n p -x α -type clusters are relatively quite dominant, with larger preformation probability due to the decreased pairing strength at higher temperatures in the liquid drop energies. Also, the study reveals the presence of competing reaction mechanisms of compound nucleus (fusion-fission, FF) and of noncompound nucleus origin (deep inelastic orbiting, DIO) in the decay of very-light-mass composite systems *20,21,22Ne and *28Si at different excitation energies. The DIO contribution in the IMF cross section σIMF is extracted for these

  11. Highly-defective nanocrystals of ZnS formed via dissimilatory bacterial sulfate reduction: A comparative study with their abiogenic analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Roco, Charles M.; Veeramani, Harish; Michel, F. Marc; Rimstidt, J. Donald; Winkler, Christopher; Hochella, Michael F.

    2016-05-01

    The physicochemical properties of a (nano)mineral are strongly affected by its formation processes, and thus, may indicate the (nano)mineral's formation environment and mechanism. This correlation, although relevant to a myriad of geological, environmental, and material-science processes, has not yet been fully appreciated and systematically explored. Here, using the Zn-S system, we demonstrate that biological and abiotic processes at similar experimental conditions can produce distinctive particle size, morphology, and crystal structure in the formed ZnS. Specifically, bacterial sulfate reduction led to the formation of highly-defective nanocrystals of mixed sphalerite and wurtzite in a range of ∼4-12 nm. By comparison, the abiotic procedures of titration- or diffusion-controlled precipitation resulted in the formation of polycrystalline aggregates that contained randomly-oriented, ultrafine crystals below ∼2-3 nm. The poor crystallinity in the abiogenic samples, regardless of the sulfide addition rates, reveals an overall nucleation-dominated, crystal growth-restricted pathway for the formation of ZnS from low-temperature aqueous solutions. The difficulty in the ZnS crystallization likely stems from the intrinsic surface instability of the ZnS growth units (i.e., in the form of nanoclusters) resulting from the dipole-dipole interactions of the unit with surrounding water molecules. In the biogenic samples, the ZnS crystallinity was significantly improved, indicating that the presence of bacterial metabolites somehow promoted the crystallization process. With evidence for the enlarged {1 1 1} planes in the biogenic nanocrystals, we attribute this enhancement mainly to the selective interaction of the bacterial metabolites with polar faces of the ZnS growth units, which might have effectively screened the dipole moments in the growth units and enabled their crystallographic assembly. By revealing the intrinsic difficulty and specific pathways for the Zn

  12. Cluster emission in superdeformed Sr isotopes in the ground state and formed in heavy-ion reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Santhosh; Antony Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Cluster decay of superdeformed 76,78,80Sr isotopes in their ground state are studied taking the Coulomb and proximity potential as the interacting barrier for the post-scission region. The predicted 1/2 values are found to be in close agreement with those values reported by the preformed cluster model (PCM). Our calculation shows that these nuclei are stable against both light and heavy cluster emissions. We studied the decay of these nuclei produced as an excited compound system in heavy-ion reaction. It is found that inclusion of excitation energy increases the decay rate (decreases 1/2 value) considerably and these nuclei become unstable against decay. These findings support earlier observation of Gupta et al based on PCM.

  13. The entire β-globin gene cluster is deleted in a form of τδβ-thalassemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Fearon; H.H.Jr. Kazazian; P.G. Waber (Pamela); J.I. Lee (Joseph); S.E. Antonarakis; S.H. Orkin (Stuart); E.F. Vanin; P.S. Henthorn; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.F. Scott; G.R. Buchanan

    1983-01-01

    textabstractWe have used restriction endonuclease mapping to study a deletion involving the beta-globin gene cluster in a Mexican-American family with gamma delta beta-thalassemia. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms demonstrated deletion of the beta-globin gene from the affected chromosome. Using a DNA

  14. The entire β-globin gene cluster is deleted in a form of τδβ-thalassemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Fearon; H.H.Jr. Kazazian; P.G. Waber (Pamela); J.I. Lee (Joseph); S.E. Antonarakis; S.H. Orkin (Stuart); E.F. Vanin; P.S. Henthorn; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.F. Scott; G.R. Buchanan

    1983-01-01

    textabstractWe have used restriction endonuclease mapping to study a deletion involving the beta-globin gene cluster in a Mexican-American family with gamma delta beta-thalassemia. Analysis of DNA polymorphisms demonstrated deletion of the beta-globin gene from the affected chromosome. Using a DNA f

  15. In vitro and in vivo studies on the thin and defect-free calcium phosphate films formed by electron-beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.H.; Kwon, S.H.; Hong, S.H.; Kim, H.E.; Lee, I.S. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea). School of Materials Science and Engineering; Jung, Y.C. [Yonsei Univ. (Korea). Coll. of Dentistry

    2001-07-01

    The thin and defect-free calcium phosphate film deposited to a thickness of 1 {mu}m by electron beam evaporation was characterized in vivo and in vitro. For the in vivo study, as-machined, as-blasted, and calcium phosphate coating on machined surface of commercially pure titanium screw implants were inserted in the rabbit tibiae. Twelve screws of each condition were implanted, and the total of 144 implants were evaluated. The various Ca/P ratios of calcium phosphate films were formed by e-beam evaporation without simultaneous Ar ion bombardment. The as-deposited films had the average bonding strengths of 64.8 MPa to metal implant and different dissolution rates with the Ca/P ratio. After a healing period of 12-week, at the day of sacrifice, the implants were unscrewed with a torque gauge instrument. The coated sample showed the highest removal torque in both normal and ovariectomized group indicating direct chemical bond with bone tissues. (orig.)

  16. Use of density functional theory method to calculate structures of neutral carbon clusters Cn (3 ≤ n ≤ 24) and study their variability of structural forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, T W; Lai, S K

    2015-02-28

    In this work, we present modifications to the well-known basin hopping (BH) optimization algorithm [D. J. Wales and J. P. Doye, J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5111 (1997)] by incorporating in it the unique and specific nature of interactions among valence electrons and ions in carbon atoms through calculating the cluster's total energy by the density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory, using it to find the lowest energy structures of carbon clusters and, from these optimized atomic and electronic structures, studying their varied forms of topological transitions, which include a linear chain, a monocyclic to a polycyclic ring, and a fullerene/cage-like geometry. In this modified BH (MBH) algorithm, we define a spatial volume within which the cluster's lowest energy structure is to be searched, and introduce in addition a cut-and-splice genetic operator to increase the searching performance of the energy minimum than the original BH technique. The present MBH/DFTB algorithm is, therefore, characteristically distinguishable from the original BH technique commonly applied to nonmetallic and metallic clusters, technically more thorough and natural in describing the intricate couplings between valence electrons and ions in a carbon cluster, and thus theoretically sound in putting these two charged components on an equal footing. The proposed modified minimization algorithm should be more appropriate, accurate, and precise in the description of a carbon cluster. We evaluate the present algorithm, its energy-minimum searching in particular, by its optimization robustness. Specifically, we first check the MBH/DFTB technique for two representative carbon clusters of larger size, i.e., C60 and C72 against the popular cut-and-splice approach [D. M. Deaven and K. M. Ho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 288 (1995)] that normally is combined with the genetic algorithm method for finding the cluster's energy minimum, before employing it to investigate carbon clusters in the size range C3-C24

  17. Impact of isovalent doping on the formation of the CiOi(SiI)n defects in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, S.-R. G.; Sgourou, E. N.; Vovk, R. V.; Chroneos, A.; Londos, C. A.

    2017-09-01

    It has been determined that carbon-oxygen-self-interstitial defects in silicon (Si) can influence the operation of devices through the concentration of intrinsic point defects. Doping with larger isovalent dopants such as germanium (Ge) and tin (Sn) can impact the formation, energetics and structure of defect clusters in Si. In the present study we use density functional theory calculations to gain insights on the formation and stability of the CiOi(SiI)n (n = 0, 1, 2) defects in Si doped with Ge or Sn. It is calculated that the CiOi(SiI)n defects will preferentially form away from the oversized dopants. This result for the interstitial clusters is opposite to what is expected for vacancy-containing clusters which strongly associate with oversized dopants.

  18. Profound defects in pupillary responses to light in TRPM-channel null mice: a role for TRPM channels in non-image-forming photoreception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven; Pothecary, Carina A; Jagannath, Aarti; Foster, Russell G; Hankins, Mark W; Peirson, Stuart N

    2012-01-01

    TRPM1 is a spontaneously active non-selective cation channel that has recently been shown to play an important role in the depolarizing light responses of ON bipolar cells. Consistent with this role, mutations in the TRPM1 gene have been identified as a principal cause of congenital stationary night blindness. However, previous microarray studies have shown that Trpm1 and Trpm3 are acutely regulated by light in the eyes of mice lacking rods and cones (rd/rd cl), a finding consistent with a role in non-image-forming photoreception. In this study we show that pupillary light responses are significantly attenuated in both Trpm1(-/-) and Trpm3(-/-) animals. Trpm1(-/-) mice exhibit a profound deficit in the pupillary response that is far in excess of that observed in mice lacking rods and cones (rd/rd cl) or melanopsin, and cannot be explained by defects in bipolar cell function alone. Immunolocalization studies suggest that TRPM1 is expressed in ON bipolar cells and also a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer, including melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs). We conclude that, in addition to its role in bipolar cell signalling, TRPM1 is involved in non-image-forming responses to light and may perform a functional role within pRGCs. By contrast, TRPM3(-/-) mice display a more subtle pupillary phenotype with attenuated responses under bright light and dim light conditions. Expression of TRPM3 is detected in Muller cells and the ciliary body but is absent from pRGCs, and thus our data support an indirect role for TRPM3 in pupillary light responses.

  19. Defective Proteolytic Processing of Fibrillar Procollagens and Prodecorin Due to Biallelic BMP1 Mutations Results in a Severe, Progressive Form of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syx, Delfien; Guillemyn, Brecht; Symoens, Sofie; Sousa, Ana Berta; Medeira, Ana; Whiteford, Margo; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Coucke, Paul J; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska

    2015-08-01

    Whereas the vast majority of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by autosomal dominant defects in the genes encoding type I procollagen, mutations in a myriad of genes affecting type I procollagen biosynthesis or bone formation and homeostasis have now been associated with rare autosomal recessive OI forms. Recently, homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in BMP1, encoding the metalloproteases bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP1) and its longer isoform mammalian Tolloid (mTLD), were identified in 5 children with a severe autosomal recessive form of OI and in 4 individuals with mild to moderate bone fragility. BMP1/mTLD functions as the procollagen carboxy-(C)-proteinase for types I to III procollagen but was also suggested to participate in amino-(N)-propeptide cleavage of types V and XI procollagens and in proteolytic trimming of other extracellular matrix (ECM) substrates. We report the phenotypic characteristics and natural history of 4 adults with severe, progressive OI characterized by numerous fractures, short stature with rhizomelic shortening, and deformity of the limbs and variable kyphoscoliosis, in whom we identified novel biallelic missense and frameshift mutations in BMP1. We show that BMP1/mTLD-deficiency in humans not only results in delayed cleavage of the type I procollagen C-propeptide but also hampers the processing of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan prodecorin, a regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. Immunofluorescent staining of types I and V collagen and transmission electron microscopy of the dermis show impaired assembly of heterotypic type I/V collagen fibrils in the ECM. Our study thus highlights the severe and progressive nature of BMP1-associated OI in adults and broadens insights into the functional consequences of BMP1/mTLD-deficiency on ECM organization.

  20. Dynamical Evolution of Globular Cluster Systems formed in Galaxy Mergers: Deep HST/ACS Imaging of Old and Intermediate-Age Globular Clusters in NGC 3610

    CERN Document Server

    Goudfrooij, P; Gilmore, D; Whitmore, B C; Goudfrooij, Paul; Schweizer, Francois; Gilmore, Diane; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    2007-01-01

    (ABRIDGED) The ACS camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain deep images of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 3610, a well-established dissipative galaxy merger remnant. These observations supersede previous WFPC2 images which revealed the presence of a population of metal-rich globular clusters (GCs) of intermediate age (~1.5-4 Gyr). We detect a total of 580 GC candidates, 46% more than from the previous WFPC2 images. The new photometry strengthens the significance of the previously found bimodality of the color distribution of GCs. Peak colors in V-I are 0.93 +/-0.01 and 1.09 +/- 0.01 for the blue and red subpopulations, respectively. The luminosity function (LF) of the inner 50% of the metal-rich (`red') population of GCs differs markedly from that of the outer 50%. In particular, the LF of the inner 50% of the red GCs shows a flattening consistent with a turnover that is about 1.0 mag fainter than the turnover of the blue GC LF. This is consistent with predictions of recent models o...

  1. Hydrogen-bonded clusters of 1, 1'-ferrocenedicarboxylic acid on Au(111) are initially formed in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C; Wasio, Natalie A; Brown, Ryan D; Christie, John A; Henderson, Kenneth W; Forrest, Ryan P; Lent, Craig S; Corcelli, Steven A; Kandel, S Alex

    2015-03-14

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy is used to observe self-assembled structures of ferrocenedicarboxylic acid (Fc(COOH)2) on the Au(111) surface. The surface is prepared by pulse-deposition of Fc(COOH)2 dissolved in methanol, and the solvent is evaporated before imaging. While the rows of hydrogen-bonded dimers that are common for carboxylic acid species are observed, the majority of adsorbed Fc(COOH)2 is instead found in six-molecule clusters with a well-defined and chiral geometry. The coverage and distribution of these clusters are consistent with a random sequential adsorption model, showing that solution-phase species are determinative of adsorbate distribution for this system under these reaction conditions.

  2. Cu, Pu and Fe high T{sub c} superconductors: Spin holes in anti-ferromagnetic clusters form nonmagnetic bipolarons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, Peter, E-mail: wachter@solid.phys.ethz.c [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-03-15

    The new iron based high T{sub c} superconductors with T{sub c} up to 55 K have stirred new interest in this field. It is consensus that the BCS mechanism is not able to explain the high T{sub c}'s. In the following we propose that spin holes in anti-ferromagnetic clusters combine to make nonmagnetic bipolarons, which can condense and lead to superconductivity.

  3. Irradiation induced defects in deformed $Ni_{3}Ge$ and $Ni_{3}Al$ single crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Murakumo, T; Miyahara, A; Hannuki, T; Sato, A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of plastic deformation on the formation of point defects and defect clusters by electron irradiation has been studied in Ll /sub 2/ ordered Ni/sub 3/Ge and Ni/sub 3/Al by high voltage electron microscopy. It is found that defects are formed preferentially along the Burgers vector directions as linear lines and grow into linear chains of clusters by electron irradiation. This phenomenon is explained by preferential generation of the defects along the antiphase boundary (APE) tubes, in specimens deformed both below and above the peak temperature T/sub p/. Based on three-dimensional analyses of the defect distribution, the formation mechanism of the APE tubes is discussed with particular reference to superdislocation motion and the strengthening of the Ll/sub 2/ ordered compounds of Ni /sub 3/Ge and Ni/sub 3/Al. (44 refs).

  4. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbelin Julia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation.

  5. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  6. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Mapolelo, D; Dingra, N; Naik, S; Lees, N; Hoffman, B; Riggs-Gelasco, P; Huynh, B; Johnson, M; Outten, C

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However, the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in Escherichia coli. We have shown that coexpression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+} cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV?visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, M{umlt o}ssbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast.

  7. Effect Analysis and Forming of Plywood Industry Clusters in China%胶合板产业集群的成因与效应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕柳; 卢晓宁; 温作民

    2011-01-01

    基于马歇尔的外部经济理论和波特的"钻石"模型,对影响胶合板产业集群的成因进行系统分析,揭示中国的四大胶合板产业集群基本是在市场自发和政府引导双重因素作用下发展起来的,其特征是以集聚区工段的深度分解为基础,辅助工段走向独立,实现胶合板分工的高度专业化.分析我国胶合板产业集聚区普遍存在的"两端不稳定"现象,提出完善产业集聚区"根植性"、"共生性"和"互动性"的若干对策建议.%It is helpful of finding the regular of development of China plywood industry on the industrial cluster study as the most of plywood products are from industrial cluster area in China. Base on Marshall' s external economic theory and Porter's "diamond" model of industrial clusters and on systematic analysis to their forming factors in the article, their forming regular was discovered that the cause of four large plywood cluster was basically action of market spontaneity and government guidance, which characteristics was decomposition of producing section, independent of accessorial section,and specialized products mix. The phenomenon of two instability ends ( veneer end and panel end) during producing was found and several suggestions were put forward.

  8. The 3D-tomography of the nano-clusters formed by Fe-coating and annealing of diamond films for enhancing their surface electron field emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang-Chin Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fe-coating and H2-annealed processes markedly increased the conductivity and enhanced the surface electron field emission (s-EFE properties for the diamond films. The enhancement on the s-EFE properties for the diamond films is presumably owing to the formation of nano-graphite clusters on the surface of the films via the Fe-to-diamond interaction. However, the extent of enhancement varied with the granular structure of the diamond films. For the microcrystalline (MCD films, the s-EFE process can be turned on at (E0MCD = 1.9 V/μm, achieving a large s-EFE current density of (JeMCD = 315 μA/cm2 at an applied field of 8.8 V/μm. These s-EFE properties are markedly better than those for Fe-coated/annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD films with (E0UNCD = 2.0 V/μm and (JeUNCD = 120 μA/cm2. The transmission electron microscopy showed that the nano-graphite clusters formed an interconnected network for MCD films that facilitated the electron transport more markedly, as compared with the isolated nano-graphitic clusters formed at the surface of the UNCD films. Therefore, the Fe-coating/annealing processes improved the s-EFE properties for the MCD films more markedly than that for the UNCD films. The understanding on the distribution of the nano-clusters is of critical importance in elucidating the authentic factor that influences the s-EFE properties of the diamond films. Such an understanding is possible only through the 3D-tomographic investigations.

  9. Deep observations of CO line emission from star-forming galaxies in a cluster candidate at z=1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, M; Salvato, M; Tanaka, M; Lentati, L; Schinnerer, E; Walter, F; Riechers, D; Smolcic, V; Capak, P; Aussel, H; Bertoldi, F; Chapman, S C; Farrah, D; Finoguenov, A; Floc'h, E Le; Lutz, D; Magdis, G; Oliver, S; Riguccini, L; Berta, S; Magnelli, B; Pozzi, F

    2012-01-01

    We report results from a deep Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) search for CO 1-0 line emission from galaxies in a candidate galaxy cluster at z~1.55 in the COSMOS field. We target 4 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the range z=1.47-1.59. Two of these 4 galaxies, ID51613 and ID51813, are nominally detected in CO line emission at the 3-4 sigma level. We find CO luminosities of 2.4x10^10 K km/s pc^2 and 1.3x10^10 K km/s pc^2, respectively. Taking advantage from the clustering and 2-GHz bandwidth of the JVLA, we perform a search for emission lines in the proximity of optical sources within the field of view of our observations. We limit our search to galaxies with K4 sigma) in the data cube, which we identify with the CO line emission. To test the reliability of the line peaks found, we performed a parallel search for line peaks using a Bayesian inference method. Monte Carlo simulations show that such associations are statistically significant, with probabilities of chance association of 3.5% and 10...

  10. Imaging defects and dopants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Philipp Ebert

    2003-06-01

    With the invention of the transistor, a revolution in the development of semiconductor-based electronic devices began. However, even in the very early stages, the importance of defects and dopant atoms became obvious. In fact, if one incorporates the right defects and dopant atoms into semiconductor materials, one can tune their electrical properties such that optimal device characteristics are achieved. Unfortunately, counteractive defects are often also formed unintentionally during semiconductor processing, leading to unfavorable electronic properties. Considerable research efforts have, therefore, focused on understanding the nanoscale physics that governs the formation of point defects, the incorporation behavior of impurities, and their respective electronic properties.

  11. Discovery of Infalling Motion with Rotation of the Cluster-forming Clump S235AB and Its Implication to the Clump Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of infalling motion with the rotation of S235AB, a massive cluster-forming clump (˜ 1× {10}3 {M}⊙ ) in the S235 region. Our C18O observations with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory have revealed an elliptical shape of the clump. A position-velocity diagram taken along its major axis exhibits two well-defined peaks symmetrically located, with respect to the clump center. This is similar to that found for a dynamically infalling envelope with rotation around a single protostar, modeled by N. Ohashi et al., indicating that the cluster-forming clump is also collapsing by the self-gravity toward the clump center. With analogue to Ohashi et al.'s model, we made a simple model of an infalling, rotating clump to fit the observed data. Based on the inferred model parameters, as well as results of earlier observations and simulations in the literature, we discuss the structures of the clump such as the relation among the global mass infall rate (˜ 1× {10}-3 {M}⊙ yr-1), formation of a compact core (with a mass and size of ˜4 {M}⊙ and ≲ 0.1 pc) at the center, and a massive star (˜11 {M}⊙ ) forming in the core.

  12. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  13. Responsiveness of the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form in comparison to the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, modified Cincinnati Knee Rating System, and Short Form 36 in patients with focal articular cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Nicholas J; Anderson, Allen F; Mann, Barton J; Cole, Brian J; Farr, Jack; Nissen, Carl W; Irrgang, James J

    2010-05-01

    The International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC SKF) is a patient-reported knee-specific outcome measure that has been shown to be a reliable, valid, and responsive measure for patients with a variety of knee conditions. Further testing is required to compare the reliability and responsiveness of the IKDC SKF to other commonly used patient-reported outcome measures for patients with articular cartilage lesions. The IKDC SKF has equal or better levels of reliability and responsiveness than the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), modified Cincinnati Knee Rating System (CKRS), and the Short Form 36 in patients with articular cartilage lesions. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Reliability was assessed by administering the 4 patient-reported outcome measures to 17 individuals who had undergone articular cartilage surgery 5 years before participation in this study. Responsiveness was determined by administering the 4 patient-reported outcome measures to 51 individuals with diagnosed focal articular cartilage defects who were scheduled to undergo surgical treatment. In both groups, the outcome measures were administered at baseline and at 6 and 12 months' follow-up. Participants also provided a global rating of change in comparison to baseline at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Test-retest reliability coefficients were 0.91 and 0.93 for the IKDC SKF at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. The effect sizes and standardized response means were large (>0.80) at 6 months after surgery for the WOMAC pain, physical function, and total scores and 12 months after surgery for the IKDC SKF; WOMAC pain, physical function, and total; and CKRS scores. Six months after surgery, significant differences between those who were improved compared with those who were unchanged or worse were found only for the IKDC SKF. Twelve months after surgery, significant differences between the improved and unchanged

  14. A novel type of developmental dentin defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinmaa, P L; Waltimo, J; Hölttä, P; Risteli, L; Risteli, J; Alaluusua, S

    1996-01-01

    We describe a developmental dentin disorder distinct from dentin defects characterized thus far. The proband was a 9-year-old boy who was the only family member known to be affected in five generations. The dental defect was not associated with any general disease or developmental disorder. The teeth appeared normal with the exception of the pink hue seen in some primary teeth. Radiographs showed pathological resorption of primary teeth and abnormally shaped pulp chambers and denticles in permanent teeth. Root canals were wide in developing teeth, but appeared thin in erupted teeth. Histological examination of two primary molars revealed canal-like defects in dentin. In the crown, the canals appeared as clusters, which alternated with columns of normal tubular dentin, and in the virtually atubular root dentin they were haphazardly distributed. Scanning electron microscopic examination confirmed the distribution pattern of the canals. In transmission electron microscopy, the defects were found to contain symmetrically banded, segmental collagenous structures. The canal contents immunostained with antibodies to the N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, suggesting retention of the propeptide extension in type I collagen. Whereas type III collagen reactivity was barely detectable in the canal region, staining for type V collagen and the non-fibril-forming type VI collagen was strong. The findings imply that the pathogenesis of the defect could be related to a local failure of odontoblasts to produce normal dentin matrix.

  15. Molecular Gas in the Inner 500 pc of the Milky Way: Violating Star Formation Relations and on the Verge of Forming Extreme Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmore, Steven N.

    With the HOPS, MALT90 and HiGAL Galactic plane surveys we are mapping a significant fraction of the dense, star-forming, molecular gas in the Galaxy. I present results from two projects based on this combined dataset, namely, (i) looking for variations in the star formation (SF) rate across the Galaxy as a function of environment, and (ii) searching for molecular cloud progenitors of the most extreme (massive and dense) stellar clusters. We find the SF rate per unit mass of dense gas in the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy is at least an order of magnitude lower than that in the disk, directly challenging the predictions of proposed universal column/volume density relations. In particular, the region 1∘ b | Orion-like clusters—but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. I present follow up studies of one molecular cloud we have studied as part of project (ii) which also lies in the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy and is clearly extreme compared to the rest of the Galactic population. With a mass of 105 Msun, a radius of only ˜ 3 pc and almost no signs of star formation it appears to be the progenitor of an Arches-like stellar cluster. Despite detailed observational follow-up searches, this object still appears to be unique in the Galaxy, making it extremely important for testing massive cluster formation models.

  16. Molecular gas in the inner 500pc of the MilkyWay: violating star formation relations and on the verge of forming extreme stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Longmore, Steven N

    2012-01-01

    With the HOPS, MALT90 and HiGAL Galactic plane surveys we are mapping a significant fraction of the dense, star-forming, molecular gas in the Galaxy. I present results from two projects based on this combined dataset, namely, (i) looking for variations in the star formation (SF) rate across the Galaxy as a function of environment, and (ii) searching for molecular cloud progenitors of the most extreme (massive and dense) stellar clusters. We find the SF rate per unit mass of dense gas in the inner 500pc of the Galaxy is at least an order of magnitude lower than that in the disk, directly challenging the predictions of proposed universal column/volume density relations. In particular, the region 1 degrees < l < 3.5 degrees, |b| < 0.5 degrees contains ~1E7 Msun of dense molecular gas -- enough to form 1000 Orion-like clusters -- but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. I present follow up studies of one molecular cloud we have studied as part of projec...

  17. Discovery of Infalling Motion with Rotation of the Cluster-Forming Clump S235AB and Its Implication to the Clump Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of infalling motion with rotation of S235AB the massive cluster-forming clump (~10^3 Mo) in the S235 region. Our C18O observations with the 45m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory have revealed the elliptical shape of the clump. Position-velocity (PV) diagram taken along its major axis exhibits two well-defined peaks symmetrically located with respect to the clump center, which is similar to that found for a dynamically infalling envelope with rotation around a single protostar modeled by N. Ohashi and his collaborators, indicating that the cluster-forming clump is also collapsing by the self-gravity toward the clump center. With analogue to Ohashi's model, we made a simple model of an infalling, rotating clump to fit the observed data. Based on the inferred model parameters as well as results of earlier observations and simulations in the literature, we discuss structures of the clump such as the relation among the global mass infall rate (~10^-3 Mo/yr), formation of a compact...

