WorldWideScience

Sample records for deep-sea hydrothermal plume

  1. A Lagrangian Particle Random Walk Model for Simulating A Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Plume with both Buoyant and Non-Buoyant Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yu; LI Wei; ZHANG Ai-qun

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model of simulating a deep-sea hydrothermal plume based on a Lagrangian particle random walk algorithm.This model achieves the efficient process to calculate a numerical plume developed in a fluid-advected environment with the characteristics such as significant filament intermittency and significant plume meander due to flow variation with both time and location.Especially,this model addresses both non-buoyant and buoyant features of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume in three dimensions,which significantly challenge a strategy for tracing the deep-sea hydrothermal plume and localizing its source.This paper also systematically discusses stochastic initial and boundary conditions that are critical to generate a proper numerical plume.The developed model is a powerful tool to evaluate and optimize strategies for the tracking of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume via an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV).

  2. The microbiology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent plumes: ecological and biogeographic linkages to seafloor and water column habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Dick

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal plumes are an important yet understudied component of deep-sea vent microbial ecosystems. The significance of plume microbial processes can be appreciated from three perspectives: (1 mediation of plume biogeochemistry, (2 dispersal of seafloor hydrothermal vent microbes between vents sites, (3 as natural laboratories for understanding the ecology, physiology, and function of microbial groups that are distributed throughout the pelagic deep sea. Plume microbiology has been largely neglected in recent years, especially relative to the extensive research conducted on seafloor and subseafloor systems. Rapidly advancing technologies for investigating microbial communities provide new motivation and opportunities to characterize this important microbial habitat. Here we briefly highlight microbial contributions to plume and broader ocean (biogeochemistry and review recent work to illustrate the ecological and biogeographic linkages between plumes, seafloor vent habitats, and other marine habitats such as oxygen minimum zones, cold seeps, and oil spills. 16S rRNA gene surveys and metagenomic/-transcriptomic data from plumes point to dominant microbial populations, genes, and functions that are also operative in oxygen minimum zones (SUP05, ammonia-oxidizing Archaea, and SAR324 Deltaproteobacteria and hydrocarbon-rich environments (methanotrophs. Plume microbial communities are distinct from those on the seafloor or in the subsurface but contain some signatures of these habitats, consistent with the notion that plumes are potential vectors for dispersal of microorganisms between seafloor vent sites. Finally, we put forward three pressing questions for the future of deep-sea hydrothermal plume research and consider interactions between vents and oceans on global scales.

  3. Enzymatic microbial Mn(II) oxidation and Mn biooxide production in the Guaymas Basin deep-sea hydrothermal plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Gregory J.; Clement, Brian G.; Webb, Samuel M.; Fodrie, F. Joel; Bargar, John R.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2009-11-01

    Microorganisms play important roles in mediating biogeochemical reactions in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes, but little is known regarding the mechanisms that underpin these transformations. At Guaymas Basin (GB) in the Gulf of California, hydrothermal vents inject fluids laden with dissolved Mn(II) (dMn) into the deep waters of the basin where it is oxidized and precipitated as particulate Mn(III/IV) oxides, forming turbid hydrothermal "clouds". Previous studies have predicted extremely short residence times for dMn at GB and suggested they are the result of microbially-mediated Mn(II) oxidation and precipitation. Here we present biogeochemical results that support a central role for microorganisms in driving Mn(II) oxidation in the GB hydrothermal plume, with enzymes being the primary catalytic agent. dMn removal rates at GB are remarkably fast for a deep-sea hydrothermal plume (up to 2 nM/h). These rapid rates were only observed within the plume, not in background deep-sea water above the GB plume or at GB plume depths (˜1750-2000 m) in the neighboring Carmen Basin, where there is no known venting. dMn removal is dramatically inhibited under anoxic conditions and by the presence of the biological poison, sodium azide. A conspicuous temperature optimum of dMn removal rates (˜40 °C) and a saturation-like (i.e. Michaelis-Menten) response to O 2 concentration were observed, indicating an enzymatic mechanism. dMn removal was resistant to heat treatment used to select for spore-forming organisms, but very sensitive to low concentrations of added Cu, a cofactor required by the putative Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and synchrotron radiation-based X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) revealed the Mn oxides to have a hexagonal birnessite or δ-MnO 2-like mineral structure, indicating that these freshly formed deep-sea Mn oxides are strikingly similar to primary biogenic Mn oxides produced by laboratory cultures of bacteria

  4. The distribution and stabilisation of dissolved Fe in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Statham, Peter J.; Fones, Gary R.; German, Christopher R.

    2008-06-01

    We have conducted a study of hydrothermal plumes overlying the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 5° S to investigate whether there is a significant export flux of dissolved Fe from hydrothermal venting to the oceans. Our study combined measurements of plume-height Fe concentrations from a series of 6 CTD stations together with studies of dissolved Fe speciation in a subset of those samples. At 2.5 km down plume from the nearest known vent site dissolved Fe concentrations were ˜ 20 nM. This is much higher than would be predicted from a combination of plume dilution and dissolved Fe(II) oxidation rates, but consistent with stabilisation due to the presence of organic Fe complexes and Fe colloids. Using Competitive Ligand Exchange-Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-CSV), stabilised dissolved Fe complexes were detected within the dissolved Fe fraction on the edges of one non-buoyant hydrothermal plume with observed ligand concentrations high enough to account for stabilisation of ˜ 4% of the total Fe emitted from the 5° S vent sites. If these results were representative of all hydrothermal systems, submarine venting could provide 12-22% of the global deep-ocean dissolved Fe budget.

  5. Major and trace-element speciation in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes of Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, J. V.; Toner, B.; Dick, G.; Breier, J. A.; Jiang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridge systems results in the flux of heat and chemical species from the crust to the cold, oxic waters of the deep ocean. The mixing of these fluids creates a buoyant, rising plume with dynamic biogeochemical processes and rapid physical mixing. The global distribution of these vent systems makes hydrothermal plumes an important source and sink of biogeochemically active elements to ocean basins. The goal of this study is to characterize the transport and fate of the chemical species within individual hydrothermal plumes. By doing so, we hope to understand the interrelationship of physical-chemical gradients present in plumes with trace element uptake by plume particles. To achieve this goal a field study was undertaken at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The larger study will include analysis of all sites, however here we report the geochemical and trace-element speciation of a single buoyant plume within ABE vent field. A series of replicate sample sets were collected by in situ filtration at 0.5m, 40m, 200m within a buoyant plume using the ROV JASON. Above plume background and near bottom background sample sets were also collected. Hydrothermal plume particles in sample replicates have been analysed for bulk geochemistry, chemical speciation, and particle-by-particle mineralogy. The speciation of iron, a major particle forming element, and the distribution of select trace elements (arsenic, vanadium) is described using chemical mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Particle morphology and carbon speciation are described using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). This data is being integrated into a physical-geochemical model, and will be used to estimate the energy available to chemlithoautotrophic organisms in plumes. The distribution of minerals and incorporated trace elements (e.g. arsenic) will be used to interpret uptake mechanisms. The research will help us understand processes

  6. Light at deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Reynolds, George T.; Chave, Alan D.; Tyson, J. Anthony

    Ambient light spectral data were acquired at two deep-sea hydrothermal vents with a temperature of ˜350°C: the Hole-to-Hell site on the East Pacific Rise at 9°N and the Snake-Pit site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Measurements were made with a simple, multi-channel photometer which simultaneously detected light in four 100 nm-wide bands over the wavelength range of 650-1050 nm. Most of the light detected is near-infrared (750-1050 nm), but there is a 19x greater photon flux than expected from thermal radiation alone at shorter wavelengths (650-750 nm) at the Hole-to-Hell vent. At Snake Pit, more light in the 750-850 nm band was observed 10 cm above the orifice where the temperature was 50-100°C than at the 351°C vent opening. These data suggest the presence of non-thermal light sources in the vent environment. Some possible non-thermal mechanisms are identified, but further data will be required to resolve them.

  7. 深海热液活动环境场参数及模型分析%Parameters and model analysis for the deep-sea hydrothermal plume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏建新; 韩凝; 任华堂

    2009-01-01

    According to the hydrothermal activity models developed in recent years, the rules of the rising height and heat flux of the thermal column were systematically considered. Results show that (1) the thermal rising height is related to the bottom horizontal flow and heat source characteristics, and the heat flux of the single hydrothermal vent and of the neutral buoyancy layer in the thermal column could reach to a magnitude of 10~9 W/m~2; that (2) the hydrothermal plume could be affected by many factors such as shape, salinity, temperature and velocity, which changed with height; that (3) by considering the characteristics of the oceanic crust, the buoyancy flux and the max rising height of the thermal column would be changed, and the rising height would reach more than 1000 m, and the heat flux would reach to a magnitude of 10~8 W/m~2. The values obtained above could be used for the further study of the mechanism of hydrothermal plume movement and the establishment of hydrothermal activity model.%深海热液活动是当今科学研究的热点,本文基于近年有关热液活动的各种模型,系统分析比较了热液柱的上升高度与热通量等参数变化规律,并对现有的热液羽状流模型和考虑洋壳特性的经验模型进行了分析.主要研究结果有:(1)热液柱上升高度与底部横向流和热源特性密切相关,单个热液喷口热通量和羽状热液柱中性浮力层模型热液热通量达10~9 W/m~2;(2)热液羽状流受多种因素影响,热液柱面积的轮廓,羽状热液柱各处的含盐量、潜在温度、速度可随深度改变发生变化;(3)考虑洋壳特性后,其浮力通量和热液柱最大的上升高度均有变化,上升高度可达1 000多m,热通量达10~8 W/m~2.上述模型和参数可为进一步深入研究热液羽流运动机制和建立热液活动正演和反演模型提供参考.

  8. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  9. COVIS Detects Interconnections Between Atmospheric, Oceanic and Geologic systems at a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Lee, R.

    2015-12-01

    COVIS (Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar) is an innovative sonar system designed to quantitatively monitor focused and diffuse flows from deep-sea hydrothermal vent clusters. From 9/2010 to 9/2015, COVIS was connected to the NEPTUNE observatory at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour Field, JdFR. COVIS monitored plumes and diffuse discharge by transmitting high-frequency (200-400 kHz), pulsed acoustic waves and recording the backscattered signals to yield time series of plume heat and volume transports, plume bending, and diffuse flow area. Temporal variations indicate the rate of hydrothermal plume mixing with the ambient seawater increases with the magnitude of ocean currents. Such current-driven entrainment links the dynamics of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume with oceanic and atmospheric processes. We estimate the direction and relative amplitude of the local bottom currents from the bending angles of the plumes. A comparison with currents from an ADCP (~80 m south of Grotto) reveals significant complexity in the mean bottom flow structure within a hydrothermal vent field. Diffuse flow area, temperature, and faunal densities vary periodically reflecting some combination of tidal pressure and current interactions. The heat transport time series suggests the heat source driving the plume remained relatively steady for 41 months. Local seismic data reveals that increased heat transport in 2000 followed seismic events in 1999 and 2000 and the steady heat flux from 10/2011 to 2/2015 coincided with quiescent seismicity. Such a correlation points to the close linkage of a seafloor hydrothermal system with geological processes. These findings demonstrate the intimate interconnections of seafloor hydrothermal systems with processes spanning the Earth's interior to the sea surface. Further, they (and the time-series acquired by COVIS) testify to the effectiveness and robustness of employing an acoustic-imaging sonar for long-term monitoring of a seafloor hydrothermal

  10. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  11. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Richard A.; Kennish, Michael J.

    1993-08-01

    Studies of the many active and inactive hydrothermal vents found during the past 15 years have radically altered views of biological and geological processes in the deep sea. The biological communities occupying the vast and relatively stable soft bottom habitats of the deep sea are characterized by low population densities, high species diversity, and low biomass. In contrast, those inhabiting the generally unstable conditions of hydrothermal vent environments exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. Biological processes, such as rates of metabolism and growth, in vent organisms are comparable to those observed in organisms from shallow-water ecosystems. An abundant energy source is provided by chemosynthetic bacteria that constitute the primary producers sustaining the lush communities at the hydrothermal sites. Fluxes in vent flow and fluid chemistry cause changes in growth rates, reproduction, mortality, and/or colonization of vent fauna, leading to temporal and spatial variation of the vent communities. Vent populations that cannot adapt to modified flow rates are adversely affected, as is evidenced by high mortality or lower rates of colonization, growth, or reproduction. Substantial changes in biota have been witnessed at several vents, and successional cycles have been proposed for the Galapagos vent fields. Dramatic temporal and spatial variations in vent community structure may also relate to variations in larval dispersal and chance recruitment, as well as biotic interactions.

  12. Hydrothermal mixing: Fuel for life in the deep-sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentscher, M.; Bach, W.; Amend, J.; McCollom, T.

    2009-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems show a wide range of fluid compositions and temperatures. They reach from highly alkaline and reducing, like the Lost City hydrothermal field, to acidic and reducing conditions, (e. g., the Logatchev hydrothermal field) to acidic and oxidizing conditions (e. g., island arc hosted systems). These apparently hostile vent systems are generally accompanied by high microbial activity forming the base of a food-web that often includes higher organisms like mussels, snails, or shrimp. The primary production is boosted by mixing of chemically reduced hydrothermal vent fluids with ambient seawater, which generates redox disequilibria that serve as energy source for chemolithoautotrophic microbial life. We used geochemical reaction path models to compute the affinities of catabolic (energy-harvesting) and anabolic (biosynthesis) reactions along trajectories of batch mixing between vent fluids and 2 °C seawater. Geochemical data of endmember hydrothermal fluids from 12 different vent fields (Lost City, Rainbow, Logatchev, TAG, EPR 21 °N, Manus Basin, Mariana Arc, etc.) were included in this reconnaissance study of the variability in metabolic energetics in global submarine vent systems. The results show a distinction between ultramafic-hosted and basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems. The highest energy yield for chemolithotrophic catabolism in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems is reached at low temperature and under slightly aerobic to aerobic conditions. The dominant reactions, for example at Rainbow or Lost City, are the oxidation of H2, Fe2+ and methane. At temperatures >60 °C, anaerobic metabolic reactions, e. g., sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, become more profitable. In contrast, basalt-hosted systems, such as TAG and 21 °N EPR uniformly indicate H2S oxidation to be the catabolically dominant reaction over the entire microbial-relevant temperature range. Affinities were calculated for the formation of individual cellular

  13. Microbial gene functions enriched in the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea oil plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.; Deng, Y.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; He, Z.; Voordeckers, J.; Zhou, A.; Lee, Y.-J.; Mason, O.U.; Dubinsky, E.; Chavarria, K.; Tom, L.; Fortney, J.; Lamendella, R.; Jansson, J.K.; D?haeseleer, P.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2011-06-15

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the deepest and largest offshore spill in U.S. history and its impacts on marine ecosystems are largely unknown. Here, we showed that the microbial community functional composition and structure were dramatically altered in a deep-sea oil plume resulting from the spill. A variety of metabolic genes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation were highly enriched in the plume compared to outside the plume, indicating a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation or natural attenuation in the deep-sea. Various other microbial functional genes relevant to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur and iron cycling, metal resistance, and bacteriophage replication were also enriched in the plume. Together, these results suggest that the indigenous marine microbial communities could play a significant role in biodegradation of oil spills in deep-sea environments.

  14. An abyssal mobilome: viruses, plasmids and vesicles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossouarn, Julien; Dupont, Samuel; Gorlas, Aurore; Mercier, Coraline; Bienvenu, Nadege; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Geslin, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as viruses, plasmids, vesicles, gene transfer agents (GTAs), transposons and transpovirions, which collectively represent the mobilome, interact with cellular organisms from all three domains of life, including those thriving in the most extreme environments. While efforts have been made to better understand deep-sea vent microbial ecology, our knowledge of the mobilome associated with prokaryotes inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents remains limited. Here we focus on the abyssal mobilome by reviewing accumulating data on viruses, plasmids and vesicles associated with thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea present in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

  15. Clay as indicator of sediment plume movement in deep-sea environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    at the sea surface, as they would affect the entire water column, including light transmission, photosynthesis and productivity. The sediment plume generated by any mining system would cause long-term effects in the deep-sea environment. In order to predict...

  16. High abundances of viruses in a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system indicates viral mediated microbial mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Alice C.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about the distribution and abundance of viruses at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Based on estimates made using epifluorescence microscopy and the dye YoPro-1, much higher viral abundances were observed at active hydrothermal vents than in the surrounding deep sea. This indicates that viral production was occurring and that viruses were a source of microbial mortality. Samples collected from three actively venting sites (Clam Bed, S&M and Salut) within the Endeavour Ridge system off the west coast of North America had viral abundances ranging from 1.45×10 5 to 9.90×10 7 ml -1, while the abundances of prokaryotes ranged from 1.30×10 5 to 4.46×10 6 ml -1. The abundances of viruses and prokaryotes in samples collected along the neutrally buoyant plume associated with the Main Endeavour Field were lower than at actively venting sites, with a mean of 5.3×10 5 prokaryotes ml -1 (s.d. 2.9×10 5, n=64) and 3.50×10 6 viruses ml -1 (s.d. 1.89×10 6, n=64), but were higher than non-plume samples (2.7×10 5 prokaryotes ml -1, s.d. 5.0×10 4, n=15 and 2.94×10 6 viruses ml -1, s.d. 1.08×10 6, n=15). Prokaryotic and viral abundances in non-hydrothermal regions were as much as 10-fold higher than found in previous studies, in which sample fixation likely resulted in underestimates. This suggests that viral infection may be a greater source of prokaryotic mortality throughout the deep sea than previously recognized. Overall, our results indicate that virus-mediated mortality of prokaryotes at these hydrothermal-vent environments is significant and may reduce energy flow to higher trophic levels.

  17. Differences in recovery between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and vent-proximate communities after a volcanic eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gollner, S.; Govenar, B.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Mills, S.; Le Bris, N.; Weinbauer, M.; Shank, T.M.; Bright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and the surrounding basalt seafloor are subject to major natural disturbance events such as volcanic eruptions. In the near future, anthropogenic disturbance in the form of deep-sea mining could also significantly affect the faunal communities of hydrothermal vents. In th

  18. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents from Three Oceanic Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianliang; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are considered to be one of the most spectacular ecosystems on Earth. Microorganisms form the basis of the food chain in vents controlling the vent communities. However, the diversity of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans remains largely unknown. In this study, the pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial communities of the venting sulfide, seawater, and tubeworm trophosome from East Pacific Rise, South Atlantic Ridge, and Southwest Indian Ridge, respectively. A total of 23,767 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned into 42 different phyla. Although Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in all vents, differences of bacterial diversity were observed among different vents from three oceanic regions. The sulfides of East Pacific Rise possessed the most diverse bacterial communities. The bacterial diversities of venting seawater were much lower than those of vent sulfides. The symbiotic bacteria of tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae were included in the bacterial community of vent sulfides, suggesting their significant ecological functions as the primary producers in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. Therefore, our study presented a comprehensive view of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans.

  19. Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Biomineralization By Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Gartman, A.; Clarke, D. R.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are characterized by steep temperature and chemical gradients and moderate pressures. At these sites, mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria thrive, however their significance for the formation of sulfide minerals is unknown. In this study we investigated sulfate reduction and sulfide biomineralization by the deep-sea bacterium Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis isolated from a deep-sea vent chimney at the Grandbonum vent site (13°N, East Pacific Rise, 2600 m water depth) [1]. Sulfate reduction rates were determined as a function of pressure and temperature. Biomineralization of sulfide minerals in the presence of various metal concentrations was characterized using light and electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. We seek to better understand the significance of biological sulfate reduction in deep-sea hydrothermal environments, to characterize the steps in sulfide mineral nucleation and growth, and identify the interactions between cells and minerals. [1] D. Alazard, S. Dukan, A. Urios, F. Verhe, N. Bouabida, F. Morel, P. Thomas, J.L. Garcia and B. Ollivier, Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis sp. nov., a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from hydrothermal vents, Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol., 53 (2003) 173-178.

  20. Biogeography of Persephonella in deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the Western Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka eMino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are areas on the seafloor with high biological productivity fueled by microbial chemosynthesis. Members of the Aquificales genus Persephonella are obligately chemosynthetic bacteria, and appear to be key players in carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles in high temperature habitats at deep-sea vents. Although this group of bacteria has cosmopolitan distribution in deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystem around the world, little is known about their population structure such as intraspecific genomic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic diversity. We developed the multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA scheme for their genomic characterization. Sequence variation was determined in five housekeeping genes and one functional gene of 36 P. hydrogeniphila strains originated from the Okinawa Trough and the South Mariana Trough. Although the strains share > 98.7% similarities in 16S rRNA gene sequences, MLSA revealed 35 different sequence types, indicating their extensive genomic diversity. A phylogenetic tree inferred from all concatenated gene sequences revealed the clustering of isolates according to the geographic origin. In addition, the phenotypic clustering pattern inferred from whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS analysis can be correlated to their MLSA clustering pattern. This study represents the first MLSA combined with phenotypic analysis indicative of allopatric speciation of deep-sea hydrothermal vent bacteria.

  1. Microbial diversity and adaptation to high hydrostatic pressure in deep-sea hydrothermal vents prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebbar, Mohamed; Franzetti, Bruno; Girard, Eric; Oger, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Prokaryotes inhabiting in the deep sea vent ecosystem will thus experience harsh conditions of temperature, pH, salinity or high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) stress. Among the fifty-two piezophilic and piezotolerant prokaryotes isolated so far from different deep-sea environments, only fifteen (four Bacteria and eleven Archaea) that are true hyper/thermophiles and piezophiles have been isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents; these belong mainly to the Thermococcales order. Different strategies are used by microorganisms to thrive in deep-sea hydrothermal vents in which "extreme" physico-chemical conditions prevail and where non-adapted organisms cannot live, or even survive. HHP is known to impact the structure of several cellular components and functions, such as membrane fluidity, protein activity and structure. Physically the impact of pressure resembles a lowering of temperature, since it reinforces the structure of certain molecules, such as membrane lipids, and an increase in temperature, since it will also destabilize other structures, such as proteins. However, universal molecular signatures of HHP adaptation are not yet known and are still to be deciphered.

  2. Genome-resolved metagenomics reveals that sulfur metabolism dominates the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Jain, S.; Reed, D. C.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plumes occur when hot fluids from hydrothermal vents replete with chemically reduced elements and compounds like sulfide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, iron and manganese mix with cold, oxic seawater. Chemosynthetic microbes use these reduced chemicals to power primary production and are pervasive throughout the deep sea, even at sites far removed from hydrothermal vents. Although neutrally-buoyant hydrothermal plumes have been well-studied, rising hydrothermal plumes have received little attention even though they represent an important interface in the deep-sea where microbial metabolism and particle formation processes control the transformation of important elements and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we used genome-resolved metagenomic analyses and thermodynamic-bioenergetic modeling to study the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes at five different hydrothermal vents spanning a range of geochemical gradients at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our analyses show that differences in the geochemistry of hydrothermal vents do not manifest in microbial diversity and community composition, both of which display only minor variance across ELSC hydrothermal plumes. Microbial metabolism is dominated by oxidation of reduced sulfur species and supports a diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses that provide intriguing insights into metabolic plasticity and virus-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the microbial community. The manifestation of sulfur oxidation genes in hydrogen and methane oxidizing organisms hints at metabolic opportunism in deep-sea microbes that would enable them to respond to varying redox conditions in hydrothermal plumes. Finally, we infer that the abundance, diversity and metabolic versatility of microbes associated with sulfur oxidation impart functional redundancy that could allow it to persist in the dynamic settings of hydrothermal plumes.

  3. Thermophilic hydrogen-producing bacteria inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal environments represented by Caloranaerobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lijing; Xu, Hongxiu; Zeng, Xiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Long, Minnan; Shao, Zongze

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen is an important energy source for deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. However, little is known about microbes and their role in hydrogen turnover in the environment. In this study, the diversity and physiological characteristics of fermentative hydrogen-producing microbes from deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields were described for the first time. Seven enrichments were obtained from hydrothermal vent sulfides collected from the Southwest Indian Ocean, East Pacific and South Atlantic. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that members of the Caloranaerobacter genus were the dominant component in these enrichments. Subsequently, three thermophilic hydrogen producers, strains H363, H53214 and DY22619, were isolated. They were phylogenetically related to species of the genus Caloranaerobacter. The H2 yields of strains H363, H53214, DY22619 and MV107, which was the type species of genus Caloranaerobacter, were 0.11, 1.21, 3.13 and 2.85 mol H2/mol glucose, respectively. Determination of the main soluble metabolites revealed that strains H363, H53214 and MV107 performed heterolactic fermentations, while strain DY22619 performed butyric acid fermentation, indicating distinct fermentation patterns among members of the genus. Finally, a diversity of forms of [FeFe]-hydrogenase with different modular structures was revealed based on draft genomic data of Caloranaerobacter strains. This highlights the complexity of hydrogen metabolism in Caloranaerobacter, reflecting adaptations to environmental conditions in hydrothermal vent systems. Collectively, results suggested that Caloranaerobacter species might be ubiquitous and play a role in biological hydrogen generation in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields.

  4. Deep-sea oil plume enriches psychrophilic oil-degrading bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C.; Dubinsky, E.A.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Andersen, G.L.; Piceno, Y.M.; Singh, N.; Jansson, J.K.; Probst, A.; Borglin, S.E.; Fortney, J.L.; Stringfellow, W.T.; Bill, M.; Conrad, M.S.; Tom, L.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Alusi, T.R.; Lamendella, R.; Joyner, D.C.; Spier, C.; Auer, M.; Zemla, M.L.; Chakraborty, R.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; D' haeseleer, P.; Holman, H.-Y. N.; Osman, S.; Lu, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Zhou, J.; Mason, O.U.

    2010-09-01

    The biological effects and expected fate of the vast amount of oil in the Gulf of Mexico from the Deepwater Horizon blowout are unknown owing to the depth and magnitude of this event. Here, we report that the dispersed hydrocarbon plume stimulated deep-sea indigenous {gamma}-Proteobacteria that are closely related to known petroleum degraders. Hydrocarbon-degrading genes coincided with the concentration of various oil contaminants. Changes in hydrocarbon composition with distance from the source and incubation experiments with environmental isolates demonstrated faster-than-expected hydrocarbon biodegradation rates at 5 C. Based on these results, the potential exists for intrinsic bioremediation of the oil plume in the deep-water column without substantial oxygen drawdown.

  5. Bacterial Sulfate Reduction Above 100-Degrees-C in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; ISAKSEN, MF; JANNASCH, HW

    1992-01-01

    The currently known upper temperature limit for growth of organisms, shared by a number of archaebacteria, is 110-degrees-C. However, among the sulfate-reducing bacteria, growth temperatures of greater than 100-degrees-C have not been found. A search for high-temperature activity of sulfate-reducing...... bacteria was done in hot deep-sea sediments at the hydrothermal vents of the Guaymas Basin tectonic spreading center in the Gulf of California. Radiotracer studies revealed that sulfate reduction can occur at temperatures up to 110-degrees-C, with an optimum rate at 103-degrees to 106-degrees...

  6. The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Ecogenomics of the Deep-Sea Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The explosion on April 20, 2010 at the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana, resulted in oil and gas rising to the surface and the oil coming ashore in many parts of the Gulf, it also resulted in the dispersment of an immense oil plume 4,000 feet below the surface of the water. Despite spanning more than 600 feet in the water column and extending more than 10 miles from the wellhead, the dispersed oil plume was gone within weeks after the wellhead was capped - degraded and diluted to undetectable levels. Furthermore, this degradation took place without significant oxygen depletion. Ecogenomics enabled discovery of new and unclassified species of oil-eating bacteria that apparently lives in the deep Gulf where oil seeps are common. Using 16s microarrays, functional gene arrays, clone libraries, lipid analysis and a variety of hydrocarbon and micronutrient analyses we were able to characterize the oil degraders. Metagenomic sequence data was obtained for the deep-water samples using the Illumina platform. In addition, single cells were sorted and sequenced for the some of the most dominant bacteria that were represented in the oil plume; namely uncultivated representatives of Colwellia and Oceanospirillum. In addition, we performed laboratory microcosm experiments using uncontaminated water collected from The Gulf at the depth of the oil plume to which we added oil and COREXIT. These samples were characterized by 454 pyrotag. The results provide information about the key players and processes involved in degradation of oil, with and without COREXIT, in different impacted environments in The Gulf of Mexico. We are also extending these studies to explore dozens of deep sediment samples that were also collected after the oil spill around the wellhead. This data suggests that a great potential for intrinsic bioremediation of oil plumes exists in the deep-sea and other environs in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Sander, Sylvia G; Jayachandran, Saranya; Nath, B Nagender; Nagaraju, G; Chennuri, Kartheek; Vudamala, Krushna; Lathika, N; Mascarenhas-Pereira, Maria Brenda L

    2014-11-01

    The current study aims to understand the speciation and fate of Cu complexes in hydrothermally altered sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin and assess the probable impacts of deep-sea mining on speciation of Cu complexes and assess the Cu flux from this sediment to the water column in this area. This study suggests that most of the Cu was strongly associated with different binding sites in Fe-oxide phases of the hydrothermally altered sediments with stabilities higher than that of Cu-EDTA complexes. The speciation of Cu indicates that hydrothermally influenced deep-sea sediments from Central Indian Ocean Basin may not significantly contribute to the global Cu flux. However, increasing lability of Cu-sediment complexes with increasing depth of sediment may increase bioavailability and Cu flux to the global ocean during deep-sea mining. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bacterial group II introns in a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Mircea; Mullineaux, Lauren; Huang, Hon-Ren; Perlman, Philip S; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2002-12-01

    Group II introns are catalytic RNAs and mobile retrotransposable elements known to be present in the genomes of some nonmarine bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Here we report the discovery of group II introns in a bacterial mat sample collected from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent near 9 degrees N on the East Pacific Rise. One of the introns was shown to self-splice in vitro. This is the first example of marine bacterial introns from molecular population structure studies of microorganisms that live in the proximity of hydrothermal vents. These types of mobile genetic elements may prove useful in improving our understanding of bacterial genome evolution and may serve as valuable markers in comparative studies of bacterial communities.