  18. Subsurface defects structural evolution in nano-cutting of single crystal copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quanlong [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Bai, Qingshun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Jiaxuan, E-mail: wangquanlong0@hit.edu.cn [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Yazhou [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Guo, Yongbo [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liang, Yingchun [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • An innovative analysis method is adopted to analyze nano-cutting process accurately. • A characteristic SFT and stair-rod dislocation are found in subsurface defect layer. • The formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated. • The local atomic structure of subsurface defects is introduced. - Abstract: In this work, molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the subsurface defects structural distribution and its evolution during nano-cutting process of single crystal copper. The formation mechanism of chip and machined surface is interviewed by analyzing the dislocation evolution and atomic migration. The centro-symmetry parameter and spherical harmonics method are adopted to characterize the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures and local atomic structures. The results show that stacking faults, dislocation loops, “V-shaped” dislocation loops, and plenty of point defects are formed during the machined surface being formed in shear-slip zone. In subsurface damage layers, stair-rod dislocation, stacking fault tetrahedra, atomic cluster defect, and vacancy defect are formed. And the formation mechanism of stair-rod dislocation is investigated by atomic-scale structure evolution. The local atomic structures of subsurface defects are icosahedrons, hexagonal close packed, body-centered cubic, and defect face center cubic, and the variations of local atomic structures are investigated.

  19. Shaping a high-mass star-forming cluster through stellar feedback. The case of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Rao, R.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 is a high-mass star-forming cluster with several detected dust cores, infrared sources, (ultra)compact H II regions, molecular outflows, and masers. In such a complex environment, interactions and feedback among the embedded objects are expected to play a major role in the evolution of the region. Aims: We study the dust, kinematic, and polarimetric properties of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 region to investigate the role of the different forces in the formation and evolution of high-mass star-forming clusters. Methods: We performed SMA high angular resolution observations at 880 μm with the compact configuration. We developed the RATPACKS code to generate synthetic velocity cubes from models of choice to be compared to the observational data. To quantify the stability against gravitational collapse we developed the "mass balance" analysis that accounts for all the energetics on core scales. Results: We detect 14 dust cores from 3.5 M⊙ to 37 M⊙ arranged in two larger scale structures: a central bar and a filamentary spiral arm. The spiral arm presents large-scale velocity gradients in H13CO+ 4-3 and C17O 3-2, and magnetic field segments aligned well to the dust main axis. The velocity gradient is reproduced well by a spiral arm expanding at 9 km s-1 with respect to the central core MM1, which is known to power a large precessing outflow. The energy of the outflow is comparable to the spiral-arm kinetic energy, which dominates gravitational and magnetic energies. In addition, the dynamical ages of the outflow and spiral arm are comparable. On core scales, those embedded in the central bar seem to be unstable against gravitational collapse and prone to forming high-mass stars, while those in the spiral arm have lower masses that seem to be supported by non-thermal motions and magnetic fields. Conclusions: The NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 cluster seems to be dominated by protostellar feedback. The dusty spiral arm appears to be formed in a snowplow fashion

  20. Cosmic defects and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Joao; Brandenberger, Robert

    2000-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical overview of defect models of structure formation. We first introduce the concept of topological defect, and describe how to classify them. We then show how defects might be produced in phase transitions in the Early Universe and approach non-pathological scaling solutions. A very heuristic account of structure formation with defects is then provided, following which we introduce the tool box required for high precision calculations of CMB and LSS power spectra in these theories. The decomposition into scalar vector and tensor modes is reviewed, and then we introduce the concept of unequal-time correlator. We use isotropy and causality to constrain the form of these correlators. We finally show how these correlators may be decomposed into eigenmodes, thereby reducing a defect problem to a series of ``inflation'' problems. We conclude with a short description of results in these theories and how they fare against observations. We finally describe yet another application of topological d...

  1. Influence of the Ti(OiPr)4: methacrylic acid ratio on the formed oxo/alkoxo clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakler, Matthias; Artner, Christine; Schubert, Ulrich

    When Ti(OiPr)4 was reacted with increasing proportions of methacrylic acid (McOH), the compounds Ti2(OiPr)6(OMc)2(iPrOH), Ti6O4(OiPr)8(OMc)8, Ti9O8(OiPr)4(OMc)16, and Ti8O8(OMc)16 were obtained in sequence. This allowed conclusions on the relative ratio of substitution and hydrolysis reactions, the latter being due to ester formation between the acid and cleaved alcohol. This ratio is also influenced by the reaction temperature, since Ti4O2(OiPr)6(OMc)6 was formed instead of Ti6O4(OiPr)8(OMc)8 at lower temperature with the same precursor ratio.

  2. Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160862.html Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's: Study Abnormality might apply to all forms of ... that may be common to all forms of Parkinson's disease. The defect plays a major role in ...

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis of HIV-1 vpu gene demonstrates two clusters of replication-defective mutants with distinct ability to down-modulate cell surface CD4 and tetherin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nomaguchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Vpu acts positively on viral infectivity by mediating CD4 degradation in endoplasmic reticulum and enhances virion release by counteracting a virion release restriction factor, tetherin. In order to define the impact of Vpu activity on HIV-1 replication, we have generated a series of site-specific proviral vpu mutants. Of fifteen mutants examined, seven exhibited a replication-defect similar to that of a vpu-deletion mutant in a lymphocyte cell line H9. These mutations clustered in narrow regions within transmembrane domain (TMD and cytoplasmic domain (CTD. Replication-defective mutants displayed the reduced ability to enhance virion release from a monolayer cell line HEp2 without exception. Upon transfection with Vpu expression vectors, neither TMD mutants nor CTD mutants blocked CD4 expression at the cell surface in another monolayer cell line MAGI. While TMD mutants were unable to down-modulate cell surface tetherin in HEp2 cells, CTD mutants did quite efficiently. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the difference of intracellular localization between TMD and CTD mutants. In total, replication capability of HIV-1 carrying vpu mutations correlates well with the ability of Vpu to enhance virion release and to impede the cell surface expression of CD4 but not with the ability to down-modulate cell surface tetherin. Our results here suggest that efficient viral replication requires not only down-regulation of cell surface tetherin but also its degradation.

  4. A Free-Form mass model of the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431) with over one hundred constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Diego, Jose M; Wong, Jess; Silk, Joseph; Lim, Jeremy; Zheng, Wei; Lam, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We derive a free-form mass distribution for the massive cluster AS1063 (z=0.348) using the completed optical imaging from the Hubble Frontier Fields programme. Based on a subset of 11 multiply lensed systems with spectroscopic redshift we produce a lens model that is accurate enough to unveil new multiply lensed systems, totalling over a 100 arclets, and to estimate their redshifts geometrically. Consistency is found between this precise model and that obtained using only the subset of lensed sources with spectroscopically measured redshifts. No significant offset is found between the centroid of our mass distribution and that of the X-ray emission map, suggesting a relatively relaxed state for this cluster, although a relatively large elongation of the mass distribution is apparent relative to the X-ray map. For the well resolved lensed images we provide detailed model comparisons to illustrate the precision of our model and hence the reliability of our de-lensed sources. A clear linear structure is associat...

  5. Avidin-biotin-based approach to forming heterotypic cell clusters and cell sheets on a gas-permeable membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamon, M; Ozawa, T; Montagne, K; Kojima, N; Ishii, R; Sakai, Y [Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Yamaguchi, S; Nagamune, T [Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ushida, T, E-mail: mzh0026@auburn.edu [Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Implantation of sheet-like liver tissues is a promising method in hepatocyte-based therapies, because angiogenesis is expected to occur upon implantation from the surrounding tissues. In this context, we introduce here a new methodology for the formation of a functional thick hepatic tissue usable for cell sheet technology. First, we report the formation of composite tissue elements in suspension culture. Composite elements were composed of human hepatoma Hep G2 cells and mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts which are important modulators for thick-tissue formation. To overcome the very low attachment and organization capability between different cells in suspension, we synthesized a new cell-to-cell binding molecule based on the avidin-biotin binding system that we previously applied to attach hepatocytes on artificial substrata. This newly synthesized biotin-conjugated biocompatible anchoring molecule was inserted in the plasma membrane of both cell types. NIH/3T3 cells were further conjugated with avidin and incubated with biotin-presenting Hep G2 cells to form highly composite tissue elements. Then, we seeded those elements on highly gas-permeable membranes at their closest packing density to induce the formation of a thick, composite, functional hepatic tissue without any perfusion. This methodology could open a new way to engineer implantable thick liver tissue sheets where different cell types are spatially organized and well supplied with oxygen.

  6. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    particular application involves considerations of the kind of data being analyzed, algorithm runtime efficiency, and how much prior knowledge is available about the problem domain, which can dictate the nature of clusters sought. Fundamentally, the clustering method and its representations of clusters carries with it a definition of what a cluster is, and it is important that this be aligned with the analysis goals for the problem at hand. In this chapter, I emphasize this point by identifying for each algorithm the cluster representation as a model, m_j , even for algorithms that are not typically thought of as creating a “model.” This chapter surveys a basic collection of clustering methods useful to any practitioner who is interested in applying clustering to a new data set. The algorithms include k-means (Section 25.2), EM (Section 25.3), agglomerative (Section 25.4), and spectral (Section 25.5) clustering, with side mentions of variants such as kernel k-means and divisive clustering. The chapter also discusses each algorithm’s strengths and limitations and provides pointers to additional in-depth reading for each subject. Section 25.6 discusses methods for incorporating domain knowledge into the clustering process. This chapter concludes with a brief survey of interesting applications of clustering methods to astronomy data (Section 25.7). The chapter begins with k-means because it is both generally accessible and so widely used that understanding it can be considered a necessary prerequisite for further work in the field. EM can be viewed as a more sophisticated version of k-means that uses a generative model for each cluster and probabilistic item assignments. Agglomerative clustering is the most basic form of hierarchical clustering and provides a basis for further exploration of algorithms in that vein. Spectral clustering permits a departure from feature-vector-based clustering and can operate on data sets instead represented as affinity, or similarity

  7. A Review of the Application of Rate Theory to Simulate Vacancy Cluster Formation and Interstitial Defect Formation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallon Laliberte

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV is subject to an extreme radiation, temperature, and pressure environment over several decades of operation; therefore it is necessary to understand the mechanisms through which radiation damage occurs and how it affects the mechanical and chemical properties of the RPV steel. Chemical rate theory is a mean field rate theory simulation model which applies chemistry to the evaluation of irradiation-induced embrittlement. It presents one method of analysis that may be coupled to other distinct methods, in order to analyze defect formation, ultimately providing useful information on strength, ductility, toughness and dimensional stability changes for effects such as embrittlement, reduction in ductility and toughness, void swelling, hardening, irradiation creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc. over time as materials are subjected to reactor operational irradiation. This paper serves as a brief review of rate theory fundamentals and presents several examples of research that exemplify the application and importance of rate theory in examining the effects of radiation damage on RPV steel.

  8. Improving preventive service delivery at adult complete health check-ups: the Preventive health Evidence-based Recommendation Form (PERFORM cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moineddin Rahim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the effectiveness of a single checklist reminder form to improve the delivery of preventive health services at adult health check-ups in a family practice setting. Methods A prospective cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted at four urban family practice clinics among 38 primary care physicians affiliated with the University of Toronto. Preventive Care Checklist Forms© were created to be used by family physicians at adult health check-ups over a five-month period. The sex-specific forms incorporate evidence-based recommendations on preventive health services and documentation space for routine procedures such as physical examination. The forms were used in two intervention clinics and two control clinics. Rates and relative risks (RR of the performance of 13 preventive health maneuvers at baseline and post-intervention and the percentage of up-to-date preventive health services delivered per patient were compared between the two groups. Results Randomly-selected charts were reviewed at baseline (n = 509 and post-intervention (n = 608. Baseline rates for provision of preventive health services ranged from 3% (fecal occult blood testing to 93% (blood pressure measurement, similar to other settings. The percentage of up-to-date preventive health services delivered per patient at the end of the intervention was 48.9% in the control group and 71.7% in the intervention group. This is an overall 22.8% absolute increase (p = 0.0001, and 46.6% relative increase in the delivery of preventive health services per patient in the intervention group compared to controls. Eight of thirteen preventive health services showed a statistically significant change (p Conclusion This simple, low cost, clinically relevant intervention improves the delivery of preventive health services by prompting physicians of evidence-based recommendations in a checklist format that incorporates existing practice patterns. Periodic updates

  9. The very wide-field gzK galaxy survey - I. Details of the clustering properties of star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shogo; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Toshikawa, Jun; Onoue, Masafusa

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of clustering analysis on z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies. By combining our data with data from publicly available archives, we collect g-, zB/z- and K-band imaging data over 5.2 deg2, which represents the largest area BzK/gzK survey. We apply colour corrections to translate our filter set to those used in the original BzK selection for the gzK selection. Because of the wide survey area, we obtain a sample of 41 112 star-forming gzK galaxies at z ˜ 2 (sgzK galaxies) down to KAB error than that in previous studies. The large amount of data enables us to determine ACFs differentially depending on the luminosity of the subset of the data. The mean halo mass of faint sgzK galaxies (22.0 = (1.32^{+0.09}_{-0.12}) × 10^{12} h^{-1} M⊙, whereas bright sgzK galaxies (18.0 ≤ K ≤ 21.0) were found to reside in dark haloes with a mass of = (3.26^{+1.23}_{-1.02}) × 10^{13} h^{-1} M⊙.

  10. The very wide-field $gzK$ galaxy survey -- I. Details of the clustering properties of star-forming galaxies at $z \\sim 2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Shogo; Toshikawa, Jun; Onoue, Masafusa

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of clustering analysis on the $z \\sim 2$ star-forming galaxies. By combining our data with data from publicly available archives, we collect $g$-, $\\zb / z$-, and $K$-band imaging data over 5.2 deg$^{2}$, which represents the largest area BzK/gzK survey. We apply colour corrections to translate our filter-set to those used in the original BzK selection for the gzK selection. Because of the wide survey area, we obtain a sample of 41,112 star-forming gzK galaxies at $z \\sim 2$ (sgzKs) down to $\\KAB < 23.0$, and determine high-quality two-point angular correlation functions (ACFs). Our ACFs show an apparent excess from power-law behaviour at small angular scale $(\\theta \\la 0.01^{\\circ})$, which corresponds the virial radius of a dark halo at $z \\sim 2$ with a mass of $\\sim 10^{13} \\Msun$. We find that the correlation lengths are consistent with the previous estimates over all magnitude range; however, our results are evaluated with a smaller margin of error than that in previous studie...

  11. Duplication of 17q11.2 and Features of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy Secondary to Methylation Defects within the GNAS Cluster: Coincidence or Causal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. White

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO in a three-year-old girl with a microduplication at 17q11.2. The child developed obesity within the first 6 months of life. A diagnosis of Albright was made at age 2 years when biochemical evidence of parathyroid resistance was found. No mutations were identified in guanine nucleotide-binding protein G (s subunit alpha (GNAS1. Subsequent investigations revealed methylation disturbance at GNAS1A, neuroendocrine secretory protein antisense (NESPAS and neuroendocrine secretory protein 55 (NESP55 confirming a diagnosis of pseudohypothyroidism type 1B. A deletion of NESP55 and uniparental disomy chromosome 20 were excluded which suggested that the features of AHO arose through a purely epigenetic mechanism. Further investigation revealed a de novo microduplication at 17q11.2 encompassing the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 gene. The combination of two rare de novo events in the same child raises the possibility that duplication of a gene within the 17q11.2 region may have triggered abnormal methylation in the GNAS cluster region on chromosome 20.

  12. Defects and permutation branes in the Liouville field theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkissian, Gor

    2009-01-01

    The defects and permutation branes for the Liouville field theory are considered. By exploiting cluster condition, equations satisfied by permutation branes and defects reflection amplitudes are obtained. It is shown that two types of solutions exist, discrete and continuous families....

  13. Genes involved in degradation of para-nitrophenol are differentially arranged in form of non-contiguous gene clusters in Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Vikram

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of para-Nitrophenol (PNP proceeds via two distinct pathways, having 1,2,3-benzenetriol (BT and hydroquinone (HQ as their respective terminal aromatic intermediates. Genes involved in these pathways have already been studied in different PNP degrading bacteria. Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 degrades PNP via both the pathways. Earlier, we have sequenced and analyzed a ~41 kb fragment from the genomic library of strain SJ98. This DNA fragment was found to harbor all the lower pathway genes; however, genes responsible for the initial transformation of PNP could not be identified within this fragment. Now, we have sequenced and annotated the whole genome of strain SJ98 and found two ORFs (viz., pnpA and pnpB showing maximum identity at amino acid level with p-nitrophenol 4-monooxygenase (PnpM and p-benzoquinone reductase (BqR. Unlike the other PNP gene clusters reported earlier in different bacteria, these two ORFs in SJ98 genome are physically separated from the other genes of PNP degradation pathway. In order to ascertain the identity of ORFs pnpA and pnpB, we have performed in-vitro assays using recombinant proteins heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. Purified PnpA was found to be a functional PnpM and transformed PNP into benzoquinone (BQ, while PnpB was found to be a functional BqR which catalyzed the transformation of BQ into hydroquinone (HQ. Noticeably, PnpM from strain SJ98 could also transform a number of PNP analogues. Based on the above observations, we propose that the genes for PNP degradation in strain SJ98 are arranged differentially in form of non-contiguous gene clusters. This is the first report for such arrangement for gene clusters involved in PNP degradation. Therefore, we propose that PNP degradation in strain SJ98 could be an important model system for further studies on differential evolution of PNP degradation functions.

  14. Heavy hitters via cluster-preserving clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nelson, Jelani; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2016-01-01

    , providing correctness whp. In fact, a simpler version of our algorithm for p = 1 in the strict turnstile model answers queries even faster than the "dyadic trick" by roughly a log n factor, dominating it in all regards. Our main innovation is an efficient reduction from the heavy hitters to a clustering...... problem in which each heavy hitter is encoded as some form of noisy spectral cluster in a much bigger graph, and the goal is to identify every cluster. Since every heavy hitter must be found, correctness requires that every cluster be found. We thus need a "cluster-preserving clustering" algorithm......, that partitions the graph into clusters with the promise of not destroying any original cluster. To do this we first apply standard spectral graph partitioning, and then we use some novel combinatorial techniques to modify the cuts obtained so as to make sure that the original clusters are sufficiently preserved...

  15. Paravaginal defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenholt, Louise T S; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Glavind, Karin;

    2016-01-01

    , arcus tendineus fascia pelvis (ATFP), pubocervical fascia, and uterosacral/cardinal ligaments. Studies conclude that physical examination is inconsistent in detecting paravaginal defects. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to describe patterns in the appearance...

  16. Molecular Statics Simulation of Hydrogen Defect Interaction in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaochun; Liu, Yinan; Yu, Yi; Niu, Guojian; Luo, Guangnan; Shu, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen (H) defect interactions have been investigated by molecular statics simulations in tungsten (W), including H-H interactions and interactions between H and W self-interstitial atoms. The interactions between H and small H-vacancy clusters are also demonstrated; the binding energies of an H, a vacancy and a self-interstitial W to an H-vacancy cluster depend on the H-to-vacancy ratio. We conclude that H bubble formation needs a high concentration of H in W for the H bubble nucleation and growth, which are also governed by the H-to-vacancy ratio of the cluster. The vacancy first combines with H atoms and a cluster forms, then the H-vacancy cluster goes through the whole process of vacancy capture, H capture, and vacancy capture again, and as a result the H-vacancy cluster grows larger and larger. Finally, the H bubble forms. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51171008 and 11405201) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB1090)

  17. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  18. Intricate interactions between the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and foreign genetic elements, revealed by diversified clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Sotaro; Yoshida, Takashi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2012-08-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) confer sequence-dependent, adaptive resistance in prokaryotes against viruses and plasmids via incorporation of short sequences, called spacers, derived from foreign genetic elements. CRISPR loci are thus considered to provide records of past infections. To describe the host-parasite (i.e., cyanophages and plasmids) interactions involving the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, we investigated CRISPR in four M. aeruginosa strains and in two previously sequenced genomes. The number of spacers in each locus was larger than the average among prokaryotes. All spacers were strain specific, except for a string of 11 spacers shared in two closely related strains, suggesting diversification of the loci. Using CRISPR repeat-based PCR, 24 CRISPR genotypes were identified in a natural cyanobacterial community. Among 995 unique spacers obtained, only 10 sequences showed similarity to M. aeruginosa phage Ma-LMM01. Of these, six spacers showed only silent or conservative nucleotide mutations compared to Ma-LMM01 sequences, suggesting a strategy by the cyanophage to avert CRISPR immunity dependent on nucleotide identity. These results imply that host-phage interactions can be divided into M. aeruginosa-cyanophage combinations rather than pandemics of population-wide infectious cyanophages. Spacer similarity also showed frequent exposure of M. aeruginosa to small cryptic plasmids that were observed only in a few strains. Thus, the diversification of CRISPR implies that M. aeruginosa has been challenged by diverse communities (almost entirely uncharacterized) of cyanophages and plasmids.

  19. A VLT spectroscopic survey of RX J0152.7-1357, a forming cluster of galaxies at z=0.837

    CERN Document Server

    Demarco, R; Lidman, C E; Homeier, N L; Scannapieco, E; Benítez, N; Mainieri, V; Nonino, M; Girardi, M; Stanford, S A; Tozzi, P; Borgani, S; Silk, J; Squires, G; Broadhurst, T J

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of an extensive spectroscopic survey of RX J0152.7-1357, one of the most massive distant clusters of galaxies known. Multi-object spectroscopy, carried out with FORS1 and FORS2 on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), has allowed us to measure more than 200 redshifts in the cluster field and to confirm 102 galaxies as cluster members. The mean redshift of the cluster is $z=0.837 \\pm 0.001$ and we estimate the velocity dispersion of the overall cluster galaxy distribution to be $\\sim 1600 \\mathrm{km \\ s^{-1}}$. The distribution of cluster members is clearly irregular, with two main clumps that follow the X-ray cluster emission mapped by Chandra. A third clump of galaxies to the east of the central structure and at the cluster redshift has also been identified. The two main clumps have velocity dispersions of $\\sim919$ and $\\sim737 \\mathrm{km s^{-1}}$ respectively, and the peculiar velocity of the two clumps suggests that they will merge into a single more massive cluster. A segregation in ...

  20. A multifrequency study of the active star-forming complex NGC 6357 - I. Interstellar structures linked to the open cluster Pis 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, C. E.; Barbá, R.; Duronea, N. U.; Vasquez, J.; Arnal, E. M.; Goss, W. M.; Fernández Lajús, E.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the distribution of gas (ionized, neutral atomic and molecular) and interstellar dust in the complex star-forming region NGC 6357 with the goal of studying the interplay between the massive stars in the open cluster Pis 24 and the surrounding interstellar matter. Our study of the distribution of the ionized gas is based on narrow-band Hα, [S II]and [O III] images obtained with the Curtis-Schmidt Camera at CTIO, Chile, and on radio continuum observations at 1465 MHz taken with the VLA with a synthesized beam of 40 arcsec. The distribution of the molecular gas is analysed using 12CO(1-0) data obtained with the NANTEN radiotelescope, Chile (angular resolution = 2.7 arcmin). The interstellar dust distribution was studied using mid-infrared data from the GLIMPSE survey and far-infrared observations from IRAS. NGC 6357 consists of a large ionized shell and a number of smaller optical nebulosities. The optical, radio continuum, and near- and mid-IR images delineate the distributions of the ionized gas and interstellar dust in the H II regions and in previously unknown wind-blown bubbles linked to the massive stars in Pis 24 revealing surrounding photodissociation regions. The CO line observations allowed us to identify the molecular counterparts of the ionized structures in the complex and to confirm the presence of photodissociation regions. The action of the WR star HD 157504 on the surrounding gas was also investigated. The molecular mass in the complex is estimated to be (4 ± 2) × 105 M⊙. The mean electron densities derived from the radio data suggest electron densities >200 cm-3, indicating that NGC 6357 is a complex formed in a region of high ambient density. The known massive stars in Pis 24 and a number of newly inferred massive stars are mainly responsible for the excitation and photodissociation of the parental molecular cloud.

  1. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    and with other experimental methods (in particular transmission electron microscopy) forms the basis for the use of PAS to quantitatively characterize defects and defect complexes, both visible and invisible is transmission electron microscopes: this is illustrated by some examples. Finally, the advantages...

  2. Fluence dependence of defect evolution in austenitic stainless steels during fission neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.

    To understand microstructural evolution during fission neutron irradiation, a pure Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloy, phosphorus-containing model austenitic stainless steels and SUS316 were irradiated in a Japanese Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) at 493 and 613 K. At 493 K, the density of defect cluster increased with the irradiation dose, but there was no significant change in loop density and loop size among all the materials. At 613 K, on the other hand, interstitial type dislocation loops and phosphides were formed in pure ternary and phosphorus-containing alloys, respectively, by an early stage of irradiation. These results suggest that the defect cluster formation at 493 and 613 K is mainly controlled by the cascade damage and long-range migration of free point defects, respectively.

  3. Klastery kak forma prostranstvennoj organizacii jekonomicheskoj dejatel'nosti: teorija voprosa i jempiricheskie nabljudenija [Clusters as a Form of Spatial Organisation of Economic Activity: Theory and Practical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shastitko Andrey

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at explaining the clustering of economic activity using instruments of new institutional economics, taking into account well-known descriptive characteristics of the cluster, as well as recent developments in research on hybrid institutional agreements, primarily, the research conducted by Michael Porter, Claude Ménard and others.

  4. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  5. Percolation and jamming of linear k -mers on a square lattice with defects: Effect of anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.; Burmistrov, Andrei S.; Shinyaeva, Taisiya S.; Laptev, Valeri V.; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V.; Lebovka, Nikolai I.

    2015-12-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we study the percolation and jamming of oriented linear k -mers on a square lattice that contains defects. The point defects with a concentration d are placed randomly and uniformly on the substrate before deposition of the k -mers. The general case of unequal probabilities for orientation of depositing of k -mers along different directions of the lattice is analyzed. Two different relaxation models of deposition that preserve the predetermined order parameter s are used. In the relaxation random sequential adsorption (RRSA) model, the deposition of k -mers is distributed over different sites on the substrate. In the single-cluster relaxation (RSC) model, the single cluster grows by the random accumulation of k -mers on the boundary of the cluster (Eden-like model). For both models, a suppression of growth of the infinite (percolation) cluster at some critical concentration of defects dc is observed. In the zero-defect lattices, the jamming concentration pj (RRSA model) and the density of single clusters ps (RSC model) decrease with increasing length k -mers and with a decrease in the order parameter. For the RRSA model, the value of dc decreases for short k -mers (k RSC model, the growth of clusters with ellipselike shapes is observed for nonzero values of s . The density of the clusters ps at the critical concentration of defects dc depends in a complex manner on the values of s and k . An interesting finding for disordered systems (s =0 ) is that the value of ps tends towards zero in the limits of the very long k -mers, k →∞ , and very small critical concentrations dc→0 . In this case, the introduction of defects results in a suppression of k -mer stacking and in the formation of empty or loose clusters with very low density. On the other hand, denser clusters are formed for ordered systems with ps≈0.065 at s =0.5 and ps≈0.38 at s =1.0 .

  6. Cosmic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kleman, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    The continuous 1D defects of an isotropic homogeneous material in an Euclidean 3D space are classified by a construction method, the Volterra process (VP). We employ the same method to classify the continuous 2D defects (which we call \\textit{cosmic forms}) of a vacuum in a 4D maximally symmetric spacetime. These defects fall into three different classes: i)- $m$-forms, akin to 3D space disclinations, related to ordinary rotations and analogous to Kibble's global cosmic strings (except that being continuous any deficit angle is allowed); ii)- $t$-forms, related to Lorentz boosts (hyperbolic rotations); iii)- $r$-forms, never been considered so far, related to null rotations. A detailed account of their metrics is presented. Their inner structure in many cases appears as a non-singular \\textit{core} separated from the outer part by a timelike hypersurface with distributional curvature and/or torsion, yielding new types of geometrical interactions with cosmic dislocations and other cosmic disclinations. Whereas...

  7. Effects of stacking fault energy on defect formation process in face-centered cubic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Taira; Yang, Yingjuan; Hirabayashi, Junichi; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of stacking fault energies (SFEs) on defect formation by the collision cascade process for face-centred cubic metals, we used six sets of interatomic potentials with different SFEs while keeping the other properties almost identical. Molecular dynamic simulations of the collision cascade were carried out using these potentials with primary knock-on atom energies (EPKA) of 10 and 20 keV at 100 K. Neither the number of residual defects nor the size distributions for both self-interstitial atom (SIA) type and vacancy type clusters were affected by the difference in the SFE. In the case of EPKA = 20 keV, the ratio of glissile SIA clusters increased as the SFE decreased, which was not expected by a prediction based on the classical dislocation theory. The trend did not change after annealing at 1100 K for 100 ps. For vacancy clusters, few stacking fault tetrahedrons (SFTs) formed before the annealing. However, lower SFEs tended to increase the SFT fraction after the annealing, where large vacancy clusters formed at considerable densities. The findings of this study can be used to characterise the defect formation process in low SFE metals such as austenitic stainless steels.

  8. DFT-investigations of coalescence behaviour of small magic Si clusters on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quester, Wolfram; Nielaba, Peter [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Experimental results indicate that small magic Si clusters do not form islands of bulk Si on weakly interacting surfaces (HOPG). For Si{sub 4} this was confirmed in earlier calculations. This leads to the question if these clusters are suited as building blocks for new cluster materials. These investigations were extended to Si{sub 7}. Potential energy curves of two approaching Si{sub 7} clusters were calculated for different reaction channels using Density Functional Theory implemented in the CPMD code available. It could be shown that the cluster-cluster interaction is either repulsive or there are fusion barriers higher than room temperature. Since the influence of the surface is important, the next step was to include the graphite surface in the simulations. Also the influence of defects was to be studied.

  9. A Chandra Study of the Rosette Star-Forming Complex. III. The NGC 2237 Cluster and the Region's Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Townsley, Leisa K; Broos, Patrick S; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G; Lada, Elizabeth; Garmire, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray images of the NGC 2237 young star cluster on the periphery of the Rosette Nebula. We detect 168 X-ray sources, 80% of which have counterparts in USNO, 2MASS, and deep FLAMINGOS images. These constitute the first census of the cluster members with 0.2<~M<~2 Msun. Star locations in near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams indicate a cluster age around 2 Myr with a visual extinction of 1cluster NGC 2244. We derive the K-band luminosity function and the X-ray luminosity function of the cluster, which indicate a population ~400-600 stars. The X-ray-selected sample shows a K-excess disk frequency of 13%. The young Class II counterparts are aligned in an arc ~3 pc long suggestive of a triggered formation process induced by the O stars in NGC 2244. The diskless Class III sources are more dispersed. Several X-ray emitting stars are located inside the molecular cloud and around gaseous pillars projecting from the cloud. These...

  10. Clustering of transmutation elements tantalum, rhenium and osmium in tungsten in a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-08-01

    The formation of transmutation solute-rich precipitates has been reported to seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten in a fusion environment. However, the underlying mechanisms controlling the formation of the precipitates are still unknown. In this study, first-principles calculations are therefore performed to systemically determine the stable structures and binding energies of solute clusters in tungsten consisting of tantalum, rhenium and osmium atoms as well as irradiation-induced vacancies. These clusters are known to act as precursors for the formation of precipitates. We find that osmium can easily segregate to form clusters even in defect-free tungsten alloys, whereas extremely high tantalum and rhenium concentrations are required for the formation of clusters. Vacancies greatly facilitate the clustering of rhenium and osmium, while tantalum is an exception. The binding energies of vacancy-osmium clusters are found to be much higher than those of vacancy-tantalum and vacancy-rhenium clusters. Osmium is observed to strongly promote the formation of vacancy-rhenium clusters, while tantalum can suppress the formation of vacancy-rhenium and vacancy-osmium clusters. The local strain and electronic structure are analyzed to reveal the underlying mechanisms governing the cluster formation. Employing the law of mass action, we predict the evolution of the relative concentration of vacancy-rhenium clusters. This work presents a microscopic picture describing the nucleation and growth of solute clusters in tungsten alloys in a fusion reactor environment, and thereby explains recent experimental phenomena.

  11. Casting defects analysis by the Pareto method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borowiecki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of receive results formed of diagram Pareto Lorenz. On the basis of receive graph it affirmed, that for 70% general number casting defects answered 3 defects (9 contribution – 100% defects. For 70% general number defects of influence it has three type of causes: sand holes, porosity and slaginclusions. Thedefects show that it is necessary to take up construction gatingsystem. The remaining 8 causes have been concerned only 25%, with general number of casting defects. Analysis of receive results permit to determine of direction of correct actions in order to eliminate or to limit the most defects.

  12. Defect production in Ar irradiated graphene membranes under different initial applied strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Asencio, J., E-mail: jesusmartinez@ua.es [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain); Ruestes, C.J.; Bringa, E. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Caturla, M.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Defects in graphene membranes are formed due to 140 eV Ar ions irradiation using MD. • Different initial strains are applied, which influence the type and number of defects. • Mono-vacancies, di-vacancies and tri-vacancies production behaves linearly with dose. • The total number of defects under compression is slightly higher than under tension. - Abstract: Irradiation with low energy Ar ions of graphene membranes gives rise to changes in the mechanical properties of this material. These changes have been associated to the production of defects, mostly isolated vacancies. However, the initial state of the graphene membrane can also affect its mechanical response. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied defect production in graphene membranes irradiated with 140 eV Ar ions up to a dose of 0.075 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and different initial strains, from −0.25% (compressive strain) to 0.25% (tensile strain). For all strains, the number of defects increases linearly with dose with a defect production of about 80% (80 defects every 100 ions). Defects are mostly single vacancies and di-vacancies, although some higher order clusters are also observed. Two different types of di-vacancies have been identified, the most common one being two vacancies at first nearest neighbours distance. Differences in the total number of defects with the applied strain are observed which is related to the production of a higher number of di-vacancies under compressive strain compared to tensile strain. We attribute this effect to the larger out-of-plane deformations of compressed samples that could favor the production of defects in closer proximity to others.

  13. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask

  14. Mutated forms of the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Clostridium pasteurianum with noncysteinyl ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J; Fujinaga, J; Gaillard, J; Lutz, M

    1994-11-22

    The [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin from Clostridium pasteurianum is unique among ferredoxins, both by its sequence and by the distribution of its cysteine residues (in positions 11, 14, 24, 56, 60). Thus, no homologous sequences are available to infer, by comparison, the identity of the ligands of the iron-sulfur cluster. Therefore, in order to obtain information on the latter point, a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and UV-vis, EPR, and resonance Raman spectroscopy has been implemented. All of the cysteine residues have individually been replaced by serine and two of them by alanine. Cysteine 14 could be replaced by either serine or alanine without any modification of the spectroscopic properties of the protein and was therefore dismissed as a ligand of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. The C56S, and C60S-mutated proteins were both found to display UV-vis, EPR, and resonance Raman spectra consistent with serine-coordinated [2Fe-2S] clusters. The C11S-mutated protein was considerably less stable than the wild type ferredoxin. This observation, together with the hypsochromic shifts of UV-visible absorption features upon cysteine 11-->serine mutation, suggested cysteine 11 to be a ligand of the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Cysteine 24 could be replaced by either serine or alanine without decreasing the stability of the protein and without dramatically changing its spectroscopic properties. Thus, either cysteine 24 is not a ligand of the [2Fe-2S] cluster or it is replaced by another ligand in the C24A mutated protein. A [2Fe-2S] cluster was also assembled in the C14A/C24A doubly mutated protein, i.e., in a polypeptide chain containing only three cysteine residues.2+ off

  15. Hydrogen spillover on DV (555-777) graphene – vanadium cluster system: First principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, E. Mathan, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com [SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India); P, Sabarikirishwaran [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT+D), the interaction of Vanadium adatom and cluster with divacancy (555-777) defective graphene sheet has been studied elaborately. We explore the prospect of hydrogen storage on V{sub 4} cluster adsorbed divacancy graphene system. It has been observed that V{sub 4} cluster (acting as a catalyst) can dissociate the H{sub 2} molecule into H atoms with very low barrier energy. We introduce the spillover of the atomic hydrogen throughout the surface via external mediator gallane (GaH{sub 3}) to form a hydrogenated system.

  16. Star-forming blue ETGs in two newly discovered galaxy overdensities in the HUDF at z=1.84 and 1.9: unveiling the progenitors of passive ETGs in cluster cores

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Simona; Pentericci, Laura; Newman, Jeffrey A; Weiner, Benjamin J; Ashby, Matthew L N; Castellano, Marco; Conselice, Chistopher J; Filkelstein, Steven L; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, Norman A; Koekemoer, Anton M; Huertas-Company, Marc; Lani, Caterina; Lucas, Ray A; Papovich, Casey; Rafelski, Marc; Tepliz, Harry I

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of two galaxy overdensities in the HST UDF: a proto-cluster, HUDFJ0332.4-2746.6 at $z = 1.84 \\pm 0.01$, and a group, HUDFJ0332.5-2747.3 at $z =1.90 \\pm 0.01$. The velocity dispersion of HUDFJ0332.4-2746.6 implies a mass of $M_{200}= (2.2 \\pm 1.8) \\times 10^{14} M_{\\odot}$, consistent with the lack of extended X-ray emission. Neither overdensity shows evidence of a red sequence. About $50\\%$ of their members show interactions and/or disturbed morphologies, which are a signature of merger remnants. Most of their morphologically classified ETGs have blue colors and show recent star-formation. These observations reveal for the first time large fractions of spectroscopically confirmed star-forming blue ETGs in proto-clusters at $z\\approx 2$. These star-forming ETGs are most likely among the progenitors of the quiescent population in clusters at more recent epochs. Their mass-size relation is consistent with that of passive ETGs in clusters at $z\\sim0.7-1.5$. If these galaxies are the proge...

  17. Cluster analysis of historical and modern hard red spring wheat cultivars based on parentage and HPLC analysis of gluten forming proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, 30 hard red spring (HRS) wheat cultivars released between 1910 and 2013 were analyzed to determine how they cluster in terms of parentage and protein data, analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) of gliadins, and size-exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) of unreduced proteins. Dwarfing genes in...

  18. Synthesis of tetranuclear, four-coordinate manganese clusters with "pinned butterfly" geometry formed by metal-mediated N-N bond cleavage in diphenylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clifton R; Baglia, Regina A; Gordon, Alexander D; Zdilla, Michael J

    2011-03-30

    The preparation of four-coordinate tetramanganese-amide-hydrazide clusters is described. Reaction of Mn(NR(2))(2) (R = SiMe(3)) with N,N'-diphenylhydrazine resulted in the formation of a black intermediary mixture that converted to a four-coordinate tetranuclear "pinned butterfly" cluster, Mn(4)(μ(3)-N(2)Ph(2))(2)(μ-N(2)Ph(2))(μ-NHPh)(2)(THF)(4). This compound was isolated in ~90% yield and identified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In pyridine, the THF ligands were replaced, giving the pyridyl complex Mn(4)(μ(3)-N(2)Ph(2))(2)(μ-N(2)Ph(2))(μ-NHPh)(2)(py)(4). Charge counting considerations indicate that the clusters had gained two protons and two electrons in addition to the formative fragments. Isolation of the black mixture was achieved by extraction techniques from a reaction with a decreased loading of hydrazine run at low temperatures with decreased solvent polarity. The black mixture was characterized by FT-IR, UV-vis, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, an isolable, colorless dimer, Mn(2)(μ-NHPh)(2)(NR(2))(2)(THF)(2), was present in the mixture and identified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These intermediates are discussed in light of possible mechanisms for formation of the tetranuclear cluster.

  19. Simulation of Defects in Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Bay, Niels; Wanheim, Tarras

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes a systematic investigation of possible flow imperfections in forging of an H-shaped profile. The influence of geometry and volume of the slug and of friction in the tool/workpiece interface on flow are investigated by numerical as well as physical modelling. A comparison...... between two different FE- codes, DEFORM ans Forge2 and physical modelling applying parafin wax shows good agreement between the different methods of analysis. Based on the results a formability diagram has been established for forging of H-shaped profiles....

  20. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  1. Effect of thermal friction on the generation and transport of interstitial defects in irradiated metals

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, S L

    2002-01-01

    Generation of interstitial and vacancy defects under 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation is expected to drive the evolution of microstructure of materials in a future fusion power station. We investigate effects of thermal friction associated with the interaction between mobile clusters of interstitial atoms produced in collision cascades and phonon excitations. Phonons give rise to the random Brownian motion of clusters in the crystal lattice. Phonon excitations are also responsible for the dissipation of energy of rapidly moving clusters formed at the periphery of collision cascades. We investigate how the coefficient of thermal friction depends on the structure of clusters. We also discuss implications of our findings for understanding the origin of higher resistance of bcc metals to irradiation and the connection between this phenomenon and the long-range effect observed in experiments on ion implantation.

  2. 多种背阔肌瓣游离移植修复下肢缺损%Application of latissimus dorsi flap in different forms in repair of skin and soft tissue defects in lower extremities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丕红; 黄晓元; 龙剑虹; 范鹏举; 任利成; 曾纪章; 肖目张

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore repair methods of skin and soft tissue defects in lower extremities with free latissimus dorsi flaps. Methods Forty-two patients with wounds and soft tissue defects in lower extremities, including 4 cases on knee, 22 cases on leg, 15 cases on ankle and foot, 1 case with extensive a-vulsion from knee to dorsum of foot, were hospitalized in our unit from February 1996 to February 2008. Wounds or soft tissue defects were respectively repaired with latissimus dorsi musculoeutaneous flaps, latissi-mus dorsi muscle flaps, latissimus dorsi perforator flaps with preserved vascular sleeves, 2 double-leaf seg-mental latissimus dorsi compound flaps after debridement. The flaps ranged from 18 cm×8 cm to 40 cm×18 cm in size. The donor sites were covered by skin grafting in 19 cases. Results All wounds were healed primarily except vascular crisis occurred in 3 cases, partial necrosis of skin at donor site in 2 cases, and graft site(1 case). Follow-up for 3 to 24 months of 31 patients showed: six cases received two-stage plastic operation on account of bulkiness with trouble in wearing shoes, and mild contraction of muscular flap in 3 cases. Conclusions Latissimus dorsi flap in various forms can be satisfactory for repair of large skin and soft tissue defects in lower extremities.%目的 寻找应用背阔肌瓣游离移植修复下肢缺损的方法.方法 1996年2月-2008年2月,笔者单位应用游离背阔肌瓣修复下肢皮肤及组织缺损患者42例,其中膝部4例,小腿22例,足、踝部15例,膝下至足背严重撕脱1例.清创后采用背阔肌肌皮瓣、背阔肌肌瓣植皮、保留肌袖的背阔肌穿支皮瓣、分叶背阔肌组织瓣修复创面.组织瓣切取范围18 cm×8 cm~40 cm × 18cm.结果 除3例患者术后发生血管危象,2例供区植皮和1例肌瓣植皮部分坏死外,其余患者创面均一次性愈合.随访3~24个月,6例患者皮瓣外形臃肿,影响穿鞋,再次行皮瓣修薄术;3例肌瓣植

  3. How do you solve a problem like Letharia? A new look at cryptic species in lichen-forming fungi using Bayesian clustering and SNPs from multilocus sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Altermann

    Full Text Available The inclusion of molecular data is increasingly an integral part of studies assessing species boundaries. Analyses based on predefined groups may obscure patterns of differentiation, and population assignment tests provide an alternative for identifying population structure and barriers to gene flow. In this study, we apply population assignment tests implemented in the programs STRUCTURE and BAPS to single nucleotide polymorphisms from DNA sequence data generated for three previous studies of the lichenized fungal genus Letharia. Previous molecular work employing a gene genealogical approach circumscribed six species-level lineages within the genus, four putative lineages within the nominal taxon L. columbiana (Nutt. J.W. Thomson and two sorediate lineages. We show that Bayesian clustering implemented in the program STRUCTURE was generally able to recover the same six putative Letharia lineages. Population assignments were largely consistent across a range of scenarios, including: extensive amounts of missing data, the exclusion of SNPs from variable markers, and inferences based on SNPs from as few as three gene regions. While our study provided additional evidence corroborating the six candidate Letharia species, the equivalence of these genetic clusters with species-level lineages is uncertain due, in part, to limited phylogenetic signal. Furthermore, both the BAPS analysis and the ad hoc ΔK statistic from results of the STRUCTURE analysis suggest that population structure can possibly be captured with fewer genetic groups. Our findings also suggest that uneven sampling across taxa may be responsible for the contrasting inferences of population substructure. Our results consistently supported two distinct sorediate groups, 'L. lupina' and L. vulpina, and subtle morphological differences support this distinction. Similarly, the putative apotheciate species 'L. lucida' was also consistently supported as a distinct genetic cluster. However

  4. How do you solve a problem like Letharia? A new look at cryptic species in lichen-forming fungi using Bayesian clustering and SNPs from multilocus sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermann, Susanne; Leavitt, Steven D; Goward, Trevor; Nelsen, Matthew P; Lumbsch, H Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of molecular data is increasingly an integral part of studies assessing species boundaries. Analyses based on predefined groups may obscure patterns of differentiation, and population assignment tests provide an alternative for identifying population structure and barriers to gene flow. In this study, we apply population assignment tests implemented in the programs STRUCTURE and BAPS to single nucleotide polymorphisms from DNA sequence data generated for three previous studies of the lichenized fungal genus Letharia. Previous molecular work employing a gene genealogical approach circumscribed six species-level lineages within the genus, four putative lineages within the nominal taxon L. columbiana (Nutt.) J.W. Thomson and two sorediate lineages. We show that Bayesian clustering implemented in the program STRUCTURE was generally able to recover the same six putative Letharia lineages. Population assignments were largely consistent across a range of scenarios, including: extensive amounts of missing data, the exclusion of SNPs from variable markers, and inferences based on SNPs from as few as three gene regions. While our study provided additional evidence corroborating the six candidate Letharia species, the equivalence of these genetic clusters with species-level lineages is uncertain due, in part, to limited phylogenetic signal. Furthermore, both the BAPS analysis and the ad hoc ΔK statistic from results of the STRUCTURE analysis suggest that population structure can possibly be captured with fewer genetic groups. Our findings also suggest that uneven sampling across taxa may be responsible for the contrasting inferences of population substructure. Our results consistently supported two distinct sorediate groups, 'L. lupina' and L. vulpina, and subtle morphological differences support this distinction. Similarly, the putative apotheciate species 'L. lucida' was also consistently supported as a distinct genetic cluster. However, additional studies

  5. Experimental studies of the formation of cluster ions formed by corona discharge in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J. O.; Hvelplund, P.; Støchkel, K.; Enghoff, M. B.; Kurten, T.

    2013-12-01

    We report on studies of ion induced nucleation in a corona discharge taking place in an atmosphere containing SO2, NH3, and H2O at standard temperature and pressure. Positive ions such as H3O+(H2O)n, NH4+(H2O)n, and H+(H2SO4)(H2O)n and negative ions such as HSO5-(H2O)n, SO4-(H2O)n, HSO4-(H2O)n and NO3-(H2O)n have been recorded. Large values of n (> 100) were observed and the experiment indicates the existence of even larger water clusters. In contrast, only clusters with a maximum of 2 sulfuric acid molecules were observed. Fragmentation studies also revealed that the negative ion HSO5-, which has been observed in many studies, in our experiments is contaminated by O2-(HNO3)(H2O) ions, and this may also have been the case in other experiments. Finally an ion with m/z = 232 (where m is the cluster mass in amu and z the charge state), capable of attaching H2O-molecules was observed and studied by fragmentation. Positive ion m/z (mass/charge) spectrum

  6. Distribution of Defects in Wind Turbine Blades and Reliability Assessment of Blades Containing Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2009-01-01

    on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models additional information about number, type and size of the defects is included as stochastic variables. The probability of failure for a wind turbine blade will not only depend on variations in the material...... properties and the load but also on potential defects in the blades. As a numerical example the probability of failure is calculated for the main spar both with and without defects in terms of delaminations. The delaminations increase the probability of failure compared to a perfect blade, but by applying......In the present paper two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size based...

  7. Reconstructions of eyelid defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Subramanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Eyelids are the protective mechanism of the eyes. The upper and lower eyelids have been formed for their specific functions by Nature. The eyelid defects are encountered in congenital anomalies, trauma, and postexcision for neoplasm. The reconstructions should be based on both functional and cosmetic aspects. The knowledge of the basic anatomy of the lids is a must. There are different techniques for reconstructing the upper eyelid, lower eyelid, and medial and lateral canthal areas. Many a times, the defects involve more than one area. For the reconstruction of the lid, the lining should be similar to the conjunctiva, a cover by skin and the middle layer to give firmness and support. It is important to understand the availability of various tissues for reconstruction. One layer should have the vascularity to support the other layer which can be a graft. A proper plan and execution of it is very important.

  8. On varieties with higher osculating defect

    CERN Document Server

    De Poi, Pietro; Ilardi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, using the method of moving frames, we generalise some of Terracini's results on varieties with tangent defect. In particular, we characterise varieties with higher order osculating defect in terms of Jacobians of higher fundamental forms and moreover we characterise varieties with "small" higher fundamental forms as contained in scrolls.

  9. Renal acidification defects in medullary sponge kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Hansen, A B; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    patients had some form of renal acidification defect; 8 had the distal type of renal tubular acidosis, 2 the complete and 6 the incomplete form. One patient had proximal renal tubular acidosis. These findings, which suggest that renal acidification defects play an important role in the pathogenesis...

  10. Thermodynamics of forming water clusters at various temperatures and pressures by Gaussian-2, Gaussian-3, complete basis set-QB3, and complete basis set-APNO model chemistries; implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Meghan E; Pokon, Emma K; Shields, George C

    2004-03-03

    The Gaussian-2, Gaussian-3, complete basis set- (CBS-) QB3, and CBS-APNO methods have been used to calculate Delta H degrees and Delta G degrees values for neutral clusters of water, (H(2)O)(n), where n = 2-6. The structures are similar to those determined from experiment and from previous high-level calculations. The thermodynamic calculations by the G2, G3, and CBS-APNO methods compare well against the estimated MP2(CBS) limit. The cyclic pentamer and hexamer structures release the most heat per hydrogen bond formed of any of the clusters. While the cage and prism forms of the hexamer are the lowest energy structures at very low temperatures, as temperature is increased the cyclic structure is favored. The free energies of cluster formation at different temperatures reveal interesting insights, the most striking being that the cyclic trimer, cyclic tetramer, and cyclic pentamer, like the dimer, should be detectable in the lower troposphere. We predict water dimer concentrations of 9 x 10(14) molecules/cm(3), water trimer concentrations of 2.6 x 10(12) molecules/cm(3), tetramer concentrations of approximately 5.8 x 10(11) molecules/cm(3), and pentamer concentrations of approximately 3.5 x 10(10) molecules/cm(3) in saturated air at 298 K. These results have important implications for understanding the gas-phase chemistry of the lower troposphere.

  11. Chemical evolution of star clusters

    OpenAIRE

    van Loon, Jacco Th.

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old globular clusters, in relation to their formation histories. Globular clusters clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxi...

  12. Study of magnetic defects in Nb2VSbO10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typek, J.; Cyran, A.; Zolnierkiewicz, G.; Bobrowska, M.; Filipek, E.; Piz, M.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic properties of Nb2VSbO10, the compound formed in V-Sb-Nb oxide system, were investigated by dc magnetisation measurements using an MPMS-7 SQUID magnetometer and EPR conventional X-band Bruker E 500 spectrometer. Although the nominal valences of the constituting metal ions indicated a diamagnetic material, Nb2VSbO10 displayed rich and interesting magnetic behaviour due to the existence of numerous defects related to oxygen vacancies. Isothermal magnetisation has revealed the presence of three spin subsystems - two different paramagnetic systems and antiferromagnetic spin clusters. EPR spectra showed the presence of three components, involving isolated and interacting V4+ ions as well as antiferromagnetic spin clusters. All these magnetic defects are the result of valence changes of metal ions due to charge compensation in the neighborhood of oxygen vacancies, most probably located on grains boundaries.

  13. Defect evolution in a Nisbnd Mosbnd Crsbnd Fe alloy subjected to high-dose Kr ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Reyes, Massey; Voskoboinikov, Roman; Kirk, Marquis A.; Huang, Hefei; Lumpkin, Greg; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti

    2016-06-01

    A candidate Nisbnd Mosbnd Crsbnd Fe alloy (GH3535) for application as a structural material in a molten salt nuclear reactor was irradiated with 1 MeV Kr2+ ions (723 K, max dose of 100 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem facility. The evolution of defects like dislocation loops and vacancy- and self-interstitial clusters was examined in-situ. For obtaining a deeper insight into the true nature of these defects, the irradiated sample was further analysed under a TEM post-facto. The results show that there is a range of different types of defects formed under irradiation. Interaction of radiation defects with each other and with pre-existing defects, e.g., linear dislocations, leads to the formation of complex microstructures. Molecular dynamics simulations used to obtain a greater understanding of these defect transformations showed that the interaction between linear dislocations and radiation induced dislocation loops could form faulted structures that explain the fringed contrast of these defects observed in TEM.