  9. Biological and environmental rhythms in (dark deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cuvelier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During 2011, two deep-sea observatories focusing on hydrothermal vent ecology were up and running in the Atlantic (Eiffel Tower, Lucky Strike vent field and the Northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP (Grotto, Main Endeavour Field. Both ecological modules recorded imagery and environmental variables jointly for a time span of 23 days (7–30 October 2011 and environmental variables for up to 9 months (October 2011–June 2012. Community dynamics were assessed based on imagery analysis and rhythms in temporal variation for both fauna and environment were revealed. Tidal rhythms were found to be at play in the two settings and were most visible in temperature and tubeworm appearances (at NEP. A  ∼  6 h lag in tidal rhythm occurrence was observed between Pacific and Atlantic hydrothermal vents, which corresponds to the geographical distance and time delay between the two sites.

  10. Biological and environmental rhythms in (dark) deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Daphne; Legendre, Pierre; Laës-Huon, Agathe; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2017-06-01

    During 2011, two deep-sea observatories focusing on hydrothermal vent ecology were up and running in the Atlantic (Eiffel Tower, Lucky Strike vent field) and the Northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP) (Grotto, Main Endeavour Field). Both ecological modules recorded imagery and environmental variables jointly for a time span of 23 days (7-30 October 2011) and environmental variables for up to 9 months (October 2011-June 2012). Community dynamics were assessed based on imagery analysis and rhythms in temporal variation for both fauna and environment were revealed. Tidal rhythms were found to be at play in the two settings and were most visible in temperature and tubeworm appearances (at NEP). A ˜ 6 h lag in tidal rhythm occurrence was observed between Pacific and Atlantic hydrothermal vents, which corresponds to the geographical distance and time delay between the two sites.

  11. Evolutionary strategies of cells and viruses in deep-sea hydrothermal systems revealed through comparative metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.; Sogin, M. L.; Baross, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems must also withstand these environmental extremes, and a high proportion of viruses in these systems are lysogenic. Comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent has provided insights into the evolutionary strategies of both cells and viruses in hydrothermal systems. We detected numerous mobile elements in the viral and cellular gene pools as well as a large number of prophage in the cellular fraction. We show that the hydrothermal vent viral gene pool is relatively enriched in genes related to energy metabolism, a feature that is unique to the hydrothermal vent viral gene pool compared to viral gene pools from other environments, indicating a potential for integrated prophage to enhance host metabolic flexibility. We also detected stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool, indicating selection pressures that promote prolonged viral integration in the host. Our results support the hypothesis that viruses enhance host genomic plasticity and adaptability in this extreme and dynamic environment. Finally, we will discuss general implications of this work for understanding the viral impact on biogeochemical cycles and evolutionary trajectories of microbial populations in the deep subsurface biosphere.

  12. The Biological Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent as a Model to Study Carbon Dioxide Capturing Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premila D. Thongbam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO2 from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO2 fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO2 fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture.

  13. The biological deep sea hydrothermal vent as a model to study carbon dioxide capturing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zoran; Thongbam, Premila D

    2011-01-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis) a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO₂ from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO₂ fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO₂ fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture.

  14. IP effects on electromagnetic data of deep-sea hydrothermal deposits in time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, H. J.; Jang, H.; Ha, W.

    2015-12-01

    A transient electromagnetic (TEM) system using a small loop source is advantageous to the development of compact, autonomous instruments which are well suited to submersible-based surveys. Since electrical conductivity of subseafloor materials can be frequency dependent, these induced polarization (IP) effects may affect the reliability of TEM data interpretation. In this study, we investigate IP effects on TEM responses of deep-sea hydrothermal mineral deposits with a thin sediment cover. Time-domain target signals are larger and appear earlier in horizontal magnetic fields than in vertical ones. IP effects cause transient magnetic fields to enhance initially, to decay rapidly and then to reverse the polarity. The DC conductivity and IP chargeability in Cole-Cole parameters influence the time of sign reversal and the enhancement of the target response, simultaneously. The reversal time is almost invariant with the time constant while the target signal is almost invariant with the frequency exponent.

  15. Abundance and Distribution of Diagnostic Carbon Fixation Genes in a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Gradient Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, H. N.; Kelley, D. S.; Girguis, P. R.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2010-12-01

    The walls of deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys sustain steep thermal and chemical gradients resulting from the mixing of hot (350°C+) hydrothermal fluids with cold, oxygenated seawater. The chemical disequilibrium generated from this process has the potential to drive numerous chemolithoautotrophic metabolisms, many of which have been demonstrated to be operative in microbial pure cultures. In addition to the well-known Calvin Cycle, at least five additional pathways have been discovered including the Reverse Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (rTCA), the Reductive Acetyl-CoA pathway, and the 3-hydroxyproprionate pathway. Most of the newly discovered pathways have been found in thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea, which are the well represented in microbial diversity studies of hydrothermal chimney walls. However, to date, little is known about the environmental controls that impact various carbon fixation pathways. The overlap of limited microbial diversity with distinct habitat conditions in hydrothermal chimney walls provides an ideal setting to explore these relationships. Hydrothermal chimney walls from multiple structures recovered from the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific were sub-sampled and analyzed using PCR-based assays. Earlier work showed elevated microbial abundances in the outer portions of mature chimney walls, with varying ratios of Archaea to Bacteria from the outer to inner portions of the chimneys. Common phylotypes identified in these regions included Epsilonproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Desulfurococcales. Total genomic DNA was extracted from mineralogically distinct niches within these structures and queried for genes coding key regulatory enzymes for each of the well studied carbon fixation pathways. Preliminary results show the occurrence of genes representing rTCA cycle (aclB) and methyl coenzyme A reductase (mcrA) - a proxy for the Reductive Acetyl-CoA Pathway within interior portion of mature

  16. Beyond the vent: New perspectives on hydrothermal plumes and pelagic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brennan T.

    2017-03-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vent fields introduce buoyant plumes of chemically altered seawater to the deep-sea water column. Chemoautotrophic microbes exploit this energy source, facilitating seafloor-based primary production that evidence suggests may transfer to pelagic consumers. While most hydrothermal plumes have relatively small volumes, there are recent examples of large-scale plume events associated with periods of eruptive activity, which have had a pronounced effect on water-column biology. This correlation suggests that hydrothermal plumes may have influenced basin-scale ocean chemistry during periods of increased submarine volcanism during the Phanerozoic eon. This paper synthesizes a growing body of scientific evidence supporting the hypothesis that hydrothermal plumes are the energetic basis of unique deep-sea pelagic food webs. While many important questions remain concerning the biology of hydrothermal plumes, this discussion is not present in ongoing management efforts related to seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) mining. Increased research efforts, focused on high-resolution surveys of midwater biology relative to plume structures, are recommended to establish baseline conditions and monitor the impact of future mining-based disturbances to the pelagic biosphere.

  17. A data processing method for MAPR hydrothermal plume tur-bidity data and its application in the Precious Stone Mountain hydrothermal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Sheng; TAO Chunhui; LI Huaiming; CHEN Yongshun; ZHOU Jianping; WU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothermal plume is an important constituent of seabed hydrothermal circulation and is also one of the characteristics of active hydrothermal vents. Portable Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders (MAPR) attached to a towed deep-sea instrument was used to search for hydrothermal plumes and hydrothermal vents. We introduced the basic principle of MAPR based on deep towing technology to detect plumes, then analyzed the factors affecting the quality of the MAPR data and presented a data correction method for MAPR, including instrument location correction, noise reduction processing, system error elimination and seawater background reduction. Finally we applied the method to analyze MAPR data obtained during the Chinese DY115-21 cruise on R/VDayang Iin the “Precious Stone Mountain” hydrothermal field on the Gala-pagos Microplate. The results provided a better understanding of the distribution of the hydrothermal activ-ity in this field, indicating the presence of a new hydrothermal vent.

  18. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alex D; Tyler, Paul A; Connelly, Douglas P; Copley, Jon T; James, Rachael; Larter, Robert D; Linse, Katrin; Mills, Rachel A; Garabato, Alfredo Naveira; Pancost, Richard D; Pearce, David A; Polunin, Nicholas V C; German, Christopher R; Shank, Timothy; Boersch-Supan, Philipp H; Alker, Belinda J; Aquilina, Alfred; Bennett, Sarah A; Clarke, Andrew; Dinley, Robert J J; Graham, Alastair G C; Green, Darryl R H; Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Hepburn, Laura; Hilario, Ana; Huvenne, Veerle A I; Marsh, Leigh; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Reid, William D K; Roterman, Christopher N; Sweeting, Christopher J; Thatje, Sven; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp.), stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae), bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more complex than

  19. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D Rogers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp., stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae, bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more

  20. Bacterial and archaeal communities in the deep-sea sediments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Xu, Jian; Shuai, Yinjie; Zhou, Xiaojian; Yang, Zhihui; Ma, Kesen

    2016-05-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents harbor abundant thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms. However, microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents have not been well documented. Here, we investigated bacterial and archaeal communities in the two deep-sea sediments (named as TVG4 and TVG11) collected from inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest India Ridge using the high-throughput sequencing technology of Illumina MiSeq2500 platform. Based on the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene, sequence analysis showed that bacterial communities in the two samples were dominated by Proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Furthermore, archaeal communities in the two samples were dominated by Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Comparative analysis showed that (i) TVG4 displayed the higher bacterial richness and lower archaeal richness than TVG11; (ii) the two samples had more divergence in archaeal communities than bacterial communities. Bacteria and archaea that are potentially associated with nitrogen, sulfur metal and methane cycling were detected in the two samples. Overall, we first provided a comparative picture of bacterial and archaeal communities and revealed their potentially ecological roles in the deep-sea environments of inactive hydrothermal vents in the Southwest Indian Ridge, augmenting microbial communities in inactive hydrothermal vents.

  1. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Viruses Compensate for Microbial Metabolism in Virus-Host Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianliang; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-07-11

    Viruses are believed to be responsible for the mortality of host organisms. However, some recent investigations reveal that viruses may be essential for host survival. To date, it remains unclear whether viruses are beneficial or harmful to their hosts. To reveal the roles of viruses in the virus-host interactions, viromes and microbiomes of sediment samples from three deep-sea hydrothermal vents were explored in this study. To exclude the influence of exogenous DNAs on viromes, the virus particles were purified with nuclease (DNase I and RNase A) treatments and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. The metagenomic analysis of viromes without exogenous DNA contamination and microbiomes of vent samples indicated that viruses had compensation effects on the metabolisms of their host microorganisms. Viral genes not only participated in most of the microbial metabolic pathways but also formed branched pathways in microbial metabolisms, including pyrimidine metabolism; alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism; nitrogen metabolism and assimilation pathways of the two-component system; selenocompound metabolism; aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis; and amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism. As is well known, deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems exist in relatively isolated environments which are barely influenced by other ecosystems. The metabolic compensation of hosts mediated by viruses might represent a very important aspect of virus-host interactions.IMPORTANCE Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans and have very important roles in regulating microbial community structure and biogeochemical cycles. The relationship between virus and host microbes is broadly thought to be that of predator and prey. Viruses can lyse host cells to control microbial population sizes and affect community structures of hosts by killing specific microbes. However, viruses also influence their hosts through manipulation of bacterial metabolism. We found

  2. Population structure of Bathymodiolus manusensis, a deep-sea hydrothermal vent-dependent mussel from Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Thaler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the western Pacific are increasingly being assessed for their potential mineral wealth. To anticipate the potential impacts on biodiversity and connectivity among populations at these vents, environmental baselines need to be established. Bathymodiolus manusensis is a deep-sea mussel found in close association with hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea. Using multiple genetic markers (cytochrome C-oxidase subunit-1 sequencing and eight microsatellite markers, we examined population structure at two sites in Manus Basin separated by 40 km and near a potential mining prospect, where the species has not been observed. No population structure was detected in mussels sampled from these two sites. We also compared a subset of samples with B. manusensis from previous studies to infer broader population trends. The genetic diversity observed can be used as a baseline against which changes in genetic diversity within the population may be assessed following the proposed mining event.

  3. Population structure of Bathymodiolus manusensis, a deep-sea hydrothermal vent-dependent mussel from Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Andrew D; Saleu, William; Carlsson, Jens; Schultz, Thomas F; Van Dover, Cindy L

    2017-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the western Pacific are increasingly being assessed for their potential mineral wealth. To anticipate the potential impacts on biodiversity and connectivity among populations at these vents, environmental baselines need to be established. Bathymodiolus manusensis is a deep-sea mussel found in close association with hydrothermal vents in Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea. Using multiple genetic markers (cytochrome C-oxidase subunit-1 sequencing and eight microsatellite markers), we examined population structure at two sites in Manus Basin separated by 40 km and near a potential mining prospect, where the species has not been observed. No population structure was detected in mussels sampled from these two sites. We also compared a subset of samples with B. manusensis from previous studies to infer broader population trends. The genetic diversity observed can be used as a baseline against which changes in genetic diversity within the population may be assessed following the proposed mining event.

  4. Photoprotective Bioactivity Present in a Unique Marine Bacteria Collection from Portuguese Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Calado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Interesting biological activities have been found for numerous marine compounds. In fact, screening of phylogenetically diverse marine microorganisms from extreme environments revealed to be a rational approach for the discovery of novel molecules with relevant bioactivities for industries such as pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical. Nevertheless, marine sources deliverables are still far from the expectations and new extreme sources of microbes should be explored. In this work, a marine prokaryotic collection from four Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR deep sea hydrothermal vents near the Azores Islands, Portugal, was created, characterized and tested for its photoprotective capacity. Within 246 isolates, a polyphasic approach, using chemotaxonomic and molecular typing methods, identified 23-related clusters of phenetically similar isolates with high indexes of diversity. Interestingly, 16S rRNA gene sequencing suggested the presence of 43% new prokaryotic species. A sub-set of 139 isolates of the prokaryotic collection was selected for biotechnological exploitation with 484 bacterial extracts prepared in a sustainable upscalling manner. 22% of the extracts showed an industrially relevant photoprotective activity, with two extracts, belonging to new strains of the species Shewanella algae and Vibrio fluvialis, uniquely showing UV-A, UV-B and UV-C protective capacity. This clearly demonstrates the high potential of the bacteria MAR vents collection in natural product synthesis with market applications.

  5. Photoprotective bioactivity present in a unique marine bacteria collection from Portuguese deep sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ana; Tenreiro, Tania; Andrade, Gonçalo; Gadanho, Mário; Chaves, Sandra; Abrantes, Marta; Calado, Patrícia; Tenreiro, Rogério; Vieira, Helena

    2013-05-10

    Interesting biological activities have been found for numerous marine compounds. In fact, screening of phylogenetically diverse marine microorganisms from extreme environments revealed to be a rational approach for the discovery of novel molecules with relevant bioactivities for industries such as pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical. Nevertheless, marine sources deliverables are still far from the expectations and new extreme sources of microbes should be explored. In this work, a marine prokaryotic collection from four Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) deep sea hydrothermal vents near the Azores Islands, Portugal, was created, characterized and tested for its photoprotective capacity. Within 246 isolates, a polyphasic approach, using chemotaxonomic and molecular typing methods, identified 23-related clusters of phenetically similar isolates with high indexes of diversity. Interestingly, 16S rRNA gene sequencing suggested the presence of 43% new prokaryotic species. A sub-set of 139 isolates of the prokaryotic collection was selected for biotechnological exploitation with 484 bacterial extracts prepared in a sustainable upscalling manner. 22% of the extracts showed an industrially relevant photoprotective activity, with two extracts, belonging to new strains of the species Shewanella algae and Vibrio fluvialis, uniquely showing UV-A, UV-B and UV-C protective capacity. This clearly demonstrates the high potential of the bacteria MAR vents collection in natural product synthesis with market applications.

  6. Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Sander, S.G.; Jayachandran, S.; Nath, B.N.; Nagaraju, G.; Chennuri, K.; Vudamala, K.; Lathika, N.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.

    version: Environ. Pollut., vol.194; 2014; 138-144 Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin Parthasarathi Chakraborty*1, Sylvia G. Sander2, Saranya Jayachandran1, B. Nagender Nath1, , G... sulphide deposits on the seafloor. Mining companies are exploring underwater volcanic vents, hoping to extract metals such as gold (Au), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), rare earth element etc (Birney et al., 2006). The initial stages of exploration are still...

  7. Characteristics of the cultivable bacteria from sediments associated with two deep-sea hydrothermal vents in Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing-lei; Wang, Ming-qing; Sun, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this study, different culture-dependent methods were used to examine the cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in the sediments associated with two deep-sea hydrothermal vents (named HV1 and HV2) located at Iheya Ridge and Iheya North in Okinawa Trough. The two vents differed in morphology, with HV1 exhibiting diffuse flows while HV2 being a black smoker with a chimney-like structure. A total of 213 isolates were identified by near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Of these isolates, 128 were from HV1 and 85 were from HV2. The bacterial community structures were, in large parts, similar between HV1 and HV2. Nevertheless, differences between HV1 and HV2 were observed in one phylum, one class, 4 orders, 10 families, and 20 genera. Bioactivity analysis revealed that 25 isolates belonging to 9 different genera exhibited extracellular protease activities, 21 isolates from 11 genera exhibited extracellular lipase activities, and 13 isolates of 8 genera displayed antimicrobial activities. This is the first observation of a large population of bacteria with extracellular bioactivities existing in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Taken together, the results of this study provide new insights into the characteristics of the cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems.

  8. Assessing microbial processes in deep-sea hydrothermal systems by incubation at in situ temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, Jesse; Sylva, Sean P.; Thomas, François; Taylor, Craig D.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2016-09-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, a large source of potential chemical energy is created when reducing vent fluid and oxidizing seawater mix. In this environment, chemolithoautotrophic microbes catalyze exergonic redox reactions which in turn provide the energy needed to fuel their growth and the fixation of CO2 into biomass. In addition to producing new organic matter, this process also consumes compounds contained both in vent fluid and entrained seawater (e.g. H2, NO3-). Despite their biogeochemical importance, such reactions have remained difficult to quantify due to methodological limitations. To address this knowledge gap, this study reports a novel application of isobaric gas-tight fluid samplers for conducting incubations of hydrothermal vent fluids at in situ temperature and pressure. Eighteen 24 h incubations were carried out, representing seven distinct conditions that examine amendments consisting of different electron donors and acceptors. Microbial activity was observed in all treatments, and time series chemical measurements showed that activity was limited by electron acceptor supply, confirming predictions based on geochemical data. Also consistent with these predictions, the presence of nitrate increased rates of hydrogen consumption and yielded ammonium as a product of nitrate respiration. The stoichiometry of predicted redox reactions was also determined, revealing that the sulfur and nitrogen cycles are incompletely understood at deep-sea vents, and likely involve unknown intermediate redox species. Finally, the measured rates of redox processes were either equal to or far greater than what has been reported in previous studies where in situ conditions were not maintained. In addition to providing insights into deep-sea hydrothermal vent biogeochemistry, the methods described herein also offer a practical approach for the incubation of any deep-sea pelagic sample under in situ conditions.

  9. Detecting deep sea hydrothermal vents with a split-beam echosounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, L. M.; Jerram, K.

    2016-12-01

    In May 2016, the NOAA Office of Exploration and Research exploration vessel, Okeanos Explorer, conducted a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive on a series of active `black smoker' hydrothermal vents at 3,300 m depth in the western Pacific Ocean near the Mariana Trench. The ROV system traversed 800 m along the seafloor and detected three distinct vent sites. The vent chimneys ranged in heights from 5 m to 30 m above the seafloor and vent fluid temperatures were measured as high as 337 °C. Immediately following the ROV dive, the Okeanos Explorer mapped the vent field with an 18 kHz split-beam echosounder traditionally used for fishery research and a 30 kHz multibeam echosounder with midwater capability. Six passes were made over the field, transiting at 4-5 knots on various headings. There was a clear and repeatable signal in the split-beam echogram from the venting but less obvious indication in the multibeam data. `Black smokers' have traditionally been detected using repeat conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) `tow-yo' casts. Our field observations suggest an alternative, and potentially more efficient, method of detecting hydrothermal vent plumes within the beamwidth of the split-beam echosounder to inform ROV dive plans. Methods previously applied for locating marine gas seeps on the seafloor with split-beam echosounders can be applied to estimate the hydrothermal vent positions in this dataset and compared to the recorded ROV positions at each site. Additionally, assuming relatively stable venting and ambient conditions, the ROV position and CTD data recorded from the vehicles can be used to better understand the observed midwater acoustic backscatter signatures of the hydrothermal vent plumes.

  10. The mitochondrial genome sequence of a deep-sea, hydrothermal vent limpet, Lepetodrilus nux, presents a novel vetigastropod gene arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Khalturina, Mariia; Nakamura, Masako; Watanabe, Hiromi; Satoh, Noriyuki; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    While mitochondrial (mt) genomes are used extensively for comparative and evolutionary genomics, few mt genomes of deep-sea species, including hydrothermal vent species, have been determined. The Genus Lepetodrilus is a major deep-sea gastropod taxon that occurs in various deep-sea ecosystems. Using next-generation sequencing, we determined nearly the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Lepetodrilus nux, which inhabits hydrothermal vents in the Okinawa Trough. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,353bp, excluding the repeat region. It contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, and a control region, typical of most metazoan genomes. Compared with other vetigastropod mt genome sequences, L. nux employs a novel mt gene arrangement. Other novel arrangements have been identified in the vetigastropod, Fissurella volcano, and in Chrysomallon squamiferum, a neomphaline gastropod; however, all three gene arrangements are different, and Bayesian inference suggests that each lineage diverged independently. Our findings suggest that vetigastropod mt gene arrangements are more diverse than previously realized.

  11. Innate immunity in the deep sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Raul; Dando, Paul; Collins, Patrick; Costa, Valentina; Allam, Bassem; Serrão Santos, Ricardo

    2009-02-01

    The interaction between microorganisms and host defense mechanisms is a decisive factor for the survival of marine bivalves. They rely on cell-mediated and humoral reactions to overcome the pathogens that naturally occur in the marine environment. In order to understand host defense reactions in animals inhabiting extreme environments we investigated some of the components from the immune system of the deep sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus. Cellular constituents in the hemolymph and extrapallial fluid were examined and led to the identification of three types of hemocytes revealing the granulocytes as the most abundant type of cell. To further characterize hemocyte types, the presence of cell surface carbohydrate epitopes was demonstrated with fluorescent WGA lectin, which was mostly ascribed to the granulocytes. Cellular reactions were then investigated by means of phagocytosis and by the activation of putative MAPKs using the microbial compounds zymosan, glucan, peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide. Two bacterial agents, Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, were also used to stimulate hemocytes. The results showed that granulocytes were the main phagocytic cells in both hemolymph and extrapallial fluid of B. azoricus. Western blotting analyses using commercially available antibodies against ERK, p38 and JNK, suggested that these putative kinases are involved in signal transduction pathways during experimental stimulation of B. azoricus hemocytes. The fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fura-2 AM was also insightful in demonstrating hemocyte stimulation in the presence of laminarin or live V. parahaemolyticus. Finally, the expression of the antibacterial gene mytilin was analyzed in gill tissues by means of RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization. Mytilin transcripts were localized in hemocytes underlying gill epithelium. Moreover, mytilin was induced by exposure of live animals to V. parahaemolyticus. These findings support the premise

  12. Transovarial inheritance of endosymbiotic bacteria in clams inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents and cold seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, S C; Giovannoni, S J

    1993-06-15

    Vesicomyid clams are conspicuous fauna at many deep-sea hydrothermal-vent and cold-seep habitats. All species examined have specialized gill tissue harboring endosymbiotic bacteria, which are thought to provide the hosts' sole nutritional support. In these species mechanisms of symbiont inheritance are likely to be key elements of dispersal strategies. These mechanisms have remained unresolved because the early life stages are not available for developmental studies. A specific 16S rRNA-directed oligodeoxynucleotide probe (CG1255R) for the vesocomyid endosymbionts was used in a combination of sensitive hybridization techniques to detect and localize the endosymbionts in host germ tissues. Symbiont-specific polymerase chain reaction amplifications, comparative gene sequencing, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to detect and confirm the presence of symbiont target in tissue nucleic acid extracts. Nonradioactive in situ hybridizations were used to resolve the position of the bacterial endosymbionts in host cells. Symbiont 16S rRNA genes were consistently amplified from the ovarial tissue of three species of vesicomyid clams: Calyptogena magnifica, C. phaseoliformis, and C. pacifica. The nucleotide sequences of the genes amplified from ovaries were identical to those from the respective host symbionts. In situ hybridizations to CG1255R labeled with digoxigenin-11-dUTP were performed on ovarial tissue from each of the vesicomyid clams. Detection of hybrids localized the symbionts to follicle cells surrounding the primary oocytes. These results suggest that vesicomyid clams assure successful, host-specific inoculation of all progeny by using a transovarial mechanism of symbiont transmission.

  13. Deep sea three component magnetic survey using ROV in the hydrothermal vent of the Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.; Park, C.

    2011-12-01

    We conducted magnetic survey at Apr., 2011 in the western slope of the caldera of TA25, the Lau Basin, the southwestern Pacific using IBRV(Ice Breaker Research Vessel) ARAON of KORDI(Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute), ROV(Remotely Operated Vehicle) of Oceaneering Co. and three component magnetometer(Fig. 1,Fig. 2). The deep-sea three component magnetic survey lines are the 13 N-S lines(100 m spacing) and the 2 E-W lines(Fig. 2). The depth ranges of the survey area are from about 900 m to 1200 m, below sea level. For the magnetic survey, the magnetometer sensor and the data logger was attached with the upper part and lower part of ROV, respectively(Fig. 2). We wanted to make the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV over 2 m long to reduce the noise effect of ROV. But, for the safe of deployment and recovery of ROV, the distance between the magnetometer sensor and ROV was 126 cm(Fig. 2). In the magnetic survey, ROV followed the planning tracks at 25~30 m above seafloor using the altimeter and USBL(Ultra Short Base Line) of ROV. IBRV ARAON accompanied ROV on the magnetic survey. The three component magnetometer measure the X(North), Y(East) and Z(Vertical) vector components of a magnetic field. A motion sensor(Oxtans) provided us the data of pitch, roll, yaw for the correction of the magnetic data to the motion of ROV. The data of the magnetometer sensor and the motion sensor were recorded on a notebook through the optical cable of ROV and the network of ARON using magnetometer software. The precision positions of magnetic data were merged by the post-processing of USBL of ROV. Hydrothermal fluids over Curie temperature can quickly alter or replace the iron-rich magnetic minerals, reducing the magnetic remanence of the crustal rocks, in some cases to near 0A/m magnetization. So, the obtained three component magnetic data are fully utilized by finding possible hydrothermal vents of the survey area.

  14. Linking microbial ultrastructure and physiology to iron depositional processes in deep sea hydrothermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. S.; Fleming, E. J.; Emerson, D.; Edwards, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    Clara S. Chan, Emily Fleming, David Emerson, Katrina J. Edwards Iron microbial mats have been discovered in a variety of deep-sea hydrothermal environments and are increasingly being recognized as more seafloor is explored. The predominant structures found in many of these mats are iron oxyhydroxide-rich filaments. One of the most common structures is a helical stalk bearing a resemblance to the twisted stalk of the terrestrial iron-oxidizing microbe, Gallionella ferruginea. While Gallionella has not been detected in, or isolated from, these mats microaerophilic iron-oxidizing, a stalk- forming bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans (PV-1 and related strains) has been isolated from mats at the Loihi seamount in Hawaii (Emerson et al. 2007, PLoS One 2(8): e667). Fossilized aggregates of iron filaments have been observed in the rock record (e.g. Little et al. 2004, Geomicrobiol. J. 21:415), and may represent ancient versions of these microbial mats. If this is shown to be true, such filaments would represent one of the few microfossil morphologies that can be linked to a specific microbial metabolism. We have used a combination of test tube culturing, microslide culturing, time lapse microscopy, and electron microscopy to study Mariprofundus stalk morphology and genesis and link these details to physiological responses to environmental chemistry. The goals include determining specific attributes of stalk morphology that can be used to determine the biogenicity of putative iron microfossils, and interpret the conditions of the depositional environment. Light microscopic observation of microslide cultures over the course of several days allowed for determination of bacterial response to developing oxygen and Fe(II) gradients. Once gradients have been established, given an abundant supply of oxygen, cells congregate in a band perpendicular to the gradient and stalks are formed, growing in the direction of increasing oxygen (and decreasing Fe) concentration. This

  15. Long-term maintenance and public exhibition of deep-sea hydrothermal fauna: The AbyssBox project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillito, Bruce; Ravaux, Juliette; Sarrazin, Jozée; Zbinden, Magali; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Barthelemy, Dominique

    2015-11-01

    The AbyssBox project aims to provide the first permanent public exhibition of live deep-sea hydrothermal fauna maintained at in situ pressure. AbyssBox is a pressurized aquarium designed to function permanently. Here we present details of the project after the public exhibition functioned for more than three years at Océanopolis aquarium in Brest, France. We also describe the AbyssBox pressure aquarium, and provide data and observations on vent shrimp (Mirocaris fortunata) and crabs (Segonzacia mesatlantica) that were sampled from 1700 m depth at the Lucky Strike vent field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) during different cruises. While mortalities exceeded 50% during the first days following sampling, the remaining animals appeared to acclimate fairly well. Some crabs have now been kept for more than 2 years, and some shrimp have spent more than 3 years in captivity. Primarily designed for a public exhibition, the AbyssBox is already used for scientific purposes, since it provides one of the most effective tools for long-term rearing of deep-sea fauna. AbyssBox is a first step towards maintaining a variety of deep-sea fauna year-round at in situ pressure, which will serve both scientific and public interests.