  14. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D2 Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Kubale

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2L-R confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER retention signal. Arginine residues (R within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E, either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET2 β-arrestin 2 (βarr2 recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3 of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal.

  15. Forms of matter and forms of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kleman, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    The theory of defects in ordered and ill-ordered media is a well-advanced part of condensed matter physics. Concepts developed in this field also occur in the study of spacetime singularities, namely: i)- the topological theory of quantized defects (Kibble's cosmic strings) and ii)- the Volterra process for continuous defects, used to classify the Poincar\\'e symmetry breakings. We reassess the classification of Minkowski spacetime defects in the same theoretical frame, starting from the conjecture that these defects fall into two classes, as on they relate to massive particles or to radiation. This we justify on the empirical evidence of the Hubble's expansion. We introduce timelike and null congruences of geodesics treated as ordered media, viz. 'm'-crystals of massive particles and 'r'-crystals of massless particles, with parallel 4-momenta in M^4. Classifying their defects (or 'forms') we find (i) 'm'- and 'r'- Volterra continuous line defects and (ii) quantized topologically stable 'r'-defects, these latt...

  16. States of the Schottky defect in uranium dioxide and other fluorite type crystals: Molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, M.A., E-mail: akm_max@mail.ru; Kupryazhkin, A. Ya, E-mail: a.ya.kupryazhkin@urfu.ru

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • We derived the degree of vacancy association in Schottky defects from temperature. • At high temperatures cation vacancy forms complexes with anion vacancies. • Point defects model in the presence of complexes was considered. • The presence of anion vacancies around cation vacancy lowers its migration energy. • The formation of nanovoids at high cation vacancy concentrations was shown. - Abstract: Mass transfer processes in fluorite-type systems are determined by the diffusion of cations via vacancies from Schottky defects. To predict diffusion coefficients of cations and other parameters based on it the Lidiard and Matzke approximation of the point defects model, namely the assumption of isolated vacancies, is widely used. States of the Schottky defect were studied with the high-speed molecular dynamics method in a wide temperature range, with six different interaction potentials. Schottky vacancies were dynamically detected during the simulation. It is shown that contrary to the Lidiard and Matzke model, the Schottky cation vacancy is always associated with anion vacancies. The degree of the Schottky defect association depends on the temperature, at high temperatures near the cation vacancy two or more anion vacancies are located. It is shown that the calculated formation energy of Schottky defects in the form of the trivacancy (5.8–7.4) eV for all potentials are close to the experimental value (6–7) eV, in contrast to the formation energy of Schottky defects in the form of isolated vacancies that exceeds 10 eV. Point defects model of the simulated system in the presence of an artificially created Schottky defect was constructed and compared with calculation results. According to our study the point defects model is applicable only at low temperatures less than half of the melting temperature. It is shown that the presence of anion vacancies near the cation vacancy reduces the migration energy of cations. However, for systems with

  17. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... A cluster headache begins as a severe, sudden headache. The headache commonly strikes 2 to 3 hours after you fall ...

  18. Re4As6S3, a thio-spinel-related cluster system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besnard, Celine; Svensson, Christer; Ståhl, Kenny

    2003-01-01

    We have synthesized a new compound with formula Re4As6S3 and characterized its crystal structure by Rietveld powder diffraction methods. Re4As6S3 crystallizes in an face-centered cubic unit cell, space group F (4) over bar 3m (no. 216), with lattice constant a = 9.8608(1) Angstrom and Z = 4....... The rhenium atoms form tetrahedral clusters linked via tetrahedral arsenic clusters to produce an NaCl-type arrangement. The oxidation state of rhenium is IV and the number of electrons shared by the rhenium atoms in the cluster is 12. The structure is based on an ordered defect thio-spinel A((1-x))B(2)X(4......) where the B-type atoms form tetrahedral clusters....

  19. From solid solution to cluster formation of Fe and Cr in α-Zr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, P. A.; Wenman, M. R.; Gault, B.; Moody, M. P.; Ivermark, M.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Preuss, M.; Edwards, L.; Grimes, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which the re-solution of Fe and Cr additions increase the corrosion rate of irradiated Zr alloys, the solubility and clustering of Fe and Cr in model binary Zr alloys was investigated using a combination of experimental and modelling techniques - atom probe tomography (APT), x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermoelectric power (TEP) and density functional theory (DFT). Cr occupies both interstitial and substitutional sites in the α-Zr lattice; Fe favours interstitial sites, and a low-symmetry site that was not previously modelled is found to be the most favourable for Fe. Lattice expansion as a function of Fe and Cr content in the α-Zr matrix deviates from Vegard's law and is strongly anisotropic for Fe additions, expanding the c-axis while contracting the a-axis. Matrix content of solutes cannot be reliably estimated from lattice parameter measurements, instead a combination of TEP and APT was employed. Defect clusters form at higher solution concentrations, which induce a smaller lattice strain compared to the dilute defects. In the presence of a Zr vacancy, all two-atom clusters are more soluble than individual point defects and as many as four Fe or three Cr atoms could be accommodated in a single Zr vacancy. The Zr vacancy is critical for the increased apparent solubility of defect clusters; the implications for irradiation induced microstructure changes in Zr alloys are discussed.

  20. Ventricular septal defect (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventricular septal defect is a congenital defect of the heart, that occurs as an abnormal opening in ... wall that separates the right and left ventricles. Ventricular septal defect may also be associated with other ...

  1. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  2. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  3. Inspection of directed self-assembly defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Chikashi; Durant, Stephane; Lange, Steve; Harukawa, Ryota; Miyagi, Takemasa; Nagaswami, Venkat; Rincon Delgadillo, Paulina; Gronheid, Roel; Nealey, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is considered as a potential patterning solution for future generation devices. One of the most critical challenges for translating DSA into high volume manufacturing is to achieve low defect density in the DSA patterning process. The defect inspection capability is fundamental to defect reduction in any process, particularly the DSA process, as it provides engineers with information on the numbers and types of defects. While the challenges of other candidates of new generation lithography are well known (for example, smaller size, noise level due to LER etc.), the DSA process causes certain defects that are unique. These defects are nearly planar and in a material which produces very little defect scattering signal. These defects, termed as "dislocation" and "disclination" have unique shapes and have very little material contrast. While large clusters of these unique defects are easy to detect, single dislocation and disclination defects offer considerable challenge during inspection. In this investigation, etching the DSA pattern into a silicon (Si) substrate structure to enhance defect signal and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is studied. We used a Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) method for solving Maxwell's equations to simulate the DSA unique defects and calculate inspection parameters. Controllable inspection parameters include various illumination and collection apertures, wavelength band, polarization, noise filtering, focus, pixel size, and signal processing. From the RCWA simulation, we compared SNR between "Post-SiN etch" and "Post-SiN+Si-substrate etch" steps. The study is also extended to investigate wafer-level data at post etch inspection. Both the simulations and inspection tool results showed dramatic signal and SNR improvements when the pattern was etched into the SiN+Si substrate allowing capture of DSA unique defect types.

  4. INTRINSIC POINT-DEFECTS AND LIGHT INTERSTITIALS IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NIESEN, L

    1993-01-01

    Clusters consisting of a radioactive probe atom and various point defects in metallic hosts were studied by means of NMR-ON and PAC. NMR resonance signals were observed for (IV2)-I-131 clusters in Fe and (InV4)-In-114m clusters in Ni. Decoration of (InV2)-In-111 clusters by H atoms in W and Mo and b

  5. Error Detection And Correction Systems For Optical Disk: Issues Of Media Defect Distribution, Defect Growth, Error Management, And Disk Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, William R.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the principal systems of Error Detection and Correction (EDAC) which have been recently proposed as U.S. standards for optical disks and discuss the the two principal methodologies employed: Reed-Solomon Codes and Product Codes, and describe the variations in their operating characteristics and their overhead in disk space. We then present current knowledge of the nature of defect distributions on optical media including bit error rates, the incidence and extents of clustered errors and burst errors, and the controversial aspects of correlation between these forms of error. We show that if such forms are correlated then stronger EDAC systems are needed than if they are not. We discuss the nature of defect growth over time and its likely causes, and present the differing views on the growth of burst errors including nucleation and incubation effects which are not detectable in new media. We exhibit a mathematical model of a currently proposed end-of-life defect distribution for write once media and discuss its implications in EDAC selection. We show that standardization of an EDAC system unifies the data recording process and is permissive to data interchange, but that enhancements in EDAC computation during reading can achieve higher than normal EDAC performance, though sometimes at the expense of decoding time. Finally we examine vendor estimates of disk longevity and possible means of life extension where archival recording is desired.

  6. Point defects in crystals (including grouped defects). Report No. 4548

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1981-08-01

    The fundamental properties of point defects, vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, in pure fcc and bcc metals is reviewed. Point defects created by both thermally-activated and irradiation processes are considered. The roles played by vacancies and self-interstitial atoms in thermal equilibrium are discussed and the best values of the enthalpy of formation of these point defects, in a number of metals, are given. Methods for obtaining fundamental properties of vacancies, such as activation volumes, mobilities, and binding enthalpies are discussed. Selected best values of mobilities and binding enthalpies of vacancies, as deduced from recovery experiments on a number of different quenched metals are listed. The problem of the production of single self-interstitial atoms and their configuration(s) is discussed. The clustering of single self-interstitials into small clusters is also considered. The physical origin of the extremely high low-temperature mobility of self-interstitials in the so-called Stage I recovery regime is also discussed.

  7. Chemical evolution of star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old globular clusters, in relation to their formation histories. Globular clusters clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of globular clusters in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the globular clusters formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter minihaloes might be favoured. Not all globular clusters may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic halo from Galactic bulge clusters.

  8. Ion beam nanopatterning in graphite: characterization of single extended defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melinon, P; Hannour, A; Bardotti, L; Prevel, B [Laboratoire de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures UMR 5586, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon I et CNRS, Batiment Lon Brillouin, 6 rue Ampere, Domaine de la Doua, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gierak, J; Bourhis, E; Faini, G [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN/CNRS), Route de Nozay, F-91560 Marcoussis (France); Canut, B [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon UMR 5270, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon I et CNRS, Batiment Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, Domaine de la Doua, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)], E-mail: pmelinon@lpmcn.univ-lyon1.fr

    2008-06-11

    The morphology and the electronic structure of a single focused ion-beam-induced artificial extended defect is probed by several methods including micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies and Monte Carlo and/or semi-analytical simulation within standard codes. The efficiency of the artificial defect for deposited metallic cluster pinning is also investigated. We show a correlation between the ion dose, morphology, electronic structure and cluster trapping efficiency. At room temperature, cluster pinning is efficient when the displacement per atom is one or more. Well-ordered patterned cluster networks are considered for potential applications.

  9. Ion beam nanopatterning in graphite: characterization of single extended defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mélinon, P; Hannour, A; Bardotti, L; Prével, B; Gierak, J; Bourhis, E; Faini, G; Canut, B

    2008-06-11

    The morphology and the electronic structure of a single focused ion-beam-induced artificial extended defect is probed by several methods including micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies and Monte Carlo and/or semi-analytical simulation within standard codes. The efficiency of the artificial defect for deposited metallic cluster pinning is also investigated. We show a correlation between the ion dose, morphology, electronic structure and cluster trapping efficiency. At room temperature, cluster pinning is efficient when the displacement per atom is one or more. Well-ordered patterned cluster networks are considered for potential applications.

  10. Star Clusters within FIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  11. Cluster Management Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Leo; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    This article explores a new management formcluster management – in Danish public sector day care. Although cluster management has been widely adopted in Danish day care at the municipality level, it has attracted only sparse research attention. We use theoretical insights from Scandinavian...... institutionalism together with a longitudinal case-based inquiry into how cluster management has entered and penetrated the management practices of day care in Denmark. We demonstrate how cluster management became widely adopted in the day care field not only because of its intrinsic properties but also because...... of how it was legitimized as a “ready-to-use” management model. Further, our account reveals how cluster management translated into considerably different local variants as it travelled into specific organizations. However, these processes have not occurred sequentially with cluster management first...

  12. Cluster Management Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Leo; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    of how it was legitimized as a “ready-to-use” management model. Further, our account reveals how cluster management translated into considerably different local variants as it travelled into specific organizations. However, these processes have not occurred sequentially with cluster management first......This article explores a new management formcluster management – in Danish public sector day care. Although cluster management has been widely adopted in Danish day care at the municipality level, it has attracted only sparse research attention. We use theoretical insights from Scandinavian...... institutionalism together with a longitudinal case-based inquiry into how cluster management has entered and penetrated the management practices of day care in Denmark. We demonstrate how cluster management became widely adopted in the day care field not only because of its intrinsic properties but also because...

  13. Human Lin28 Forms a High-Affinity 1:1 Complex with the 106~363 Cluster miRNA miR-363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Daniel T; Fung, Herman K H; Levdikov, Vladimir M; Irmscher, Tobias; Warrander, Fiona C; Greive, Sandra J; Kovalevskiy, Oleg; Isaacs, Harry V; Coles, Mark; Antson, Alfred A

    2016-09-13

    Lin28A is a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression that interacts with and negatively regulates the biogenesis of let-7 family miRNAs. Recent data suggested that Lin28A also binds the putative tumor suppressor miR-363, a member of the 106~363 cluster of miRNAs. Affinity for this miRNA and the stoichiometry of the protein-RNA complex are unknown. Characterization of human Lin28's interaction with RNA has been complicated by difficulties in producing stable RNA-free protein. We have engineered a maltose binding protein fusion with Lin28, which binds let-7 miRNA with a Kd of 54.1 ± 4.2 nM, in agreement with previous data on a murine homologue. We show that human Lin28A binds miR-363 with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with a similar, if not higher, affinity (Kd = 16.6 ± 1.9 nM). Further analysis suggests that the interaction of the N-terminal cold shock domain of Lin28A with RNA is salt-dependent, supporting a model in which the cold shock domain allows the protein to sample RNA substrates through transient electrostatic interactions.

  14. Human Lin28 Forms a High-Affinity 1:1 Complex with the 106~363 Cluster miRNA miR-363

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lin28A is a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression that interacts with and negatively regulates the biogenesis of let-7 family miRNAs. Recent data suggested that Lin28A also binds the putative tumor suppressor miR-363, a member of the 106~363 cluster of miRNAs. Affinity for this miRNA and the stoichiometry of the protein–RNA complex are unknown. Characterization of human Lin28’s interaction with RNA has been complicated by difficulties in producing stable RNA-free protein. We have engineered a maltose binding protein fusion with Lin28, which binds let-7 miRNA with a Kd of 54.1 ± 4.2 nM, in agreement with previous data on a murine homologue. We show that human Lin28A binds miR-363 with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with a similar, if not higher, affinity (Kd = 16.6 ± 1.9 nM). Further analysis suggests that the interaction of the N-terminal cold shock domain of Lin28A with RNA is salt-dependent, supporting a model in which the cold shock domain allows the protein to sample RNA substrates through transient electrostatic interactions. PMID:27559824

  15. HuCNS-SC Human NSCs Fail to Differentiate, Form Ectopic Clusters, and Provide No Cognitive Benefits in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Marsh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs can improve cognition in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, AD is a protracted disorder, and prior studies have examined only short-term effects. We therefore used an immune-deficient model of AD (Rag-5xfAD mice to examine long-term transplantation of human NSCs (StemCells Inc.; HuCNS-SCs. Five months after transplantation, HuCNS-SCs had engrafted and migrated throughout the hippocampus and exhibited no differences in survival or migration in response to β-amyloid pathology. Despite robust engraftment, HuCNS-SCs failed to terminally differentiate and over a quarter of the animals exhibited ectopic human cell clusters within the lateral ventricle. Unlike prior short-term experiments with research-grade HuCNS-SCs, we also found no evidence of improved cognition, no changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and no increase in synaptic density. These data, while disappointing, reinforce the notion that individual human NSC lines need to be carefully assessed for efficacy and safety in appropriate long-term models.

  16. A Galaxy in Transition: Structure, Globular Clusters, and Distance of the Star-Forming S0 Galaxy NGC 1533 in Dorado

    CERN Document Server

    DeGraaff, Regina Barber; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Putman, Mary E

    2007-01-01

    We use two-band imaging data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope for a detailed study of NGC1533, an SB0 galaxy in the Dorado group surrounded by a ring of HI. NGC1533 appears to be completing a transition from late to early type: it is red, but not quite dead. Faint spiral structure becomes visible following galaxy subtraction, and luminous blue stars can be seen in isolated areas of the disk. Dust is visible in the color map in the region around the bar, and there is a linear color gradient throughout the disk. We determine an accurate distance from the surface brightness fluctuations (SBF) method, finding m-M = 31.44\\pm0.12 mag, or d = 19.4\\pm1.1 Mpc. We then study the globular cluster (GC) colors, sizes, and luminosity function (GCLF). Estimates of the distance from the median of the GC half-light radii and from the peak of the GCLF both agree well with the SBF distance. The GC specific frequency is S_N=1.3\\pm0.2, typical for an early-type disk galaxy. The color distri...

  17. Folding defect affine Toda field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, C

    2013-01-01

    A folding process is applied to fused a^(1)_r defects to construct defects for the non-simply laced affi?ne Toda ?field theories of c^(1)_n, d^(2)_n and a^(2)_n at the classical level. Support for the hypothesis that these defects are integrable in the folded theories is provided by the observation that transmitted solitons retain their form. Further support is given by the demonstration that energy and momentum are conserved.

  18. Phosphorous–vacancy–oxygen defects in silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2013-07-30

    Electronic structure calculations employing the hybrid functional approach are used to gain fundamental insight in the interaction of phosphorous with oxygen interstitials and vacancies in silicon. It recently has been proposed, based on a binding energy analysis, that phosphorous–vacancy–oxygen defects may form. In the present study we investigate the stability of this defect as a function of the Fermi energy for the possible charge states. Spin polarization is found to be essential for the charge neutral defect.

  19. Defect distribution and reliability assessment of wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard Toft, Henrik; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two stochastic models for the distribution of defects in wind turbine blades are proposed. The first model assumes that the individual defects are completely randomly distributed in the blade. The second model assumes that the defects occur in clusters of different size, based...... on the assumption that one error in the production process tends to trigger several defects. For both models, additional information, such as number, type, and size of the defects, is included as stochastic variables. In a numerical example, the reliability is estimated for a generic wind turbine blade model both...... the reliability for the wind turbine blade using Bayesian statistics....

  20. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  1. On the dynamics of supermassive black holes in gas-rich, star-forming galaxies: the case for nuclear star cluster co-evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacki, Pawel; Teyssier, Romain; Bleuler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a new model for the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the ramses code using sink particles, improving over previous work the treatment of gas accretion and dynamical evolution. This new model is tested against a suite of high-resolution simulations of an isolated, gas-rich, cooling halo. We study the effect of various feedback models on the SMBH growth and its dynamics within the galaxy. In runs without any feedback, the SMBH is trapped within a massive bulge and is therefore able to grow quickly, but only if the seed mass is chosen larger than the minimum Jeans mass resolved by the simulation. We demonstrate that, in the absence of supernovae (SN) feedback, the maximum SMBH mass is reached when active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating balances gas cooling in the nuclear region. When our efficient SN feedback is included, it completely prevents bulge formation, so that massive gas clumps can perturb the SMBH orbit, and reduce the accretion rate significantly. To overcome this issue, we propose an observationally motivated model for the joint evolution of the SMBH and a parent nuclear star cluster (NSC), which allows the SMBH to remain in the nuclear region, grow fast and resist external perturbations. In this scenario, however, SN feedback controls the gas supply and the maximum SMBH mass now depends on the balance between AGN heating and gravity. We conclude that SMBH/NSC co-evolution is crucial for the growth of SMBH in high-z galaxies, the progenitors of massive ellipticals today.

  2. Defect-Tolerant Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Rasmussen, Filip Anselm; Kuhar, Korina;

    2016-01-01

    -principles investigation of defect tolerance in 29 monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) of interest for nanoscale optoelectronics. We find that the TMDs based on group VI and X metals form deep gap states upon creation of a chalcogen (S, Se, Te) vacancy, while the TMDs based on group IV metals form only...... shallow defect levels and are thus predicted to be defect-tolerant. Interestingly, all the defect sensitive TMDs have valence and conduction bands with a very similar orbital composition. This indicates a bonding/antibonding nature of the gap, which in turn suggests that dangling bonds will fall inside...... the gap. These ideas are made quantitative by introducing a descriptor that measures the degree of similarity of the conduction and valence band manifolds. Finally, the study is generalized to nonpolar nanoribbons of the TMDs where we find that only the defect sensitive materials form edge states within...

  3. Stable line defects in silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  4. Line defects and (framed) BPS quivers

    CERN Document Server

    Cirafici, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The BPS spectrum of certain N=2 supersymmetric field theories can be determined algebraically by studying the representation theory of BPS quivers. We introduce methods based on BPS quivers to study line defects. The presence of a line defect opens up a new BPS sector: framed BPS states can be bound to the defect. The defect can be geometrically described in terms of laminations on a curve. To a lamination we associate certain elements of the Leavitt path algebra of the BPS quiver and use them to compute the framed BPS spectrum. We also provide an alternative characterization of line defects by introducing framed BPS quivers. Using the theory of (quantum) cluster algebras, we derive an algorithm to compute the framed BPS spectra of new defects from known ones. Line defects are generated from a framed BPS quiver by applying certain sequences of mutation operations. Framed BPS quivers also behave nicely under a set of "cut and join" rules, which can be used to study how N=2 systems with defects couple to produc...

  5. Submillimeter Array Observations of Magnetic Fields in G240.31+0.07: an Hourglass in a Massive Cluster-forming Core

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Keping; Zhang, Qizhou; Menten, Karl M.; Liu, Hauyu B.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Girart, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of an hourglass magnetic field aligned with a well-defined outflow-rotation system in a high-mass star-forming region. The observations were performed with Submillimeter Array toward G240.31+0.07, which harbors a massive, flattened, and fragmenting molecular cloud core and a wide-angle bipolar outflow. The polarized dust emission at 0.88 mm reveals a clear hourglass-shaped magnetic field aligned within 20 degree of the outflow axis. Maps of high-density tracing s...

  6. Familial ventricular aneurysms and septal defects map to chromosome 10p15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Nicolas; Yang, Shi Wei; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Asselin, Géraldine; Ginns, Jonathan; Riopel, Kathleen; Gendron, Roxanne; Montpetit, Alexandre; Duhig, Edwina; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Radford, Dorothy; Andelfinger, Gregor

    2011-03-01

    Although ventricular septal defects (VSD) are the most common congenital heart lesion, familial clustering has been described only in rare instances. The aim of this study was to identify genetic factors and chromosomal regions contributing to VSD. A unique, large kindred segregating various forms of septal pathologies-including VSD, ventricular septal aneurysms, and atrial septal defects (ASD)-was ascertained and characterized clinically and genetically. Eighteen family members in three generations could be studied, out of whom 10 are affected (2 ASD, 3 septal aneurysm, 4 VSD, and 1 tetralogy of Fallot). Parametric multipoint LOD scores reach significance on chromosome 10p15.3-10p15.2 (max. 3.29). The LOD score support interval is in a gene-poor region where deletions have been reported to associate with septal defects, but that is distinct from the DiGeorge syndrome 2 region on 10p. Multiple linkage analysis scenarios suggest that tetralogy of Fallot is a phenocopy and genetically distinct from the autosomal dominant form of septal pathologies observed in this family. This study maps a rare familial form of VSD/septal aneurysms to chromosome 10p15 and extends the spectrum of the genetic heterogeneity of septal pathologies. Fine mapping, haplotype construction, and resequencing will provide a unique opportunity to study the pathogenesis of septal defects and shed light on molecular mechanisms of septal development.

  7. Combined kinetic and DFT studies on the stabilization of the pyramidal form of H3PO2 at the heterometal site of [Mo3M'S4(H2O)10]4+ clusters (M' = Pd, Ni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, Andrés G; Fernández-Trujillo, María J; Safont, Vicent S; Hernández-Molina, Rita; Basallote, Manuel G

    2009-03-07

    Kinetic and DFT studies have been carried out on the reaction of the [Mo(3)M'S(4)(H(2)O)(10)](4+) clusters (M' = Pd, Ni) with H(3)PO(2) to form the [Mo(3)M'(pyr-H(3)PO(2))S(4)(H(2)O)(9)](4+) complexes, in which the rare pyramidal form of H(3)PO(2) is stabilized by coordination to the M' site of the clusters. The reaction proceeds with biphasic kinetics, both steps showing a first order dependence with respect to H(3)PO(2). These results are interpreted in terms of a mechanism that involves an initial substitution step in which one tetrahedral H(3)PO(2) molecule coordinates to M' through the oxygen atom of the P=O bond, followed by a second step that consists in tautomerization of coordinated H(3)PO(2) assisted by a second H(3)PO(2) molecule. DFT studies have been carried out to obtain information on the details of both kinetic steps, the major finding being that the role of the additional H(3)PO(2) molecule in the second step consists in catalysing a hydrogen shift from phosphorus to oxygen in O-coordinated H(3)PO(2), which is made possible by its capability of accepting a proton from P-H to form H(4)PO(2)(+) and then transfer it to the oxygen. DFT studies have been also carried out on the reaction at the Mo centres to understand the reasons that make these metal centres ineffective for promoting tautomerization.

  8. Elastic Properties of Nematic Liquid Crystals Formed by Living and Migrating Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kemkemer, R; Kaufmann, D; Gruler, H; Kemkemer, Ralf; Kling, Dieter; Kaufmann, Dieter; Gruler, Hans

    1998-01-01

    In culture migrating and interacting amoeboid cells can form nematic liquid crystal phases. A polar nematic liquid crystal is formed if the interaction has a polar symmetry. One type of white blood cells (granulocytes) form clusters where the cells are oriented towards the center. The core of such an orientational defect (disclination) is either a granulocyte forced to be in an isotropic state or another cell type like a monocyte. An apolar nematic liquid crystal is formed if the interaction has an apolar symmetry. Different cell types like human melanocytes (=pigment cells of the skin), human fibroblasts (=connective tissue cells), human osteoblasts (=bone cells), human adipocytes (= fat cells) etc., form an apolar nematic liquid crystal. The orientational elastic energy is derived and the orientational defects (disclination) of nematic liquid crystals are investigated. The existence of half-numbered disclinations show that the nematic phase has an apolar symmetry. The density- and order parameter dependence...

  9. Multiplicity and clustering in Taurus star-forming region. I. Unexpected ultra-wide pairs of high-order multiplicity in Taurus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joncour, Isabelle; Duchêne, Gaspard; Moraux, Estelle

    2017-02-01

    Aims: This work analyses the spatial distribution of stars in Taurus with a specific focus on multiple stars and wide pairs in order to derive new constraints on star formation and early dynamical evolution scenarios. Methods: We collected the multiplicity data of stars in Taurus to build an up-to-date stellar/multiplicity catalog. We first present a general study of nearest-neighbor statistics on spatial random distribution, comparing its analytical distribution and moments to those obtained from Monte Carlo samplings. We introduce the one-point correlation Ψ function to complement the pair correlation function and define the spatial regimes departing from randomness in Taurus. We then perform a set of statistical studies to characterize the binary regime that prevails in Taurus. Results: The Ψ function in Taurus has a scale-free trend with a similar exponent as the correlation function at small scale. It extends almost 3 decades up to 60 kAU showing a potential extended wide binary regime. This was hidden in the correlation function due to the clustering pattern blending. Distinguishing two stellar populations, single stars versus multiple systems (separation ≤1 kAU), within Class II/III stars observed at high angular resolution, we highlight a major spatial neighborhood difference between the two populations using nearest-neighbor statistics. The multiple systems are three times more likely to have a distant companion within 10 kAU when compared to single stars. We show that this is due to the presence of most probable physical ultra-wide pairs (UWPs, defined as such from their mutual nearest neighbor property), that are themselves generally composed of multiple systems containing up to five stars altogether. More generally, our work highlights; 1) a new large population of candidate UWPs in Taurus within the range 1-60 kAU in Taurus and 2) the major local structural role they play up to 60 kAU. There are three different types of UWPs; either composed of two

  10. The effects of cluster carbon implantation at low temperature on damage recovery after annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Amorphous Si layer formation with cluster carbon ion implantations at low substrate temperature and its effects on damage recovery and diffusion suppression have been discussed. Cluster carbon molecule species (C3Hx˜C7Hx), implantation temperature (RT ˜ -60°C), implantation dose and energy were used as parameters. Amorphous Si formation by cluster carbon implantation is more effective compared with monomer carbon implantation. Low temperature cluster carbon implantations increase amorphous Si thickness far beyond monomer carbon implantation even at very low temperature. Amorphous-crystal interface smoothness was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, and is improved by lower temperature implantations. The smoothness improvement affects the residual damage, End of Range Defects, after annealing. Thicker amorphous Si over 100 nm depth can be formed with light Cn+ molecule implantations. That makes it possible to suppress wide distributed phosphorus diffusion.

  11. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form....... In general, students enter design education as far more skilled observers with regards to function than form. They are, in other words, predisposed to observe objects asking ‘what is?’, rather than ‘how is?’. This habit has not only cognitive implications. It is closely intertwined with a rudimentary...

  12. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... means that form serves both as the connective value and as the concept for reflection. In other words, form is observed as form, not anything else. The didactical challenge of teaching form as form is accentuated by students’ everyday-based pre-orientation towards function at the expense of form...... vocabulary of form. Even in cases in which teaching uses terms and phrases from everyday life (for instance, ‘intersection’), the meaning of the word cannot necessarily be transmitted directly from an ordinary vocabulary into a design context. And it is clearly a common issue for the contributions...

  13. Influence of material quality and process-induced defects on semiconductor device performance and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, W. A.; Mckee, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of major causes of device yield degradation is presented. The relationships of device types to critical processes and typical defects are discussed, and the influence of the defect on device yield and performance is demonstrated. Various defect characterization techniques are described and applied. A correlation of device failure, defect type, and cause of defect is presented in tabular form with accompanying illustrations.

  14. Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity Updated:Apr 19,2016 Exercise Is for Everyone ... almost all patients do some form of regular physical activity. There are a few exceptions, so it's good ...

  15. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  16. Defect studies of ZnSe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipose, U; Saxena, Ankur; Ruda, Harry E [Centre for Nanotechnology, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3E4 (Canada); Simpson, P J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wang, Y Q; Kavanagh, K L [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2008-05-28

    During the synthesis of ZnSe nanowires various point and extended defects can form, leading to observed stacking faults and twinning defects, and strong defect related emission in photoluminescence spectra. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple thermodynamic model for estimating the defect concentration in ZnSe nanowires grown under varying Se vapour pressure and for explaining the results of our experimental findings. Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used successfully for the first time for nanowires and the results support predictions from the defect model as well as agreeing well with our structural and optical characterization results. Under very high Se vapour pressure, Se nodules were observed to form on the sidewalls of the nanowire, indicating that beyond a limit, excess Se will begin to precipitate out of the liquid alloy droplet in the vapour-liquid-solid growth of nanowires.

  17. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that ... function, even though there are normal platelet numbers. Most ...

  19. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects, premature birth and infant mortality. Solving premature birth Featured articles Accomplishments and lessons learned since the ... and pregnancy Folic acid Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce your ...

  20. Spatiotemporal Property Analysis of Birth Defects in Wuxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI-LEI WU; GONG CHEN; XIN-MING SONG; CHENG-FU LI; LEI ZHANG; LAN LIU; XIAO-YING ZHENG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the temporal trends and spatial patterns of birth defects occurring in Wuxi, a developed region of China. Methods Wavelet analysis was used to decompose the temporal trends of birth defect prevalence based on the birth defect rates over the past 16 years. Birth defect cases with detailed personal and family information were geo-coded and the relative risk in each village was calculated. General G statistic was used to test the spatial property with different scales. Results Wavelet analysis showed an increasing temporal trend of birth defects in this region. Clustering analysis revealed that changes continued in the spatial patterns with different scales. Conclusion Wuxi is confronted with severe challenges to reduce birth defect prevalence. The risk factors are stable and show no change with spatial scale but an increasing temporal trend. Interventions should be focused on villages with a higher prevalence of birth defects.

  1. Cluster Lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Kneib, Jean-Paul; 10.1007/s00159-011-0047-3

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most recently assembled, massive, bound structures in the Universe. As predicted by General Relativity, given their masses, clusters strongly deform space-time in their vicinity. Clusters act as some of the most powerful gravitational lenses in the Universe. Light rays traversing through clusters from distant sources are hence deflected, and the resulting images of these distant objects therefore appear distorted and magnified. Lensing by clusters occurs in two regimes, each with unique observational signatures. The strong lensing regime is characterized by effects readily seen by eye, namely, the production of giant arcs, multiple-images, and arclets. The weak lensing regime is characterized by small deformations in the shapes of background galaxies only detectable statistically. Cluster lenses have been exploited successfully to address several important current questions in cosmology: (i) the study of the lens(es) - understanding cluster mass distributions and issues pertaining...

  2. Atrioventricular Canal Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor See your doctor if you or your child develops signs or symptoms of atrioventricular canal defect. Atrioventricular canal defect occurs before birth when a baby's heart is developing. Some factors, such as Down syndrome, might increase the risk of atrioventricular canal defect. ...

  3. Trapping of He in intrinsic defects in zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulroue, Jack; Watkins, Matthew; Morris, Andrew J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and The London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Duffy, Dorothy M., E-mail: d.duffy@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy and The London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}) is a proposed ceramic for the disposal of plutonium. Density functional theory with the dispersion correction (DFT-D3) has been used to study the behaviour of the He defect in zirconolite. The lowest energy He interstitial site is located in the 〈0 1 0〉 channels and found to have a migration barrier of 1.46 eV. There was a significant charge state dependence on the binding energies of a He atom to the vacancies, with the neutral 5-fold coordinated Ti having the strongest binding followed by the Ca vacancies. Multiple He interstitials were studied to examine if He bubbles were likely to form in bulk zirconolite. It was found that it was unfavourable for He to cluster at the concentrations studied.

  4. Studying post-etching silicon crystal defects on 300mm wafer by automatic defect review AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandiatashbar, Ardavan; Taylor, Patrick A.; Kim, Byong; Yoo, Young-kook; Lee, Keibock; Jo, Ahjin; Lee, Ju Suk; Cho, Sang-Joon; Park, Sang-il

    2016-03-01

    Single crystal silicon wafers are the fundamental elements of semiconductor manufacturing industry. The wafers produced by Czochralski (CZ) process are very high quality single crystalline materials with known defects that are formed during the crystal growth or modified by further processing. While defects can be unfavorable for yield for some manufactured electrical devices, a group of defects like oxide precipitates can have both positive and negative impacts on the final device. The spatial distribution of these defects may be found by scattering techniques. However, due to limitations of scattering (i.e. light wavelength), many crystal defects are either poorly classified or not detected. Therefore a high throughput and accurate characterization of their shape and dimension is essential for reviewing the defects and proper classification. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) can provide high resolution twodimensional images, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is essential for obtaining three-dimensional information of the defects of interest (DOI) as it is known to provide the highest vertical resolution among all techniques [1]. However AFM's low throughput, limited tip life, and laborious efforts for locating the DOI have been the limitations of this technique for defect review for 300 mm wafers. To address these limitations of AFM, automatic defect review AFM has been introduced recently [2], and is utilized in this work for studying DOI on 300 mm silicon wafer. In this work, we carefully etched a 300 mm silicon wafer with a gaseous acid in a reducing atmosphere at a temperature and for a sufficient duration to decorate and grow the crystal defects to a size capable of being detected as light scattering defects [3]. The etched defects form a shallow structure and their distribution and relative size are inspected by laser light scattering (LLS). However, several groups of defects couldn't be properly sized by the LLS due to the very shallow depth and low

  5. The rotation of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, Hrant M

    2015-01-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher of the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with $a/b>1.8$ and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy in which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60\\%, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ~ 35%. The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not have merging with other clusters and groups of galaxies, in the result of which the rotation has been prevented.

  6. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  7. RESEARCH FOR CLUSTERING OF FEATURE MANUFACTURING-ORIENTED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The following questions are discussed:feature cluster, feature cluster concept and the reasoning formula. The defect based on approach direction and feed direction are analyzed. Feature tool axis direction concept and its definition method are submitted. The feature for practical part is also clustered by tool axis direction.

  8. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  9. Defect charge states in Si doped hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapasha, R E; Molepo, M P; Andrew, R C; Chetty, N

    2016-02-10

    We perform ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the energetics, electronic and magnetic properties of isolated stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric substitutional Si complexes in a hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer. The Si impurity atoms substituting the boron atom sites SiB giving non-stoichiometric complexes are found to be the most energetically favourable, and are half-metallic and order ferromagnetically in the neutral charge state. We find that the magnetic moments and magnetization energies increase monotonically when Si defects form a cluster. Partial density of states and standard Mulliken population analysis indicate that the half-metallic character and magnetic moments mainly arise from the Si 3p impurity states. The stoichiometric Si complexes are energetically unfavorable and non-magnetic. When charging the energetically favourable non-stoichiometric Si complexes, we find that the formation energies strongly depend on the impurity charge states and Fermi level position. We also find that the magnetic moments and orderings are tunable by charge state modulation q  =  -2, -1, 0, +1, +2. The induced half-metallic character is lost (retained) when charging isolated (clustered) Si defect(s). This underlines the potential of a Si doped hexagonal boron-nitride monolayer for novel spin-based applications.

  10. Interaction between helium and intrinsic point defects in 3C-SiC single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dan; Li, Ruihuan; Ding, Jianhua; Zhang, Pengbo; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-06-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a candidate structural material for fission and fusion reactors as well as an important wide band-gap semiconductor for electronic devices. Using first-principles calculations, we systemically investigate the energetics and stability of helium (He) atoms and intrinsic point defects inside single-crystalline 3C-SiC. We find that the formation energy of interstitial He is lower than those of point defects. Inside 3C-SiC, the He-C interaction is stronger than He-Si. Hence, the interstitial He atom in the Si tetrahedral site has a stronger interaction with the six C atoms in the second nearest neighbor than the four nearest neighboring Si atoms. For interstitial He atoms, the equilibrium He-He distance is about 1.81 Å with a weak attraction of 0.09 eV. According to the binding energies of Hen (n = 2-4) clusters, He interstitials can form He bubbles without involving other types of structural defects. Moreover, a Si (C) monovacancy can accommodate up to 11 (9) He atoms. The Hen clusters trapped in the Si or C monovacancy induce large internal pressure in the order of magnitude of GPa and thus facilitate the creation of a new vacancy at the nearby lattice site.

  11. Polarizability effect in metallic clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ş Şentürk; K Harigaya; O Özsoy

    2006-03-01

    Langevin approach implemented in the inelastic cross-sections measured for the low-energy electrons colliding with metallic clusters points out that statical form of the polarizability dominate at energies less than 1.25 eV. The dynamical form comes into play at energies around 1.3 eV. The form of the polarizabilities indicates that polarizability of the metallic clusters is energy-dependent.

  12. The Nature and Nurture of Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2009-01-01

    Star clusters have hierarchical patterns in space and time, suggesting formation processes in the densest regions of a turbulent interstellar medium. Clusters also have hierarchical substructure when they are young, which makes them all look like the inner mixed parts of a pervasive stellar hierarchy. Young field stars share this distribution, presumably because some of them came from dissolved clusters and others formed in a dispersed fashion in the same gas. The fraction of star formation that ends up in clusters is apparently not constant, but may increase with interstellar pressure. Hierarchical structure explains why stars form in clusters and why many of these clusters are self-bound. It also explains the cluster mass function. Halo globular clusters share many properties of disk clusters, including what appears to be an upper cluster cutoff mass. However, halo globulars are self-enriched and often connected with dwarf galaxy streams. The mass function of halo globulars could have initially been like th...

  13. Clustered regression with unknown clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barman, Kishor

    2011-01-01

    We consider a collection of prediction experiments, which are clustered in the sense that groups of experiments ex- hibit similar relationship between the predictor and response variables. The experiment clusters as well as the regres- sion relationships are unknown. The regression relation- ships define the experiment clusters, and in general, the predictor and response variables may not exhibit any clus- tering. We call this prediction problem clustered regres- sion with unknown clusters (CRUC) and in this paper we focus on linear regression. We study and compare several methods for CRUC, demonstrate their applicability to the Yahoo Learning-to-rank Challenge (YLRC) dataset, and in- vestigate an associated mathematical model. CRUC is at the crossroads of many prior works and we study several prediction algorithms with diverse origins: an adaptation of the expectation-maximization algorithm, an approach in- spired by K-means clustering, the singular value threshold- ing approach to matrix rank minimization u...

  14. Atrial – Ventricular Septal Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Panagiotopoulos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Atrial and ventricular septal defect constitute the most common congenital heart disease.Aim: Τhe aim of the present retrospective study was to record data and factors that affect atrial and ventricular septal defect.Method and material: The sample study included patients of both sexes who were hospitalized with diagnosis atrial and ventricular septal defect in a Cardiac Surgery hospital of Athens. A specially constructed printed form was used for data collection, where were recorded the demographic and personal variables, the pathological, surgical, cardiology and obstetric history, the habits of adults, as well as the personal characteristics of mothers. Analysis of data was performed by descriptive statistical analysis.Results: The sample study consisted of 101 individuals with diagnosis atrial or ventricular Septal Defect, of which 40% were boys and 60% girls. The 70% of the sample study suffered from atrial Septal Defect and the 30% suffered from ventricular Septal Defect. Regarding age, 12% of the sample study was 0-1 years old, 35% was >1 years old, 8% was >12-18 years old and 45% over than 18 years old. Regarding educational status of the adult participants, 9% was of 0-6 years education, 22%>6 -12 years, 13%>12 years. 14% of the adult paticipants smoked, 4% consumed alcohol and 5% smoked in conjunction with alcohol. In terms of the obstetric history of the sample studied, 32% of the cases had normal birth, 4% had a twin birth and 1% had a triplet one. According to the variables related to mothers, the mean age of the mother was 30 years and 3 months, 10% were smokers at pregnancy and 3% used chemical substance and mainly hair color. Also, the results of the present study showed that individuals of 12-18 and >18 years old did not suffer from ventricular Septal Defect, whereas the infants 0-1 years old did not suffer from Atrial Septal Defect. The mean value of age at the admission in intensive care unit was 7 months (12% for the infants

  15. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  16. Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters in mammalian cells: new insights and relevance to human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey A. Rouault

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron-sulfur (Fe-S clusters are ubiquitous cofactors composed of iron and inorganic sulfur. They are required for the function of proteins involved in a wide range of activities, including electron transport in respiratory chain complexes, regulatory sensing, photosynthesis and DNA repair. The proteins involved in the biogenesis of Fe-S clusters are evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans, and many insights into the process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis have come from studies of model organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants. It is now clear that several rare and seemingly dissimilar human diseases are attributable to defects in the basic process of Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Although these diseases –which include Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA, ISCU myopathy, a rare form of sideroblastic anemia, an encephalomyopathy caused by dysfunction of respiratory chain complex I and multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome – affect different tissues, a feature common to many of them is that mitochondrial iron overload develops as a secondary consequence of a defect in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. This Commentary outlines the basic steps of Fe-S cluster biogenesis as they have been defined in model organisms. In addition, it draws attention to refinements of the process that might be specific to the subcellular compartmentalization of Fe-S cluster biogenesis proteins in some eukaryotes, including mammals. Finally, it outlines several important unresolved questions in the field that, once addressed, should offer important clues into how mitochondrial iron homeostasis is regulated, and how dysfunction in Fe-S cluster biogenesis can contribute to disease.

  17. Genetic defects of iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, R M

    1976-09-01

    Five genetic traits in man and laboratory animals have major effects on iron transport. The heterogeneous condition, hemochromatosis, in some families appears to segregate as a Mendelian trait, and is associated with defective control of intestinal iron absorption. In the very rare human autosomal recessive trait, atransferrinemia, there is an almost total lack of transferrin and gross maldistribution of iron through the body. In mice, sex-linked anemia (an X-linked recessive trait) causes iron deficiency through defective iron absorption, at the "exit" step; a similar defect probably exists in placental iron transfer. In microcytic anemia of mice, an autosomal recessive trait, iron absorption is also impaired because of a defect of iron entry into cells, which is probably generalized. Belgrade rat anemia, less understood at present, also may involve a major disorder of iron metabolism. Study of these mutations has provided new knowledge of iron metabolism and its genetic control Their phenotypic interaction with nutritional factors, especially the form and quantity of iron in the diet, may provide new insights for the study of nutrition.

  18. Subspace clustering through attribute clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun NIU; Shubo ZHANG; Junliang CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Many recently proposed subspace clustering methods suffer from two severe problems. First, the algorithms typically scale exponentially with the data dimensionality or the subspace dimensionality of clusters. Second, the clustering results are often sensitive to input parameters. In this paper, a fast algorithm of subspace clustering using attribute clustering is proposed to over-come these limitations. This algorithm first filters out redundant attributes by computing the Gini coefficient. To evaluate the correlation of every two non-redundant attributes, the relation matrix of non-redundant attributes is constructed based on the relation function of two dimensional united Gini coefficients. After applying an overlapping clustering algorithm on the relation matrix, the candidate of all interesting subspaces is achieved. Finally, all subspace clusters can be derived by clustering on interesting subspaces. Experiments on both synthesis and real datasets show that the new algorithm not only achieves a significant gain of runtime and quality to find subspace clusters, but also is insensitive to input parameters.

  19. Role of Defects in Swelling and Creep of Irradiated SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Voyles, Paul [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-16

    Silicon carbide is a promising cladding material because of its high strength and relatively good corrosion resistance. However, SiC is brittle and therefore SiC-based components need to be carefully designed to avoid cracking and failure by fracture. In design of SiC-based composites for nuclear reactor applications it is essential to take into account how mechanical properties are affected by radiation and temperature, or in other words, what strains and stresses develop in this material due to environmental conditions. While thermal strains in SiC can be predicted using classical theories, radiation-induced strains are much less understood. In particular, it is critical to correctly account for radiation swelling and radiation creep, which contribute significantly to dimensional instability of SiC under radiation. Swelling typically increases logarithmically with radiation dose and saturates at relatively low doses (damage levels of a few dpa). Consequently, swelling-induced stresses are likely to develop within a few months of operation of a reactor. Radiation-induced volume swelling in SiC can be as high as 2%, which is significantly higher than the cracking strain of 0.1% in SiC. Swelling-induced strains will lead to enormous stresses and fracture, unless these stresses can be relaxed via some other mechanism. An effective way to achieve stress relaxation is via radiation creep. Although it has been hypothesized that both radiation swelling and radiation creep are driven by formation of defect clusters, existing models for swelling and creep in SiC are limited by the lack of understanding of specific defects that form due to radiation in the range of temperatures relevant to fuel cladding in light water reactors (LWRs) (<1000°C). For example, defects that can be detected with traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques account only for 10-45% of the swelling measured in irradiated SiC. Here, we have undertaken an integrated experimental and

  20. Internal gettering by metal alloy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonassisi, Anthony; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Pickett, Matthew D.; Marcus, Mathew A.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2010-07-27

    The present invention relates to the internal gettering of impurities in semiconductors by metal alloy clusters. In particular, intermetallic clusters are formed within silicon, such clusters containing two or more transition metal species. Such clusters have melting temperatures below that of the host material and are shown to be particularly effective in gettering impurities within the silicon and collecting them into isolated, less harmful locations. Novel compositions for some of the metal alloy clusters are also described.

  1. The Assembly of Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Purcell, Chris W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-05-16

    We study the formation of fifty-three galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos (M = 10{sup 14.0-14.76} M{sub {circle_dot}}) formed within a pair of cosmological {Lambda}CDM N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host {approx} 0.1L{sub *} galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no 'pre-processing' in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, {approx} 70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; and less than {approx} 12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past ({approx}< 6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local, cluster processes like ram-pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between cluster and field populations at a fixed stellar mass; and that pre-evolution or past merging in the group environment is of secondary importance for setting cluster galaxy properties for most clusters. The accretion times for z = 0 cluster members are quite extended, with {approx} 20% incorporated into the cluster halo more than 7 Gyr ago and {approx} 20% within the last 2 Gyr. By comparing the observed morphological fractions in cluster and field populations, we estimate an approximate time-scale for late-type to early-type transformation within the cluster environment to be {approx} 6 Gyr.

  2. Topological conformal defects with tensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauru, Markus; Evenbly, Glen; Ho, Wen Wei; Gaiotto, Davide; Vidal, Guifre

    2016-09-01

    The critical two-dimensional classical Ising model on the square lattice has two topological conformal defects: the Z2 symmetry defect Dɛ and the Kramers-Wannier duality defect Dσ. These two defects implement antiperiodic boundary conditions and a more exotic form of twisted boundary conditions, respectively. On the torus, the partition function ZD of the critical Ising model in the presence of a topological conformal defect D is expressed in terms of the scaling dimensions Δα and conformal spins sα of a distinct set of primary fields (and their descendants, or conformal towers) of the Ising conformal field theory. This characteristic conformal data {Δα,sα}D can be extracted from the eigenvalue spectrum of a transfer matrix MD for the partition function ZD. In this paper, we investigate the use of tensor network techniques to both represent and coarse grain the partition functions ZDɛand ZD σ of the critical Ising model with either a symmetry defect Dɛ or a duality defect Dσ. We also explain how to coarse grain the corresponding transfer matrices MDɛand MD σ, from which we can extract accurate numerical estimates of {Δα,sα}Dɛ and {Δα,sα}Dσ. Two key ingredients of our approach are (i) coarse graining of the defect D , which applies to any (i.e., not just topological) conformal defect and yields a set of associated scaling dimensions Δα, and (ii) construction and coarse graining of a generalized translation operator using a local unitary transformation that moves the defect, which only exist for topological conformal defects and yields the corresponding conformal spins sα.

  3. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K; Reddy, J N

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  4. Molecular dynamics analysis on buckling of defective carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulathunga, D D T K; Ang, K K [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Reddy, J N, E-mail: cveangkk@nus.edu.s [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3123 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Owing to their remarkable mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been employed in many diverse areas of applications. However, similar to any of the many man-made materials used today, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also susceptible to various kinds of defects. Understanding the effect of defects on the mechanical properties and behavior of CNTs is essential in the design of nanotube-based devices and composites. It has been found in various past studies that these defects can considerably affect the tensile strength and fracture of CNTs. Comprehensive studies on the effect of defects on the buckling and vibration of nanotubes is however lacking in the literature. In this paper, the effects of various configurations of atomic vacancy defects, on axial buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), in different thermal environments, is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), based on a COMPASS force field. Our findings revealed that even a single missing atom can cause a significant reduction in the critical buckling strain and load of SWCNTs. In general, increasing the number of missing atoms, asymmetry of vacancy configurations and asymmetric distribution of vacancy clusters seemed to lead to higher deterioration in buckling properties. Further, SWCNTs with a single vacancy cluster, compared to SWCNTs with two or more vacancy clusters having the same number of missing atoms, appeared to cause higher deterioration of buckling properties. However, exceptions from the above mentioned trends could be expected due to chemical instabilities of defects. Temperature appeared to have less effect on defective CNTs compared to pristine CNTs.

  5. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  6. Watching the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, J L; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara C.

    2003-01-01

    Subarcsecond infrared and radio observations yield important information about the formation of super star clusters from their surrounding gas. We discuss the general properties of ionized and molecular gas near young, forming SSCs, as illustrated by the prototypical young forming super star cluster nebula in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. This super star cluster appears to have a gravitationally bound nebula. The lack of molecular gas suggests a very high star formation efficiency, consistent with the formation of a large, bound star cluster.

  7. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side...

  8. Weighted Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Margareta; Branzei, Simina; Loker, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate clustering in the weighted setting, in which every data point is assigned a real valued weight. We conduct a theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in each of the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterising the precise conditions under which such algorithms react to weights, and classifying clustering methods into three broad categories: weight-responsive, weight-considering, and weight-robust. Our analysis raises several interesting questions and can be directly mapped to the classical unweighted setting.