  16. Distribution, abundance, and diversity patterns of the thermoacidophilic Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota 2 (DHVE2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto E Flores

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation-independent studies have shown that taxa belonging to the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota 2 (DHVE2 lineage are widespread at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. While this lineage appears to be a common and important member of the microbial community at vent environments, relatively little is known about their overall distribution and phylogenetic diversity. In this study, we examined the distribution, relative abundance, co-occurrence patterns, and genetic diversity of cultivable thermoacidophilic DHVE2 in deposits from globally distributed vent fields. Results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays with primers specific for the DHVE2 and Archaea demonstrate the ubiquity of the DHVE2 at deep-sea vents and suggest that they are significant members of the archaeal communities of established vent deposit communities. Local similarity analysis of pyrosequencing data revealed that the distribution of the DHVE2 was positively correlated with ten other Euryarchaeota phylotypes and negatively correlated with mostly Crenarchaeota phylotypes. Targeted cultivation efforts resulted in the isolation of 12 axenic strains from six different vent fields, expanding the cultivable diversity of this lineage to vents along the East Pacific Rise and Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Eleven of these isolates shared greater than 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with one another and the only described isolate of the DHVE2, Aciduliprofundum boonei T469T. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of five protein-coding loci, atpA, EF-2, radA, rpoB, and secY, revealed clustering of isolates according to geographic region of isolation. Overall, this study increases our understanding of the distribution, abundance, and genetic diversity of the DHVE2.

  17. Arsenic bioaccumulation and biotransformation in deep-sea hydrothermal vent organisms from the PACMANUS hydrothermal field, Manus Basin, PNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Roy E.; Breuer, Christian; Reeves, Eoghan; Bach, Wolfgang; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Hydrothermal vents are often enriched in arsenic, and organisms living in these environments may accumulate high concentrations of this and other trace elements. However, very little research to date has focused on understanding arsenic bioaccumulation and biotransformation in marine organisms at deep-sea vent areas; none to date have focused organisms from back-arc spreading centers. We present for the first time concentration and speciation data for As in vent biota from several hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Manus basin, a back-arc basin vent field located in the Bismark Sea, western Pacific Ocean. The gastropods Alviniconcha hessleri and Ifremeria nautilei, and the mussel Bathymodiolus manusensis were collected from diffuse venting areas where pH was slightly lower (6.2-6.8), and temperature (26.8-10.5 °C) and arsenic concentrations (169.5-44.0 nM) were higher than seawater. In the tissues of these organisms, the highest total measured As concentrations were in the gills of A. hessleri (5580 mg kg-1), with 721 mg kg-1 and 43 mg kg-1 in digestive gland and muscle, respectively. I. nautilei contained 118 mg kg-1 in the gill, 108 mg kg-1 in the digestive gland and 22 mg kg-1 in the muscle. B. manusensis contained 15.7 mg kg-1 in the digestive gland, followed by 9.8 mg kg-1 and 4.5 mg kg-1 in its gill and muscle tissue, respectively. We interpret the decreasing overall total concentrations in each organism as a function of distance from the source of hydrothermally derived As. The high concentration of arsenic in A. hessleri gills may be associated with elemental sulfur known to occur in this organism as a result of symbiotic microorganisms. Arsenic extracted from freeze-dried A. hessleri tissue was dominated by AsIII and AsV in the digestive gland (82% and 16%, respectively) and gills (97% AsIII, 2.3% AsV), with only 1.8% and 0.2% arsenobetaine (As-Bet) in the digestive gland and gills, respectively. However, the muscle contained substantial amounts of

  18. Isotopic signatures associated with growth and metabolic activities of chemosynthetic nitrate-reducing microbes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, I. M.; Foustoukos, D.; Fogel, M. L.; Sievert, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Epsilonproteobacteria and Aquificaceae have been identified as dominant members of microbial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Cultured representatives from these two groups appear to be mostly genetically wired to perform chemosynthesis at moderate-to-high temperatures (45 - 80oC) under anaerobic and sulfidic conditions. In this study we used Caminibacter mediatlanticus and Thermovibrio ammonificans as model organisms to constrain physiological parameters associated with dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in deep-sea vent Epsilonproteobacteria and Aquificaceae. We postulate that nitrate-based metabolic processes are of relevance for understanding primary production as well as nitrate mobilization in deep-sea vents. By constraining growth and respiration rates during DNRA, we observed that C. mediatlanticus achieved higher cell densities than T. ammonificans while exhibiting similar growth rates. DNRA kinetic rate constants and cell-specific nitrate reduction rates (csNRR) obtained from our data showed that within similar time frames T. ammonificans used 2.5 to 3 times as much nitrate than C. mediatlanticus and it did so ~3 times faster. However, the increased consumption of nitrate in T. ammonificans did not translate into higher growth yield. This is suggestive of either differential efficiencies in energy generating pathways or differential organic matter production (cell biomass versus extracellular organic material) associated with DNRA in these microorganisms. Nitrogen isotope fractionation for nitrate was similar for both organisms, with discrimination factors of ~ -5 to -6‰ for C. mediatlanticus and ~ -7 to -8‰ for T. ammonificans. Similar experiments performed under high hydrostatic pressure conditions (50 and 200 bar) showed that changes in pressure greatly affected both growth rates and DNRA kinetic rate constants in both microorganisms, however, δ15N discrimination factors for nitrate were not affected. This study provides

  19. Behavior of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume at two sites on the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitashima, K.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal systems play an important role in the oceanic geochemical cycles of trace metals. High concentration of trace metals of the basalt origin is discharged into the deep sea via the hydrothermal plume. The hydrothermal plume is widely diffused to the ocean by mixing with ambient seawater. The processes of input and removal in the diffusing hydrothermal plume differ by individual hydrothermal systems. In this presentation, the behavior of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume of two sites on the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc is compared. This study was funded by the O`Archaean ParkO_L project of MEXT. The hydrothermal plume samples were taken from the Suiyo Seamount and the southern Mariana Trough (Pika Site). The mini CTDT-RMS mounted twelve 1.2L Niskin bottles was installed onto the manned submersible. And the hydrothermal plume samples were collected with monitoring the anomaly of temperature and turbidity. The samples were immediately filtered in an onboard clean bench. Unfiltered sample for analysis of total (particulate + dissolved) trace metal and filtered sample for analysis of dissolved trace metal were acidified. Trace metals (Al, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn) in the hydrothermal plume samples were analyzed by GFAAS. The ranges of concentration of Al, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn in the hydrothermal plume samples collected from two sites are _`15uM, _`5uM, _`5uM, _` 0.2uM and _`0.6uM, respectively. The particulate phase is predominant form in Al, Fe, Cu and Zn, and Mn shows the superiority of dissolved form. At the Suiyo Seamount, the hydrothermal active site is located in the bottom of caldera. On the other hand, the hydrothermal active site exists on the top of off-ridge seamount at the southern Mariana Trough. The diffusion process of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume to the ocean differed by the topographic factor in two sites. It suggests that trace metals discharged from the vents are hardly diffused to the ocean surmounting the Suiyo Seamount caldera

  20. Thermococcus nautili sp. nov., a hyperthermophilic archaeon isolated from a hydrothermal deep-sea vent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorlas, Aurore; Croce, Olivier; Oberto, Jacques; Gauliard, Emilie; Forterre, Patrick; Marguet, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    Thermococcus nautili, strain 30-1T (formerly reported as Thermococcus nautilus), was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney sample collected from the East Pacific Rise at a depth of 2633 m on the 'La chainette PP57' area...

  1. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the Deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E.; Queiroz, A.; Serrão Santos, R.; Bettencourt, R.

    2013-11-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterised by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio bacteria. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as a non-pathogenic bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from infected animals by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h to 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the bacterium inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly evident for proteins of 18-20 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarity was found. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that immune genes, as well as experimental

  2. Rhythms and community dynamics of a hydrothermal tubeworm assemblage at main endeavour field - a multidisciplinary deep-sea observatory approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Cuvelier

    Full Text Available The NEPTUNE cabled observatory network hosts an ecological module called TEMPO-mini that focuses on hydrothermal vent ecology and time series, granting us real-time access to data originating from the deep sea. In 2011-2012, during TEMPO-mini's first deployment on the NEPTUNE network, the module recorded high-resolution imagery, temperature, iron (Fe and oxygen on a hydrothermal assemblage at 2186 m depth at Main Endeavour Field (North East Pacific. 23 days of continuous imagery were analysed with an hourly frequency. Community dynamics were analysed in detail for Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms, Polynoidae, Pycnogonida and Buccinidae, documenting faunal variations, natural change and biotic interactions in the filmed tubeworm assemblage as well as links with the local environment. Semi-diurnal and diurnal periods were identified both in fauna and environment, revealing the influence of tidal cycles. Species interactions were described and distribution patterns were indicative of possible microhabitat preference. The importance of high-resolution frequencies (<1 h to fully comprehend rhythms in fauna and environment was emphasised, as well as the need for the development of automated or semi-automated imagery analysis tools.

  3. Metagenomic comparison of two Thiomicrospira lineages inhabiting contrasting deep-sea hydrothermal environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Brazelton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most widespread bacteria in oxic zones of carbonate chimneys at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, belong to the Thiomicrospira group of sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. It is unclear why Thiomicrospira-like organisms thrive in these chimneys considering that Lost City hydrothermal fluids are notably lacking in hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe metagenomic sequences obtained from a Lost City carbonate chimney that are highly similar to the genome of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, an isolate from a basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean. Even though T. crunogena and Lost City Thiomicrospira inhabit different types of hydrothermal systems in different oceans, their genomic contents are highly similar. For example, sequences encoding the sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation pathways (including a carbon concentration mechanism of T. crunogena are also present in the Lost City metagenome. Comparative genomic analyses also revealed substantial genomic changes that must have occurred since the divergence of the two lineages, including large genomic rearrangements, gene fusion events, a prophage insertion, and transposase activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show significant genomic similarity between Thiomicrospira organisms inhabiting different kinds of hydrothermal systems in different oceans, suggesting that these organisms are widespread and highly adaptable. These data also indicate genomic processes potentially associated with the adaptation of these lineages into strikingly different habitats.

  4. Molecular diversity and distribution pattern of ciliates in sediments from deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Okinawa Trough and adjacent sea areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Xu, Kuidong

    2016-10-01

    In comparison with the macrobenthos and prokaryotes, patterns of diversity and distribution of microbial eukaryotes in deep-sea hydrothermal vents are poorly known. The widely used high-throughput sequencing of 18S rDNA has revealed a high diversity of microeukaryotes yielded from both living organisms and buried DNA in marine sediments. More recently, cDNA surveys have been utilized to uncover the diversity of active organisms. However, both methods have never been used to evaluate the diversity of ciliates in hydrothermal vents. By using high-throughput DNA and cDNA sequencing of 18S rDNA, we evaluated the molecular diversity of ciliates, a representative group of microbial eukaryotes, from the sediments of deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Okinawa Trough and compared it with that of an adjacent deep-sea area about 15 km away and that of an offshore area of the Yellow Sea about 500 km away. The results of DNA sequencing showed that Spirotrichea and Oligohymenophorea were the most diverse and abundant groups in all the three habitats. The proportion of sequences of Oligohymenophorea was the highest in the hydrothermal vents whereas Spirotrichea was the most diverse group at all three habitats. Plagiopyleans were found only in the hydrothermal vents but with low diversity and abundance. By contrast, the cDNA sequencing showed that Plagiopylea was the most diverse and most abundant group in the hydrothermal vents, followed by Spirotrichea in terms of diversity and Oligohymenophorea in terms of relative abundance. A novel group of ciliates, distinctly separate from the 12 known classes, was detected in the hydrothermal vents, indicating undescribed, possibly highly divergent ciliates may inhabit this environment. Statistical analyses showed that: (i) the three habitats differed significantly from one another in terms of diversity of both the rare and the total ciliate taxa, and; (ii) the adjacent deep sea was more similar to the offshore area than to the

  5. Physical controls on mixing and transport within rising submarine hydrothermal plumes: A numerical simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Breier, John A.

    2014-10-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the turbulent flow and species transport of deep-sea high temperature hydrothermal plumes. The model solves numerically the density weighted unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and energy equation and the species transport equation. Turbulent entrainment and mixing is modeled by a k-ε turbulence closure model. The CFD model explicitly considers realistic vent chimney geometry, vent exit fluid temperature and velocity, and background stratification. The model uses field measurements as model inputs and has been validated by field data. These measurements and data, including vent temperature and plume physical structure, were made in the ABE hydrothermal field of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center. A parametric sensitivity study based on this CFD model was conducted to determine the relative importance of vent exit velocity, background stratification, and chimney height on the mixing of vent fluid and seawater. The CFD model was also used to derive several important scalings that are relevant to understanding plume impact on the ocean. These scalings include maximum plume rise height, neutrally buoyant plume height, maximum plume induced turbulent diffusivity, and total plume vertically transported water mass flux. These scaling relationships can be used for constructing simplified 1-dimensional models of geochemistry and microbial activity in hydrothermal plumes. Simulation results show that the classical entrainment assumptions, typically invoked to describe hydrothermal plume transport, only apply up to the vertical level of ~0.6 times the maximum plume rise height. Below that level, the entrainment coefficient remains relatively constant (~0.15). Above that level, the plume flow consists of a pronounced lateral spreading flow, two branches of inward flow immediately above and below the lateral spreading, and recirculation flanking the plume cap region. Both turbulent kinetic energy

  6. Investigation of extractable organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility that deep-sea hydrothermal vents may contain organic compounds produced by abiotic synthesis or by microbial communities living deep beneath the surface has led to numerous studies of the organic composition of vent fluids. Most of these studies have focused on methane and other light hydrocarbons, while the possible occurrence of more complex organic compounds in the fluids has remained largely unstudied. To address this issue, the presence of higher molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal fluids was assessed at three sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that span a range of temperatures (51 to >360 °C), fluid compositions, and host-rock lithologies (mafic to ultramafic). Samples were obtained at several sites within the Lucky Strike, Rainbow, and Lost City hydrothermal fields. Three methods were employed to extract organic compounds for analysis, including liquid:liquid extraction, cold trapping on the walls of a coil of titanium tubing, and pumping fluids through cartridges filled with solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents. The only samples to consistently yield high amounts of extractable organic compounds were the warm (51-91 °C), highly alkaline fluids from Lost City, which contained elevated concentrations of C8, C10, and C12n-alkanoic acids and, in some cases, trithiolane, hexadecanol, squalene, and cholesterol. Collectively, the C8-C12 acids can account for about 15% of the total dissolved organic carbon in the Lost City fluids. The even-carbon-number predominance of the alkanoic acids indicates a biological origin, but it is unclear whether these compounds are derived from microbial activity occurring within the hydrothermal chimney proximal to the site of fluid discharge or are transported from deeper within the system. Hydrothermal fluids from the Lucky Strike and Rainbow fields were characterized by an overall scarcity of extractable dissolved organic compounds. Trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons including

  7. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios catabolic energy source at all temperatures (and SW:HF ratios) considered. The energetics of catabolism at the troctolite-basalt hybrid system were intermediate to these extremes. Reaction energetics for anabolism in chemolithoautotrophs—represented here by the synthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, saccharides, and amines—were generally most favorable at moderate temperatures (22-32 °C) and corresponding SW:HF mixing ratios (˜15). In peridotite-hosted and the troctolite-basalt hybrid systems, Δ G r for primary biomass synthesis yielded up to ˜900 J per g dry cell mass. The energetics of anabolism in basalt- and felsic rock-hosted systems were far less favorable. The results suggest that in peridotite-hosted (and troctolite-basalt hybrid) systems, compared with their basalt (and felsic rock) counterparts, microbial

  8. Preservation of iron(II) by carbon-rich matrices in a hydrothermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Manganini, Steven J.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moffett, James W.; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-09-20

    Hydrothermal venting associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism is globally widespread. This venting is responsible for a dissolved iron flux to the ocean that is approximately equal to that associated with continental riverine runoff. For hydrothermal fluxes, it has long been assumed that most of the iron entering the oceans is precipitated in inorganic forms. However, the possibility of globally significant fluxes of iron escaping these mass precipitation events and entering open-ocean cycles is now being debated, and two recent studies suggest that dissolved organic ligands might influence the fate of hydrothermally vented metals. Here we present spectromicroscopic measurements of iron and carbon in hydrothermal plume particles at the East Pacific Rise mid-ocean ridge. We show that organic carbon-rich matrices, containing evenly dispersed iron(II)-rich materials, are pervasive in hydrothermal plume particles. The absence of discrete iron(II) particles suggests that the carbon and iron associate through sorption or complexation. We suggest that these carbon matrices stabilize iron(II) released from hydrothermal vents in the region, preventing its oxidation and/or precipitation as insoluble minerals. Our findings have implications for deep-sea biogeochemical cycling of iron, a widely recognized limiting nutrient in the oceans.

  9. Unusual Glycosaminoglycans from a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Bacterium Improve Fibrillar Collagen Structuring and Fibroblast Activities in Engineered Connective Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Guezennec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers produced by marine organisms can offer useful tools for regenerative medicine. Particularly, HE800 exopolysaccharide (HE800 EPS secreted by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium displays an interesting glycosaminoglycan-like feature resembling hyaluronan. Previous studies demonstrated its effectiveness to enhance in vivo bone regeneration and to support osteoblastic cell metabolism in culture. Thus, in order to assess the usefulness of this high-molecular weight polymer in tissue engineering and tissue repair, in vitro reconstructed connective tissues containing HE800 EPS were performed. We showed that this polysaccharide promotes both collagen structuring and extracellular matrix settle by dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, from the native HE800 EPS, a low-molecular weight sulfated derivative (HE800 DROS displaying chemical analogy with heparan-sulfate, was designed. Thus, it was demonstrated that HE800 DROS mimics some properties of heparan-sulfate, such as promotion of fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. Therefore, we suggest that the HE800EPS family can be considered as an innovative biotechnological source of glycosaminoglycan-like compounds useful to design biomaterials and drugs for tissue engineering and repair.

  10. Cryptic species of deep-sea clams (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae) from hydrothermal vent and cold-water seep environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijenhoek, Robert C.; Schutz, Steven J.; Gustafson, Richard G.; Lutz, Richard A.

    1994-08-01

    A protein-electrophoretic analysis of six putative morphospecies in the bivalve family Vesicomyidae from eight deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the eastern Pacific, three cold-water seep sites in the eastern Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico, and one whale-carcass site off Southern California revealed electromorph patterns diagnostic of 10 vesicomyid species. Electrophoretic patterns for 14 enzymes encoded by 17 presumptive gene loci were scored in all 10 species. The pairwise genetic distances (Nei's D) for these 10 species ranged from 0.857 to 2.792, values within the range expected for distinct species and genera. However, the degree of genetic divergence among these taxa could not be used for phylogenetic inferences because allozyme differences had in many cases reached evolutionary saturation. Notwithstanding, the present results revealed a significant problem with current morphospecies identifications of these clams and with applications of the current generic names Calyptogena and Vesicomya. Given the cryptic nature of these taxa, we suggest that subsequent studies simply refer to these clams as "vesicomyids" until careful morphological analyses and molecular studies are completed and systematic relationships are clarified.

  11. Unusual glycosaminoglycans from a deep sea hydrothermal bacterium improve fibrillar collagen structuring and fibroblast activities in engineered connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senni, Karim; Gueniche, Farida; Changotade, Sylvie; Septier, Dominique; Sinquin, Corinne; Ratiskol, Jacqueline; Lutomski, Didier; Godeau, Gaston; Guezennec, Jean; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2013-04-23

    Biopolymers produced by marine organisms can offer useful tools for regenerative medicine. Particularly, HE800 exopolysaccharide (HE800 EPS) secreted by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium displays an interesting glycosaminoglycan-like feature resembling hyaluronan. Previous studies demonstrated its effectiveness to enhance in vivo bone regeneration and to support osteoblastic cell metabolism in culture. Thus, in order to assess the usefulness of this high-molecular weight polymer in tissue engineering and tissue repair, in vitro reconstructed connective tissues containing HE800 EPS were performed. We showed that this polysaccharide promotes both collagen structuring and extracellular matrix settle by dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, from the native HE800 EPS, a low-molecular weight sulfated derivative (HE800 DROS) displaying chemical analogy with heparan-sulfate, was designed. Thus, it was demonstrated that HE800 DROS mimics some properties of heparan-sulfate, such as promotion of fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. Therefore, we suggest that the HE800EPS family can be considered as an innovative biotechnological source of glycosaminoglycan-like compounds useful to design biomaterials and drugs for tissue engineering and repair.

  12. Rhodopsin in the Dark Hot Sea: Molecular Analysis of Rhodopsin in a Snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, Living near the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Sakata

    Full Text Available Visual systems in deep-sea fishes have been previously studied from a photobiological aspect; however, those of deep-sea fish inhabiting the hydrothermal vents are far less understood due to sampling difficulties. In this study, we analyzed the visual pigment of a deep-sea snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, discovered and collected only near the hydrothermal vents of oceans around Japan. Proteins were solubilized from the C. rhodomelas eyeball and subjected to spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the presence of a pigment characterized by an absorption maximum (λmax at 480 nm. Immunoblot analysis of the ocular protein showed a rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity. We also isolated a retinal cDNA encoding the entire coding sequence of putative C. rhodomelas rhodopsin (CrRh. HEK293EBNA cells were transfected with the CrRh cDNA and the proteins extracted from the cells were subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The recombinant CrRh showed the absorption maximum at 480 nm in the presence of 11-cis retinal. Comparison of the results from the eyeball extract and the recombinant CrRh strongly suggests that CrRh has an A1-based 11-cis-retinal chromophore and works as a photoreceptor in the C. rhodomelas retina, and hence that C. rhodomelas responds to dim blue light much the same as other deep-sea fishes. Because hydrothermal vent is a huge supply of viable food, C. rhodomelas likely do not need to participate diel vertical migration and may recognize the bioluminescence produced by aquatic animals living near the hydrothermal vents.

  13. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

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    R. Bettencourt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterized by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio strains. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as an irrelevant bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from animals dissected at 12 h and 24 h post-infection times by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h and 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the microorganism species inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly around a protein area, of 18 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarities were found. Multivariate

  14. Protection mechanisms of the iron-plated armor of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent gastropod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haimin; Dao, Ming; Imholt, Timothy; Huang, Jamie; Wheeler, Kevin; Bonilla, Alejandro; Suresh, Subra; Ortiz, Christine

    2010-01-19

    Biological exoskeletons, in particular those with unusually robust and multifunctional properties, hold enormous potential for the development of improved load-bearing and protective engineering materials. Here, we report new materials and mechanical design principles of the iron-plated multilayered structure of the natural armor of Crysomallon squamiferum, a recently discovered gastropod mollusc from the Kairei Indian hydrothermal vent field, which is unlike any other known natural or synthetic engineered armor. We have determined through nanoscale experiments and computational simulations of a predatory attack that the specific combination of different materials, microstructures, interfacial geometries, gradation, and layering are advantageous for penetration resistance, energy dissipation, mitigation of fracture and crack arrest, reduction of back deflections, and resistance to bending and tensile loads. The structure-property-performance relationships described are expected to be of technological interest for a variety of civilian and defense applications.

  15. Comparative population structure of two deep-sea hydrothermal-vent-associated decapods (Chorocaris sp. 2 and Munidopsis lauensis from southwestern Pacific back-arc basins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew David Thaler

    Full Text Available Studies of genetic connectivity and population structure in deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems often focus on endosymbiont-hosting species that are directly dependent on chemical energy extracted from vent effluent for survival. Relatively little attention has been paid to vent-associated species that are not exclusively dependent on chemosynthetic ecosystems. Here we assess connectivity and population structure of two vent-associated invertebrates--the shrimp Chorocaris sp. 2 and the squat lobster Munidopsis lauensis--that are common at deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the western Pacific. While Chorocaris sp. 2 has only been observed at hydrothermal vent sites, M. lauensis can be found throughout the deep sea but occurs in higher abundance around the periphery of active vents We sequenced mitochondrial COI genes and deployed nuclear microsatellite markers for both species at three sites in Manus Basin and either North Fiji Basin (Chorocaris sp. 2 or Lau Basin (Munidopsis lauensis. We assessed genetic differentiation across a range of spatial scales, from approximately 2.5 km to more than 3000 km. Population structure for Chorocaris sp. 2 was comparable to that of the vent-associated snail Ifremeria nautilei, with a single seemingly well-mixed population within Manus Basin that is genetically differentiated from conspecifics in North Fiji Basin. Population structure for Munidopsis lauensis was more complex, with two genetically differentiated populations in Manus Basin and a third well-differentiated population in Lau Basin. The unexpectedly high level of genetic differentiation between M. lauensis populations in Manus Basin deserves further study since it has implications for conservation and management of diversity in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems.

  16. Deep-Sea Investigations on Hydrothermal Site Rainbow (MAR 36°14 N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Fouquet, Y.; Gente, P.; Ildefonse, B.; Thibaud, R.; Hoise, E.; Bissessur, D.; Yatheesh, V.; Scientific Party, M.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrothermal site Rainbow, one of the few known site on an ultramafic basement, is an exceptional target for the multidisciplinary study of hydrothermal phenomena. It is one of the two targets of the MoMAR (Monitoring the Mid Atlantic Ridge) project patronized by InterRidge, and is the focus of an IODP drilling project. What makes this site exceptional is the abundance of natural hydrogen, methane, and iron, an element which plays a major role in active processes, down to the scale of molecules. During Cruise MomarDream (25 Aug. - 15 Sept. 2008), R/V L'Atalante and ROV Victor spent 3 weeks on site Rainbow to carry out detailed investigation of this unique area. The goals of the cruise were, first, to study the role of iron in the geological, hydrological, and biological processes, and second, to identify potential drilling targets. Beyond the requirement of a "zero state" for the repeated observations and in fine the site monitoring in the framework of the MOMAR project, the completion of an exhaustive inventory of the biological populations is needed for the sake of preservation of a fragile environment. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetics have been collected by ROV Victor 50 m above the seafloor on a 4 km × 3 km wide box centered on the site and covering about 25% of the Rainbow Massif. Similarly, multibeam bathymetry, magnetics, and high resolution photographs have been acquired 10 m above the seafloor on a 650 m × 500 m box centered on the site, and on a 300 m × 300 m box centered on a field of dead clams. A nearly full coverage was obtained in these boxes. Direct geological exploration was also carried out and allowed the collection of rock samples, complemented by an intensive dredge program when the ROV was onboard. A large part of the cruise was devoted to biological studies sensu lato, including the collection of fluids dedicated to the study of abiotic organic molecules and metagenomics, the collection of sulfide for microbiological investigations, in

  17. Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter from Deep-sea Floor Hydrothermal Vents in South Mariana Backarc Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, F.; Yamanaka, T.

    2004-12-01

    In South Mariana Backarc Spreading Center, a few active hydrothermal fields are located. We investigated a characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from hydrothermal vents in this area, in order to clarify the biosphere beneath deep-sea floor. Hot water sample was collected from a drilled hole (APM01 located in Fryer site, 12o 55.22fN, 143o 37.16fE, depth 2850m) during the ROPOS/TN167A cruise in March 2004. The hole had been drilled during Hakurei-Maru 2 cruise in January 2004. Another hot water sample was collected from a natural black smoker located in Pika site (12o 55.15fN, 143o 36.96fE, depth 2773m) during YK03-09 cruise. In this investigation, we developed a standalone filtration system in order to collect and enrich dissolved organic matter of quite low concentration. This system was designed to be put near hydrothermal vents for at least 24h. This system has an ODS disk (EmporeTM High Performance Extraction Disk C18 90mmφ) with a pre-filter (Whatman GMF 1 μ)m filter paper) to adsorb dilute organics. We collected DOM from the APM01 casing pipe for about 30h (Tmax = 25-30 o C, the estimated volume of filtrated water is max. 300L) using this filtration system. Adsorbed organics were eluted with methanol for 12h twice and toluene once using soxhlet extractor. Recovered amounts of methanol eluents are 72.8mg for APM01, and 89.7mg for the black smoker. Prior to GCMS analysis, we carried out high resolution 1 H-NMR measurement (400MHz), together with the DOM samples collected from the Suiyo Seamount in July-August 2001 and August 2002. Most of the samples show signals in the region of 3-4 ppm, and the samples from the vents of relatively low temperatures (APM01 and AP04: the natural vent at the Suiyo Seamount, temperature 8-48o C ) show signals also in the region of 0.8-1.6 ppm.