  9. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  10. Defects and texture studies on polish and electron irradiated copper foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia S, F.; Barragan V, A.; Cabral P, A.; Tavera D, L.; Nieto, M.; Adem, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Applied and basic research on the irradiation-induced defects on metals and alloys has attracted the attention of many researches and the number of published articles is large (1-4). In copper can be distinguished two main temperature ranges to produce characteristic interstitial and vacancies (Frenkel pairs). When electron irradiation is carried out at the low temperature range ({<=} 300 K) Frenkel pairs are created where vacancies are immobile and the interstitial are mobile, forming interstitial clusters. However, when electron irradiation is carried out at the high temperature range ({>=} 350 K) interstitial and vacancies are both mobile (1,2,5). In this latter case the vacancy interstitial mutual annihilation becomes effective due to their high mobility, but other stable defects may be produced. It is also well known that by mechanical polishing, electrochemical polishing, sputtering, radiation damage, annealing among others, the surface of metal specimens may be modified. Several techniques have been used to follow the polishing and irradiation-induced damage in copper and other metals and alloys. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), High voltage electron microscopy (HVEM), Resistivity as a function of fluence, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements are among others used to these purposes. Particularly, PAS is one of these techniques that is only sensitive to free volume vacancies, being of paramount importance in studies of point defects. Within this area, preliminary PAS and XRD results on the characterization of the electron irradiation-induced defects and the polishing induced deformation on copper are presented. (Author)

  11. Interactions of point defects with stacking faults in oxygen-free phosphorus-containing copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yunguo, E-mail: yunguo@kth.se [Division of Materials Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Korzhavyi, Pavel A., E-mail: pavelk@kth.se [Division of Materials Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620219 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The interactions of stacking faults and point defects in oxygen-free phosphorus-containing copper are investigated using ab initio methods. Although monovacancies can act as traps for H impurities or OH groups, the calculations show that two vacancies only weakly bind with each other and this interaction terminates at the third nearest-neighbor distance. An interstitial P tends to form a Cu–P dumbbell-like cluster around the lattice site and can readily combine with a vacancy to become a substitutional impurity. It is also found that the intrinsic stacking-fault energy of copper strongly depends on the temperature as well as on the presences of point defects. The intrinsic stacking-fault energy varies between 20 and 77 mJ/m{sup 2} depending on the presence of point defects in the faulted region. These point defects are also found to affect the unstable stacking-fault energy, but they always increase the twinning tendency of copper. Among them, the substitutional P is found to have the strongest effects, decreasing the intrinsic stacking-fault energy and increasing the twinnability.

  12. An incremental clustering algorithm based on Mahalanobis distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aik, Lim Eng; Choon, Tan Wee

    2014-12-01

    Classical fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm is insufficient to cluster non-spherical or elliptical distributed datasets. The paper replaces classical fuzzy c-means clustering euclidean distance with Mahalanobis distance. It applies Mahalanobis distance to incremental learning for its merits. A Mahalanobis distance based fuzzy incremental clustering learning algorithm is proposed. Experimental results show the algorithm is an effective remedy for the defect in fuzzy c-means algorithm but also increase training accuracy.

  13. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    unexplored. Accordingly, we present information for practitioners on the behaviour of Brown clustering in order to assist hyper-parametre tuning, in the form of a theoretical model of Brown clustering utility. This model is then evaluated empirically in two sequence labelling tasks over two text types. We...

  14. Superheating and melting behaviors of Ag clusters with Ni coating studied by molecular dynamics and experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics with embedded-atom-type interatomicpotentials, we simulated the melting behavior of a spherical Ag3055 cluster coated with Ni. The semi-coherent Ag/Ni interface formed at low temperatures acts as an effective barrier against the surface melting and leads to a substantial superheating of the Ag cluster. The melting point was found to be about 100 K above the equilibrium melting point of the bulk Ag crystal (1230 K±15 K) and about 290 K above that (1040 K) of the free Ag3055 cluster. A superheating of 70 K was observed in the high-temperature differential scanning calorimetry measurement for Ag particles with a mean size of 30 nm embedded in Ni matrix prepared by means of melt-spinning. Melting is initiated locally at the defective interfacial area and then propagates inwards, suggesting a heterogeneously nucleated melting event at the Ag/Ni interface.

  15. Defects in Human Nature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄靓

    2008-01-01

    By tracing the defects of society back to the defects of human nature, humanity's essence is proved to be inherent evil. Man's natural tendency to do evil remain harnessed through the controls and conventions imposed by civilization, however, when rules or civilization are weakened, man' s dark side is unleashed.

  16. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this virus during pregnancy, her child may have low birth weight, intellectual disability (mental retardation) or learning disabilities, ... and central nervous system problems. A child with late congenital syphilis may have abnormalities of the ... Diagnosing Birth Defects Many birth defects are diagnosed even before ...

  17. Cluster functional renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  18. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A symptom is a condition indicating the presence of a disease, especially, when regarded as an aid in diagnosis.Symptoms are the smallest units indicating the existence of a disease. A syndrome on the other hand is an aggregate, set or cluster of concurrent symptoms which together indicate...... and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c......-mean clustering is an easy and well improved tool, which has been applied in many medical fields. We used c-mean fuzzy clustering after feature extraction from an aphasia database. Factor analysis was applied on a correlation matrix of 26 symptoms of language disorders and led to five factors. The factors...

  19. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...

  20. Magnetic cluster excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Albert; Waldmann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic clusters, i.e., assemblies of a finite number (between two or three and several hundred) of interacting spin centers which are magnetically decoupled from their environment, can be found in many materials ranging from inorganic compounds and magnetic molecules to artificial metal structures formed on surfaces and metalloproteins. Their magnetic excitation spectra are determined by the nature of the spin centers and of the magnetic interactions, and the particular arrangement of the mutual interaction paths between the spin centers. Small clusters of up to four magnetic ions are ideal model systems in which to examine the fundamental magnetic interactions, which are usually dominated by Heisenberg exchange, but often complemented by anisotropic and/or higher-order interactions. In large magnetic clusters, which may potentially deal with a dozen or more spin centers, there is the possibility of novel many-body quantum states and quantum phenomena. In this review the necessary theoretical concepts and experimental techniques to study the magnetic cluster excitations and the resulting characteristic magnetic properties are introduced, followed by examples of small clusters, demonstrating the enormous amount of detailed physical information that can be retrieved. The current understanding of the excitations and their physical interpretation in the molecular nanomagnets which represent large magnetic clusters is then presented, with a section devoted to the subclass of single-molecule magnets, distinguished by displaying quantum tunneling of the magnetization. Finally, there is a summary of some quantum many-body states which evolve in magnetic insulators characterized by built-in or field-induced magnetic clusters. The review concludes by addressing future perspectives in the field of magnetic cluster excitations.

  1. Ab initio simulations of the structure, energetics and mobility of radiation-induced point defects in bcc Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeira, M. A.; Palacios, S. L.; González, C.; Fernández-Pello, D.; Iglesias, R.

    2016-09-01

    The formation, binding and migration energetics of helium clusters inside a niobium crystal have been analysed via ab initio simulations. The effect of placing several He atoms within an n-vacancy previously formed or as interstitials inside the initial perfect bulk matrix has been studied. DFT-based results show that He atoms prefer to aggregate forming small clusters at n-vacancy sites rather than at interstitial positions in the perfect crystal. The minimum formation energy is found when NHe is equal to the number of vacancies, n. It follows that vacancies act as almost perfect traps for He atoms, as is well known for other metals. The migration barriers of He atoms inside vacancies increase considerably when compared to what happens for vacancies alone. A secondary consequence is that the full set of energies obtained will be highly relevant as an input for new approaches to KMC simulations of defects in Nb.

  2. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sanjubala; Gruner, Markus E; Khanna, Shiv N; Entel, Peter

    2014-08-21

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM13 (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM13 clusters, Co13 is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe13 and Ni13 clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters.

  3. Integrative cluster analysis in bioinformatics

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Jamous, Basel; Nandi, Asoke K

    2015-01-01

    Clustering techniques are increasingly being put to use in the analysis of high-throughput biological datasets. Novel computational techniques to analyse high throughput data in the form of sequences, gene and protein expressions, pathways, and images are becoming vital for understanding diseases and future drug discovery. This book details the complete pathway of cluster analysis, from the basics of molecular biology to the generation of biological knowledge. The book also presents the latest clustering methods and clustering validation, thereby offering the reader a comprehensive review o

  4. Silicon exfoliation by hydrogen implantation: Actual nature of precursor defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisseu, Pauline Sylvia Pokam; Pingault, Timothée; Ntsoenzok, Esidor; Regula, Gabrielle; Mazen, Frédéric; Sauldubois, Audrey; Andreazza, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    MeV energy hydrogen implantation in silicon followed by a thermal annealing is a very smart way to produce high crystalline quality silicon substrates, much thinner than what can be obtained by diamond disk or wire sawing. Using this kerf-less approach, ultra-thin substrates with thicknesses between 15 μm and 100 μm, compatible with microelectronic and photovoltaic applications are reported. But, despite the benefits of this approach, there is still a lack of fundamental studies at this implantation energy range. However, if very few papers have addressed the MeV energy range, a lot of works have been carried out in the keV implantation energy range, which is the one used in the smart-cut® technology. In order to check if the nature and the growth mechanism of extended defects reported in the widely studied keV implantation energy range could be extrapolated in the MeV range, the thermal evolution of extended defects formed after MeV hydrogen implantation in (100) Si was investigated in this study. Samples were implanted at 1 MeV with different fluences ranging from 6 × 1016 H/cm2 to 2 × 1017 H/cm2 and annealed at temperatures up to 873 K. By cross-section transmission electron microscopy, we found that the nature of extended defects in the MeV range is quite different of what is observed in the keV range. In fact, in our implantation conditions, the generated extended defects are some kinds of planar clusters of gas-filled lenses, instead of platelets as commonly reported in the keV energy range. This result underlines that hydrogen behaves differently when it is introduced in silicon at high or low implantation energy. The activation energy of the growth of these extended defects is independent of the chosen fluence and is between (0.5-0.6) eV, which is very close to the activation energy reported for atomic hydrogen diffusion in a perfect silicon crystal.

  5. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  6. Electronic structure of point defects in rutile TiO[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, N.; Halley, J.W. (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States))

    1995-02-15

    We present results of a computation of the electronic structure of point defects in reduced rutile using a semiempirical self-consistent method. Calculations on models of both titanium interstitials and oxygen vacancies are reported. We find donor levels in the range 0.7--0.8 eV for isolated defects in each case. The defects have an effective screening radius of less than 5 A. We also report results on clusters of defects. These suggest that a model in which the screening charges of multiple defects are added would be quite accurate for systems with multiple defects. Comparison of our results with infrared experiments suggests the presence of defect clustering in nearly stoichiometric rutile, as proposed earlier on the basis of other experiments.

  7. X-ray diffuse scattering investigation of defects in ion implanted and annealed silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.H.; Patel, J.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Beck, U.; Metzger, T.H. [Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Sektion Physik

    1998-12-31

    To characterize the point defects and point defect clusters introduced by ion implantation and annealing, the authors have used grazing incidence x-rays to measure the diffuse scattering in the tails of Bragg peaks (Huang Scattering). An analysis of the diffuse scattered intensity will allow the authors to characterize the nature of point defects or defect clusters introduced by ion implantation. They have also observed unexpected satellite peaks in the diffuse scattering tails. Possible causes for the occurrence of the peaks will be discussed.

  8. Risk group characteristics and viral transmission clusters in South-East Asian patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF 01_AE and subtype B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Oyomopito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 epidemics in Asian countries are driven by varying exposures. The epidemiology of the regional pandemic has been changing with the spread of HIV-1 to lower-risk populations through sexual transmission. Common HIV-1 genotypes include subtype B and circulating recombinant form (CRF 01_AE. Our objective was to use HIV-1 genotypic data to better quantify local epidemics. TASER-M is a multicenter prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients. Associations between HIV exposure, patient sex, country of sample origin and HIV-1 genotype were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. Phylogenetic methods were used on genotypic data to investigate transmission relationships. A total of 1086 patients from Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia and the Philippines were included in analyses. Proportions of male patients within countries varied (Thailand: 55.6%, Hong Kong: 86.1%, Malaysia: 81.4%, Philippines: 93.8%; p < 0.001 as did HIV exposures (heterosexual contact: Thailand: 85.7%, Hong Kong, 46.2%, Malaysia: 47.8%, Philippines: 25.0%; p < 0.001. After adjustment, we found increased subtype B infection among men who have sex with men, relative to heterosexual-reported exposures (odds ratio = 2.4, p < 0.001. We further describe four transmission clusters of eight to 15 treatment naïve, predominantly symptomatic patients (two each for subtype B and CRF01_AE. Risk-group subpopulations differed with respect to the infecting HIV-1 genotype. Homosexual exposure patients had higher odds of being infected with subtype B. Where HIV-1 genotypes circulate within countries or patient risk-groups, local monitoring of genotype-specific transmissions may play a role in focusing public health prevention strategies. Phylogenetic evaluations provide complementary information for surveillance and monitoring of viruses with high mutation rates such as HIV-1 and Ebola.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and birth defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Adolfo; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Besser, Lilah M.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Moore, Cynthia A.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Cleves, Mario A.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Waller, D. Kim; Reece, E. Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes mellitus and 39 birth defects. STUDY DESIGN This was a multicenter case-control study of mothers of infants who were born with (n = 13,030) and without (n = 4895) birth defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997–2003). RESULTS Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) was associated significantly with noncardiac defects (isolated, 7/23 defects; multiples, 13/23 defects) and cardiac defects (isolated, 11/16 defects; multiples, 8/16 defects). Adjusted odds ratios for PGDM and all isolated and multiple defects were 3.17 (95% CI, 2.20–4.99) and 8.62 (95% CI, 5.27–14.10), respectively. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was associated with fewer noncardiac defects (isolated, 3/23 defects; multiples, 3/23 defects) and cardiac defects (isolated, 3/16 defects; multiples, 2/16 defects). Odds ratios between GDM and all isolated and multiple defects were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.17–1.73) and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.13–2.00), respectively. These associations were limited generally to offspring of women with prepregnancy body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. CONCLUSION PGDM was associated with a wide range of birth defects; GDM was associated with a limited group of birth defects. PMID:18674752

  10. What Are Neural Tube Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What are neural tube defects? Neural (pronounced NOOR-uhl ) tube defects are ...

  11. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Congenital Heart Defects? Congenital (kon-JEN-ih-tal) heart defects are problems ... carry blood to the heart or the body Congenital heart defects change the normal flow of blood through the ...

  12. Molecular diversity of HIV-1 among people who inject drugs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: massive expansion of circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B and emergence of multiple unique recombinant clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Ong, Lai Yee; Razak, Siti Humaira; Lee, Yeat Mei; Ng, Kim Tien; Yong, Yean Kong; Azmel, Azureen; Takebe, Yutaka; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B in Malaysia in the early 2000 s, continuous genetic diversification and active recombination involving CRF33_01B and other circulating genotypes in the region including CRF01_AE and subtype B' of Thai origin, have led to the emergence of novel CRFs and unique recombinant forms. The history and magnitude of CRF33_01B transmission among various risk groups including people who inject drugs (PWID) however have not been investigated despite the high epidemiological impact of CRF33_01B in the region. We update the most recent molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among PWIDs recruited in Malaysia between 2010 and 2011 by population sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 128 gag-pol sequences. HIV-1 CRF33_01B was circulating among 71% of PWIDs whilst a lower prevalence of other previously dominant HIV-1 genotypes [subtype B' (11%) and CRF01_AE (5%)] and CRF01_AE/B' unique recombinants (13%) were detected, indicating a significant shift in genotype replacement in this population. Three clusters of CRF01_AE/B' recombinants displaying divergent yet phylogenetically-related mosaic genomes to CRF33_01B were identified and characterized, suggestive of an abrupt emergence of multiple novel CRF clades. Using rigorous maximum likelihood approach and the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of CRF33_01Bpol sequences to elucidate the past population dynamics, we found that the founder lineages of CRF33_01B were likely to have first emerged among PWIDs in the early 1990 s before spreading exponentially to various high and low-risk populations (including children who acquired infections from their mothers) and later on became endemic around the early 2000 s. Taken together, our findings provide notable genetic evidence indicating the widespread expansion of CRF33_01B among PWIDs and into the general population. The emergence of numerous previously unknown recombinant clades highlights the escalating

  13. Low temperature diffusivity of self-interstitial defects in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinburne, Thomas D.; Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, Sergei L.

    2017-07-01

    The low temperature diffusivity of nanoscale crystal defects, where quantum mechanical fluctuations are known to play a crucial role, are essential to interpret observations of irradiated microstructures conducted at cryogenic temperatures. Using density functional theory calculations, quantum heat bath molecular dynamics and open quantum systems theory, we evaluate the low temperature diffusivity of self-interstitial atom clusters in tungsten valid down to temperatures of 1 K. Due to an exceptionally low defect migration barrier, our results show that interstitial defects exhibit very high diffusivity of order {10}3 μ {{{m}}}2 {{{s}}}-1 over the entire range of temperatures investigated.

  14. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    .g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco......, Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e...... to the automotive sector in Wales. Specifically, the paper evaluates the "Accelerates" programme initiated by the Welsh Development Agency and elaborates on how and to what extent the Accelerate programme supports the development of a sustainable automotive industry cluster. The Accelerate programme was set up...

  15. Chemical Abundances of Giants in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.; Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; D'Orazi, Valentina; Lucatello, Sara

    A large fraction of stars form in clusters. According to a widespread paradigma, stellar clusters are prototypes of single stellar populations. According to this concept, they formed on a very short time scale, and all their stars share the same chemical composition. Recently it has been understood that massive stellar clusters (the globular clusters) rather host various stellar populations, characterized by different chemical composition: these stellar populations have also slightly different ages, stars of the second generations being formed from the ejecta of part of those of an earlier one. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that the efficiency of the process is quite low: many more stars formed within this process than currently present in the clusters. This implies that a significant, perhaps even dominant fraction of the ancient population of galaxies formed within the episodes that lead to formation the globular clusters.

  16. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  17. Defect Prevention Based on 5 Dimensions of Defect Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakthi Kumaresh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available “Discovering the unexpected is more important than confirming the known [7]. In software development,the “unexpected” one relates to defects. These defects when unattended would cause failure to the productand risk to the users. The increasing dependency of society on software and the crucial consequences that afailure can cause requires the need to find out the defects at the origin itself. Based on the lessons learntfrom the earlier set of projects, a defect framework highlighting the 5 Dimensions (Ds of defect origin isproposed in this work. The defect framework is based on analyzing the defects that had emerged fromvarious stages of software development like Requirements, Design, Coding, Testing and Timeline (defectsdue to lack of time during development. This study is not limited to just identifying the origin of defects atvarious phases of software development but also finds out the reasons for such defects, and defectpreventive (DP measures are proposed for each type of defect. This work can help practitioners chooseeffective defect avoidance measures.In addition to arriving at defect framework, this work also proposes a defect injection metric based onseverity of the defect rather than just defect count, which gives the number of adjusted defects produced bya project at various phases. The defect injection metric value, once calculated, serves as a yardstick tomake a comparison in the improvements made in the software process development between similar set ofprojects

  18. Phase defect analysis with actinic full-field EUVL mask blank inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Suga, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    We had developed an actinic full-field inspection system to detect multilayer phase-defects with dark field imaging. Regarding the actinic inspection of native defects, the influence of the defect's surface dimension and multilayer structure, on the intensity-signal obtained from the inspection was analyzed. Three mask blanks were inspected from which 55 defects, observed with AFM and SEM, were classified as amplitude-defects or phase-defects. The surface dimensions and SEVDs (sphere equivalent volume diameters) of the defects were measured with the AFM. In the case where their SEVDs were same as of the programmed phase-defects, they were found to produce stronger intensitysignals in comparison to the ones from the programmed phase-defects. Cross-sectional multilayer structures of two native phase-defects were observed with TEM, and those defects formed non-conformal structures in the multilayer. This result means that most of the native phase-defects tend to form a non-conformal structure, and can make large impact on the wafer image in comparison to the ones from a conformal structure. Besides phase-defects, the actinic inspection also detected amplitude-defects. Although the sensitivities of the amplitude-defects were found to be lower than those of the phase-defects, an amplitude-defect higher than 30 nm could be detected with high probability.

  19. Transport-reaction model for defect and carrier behavior within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell,

    2014-02-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Charging of the defects can produce high electric fields within the cluster which may influence transport and reaction of carriers and defects, and which may enhance carrier recombination through band-to-trap tunneling. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to pulsed neutron irradiation.

  20. Chemical evolution of star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2010-02-28

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old Galactic globular clusters (GCs), in relation to their formation histories. GCs are clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of GCs in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the GCs formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter mini-haloes might be favoured. Not all GCs may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic Halo from Galactic Bulge clusters.

  1. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands...

  2. Electronic Defect States in Polyaniline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginder, John Matthew

    The electronic defect states of the conducting polymer polyaniline are studied by a variety of magnetic and optical techniques. The insulating emeraldine base form (EB) of polyaniline can be converted to the conducting emeraldine salt form (ES) by treatment with aqueous acids such as HCl. This "protonic acid doping" process occurs via the bonding of protons to the polymer chain, without altering the number of chain electrons. Magnetic susceptibility studies reveal that a roughly linear growth of the Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility, and an increase in the density of Curie-like spins, accompanies this conversion. Consequently, the protonation-induced defects are mainly spin-1/2 polarons; further, the linear growth of the Pauli susceptibility suggests that fully protonated regions--metallic islands --grow with increasing doping level. The electronic structure of the metallic phase is proposed to be that of a polaron lattice with electronic bandwidth ~0.4 eV and polaron decay length ~2 A. The defects which accomodate excess charge in EB were also studied by near-steady-state photoinduced absorption experiments. Upon photoexcitation into the 2 eV absorption band in EB, several photoinduced features evolved. Induced bleachings of the existing transitions at 2.0 and 3.7 eV were observed; induced absorptions were found at 0.9, 1.4, and 3.0 eV. The 2.0 eV bleaching is consistent with the production of molecular charge-transfer excitons, which may relax to a different ring conformation causing long-lived bleaching, or to two separate charges on a single chain. Indeed, the induced absorptions at 1.4 and 3.0 eV are, by analogy with similar protonation -induced absorptions and by their bimolecular recombination kinetics, assigned to photoexcited polarons. Light-induced electron spin resonance experiments confirm the presence of photogenerated spins upon pumping into the excitonic absorption. Near-steady-state photoconductivity measurements on EB reveal a very small induced

  3. Structure of a low-lying isomer of BOSi$_2$, as a free-space planar cluster, using the Hartree-Fock method plus second order perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Forte, G; March, N H; Pucci, R

    2014-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock (HF) method, supplemented by low-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory, has been utilized to predict the nuclear geometry, assuming planarity, of a low-lying isomer of the free space cluster BOSi$_2$. The planar structure found at equilibrium geometry is shown to be stable against small amplitude molecular vibrations. Finally, some brief comments are made on the possible relevance of the above free-space cluster geometry to the known B-O defects which limit the improvement of minority carrier lifetime in a form of p-type silicon.

  4. Structure of a low-lying isomer of BOSi2, as a free-space planar cluster, using the Hartree-Fock method plus second order perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, G.; Angilella, G. G. N.; March, N. H.; Pucci, R.

    2014-07-01

    The Hartree-Fock (HF) method, supplemented by low-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory, has been utilized to predict the nuclear geometry, assuming planarity, of a low-lying isomer of the free space cluster BOSi2. The planar structure found at equilibrium geometry is shown to be stable against small amplitude molecular vibrations. Finally, some brief comments are made on the possible relevance of the above free-space cluster geometry to the known B-O defects which limit the improvement of minority carrier lifetime in a form of p-type silicon.

  5. Defect Chemistry of a Zinc-Doped Lepidocrocite Titanate CsxTi2−x/2Znx/2O4 (x = 0.7) and its Protonic Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Norby, Poul

    2009-01-01

    A zinc-doped layered titanate CsxTi2−x/2Znx/2O4 (x = 0.7) with lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH)-type layered structure was prepared via solid-state calcination. A complete extraction of both lattice Zn atoms and interlayer Cs ions was observed upon acid exchange, producing a protonic form H2xTi2−x/2x/2O4·H2....... The protonic titanate H2xTi2−x/2x/2O4·H2O readily underwent delamination to produce its molecular single sheets Ti1−δδO24δ− (δ = 0.175) with distinctive two-dimensional morphology and small thickness (1 nm), suggesting promising applications in the assembly of functional nanostructures....

  6. Defect Chemistry of a Zinc-Doped Lepidocrocite Titanate CsxTi2−x/2Znx/2O4 (x = 0.7) and its Protonic Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Norby, Poul

    2009-01-01

    A zinc-doped layered titanate CsxTi2−x/2Znx/2O4 (x = 0.7) with lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH)-type layered structure was prepared via solid-state calcination. A complete extraction of both lattice Zn atoms and interlayer Cs ions was observed upon acid exchange, producing a protonic form H2xTi2−x/2x/2O4·H2....... The protonic titanate H2xTi2−x/2x/2O4·H2O readily underwent delamination to produce its molecular single sheets Ti1−δδO24δ− (δ = 0.175) with distinctive two-dimensional morphology and small thickness (1 nm), suggesting promising applications in the assembly of functional nanostructures....

  7. The Assembly of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Berrier, Joel C; Bullock, James S; Purcell, Chris W; Barton, Elizabeth J; Wechsler, Risa H

    2008-01-01

    We study the formation of fifty-three galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos formed within a pair of cosmological LCDM N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host 0.1L* galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no pre-processing in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, ~70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; and less than ~12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past (~6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local, cluster processes like ram-pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between clust...

  8. Study on defects associated with interstitial oxygen in PbWO4 crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Feng-song; Gu Mu; Zhang Rui

    2004-01-01

    The defects associated with interstitial oxygen in lead tungstate crystals (PbWO4) are investigated by the relativistic self-consistent discrete variational embedded cluster method. The research work is focused on the density of states of interstitial oxygen defects and relational Frankel defects. The transition state method is used to calculate excitation energy of different electron orbits. Simulation results show that the existence of defects related to interstitial oxygen can diminish the bandwidth of the WO2-4 group, and it might produce the green luminescence. Frankel defects associated with interstitial oxygen could result in the absorption at 420nm.

  9. Coupling of gelation and glass transition in a biphasic colloidal mixture--from gel-to-defective gel-toglass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, He; Jia, Di; Han, Charles

    The state transition from gel to glass is studied in a biphasic mixture of polystyrene core/poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) shell (CS) microgels and sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) particles. At 35 °C, the interaction between CS is due to short-range Van der Waals attraction while that between PSS is from long-range electrostatic repulsion. During variation of the relative ratio of the two species at a fixed apparent total volume fraction, the mixture exhibits a gel-to-defective gel-to-glass transition. When small amounts of PSS are introduced into the CS gel network, some of them are kinetically trapped, causing a change in its fractal structure, and act as defects to weaken the macroscopic gel strength. An increase of PSS content in the mixture promotes the switch from gel to defective gel, e . g . , the typical two-step yielding gel merges into one-step yielding. This phenomenon is an indication that inter-cluster bond breakage coincides with intra-cluster bond fracture. As the relative volume fraction of PSS exceeds a critical threshold, the gel network can no longer be formed; hence, the mixture exhibits characteristics of glass. A state diagram of the biphasic mixture is constructed, and the landscape of the different transitions will be described in future studies The financial support from the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, 2012CB821500) is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Star-forming regions at the periphery of the supershell surrounding the Cyg OB1 association. I. The star cluster vdB 130 and its ambient gas and dust medium

    CERN Document Server

    Sitnik, T G; Lozinskaya, T A; Moiseev, A V; Rastorguev, A S; Tatarnikov, A M; Tatarnikova, A A; Wiebe, D S; Zabolotskikh, M V

    2015-01-01

    Stellar population and the interstellar gas-dust medium in the vicinity of the open star cluster vdB 130 are analysed using optical observations taken with the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS and the 125-cm telescope of the SAI MSU along with the data of Spitzer and Herschel. Based on proper motions and BV and JHKs 2MASS photometric data, we select additional 36 stars as probable cluster members. Some stars in vdB 130 are classified as B stars. Our estimates of minimum colour excess, apparent distance modulus and the distance are consistent with young age (from 5 to 10 Myrs) of the cluster vdB 130. We suppose the large deviations from the conventional extinction law in the cluster direction, with $R_V$ ~ 4 - 5. The cluster vdB 130 appears to be physically related to the supershell around Cyg OB1, a cometary CO cloud, ionized gas, and regions of infrared emission. There are a few regions of bright mid-infrared emission in the vicinity of vdB 130. The largest of them is also visible on H-alpha and [SII] emission m...