  18. Conjugating effects of symbionts and environmental factors on gene expression in deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussels

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    Corre Erwan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus harbors thiotrophic and methanotrophic symbiotic bacteria in its gills. While the symbiotic relationship between this hydrothermal mussel and these chemoautotrophic bacteria has been described, the molecular processes involved in the cross-talking between symbionts and host, in the maintenance of the symbiois, in the influence of environmental parameters on gene expression, and in transcriptome variation across individuals remain poorly understood. In an attempt to understand how, and to what extent, this double symbiosis affects host gene expression, we used a transcriptomic approach to identify genes potentially regulated by symbiont characteristics, environmental conditions or both. This study was done on mussels from two contrasting populations. Results Subtractive libraries allowed the identification of about 1000 genes putatively regulated by symbiosis and/or environmental factors. Microarray analysis showed that 120 genes (3.5% of all genes were differentially expressed between the Menez Gwen (MG and Rainbow (Rb vent fields. The total number of regulated genes in mussels harboring a high versus a low symbiont content did not differ significantly. With regard to the impact of symbiont content, only 1% of all genes were regulated by thiotrophic (SOX and methanotrophic (MOX bacteria content in MG mussels whereas 5.6% were regulated in mussels collected at Rb. MOX symbionts also impacted a higher proportion of genes than SOX in both vent fields. When host transcriptome expression was analyzed with respect to symbiont gene expression, it was related to symbiont quantity in each field. Conclusions Our study has produced a preliminary description of a transcriptomic response in a hydrothermal vent mussel host of both thiotrophic and methanotrophic symbiotic bacteria. This model can help to identify genes involved in the maintenance of symbiosis or regulated by

  19. Clostridium tepidiprofundi sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodkina, G B; Kolganova, T V; Tourova, T P; Kostrikina, N A; Jeanthon, C; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A; Slobodkin, A I

    2008-04-01

    A moderately thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium (strain SG 508T) was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney located at 1 degrees N on the East Pacific Rise at a depth of 2650 m. Cells of strain SG 508T were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.4-0.6 microm in diameter and 2.0-3.0 microm in length. Spore formation was observed only below pH 5.5. The temperature range for growth was 22-60 degrees C, with optimum growth at 50 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 4.0-8.5, with optimum growth at pH 6.0-6.8. Growth of strain SG 508T was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 6.0 % (w/v), with optimum growth at 2.5 % (w/v). Substrates utilized by strain SG 508T included casein, peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract, starch, maltose and glucose. The products of glucose fermentation were ethanol, acetate, H2, formate and CO2. Strain SG 508T was able to reduce elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide. The DNA G+C content of strain SG 508T was 30.9 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolated organism belonged to cluster I of the genus Clostridium. On the basis of its physiological properties and data from phylogenetic analyses, strain SG 508T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium tepidiprofundi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SG 508T (=DSM 19306T =VKM B-2459T).

  20. Mg/Ca and isotopic high resolution record of deep-sea hydrothermal barnacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, A.-V.; Bojar, H.-P.; Tufar, W.

    2012-04-01

    Barnacles are crustaceans adapted to a sessile existence and cemented to a substrate by a protein complex. Most of the known species inhabit shallow marine environment, less than 2% of the species are found at depths between 100 and 2500 m. The shell of barnacles has a great adaptive significance, the shell of some barnacle species have been already investigated for microstructure. In this study we investigated the shell microstructure as well as the Mg/Ca and stable isotope distribution of barnacles found at a depth of around 2500m at a black smoker from the Manus Spreading centre, north-east of Papua New Guinea. The shell consists of three substructures: an outer layer with pores and aragonite crystals, a massive interior mass and an inner layer with pores. The shell shows grown lines and the outer layer exhibits longitudinal striation from base to apex. The pores have a medium size of 0.8 microns. The size of the calcitic microcrystals are in the range of 0.2 to 0.5 microns, beside, larger aragonite crystals, with size of c. 10 microns are present. The massive interior mass has a compact structure, no pores or channels could be observed. Oxygen stable isotope data of barnacle shell were performed from the centre to the border of the calcitic shells, along profiles. Within one shell, the isotope values show variations of max. 0.6 ‰. The calculated temperatures from the stable isotope data consistently indicate that the barnacles populate sites with low temperature values, up to a few °C. The calculated temperatures from the isotope data are also in agreement with the reported habitat from the North Fiji and Lau Basins, where temperatures of max. 6°C were measured at sites populated by barnacles. Both calculated and measured temperatures of a few degrees indicate that at the sites where barnacles live, hydrothermal fluid input is present, as ambient temperature is around 1.5°C. Electron-microbeam analyses were done along the interior layer of the shell. The

  1. In situ chemical sensing for hydrothermal plume mapping and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, T.; Kusunoki, T.; Maeda, Y.; Shitashima, K.; Kyo, M.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, T.; Sunamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, monitoring, and mapping of biogeochemical anomalies in seawater such as temperature, salinity, turbidity, oxidation-reduction potential, and pH are essential missions to explore undiscovered hydrothermal sites and to understand distribution and behavior of hydrothermal plumes. Utilization of reliable and useful in situ sensors has been widely accepted as a promised approach to realize a spatiotemporally resolved mapping of anomalies without water sampling operations. Due to remarkable progresses of sensor technologies and its relatives, a number of highly miniaturized and robust chemical sensors have been proposed and developed. We have been developed, evaluated, and operated a compact ISFET (Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor)-based chemical sensors for ocean environmental sensing purposes. An ISFET has advantages against conventional glass-based electrodes on its faster response, robustness, and potential on miniaturization, and thus variety of chemical sensors has been already on the market. In this study, ISFET-based standalone pH sensors with a solid-state Cl-ISE as a reference electrode were mounted on various platforms and operated to monitor the pH anomalies in deep-sea environment at the Kairei, Edmond, and surrounding hydrothermal sites in the southern Central Indian Ridge area during KH10-06 scientific cruise (Nov. 2010), supported by project TAIGA (Trans-crustal Advection and In situ biogeochemical processes of Global sub-seafloor Aquifer). Up to three pH sensors were mounted on a wire-lined CTD/RMS (Rosette Multiple Sampler), dredge sampler, a series of MTD plankton nets, and VMPS (Vertical Multiple-operating Plankton Sampler). A standalone temperature sensor was bundled and operated with the pH sensor when they were mounted on the dredge sampler, MTD plankton nets, and VMPS. An AUV equipped with the pH sensor was also operated for hydrothermal activity survey operations. As a result of Tow-Yo intersect operations of the CTD

  2. The origin of life near deep-sea hydrothermal systems during the Cambrian explosion: data from the Kyzyl Tashtyg sulphide deposit (Central Asia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, Vladimir; Terleev, Alexander; Safonova, Inna; Kotlyarov, Alexey; Stupakov, Sergey; Tokarev, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    On Earth the solar radiation and the hydrothermal circulation both affect life evolution. Recent extensive studies of the World Ocean have shown that the biodiversity of Earth is linked with hydrothermal activity on the oceanic floor. These deep-sea ecosystems use chemical energy, not solar radiation. In the last quarter of the XX century, a new type of hydrothermal systems, so-called black smokers, was discovered in mid-oceanic ridges. As black smokers form sulfide ores and are surrounded by abundant bio-oases or symbioses, identification of their analogues in ancient orogenic belts is necessary for studying life origin and evolution. Of special importance are problems of life associated with deep-sea hydrothermal systems acted at the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary - the time of Cambrian explosion (Maruyama et al., 2013). During that explosion life significantly evolved and diversified due to dramatic changes of Earth's environment. Consequently, the early Cambrian - late Precambrian Kyzyl Tashtyg sulphide deposit of East Tuva in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt is of special interest. This deposit was formed on the bottom of ancient back-arc deep-sea basin as a result of black smoker hydrothermal activity and is hosted by volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks altered by the high temperature solutions. The altered Kyzyl Tashtyg basalts have an amygdules (filled by albite, epidote and carbonates), contain brown-green microfossils, often attached to their walls. The microfossils are thin tubes 5 to 25 microns in diameter and 500 microns long. This tubes are empty and have straight, curved or branching shape. Chemically, the tube material is close to epidote. In consideration of microscopic dimensions, simple morphology and similarity with modern tubular microorganisms, the studied tube-shaped microfossils can be related to cyanobacteria. Almost the same fossils, associated with oceanic basalt complexes, were described earlier (Furnes et al., 2007; Mcloughlin et al., 2007

  3. Post-drilling changes in seabed landscape and megabenthos in a deep-sea hydrothermal system, the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryota; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Takaya, Yutaro; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Chen, Chong; Fujikura, Katsunori; Miwa, Tetsuya; Takai, Ken

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in seafloor exploitation such as mineral mining in deep-sea hydrothermal fields, but the environmental impact of anthropogenic disturbance to the seafloor is poorly known. In this study, the effect of such anthropogenic disturbance by scientific drilling operations (IODP Expedition 331) on seabed landscape and megafaunal habitation was surveyed for over 3 years using remotely operated vehicle video observation in a deep-sea hydrothermal field, the Iheya North field, in the Okinawa Trough. We focused on observations from a particular drilling site (Site C0014) where the most dynamic change of landscape and megafaunal habitation was observed among the drilling sites of IODP Exp. 331. No visible hydrothermal fluid discharge had been observed at the sedimentary seafloor at Site C0014, where Calyptogena clam colonies were known for more than 10 years, before the drilling event. After drilling commenced, the original Calyptogena colonies were completely buried by the drilling deposits. Several months after the drilling, diffusing high-temperature hydrothermal fluid began to discharge from the sedimentary subseafloor in the area of over 20 m from the drill holes, 'artificially' creating a new hydrothermal vent habitat. Widespread microbial mats developed on the seafloor with the diffusing hydrothermal fluids and the galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri endemic to vents dominated the new vent community. The previously soft, sedimentary seafloor was hardened probably due to barite/gypsum mineralization or silicification, becoming rough and undulated with many fissures after the drilling operation. Although the effects of the drilling operation on seabed landscape and megafaunal composition are probably confined to an area of maximally 30 m from the drill holes, the newly established hydrothermal vent ecosystem has already lasted 2 years and is like to continue to exist until the fluid discharge ceases and thus the ecosystem in the area has

  4. Ultrastructural and molecular evidence for potentially symbiotic bacteria within the byssal plaques of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Enikõ; Bettencourt, Raul

    2008-08-01

    This study reports on the presence of a putatively symbiotic bacterial flora within the byssus plaque of the deep sea hydrothermal mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus, contributing to metal sequestration/deposition and testing positive to methane oxidizing symbiont-specific fluorescent probes. Combining an array of approaches including histology, electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, analytical chemistry, and microbiology we provide evidence for the frequently assumed, but rarely shown influence of prokaryotes on the biogeochemical cycling of metals as well as inorganic C sources (i.e., methane) at deep sea hydrothermal vents. Our results indicate that in spite of its antibacterial protective sheath, the byssus plaque gives access to a whole range of prokaryotic organisms which may be responsible for the extremely high concentration of metallic elements (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Co, Mo, Cd, Pb and Hg) measured in this attachment organ. The very high levels of metals in byssus, together with its frequent renewal rate due to the dynamic nature of the habitat, suggest that intra-byssal bacteria may have a major influence on biomineralisation/deposition of metals. The presence of a methanotroph morphotype within the byssus plaque was confirmed by FISH and TEM. The implications of the biogeochemical cycling of metals and methane at hydrothermal vents are discussed.

  5. Development of a new deep-sea hybrid Raman insertion probe and its application to the geochemistry of hydrothermal vent and cold seep fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Du, Zengfeng; Zheng, Ronger; Luan, Zhendong; Qi, Fujun; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Bing; Ye, Wangquan; Liu, Xiaorui; Lian, Chao; Chen, Changan; Guo, Jinjia; Li, Ying; Yan, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids, cold seep fluids, their associated chemosynthetic communities, and the biogeochemical anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) play very important roles in the biogeochemical sulfur and carbon cycles in the ocean. Based on our previous success developing and deploying a deep-sea sediment pore water Raman probe, we developed a new deep-sea hybrid Raman insertion probe (RiP) designed to operate at temperatures up to 450 °C that can be inserted directly into high-temperature fluids emerging from hydrothermal vents. By routinely exchanging the various tips and optics of the probe, we can analyze the geochemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids, cold seep fluids, and sediment pore water profiles (0-60 cm) in situ. The instrument ensemble also includes a new deep-sea laser Raman spectrometer in a custom-designed, 6000-m titanium pressure housing, which is powered, controlled and deployed by the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Faxian down to a maximum water depth of 4500 m. The new RiP was deployed at the Izena Hole hydrothermal area in the middle Okinawa Trough back-arc basin; the Papua-Australia-Canada-Manus (PACManus) hydrothermal vent area in the Manus back-arc basin, Papua New Guinea; and a cold seep field at Formosa Ridge in the northern South China Sea. The Raman peaks of CO2, CH4, H2S, HS-, SO42- and S8 were obtained in situ from high-temperature hydrothermal vents (290 °C), low-temperature cold seep fluids (2 °C) and the surrounding sediment pore water. Dissolved CH4 and S8 were identified for the first time in the fluids under the lush chemosynthetic communities of the cold seep. Several sediment pore water profiles collected near the cold seep were characterized by the loss of SO42- and increased CH4, H2S and HS- peaks. Additionally, the in situ pH range of the pore water profile was between 6.95 and 7.22. Thus, the RiP system provides a very useful tool for investigating the geochemistry of hydrothermal vent and cold seep fluids.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus sp. Strain ST04, Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimney on the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Holden, James F.; Seo, Dong-Ho; Shin, Hakdong; Kim, Hae-Yeong; Kim, Wooki; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-01-01

    Pyrococcus sp. strain ST04 is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and heterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide chimney on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To further understand the distinct characteristics of this archaeon at the genome level (polysaccharide utilization at high temperature and ATP generation by a Na+ gradient), the genome of strain ST04 was completely sequenced and analyzed. Here, we present the complete genome sequence analysis results of Pyrococcus sp. ST04 and report the major findings from the genome annotation, with a focus on its saccharolytic and metabolite production potential. PMID:22843576

  7. High-throughput sequencing and analysis of the gill tissue transcriptome from the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Paula

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bathymodiolus azoricus is a deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel found in association with large faunal communities living in chemosynthetic environments at the bottom of the sea floor near the Azores Islands. Investigation of the exceptional physiological reactions that vent mussels have adopted in their habitat, including responses to environmental microbes, remains a difficult challenge for deep-sea biologists. In an attempt to reveal genes potentially involved in the deep-sea mussel innate immunity we carried out a high-throughput sequence analysis of freshly collected B. azoricus transcriptome using gills tissues as the primary source of immune transcripts given its strategic role in filtering the surrounding waterborne potentially infectious microorganisms. Additionally, a substantial EST data set was produced and from which a comprehensive collection of genes coding for putative proteins was organized in a dedicated database, "DeepSeaVent" the first deep-sea vent animal transcriptome database based on the 454 pyrosequencing technology. Results A normalized cDNA library from gills tissue was sequenced in a full 454 GS-FLX run, producing 778,996 sequencing reads. Assembly of the high quality reads resulted in 75,407 contigs of which 3,071 were singletons. A total of 39,425 transcripts were conceptually translated into amino-sequences of which 22,023 matched known proteins in the NCBI non-redundant protein database, 15,839 revealed conserved protein domains through InterPro functional classification and 9,584 were assigned with Gene Ontology terms. Queries conducted within the database enabled the identification of genes putatively involved in immune and inflammatory reactions which had not been previously evidenced in the vent mussel. Their physical counterpart was confirmed by semi-quantitative quantitative Reverse-Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reactions (RT-PCR and their RNA transcription level by quantitative PCR (q

  8. Mesonerilla neridae, n. sp. (Nerillidae): First meiofaunal annelid from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W

    2009-01-01

    Though most common in coastal sandy bottoms, nerillid annelids have been found in a broad variety of habitats around the world and two genera have previously been reported from the deep sea. During a cruise to the southern East Pacific Rise and northern Pacific Antarctic Ridge (near Easter Island...

  9. Mesonerilla neridae, n. sp. (Nerillidae): First meiofaunal annelid from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsaae, Katrine; Rouse, Greg W

    2009-01-01

    Though most common in coastal sandy bottoms, nerillid annelids have been found in a broad variety of habitats around the world and two genera have previously been reported from the deep sea. During a cruise to the southern East Pacific Rise and northern Pacific Antarctic Ridge (near Easter Island...

  10. The Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) Expedition: Technology Development and the Search for Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Fields Under the Arctic Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Singh, H.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Jakuba, M.; Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Willis, C.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields on the Gakkel Ridge beneath the Arctic ice cap provide perhaps the best terrestrial analogue for volcanically-hosted chemosynthetic biological communities that may exist beneath the ice-covered ocean of Europa. In both cases the key enabling technologies are robotic (untethered) vehicles that can swim freely under the ice and the supporting hardware and software. The development of robotic technology for deep- sea research beneath ice-covered oceans thus has relevance to both polar oceanography and future astrobiological missions to Europa. These considerations motivated a technology development effort under the auspices of NASA's ASTEP program and NSF's Office of Polar Programs that culminated in the AGAVE expedition aboard the icebreaker Oden from July 1 - August 10, 2007. The scientific objective was to study hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge, which is a key target for global studies of deep-sea vent fields. We developed two new autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for the project, and deployed them to search for vent fields beneath the ice. We conducted eight AUV missions (four to completion) during the 40-day long expedition, which also included ship-based bathymetric surveys, CTD/rosette water column surveys, and wireline photographic and sampling surveys of remote sections of the Gakkel Ridge. The AUV missions, which lasted 16 hours on average and achieved operational depths of 4200 meters, returned sensor data that showed clear evidence of hydrothermal venting, but for a combination of technical reasons and time constraints, the AUVs did not ultimately return images of deep-sea vent fields. Nevertheless we used our wireline system to obtain images and samples of extensive microbial mats that covered fresh volcanic surfaces on a newly discovered set of volcanoes. The microbes appear to be living in regions where reducing and slightly warm fluids are seeping through cracks in the fresh volcanic terrain. These discoveries

  11. Microbial community structure and nitrogenase gene diversity of sediment from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yuehong; CAO Yi; WANG Chunsheng; WU Min; AHARON Oren; XU Xuewei

    2014-01-01

    A sediment sample was collected from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located at a depth of 2 951 m on the Southwest Indian Ridge. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on the prokaryotic community using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Within the Archaea, the dominant clones were from marine benthic group E (MBGE) and marine group I (MGI) belonging to the phyla Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, respectively. More than half of the bacterial clones belonged to the Proteobacteria, and most fell within the Gammaproteobacteria. No epsilonproteobacterial sequence was observed. Additional phyla were detected including the Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi, Chlorobi, Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, and candidate divisions OD1, OP11, WS3 and TM6, confirming their existence in hydrothermal vent environments. The detection of nifH gene suggests that biological nitrogen fixation may occur in the hydrothermal vent field of the South-west Indian Ridge. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that only Clusters I and III NifH were present. This is consistent with the phylogenetic analysis of the microbial 16S rRNA genes, indicating that Bacteria play the main role in nitrogen fixation in this hydrothermal vent environment.

  12. Time-series measurements of hydrothermal plume volume flux with imaging sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    COVIS (Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar) is an innovative sonar system designed to quantitatively monitor the outputs of deep-sea hydrothermal vent clusters for both high-temperature focused vents and diffuse flows. In September 2010, COVIS was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada underwater ocean observatory network (http://www.NEPTUNEcanada.ca) at the Grotto vent cluster at the Main Endeavour Field on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Since then, COVIS has been monitoring the hydrothermal plumes above Grotto by transmitting high-frequency (400 kHz), pulsed acoustic waves towards the plumes and recording the backscattered signals from each pulse, except for a one-year hiatus due to the power-off of the NEPTUNE Canada network between November 2010 and September 2011. The received backscatter signals are transmitted via the NEPTUNE Canada network to the land-based servers in real time, where a combination of automatic and manual data analyses produces a plume volume-flux and flow-rate time series using both the intensity and Doppler shift of the backscatter signals. The initial 30-day time series (Sep-Oct 2010) was presented in AGU Fall meeting, 2011. Evident short-term temporal variations (Sensor (BARS, principal Investigator M. Lilley, University of Washington) and the Remotely Activated water Sampler (RAS, principal Investigator D. Butterfield, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and University of Washington) at the vent orifices to link the variations observed in the buoyant plume with those at the orifices. This work is supported by NSF award OCE-0825088 to Rutgers.

  13. Activity of antioxidant enzymes in response to atmospheric pressure induced physiological stress in deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Inês; Romão, Célia V; Goulart, Joana; Cerqueira, Teresa; Santos, Ricardo S; Bettencourt, Raul

    2016-03-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels from Portuguese EEZ Menez Gwen hydrothermal field possess the remarkable ability to overcome decompression and survive successfully at atmospheric pressure conditions. We investigated the potential use of antioxidant defense enzymes in mussel B. azoricus as biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by long term acclimatization to atmospheric pressure conditions. Mussels collected at Menez Gwen hydrothermal field were acclimatized for two weeks in three distinct conditions suitable of promoting physiological stress, (i) in plain seawater for concomitant endosymbiont bacteria loss, (ii) in plain seawater under metal iron exposure, (iii) constant bubbling methane and pumped sulfide for endosymbiont bacteria survival. The enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and iron storage proteins in addition to electrophoretic profiles were examined in vent mussel gills and digestive gland. Gills showed approximately 3 times more SOD specific activity than digestive glands. On the other hand, digestive glands showed approximately 6 times more CAT specific activity than gills. Iron storage proteins were identified in gill extracts from all experimental conditions mussels. However, in digestive gland extracts only fresh collected mussels and after 2 weeks in FeSO4 showed the presence of iron storage proteins. The differences between SOD, CAT specific activities and the presence of iron storage proteins in the examined tissues reflect dissimilar metabolic and antioxidant activities, as a result of tissue specificities and acclimatization conditions influences on the organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Copepod colonization of organic and inorganic substrata at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Christoph; Pradillon, Florence; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2017-03-01

    The few existing studies on deep-sea hydrothermal vent copepods indicate low connectivity with surrounding environments and reveal high endemism among vents. However, the finding of non-endemic copepod species in association with engineer species at different reduced ecosystems poses questions about the dispersal of copepods and the colonization of hydrothermal vents as well as their ecological connectivity. The objective of this study is to understand copepod colonization patterns at a hydrothermal vent site in response to environmental factors such as temperature and fluid flow as well as the presence of different types of substrata. To address this objective, an in situ experiment was deployed using both organic (woods, pig bones) and inorganic (slates) substrata along a gradient of hydrothermal activity at the Lucky Strike vent field (Eiffel Tower, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). The substrata were deployed in 2011 during the MoMARSAT cruise and were recovered after two years in 2013. Overall, copepod density showed significant differences between substrata types, but was similar among different hydrothermal activity regimes. Highest densities were observed on woods at sites with moderate or low fluid input, whereas bones were the most densely colonized substrata at the 2 sites with higher hydrothermal influence. Although differences in copepod diversity were not significant, the observed trends revealed overall increasing diversity with decreasing temperature and fluid input. Slates showed highest diversity compared to the organic substrata. Temperature and fluid input had a significant influence on copepod community composition, resulting in higher similarity among stations with relatively high and low fluid inputs, respectively. While vent-specialists such as dirivultids and the tegastid Smacigastes micheli dominated substrata at high vent activity, the experiment demonstrated increasing abundance and dominance of non-vent taxa with decreasing temperature and fluid

  15. Linking geology, fluid chemistry, and microbial activity of basalt- and ultramafic-hosted deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, M; Hansen, M; Seifert, R; Strauss, H; Koschinsky, A; Petersen, S

    2013-07-01

    Hydrothermal fluids passing through basaltic rocks along mid-ocean ridges are known to be enriched in sulfide, while those circulating through ultramafic mantle rocks are typically elevated in hydrogen. Therefore, it has been estimated that the maximum energy in basalt-hosted systems is available through sulfide oxidation and in ultramafic-hosted systems through hydrogen oxidation. Furthermore, thermodynamic models suggest that the greatest biomass potential arises from sulfide oxidation in basalt-hosted and from hydrogen oxidation in ultramafic-hosted systems. We tested these predictions by measuring biological sulfide and hydrogen removal and subsequent autotrophic CO2 fixation in chemically distinct hydrothermal fluids from basalt-hosted and ultramafic-hosted vents. We found a large potential of microbial hydrogen oxidation in naturally hydrogen-rich (ultramafic-hosted) but also in naturally hydrogen-poor (basalt-hosted) hydrothermal fluids. Moreover, hydrogen oxidation-based primary production proved to be highly attractive under our incubation conditions regardless whether hydrothermal fluids from ultramafic-hosted or basalt-hosted sites were used. Site-specific hydrogen and sulfide availability alone did not appear to determine whether hydrogen or sulfide oxidation provides the energy for primary production by the free-living microbes in the tested hydrothermal fluids. This suggests that more complex features (e.g., a combination of oxygen, temperature, biological interactions) may play a role for determining which energy source is preferably used in chemically distinct hydrothermal vent biotopes.

  16. Isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 from an Arctic deep-sea hydrothermal vent site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissuwa, Juliane; Stokke, Runar; Fedøy, Anita-Elin; Lian, Kjersti; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Steen, Ida Helene

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus have been isolated from a wide variety of habitats worldwide and are the subject for targeted enzyme utilization in various industrial applications. Here we report the isolation and complete genome sequence of the thermophilic starch-degrading Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1. The strain 12AMOR1 was isolated from deep-sea hot sediment at the Jan Mayen hydrothermal Vent Site. Geobacillus sp. 12AMOR1 consists of a 3,410,035 bp circular chromosome and a 32,689 bp plasmid with a G + C content of 52 % and 47 %, respectively. The genome comprises 3323 protein-coding genes, 88 tRNA species and 10 rRNA operons. The isolate grows on a suite of sugars, complex polysaccharides and proteinous carbon sources. Accordingly, a versatility of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZy) and peptidases were identified in the genome. Expression, purification and characterization of an enzyme of the glycoside hydrolase family 13 revealed a starch-degrading capacity and high thermal stability with a melting temperature of 76.4 °C. Altogether, the data obtained point to a new isolate from a marine hydrothermal vent with a large bioprospecting potential.

  17. Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Deep-Sea Sediments at the Guaymas Basin - Hydrothermal Vent Area - Influence of Temperature and Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ELSGAARD, L.; ISAKSEN, MF; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    . Addition of short-chain fatty acids and yeast extract to the sediment slurries stimulated sulfate reduction rates at all incubation temperatures. No sulfate reduction was detected in the temperature range from 102-120-degrees-C. Microbial rather than thermochemical sulfate reduction could be a possible...... was 0.85 mmol m-2 d-1 at the in situ temperature of about 3-degrees-C. The high subsurface rates of sulfate reduction in the hydrothermal vent area was attributed to an enhanced local substrate availability. In slurries of hydrothermal sediment, incubated at 10-120-degrees-C, microbial sulfate reduction...

  18. Pathways of carbon and energy metabolism of the epibiotic community associated with the deep-sea hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hügler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the faunal biomass at many deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In its enlarged gill chamber it harbors a specialized epibiotic bacterial community for which a nutritional role has been proposed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed specimens from the Snake Pit hydrothermal vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by complementing a 16S rRNA gene survey with the analysis of genes involved in carbon, sulfur and hydrogen metabolism. In addition to Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria, the epibiotic community unexpectedly also consists of Deltaproteobacteria of a single phylotype, closely related to the genus Desulfocapsa. The association of these phylogenetic groups with the shrimp was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Based on functional gene analyses, we hypothesize that the Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria are capable of autotrophic growth by oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds, and that the Deltaproteobacteria are also involved in sulfur metabolism. In addition, the detection of proteobacterial hydrogenases indicates the potential for hydrogen oxidation in these communities. Interestingly, the frequency of these phylotypes in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the mouthparts differ from that of the inner lining of the gill chamber, indicating potential functional compartmentalization. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show the specific association of autotrophic bacteria with Rimicaris exoculata from the Snake Pit hydrothermal vent field, and suggest that autotrophic carbon fixation is contributing to the productivity of the epibiotic community with the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle as one important carbon fixation pathway. This has not been considered in previous studies of carbon fixation and stable carbon isotope composition of the shrimp and its epibionts. Furthermore, the co-occurrence of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing epibionts raises the possibility

  19. Comparative analysis between protist communities from the deep-sea pelagic ecosystem and specific deep hydrothermal habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvadet, Anne-Laure; Gobet, Angélique; Guillou, Laure

    2010-11-01

    Protist communities associated with deep seawater and bivalves from six hydrothermal sites in the Pacific Ocean were characterized by microscopy and molecular rRNA gene surveys (18S rRNA) and compared with planktonic communities from Pacific deep-pelagic seawater (from 500 to 3000 m in depth). Genetic libraries from larger size fractions (>3 µm) of deep-pelagic water were mainly dominated by Dinophyceae, whereas small size fractions (cold seeps from the Gulf of Mexico. Hence, complex protist communities seem to occur inside hydrothermal bivalves, and these metazoa may constitute a stable micro-niche for micro-eukaryotes, including grazers, detritivores, symbionts and potential parasites. From these communities, new lineages within the ciliates may emerge. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Modeling the growth and constraints of thermophiles and biogeochemical processes in deep-sea hydrothermal environments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, J. F.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Lin, T. J.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.; Jamieson, J.; Knutson, J. K.; Dyar, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    In 2008 and 2009, 233 fluid and 4 active black smoker chimney samples were collected from the Endeavour Segment and Axial Volcano in the NE Pacific Ocean. Hyperthermophilic methanogens, autotrophic iron reducers, and heterotrophs were present at both sites, with iron reducers generally more abundant than methanogens in MPN estimates. Culture-based experiments with three Methanocaldococcus strains at 70 and 82°C showed that these organisms are H2 limited below 10-20 µM H2. Furthermore, respiration rates per cell increased significantly for Methanocaldococcus strain JH146 when grown near its limits of temperature, pH, and minimum NH4+ suggesting that its H2 demand increases under non-ideal conditions. H2 concentrations in Endeavour fluids were slightly above the predicted minimum threshold for methanogen growth, which likely explains their low abundances. H2 concentrations were well above the minimum threshold at Axial Volcano where methanogens and methanogenesis were more evident. Nineteen deep-sea hyperthermophilic heterotrophs all grew on peptides and sugars with concomitant H2 production. Based on pure culture respiration rate measurements, it is estimated that 50-100 heterotrophs would be needed to produce enough H2 to support one methanogen. Co-culture experiments with a heterotroph and a methanogen show that large numbers of heterotrophs grow in aggregates with a small number of methanogens and that the heterotrophs are the sole source of H2 for the methanogens in a commensal or symbiotic relationship. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the minimum H2 threshold for growth should be much lower for iron reduction than for methanogenesis, and culture experiments show far less H2 consumption by iron reducers than methanogens. Access to Fe(III) oxide and physiological mechanisms for respiring insoluble iron limit growth for iron reducers. Petrology and Mössbauer, VNIR, and thermal emission spectra show that the interior of black smoker chimneys are porous

  1. First report on the micro-essential metal concentrations in bivalve shells from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Enikõ; Costa, Valentina

    2006-07-01

    The hydrothermal vent bivalve Bathymodiolus azoricus is naturally exposed to elevated levels of trace elements (Fe, Cu and Zn) and is therefore a suitable model organism to study physiological adaptations to extreme environments. Whole shells and various shell compartments of B. azoricus from two geochemically different hydrothermal vents of the Mid- Atlantic Ridge were analysed regarding their micro-essential metal concentration, and compared with levels in their shore analogues from contaminated sites reported in the relevant literature. Concentrations of Cu and Zn in hydrothermal shells exceeded many-fold levels reported for polluted areas worldwide, and thus reveal a prominent potential of this organ to accumulate bivalent metals (average concentrations of metals in whole shells of mussels from the Lucky Strike vent site were above average 280 μg g - 1 for Fe, 80 μg g - 1 for Cu and 40 μg g - 1 for Zn). Moreover, shell metal concentrations reflected fluid composition. In spite of higher metal concentrations in the periostracum than in the nacre, the latter has a higher metal burden because of its greater mass as compared to the thin periostracum. Additionally, metals were shown to bind reversibly to the outer surface of the shell (up to 6% of both total Cu and Zn, and 30% of total Fe from shells were recovered in an acidic solution in which the shells were soaked for 12 hours). It is concluded that shells are good indicators of environmental levels of Fe, Cu and Zn at hydrothermal vents and thus may be considered markers of putative changes in metal exposure over the mussel's lifespan.

  2. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D; Stewart, Lucy C; Morrison, Hilary G; Butterfield, David A; Huber, Julie A; Holden, James F

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7-40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4 (+) generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  3. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D.; Stewart, Lucy C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Butterfield, David A.; Huber, Julie A.; Holden, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7–40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4+ generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments. PMID:27547206

  4. Hydrothermal plume anomalies along the Central Indian Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jian; LIN Jian; GUO ShiQin; CHEN YongShun

    2008-01-01

    Water column turbidity and temperature were investigated along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR) from 25°19'S to 23°48'S during a December 2005 cruise on board Chinese P/V DayangYihao.Measurements were made using NOAA's MAPR (Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder) sensors during CTD casts,TV grabber operations,and tow-yo profiles,yielding the following results on hydrothermal plume anomalies:(1) Strong hydrothermal turbidity and temperature anomalies were recorded over the pre-viously discovered Kairei (25°19.2'S,70°02.4'E) and Edmond (23°52.7'S,69°35.8"E) vent fields,with the plume anomalies concentrated at depths of 2150-2300 m and 2700-2900 m,respectively.The maxi-mum height of the turbidity anomalies near the Kairei vent field recorded in December 2005 was slightly below 2100 m,which is consistent with the plume depth measured in June 2001,indicating that the Kairei plume may have maintained its buoyancy flux in the intervening 4.5 years.(2) The water column beneath the Kairei plume has background anomalies of about 0.005△NTU,whereas no such back-ground turbidity anomalies were observed below the Edmond hydrothermal plume.(3) No visible tur-bidity anomalies were detected from 24°42'S to 24°12'S including the Knorr Seamount.Thus 24°12'S marks the southern end of the hydrothermal plume.(4) Significant turbidity anomalies were observed at four individual sections from 24°12'S to 23°56'S at the depth of 2500-3000 m along the eastern rift valley wall.Whether the individual sections of anomalies are connected is still unknown due to the absence of data at the intervening gaps.If the four sections are connected with each other and are linked to the Edmond vent field farther to the north,the total along-axis length of the plume anomaly would be more than 37 km,implying a plume incidence value Ph of 0.38,greater than the predicted Ph of 0.21-0.25 based on the spreading rate of the Central Indian Ridge.

  5. Hydrogen and thiosulfate limits for growth of a thermophilic, autotrophic Desulfurobacterium species from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lucy C; Llewellyn, James G; Butterfield, David A; Lilley, Marvin D; Holden, James F

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal fluids (341°C and 19°C) were collected < 1 m apart from a black smoker chimney and a tubeworm mound on the Boardwalk edifice at the Endeavour Segment in the northeastern Pacific Ocean to study anaerobic microbial growth in hydrothermal mineral deposits. Geochemical modelling of mixed vent fluid and seawater suggests the mixture was anoxic above 55°C and that low H2 concentrations (79 μmol kg(-1) in end-member hydrothermal fluid) limit anaerobic hydrogenotrophic growth above this temperature. A thermophilic, hydrogenotrophic sulfur reducer, Desulfurobacterium strain HR11, was isolated from the 19°C fluid raising questions about its H2 -dependent growth kinetics. Strain HR11 grew at 40-77°C (Topt 72-75°C), pH 5-8.5 (pHopt 6-7) and 1-5% (wt vol(-1) ) NaCl (NaClopt 3-4%). The highest growth rates occurred when S2 O3 (2-) and S° were reduced to H2 S. Modest growth occurred by NO3 (-) reduction. Monod constants for its growth were Ks of 30 μM for H2 and Ks of 20 μM for S2 O3 (2-) with a μmax of 2.0 h(-1) . The minimum H2 and S2 O3 (2-) concentrations for growth were 3 μM and 5 μM respectively. Possible sources of S2 O3 (2-) and S° are from abiotic dissolved sulfide and pyrite oxidation by O2 .

  6. High connectivity of animal populations in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields in the Central Indian Ridge relevant to its geological setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Beedessee

    Full Text Available Dispersal ability plays a key role in the maintenance of species in spatially and temporally discrete niches of deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments. On the basis of population genetic analyses in the eastern Pacific vent fields, dispersal of animals in the mid-oceanic ridge systems generally appears to be constrained by geographical barriers such as trenches, transform faults, and microplates. Four hydrothermal vent fields (the Kairei and Edmond fields near the Rodriguez Triple Junction, and the Dodo and Solitaire fields in the Central Indian Ridge have been discovered in the mid-oceanic ridge system of the Indian Ocean. In the present study, we monitored the dispersal of four representative animals, Austinograea rodriguezensis, Rimicaris kairei, Alviniconcha and the scaly-foot gastropods, among these vent fields by using indirect methods, i.e., phylogenetic and population genetic analyses. For all four investigated species, we estimated potentially high connectivity, i.e., no genetic difference among the populations present in vent fields located several thousands of kilometers apart; however, the direction of migration appeared to differ among the species, probably because of different dispersal strategies. Comparison of the intermediate-spreading Central Indian Ridge with the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed the presence of relatively high connectivity in the intermediate- and slow-spreading ridge systems. We propose that geological background, such as spreading rate which determines distance among vent fields, is related to the larval dispersal and population establishment of vent-endemic animal species, and may play an important role in controlling connectivity among populations within a biogeographical province.

  7. Reaction-driven cracking in the TAG deep-sea hydrothermal field: Implications for serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Tens of thousands of very small (-1.5 ≤ ML ≤ 0.5) microearthquakes were detected by a small-aperture (200 m) network of 5 ocean bottom seismometers during a 9-month deployment at the TAG active hydrothermal mound on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (26°N). The earthquakes exhibit purely compressional phase arrivals, are clustered within a narrow depth interval extending from ~50 - 150 m below the seafloor, and are located just beyond the perimeter of the surface expression of the hydrothermal mound. Analyses of these events indicates that they are most likely generated by crack opening resulting from the deposition of anhydrite in the secondary circulation system of the active mound. This reaction-driven cracking is analogous to that expected from serpentinization and/or carbonation of peridotite, and suggests that a properly designed seismic experiment may be able to provide in-situ monitoring of these processes either on land or in the oceans. A straightforward test of this hypothesis could be obtained by deploying a borehole seismic network in a subaerial region, such as the ophiolite terrains of Oman, where serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite are active processes

  8. In situ ore formation experiment: Amino acids and amino sugars trapped in artificial chimneys on deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Pacific Ocean

    CERN Document Server

    Takano,; Marumo,; K.,; Ebashi,; T.,; Gupta,; P., L; Kawahata,; H.,; Kobayashi,; K.,; Yamagishi,; A.,; Kuwabara,; T,

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the bio-organic composition of a deep-sea venting hydrothermal system originating from arc volcanism; the origin of the particulates in hydrothermal fluids from the Suiyo Seamount in the southern Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) Arc is discussed with regard to amino compounds. Chimney samples on deep-sea hydrothermal systems and core samples at Suiyo Seamount were determined for amino acids, and occasionally amino sugars. Two types of chimney samples were obtained from active hydrothermal systems by submersible vehicles: one was natural chimney (NC) on a hydrothermal natural vent; the other was artificial chimneys (AC), mainly formed by the growth and deposition of sulfide-rich particulate components in a Kuwabara-type in situ incubator (KI incubator). Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) and hydrolyzed hexosamines (HA) in AC ranged from 10.7 nmol/g to 64.0 nmol/g and from 0 nmol/g to 8.1 nmol/g, respectively, while THAA in hydrothermally altered core samples ranged from 26.0 nmol/g to 107.4 ...

  9. Trophic regions of a hydrothermal plume dispersing away from an ultramafic-hosted vent-system: Von Damm vent-site, Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Coleman, Max; Huber, Julie A.; Reddington, Emily; Kinsey, James C.; McIntyre, Cameron; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.

    2013-02-01

    Abstract Deep-sea ultramafic-hosted vent systems have the potential to provide large amounts of metabolic energy to both autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms in their dispersing hydrothermal plumes. Such vent-systems release large quantities of hydrogen and methane to the water column, both of which can be exploited by autotrophic microorganisms. Carbon cycling in these hydrothermal plumes may, therefore, have an important influence on open-ocean biogeochemistry. In this study, we investigated an ultramafic-hosted system on the Mid-Cayman Rise, emitting metal-poor and hydrogen sulfide-, methane-, and hydrogen-rich hydrothermal fluids. Total organic carbon concentrations in the plume ranged between 42.1 and 51.1 μM (background = 43.2 ± 0.7 μM (n = 5)) and near-field plume samples with elevated methane concentrations imply the presence of chemoautotrophic primary production and in particular methanotrophy. In parts of the plume characterized by persistent potential temperature anomalies but lacking elevated methane concentrations, we found elevated organic carbon concentrations of up to 51.1 μM, most likely resulting from the presence of heterotrophic communities, their extracellular products and vent larvae. Elevated carbon concentrations up to 47.4 μM were detected even in far-field plume samples. Within the Von Damm hydrothermal plume, we have used our data to hypothesize a microbial food web in which chemoautotrophy supports a heterotrophic community of microorganisms. Such an active microbial food web would provide a source of labile organic carbon to the deep ocean that should be considered in any future studies evaluating sources and sinks of carbon from hydrothermal venting to the deep ocean.

  10. Differential gene expression in the mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from the Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, R.; Rodrigues, M. I.; Barros, I.; Cerqueira, T.; Freitas, C.; Costa, V.; Pinheiro, M.; Egas, C.; Santos, R. S.

    2013-02-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus is a symbiont bearing bivalve that is found in great abundance at the Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike vent sites and in close vicinity off the Azores region near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The distinct relationships that vent mussels have developed with their physical and chemical environments are likely reflected in global gene expression profiles providing thus a means to distinguish geographically distinct vent mussels on the basis of gene expression studies, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, to assess the natural expression of bacterial genes and vent mussel immune genes and the constitutive distribution and relative abundance of endosymbiotic bacteria within gill tissues. Our results confirmed the presence of methanotroph-related endosymbionts in Menez Gwen vent mussels whereas Lucky Strike specimens seem to harbor a different bacterial morphotype when a methane monooxygenase gene specific probe was used. No qualitative differences could be visualized between Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike individuals when tested with sulfur-oxidizing-related nucleic-acid probe. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies revealed varied gene expression profiles in both Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike mussel gill tissues for the immune genes selected. Genes encoding transcription factors presented noticeably low levels of fold expression whether in MG or LS animals whereas the genes encoding effector molecules appeared to have higher levels expression in MG gill tissues. The peptidoglycan recognition molecule, encoding gene, PGRP presented the highest level of transcriptional activity among the genes analyzed in MG gill tissues, seconded by carcinolectin and thus denoting the relevance of immune recognition molecules in early stage of the immune responses onset. Genes regarded as encoding molecules involved in signaling pathways were consistently expressed in both MG and LS gill

  11. Differential gene expression in the mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus from the Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pinheiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus is a symbiont bearing bivalve that is found in great abundance at the Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike vent sites and in close vicinity off the Azores region near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR. The distinct relationships that vent mussels have developed with their physical and chemical environments are likely reflected in global gene expression profiles providing thus a means to distinguish geographically distinct vent mussels on the basis of gene expression studies, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH experiments and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, to assess the natural expression of bacterial genes and vent mussel immune genes and the constitutive distribution and relative abundance of endosymbiotic bacteria within gill tissues. Our results confirmed the presence of methanotroph-related endosymbionts in Menez Gwen vent mussels whereas Lucky Strike specimens seem to harbor a different bacterial morphotype when a methane monooxygenase gene specific probe was used. No qualitative differences could be visualized between Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike individuals when tested with sulfur-oxidizing-related nucleic-acid probe. Quantitative PCR (qPCR studies revealed varied gene expression profiles in both Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike mussel gill tissues for the immune genes selected. Genes encoding transcription factors presented noticeably low levels of fold expression whether in MG or LS animals whereas the genes encoding effector molecules appeared to have higher levels expression in MG gill tissues. The peptidoglycan recognition molecule, encoding gene, PGRP presented the highest level of transcriptional activity among the genes analyzed in MG gill tissues, seconded by carcinolectin and thus denoting the relevance of immune recognition molecules in early stage of the immune responses onset. Genes regarded as encoding molecules involved in signaling pathways were consistently expressed in both MG

  12. Molecular isotopic evidence for anaerobic oxidation of methane in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment in Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2003-04-01

    Large amount of methane in anoxic marine sediments as well as cold seeps and hydrothermal vents is recycled through for an anoxic oxidation of methane processes. Now that combined results of field and laboratory studies revealed that microbiological activity associated with syntrophic consortium of archaea performing reversed methanogenesis and sulfate-reducing bacteria is significant roles in methane recycling, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). In this study, we examined the diversity of archaeal and bacterial assemblages of AOM using compound-specific stable carbon isotopic and phylogenetic analyses. "Iheya North" in Okinawa Trough is sediment-rich, back arc type hydrothermal system (27^o47'N, 126^o53'E). Sediment samples were collected from three sites where are "bubbling sites", yellow-colored microbial mats are formed with continuous bubbling from the seafloor bottom, vent mussel's colonies site together with slowly venting and simmering, and control site off 100 m distance from thermal vent. This subsea floor structure has important effect in the microbial ecosystem and interaction between their activity and geochemical processes in the subseafloor habitats. Culture-independent, molecular biological analysis clearly indicated the presence of thermophilic methanogens in deeper area having higher temperatures and potential activity of AMOs consortium in the shallower area. AMO is composed with sulfate-reducing bacterial components (Desulfosarcina spp.) and anoxic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME-2). These results were consistent with the results of compound-specific carbon analysis of archaeal biomarkers. They showed extremely depleted 13C contents (-80 ppm ˜ -100 ppm), which also appeared to be capable of directly oxidizing methane.

  13. Respiration of bivalves from three different deep-sea areas: Cold seeps, hydrothermal vents and organic carbon-rich sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripounoff, A.; Caprais, J. C.; Decker, C.; Le Bruchec, J.; Noel, P.; Husson, B.

    2017-08-01

    We studied bivalves (vesicomyids and mytilids) inhabiting four different areas of high sulfide and methane production: (1) in the Gulf of Guinea, two pockmarks (650 m and 3150 m depth) and one site rich in organic sediments in the deepest zone (4950 m average depth), (2) at the Azores Triple Junction on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, one hydrothermal site (Lucky Strike vent field, 1700 m depth). Two types of Calmar benthic chambers were deployed, either directly set into the sediment (standard Calmar chamber) or fitted with a tank to isolate organisms from the sediment (modified Calmar chamber), to assess gas and solute exchanges in relation to bivalve bed metabolism. Fluxes of oxygen, total carbon dioxide, ammonium and methane were measured. At the site with organic-rich sediments, oxygen consumption by clams measured in situ with the standard benthic chamber was variable (1.3-6.7 mmol m-2 h-1) as was total carbon dioxide production (1-9.6 mmol m-2 h-1). The observed gas and solute fluxes were attributed primarily to bivalve respiration (vesicomyids or mytilids), but microbial and geochemical processes in the sediment may be also responsible for some of variations in the deepest stations. The respiration rate of isolated vesicomyids (16.1-0.25.7 μmol g-1 dry weight h-1) was always lower than that of mytilids (33 μmol g-1 dry weight h-1). This difference was attributed to the presence of a commensal scaleworm in the mytilids. The respiratory coefficient (QR) ≥1 indicated high levels of anaerobic metabolism. The O:N index ranged from 5 to 25, confirming that vesicomyids and mytilids, living in symbiosis with bacteria, have a protein-based food diet.

  14. Caloranaerobacter ferrireducens sp. nov., an anaerobic, thermophilic, iron (III)-reducing bacterium isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xi; Jebbar, Mohamed; Alain, Karine; Shao, Zongze

    2015-06-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, iron-reducing bacterium (strain DY22619T) was isolated from a sulfide sample collected from an East Pacific Ocean hydrothermal field at a depth of 2901 m. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, motile rods (2-10 µm in length, 0.5 µm in width) with multiple peritrichous flagella. The strain grew at 40-70 °C inclusive (optimum 60 °C), at pH 4.5-8.5 inclusive (optimum pH 7.0) and with sea salts concentrations of 1-10 % (w/v) (optimum 3 % sea salts) and NaCl concentrations of 1.5-5.0 % (w/v) (optimum 2.5 % NaCl). Under optimal growth conditions, the generation time was around 55 min. The isolate was an obligate chemoorganoheterotroph, utilizing complex organic compounds, amino acids, carbohydrates and organic acids including peptone, tryptone, beef extract, yeast extract, alanine, glutamate, methionine, threonine, fructose, mannose, galactose, glucose, palatinose, rhamnose, turanose, gentiobiose, xylose, sorbose, pyruvate, tartaric acid, α-ketobutyric acid, α-ketovaleric acid, galacturonic acid and glucosaminic acid. Strain DY22619T was strictly anaerobic and facultatively dependent on various forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor: insoluble forms and soluble forms. It did not reduce sulfite, sulfate, thiosulfate or nitrate. The genomic DNA G+C content was 29.0 mol%. Phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the closest relative of strain DY22619T was Caloranaerobacter azorensis MV1087T, sharing 97.41 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. On the basis of physiological distinctness and phylogenetic distance, the isolate is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Caloranaerobacter, for which the name Caloranaerobacterhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1601/nm.4081ferrireducens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DY22619T ( = JCM 19467T = DSM 27799T = MCCC1A06455T).

  15. Comparative study of immune responses in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus and the shallow-water mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis challenged with Vibrio bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Eva; Figueras, António; Novoa, Beatriz; Santos, Ricardo Serrão; Moreira, Rebeca; Bettencourt, Raul

    2014-10-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus and the continental European coast Mytilus galloprovincialis are two bivalves species living in highly distinct marine habitats. Mussels are filter-feeding animals that may accumulate rapidly bacteria from the environment. Contact with microorganism is thus inevitable during feeding processes where gill tissues assume a strategic importance at the interface between the external milieu and the internal body cavities promoting interactions with potential pathogens during normal filtration and a constant challenge to their immune system. In the present study B. azoricus and M. galloprovincialis were exposed to Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus suspensions and to a mixture of these Vibrio suspensions, in order to ascertain the expression level of immune genes in gill samples, from both mussel species. The immune gene expressions were analyzed by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). The gene expression results revealed that these bivalve species exhibit significant expression differences between 12 h and 24 h post-challenge times, and between the Vibrio strains used. V. splendidus induced the strongest gene expression level in the two bivalve species whereas the NF-κB and Aggrecan were the most significantly differentially expressed between the two mussel species. When comparing exposure times, both B. azoricus and M. galloprovincialis showed similar percentage of up-regulated genes at 12 h while a marked increased of gene expression was observed at 24 h for the majority of the immune genes in M. galloprovincialis. This contrasts with B. azoricus where the majority of the immune genes were down-regulated at 24 h. The 24 h post-challenge gene expression results clearly bring new evidence supporting time-dependent transcriptional activities resembling acute phase-like responses and different immune responses build-up in these two mussel species when challenged

  16. Conditions of Formation of Secondary Quartz in Hydrothermally Altered, Subsurface Dacite beneath the Deep-Sea PACMANUS Hydrothermal Field, Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanko, D. A.; Wicker, S. G.; Binns, R. A.

    2006-05-01

    New fluid inclusion (FI) data from secondary quartz within the altered felsic rocks underlying the PACMANUS hydrothermal field provide additional constraints on the thermal conditions and fluid salinities accompanying hydrothermal alteration. PACMANUS, at a water depth of about 1650 to 1700 m on the summit of the neovolcanic Pual Ridge in the eastern part of the Manus backarc basin, is an active seafloor system situated in a felsic volcanic setting at a convergent plate boundary. Two sites of active venting - Roman Ruins, with high-temperature (220-276° C) sulfide chimneys, and Snowcap, which is an area of lower-temperature (6- 65° C) diffuse flow - were cored during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 193. Drilling reached sub-seafloor depths of 387 m at Snowcap and 206 m at Roman Ruins. At both Snowcap and Roman Ruins, fresh dacite/rhyodacite is underlain by highly to completely altered rocks with clays (illite, illite-smectite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays), disseminated pyrite, silica and late stage anhydrite. At shallow depths the silica is mostly cristobalite, whereas quartz is the polymorph at depth. Secondary quartz occurs in amygdules, alone or with accessory anhydrite and pyrite; in cm-scale granular nodules; and as tiny grains forming an open mosaic with interstitial clays and pore space. Scarce FI in secondary quartz are small (10-20μ), irregular, and contain liquid (L) plus vapor. Only a few are arrayed along healed fractures, and most are interpreted as primary. FI from Snowcap homogenize to L between 290° C and 390° C. Ice melting temperatures vary between about -10° C and -0.4° C, with most ice melting near -2.0° C. Thus, while most FI have near-seawater salinities, a significant number are much more saline, while others are much less saline, approaching fresh water. FI from Roman Ruins homogenize between 257° C and 370° C, and ice melting temperatures vary from about -14° C to -1.2° C. These data are best explained if the hydrothermal

  17. Noble gases in hydrothermal plumes of Loihi Seamount

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodera, Masako; Igarashi, G.; Ozima, Minoru

    1988-02-01

    Seawater samples from hydrothermal plumes of Loihi Seamount show very high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios (up to 15.8x10/sup -6/) and /sup 4/He//sup 20/Ne ratios higher than that of air-saturated seawater (ASSW). The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio in the source from which the helium is released into the seawater is estimated as (23.1 +- 2.3)x10/sup -6/ from the correlation plot of /sup 3/He//sup 20/Ne vs. /sup 4/He//sup 20/Ne. The /sup 3/He/heat ratio at Loihi is 5-49 times higher than that at the Galapagos Rift and at 21/sup 0/N EPR. The difference may be attributed to the differences in the structure of the mantle beneath hot spots and the mid-ocean ridge, the former representing the deeper mantle region and the latter the shallower, depleted mantle. These observations are consistent with the view that helium in hydrothermal plumes of Loihi Seamount was derived from a deeper mantle region via a hot spot, where more primordial helium is still preserved.

  18. Biodiversity of deep-sea microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengping Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The oceans, with an average depth of 3,800 meters and an average pressure about 38 MPa, cover about 70% of the surface of the Earth. Geological structures under the seawater, such as marine sediments, oceanic crust, hydrothermal vents, and the cold seeps, vary significantly with regard to physical and chemical properties. In combination, these diverse environments contain the largest microbial ecosystem in the world. In deep seawater, the major microorganism groups are Alpha-& Gammaproteobacteria, and Marine Group I. In deep-sea sediments, the abundance of microbes is related to the content of organic matter and distance from land. Methane Oxidizing Archaea (ANME and sulfate reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria are common in deep-sea cold seep environments; while in hydrothermal vents, the richness and dynamics of chemical substances have led to highly diversified archaeal and bacterial groups. In contrast, the oceanic crust is mainly composed of basic and ultrabasic rocks rich in minerals, and as a result houses microorganisms that are mainly autotrophic, utilizing iron, manganese and sulfur. Because more than 99% of deep-sea microorganisms cannot be cultured, an understanding of their diversity, physiological features, and biogeochemical roles remains to be fully achieved. In this article, we review and summarize what is known about the distribution and diversity of deep-sea microorganisms in diverse habitats. It is emphasized that there is much to learn about these microbes.

  19. Deep-sea fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Damare, S.

    The deep-sea environment, despite being rich in mineral nutrients and near-saturation levels of oxygen, because of its darkness is not conducive to photosynthesis, the process that sustains life on earth. If a liigh abundance and diversity of life...

  20. Size fractionation of trace metals in the Edmond hydrothermal plume, Central Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, C. M.; Connelly, D. P.; Statham, P. J.; German, C. R.

    2012-02-01

    The investigation of the distribution of trace elements between the dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases within a hydrothermal plume is key to understanding plume processes. Particulate and colloidal size fractions of four trace elements (iron, manganese, copper and phosphorus) along with the dissolved size fraction of iron, manganese and copper have been determined in the hydrothermal plume overlying the Edmond vent-site in the Central Indian Ocean. Dissolved iron and manganese are the most heavily enriched metals in hydrothermal fluids emerging from vents and iron plays a significant role in subsequent dissolved-particulate interactions within hydrothermal plumes. Copper and phosphorus are each representative members of discrete groups of tracers (chalcophile elements and oxyanions, respectively) that are known to exhibit distinct patterns of behaviour, relative to iron, within hydrothermal plumes. Here we show that iron is present in all three hydrothermal plume fractions (dissolved, colloidal and particulate), being least abundant in dissolved form. Manganese resides predominantly in the dissolved fraction, copper resides primarily in the particulate phase and phosphorus is abundant in both the colloidal and coarser particulate phases, but not the dissolved fraction. The correlation of phosphorus to iron in the Edmond hydrothermal plume is both (i) constant across the colloidal and coarser particulate phases and (ii) matches well to broader inter-ocean trends reported previously from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. These results demonstrate a mechanism whereby plume-height P:Fe ratios are established during the very earliest stages of dissolved Fe(II) oxidation, followed by aggregation into coarser hydrothermal plume particles. This provides a strong argument for the study of P:Fe ratios in hydrothermal sediments as potential paleotracers of deep-water dissolved phosphate distributions and, hence, past deep-ocean circulation patterns.

  1. Evidence for hydrogen oxidation and metabolic plasticity in widespread deep-sea sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Karthik; Breier, John A; Sheik, Cody S; Dick, Gregory J

    2013-01-02

    Hydrothermal vents are a well-known source of energy that powers chemosynthesis in the deep sea. Recent work suggests that microbial chemosynthesis is also surprisingly pervasive throughout the dark oceans, serving as a significant CO(2) sink even at sites far removed from vents. Ammonia and sulfur have been identified as potential electron donors for this chemosynthesis, but they do not fully account for measured rates of dark primary production in the pelagic water column. Here we use metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to show that deep-sea populations of the SUP05 group of uncultured sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria, which are abundant in widespread and diverse marine environments, contain and highly express genes encoding group 1 Ni, Fe hydrogenase enzymes for H(2) oxidation. Reconstruction of near-complete genomes of two cooccurring SUP05 populations in hydrothermal plumes and deep waters of the Gulf of California enabled detailed population-specific metatranscriptomic analyses, revealing dynamic patterns of gene content and transcript abundance. SUP05 transcripts for genes involved in H(2) and sulfur oxidation are most abundant in hydrothermal plumes where these electron donors are enriched. In contrast, a second hydrogenase has more abundant transcripts in background deep-sea samples. Coupled with results from a bioenergetic model that suggest that H(2) oxidation can contribute significantly to the SUP05 energy budget, these findings reveal the potential importance of H(2) as a key energy source in the deep ocean. This study also highlights the genomic plasticity of SUP05, which enables this widely distributed group to optimize its energy metabolism (electron donor and acceptor) to local geochemical conditions.

  2. Helium, heat, and the generation of hydrothermal event plumes at mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, John E.; Baker, Edward T.; Massoth, Gary J.

    1999-09-01

    Hydrothermal event plumes are unique water-column features observed over mid-ocean ridges, presumably generated by the sudden release of large volumes of hot, buoyant fluid. Although the specifics of event plume generation are unknown, event plumes have been attributed to the rapid emptying of a hydrothermal reservoir or to rapid heat extraction from a recently emplaced dike or seafloor lava flows. The chemical and thermal signatures of event plumes as compared to the underlying steady-state plumes offer important clues to the generation of event plumes. Event plumes have low 3He/heat ratios of ˜0.4 × 10-17 mol J-1, similar to vent fluids from mature hydrothermal systems. In contrast, the steady-state plumes found beneath the event plumes have elevated and variable 3He/heat ratios of 2 to 5 × 10-17 mol J-1. Fluids collected directly over fresh lava flows have even higher 3He/heat ratios of 2 to 8 × 10-17 mol J-1, up to 30 times the event plume values. These disparate 3He/heat ratios place strong constraints on models of event plume generation, especially models which rely on heat extraction from seafloor eruptions. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Some features of the trace metal biogeochemistry in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields (Menez Gwen, Rainbow, Broken Spur at the MAR and 9°50‧N at the EPR): A synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, Ludmila L.; Holm, Nils G.; Galkin, Sergey V.; Lein, Alla Yu.