  11. Herd Clustering: A synergistic data clustering approach using collective intelligence

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Kachun

    2014-10-01

    Traditional data mining methods emphasize on analytical abilities to decipher data, assuming that data are static during a mining process. We challenge this assumption, arguing that we can improve the analysis by vitalizing data. In this paper, this principle is used to develop a new clustering algorithm. Inspired by herd behavior, the clustering method is a synergistic approach using collective intelligence called Herd Clustering (HC). The novel part is laid in its first stage where data instances are represented by moving particles. Particles attract each other locally and form clusters by themselves as shown in the case studies reported. To demonstrate its effectiveness, the performance of HC is compared to other state-of-the art clustering methods on more than thirty datasets using four performance metrics. An application for DNA motif discovery is also conducted. The results support the effectiveness of HC and thus the underlying philosophy. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Reduction in Defect Content of ODS Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritherdon, J

    2001-05-15

    The work detailed within this report is a continuation of earlier work carried out under contract number 1DX-SY382V. The earlier work comprises a literature review of the sources and types of defects found principally in Fe-based ODS alloys as well as experimental work designed to identify defects in the prototype ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy, deduce their origins and to recommend methods of defect reduction. The present work is an extension of the experimental work already reported and concentrates on means of reduction of defects already identified rather than the search for new defect types. This report also includes results gathered during powder separation trials, conducted by the University of Groningen, Netherlands and coordinated by the University of Liverpool, involving the separation of different metallic powders in terms of their differing densities. The scope and objectives of the present work were laid out in the technical proposal ''Reduction in Defect Content in ODS Alloys-III''. All the work proposed in the ''Statement of Work'' section of the technical proposal has been carried out and all work extra to the ''Statement of Work'' falls within the context of an ODS-Fe{sub 3}Al alloy of improved overall quality and potential creep performance in the consolidated form. The outturn of the experimental work performed is reported in the following sections.

  13. Quotients of cluster categories

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Higher cluster categories were recently introduced as a generalization of cluster categories. This paper shows that in Dynkin types A and D, half of all higher cluster categories are actually just quotients of cluster categories. The other half can be obtained as quotients of 2-cluster categories, the "lowest" type of higher cluster categories. Hence, in Dynkin types A and D, all higher cluster phenomena are implicit in cluster categories and 2-cluster categories. In contrast, the same is not...

  14. Computer simulation of the effect of copper on defect production and damage evolution in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlado, J M; Marian, J; Lodi, D; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    1999-11-28

    It has long been noticed that the effect of Cu solute atoms is important for the microstructural evolution of ferritic pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation conditions. Despite the low concentration of Cu in steel, Cu precipitates form inside the a-Fe surrounding matrix and by impeding free dislocation motion considerably contribute to the hardening of the material. It has been suggested that Cu-rich clusters and combined Cu solute atoms-defect clusters that may act as initiating structures of further precipitates nucleate during annealing of displacement cascades. In order to assess the importance of the different mechanisms taking place during collision events in the formation and later evolution of these structures, a detailed Molecular Dynamics (MD) analysis of displacement cascades in a Fe-1.3% at. Cu binary alloy has been carried out. Cascade energies ranging from 1 to 20 keV have been simulated at temperatures of 100 and 600 K using the MDCASK code, in which the Ackland-Finnis-Sinclair many-body interatomic potential has been implemented. The behavior of metastable Cu self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in the form of mixed Fe-Cu features is studied as well as their impact on the resulting defect structures. It is observed that above 300 K generated Cu SIAs undergo recombination with no substantial effect on the after-cascade microstructure while at 100 K Cu SIAs remain sessile and exhibit a considerable binding to interstitial and vacancy clusters, Finally, the effect that the production of vacancies via collision cascades may have on the self-diffusion of Cu solute atoms is quantitatively addressed by means of determining diffusion coefficients for Cu atoms under different microstructural conditions.

  15. Defect classification in sparsity-based structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golato, Andrew; Ahmad, Fauzia; Santhanam, Sridhar; Amin, Moeness G.

    2017-05-01

    Guided waves have gained popularity in structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their ability to inspect large areas with little attenuation, while providing rich interactions with defects. For thin-walled structures, the propagating waves are Lamb waves, which are a complex but well understood type of guided waves. Recent works have cast the defect localization problem of Lamb wave based SHM within the sparse reconstruction framework. These methods make use of a linear model relating the measurements with the scene reflectivity under the assumption of point-like defects. However, most structural defects are not perfect points but tend to assume specific forms, such as surface cracks or internal cracks. Knowledge of the "type" of defects is useful in the assessment phase of SHM. In this paper, we present a dual purpose sparsity-based imaging scheme which, in addition to accurately localizing defects, properly classifies the defects present simultaneously. The proposed approach takes advantage of the bias exhibited by certain types of defects toward a specific Lamb wave mode. For example, some defects strongly interact with the anti-symmetric modes, while others strongly interact with the symmetric modes. We build model based dictionaries for the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric wave modes, which are then utilized in unison to properly localize and classify the defects present. Simulated data of surface and internal defects in a thin Aluminum plate are used to validate the proposed scheme.

  16. Norwegian Pitched Roof Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Gullbrekken

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The building constructions investigated in this work are pitched wooden roofs with exterior vertical drainpipes and wooden load-bearing system. The aim of this research is to further investigate the building defects of pitched wooden roofs and obtain an overview of typical roof defects. The work involves an analysis of the building defect archive from the research institute SINTEF Building and Infrastructure. The findings from the SINTEF archive show that moisture is a dominant exposure factor, especially in roof constructions. In pitched wooden roofs, more than half of the defects are caused by deficiencies in design, materials, or workmanship, where these deficiencies allow moisture from precipitation or indoor moisture into the structure. Hence, it is important to increase the focus on robust and durable solutions to avoid defects both from exterior and interior moisture sources in pitched wooden roofs. Proper design of interior ventilation and vapour retarders seem to be the main ways to control entry from interior moisture sources into attic and roof spaces.

  17. Generation of optical vorticity from topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fumeron, Sébastien [Institut Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, 54506 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Pereira, Erms [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió, Alagoas (Brazil); Escola Politécnica de Pernambuco, Universidade de Pernambuco, Rua Benfíca, 455, 50720-001 Recife, PE (Brazil); Moraes, Fernando, E-mail: moraes@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física and Departamento de Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil); Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    The propagation of an electromagnetic wave along a chiral string (or screw dislocation) is studied. Adopting the formalism of differential forms, it is shown that the singular torsion of the defect is responsible for quantized modes. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the modes thus obtained have well defined orbital angular momentum, opening the possibility for applications relevant both for cosmology and for optics.

  18. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  19. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  20. Structural defects induced by Fe-ion implantation in TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedahl, B.; Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Green, R. J.; McLeod, J. A.; Kim, S. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.; Moewes, A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements of pellet and thin film forms of TiO2 with implanted Fe ions are presented and discussed. The findings indicate that Fe-implantation in a TiO2 pellet sample induces heterovalent cation substitution (Fe2+ → Ti4+) beneath the surface region. But in thin film samples, the clustering of Fe atoms is primarily detected. In addition to this, significant amounts of secondary phases of Fe3+ are detected on the surface of all doped samples due to oxygen exposure. These experimental findings are compared with density functional theory calculations of formation energies for different configurations of structural defects in the implanted TiO2:Fe system. According to our calculations, the clustering of Fe-atoms in TiO2:Fe thin films can be attributed to the formation of combined substitutional and interstitial defects. Further, the differences due to Fe doping in pellet and thin film samples can ultimately be attributed to different surface to volume ratios.

  1. Structural defects induced by Fe-ion implantation in TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leedahl, B., E-mail: bdl816@mail.usask.ca; Green, R. J.; McLeod, J. A.; Moewes, A. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Zatsepin, D. A.; Zhidkov, I. S. [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Boukhvalov, D. W. [School of Computational Sciences, Korea Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS) Hoegiro 87, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kurmaev, E. Z. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, N. V. [Institute of Electrophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620016 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Cholakh, S. O. [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-07

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements of pellet and thin film forms of TiO{sub 2} with implanted Fe ions are presented and discussed. The findings indicate that Fe-implantation in a TiO{sub 2} pellet sample induces heterovalent cation substitution (Fe{sup 2+} → Ti{sup 4+}) beneath the surface region. But in thin film samples, the clustering of Fe atoms is primarily detected. In addition to this, significant amounts of secondary phases of Fe{sup 3+} are detected on the surface of all doped samples due to oxygen exposure. These experimental findings are compared with density functional theory calculations of formation energies for different configurations of structural defects in the implanted TiO{sub 2}:Fe system. According to our calculations, the clustering of Fe-atoms in TiO{sub 2}:Fe thin films can be attributed to the formation of combined substitutional and interstitial defects. Further, the differences due to Fe doping in pellet and thin film samples can ultimately be attributed to different surface to volume ratios.

  2. Double-bond defect modelling in As-S glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, V; Shpotyuk, O; Hyla, M, E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2010-11-15

    Ab initio calculations with the RHF/6-311G* basis set are used for geometrical optimization of regular pyramidal and defect quasi-tetrahedral clusters in binary As-S glasses. It is shown that quasi-tetrahedral S=AsS{sub 3/2} structural units are impossible as main network-building blocks in these glasses.

  3. Growth and defects of explosives crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, H. H.

    Large single crystals of PETN, RDX, and TNT can be grown easily from evaporating ethyl acetate solutions. The crystals all share a similar type of defect that may not be commonly recognized. The defect generates conical faces, ideally mosaic crystals, and may account for the 'polymorphs' of TNT and detonator grades of PETN. TATB crystals manufactured by the amination of trichlorotrinitrobenzene in dry toluene entrain two forms of ammonium chloride. One of these forms causes 'worm holes' in the TATB crystals that may be the reason for its unusually low failure diameters. Strained HMX crystals form mechanical twins that can spontaneously revert back to the untwinned form when the straining force is removed. Large strains or temperatures above 100 C lock in the mechanical twins.

  4. Pruning nearest neighbor cluster trees

    CERN Document Server

    Kpotufe, Samory

    2011-01-01

    Nearest neighbor (k-NN) graphs are widely used in machine learning and data mining applications, and our aim is to better understand what they reveal about the cluster structure of the unknown underlying distribution of points. Moreover, is it possible to identify spurious structures that might arise due to sampling variability? Our first contribution is a statistical analysis that reveals how certain subgraphs of a k-NN graph form a consistent estimator of the cluster tree of the underlying distribution of points. Our second and perhaps most important contribution is the following finite sample guarantee. We carefully work out the tradeoff between aggressive and conservative pruning and are able to guarantee the removal of all spurious cluster structures at all levels of the tree while at the same time guaranteeing the recovery of salient clusters. This is the first such finite sample result in the context of clustering.

  5. Assembling of hydrogenated aluminum clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, F.; Mananes, A. [Dept. de Fisica Moderna, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Molina, L.M.; Lopez, M.J.; Alonso, J.A. [Dept. de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)

    2001-09-01

    The electronic and atomic structure of Al{sub 13}H has been studied using Density Functional Theory. Al{sub 13}H has closed electronic shells. This makes the cluster very stable and suggests that it could be a candidate to form cluster assembled solids. The interaction between two Al{sub 13}H clusters was analyzed and we found that the two units preserve their identities in the dimer. A cubic-like solid phase assembled from Al{sub 13}H units was then modeled. In that solid the clusters retain much of their identity. Molecular dynamics runs show that the structure of the assembled solid is stable at least up to 150 K. A favorable relative orientation of the clusters with respect to their neighbors is critical for the stability of that solid. (orig.)

  6. Discrete torsion defects

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, Ilka; Plencner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Orbifolding two-dimensional quantum field theories by a symmetry group can involve a choice of discrete torsion. We apply the general formalism of `orbifolding defects' to study and elucidate discrete torsion for topological field theories. In the case of Landau-Ginzburg models only the bulk sector had been studied previously, and we re-derive all known results. We also introduce the notion of `projective matrix factorisations', show how they naturally describe boundary and defect sectors, and we further illustrate the efficiency of the defect-based approach by explicitly computing RR charges. Roughly half of our results are not restricted to Landau-Ginzburg models but hold more generally, for any topological field theory. In particular we prove that for a pivotal bicategory, any two objects of its orbifold completion that have the same base are orbifold equivalent. Equivalently, from any orbifold theory (including those based on nonabelian groups) the original unorbifolded theory can be be obtained by orbifo...

  7. AMOEBA clustering revisited. [cluster analysis, classification, and image display program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jack

    1990-01-01

    A description of the clustering, classification, and image display program AMOEBA is presented. Using a difficult high resolution aircraft-acquired MSS image, the steps the program takes in forming clusters are traced. A number of new features are described here for the first time. Usage of the program is discussed. The theoretical foundation (the underlying mathematical model) is briefly presented. The program can handle images of any size and dimensionality.

  8. Cluster Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Greiner, Walter

    One of the rare examples of phenomena predicted before experimental discovery, offers the opportunity to introduce fission theory based on the asymmetric two center shell model. The valleys within the potential energy surfaces are due to the shell effects and are clearly showing why cluster radioactivity was mostly detected in parent nuclei leading to a doubly magic lead daughter. Saddle point shapes can be determined by solving an integro-differential equation. Nuclear dynamics allows us to calculate the half-lives. The following cluster decay modes (or heavy particle radioactivities) have been experimentally confirmed: 14C, 20O, 23F, 22,24-26Ne, 28,30Mg, 32,34Si with half-lives in good agreement with predicted values within our analytical superasymmetric fission model. The preformation probability is calculated as the internal barrier penetrability. An universal curve is described and used as an alternative for the estimation of the half-lives. The macroscopic-microscopic method was extended to investigate two-alpha accompanied fission and true ternary fission. The methods developed in nuclear physics are also adapted to study the stability of deposited atomic clusters on the planar surfaces.

  9. Assessing EUV mask defectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Tchikoulaeva, Anna; Ackmann, Paul; Wood, Obert; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bubke, Karsten; Holfeld, Christian; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Kini, Sumanth; Watson, Sterling; Lee, Isaac; Mu, Bo; Lim, Phillip; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Boye, Carol

    2010-04-01

    This paper assesses the readiness of EUV masks for pilot line production. The printability of well characterized reticle defects, with particular emphasis on those reticle defects that cause electrical errors on wafer test chips, is investigated. The reticles are equipped with test marks that are inspected in a die-to-die mode (using DUV inspection tool) and reviewed (using a SEM tool), and which also comprise electrically testable patterns. The reticles have three modules comprising features with 32 nm ground rules in 104 nm pitch, 22 nm ground rules with 80 nm pitch, and 16 nm ground rules with 56 nm pitch (on the wafer scale). In order to determine whether specific defects originate from the substrate, the multilayer film, the absorber stack, or from the patterning process, the reticles were inspected after each fabrication step. Following fabrication, the reticles were used to print wafers on a 0.25 NA full-field ASML EUV exposure tool. The printed wafers were inspected with state of the art bright-field and Deep UV inspection tools. It is observed that the printability of EUV mask defects down to a pitch of 56 nm shows a trend of increased printability as the pitch of the printed pattern gets smaller - a well established trend at larger pitches of 80 nm and 104 nm, respectively. The sensitivity of state-of-the-art reticle inspection tools is greatly improved over that of the previous generation of tools. There appears to be no apparent decline in the sensitivity of these state-of-the-art reticle inspection tools for higher density (smaller) patterns on the mask, even down to 56nm pitch (1x). Preliminary results indicate that a blank defect density of the order of 0.25 defects/cm2 can support very early learning on EUV pilot line production at the 16nm node.

  10. Congenital Abdominal Wall Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risby, Kirsten; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    complications were seen in five (15%) children: four had detachment of the mesh and one patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Mesh related clinical infection was observed in five children. In hospital mortality occurred in four cases (2 gastroschisis and 2 omphalocele) and was not procedure......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical utility of GORE® DUALMESH (GDM) in the staged closure of large congenital abdominal wall defects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of patients with congenital abdominal wall defects managed with GDM was analyzed for outcome regarding complete fascial closure; mesh...

  11. Supersymmetric k-defects

    CERN Document Server

    Koehn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. We find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  12. Intuitionistic fuzzy hierarchical clustering algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zeshui

    2009-01-01

    Intuitionistic fuzzy set (IFS) is a set of 2-tuple arguments, each of which is characterized by a mem-bership degree and a nonmembership degree. The generalized form of IFS is interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy set (IVIFS), whose components are intervals rather than exact numbers. IFSs and IVIFSs have been found to be very useful to describe vagueness and uncertainty. However, it seems that little attention has been focused on the clus-tering analysis of IFSs and IVIFSs. An intuitionistic fuzzy hierarchical algorithm is introduced for clustering IFSs, which is based on the traditional hierarchical clustering procedure, the intuitionistic fuzzy aggregation operator, and the basic distance measures between IFSs: the Hamming distance, normalized Hamming, weighted Hamming, the Euclidean distance, the normalized Euclidean distance, and the weighted Euclidean distance. Subsequently, the algorithm is extended for clustering IVIFSs. Finally the algorithm and its extended form are applied to the classifications of building materials and enterprises respectively.

  13. Star Cluster Formation and Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R; Arce, Hector G; Dale, James E; Gutermuth, Robert; Klein, Richard I; Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-01

    Stars do not generally form in isolation. Instead, they form in clusters, and in these clustered environments newborn stars can have profound effects on one another and on their parent gas clouds. Feedback from clustered stars is almost certainly responsible for a number of otherwise puzzling facts about star formation: that it is an inefficient process that proceeds slowly when averaged over galactic scales; that most stars disperse from their birth sites and dissolve into the galactic field over timescales $\\ll 1$ Gyr; and that newborn stars follow an initial mass function (IMF) with a distinct peak in the range $0.1 - 1$ $M_\\odot$, rather than an IMF dominated by brown dwarfs. In this review we summarize current observational constraints and theoretical models for the complex interplay between clustered star formation and feedback.

  14. The Cluster as Market Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maskell, Peter; Lorenzen, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The many competing schools of thought concerning themselves with industrial clusters have atleast one thing in common: they all agree that clusters are real life phenomena characterized bythe co-localization of separate economic entities, which are in some sense related, but not joinedtogether...... by any common ownership or management. So hierarchies they are certainly not.Yet, it is usually taken for granted that clusters, almost regardless of how they are defined, allexpatriate the 'swollen middle' of various hybrid 'forms of long-term contracting, reciprocaltrading, regulation, franchising...... organization or market form. The cluster is one suchspecific market organization that is structured along territorial lines because this enables thebuilding of a set of institutions that are helpful in conducting certain kinds of economicactivities....

  15. Do O-stars form in isolation?

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    Around 4% of O-stars are observed in apparent isolation, with no associated cluster, and no indication of having been ejected from a nearby cluster. We define an isolated O-star as a star > 17.5 M_\\odot in a cluster with total mass 10 M_\\odot) stars. We show that the fraction of apparently isolated O-stars is reproduced when stars are sampled (randomly) from a standard initial mass function and a standard cluster mass function of the form N(M) \\propto M^-2. This result is difficult to reconcile with the idea that there is a fundamental relationship between the mass of a cluster and the mass of the most massive star in that cluster. We suggest that such a relationship is a typical result of star formation in clusters, and that `isolated O-stars' are low-mass clusters in which massive stars have been able to form.

  16. Architecture of the Yeast Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery: THE SUB-COMPLEX FORMED BY THE IRON DONOR, Yfh1 PROTEIN, AND THE SCAFFOLD, Isu1 PROTEIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, Wasantha; Gakh, Oleksandr; Galeano, Belinda K; Smith, Douglas Y; Söderberg, Christopher A G; Al-Karadaghi, Salam; Thompson, James R; Isaya, Grazia

    2016-05-06

    The biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters is a vital process involving the delivery of elemental iron and sulfur to scaffold proteins via molecular interactions that are still poorly defined. We reconstituted a stable, functional complex consisting of the iron donor, Yfh1 (yeast frataxin homologue 1), and the Fe-S cluster scaffold, Isu1, with 1:1 stoichiometry, [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 Using negative staining transmission EM and single particle analysis, we obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction of this complex at a resolution of ∼17 Å. In addition, via chemical cross-linking, limited proteolysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified protein-protein interaction surfaces within the complex. The data together reveal that [Yfh1]24·[Isu1]24 is a roughly cubic macromolecule consisting of one symmetric Isu1 trimer binding on top of one symmetric Yfh1 trimer at each of its eight vertices. Furthermore, molecular modeling suggests that two subunits of the cysteine desulfurase, Nfs1, may bind symmetrically on top of two adjacent Isu1 trimers in a manner that creates two putative [2Fe-2S] cluster assembly centers. In each center, conserved amino acids known to be involved in sulfur and iron donation by Nfs1 and Yfh1, respectively, are in close proximity to the Fe-S cluster-coordinating residues of Isu1. We suggest that this architecture is suitable to ensure concerted and protected transfer of potentially toxic iron and sulfur atoms to Isu1 during Fe-S cluster assembly.

  17. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  18. Collective thermoregulation in bee clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocko, Samuel A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Swarming is an essential part of honeybee behaviour, wherein thousands of bees cling onto each other to form a dense cluster that may be exposed to the environment for several days. This cluster has the ability to maintain its core temperature actively without a central controller. We suggest that the swarm cluster is akin to an active porous structure whose functional requirement is to adjust to outside conditions by varying its porosity to control its core temperature. Using a continuum model that takes the form of a set of advection–diffusion equations for heat transfer in a mobile porous medium, we show that the equalization of an effective ‘behavioural pressure’, which propagates information about the ambient temperature through variations in density, leads to effective thermoregulation. Our model extends and generalizes previous models by focusing the question of mechanism on the form and role of the behavioural pressure, and allows us to explain the vertical asymmetry of the cluster (as a consequence of buoyancy-driven flows), the ability of the cluster to overpack at low ambient temperatures without breaking up at high ambient temperatures, and the relative insensitivity to large variations in the ambient temperature. Our theory also makes testable hypotheses for the response of the cluster to external temperature inhomogeneities and suggests strategies for biomimetic thermoregulation. PMID:24335563

  19. Logistics Clusters. Delivering Value and Driving Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Kato

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We live in a world where the exchange of goods, information and money is achieved through complex logistic processes. The questions that the author tries to answer in his book are: What is a logistics cluster? Where are these logistics clusters formed, and where are they located? What is the difference in dynamics of the logistics clusters compared to other clusters or industrial parks? What kind of jobs exist in logistics clusters, and why the logistics clusters should be promoted and supported by authorities? How good and how reliable are these jobs? What is the environmental impact of logistics clusters? What is the role of authorities in creating successful logistics clusters and what benefits can be expected from them?

  20. Discovery of eight lensing clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, S M; Han, J L; Jiang, Y Y

    2013-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies have a huge mass which can act as gravitational lenses. Galaxies behind clusters can be distorted to form arcs in images by the lenses. Herein a search was done for giant lensed arcs by galaxy clusters using the SDSS data. By visually inspecting SDSS images of newly identified clusters in the SDSS DR8 and Stripe 82 data, we discover 8 strong lensing clusters together with additional 3 probable and 6 possible cases. The lensed arcs show bluer colors than the member galaxies of clusters. The masses and optical luminosities of galaxy clusters interior to the arcs are calculated, and the mass-to-light ratios are found to be in the range of a few tens of M_Solar/L_Solar, consistent with the distribution of previously known lensing clusters.

  1. The applicability and effectiveness of cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, D. S.; Actkinson, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    An insight into the characteristics which determine the performance of a clustering algorithm is presented. In order for the techniques which are examined to accurately cluster data, two conditions must be simultaneously satisfied. First the data must have a particular structure, and second the parameters chosen for the clustering algorithm must be correct. By examining the structure of the data from the Cl flight line, it is clear that no single set of parameters can be used to accurately cluster all the different crops. The effectiveness of either a noniterative or iterative clustering algorithm to accurately cluster data representative of the Cl flight line is questionable. Thus extensive a prior knowledge is required in order to use cluster analysis in its present form for applications like assisting in the definition of field boundaries and evaluating the homogeneity of a field. New or modified techniques are necessary for clustering to be a reliable tool.

  2. Traffic jam in the primitive streak: the role of defective mesoderm migration in birth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herion, Nils J; Salbaum, J Michael; Kappen, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    Gastrulation is the process in which the three germ layers are formed that contribute to the formation of all major tissues in the developing embryo. We here review mouse genetic models in which defective gastrulation leads to mesoderm insufficiencies in the embryo. Depending on severity of the abnormalities, the outcomes range from incompatible with embryonic survival to structural birth defects, such as heart defects, spina bifida, or caudal dysgenesis. The combined evidence from the mutant models supports the notion that these congenital anomalies can originate from perturbations of mesoderm specification, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and mesodermal cell migration. Knowledge about the molecular pathways involved may help to improve strategies for the prevention of major structural birth defects.

  3. Massive star forming environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    We present a study of the earliest stages of massive star formation, in which we focus on Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) and young massive clusters. We present Very Large Array spectral line observations of ammonia (NH 3) and CCS toward four IRDCs. The NH3 lines provide diagnostics of the temperature and density structure within IRDCs. Based upon the NH 3 column density, IRDCs have masses of ˜ 103 to 10 4 M⊙ . We detect twenty NH3 clumps within four IRDCs, with radii regions are presented from the Near Infrared Imager (NIRIM) camera on the 3.5 m WIYN telescope. We report J, H, and K' band photometry in the clusters AFGL437, AFGL5180, and AFGL5142 and use these results to probe the stellar populations, extinction, and ages of the clusters. We find that all three clusters suffer significant extinction (AK ˜1), have ages ≤ 5 Myr, and are actively forming stars. We conclude that the properties of these embedded clusters are consistent with their evolving from IRDC clumps.