    2013-10-01

    Along with summarizing the published literature and our own data some new results on properties of the trace metal biogeochemistry in the deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and East Pacific Rise (EPR) are shown. Differences in mean concentrations of big group of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, Co, As, Pb, Cd, Ag, Hg) between the biotope water of the low- and high-temperature hydrothermal vent fields were firstly revealed. The same trace metals were studied in different groups of organisms within different temperature zones at one and the same vent field (9°50‧N EPR), as well as in fauna inhabiting geochemically different vent sites. Distribution patterns of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb, Ag, Ni, Cr, Co, As, Se, Sb, and Hg in different taxa gave an evidence of the influence of environmental and biological parameters on their bioaccumulation in organisms. Among the animals a particular “champion” with respect to the trace metal content was found to be a polychaeta Alvinella pompejana that inhabits the hottest places of the vent sulfide chimneys of the 9°50‧N field, EPR. New data on the trace metal distribution between soft tissues and carbonate shell let us estimate a role of biomineralization in the accumulation of metals in the Bathimodiolus mussels. Contrasting geochemical behavior was revealed for Cu that is enriched in soft tissues of mussels and depleted in shells, on the one hand, and Mn that is accumulated almost totally in mussel shells, on the other hand. Deep-sea hydrothermal biological communities demonstrate a strong concentration function, and bioconcentration factors (BCF) of trace metals estimated for Bathimodiolus mussels collected at the four hydrothermal fields vary within the limits of n102-n105 and are similar to that of the littoral mussels. Due to this and to the high values of biomasses per square meter, the hydrothermal fauna may be considered as a newly discovered biological filter of the oceans.

  4. Mapping deep-sea hydrothermal deposits with an in-loop transient electromagnetic method: Insights from 1D forward and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hangilro; Kim, Hee Joon

    2015-12-01

    In transient electromagnetic (TEM) measurements, secondary fields that contain information on conductive targets such as hydrothermal mineral deposits in the seafloor can be measured in the absence of strong primary fields. A TEM system using a loop source is useful to the development of compact, autonomous instruments, which are well suited to submersible-based surveys. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of applying an in-loop TEM system to the detection of marine hydrothermal deposits through a one-dimensional modeling and inversion study. We examine step-off responses for a layered model and compare the characteristics of horizontal and vertical loop systems for detecting hydrothermal deposits. The feasibility study shows that TEM responses are very sensitive to a highly conductive layer. Time-domain target responses are larger and appear earlier in horizontal magnetic fields than in vertical ones, although the vertical field has 2-3 times larger magnitude than the horizontal one. An inverse problem is formulated with the Gauss-Newton method and solved with the damped and smoothness-constrained least-squares approach. The test example for a marine hydrothermal TEM survey demonstrated that the depth extent, conductivity and thickness of the highly conductive layer are well resolved.

  5. First insights into macro- and meiofaunal colonisation patterns on paired wood/slate substrata at Atlantic deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, Daphne; Beesau, Julie; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.; Zeppilli, Daniela; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Sarrazin, Jozée

    2014-05-01

    In 2006, paired wood and slate panels, each equipped with a temperature probe, were deployed on three different localities on and around the Eiffel Tower edifice (Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) within close proximity of visible hydrothermal activity. Recovery of these panels took place in 2008. For this two-year deployment period, the composition of colonising organisms (both macro-and meiofauna) was assessed, along with image analyses of the deployment sites in 2006 and 2008. Very few significant differences in colonisation between organic (wood) and inorganic (slate) panels were revealed. Rather, the locality of deployment and the local environmental conditions and hydrothermal activity were found to influence taxonomic composition. Variability in microhabitat conditions and biological interactions were hypothesised to interact jointly in shaping new faunal communities on the colonisation substrata.

  6. Stabilization and oxidation kinetics of iron in hydrothermal plumes above the East Scotia Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, J.; Connelly, D.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Two hydrothermal vent fields were recently discovered along the East Scotia Ridge (a back arc basin spreading centre) in the Southern Ocean. These are the most southerly high-temperature vents discovered to date. End-member fluids and the associated hydrothermal plumes were sampled for total, dissolved and 'soluble' (cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV) experiments. In doing so, we present a first evaluation of the relationship between ligand and colloid stabilization mechanisms in hydrothermal plume settings. Plume samples are discussed in relation to the end-member fluid chemistry of the vent fields, which have relatively low dissolved metal concentrations (~1 mM Fe) and very high H2S:Fe ratios (~8) compared with typical mid-ocean ridge settings. The bottom water oxygen concentration is 175 μM (c.f. North Atlantic: 250 μM, North Pacific: 104 μM), and background dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations are ~43 μM. Ambient seawater temperature at plume depth (~2200m) is close to 0°C. All of these features may play a part in the observed Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and Fe(III) stabilization and therefore the impact of hydrothermal Fe input on Southern Ocean biogeochemistry. The likelihood of long range transport of dissolved iron from this type of high-temperature hydrothermal system will be discussed.

  7. Bathymetric influence on dissolved methane in hydrothermal plumes revealed by concentration and stable carbon isotope measurements at newly discovered venting sites on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ok-Rye; Son, Seung Kyu; Baker, Edward T.; Son, Juwon; Kim, Mi Jin; Barcelona, Michael J.; Kim, Moonkoo

    2014-09-01

    Methane is a useful tracer for studying hydrothermal discharge, especially where the source fluids are of low temperature and lack metal precipitates. However, the dual origins of deep-sea methane, both chemical and biological, complicate the interpretation of methane observations. Here, we use both the concentration and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved methane to trace hydrothermal plumes and identify the source and behavior of methane at two sites of newly discovered hydrothermal activity on the Central Indian Ridge (11-13°S). At both sites, methane and optical anomalies between 2500 and 3500 m at all stations indicate active hydrothermal discharge. We compared methane concentrations and δ13C at three stations, two (CTIR110136 and CTIR110208) with the most prominent anomalies at each site, and a third (CTIR110140) with near-background methane values. At stations CTIR110136 and CTIR110208, the concentration and δ13C of methane in distinct plumes ranged from 3.3 to 42.3 nmol kg-1 and -30.0 to -15.4‰, respectively, compared to deep-water values of 0.5 to 1.2 nmol kg-1 and -35.1 to -28.9‰ at the station with a near-background distal plume (CTIR110140). δ13C was highest in the center of the plumes at CTIR110136 (-15.4‰) and CTIR110208 (-17.8‰). From the plume values we estimate that the δ13C of methane in the hydrothermal fluids at these stations was approximately -19‰ and thus the methane was most likely derived from magmatic outgassing or the chemical synthesis of inorganic matter. We used the relationship between δ13C and methane concentration to examine the behavior of methane at the plume stations. In the CTIR110208 plume, simple physical mixing was likely the major process controlling the methane profile. In the CTIR110136 plume we interpret a more complicated relationship as resulting from microbial oxidation as well as physical mixing. We argue that this difference in methane behavior between the two areas stems from a

  8. The NOAA/PMEL Vents Program - 1983 to 2013: A History of Deep-Sea Volcanic and Hydrothermal Exploration and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, S. R.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Inspiration for the Vents program arose from two serendipitous events: the discovery of seafloor spreading-center hydrothermal venting on the Galápagos Rift in 1977, and NOAA's deployment of the first US civilian research multibeam bathymetric sonar on the NOAA Ship Surveyor in 1979. Multibeam mapping in the NE Pacific revealed an unprecedented and revolutionary perspective of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca spreading centers, thus stimulating a successful exploration for volcanic and hydrothermal activity at numerous locations along both. After the 1986 discovery of the first "megaplume,", quickly recognized as the water column manifestation of a deep submarine volcanic eruption, the Vents program embarked on a multi-decadal effort to discover and understand local-, regional-, and, ultimately, global-scale physical, chemical, and biological ocean environmental impacts of submarine volcanism and hydrothermal venting. The Vents program made scores of scientific discoveries, many of which owed their success to the program's equally innovative and productive technological prowess. These discoveries were documented in hundreds of peer-reviewed papers by Vents researchers and their colleagues around the world. An emblematic success was the internationally recognized, first-ever detection, location, and study of an active deep volcanic eruption in 1993. To continue the Vents mission and further enhance its effectiveness in marine science and technology innovation, the program was reorganized in 2014 into two distinct, but closely linked, programs: Earth-Oceans Interactions and Acoustics. Both are currently engaged in expeditions and projects that maintain the Vents tradition of pioneering ocean exploration and research.

  9. Sulfur, sulfides, oxides and organic matter aggregated in submarine hydrothermal plumes at 9°50‧N East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, J. A.; Toner, B. M.; Fakra, S. C.; Marcus, M. A.; White, S. N.; Thurnherr, A. M.; German, C. R.

    2012-07-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plume particles are known to sequester seawater trace elements and influence ocean-scale biogeochemical budgets. The relative importance of biotic versus abiotic oxidation-reduction and other particle-forming reaction, however, and the mechanisms of seawater trace element sequestration remain unknown. Suspended particulate material was collected from a non-buoyant hydrothermal plume by in situ filtration at 9°50‧N East Pacific Rise during a 3-day, 24 sample, time-series. Twenty-three samples were digested for total elemental analysis. One representative sample was selected for particle-by-particle geochemical analyses including elemental composition by X-ray fluorescence, speciation of Fe, S, and C by 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Consistent with past studies, positive linear correlations were observed for P, V, As, and Cr with Fe in the bulk chemistry. Arsenic was associated with both Fe oxyhydroxides and sulfides but not uniformly distributed among either mineral type. Particle aggregation was common. Aggregates were composed of minerals embedded in an organic matrix; the minerals ranged from 10 μm in diameter. The speciation of major mineral forming elements (Fe, Mn, S) was complex. Over 20 different minerals were observed, nine of which were either unpredicted by thermodynamic modeling or had no close match in the thermodynamic database. Sulfur-bearing phases consisted of polysulfides (S6, S8), and metal sulfides (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn). Four dominant species, Fe oxyhydroxide, Fe monosulfide, pyrrhotite, and pyrite, accounted for >80% of the Fe present. Particulate Mn was prevalent in both oxidized and reduced minerals. The organic matrix was: (1) always associated with minerals, (2) composed of biomolecules, and (3) rich in S. Possible sources of this S-rich organic matter include entrained near vent biomass and in situ production by S-oxidizing microorganisms. These results indicate that

  10. Recruitment of marine invertebrates to hard substrates at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise and Galapagos spreading center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Berg, Carl J.; Turner, Ruth D.

    1988-10-01

    Recruitment panels were placed at and near hydrothermal vent communities at three sites on the Galapagos spreading center and one site on the East Pacific Rise at 21°N. Deployment periods ranged from 26 days (Clam Acres, 21°N) to 260-320 days (Rose Garden, Garden of Eden, Mussel Bed, GSC) to 1216 days (Clam Acres). Recruitment of gastropod post-larvae and juveniles was observed on arrays deployed at Clam Acres for 26 days. Regardless of length of deployment, populations of polychaetes, mollusks, and barnacles colonizing the panels were predominantly post-larval, juvenile, or sub-adult stages. We suggest that some combination of competition, migration, and predation maintains these populations in immature stages. Size distributions of individuals within a taxon on panels deployed for 1216 days are broad, suggesting intermittent or continuous recruitment in many of the vent-associated species rather than a single episodic recruitment event. Folliculinid and foraminiferan protozoans were the most abundant eucaryotic organisms colonizing long-term deployments at Clam Acres. On the Galapagos spreading center, level of recruitment differed among the vent sites, with Rose Garden > Garden of Eden ≫ Mussel Bed. Recruitment of vent-associated species was greater on panels placed within vent communities compared to panels placed adjacent to these communities. This observation is consistent with the maintenance of vent communities in discrete regions of hydrothermal flux.

  11. Opposing authigenic controls on the isotopic signature of dissolved iron in hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. J. M.; Klar, J. K.; Homoky, W. B.; Comer-Warner, S. A.; Milton, J. A.; Connelly, D. P.; James, R. H.; Mills, R. A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a scarce but essential micronutrient in the oceans that limits primary productivity in many regions of the surface ocean. The mechanisms and rates of Fe supply to the ocean interior are still poorly understood and quantified. Iron isotope ratios of different Fe pools can potentially be used to trace sources and sinks of the global Fe biogeochemical cycle if these boundary fluxes have distinct signatures. Seafloor hydrothermal vents emit metal rich fluids from mid-ocean ridges into the deep ocean. Iron isotope ratios have the potential to be used to trace the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron to the oceans if the local controls on the fractionation of Fe isotopes during plume dispersal in the deep ocean are understood. In this study we assess the behaviour of Fe isotopes in a Southern Ocean hydrothermal plume using a sampling program of Total Dissolvable Fe (TDFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe). We demonstrate that δ56Fe values of dFe (δ56dFe) within the hydrothermal plume change dramatically during early plume dispersal, ranging from -2.39 ± 0.05‰ to -0.13 ± 0.06‰ (2 SD). The isotopic composition of TDFe (δ56TDFe) was consistently heavier than dFe values, ranging from -0.31 ± 0.03‰ to 0.78 ± 0.05‰, consistent with Fe oxyhydroxide precipitation as the plume samples age. The dFe present in the hydrothermal plume includes stabilised dFe species with potential to be transported to the deep ocean. We estimate that stable dFe exported from the plume will have a δ56Fe of -0.28 ± 0.17‰. Further, we show that the proportion of authigenic iron-sulfide and iron-oxyhydroxide minerals precipitating in the buoyant plume exert opposing controls on the resultant isotope composition of dissolved Fe passed into the neutrally buoyant plume. We show that such controls yield variable dissolved Fe isotope signatures under the authigenic conditions reported from modern vent sites elsewhere, and so ought to be considered during iron isotope reconstructions of past

  12. Culture-Independent Identification of Manganese-Oxidizing Genes from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Chemoautotrophic Ferromanganese Microbial Communities Using a Metagenomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity has long been recognized as being important to the fate of manganese (Mn) in hydrothermal systems, yet we know very little about the organisms that catalyze Mn oxidation, the mechanisms by which Mn is oxidized or the physiological function that Mn oxidation serves in these hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal vents with thick ferromanganese microbial mats and Mn oxide-coated rocks observed throughout the Pacific Ring of Fire are ideal models to study the mechanisms of microbial Mn oxidation, as well as primary productivity in these metal-cycling ecosystems. We sampled ferromanganese microbial mats from Vai Lili Vent Field (Tmax=43°C) located on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mn oxide-encrusted rhyolytic pumice (4°C) from Niua South Seamount on the Tonga Volcanic Arc. Metagenomic libraries were constructed and assembled from these samples and key genes known to be involved in Mn oxidation and carbon fixation pathways were identified in the reconstructed genomes. The Vai Lili metagenome assembled to form 121,157 contiguous sequences (contigs) greater than 1000bp in length, with an N50 of 8,261bp and a total metagenome size of 593 Mbp. Contigs were binned using an emergent self-organizing map of tetranucleotide frequencies. Putative homologs of the multicopper Mn-oxidase MnxG were found in the metagenome that were related to both the Pseudomonas-like and Bacillus-like forms of the enzyme. The bins containing the Pseudomonas-like mnxG genes are most closely related to uncultured Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi. The Deltaproteobacteria bin appears to be an obligate anaerobe with possible chemoautotrophic metabolisms, while the Chloroflexi appears to be a heterotrophic organism. The metagenome from the Mn-stained pumice was assembled into 122,092 contigs greater than 1000bp in length with an N50 of 7635 and a metagenome size of 385 Mbp. Both forms of mnxG genes are present in this metagenome as well as the genes encoding the putative Mn

  13. Deep sea study takes a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, Véronique; Ballard, Robert D.

    The rapidly evolving technology of remotely operated vehicles (ROV) is revolutionizing the exploration and study of deepwater environments. In 1991, the JASON/MEDEA ROV system exhibited its high-resolution imaging capabilities in the rugged hydrothermal environment of the Endeavour Segment, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge [Delaney et al., 1991; Sempéré et al., 1991]. In 1992, the Canadian Remotely Operated Platform for Ocean Science (ROPOS) successfully sampled hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge and recovered data from an Ocean Drilling Program borehole in Middle Valley, northern Juan de Fuca Ridge [Embley and Franklin, 1993]. In 1993, a 21-day expedition to the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico, went a step further, combining ROV and manned-submersible assets to maximize the effectiveness of both vehicles for scientific use and ultimately demonstrating a completely new approach to deep-sea research.

  14. Ecology and biogeography of megafauna and macrofauna at the first known deep-sea hydrothermal vents on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, J. T.; Marsh, L.; Glover, A. G.; Hühnerbach, V.; Nye, V. E.; Reid, W. D. K.; Sweeting, C. J.; Wigham, B. D.; Wiklund, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Southwest Indian Ridge is the longest section of very slow to ultraslow-spreading seafloor in the global mid-ocean ridge system, but the biogeography and ecology of its hydrothermal vent fauna are previously unknown. We collected 21 macro- and megafaunal taxa during the first Remotely Operated Vehicle dives to the Longqi vent field at 37° 47‧S 49° 39‧E, depth 2800 m. Six species are not yet known from other vents, while six other species are known from the Central Indian Ridge, and morphological and molecular analyses show that two further polychaete species are shared with vents beyond the Indian Ocean. Multivariate analysis of vent fauna across three oceans places Longqi in an Indian Ocean province of vent biogeography. Faunal zonation with increasing distance from vents is dominated by the gastropods Chrysomallon squamiferum and Gigantopelta aegis, mussel Bathymodiolus marisindicus, and Neolepas sp. stalked barnacle. Other taxa occur at lower abundance, in some cases contrasting with abundances at other vent fields, and δ13C and δ15N isotope values of species analysed from Longqi are similar to those of shared or related species elsewhere. This study provides baseline ecological observations prior to mineral exploration activities licensed at Longqi by the United Nations.

  15. Trace Element Distributions and Size Fractionation in the Edmond Hydrothermal Plume, Central Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, C. M.; Connelly, D. P.; Green, D.; German, C. R.; Statham, P. J.; Gallant, R.; von Damm, K.

    2004-12-01

    Because cycling of the entire ocean volume through hydrothermal plumes is rapid relative to thermohaline circulation (order 103 years), understanding the processes active within these plumes is crucial if we are to assess their impact on global geochemical cycles. Preliminary results from hydrothermal plume particle analyses at the Kairei and Edmond systems (Indian Ocean) have indicated that key processes, previously identified to be important in the Atlantic Ocean, also appear broadly applicable to the Indian Ocean. This was not immediately expected because parallel work has shown that the rate of dissolved iron (II) oxidation in hydrothermal plumes decreases systematically from the Atlantic to the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Here, we examine dissolved-particulate trace metal distributions in greater detail within one Indian Ocean plume (Edmond), together with the complementary vent-fluid data, to investigate these processes further. Upon oxidation, dissolved iron (II) initially forms colloidal iron (III) which then aggregates to form particulate iron (III) - the oxyhydroxide particles which apparently co-precipitate and adsorb dissolved metals from the surrounding seawater. What has remained unstudied, however, is the role that colloidal rather than aggregated particulate Fe may play in these systems. To investigate this we have combined studies of large-volume plume-particle samples (1.0μ m filters) with a series of dissolved, colloidal and finer-grained particles collected using a CTD-rosette. Here, we will discuss the distributions of Fe and the relative fractionations of Mn, Cu (representative of the chalcophile elements) and P (representative of the oxyanions) within and between different hydrothermal "pools": dissolved, colloidal, fine particles and coarse particles as determined from filtration through 0.1, 0.4 and 1.0μ m filters.

  16. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A.S.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    robust light-scattering and ORP anomalies at multiple depths, implying multiple sources. ORP anomalies are very short-lived, so the strong signals at both sites suggest that fluid sources lie within a few kilometers or less from the plume sampling...

  17. Cassini finds molecular hydrogen in the Enceladus plume: Evidence for hydrothermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. Hunter; Glein, Christopher R.; Perryman, Rebecca S.; Teolis, Ben D.; Magee, Brian A.; Miller, Greg; Grimes, Jacob; Perry, Mark E.; Miller, Kelly E.; Bouquet, Alexis; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Brockwell, Tim; Bolton, Scott J.

    2017-04-01

    Saturn’s moon Enceladus has an ice-covered ocean; a plume of material erupts from cracks in the ice. The plume contains chemical signatures of water-rock interaction between the ocean and a rocky core. We used the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft to detect molecular hydrogen in the plume. By using the instrument’s open-source mode, background processes of hydrogen production in the instrument were minimized and quantified, enabling the identification of a statistically significant signal of hydrogen native to Enceladus. We find that the most plausible source of this hydrogen is ongoing hydrothermal reactions of rock containing reduced minerals and organic materials. The relatively high hydrogen abundance in the plume signals thermodynamic disequilibrium that favors the formation of methane from CO2 in Enceladus’ ocean.

  18. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY: Lessons Learned from Deep-Sea Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasby, G P

    2000-07-28

    The first attempt to exploit deep-sea manganese nodules ended in failure as a result of the collapse of world metal prices, the onerous provisions imposed by the U. N. Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), and the overoptimistic assumptions about the viability of nodule mining. Attention then focused on cobalt-rich manganese crusts from seamounts. Since the mid-1980s, a number of new players have committed themselves to long-term programs to establish the viability of mining deep-sea manganese nodules. These programs require heavy subsidy by host governments. Gold-rich submarine hydrothermal deposits located at convergent plate margins are now emerging as a more promising prospect for mining than deep-sea manganese deposits.

  19. Physical properties and constraints of hydrothermal plumes on the Gakkel Ridge during AGAVE 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsor, P.; Liljebladh, B.; Edmonds, H. N.; Stranne, C.; Nakamura, K.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Tupper, G.; Upchurch, L.

    2007-12-01

    The unique hydrographic characteristics of the Arctic Ocean have important implications for the dynamical behavior of hydrothermal plumes. Some of the main issues include the weak density stratification of the deep bottom layer, topographical effects from a deep axial valley, and high-latitude tides. We address these issues using analytical and numerical models, and comparing the results to hydrographic water column plume data acquired during the Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) from July 1 to August 10, 2007. A total of 36 CTD casts were conducted from the icebreaker Oden at two main sites (85N 7E and 85N 85E), where different modes of hydrothermal circulation appear to generate different kinds of water column plumes. Several plume signals of varying thickness and rise height above the bottom were observed, which implies that several seafloor sources with distinct discharge characteristics were active during the surveys. We use our models to constrain the character of the seafloor sources, and discuss observational strategies for future field work aimed at locating and mapping hydrothermal sources in the deep Arctic.

  20. Iron persistence in a distal hydrothermal plume supported by dissolved-particulate exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; John, Seth G.; Marsay, Christopher M.; Hoffman, Colleen L.; Nicholas, Sarah L.; Toner, Brandy M.; German, Christopher R.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrothermally sourced dissolved metals have been recorded in all ocean basins. In the oceans' largest known hydrothermal plume, extending westwards across the Pacific from the Southern East Pacific Rise, dissolved iron and manganese were shown by the GEOTRACES program to be transported halfway across the Pacific. Here, we report that particulate iron and manganese in the same plume also exceed background concentrations, even 4,000 km from the vent source. Both dissolved and particulate iron deepen by more than 350 m relative to 3He--a non-reactive tracer of hydrothermal input--crossing isopycnals. Manganese shows no similar descent. Individual plume particle analyses indicate that particulate iron occurs within low-density organic matrices, consistent with its slow sinking rate of 5-10 m yr-1. Chemical speciation and isotopic composition analyses reveal that particulate iron consists of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides, whereas dissolved iron consists of nanoparticulate Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and an organically complexed iron phase. The descent of plume-dissolved iron is best explained by reversible exchange onto slowly sinking particles, probably mediated by organic compounds binding iron. We suggest that in ocean regimes with high particulate iron loadings, dissolved iron fluxes may depend on the balance between stabilization in the dissolved phase and the reversibility of exchange onto sinking particles.

  1. 声学法深海热液速度场测量重建算法研究%Reconstruction algorithm for acoustic measurement of velocity field of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白燕; 毛洁; 樊炜; 潘华辰; 刘云峰

    2011-01-01

    介绍了利用声学法测量深海热液速度场的基本原理.利用往返飞渡时间差与流场速度的关系,应用反问题求解技术重建测量区域的速度场.应用最小二乘法对两种典型的热液口速度场模型进行了仿真重建,分析了换能器数量、实验测量误差以及换能器的布放对重建结果的影响,并对重建结果进行了流量分析.仿真重建的绝对误差、相对误差以及流量分析结果表明,最小二乘法具有较高重建精度,增加声学换能器及细化网格可提高重建精度,换能器对称分布时具有最优重建结果.最后对声学法深海热液温度场速度场测量系统进行了介绍和说明.深海热液速度场的测量重建可为热液热通量的测量奠定基础.%The basic theory of acoustic velocity field measurement in deep-sea hydrothermal vents was introduced.The time of flight (TOF) of acoustic signals through hydrothermal vents was dependent on temperature and velocity.The velocity field was reconstructed by inverse problem solving techniques based on the relationship between the round-trip TOF difference and velocity of flow. The reconstruction of velocity field using the least square method was presented. At the same time, flow flux of reconstruction results was analyzed. The results show that the least square method has good accuracy. Increase of the number of acoustic transducers and mesh density can improve the reconstruction accuracy effectively.

  2. Mapping the deep sea floor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    By the early 20th century, oceanographers intensified their efforts to map the deep sea. The great depth of the Philippine Trench was first observed by the German Planet Expedition in 1912. During World War II, the US naval vessel Cape Johnson used directional echo-sounding to obtain a depth of 10......,497 m. In 1951, the Danish Galathea Deep Sea Expedition from 1950 to 1952 verified the result of the Cape Johnson sounding. Today, the greatest depth in the Philippine Trench is the Galathea Depth of 10,540 m. The Galathea Expedition produced several echograms of the deepest parts of the Philippine...... Trench in order to map its bathymetric features. The resulting maps are presented in this poster. Unlike many other contemporary developments in deep sea topography and cartography that were shaped by the Cold War, the Galathea maps of the Philippine Trench were intimately connected with the expedition...

  3. The geochemistry of seawater neodymium isotopes in the TAG hydrothermal plume at the Mid Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichel, T.; Pahnke, K.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hartman, A. E.; Scher, H.

    2012-12-01

    Neodymium (Nd) isotopes are useful tracers for ocean circulation and trace metal cycling. However, there are many unknowns regarding the input mechanisms and removal processes, which need to be understood in order to utilize this tracer optimally. For example, there is only one published study of Nd isotopes in ocean ridge hydrothermal vent fluids and nearby seawater [1]. Rare earth elements (REE) patterns hydrothermal particles in earlier studies indicate a net removal of these elements [2]. However, the degree that this process impacts the dissolved REE budget, and whether there is isotopic exchange between the Nd in particulates and in seawater, is still largely unconstrained. We present new results on the distribution of Nd isotopes and Nd concentrations ([Nd]) from the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal vent field located at 26.14°N, 44.83°W and 3800 m water depth. The plume was detected by elevated particle density between 400 m and 600 m above the seafloor. The dominant water mass around TAG is North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). First results show that Nd isotopes and [Nd] at about 200 m below the plume do not significantly deviate from overlying NADW. The Nd isotope composition of seawater here is ɛNd = -12.3 (±0.8). This value is identical to the lower NADW in this part of the Atlantic, and to the ɛNd value measured above the plume at 2100 m water depth with ɛNd = -12.2 (±0.3). We observe a higher [Nd] of 21.7 pmol/kg below the plume at 3600 m compared to 17.1 pmol/kg above the plume at 2100 m. At other open Atlantic sites, [Nd] are between 21 and 22 pmol/kg at this depth and thus reflecting typical values. We therefore conclude that the pronounced hydrothermal activity at the TAG field does not significantly influence Nd isotope ratios nor Nd concentrations in seawater directly over- and underlying the plume. More detailed analyses from within the actual plume will be carried out and presented to further address processes involved here

  4. High resolution mapping of hydrothermal plumes in the Mariana back-arc relate seafloor sources to above-bottom plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. L.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Merle, S. G.; Kaiser, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Mariana backarc spreading center between 12.9°-18°N was systematically explored for hydrothermal activity in Nov-Dec 2015 (R/V Falkor cruise FK151121) by conducting long distance along-axis CTD tows (vertical range was 20-600 meters above bottom (mab)) followed by higher resolution, horizontal grid AUV Sentry surveys at 70 mab in some of the areas where plumes were found. In those areas, the combination of along-axis CTD tows and near-bottom AUV surveys provides a nearly 3-dimensional view of the above-bottom plume relative to the seafloor morphology and potential sources. In addition, photo surveys were run at 5 mab at two of the sites. At 15.4°N, strong ORP anomalies (ΔE=-39 mv) with weak to absent optical signals were aligned with a new (ROV dives in May 2016. At 18°N, anomalies seen in the 11 km2 AUV survey were generally located along the axis of the spreading center and, with one exception, were limited to areas of previously-known (1987) venting. The plume in the water column over the Burke vent site was defined by both particle (dNTU=0.010) and ORP (ΔE=-11 mv) anomalies from 400-800 mab, but only ORP signals 120-400 mab. ORP signals were seen over the other sites without any optical anomalies; the much lower rise heights (200-400 mab) suggest only lower temperature, diffuse venting persists at these sites.

  5. Monitoring Endeavour vent field deep-sea ecosystem dynamics through NEPTUNE Canada seafloor observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matabos, M.; NC Endeavour Science Team

    2010-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridges are dynamic systems where the complex linkages between geological, biological, chemical, and physical processes are not yet well understood. Indeed, the poor accessibility to the marine environment has greatly limited our understanding of deep-sea ecosystems. Undersea cabled observatories offer the power and bandwidth required to conduct long-term and high-resolution time-series observations of the seafloor. Investigations of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal ecosystem require interdisciplinary studies to better understand the dynamics of vent communities and the physico-chemical forces that influence them. NEPTUNE Canada (NC) regional observatory is located in the Northeast Pacific, off Vancouver Island (BC, Canada), and spans ecological environments from the beach to the abyss. In September-October 2010, NC will be instrumenting its 5th node, including deployment of a multi-disciplinary suite of instruments in two vent fields on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. These include a digital camera, an imaging sonar for vent plumes and flow characteristics (i.e. COVIS), temperature resistivity probes, a water sampler and seismometers. In 2011, the TEMPO-mini, a new custom-designed camera and sensor package created by IFREMER for real-time monitoring of hydrothermal faunal assemblages and their ecosystems (Sarrazin et al. 2007), and a microbial incubator, will added to the network in the Main Endeavour and Mothra vent fields. This multidisciplinary approach will involve a scientific community from different institutions and countries. Significant experience aids in this installation. For example, video systems connected to VENUS and NC have led to the development of new experimental protocols for time-series observations using seafloor cameras, including sampling design, camera calibration and image analysis methodologies (see communication by Aron et al. and Robert et al.). Similarly, autonomous deployment of many of the planned instruments

  6. Mapping of Hydrothermal Plumes on the Gakkel Ridge During AGAVE 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, H. N.; Winsor, P.; Nakamura, K.; Liljebladh, B.; Upchurch, L. M.; Stranne, C.; Tupper, G.; Jakuba, M.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T. M.; Singh, H.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    During the Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition in July and August, 2007, hydrothermal plumes were located and mapped in two distinct regions of the Gakkel Ridge, using both a CTD-rosette and the AUV PUMA, deployed from the icebreaker Oden and equipped with optical (backscatter and transmission) and redox (Eh) sensors in addition to standard CTD instrumentation. CTD casts were conducted in two modes, standard vertical casts and "drift-yo's", which are analogous to tow-yos but whose speed and direction are determined by the ice drift rather than purposeful movement of the ship. At 7.5 degrees east, two MAPR profiles separated by about 10 km in 2001 showed sharp anomalies in temperature and optical backscatter at about 2800 m water depth. We conducted 16 CTD casts in this region, successfully relocating the plume at 2800 m and finding it to be confined to a narrow (approximately 800 m wide in the across-axis direction), along-axis flow. While the amplitude and smoothness of the temperature and backscatter profiles varied with location indicating relative proximity to the source of the plume, no Eh anomalies were observed nor was a seafloor source located. At the volcanically active 85 degrees E site, a total of 20 CTD casts and drifts, and 3 PUMA dives identified at least 6 different plumes, that can be differentiated based on their depths, spatial variability, and/or the strength and nature of the various signals obtained, but again no seafloor source was localized.

  7. Europa's Ocean Can Be Sustained By Hydrothermal Plumes and Salt Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, B. J.; Palguta, J.; Schubert, G.

    2011-12-01

    Data returned by the Galileo spacecraft provide considerable evidence that Jupiter's satellite Europa possesses a liquid ocean beneath its solid, icy outer shell. However, it is not known if that ocean has existed throughout Europa's history. Previous thermal evolution models of Europa suggest that without active tidal dissipative heating (TDH), a global liquid ocean layer would eventually freeze long before the present. However, previous models have not coupled all the various thermal and flow processes that may be operating in Europa. Recently, we have developed a whole-moon numerical model for Europa. This model couples radiogenic heating, thermal diffusion, hydrothermal convection and salt transport in mantle pore water, hydrothermal flow and transport in an ocean layer, parameterized convection in the ice shell, and change of phase between ice and liquid water. Application of our model suggests that, even without TDH active until recently, hydrothermal convection in a salty, rocky mantle can sustain flow in an ocean layer throughout Europa's post-differentiation history. The model thermal history covers three phases: (i) an initial, roughly 0.5 Gyr-long period of radiogenic heating and differentiation, (ii) a long period from 0.5 Gyr to 4 Gyr with continuing radiogenic heating but no TDH (following Yoder, Nature 279: 767-770, 1979), and (iii) a final period covering the last 0.5 Gyr until present day, during which TDH is active. In our model, hydrothermal plumes develop throughout phases II and III, transporting heat and salt from Europa's silicate mantle to its ocean. The outer ice shell thickens over time, growing to about 75 km in depth. When TDH becomes active, the ice shell melts quickly to a thickness of about 10 km, and then stabilizes at roughly 20 to 25 km thickness, leaving an ocean 80 km deep. Parameterized convection in the ice shell is spatially non-uniform and changes over time, reflecting its ties to the evolving deeper ocean-mantle dynamics. A

  8. Deep-sea fungi: Occurrence and adaptations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.

    in it being the least understood environments on the earth. The understanding of deep sea will unravel a lot of exciting information about the history of life existing on earth. The deep sea was thought to be a very difficult environment for life forms.... Danovaro R, Fabiano M, Della Croce N (1995) Labile organic matter and microbial biomasses in deep-sea sediments (Eastern Mediterranean Sea). Deep-Sea Research I, 40: 953-65. DasSarma S, Arora P (2001) Halophiles. Encyclopedia of Life Sciences. Macmillan...

  9. Helium-3 and Manganese in Hydrothermal Plumes Along the Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. W.; Connelly, D. P.; German, C. R.; Lupton, J. E.; Michael, P. J.; Edmonds, H. N.

    2002-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge is the slowest spreading end-member of the global ocean ridge system. It thus represents a key locality for investigating hydrothermal activity, both as it relates to spreading rate, magma flux and tectonics, and for its potential impact on Arctic Ocean chemistry and biogeography. We report new helium, manganese and hydrographic results for a reconnaissance survey of ~1100 km of the western Gakkel Ridge between 2°W and 85°E. Six CTD stations were completed during AMORE (the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Expedition), a geological sampling and seafloor mapping expedition carried out jointly by American and German scientists, in August-October 2001 aboard the icebreakers USCGC Healy and PFS Polarstern. CTD station locations were targeted using water column light-scattering and temperature profiles, obtained during the dredging operations using Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorders (MAPRs) supplied by Ed Baker (NOAA/PMEL). Hydrothermal plumes were discovered at several localities, most notably at 37.0°E, 43.2°E and 84.9°E, all of which are near the summits of axial volcanoes. The last site is significant in light of its seismic activity during 1999, possibly associated with a volcanic eruption. A very large plume, >1000 m thick, was observed in the 85°E region, with δ3He ranging up to 40% and total dissolvable [Mn] up to 10 nmol/kg. Combined with a temperature anomaly of ~0.05°C, the 3He/heat ratio is 5x10-13 std-cm3/g per cal at 85°E, similar to megaplumes discovered along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and to smaller plumes observed along the East Pacific Rise that appear to represent "equilibrium" conditions. In contrast, at 43.2°E a plume ~350 m thick has δ3He up to 85% while [Mn] ranges up to 3 nmol/kg. The 3He/heat ratio at 43.2°E is 2x10-12 std-cm3/g per cal, equivalent to the theoretical ratio for Earth's upper mantle having 3He/4He=8 RA, U=5 ppb and Th/U=2.5. These 3He, heat and Mn characteristics at 43.2°E are similar to those observed

  10. Detection of methane plumes in the water column of Logatchev hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU HuaiYang; WU ZiJun; PENG XiaoTong; JIANG Lei; TANG Song

    2007-01-01

    During DY105-17 cruise onboard the R/V "Da Yang Yi Hao" in 2005, methane concentrations in the water column above Logachev hydrothermal vent field were measured by applying stripping/trapping-gas chromatographic (GC) and the distinct methane plumes were detected. Results show that the background methane concentration within the Logachev area is from 1.05 nmol/L to 1.68 nmol/L, significantly higher than the background level of the Atlantic abyssal plain of 0.4-0.5 nmol/L, suggesting that hydrothermal venting is a major source of dissolved methane to the ocean. The highest anomalies of methane concentrations in the water column range from 7.14 nmol/L to 113.9 nmol/L and occur just at 180-500 m above the seafloor. The distribution of methane concentration and the structural characteristics of hydrothermal plumes are strongly influenced by the supply of underlying hydrothermal fluids, the mixing process of ocean bottom currents and the microbial oxidation. Furthermore, the differences in distribution of methane plume between the station MAR-CTD3 and the other stations indicate a probable unknown hydrothermal vent site nearby. There occurs high concentration of methane along with temperature and nephelometry anomalies, which strongly confirms that the subtle measurement of methane concentration in water column is one of the effective ways to locate active sites of hydrothermal venting.

  11. [Microbial diversity of deep-sea extremophiles--Piezophiles, Hyperthermophiles, and subsurface microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, C; Takai, K

    2000-12-01

    Knowledge of our Planet's biosphere has increased tremendously during the last 10 to 20 years. In the field of Microbiology in particular, scientists have discovered novel "extremophiles", microorganisms capable of living in extreme environments such as highly acidic or alkaline conditions, at high salt concentration, with no oxygen, extreme temperatures (as low as -20 degrees C and as high as 300 degrees C), at high concentrations of heavy metals and in high pressure environments such as the deep-sea. It is apparent that microorganisms can exist in any extreme environment of the Earth, yet already scientists have started to look for life on other planets; the so-called "Exobiology" project. But as yet we have little knowledge of the deep-sea and subsurface biosphere of our own planet. We believe that we should elucidate the Biodiversity of Earth more thoroughly before exploring life on other planets, and these attempts would provide deeper insight into clarifying the existence of extraterrestrial life. We focused on two deep-sea extremophiles in this article; one is "Piezophiles", and another is "Hyperthermophiles". Piezophiles are typical microorganisms adapted to high-pressure and cold temperature environments, and located in deep-sea bottom. Otherwise, hyperthermophiles are living in high temperature environment, and located at around the hydrothermal vent systems in deep-sea. They are not typical deep-sea microorganisms, but they can grow well at high-pressure condition, just like piezophiles. Deming and Baross mentioned that most of the hyperthermophilic archaea isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents are able to grow under conditions of high temperature and pressure, and in most cases their optimal pressure for growth was greater than the environmental pressure they were isolated from. It is possible that originally their native environment may have been deeper than the sea floor and that there had to be a deeper biosphere. This implication suggests that

  12. NESTOR Deep Sea Neutrino Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    NESTOR Collaboration; Aggouras, G.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Ball, A. E.; Bourlis, G.; Chinowsky, W.; Fahrun, E.; Grammatikakis, G.; Green, C.; Grieder, P.; Katrivanos, P.; Koske, P.; Leisos, A.; Markopoulos, E.; Minkowsky, P.; Nygren, D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Przybylski, G.; Resvanis, L. K.; Siotis, I.; Sopher, J.; Staveris-Polikalas, A.; Tsagli, V.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Zhukov, V. A.

    2006-01-01

    One module of NESTOR, the Mediterranean deep-sea neutrino telescope, was deployed at a depth of 4000m, 14km off the Sapienza Island, off the South West coast of Greece. The deployment site provides excellent environmental characteristics. The deployed NESTOR module is constructed as a hexagonal star like latticed titanium star with 12 Optical Modules and an one-meter diameter titanium sphere which houses the electronics. Power and data were transferred through a 30km electro-optical cable to the shore laboratory. In this report we describe briefly the detector and the detector electronics and discuss the first physics data acquired and give the zenith angular distribution of the reconstructed muons.

  13. Microplastic pollution in deep-sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Vanreusel, Ann; Mees, Jan; Janssen, Colin R

    2013-11-01

    Microplastics are small plastic particles (microplastics have been accumulating in the marine environment for decades and have been detected throughout the water column and in sublittoral and beach sediments worldwide. However, up to now, it has never been established whether microplastic presence in sediments is limited to accumulation hot spots such as the continental shelf, or whether they are also present in deep-sea sediments. Here we show, for the first time ever, that microplastics have indeed reached the most remote of marine environments: the deep sea. We found plastic particles sized in the micrometre range in deep-sea sediments collected at four locations representing different deep-sea habitats ranging in depth from 1100 to 5000 m. Our results demonstrate that microplastic pollution has spread throughout the world's seas and oceans, into the remote and largely unknown deep sea.

  14. Chemosynthesis in the deep-sea: life without the sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Smith

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemosynthetic communities in the deep-sea can be found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, whale falls and wood falls. While these communities have been suggested to exist in isolation from solar energy, much of the life associated with them relies either directly or indirectly on photosynthesis in the surface waters of the oceans. The sun indirectly provides oxygen, a byproduct of photosynthesis, which aerobic chemosynthetic microorganisms require to synthesize organic carbon from CO2. Planktonic life stages of many vent and cold seep invertebrates also directly feed on photosynthetically produced organic matter as they disperse to new vent and seep systems. While a large portion of the life at deep-sea chemosynthetic habitats can be linked to the sun and so could not survive without it, a small portion of anaerobically chemosynthetic microorganisms can persist in its absence. These small and exotic organisms have developed a way of life in the deep-sea which involves the use of resources originating in their entirety from terrestrial sources.

  15. Trace Metal and Sulfur Dynamics in the First Meter of Buoyant Hydrothermal Vent Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, A.; Gartman, A.; Shaw, T. J.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of metals and metal sulfides within the buoyant plume is critical to determining the ultimate fate of metals emitted from hydrothermal vents. The concentration, size fractionation, and partitioning of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb) were determined within the first meter of the rising plume at three vent fields (TAG, Snakepit, and Rainbow) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Rainbow, total Fe concentrations exceed total sulfide concentrations by an order of magnitude, whereas at the other two sites, total Fe and total sulfide concentrations are nearly equal. At all three sites, Mn and Fe are primarily in the filtered (metals present in pyrite and chalcopyrite in both unfiltered and filtered samples. Significant portions of unfiltered Cu and Co were extracted in HNO3, whereas unfiltered Zn, Cd, and Pb were extracted in HCl. Up to 95 % of filtered Cu, Co, and Zn, up to 80% Cd, and up to 60 % Pb are only extractable in HNO3, indicating that a significant portion of metals < 0.2 μm are incorporated into a recalcitrant fraction such as nanoparticulate pyrite or chalcopyrite.

  16. Genomic and population genetic analysis of deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S.; Shimamura, S.; Takaki, Y.; Mino, S.; Makita, H.; Sawabe, T.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea vents are the light-independent, highly productive ecosystems driven primarily by chemoautotrophs. Most of the invertebrates thrive there through their relationship with symbiotic chemoautotrophs. Chemoautotrophs are microorganisms that are able to fix inorganic carbon using a chemical energy obtained through the oxidation of reduced compounds. Following the discovery of deep-sea vent ecosystems in 1977, there has been an increasing knowledge that deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs display remarkable physiological and phylogenetic diversity. Recent microbiological studies have led to an emerging view that the majority of deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs have the ability to derive energy from multiple redox couples other than the conventional sulfur-oxygen couple. Genomic, metagenomic and postgenomic studies have considerably accelerated the comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms of deep-sea vent chemoautotrophy, even in unculturable endosymbionts of vent fauna. For example, genomic analysis suggested that there were previously unrecognized evolutionary links between deep-sea vent chemoautotrophs and important human/animal pathogens. However, relatively little is known about the genome of horizontally transmitted endosymbionts. In this study, we sequenced whole genomes of the probably horizontally transmitted endosymbionts of two different gastropod species from a deep-sea hydrothermal field, as an effort to address questions about 1) the genome evolution of horizontally transmitted, facultative endosymbionts, 2) their genomic variability, and 3) genetic differences among symbionts of various deep-sea vent invertebrates. Both endosymbiont genomes display features consistent with ongoing genome reduction such as large proportions of pseudogenes and transposable elements. The genomes encode multiple functions for chemoautotrophic respirations, probably reflecting their adaptation to their niches with continuous changes in environmental conditions. When

  17. Deep Sea Actinomycetes and Their Secondary Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Hong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea is a unique and extreme environment. It is a hot spot for hunting marine actinomycetes resources and secondary metabolites. The novel deep sea actinomycete species reported from 2006 to 2016 including 21 species under 13 genera with the maximum number from Microbacterium, followed by Dermacoccus, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora, and one novel species for the other 9 genera. Eight genera of actinomycetes were reported to produce secondary metabolites, among which Streptomyces is the richest producer. Most of the compounds produced by the deep sea actinomycetes presented antimicrobial and anti-cancer cell activities. Gene clusters related to biosynthesis of desotamide, heronamide, and lobophorin have been identified from the deep sea derived Streptomyces.

  18. Methods in mooring deep sea sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Fernando, V.; Rajaraman, V.S.; Janakiraman, G.

    The experience gained during the process of deployment and retrieval of nearly 39 sets of deep sea sediment trap moorings on various ships like FS Sonne, ORV Sagarkanya and DSV Nand Rachit are outlined. The various problems encountered...

  19. Temperature Impacts on Deep-Sea Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, M.; Danovaro, R.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature is considered to be a fundamental factor controlling biodiversity in marine ecosystems, but precisely what role temperature plays in modulating diversity is still not clear. The deep ocean, lacking light and in situ photosynthetic primary production, is an ideal model system to test the effects of temperature changes on biodiversity. Here we synthesize current knowledge on temperature-diversity relationships in the deep sea. Our results from both present and past deep-sea assemblages suggest that, when a wide range of deep-sea bottom-water temperatures is considered, a unimodal relationship exists between temperature and diversity (that may be right skewed). It is possible that temperature is important only when at relatively high and low levels but does not play a major role in the intermediate temperature range. Possible mechanisms explaining the temperature-biodiversity relationship include the physiological-tolerance hypothesis, the metabolic hypothesis, island biogeography theory, or some combination of these. The possible unimodal relationship discussed here may allow us to identify tipping points at which on-going global change and deep-water warming may increase or decrease deep-sea biodiversity. Predicted changes in deep-sea temperatures due to human-induced climate change may have more adverse consequences than expected considering the sensitivity of deep-sea ecosystems to temperature changes.

  20. Temperature impacts on deep-sea biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Temperature is considered to be a fundamental factor controlling biodiversity in marine ecosystems, but precisely what role temperature plays in modulating diversity is still not clear. The deep ocean, lacking light and in situ photosynthetic primary production, is an ideal model system to test the effects of temperature changes on biodiversity. Here we synthesize current knowledge on temperature-diversity relationships in the deep sea. Our results from both present and past deep-sea assemblages suggest that, when a wide range of deep-sea bottom-water temperatures is considered, a unimodal relationship exists between temperature and diversity (that may be right skewed). It is possible that temperature is important only when at relatively high and low levels but does not play a major role in the intermediate temperature range. Possible mechanisms explaining the temperature-biodiversity relationship include the physiological-tolerance hypothesis, the metabolic hypothesis, island biogeography theory, or some combination of these. The possible unimodal relationship discussed here may allow us to identify tipping points at which on-going global change and deep-water warming may increase or decrease deep-sea biodiversity. Predicted changes in deep-sea temperatures due to human-induced climate change may have more adverse consequences than expected considering the sensitivity of deep-sea ecosystems to temperature changes.

  1. 47 CFR 32.2424 - Submarine & deep sea cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submarine & deep sea cable. 32.2424 Section 32... Submarine & deep sea cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of submarine cable and deep sea... defined below, are to be maintained for nonmetallic submarine and deep sea cable and metallic...

  2. Microbiological production and ecological flux of northwestern subduction hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, M.; Okamura, K.; Noguchi, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukuba, T.; Yanagawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal system is one of the most important sources for heat and chemical flux from the oceanic crust to the global ocean. The rich biological community around the hydrothermal vent shows chemolithoautotrophic microbial production are important in deep sea ecosystems. More than 99% of microbiological available chemical components in hydrothermal vent fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane, hydrogen, Fe2+, and Mn2+, is released into surrounding seawater to construct hydrothermal plume, suggesting that the chemolithoautotrophic-microbial primary production in the hydrothermal plume is huge and important in the whole hydrothermal ecosystems. To understand the impact of hydrothermal plume to a microbial ecosystem and a connectivity with zooplankton, we targeted and investigated a total of 16 hydrothermal fileds (7 sites in Okinawa trough, 3 sites in Ogasawara arc, and 6 sites in Mariana arc and back arc) and investigated in several cruises under the TAIGA project in Japan. Hydrothermal fluids in the subduction system are rich in sulfide. The hydrothermal fluids in the Okinawa trough, Ogasawara arc. and Mariana trough are characterized by rich in methane, poor in other reduced chemicals, and rich in iron, respectively. The major microbial composition was a potential sulfur oxidizing microbes SUP05 in the plume ecosystems, while an aerobic methanotrophic bacteria was secondary major member in methane-rich hydrothermal systems in Okinawa trough. Microbial quantitative and spatial distribution analyses of each plume site showed that the microbial population size and community structures are influenced by original chemical components of hydrothermal fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane and iron concentration. Microbial quantitative data indicated the removal/sedimentation of microbial cells from the plume and effect of phase separation in a same vent field through construction of gas-rich or gas-poor plumes. After the correlation of plume mixing effect, we estimates that the

  3. From deep-sea volcanoes to human pathogens: a conserved quorum-sensing signal in Epsilonproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Bolognini, Marie; Ricci, Jessica; Bini, Elisabetta; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-05-01

    Chemosynthetic Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents colonize substrates exposed to steep thermal and redox gradients. In many bacteria, substrate attachment, biofilm formation, expression of virulence genes and host colonization are partly controlled via a cell density-dependent mechanism involving signal molecules, known as quorum sensing. Within the Epsilonproteobacteria, quorum sensing has been investigated only in human pathogens that use the luxS/autoinducer-2 (AI-2) mechanism to control the expression of some of these functions. In this study we showed that luxS is conserved in Epsilonproteobacteria and that pathogenic and mesophilic members of this class inherited this gene from a thermophilic ancestor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the luxS gene is expressed--and a quorum-sensing signal is produced--during growth of Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Caminibacter mediatlanticus, two Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Finally, we detected luxS transcripts in Epsilonproteobacteria-dominated biofilm communities collected from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Taken together, our findings indicate that the epsiloproteobacterial lineage of the LuxS enzyme originated in high-temperature geothermal environments and that, in vent Epsilonproteobacteria, luxS expression is linked to the production of AI-2 signals, which are likely produced in situ at deep-sea vents. We conclude that the luxS gene is part of the ancestral epsilonproteobacterial genome and represents an evolutionary link that connects thermophiles to human pathogens.

  4. Deep-sea pollen research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiangjun; LUO Yunli; CHEN Huaicheng

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly presents the progress of deep-sea pollen research in China since the beginning ofninetieths of the last Century. All the deep-sea pollen contri-butions mainly come from the South China Sea (SCS) andthe East China Sea (ECS). The German-Chinese joint cruise(Sonne 95) and ODP 184 cruise initiated by Chinese scientistsin the SCS provided excellent material for the deep-sea pol-len research. So far a number of pollen results of 20-30 kaand million years from the SCS have been published. A couple of deep-sea pollen records from Okinawa Through of the ECS also came out. The high resolution pollen records obtained from the continuous deposits with high sedimentation rates and reliable age control of the deep-sea sediments provided a high time resolution history (hundred to millennial scales) of vegetation, environment and monsoon evolution of the pollen source areas (southern China and Japan). Spectral analysis of deep-sea pollen records from the SCS discovered orbital (100, 41, 23, 10 ka) and suborbital cyclicities (Heinrich and Dansgaard/Oscheger-O/D events) in the vege-tation changes. Moreover, cross spectral analysis showed that the trend of vegetation changes in northern SCS was regulated mainly by changes of the ice volume in the Northern Hemisphere. The pollen record of the last 20 ka from the Okinawa Through of the ECS indicates that the marine environmental change lagged that on the terrestrail by about 1000 year. The asynchronous environmental changes between land and sea were probably caused by the time difference in thermohaline circulation. This study underscored the role of the deep-sea plant fossils as a bridge across the land and sea.

  5. Delta-proteobacterial SAR324 group in hydrothermal plumes on the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Huiluo

    2016-03-08

    In the dark ocean, the SAR324 group of Delta-proteobacteria has been associated with a chemolithotrophic lifestyle. However, their electron transport chain for energy generation and information system has not yet been well characterized. In the present study, four SAR324 draft genomes were extracted from metagenomes sampled from hydrothermal plumes in the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We describe novel electron transport chain components in the SAR324 group, particularly the alternative complex III, which is involved in energy generation. Moreover, we propose that the C-type cytochrome, for example the C553, may play a novel role in electron transfer, adding to our knowledge regarding the energy generation process in the SAR324 cluster. The central carbon metabolism in the described SAR324 genomes exhibits several new features other than methanotrophy e.g. aromatic compound degradation. This suggests that methane oxidation may not be the main central carbon metabolism component in SAR324 cluster bacteria. The reductive acetyl-CoA pathway may potentially be essential in carbon fixation due to the absence of components from the Calvin-Benson cycle. Our study provides insight into the role of recombination events in shaping the genome of the SAR324 group based on a larger number of repeat regions observed, which has been overlooked thus far.

  6. Deep-sea benthic footprint of the deepwater horizon blowout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Montagna

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurred on April 20, 2010 at a water depth of 1525 meters, and a deep-sea plume was detected within one month. Oil contacted and persisted in parts of the bottom of the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the response to the accident, monitoring cruises were deployed in fall 2010 to measure potential impacts on the two main soft-bottom benthic invertebrate groups: macrofauna and meiofauna. Sediment was collected using a multicorer so that samples for chemical, physical and biological analyses could be taken simultaneously and analyzed using multivariate methods. The footprint of the oil spill was identified by creating a new variable with principal components analysis where the first factor was indicative of the oil spill impacts and this new variable mapped in a geographic information system to identify the area of the oil spill footprint. The most severe relative reduction of faunal abundance and diversity extended to 3 km from the wellhead in all directions covering an area about 24 km(2. Moderate impacts were observed up to 17 km towards the southwest and 8.5 km towards the northeast of the wellhead, covering an area 148 km(2. Benthic effects were correlated to total petroleum hydrocarbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and barium concentrations, and distance to the wellhead; but not distance to hydrocarbon seeps. Thus, benthic effects are more likely due to the oil spill, and not natural hydrocarbon seepage. Recovery rates in the deep sea are likely to be slow, on the order of decades or longer.

  7. Deep-Sea Benthic Footprint of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Paul A.; Baguley, Jeffrey G.; Cooksey, Cynthia; Hartwell, Ian; Hyde, Larry J.; Hyland, Jeffrey L.; Kalke, Richard D.; Kracker, Laura M.; Reuscher, Michael; Rhodes, Adelaide C. E.

    2013-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurred on April 20, 2010 at a water depth of 1525 meters, and a deep-sea plume was detected within one month. Oil contacted and persisted in parts of the bottom of the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the response to the accident, monitoring cruises were deployed in fall 2010 to measure potential impacts on the two main soft-bottom benthic invertebrate groups: macrofauna and meiofauna. Sediment was collected using a multicorer so that samples for chemical, physical and biological analyses could be taken simultaneously and analyzed using multivariate methods. The footprint of the oil spill was identified by creating a new variable with principal components analysis where the first factor was indicative of the oil spill impacts and this new variable mapped in a geographic information system to identify the area of the oil spill footprint. The most severe relative reduction of faunal abundance and diversity extended to 3 km from the wellhead in all directions covering an area about 24 km2. Moderate impacts were observed up to 17 km towards the southwest and 8.5 km towards the northeast of the wellhead, covering an area 148 km2. Benthic effects were correlated to total petroleum hydrocarbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and barium concentrations, and distance to the wellhead; but not distance to hydrocarbon seeps. Thus, benthic effects are more likely due to the oil spill, and not natural hydrocarbon seepage. Recovery rates in the deep sea are likely to be slow, on the order of decades or longer. PMID:23950956

  8. Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Bougouffa, Salim

    2013-03-29

    Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.

  9. New insights into diversity and evolution of deep-sea Mytilidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, Julien; Buge, Barbara; Cruaud, Corinne; Samadi, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Bathymodiolinae mussels have been used as a biological model to better understand the evolutionary origin of faunas associated with deep-sea hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. Most studies to date, however, have sampled with a strong bias towards vent and seep species, mainly because of a lack of knowledge of closely related species from organic falls. Here we reassess the species diversity of deep-sea mussels using two genes and a large taxon sample from the South-Western Pacific. This new taxonomic framework serves as a basis for a phylogenetic investigation of their evolutionary history. We first highlight an unexpected allopatric pattern and suggest that mussels usually reported from organic falls are in fact poorly specialized with regard to their environment. This challenges the adaptive scenarios proposed to explain the diversification of the group. Second, we confirm that deep-sea mussels arose from organic falls and then colonized hydrothermal vents and cold seeps in multiple events. Overall, this study constitutes a new basis for further phylogenetic investigations and a global systematic revision of deep-sea mussels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 深海热液口化能合成共生作用的研究进展%Research Progress of the Chemosynthetic Symbioses in the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘昕明; 林荣澄; 黄丁勇

    2013-01-01

    海洋无脊椎动物和细菌间的化能合成共生作用的发现,改变了人们对深海热液口初级生产力主要来源的认知.近年的研究表明,营化能合成共生的动物隶属于纤毛门、软体动物门、环节动物门和节肢动物门;其中无脊椎动物作为宿主在与共生菌的长期共生过程中,伴随着部分器官和功能的退化或消失,逐渐形成和演化出了与此相适应的形态结构,并产生了一些特殊的行为;在深海热液口发现的所有化能合成共生菌都属于革兰氏阴性菌,它们的宿主大致可以分为2个群体;通过16 SrRNA基因编码分析,不同代谢类型的共生菌在系统发育中通常处于不同分支,形态也有所差异;共生菌独特的传播方式和进化模式也使其更加适应共生生活;由无脊椎动物和化能合成细菌构成的共生体系与环境相互作用,影响了深海热液口生态系统的演化.对共生菌蛋白质及代谢组学的研究,以及对宿主生理和代谢机制的研究将成为未来热液口化能合成共生作用研究的新热点.%The discovery of the chemosynthetic symbioses between marine invertebrates and bacteria revolutionized our understanding of the energy sources that fuel primary productivity in the deep sea.Chemosynthetic host were classified within four major group including Ciliophora,Mollusca,Annelida and Arthropoda; Symbiotic invertebrates with anatomical adaptations of chemosynthetic associations are usually characterized by rudimentary or absent digestive system.Effective behavioural and physiological strategies are also used by animals to supply their symbionts with both reductants and oxidants.All the symbionts are Gram negative bacteria,and clustered in two different branches related to symbiont type in the phylogenetic tree based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences,distinct differences in morphology were also observed between the two groups.The transmission and evolution strategy utilized

  11. Climate Change Affects Deep Sea Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emma Marris; 秦春雨

    2004-01-01

    @@ The remote and lightless deep-sea floor has long been thought to be protected from events on the surface, such as global warming. But it now seems that climate change impinges on the rhythm of life on the seabed after all.