  4. Global Optimization strategies for two-mode clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); J. Trejos (Javier); W. Castilli

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTwo-mode clustering is a relatively new form of clustering that clusters both rows and columns of a data matrix. To do so, a criterion similar to k-means is optimized. However, it is still unclear which optimization method should be used to perform two-mode clustering, as various meth

  5. Structural phase transitions and topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partner, Heather L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Nigmatullin, Ramil [Institute of Quantum Physics, Albert-Einstein Allee-11, Ulm University, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Burgermeister, Tobias; Keller, Jonas; Pyka, Karsten [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Plenio, Martin B. [Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm University, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm University, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Retzker, Alex [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, Givat Ram (Israel); Zurek, Wojciech H. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Campo, Adolfo del [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA 02125 (United States); Mehlstäubler, Tanja E., E-mail: tanja.mehlstaeubler@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    We use laser-cooled ion Coulomb crystals in the well-controlled environment of a harmonic radiofrequency ion trap to investigate phase transitions and defect formation. Topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals (kinks) have been recently proposed for studies of nonlinear physics with solitons and as carriers of quantum information. Defects form when a symmetry breaking phase transition is crossed nonadiabatically. For a second order phase transition, the Kibble–Zurek mechanism predicts that the formation of these defects follows a power law scaling in the rate of the transition. We demonstrate a scaling of defect density and describe kink dynamics and stability. We further discuss the implementation of mass defects and electric fields as first steps toward controlled kink preparation and manipulation.

  6. Structural phase transitions and topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partner, Heather L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Nigmatullin, Ramil [Institute of Quantum Physics, Ulm Univ., Ulm (Germany); Burgermeister, Tobias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Keller, Jonas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Pyka, Karsten [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Plenio, Martin B. [Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Ulm Univ., Ulm, (Germany):Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ulm Univ.,Ulm, (Germany); Retzker, Alex [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram (Israel); Zurek, Wojciech Hubert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); del Campo, Adolfo [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Mehlstaubler, Tanja E. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-11-19

    We use laser-cooled ion Coulomb crystals in the well-controlled environment of a harmonic radiofrequency ion trap to investigate phase transitions and defect formation. Topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals (kinks) have been recently proposed for studies of nonlinear physics with solitons and as carriers of quantum information. Defects form when a symmetry breaking phase transition is crossed non-adiabatically. For a second order phase transition, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism predicts that the formation of these defects follows a power law scaling in the rate of the transition. We demonstrate a scaling of defect density and describe kink dynamics and stability. We further discuss the implementation of mass defects and electric fields as first steps toward controlled kink preparation and manipulation.

  7. Endotracheal tube defects: Hidden causes of airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing defects of endotracheal tube (ETT are still encountered in anesthesia practice. Many such defects go unnoticed during routine inspection prior to their use. Such defects in ETT may lead to partial or complete airway obstruction in an intubated patient. We report a case of partial airway obstruction with a prepacked, single use, uncuffed ETT due to a manufacturing defect in the form of a plastic meniscus at the distal end of the tube. This case report highlights the significance of standard monitoring of ventilation and the role of a vigilant clinician in detecting such defects in avoiding critical events as can arise from the use of such defective ETTs. It also emphasizes the need for double checking ETTs prior to their use.

  8. Defects in aluminum foam with superfine open-cell structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fang; Zhang Zhimin; Li Baocheng; Wang Lucai

    2008-01-01

    The infiltration casting process for producing aluminum foam includes three steps: preparing precursor using NaCI particles, infiltrating molten aluminum and cleaning NaCI precursor. Defects occur during the preparation of aluminum foam with superfine open-cell structure, and influence the pore structure and performance of aluminum foam materials. The types of the defect and their forming mechanisms are analyzed in this paper. The defects include point defects and linear metal defects, and are caused by the defects in salt precursor and the insufficient infiltration of molten aluminum into precursor. With the choice of proper precursor preparation method and infiltration process parameters, the complete aluminum foam with superfine pores could be achieved.

  9. Stochastic annealing simulations of defect interactions among subcascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Singh, B.N.

    1997-04-01

    The effects of the subcascade structure of high energy cascades on the temperature dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are investigated. The subcascade structure is simulated by closely spaced groups of lower energy MD cascades. The simulation results illustrate the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent intracascade evolution. Other significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution are the large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. Annealing simulations are also performed on high-energy, subcascade-producing cascades generated with the binary collision approximation and calibrated to MD results.

  10. Anomalous Coupling Between Topological Defects and Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo; Turner, Ari M.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate a counterintuitive geometric interaction between defects and curvature in thin layers of superfluids, superconductors, and liquid crystals deposited on curved surfaces. Each defect feels a geometric potential whose functional form is determined only by the shape of the surface, but whose sign and strength depend on the transformation properties of the order parameter. For superfluids and superconductors, the strength of this interaction is proportional to the square of the charge and causes all defects to be repelled (attracted) by regions of positive (negative) Gaussian curvature. For liquid crystals in the one elastic constant approximation, charges between 0 and 4π are attracted by regions of positive curvature while all other charges are repelled.

  11. Rearrangement of cluster structure during fission processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2004-01-01

    Results of molecular dynamics simulations of fission reactions $Na_10^2+ -->Na_7^++ Na_3^+ and Na_18^2+--> 2Na_9^+ are presented. The dependence of the fission barriers on the isomer structure of the parent cluster is analysed. It is demonstrated that the energy necessary for removing homothetic...... groups of atoms from the parent cluster is largely independent of the isomer form of the parent cluster. The importance of rearrangement of the cluster structure during the fission process is elucidated. This rearrangement may include transition to another isomer state of the parent cluster before actual...

  12. Understanding of the formation of shallow level defects from the intrinsic defects of lead tri-halide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongseob; Chung, Choong-Heui; Hong, Ki-Ha

    2016-10-05

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have unique electronic properties in which deep level defects are rarely formed. This unique defect characteristic is the source of the long carrier diffusion length. This theoretical study shows what causes this characteristic formation of shallow level defects in lead tri-halide perovskites. Comparative studies between iodides and other halides showed that deep level defect states were generated for Cl based perovskites. Longer Pb-halide bond lengths and narrower band gaps are beneficial for preventing deep level defect states. Additionally, our study shows that the formation of shallow level defects does not change even when the lattice structures of the perovskites do not reach their equilibrium structures.

  13. An Automatic Clustering Technique for Optimal Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, K Karteeka; Rao, A V Dattatreya; 10.5121/ijcsea.2011.1412

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a simple, automatic and efficient clustering algorithm, namely, Automatic Merging for Optimal Clusters (AMOC) which aims to generate nearly optimal clusters for the given datasets automatically. The AMOC is an extension to standard k-means with a two phase iterative procedure combining certain validation techniques in order to find optimal clusters with automation of merging of clusters. Experiments on both synthetic and real data have proved that the proposed algorithm finds nearly optimal clustering structures in terms of number of clusters, compactness and separation.

  14. Structure and physical properties of silicon clusters and of vacancy clusters in bulk silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Sieck, A

    2000-01-01

    different from the solid. The calculated stabilities and positron-lifetimes of vacancy clusters in bulk silicon indicate the positron-lifetimes of about 435 ps detected in irradiated silicon to be related to clusters of 9 or 10 vacancies. The vacancies in these clusters form neighboring hexa-rings and, therefore, minimize the number of dangling bonds. In this thesis the growth-pattern of free silicon clusters and vacancy clusters in bulk silicon is investigated. The aim is to describe and to better understand the cluster to bulk transition. Silicon structures in between clusters and solids feature new interesting physical properties. The structure and physical properties of silicon clusters can be revealed by a combination of theory and experiment, only. Low-energy clusters are determined with different optimization techniques and a density-functional based tight-binding method. Additionally, infrared and Raman spectra, and polarizabilities calculated within self-consistent field density-functional theory are...

  15. Color Vision Defects in School Going Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Shrestha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Color Vision defect can be observed in various diseases of optic nerve and retina and also a significant number of people suffer from the inherited condition of red and green color defect. Methods: A cross-sectional descritptive study was designed with purposive sampling of students from various schools of Kathmandu Valley. All children were subjected to color vision evaluation using Ishihara Isochromatic color plates along with other examination to rule out any other causes of color deficiency. Results: A total of 2001 students were examined, 1050 male students and 951 females with mean age of 10.35 (±2.75 and 10.54 (±2.72 respectively. Among the total students examined, 2.1% had some form of color vision defects. Of the male population , 3.9% had color vision defects while none of the female was found with the deficiency. Conclusions: The prelevance of color vision defect in Nepal is significant and comparable with the prelevance quoted in the studies from different countries. Keywords:color vision; congenital red green color effect; Nepal; prevalence.

  16. High Dimensional Data Clustering Using Fast Cluster Based Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan.P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Feature selection involves identifying a subset of the most useful features that produces compatible results as the original entire set of features. A feature selection algorithm may be evaluated from both the efficiency and effectiveness points of view. While the efficiency concerns the time required to find a subset of features, the effectiveness is related to the quality of the subset of features. Based on these criteria, a fast clustering-based feature selection algorithm (FAST is proposed and experimentally evaluated in this paper. The FAST algorithm works in two steps. In the first step, features are divided into clusters by using graph-theoretic clustering methods. In the second step, the most representative feature that is strongly related to target classes is selected from each cluster to form a subset of features. Features in different clusters are relatively independent; the clustering-based strategy of FAST has a high probability of producing a subset of useful and independent features. To ensure the efficiency of FAST, we adopt the efficient minimum-spanning tree (MST using the Kruskal‟s Algorithm clustering method. The efficiency and effectiveness of the FAST algorithm are evaluated through an empirical study. Index Terms—

  17. Evolution of defects in copper deformed by high-pressure torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizek, J., E-mail: jakub.cizek@mff.cuni.cz [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Department of Low Temperature Physics, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Janecek, M.; Srba, O. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Department of Physics of Materials, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague 2, CZ-12116 (Czech Republic); Kuzel, R. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Ke Karlovu 5, 12116 Prague 2, CZ-12116 (Czech Republic); Barnovska, Z.; Prochazka, I. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Department of Low Temperature Physics, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Dobatkin, S. [A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    Lattice defects in Cu deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) were investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Vicker's microhardness (HV) measurements. The evolution of the microstructure during HPT processing was studied on samples subjected to various numbers of HPT revolutions using pressures of 2 and 4 GPa. Since strain in torsion deformation increases with the radial distance from the center of rotation, one can expect a non-uniform microstructure across the sample diameter. To examine this, HV was measured at various distances from the center of the HPT-deformed sample and the microstructure at the center was compared with that at the periphery. It was found that HPT-deformed Cu contains a high density of dislocations and also small vacancy clusters formed by the agglomeration of deformation-induced vacancies. The center of the sample exhibits coarser grains, a slightly lower density of dislocations and smaller vacancy clusters compared to the periphery. The dislocation density and concentration of vacancy clusters were evaluated from the combination of the PAS and XRD results. The theoretically estimated concentration of deformation-induced vacancies is of an order of magnitude comparable to that determined in experiment.

  18. Analytical analysis of adaptive defect detection in amplitude and phase structures using photorefractive four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehmetallah, George; Donoghue, John; Banerjee, Partha; Khoury, Jed; Yamamoto, Michiharu; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2016-04-01

    In this work, brief theoretical modeling, analysis, and novel numerical verification of a photorefractive polymer based four wave mixing (FWM) setup for defect detection has been developed. The numerical simulation helps to validate our earlier experimental results to perform defect detection in periodic amplitude and phase objects using FWM. Specifically, we develop the theory behind the detection of isolated defects, and random defects in amplitude, and phase periodic patterns. In accordance with the developed theory, the results show that this technique successfully detects the slightest defects through band-pass intensity filtering and requires minimal additional post image processing contrast enhancement. This optical defect detection technique can be applied to the detection of production line defects, e.g., scratch enhancement, defect cluster enhancement, and periodic pattern dislocation enhancement. This technique is very useful in quality control systems, production line defect inspection, and computer vision.

  19. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments. The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster. Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more. While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster. Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image. This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming from the same cloud. The blue dots

  20. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart develops. Examples of Simple Congenital Heart Defects Holes in the Heart (Septal Defects) The septum is ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  1. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Aug 29,2017 ... the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: Adults with ...

  2. Investigation of point and extended defects in electron irradiated silicon—Dependence on the particle energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, R.; Pintilie, I.; Nistor, L. C. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105 bis, Magurele 077125 (Romania); Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G. [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Makarenko, L. F. [Belarusian State University, Independence Ave. 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-04-28

    This work is focusing on generation, time evolution, and impact on the electrical performance of silicon diodes impaired by radiation induced active defects. n-type silicon diodes had been irradiated with electrons ranging from 1.5 MeV to 27 MeV. It is shown that the formation of small clusters starts already after irradiation with high fluence of 1.5 MeV electrons. An increase of the introduction rates of both point defects and small clusters with increasing energy is seen, showing saturation for electron energies above ∼15 MeV. The changes in the leakage current at low irradiation fluence-values proved to be determined by the change in the configuration of the tri-vacancy (V{sub 3}). Similar to V{sub 3}, other cluster related defects are showing bistability indicating that they might be associated with larger vacancy clusters. The change of the space charge density with irradiation and with annealing time after irradiation is fully described by accounting for the radiation induced trapping centers. High resolution electron microscopy investigations correlated with the annealing experiments revealed changes in the spatial structure of the defects. Furthermore, it is shown that while the generation of point defects is well described by the classical Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL), the formation of small defect clusters is better described by the “effective NIEL” using results from molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Controlled fabrication of oriented co-doped ZnO clustered nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barick, K C; Aslam, M; Dravid, Vinayak P; Bahadur, D

    2010-09-01

    Clustered nanoassemblies of Mn doped ZnO and co-doped ZnO (Mn, Sn co-doped ZnO; Mn, Sb co-doped ZnO; and Mn, Bi co-doped ZnO) were prepared by refluxing their respective precursors in diethylene glycol medium. The co-doping elements, Sn, Sb and Bi exist in multi oxidation states by forming Zn-O-M (M=Sb, Bi and Sn) bonds in hexagonal wurtzite nanostructure. The analyses of detailed structural characterization performed by XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), show that co-doping ions are successfully incorporated into the ZnO nanostructure and do not appear as precipitates or secondary phases. HRTEM analysis also confirmed the oriented attachment of nanocrystals as well as their defect structures. The formation/activation of higher amount of intrinsic host defects, for instance, oxygen vacancies in co-doped ZnO as compared to Mn doped ZnO sample is evident from Raman spectra. The doped and co-doped samples exhibit ferromagnetic like behavior at room temperature presumably due to the presence of defects. Specifically, it has been observed that the incorporation of dopant and co-dopants into ZnO structure can modulate the local electronic structure due to the formation/activation of defects and hence, cause significant changes in their structural, vibrational, optical and magnetic properties.

  4. Wetting on smooth micropatterned defects

    OpenAIRE

    Debuisson, Damien; Dufour, Renaud; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model which predicts the contact angle hysteresis introduced by smooth micropatterned defects. The defects are modeled by a smooth function and the contact angle hysteresis is explained using a tangent line solution. When the liquid micro-meniscus touches both sides of the defect simultaneously, depinning of the contact line occurs. The defects are fabricated using a photoresist and experimental results confirm the model. An important point is that the model is scale-independent,...

  5. pySAPC, a python package for sparse affinity propagation clustering: Application to odontogenesis whole genome time series gene-expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2016-11-01

    Developmental dental anomalies are common forms of congenital defects. The molecular mechanisms of dental anomalies are poorly understood. Systematic approaches such as clustering genes based on similar expression patterns could identify novel genes involved in dental anomalies and provide a framework for understanding molecular regulatory mechanisms of these genes during tooth development (odontogenesis). A python package (pySAPC) of sparse affinity propagation clustering algorithm for large datasets was developed. Whole genome pair-wise similarity was calculated based on expression pattern similarity based on 45 microarrays of several stages during odontogenesis. pySAPC identified 743 gene clusters based on expression pattern similarity during mouse tooth development. Three clusters are significantly enriched for genes associated with dental anomalies (with FDR odontogenesis. Clustering genes based on similar expression profiles recovered several known regulatory relationships for genes involved in odontogenesis, as well as many novel genes that may be involved with the same genetic pathways as genes that have already been shown to contribute to dental defects. By using sparse similarity matrix, pySAPC use much less memory and CPU time compared with the original affinity propagation program that uses a full similarity matrix. This python package will be useful for many applications where dataset(s) are too large to use full similarity matrix. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "System Genetics" Guest Editor: Dr. Yudong Cai and Dr. Tao Huang. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Congenital Heart Defects KidsHealth > For Parents > Congenital Heart Defects A A A What's in this article? How ... a Problem en español Anomalías cardíacas congénitas A congenital heart defect is a problem in the heart's structure that ...

  7. [Nephrolithiasis: metabolic defects and terapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Andrea; Ammendola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, major progress has been made in the knowledge of urinary lithogenesis, including the potential pathogenetic role of Randall's plaques and renal tubular crystal retention. Urine supersaturation is the driving force of this process and can be induced by some risk factors, including low urine volume, high urinary excretion of calcium oxalate and uric acid and low urinary excretion of citrate. Primary hypercalciuria can be due to intestinal overabsorption renal leak and bone reabsorption of calcium. Prophilaxis is mainly conducted with thiazides and low calcium diet which is indicated only in the intestinal form. Primary hyperoxaluria is treated with pyridoxine and may require in the severe forms simultaneous renal and liver transplantation. Enteric hyperoxaluria is secondary to fatty acids malabsorption and requires diet, oral calcium and cholestiramine. Hyperuricosuria is caused by diet endogenous overproduction, mainly due to enzymatic defects or high renal excretion of uric acid. Urine alkalinization with K or K and Mg citrate can prevent stone formation even in idiopathic uric acid nephrolithiasis, in which a defect of urine acidification is supposed to be the main abnormality, and in hypocitraturic patients. Cystinuria is a rare inherited defect with an intense clinical impact. It can be classified in three forms and urinary stone formation is the role. Increased solubility and conversion of cystine in a more soluble form are the main goals of the prophylaxis which includes K citrate and thiol agents administration. Tiopronin is preferred to D-penicillamine due to its lower side effects.

  8. The star cluster - field star connection in nearby spiral galaxies. II. Field star and cluster formation histories and their relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Larsen, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Recent studies have started to cast doubt on the assumption that most stars are formed in clusters. Observational studies of field stars and star cluster systems in nearby galaxies can lead to better constraints on the fraction of stars forming in clusters. Ultimately this may lead to a bet

  9. Characterization of a detective form of tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkleij, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was aimed at the elucidation of the nature of a defective form of TSWV which does not form complete particles during infection.Properties of TSWV and the existence of a defective form of this virus are described in Chapter 1. A survey of the literature on three diff

  10. Experimental and theoretical studies of interactions between Si{7} clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynz-Rekowski, F. V.; Quester, W.; Dietsche, R.; Lim, D. C.; Bertram, N.; Fischer, T.; Ganteför, G.; Schach, M.; Nielaba, P.; Kim, Y. D.

    2007-12-01

    The possibility of using magic Si7 clusters to form a cluster material was studied experimentally and theoretically. In experiments Si7 clusters were deposited on carbon surfaces, and the electronic structure and chemical properties of the deposited clusters were measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A non bulk-like electronic structure of Si7 was found in the Si 2p core level spectra. Si7 is suggested to form a more stable structure than the non-magic Si8 cluster and Si atoms upon deposition on carbon surfaces. Theoretically it was possible to study the interaction between the clusters without the effect of a surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential curves of two free Si7 clusters approaching each other in various orientations hint at the formation of cluster materials rather than the fusion of clusters forming bulk-like structures.

  11. Designed defects in 2D antidot lattices for quantum information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Flindt, Christian; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2008-01-01

    . A point defect is created by removing a single antidot, and calculations show that localized states form within the defect, with an energy structure which is robust against thermal dephasing. The exchange coupling between two electrons residing in two tunnel-coupled defect states is calculated numerically...

  12. Investigating Exoplanets Within Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Joseph Paul; Reisinger, Tyler; Thornton, Jonathan; McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent surveys exploring nearby open clusters have yielded noticeable differences in the planetary population from that seen in the Field. This is surprising, as it is widely accepted that a majority of stars form within clustered environments before dispersing throughout the galaxy. Though dynamical arguments have been used to explain this discrepancy in the past, previous surveys' observational statistics and detection biases can also be used to argue that the open cluster planet population is indistinguishable from the Field.Our group aims to explore the role of stellar close encounters and interplanetary interactions in producing the observed exoplanet populations for both open cluster stars and Field stars. We employ a variety of different computational techniques to investigate these effects, ranging from traditional Monte Carlo scattering experiments to multi-scale n-body simulations. We are interested in: the effects of stellar binaries; Hot Jupiter migrations; long-period ice giants; and the habitability history of terrestrial planets.

  13. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds-1: Parameterisation and Classification of 1072 Clusters in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, P. K.; Subramaniam, A.; Choudhury, S.; Indu, G.; Sagar, Ram

    2016-08-01

    We have introduced a semi-automated quantitative method to estimate the age and reddening of 1072 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) III survey data. This study brings out 308 newly parameterised clusters. In a first of its kind, the LMC clusters are classified into groups based on richness/mass as very poor, poor, moderate and rich clusters, similar to the classification scheme of open clusters in the Galaxy. A major cluster formation episode is found to happen at 125±25 Myr in the inner LMC. The bar region of the LMC appears prominently in the age range 60 - 250 Myr and is found to have a relatively higher concentration of poor and moderate clusters. The eastern and the western ends of the bar are found to form clusters initially, which later propagates to the central part. We demonstrate that there is a significant difference in the distribution of clusters as a function of mass, using a movie based on the propagation (in space and time) of cluster formation in various groups. The importance of including the low mass clusters in the cluster formation history is demonstrated. The catalog with parameters, classification, and cleaned and isochrone fitted CMDs of 1072 clusters, which are available as online material, can be further used to understand the hierarchical formation of clusters in selected regions of the LMC.

  14. Wetting on smooth micropatterned defects

    CERN Document Server

    Debuisson, Damien; Senez, Vincent; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model which predicts the contact angle hysteresis introduced by smooth micropatterned defects. The defects are modeled by a smooth function and the contact angle hysteresis is explained using a tangent line solution. When the liquid micro-meniscus touches both sides of the defect simultaneously, depinning of the contact line occurs. The defects are fabricated using a photoresist and experimental results confirm the model. An important point is that the model is scale-independent, i.e. the contact angle hysteresis is dependent on the aspect ratio of the function, not on its absolute size; this could have implications for natural surface defects.

  15. Clustering: Applied to Data Structuring and Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogechukwu N. Iloanusi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustering is a very useful scheme for data structuring and retrieval behuhcause it can handle large volumes of multi-dimensional data and employs a very fast algorithm. Other forms of data structuring techniques include hashing and binary tree structures. However, clustering has the advantage of employing little computational storage requirements and a fast speed algorithm. In this paper, clustering, k-means clustering and the approaches to effective clustering are extensively discussed. Clustering was employed as a data grouping and retrieval strategy in the filtering of fingerprints in the Fingerprint Verification Competition 2000 database 4(a. An average penetration of 7.41% obtained from the experiment shows clearly that the clustering scheme is an effective retrieval strategy for the filtering of fingerprints.

  16. Astrophysics of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Most of the baryons gravitationally bound to the cluster's halo is in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? We will present the ongoing activities to define the strategy on how an X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, such as Athena, can address these questions.

  17. Defect Recognition in Thermosonic Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dapeng; WU Naiming; ZHANG Zheng

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at developing an effective method for defect recognition in thermosonic imaging.The heat mechanism of thermosonic imaging is introduced,and the problem for defect recognition is discussed.For this purpose,defect existing in the inner wall of a metal pipeline specimen and defects embedded in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate are tested.The experimental data are processed by pulse phase thermography (PPT) method to show the phase images at different frequencies,and the characteristic of phase angle vs frequency curve of thermal anomalies and sound area is analyzed.A binary image,which is based on the characteristic value of defects,is obtained by a new recognition algorithm to show the defects.Results demonstrate good defect recognition performance for thermosonic imaging,and the reliability of this technique can be improved by the method.

  18. Fuzzy Clustering of Multiple Instance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    NO. 0704-0188 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) - UU UU UU UU 10-03-2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Fuzzy Clustering of...RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Louisville 2301 S. Third Street Jouett Hall Louisville, KY 40208 -1838 ABSTRACT Fuzzy Clustering ...and identify K target concepts simultaneously. The proposed algorithm, called Fuzzy Clustering of Multiple Instance data (FCMI), is tested and

  19. Factored Translation with Unsupervised Word Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishøj, Christian; Søgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Unsupervised word clustering algorithms — which form word clusters based on a measure of distributional similarity — have proven to be useful in providing beneficial features for various natural language processing tasks involving supervised learning. This work explores the utility of such word c....... While such an “oracle” method is not identified, evaluations indicate that unsupervised word cluster are most beneficial in sentences without unknown words....

  20. Gas Dynamics in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Michael Kingsley, Jr.

    Galaxy clusters are the most massive structures in the universe and, in the hierarchical pattern of cosmological structure formation, the largest objects in the universe form last. Galaxy clusters are thus interesting objects for a number of reasons. Three examples relevant to this thesis are: 1. Constraining the properties of dark energy: Due to the hierarchical nature of structure formation, the largest objects in the universe form last. The cluster mass function is thus sensitive to the entire expansion history of the universe and can be used to constrain the properties of dark energy. This constraint complements others derived from the CMB or from Type Ia supernovae and provides an important, independent confirmation of such methods. In particular, clusters provide detailed information about the equation of state parameter w because they sample a large redshift range z ˜ 0 - 1. 2. Probing galaxy formation: Clusters contain the most massive galaxies in the uni- verse, and the most massive black holes; because clusters form so late, we can still witness the assembly of these objects in the nearby universe. Clusters thus provide a more detailed view of galaxy formation than is possible in studies of lower-mass ob- jects. An important example comes from x-ray studies of clusters, which unexpectedly found that star formation in massive galaxies in clusters is closely correlated with the properties of the hot, virialized gas in their halos. This correlation persists despite the enormous separation in temperature, in dynamical time-scales, and in length-scales between the virialized gas in the halo and the star-forming regions in the galaxy. This remains a challenge to interpret theoretically. 3. Developing our knowledge of dilute plasmas: The masses and sizes of galaxy clusters imply that the plasma which permeates them is both very hot (˜ 108 K) and very dilute (˜ 10 -2 cm-3). This plasma is collisional enough to be considered a fluid, but collisionless enough to