  12. The first microbiological contamination assessment by deep-sea drilling and coring by the D/V Chikyu at the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough (IODP Expedition 331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori eYanagawa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 331 at the Iheya North hydrothermal system in the Mid-Okinawa Trough by the D/V Chikyu, we conducted microbiological contamination tests of the drilling and coring operations. The contamination from the drilling mud fluids was assessed using both perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT and fluorescent microsphere beads. PFT infiltration was detected from the periphery of almost all whole round cores. By contrast, fluorescent microspheres were not detected in hydrothermally active core samples, possibly due to thermal decomposition of the microspheres under high-temperature conditions. Microbial contamination from drilling mud fluids to the core interior subsamples was further characterized by molecular-based evaluation. The microbial 16S rRNA gene phylotype compositions in the drilling mud fluids were mainly composed of sequences of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and not archaeal sequences. The phylotypes that displayed more than 97% similarity to the sequences obtained from the drilling mud fluids were defined as possible contaminants in this study and were detected as minor components of the bacterial phylotype compositions in 13 of 37 core samples. The degree of microbiological contamination was consistent with that determined by the PFT and/or microsphere assessments. This study suggests a constructive approach for evaluation and eliminating microbial contamination during riser-less drilling and coring operations by the D/V Chikyu.

  13. The first microbiological contamination assessment by deep-sea drilling and coring by the D/V Chikyu at the Iheya North hydrothermal field in the Mid-Okinawa Trough (IODP Expedition 331).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Nunoura, Takuro; McAllister, Sean M; Hirai, Miho; Breuker, Anja; Brandt, Leah; House, Christopher H; Moyer, Craig L; Birrien, Jean-Louis; Aoike, Kan; Sunamura, Michinari; Urabe, Tetsuro; Mottl, Michael J; Takai, Ken

    2013-01-01

    During the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 331 at the Iheya North hydrothermal system in the Mid-Okinawa Trough by the D/V Chikyu, we conducted microbiological contamination tests of the drilling and coring operations. The contamination from the drilling mud fluids was assessed using both perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) and fluorescent microsphere beads. PFT infiltration was detected from the periphery of almost all whole round cores (WRCs). By contrast, fluorescent microspheres were not detected in hydrothermally active core samples, possibly due to thermal decomposition of the microspheres under high-temperature conditions. Microbial contamination from drilling mud fluids to the core interior subsamples was further characterized by molecular-based evaluation. The microbial 16S rRNA gene phylotype compositions in the drilling mud fluids were mainly composed of sequences of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and not archaeal sequences. The phylotypes that displayed more than 97% similarity to the sequences obtained from the drilling mud fluids were defined as possible contaminants in this study and were detected as minor components of the bacterial phylotype compositions in 13 of 37 core samples. The degree of microbiological contamination was consistent with that determined by the PFT and/or microsphere assessments. This study suggests a constructive approach for evaluation and eliminating microbial contamination during riser-less drilling and coring operations by the D/V Chikyu.

  14. Tectonic localization of multi-plume hydrothermal fluid flow in a segmented rift system, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. V.; Downs, D. T.; Scholz, C.; de P. S. Zuquim, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-temperature (>250°C) multi-plume hydrothermal systems occur in a range of tectonic settings, though most are extensional or transtensional. A key feature of such settings is their tendency to partition into discrete structural elements that scale with the thickness of the seismogenic zone. The late Miocene to present record of arc magmatism and rifting in the North Island of New Zealand illustrates the importance of structural segmentation and reactivation of inherited basement fabrics on the localisation of hydrothermal upflow. The 15 My record of similarly-oriented magmatism, rifting and hydrothermal activity associated with subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North Island of New Zealand. Lateral migration of the locus of arc magmatism, concomitant with roll-back of the subducting slab, is supported by the SE-directed younging of: 1) volcanism; 2) fault-controlled rift basins; and 3) hydrothermal activity, represented by the distribution of epithermal mineralisation within the ~15-3 Ma Coromandel Volcanic Zone (CVZ), and geothermal activity within the TVZ. Currently the TVZ is extending in a NW-SE direction at a rate that varies from ~3 mm/yr to ~15 mm/yr from SW to NE, respectively. The TVZ is partitioned into discrete rift segments, comprising arrays of NE-striking normal faults of ~20 km in length, as expected on mechanical grounds for the 6-8 km-thick seismogenic zone. Transfer zones between rift segments coincide with N-to-NW-trending alignments of geothermal fields, spaced ~ 30 km apart can be recognized elsewhere within the CVZ. The most productive epithermal deposits to date are localised where these inferred transfer zones intersect arc-parallel fault arrays. A similar tectonic configuration occurs in the Deseado Massif, Argentinian Patagonia, where interplay between transfer and rift faults is inferred to have localized hydrothermal fluids in small pull-apart basins and arrays of extension veins for durations >30 My.

  15. Correlated patterns in hydrothermal plume distribution and apparent magmatic budget along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Edward T.; Hémond, Christophe; Briais, Anne; Maia, Marcia; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Walker, Sharon L.; Wang, Tingting; Chen, Yongshun John

    2014-08-01

    geological processes affect the distribution of hydrothermal venting along a mid-ocean ridge. Deciphering the role of a specific process is often frustrated by simultaneous changes in other influences. Here we take advantage of the almost constant spreading rate (65-71 mm/yr) along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 77°E and 99°E to examine the spatial density of hydrothermal venting relative to regional and segment-scale changes in the apparent magmatic budget. We use 227 vertical profiles of light backscatter and (on 41 profiles) oxidation-reduction potential along 27 first and second-order ridge segments on and adjacent to the Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) Plateau to map ph, the fraction of casts detecting a plume. At the regional scale, venting on the five segments crossing the magma-thickened hot spot plateau is almost entirely suppressed (ph = 0.02). Conversely, the combined ph (0.34) from all other segments follows the global trend of ph versus spreading rate. Off the ASP Plateau, multisegment trends in ph track trends in the regional axial depth, high where regional depth increases and low where it decreases. At the individual segment scale, a robust correlation between ph and cross-axis inflation for first-order segments shows that different magmatic budgets among first-order segments are expressed as different levels of hydrothermal spatial density. This correlation is absent among second-order segments. Eighty-five percent of the plumes occur in eight clusters totaling ˜350 km. We hypothesize that these clusters are a minimum estimate of the length of axial melt lenses underlying this section of the SEIR.

  16. Virtual Investigations of an Active Deep Sea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter, L.; Taylor, M. M.; Fundis, A.; Kelley, D. S.; Elend, M.

    2013-12-01

    Axial Seamount, located on the Juan de Fuca spreading ridge 300 miles off the Oregon coast, is an active volcano whose summit caldera lies 1500 m beneath the sea surface. Ongoing construction of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) cabled observatory by the University of Washington (funded by the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative) has allowed for exploration of recent lava flows and active hydrothermal vents using HD video mounted on the ROVs, ROPOS and JASON II. College level oceanography/marine geology online laboratory exercises referred to as Online Concept Modules (OCMs) have been created using video and video frame-captured mosaics to promote skill development for characterizing and quantifying deep sea environments. Students proceed at their own pace through a sequence of short movies with which they (a) gain background knowledge, (b) learn skills to identify and classify features or biota within a targeted environment, (c) practice these skills, and (d) use their knowledge and skills to make interpretations regarding the environment. Part (d) serves as the necessary assessment component of the laboratory exercise. Two Axial Seamount-focused OCMs will be presented: 1) Lava Flow Characterization: Identifying a Suitable Cable Route, and 2) Assessing Hydrothermal Vent Communities: Comparisons Among Multiple Sulfide Chimneys.

  17. Structural Geology and Tectonics in Marine Science:Perspectives in the Research of Deep Sea and Deep Interior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Sanzhong; YU Shan; JIN Chong; SUO Yanhui; M.Santosh; DAI Liming; LIU Xin; MA Yun; WANG Xiaofei; ZHANG Bingkun

    2012-01-01

    The fields of structural geology and tectonics have witnessed great progress over the last decade and are poised for further expansion in the future.One of the significant breakthroughs is the establishment of the ‘Beyond Plate Tectonics Theory’where a combination of conceptual models and numerical modeling on plume tectonics and plate tectonics has enabled new insights into the structural and tectonic architecture and processes in the deep interior and deep sea.This paper Synthesizes developments of structural geology and tectonics from a macroscopic perspective in deep interior and deep sea.Four key techniques are also reviewed:satellite altimetry for surface structures in deep-sea multi-beam sea-floor mapping;tomography for tectonics of the deep interior;diverse modeling approaches and software for unfolding dynamic evolution;and techniques for HT/HP experiments on material rheology and in situ component measurements.

  18. Adaptive radiation of chemosymbiotic deep-sea mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, Julien; Kiel, Steffen; Faure, Baptiste; Kawato, Masaru; Ho, Simon Y W; Marshall, Bruce; Tsuchida, Shinji; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2013-11-07

    Adaptive radiations present fascinating opportunities for studying the evolutionary process. Most cases come from isolated lakes or islands, where unoccupied ecological space is filled through novel adaptations. Here, we describe an unusual example of an adaptive radiation: symbiotic mussels that colonized island-like chemosynthetic environments such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and sunken organic substrates on the vast deep-sea floor. Our time-calibrated molecular phylogeny suggests that the group originated and acquired sulfur-oxidizing symbionts in the Late Cretaceous, possibly while inhabiting organic substrates and long before its major radiation in the Middle Eocene to Early Oligocene. The first appearance of intracellular and methanotrophic symbionts was detected only after this major radiation. Thus, contrary to expectations, the major radiation may have not been triggered by the evolution of novel types of symbioses. We hypothesize that environmental factors, such as increased habitat availability and/or increased dispersal capabilities, sparked the radiation. Intracellular and methanotrophic symbionts were acquired in several independent lineages and marked the onset of a second wave of diversification at vents and seeps. Changes in habitat type resulted in adaptive trends in shell lengths (related to the availability of space and energy, and physiological trade-offs) and in the successive colonization of greater water depths.

  19. Advances in taxonomy, ecology, and biogeography of Dirivultidae (copepoda associated with chemosynthetic environments in the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gollner

    Full Text Available Copepoda is one of the most prominent higher taxa with almost 80 described species at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The unique copepod family Dirivultidae with currently 50 described species is the most species rich invertebrate family at hydrothermal vents.We reviewed the literature of Dirivultidae and provide a complete key to species, and map geographical and habitat specific distribution. In addition we discuss the ecology and origin of this family.Dirivultidae are only present at deep-sea hydrothermal vents and along the axial summit trough of midocean ridges, with the exception of Dirivultus dentaneus found associated with Lamellibrachia species at 1125 m depth off southern California. To our current knowledge Dirivultidae are unknown from shallow-water vents, seeps, whale falls, and wood falls. They are a prominent part of all communities at vents and in certain habitat types (like sulfide chimneys colonized by pompei worms they are the most abundant animals. They are free-living on hard substrate, mostly found in aggregations of various foundation species (e.g. alvinellids, vestimentiferans, and bivalves. Most dirivultid species colonize more than one habitat type. Dirivultids have a world-wide distribution, but most genera and species are endemic to a single biogeographic region. Their origin is unclear yet, but immigration from other deep-sea chemosynthetic habitats (stepping stone hypothesis or from the deep-sea sediments seems unlikely, since Dirivultidae are unknown from these environments. Dirivultidae is the most species rich family and thus can be considered the most successful taxon at deep-sea vents.

  20. The Deep Seas--Unexpectedly, An Astounding Variety of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    As oceanographic technology advances, the study of deep-sea environments is accelerating. Numerous ecological theories concerning deep-sea food relationships, environmental extremes, and life forms are changing as the environments of the deepest ocean trenches are studied. Thousands of new species are being discovered and studied constantly. (MA)

  1. Adapting to the Deep Sea: A Fun Activity with Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, Gwynne

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade, much has been learned about the ocean's secrets and especially about the creatures of the deep sea. The deepest parts of the oceans are currently the focus of many new discoveries in both the physical and biological sciences. Middle school students find the deep sea fascinating and especially seem to enjoy its mysterious and…

  2. New Waves in Marine Science Symposium: Deep Sea !Discoveries!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Betty, Comp.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the abstracts from three research projects involving deep sea technology which were a part of a marine science symposium. Five sets of activities on deep sea science are included, one each for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12, and informal education. (CW)

  3. Dissolved Fe and Fe binding ligand concentrations at the hydrothermal vent fields in the Coriolis Troughs, New Hebrides Island Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleint, C.; Hawkes, J. A.; Sander, S. G.; Koschinsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    It is globally accepted that hydrothermal vent fluids are highly enriched in Fe compared to the surrounding seawater and for long it was believed that the majority of the dissolved Fe is precipitated either directly out of the fluid with seawater contact or from the plume within a short distance. Recent research at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents has shown, however, that organic ligands are able to keep Fe soluble and therefore facilitating its transport into the open ocean. This is important since Fe is also considered a limiting factor for primary production in large parts of the world`s surface ocean. The New Hebrides Island Arc is not studied well with respect to the fluid chemistry of its numerous vents. Up until now, no data is published for the crucial micronutrient Fe in these fluids. Several hydrothermal vent fluids, divided into mixing zone, outlet and pure fluid as well as one hydrothermal plume from the Coriolis Troughs have been analyzed with respect to total dissolved Fe (dFe) and Fe binding ligands (FeL), using competitive ligand exchange - adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE - AdCSV) with Salicylaldoxime as the artificial ligand. Our dFe data for the hydrothermal plume show concentrations ranging from 9.6 nM to 30.1 nM, being highly enriched compared to the surrounding seawater. Good correlation is observed between dFe and turbidity, which can be used as a proxy for hydrothermal plumes. Hydrothermal fluid samples collected near and directly from the vent outlet show total dissolved Fe concentrations varying from 0.46 µM up to 380 µM, respectively. We find enriched organic ligand concentrations in the plume samples as well as in the samples taken near the hydrothermal vent outlets. Pure hydrothermal fluid samples with an in-situ temperature of up to 370 °C show different ligand properties than low to mid temperature samples.

  4. Extreme Longevity in Proteinaceous Deep-Sea Corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Fallon, S J; Mucciarone, D A

    2009-02-09

    Deep-sea corals are found on hard substrates on seamounts and continental margins world-wide at depths of 300 to {approx}3000 meters. Deep-sea coral communities are hotspots of deep ocean biomass and biodiversity, providing critical habitat for fish and invertebrates. Newly applied radiocarbon age date from the deep water proteinaceous corals Gerardia sp. and Leiopathes glaberrima show that radial growth rates are as low as 4 to 35 {micro}m yr{sup -1} and that individual colony longevities are on the order of thousands of years. The management and conservation of deep sea coral communities is challenged by their commercial harvest for the jewelry trade and damage caused by deep water fishing practices. In light of their unusual longevity, a better understanding of deep sea coral ecology and their interrelationships with associated benthic communities is needed to inform coherent international conservation strategies for these important deep-sea ecosystems.

  5. Environmental hazard assessment of a marine mine tailings deposit site and potential implications for deep-sea mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Nélia C; Rocha, Thiago L; Canals, Miquel; Cardoso, Cátia; Danovaro, Roberto; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Gambi, Cristina; Regoli, Francesco; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Bebianno, Maria João

    2017-09-01

    Portmán Bay is a heavily contaminated area resulting from decades of metal mine tailings disposal, and is considered a suitable shallow-water analogue to investigate the potential ecotoxicological impact of deep-sea mining. Resuspension plumes were artificially created by removing the top layer of the mine tailings deposit by bottom trawling. Mussels were deployed at three sites: i) off the mine tailings deposit area; ii) on the mine tailings deposit beyond the influence from the resuspension plumes; iii) under the influence of the artificially generated resuspension plumes. Surface sediment samples were collected at the same sites for metal analysis and ecotoxicity assessment. Metal concentrations and a battery of biomarkers (oxidative stress, metal exposure, biotransformation and oxidative damage) were measured in different mussel tissues. The environmental hazard posed by the resuspension plumes was investigated by a quantitative weight of evidence (WOE) model that integrated all the data. The resuspension of sediments loaded with metal mine tails demonstrated that chemical contaminants were released by trawling subsequently inducing ecotoxicological impact in mussels' health. Considering as sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) those indicated in Spanish action level B for the disposal of dredged material at sea, the WOE model indicates that the hazard is slight off the mine tailings deposit, moderate on the mine tailings deposit without the influence from the resuspension plumes, and major under the influence of the resuspension plumes. Portmán Bay mine tailings deposit is a by-product of sulphide mining, and despite differences in environmental setting, it can reflect the potential ecotoxic effects to marine fauna from the impact of resuspension of plumes created by deep-sea mining of polymetallic sulphides. A similar approach as in this study could be applied in other areas affected by sediment resuspension and for testing future deep-sea mining sites in

  6. Coupled cycling of Fe and organic carbon in submarine hydrothermal systems: Impacts on Ocean Biogeochemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher; Sander, Sylvia; Legendre, Louis; Niquil, Nathalie; Working Group 135

    2014-05-01

    seafloor in areas immediately surrounding deep sea hydrothermal systems.

  7. New perspectives in benthic deep-sea microbial ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia eCorinaldesi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest and most remote biome of the biosphere. They play a fundamental role in global biogeochemical cycles and their functions allow existence of life on our planet. In the last 20 years enormous progress has been made in the investigation of deep-sea microbes, but the knowledge of the microbial ecology of the soft bottoms (representing >90% of the deep-sea floor surface is still very limited. Deep-sea sediments host the largest fractions of Bacteria, Archaea and viruses on Earth, and potentially, a high diversity. At the same time, available results from metagenomics suggest that a large fraction of microbial taxa is completely unknown to science. Estimating the diversity of deep-sea benthic microbes and understanding their functions are some of the challenges of absolute priority, not only for deep-sea microbial ecology, but also for the entire research field of life sciences. The achievement of these goals, given the importance of the deep-sea microbial life for the functioning of the global biosphere, will open new perspectives for the comprehension of adaptation processes to the impact of global changes.

  8. Deep-sea ophiuroids (Echinodermata) from reducing and non-reducing environments in the North Atlantic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Stohr, Sabine; Segonzac, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The animal communities associated with the deep-sea reducing environment have been studied for almost 30 years, but until now only a single species of ophiuroid, Ophioctenella acies, has been found at both hydrothermal vents and methane cold seeps. Since the faunal overlap between vent and seep communities is small and many endemic species have been found among other taxa (e.g. Mollusca, Crustacea), additional species of ophiuroids were expected at previously unstudied sites. Chemical composi...

  9. Helium and methane sources and fluxes of shallow submarine hydrothermal plumes near the Tokara Islands, Southern Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hsin-Yi; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; Tomonaga, Yama; Ishida, Akizumi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Kagoshima, Takanori; Shirai, Kotaro; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Yokose, Hisayoshi; Tsunogai, Urumu; Yang, Tsanyao F.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow submarine volcanoes have been newly discovered near the Tokara Islands, which are situated at the volcanic front of the northern Ryukyu Arc in southern Japan. Here, we report for the first time the volatile geochemistry of shallow hydrothermal plumes, which were sampled using a CTD-RMS system after analyzing water column images collected by multi-beam echo sounder surveys. These surveys were performed during the research cruise KS-14-10 of the R/V Shinsei Maru in a region stretching from the Wakamiko Crater to the Tokara Islands. The 3He flux and methane flux in the investigated area are estimated to be (0.99–2.6) × 104 atoms/cm2/sec and 6–60 t/yr, respectively. The methane in the region of the Tokara Islands is a mix between abiotic methane similar to that found in the East Pacific Rise and thermogenic one. Methane at the Wakamiko Crater is of abiotic origin but affected by isotopic fractionation through rapid microbial oxidation. The helium isotopes suggest the presence of subduction-type mantle helium at the Wakamiko Crater, while a larger crustal component is found close to the Tokara Islands. This suggests that the Tokara Islands submarine volcanoes are a key feature of the transition zone between the volcanic front and the spreading back-arc basin. PMID:27671524

  10. Microbial Diversity of Indian Ocean Hydrothermal Vent Plumes: Microbes Tolerant of Desiccation, Peroxide Exposure, and Ultraviolet and γ-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Benardini, James N.; Kempf, Michael J.; Newcombe, David A.; Lubarsky, Michael; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2007-05-01

    The microbial diversity of Kali chimney plumes, part of a hydrothermal vent field in the Rodriguez Triple Junction, Indian Ocean (depth approximately 2,240 m), was examined in an attempt to discover ``extremotolerant'' microorganisms that have evolved unique resistance capabilities to this harsh environment. Water and sediment samples were collected from the vent and from sediments located at various distances (2-20 m) away from and surrounding the chimney. Samples were screened for hypertolerant microbes that are able to withstand multiple stresses. A total of 46 isolates were selected for exposure to a number of perturbations, such as heat shock, desiccation, H2O2, and ultraviolet (UV) and γ-irradiation. The survival of Psychrobacter sp. L0S3S-03b following exposure to >1,000 J/m2 UV254 radiation was particularly intriguing amid a background of varying levels of resistance. Vegetative cells of this non-spore-forming microbe not only survived all of the treatments, but also exhibited a 90% lethal dose of 30 s when exposed to simulated martian UV radiation and a 100% lethal dose of 2 min when exposed to full spectrum UV, which is comparable to findings for bacterial endospores.

  11. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Scoma; Michail M. Yakimov; Nico Boon

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of p...

  12. Nuclear power plant for deep sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Jun; Itoh, Yasuyoshi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Hashidate, Koji; Ambo, Noriaki; Ishizaka, Yuichi; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi.

    1991-08-29

    The present invention provides a nuclear reactor utilized as an energy source for a deep-sea submarine boat and a fixed energy source at the bottom of the sea. Here to fore, electric power generation by using chemical cells or radioisotopes has been considered as such an energy source. However, since the power and the heat generation density per weight is small, it is poor in the practicality. Then, utilization of a small-sized and highly safe nuclear reactor easy to operate is desired. That is, a reactor is disposed in the lower portion of a pressure resistant shell filled with water. An electric power generator which is directly connected to a steam turbine is contained in the upper portion. The space above the reactor containing water is used as a condenser for the turbine. In the reactor having such a constitution, countermeasures for the occurrence of accidents such as pipeline rupture can be simplified and the structure is simple to improve the safety. (I.S.).

  13. Searching for Environments That Could Support Life: Lessons Learned From Six Deep Sea Cruises with the Sentry and Nereus Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoerger, D. R.; Kinsey, J. C.; Jakuba, M.; Camilli, R.; German, C. R.; Shank, T. M.; Bowen, A.; Nakamura, K.; Seeps 2009 Science Team; Oases 2009 Science Team; Gruvee 2010 Science Team; Enlighten 2010 Science Team; Hmmv 2010 Science Team

    2010-12-01

    In the past year, we have used our Sentry and Nereus Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) on six deep sea cruises searching for extreme environments that can support life. Two of these cruises took place on Mid-Ocean Ridge terrain (Mid Cayman Rise, Galapagos Rift), three on active methane seeps (Santa Monica/Santa Barbara Basins, Hydrate Ridge, Haakon-Mosby Mud Volcano), and one took place at the site of the Deepwater Horizon blowout. This presentation summarizes how we used the vehicles, their automatic control systems, and their sensor suites in these different environments to identify and quantify chemical fluxes emerging from the seafloor. We also took advantage of complementary data from lowered and towed platforms. Examples will include the following: * ●In the Cayman Trough and the Galapagos Rift, we used in-situ chemical sensing (conductivity, temperature, optical backscatter, and redox potential) to locate hydrothermal sources. * ●In the Galapagos Rift, we also used our 400khz multibeam sonar to locate hydrothermal sites using acoustic backscatter from plumes and by building bathymetric maps of likely hydrothermal structures. * ●In the Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins, we used the TETHYS in-situ mass spectrometer to locate active methane seeps and to determine the ratio of biogenic to thermogenic methane through isotopic analysis. We used this information in real-time to alter the vehicle's trajectory and, hence, improve measurements over the most interesting locations. * ●At the site of the Deepwater Horizon blowout, we used Sentry and TETHYS to map a deep hydrocarbon plume from just outside the vessel exclusion zone out to a distance of 35 km. Analysis of oxygen data from an electrode, an optode, the mass spectrometer, and from titration of samples brought to the surface supported estimates of microbial respiration rates. * ●On Hydrate Ridge, we showed that the 400khz multibeam sonar is an effective tool for locating active methane bubble

  14. The MEUST deep sea infrastructure in the Toulon site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamare Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MEUST infrastructure (Mediterranean Eurocentre for Underwater Sciences and Technologies is a permanent deep sea cabled infrastructure currently being deployed off shore of Toulon, France. The design and the status of the infrastructure are presented.

  15. Deep Sea Coral National Observation Database, Northeast Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The national database of deep sea coral observations. Northeast version 1.0. * This database was developed by the NOAA NOS NCCOS CCMA Biogeography office as part of...

  16. Development of environmental management plan for deep-sea mining

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    Deep-sea mining is currently at a stage when several mine sites have been identified, mining technologies are under development, processing technologies are being tested, studies for assessing potential environmental impacts have been conducted...

  17. Deep-sea impact experiments and their future requirements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    In recent years, several experiments to assess the potential impacts due to deep-sea mining in the Pacific as well as the Indian Oceans have indicated the immediate changes and restoration patterns of environmental conditions in the marine ecosystem...

  18. Erbium-doped fiber lasers as deep-sea hydrophones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnoli, P.E. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, Pisa 56100 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Beverini, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Bouhadef, B. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Castorina, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Falchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Falciai, R. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Florence (Italy); Flaminio, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Maccioni, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy) and Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy)]. E-mail: maccioni@df.unipi.it; Morganti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Largo Pontecorvo 3, Pisa 56127 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Sorrentino, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Stefani, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, Pisa 56100 (Italy); Trono, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.Fermi' University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 (Italy); Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' , IFAC-CNR, Florence (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    The present work describes the development of a hydrophone prototype for deep-sea acoustic detection. The base-sensitive element is a single-mode erbium-doped fiber laser. The high sensitivity of these sensors makes them particularly suitable for a wide range of deep-sea acoustic applications, including geological and marine mammals surveys and above all as acoustic detectors in under-water telescopes for high-energy neutrinos.

  19. Coupled cycling of Fe and organic carbon in submarine hydrothermal systems: Modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Louis; German, Christopher R.; Sander, Sylvia G.; Niquil, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently proposed that hydrothermal plumes may be a significant source of dissolved Fe to the oceans. In order to assess this proposal, we investigated the fate of dissolved Fe released from hydrothermal systems to the overlying ocean using an approach that combined modelling and field values. We based our work on a consensus conceptual model developed by members of SCOR-InterRidge Working Group 135. The model was both complex enough to capture the main processes of dissolved Fe released from hydrothermal systems and chemical transformation in the hydrothermal plume, and simple enough to be parameterized with existing field data. It included the following flows: Fe, water and heat in the high temperature vent fluids, in the fluids diffusing around the vent, and in the entrained seawater in the buoyant plume; Fe precipitation in polymetallic sulphides near the vent; transport of Fe in the non-buoyant plume, and both its precipitation in particles onto the sea bottom away from the vent and dissolution into deep-sea waters. In other words, there were three Fe input flows into the buoyant hydrothermal plume (vent-fluids; entrained diffuse flow; entrained seawater) and three Fe output flows (sedimentation from the buoyant plume as polymetallic sulfides; sedimentation from the non-buoyant plume in particulate form; export to the deep ocean in dissolved or nanoparticulate form). The output flows balanced the input flows. We transformed the conceptual model into equations, and parameterized these with field data. To do so, we assumed that all hydrothermal systems, globally, can be represented by the circumstances that prevail at the EPR 9°50'N hydrothermal field, although we knew this assumption not to be accurate. We nevertheless achieved, by following this approach, two important goals, i.e. we could assemble into a coherent framework, for the first time, several discrete data sets acquired independently over decades of field work, and we could obtain model

  20. The Speciation of Particulate Iron and Carbon in the East Pacific Rise 15oS Near-field Hydrothermal Plume and Underlying Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, B. M.; Lam, P. J.; Nicholas, S. L.; Ohnemus, D.; Hoffman, C. L.; Fitzsimmons, J. N.; Sherrell, R. M.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate iron and carbon speciation were measured for water column and sediment samples collected at the East Pacific Rise ridge axis (15oS; Station 18) and approximately 80 km down-current (Station 20) during the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise. Water column particles were collected by in situ filtration (0.2 micron, polycarbonate) from above, within, and below the hydrothermal plume. Water column samples were handled in an anaerobic chamber and stored frozen under inert gas shipboard, and protected from ambient oxygen during analysis. The flocculant, top-layer of the sediments was sampled shipboard under ambient conditions and stored frozen until analysis. Iron and carbon speciation were measured using X-ray microprobe (10.3.2) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) instruments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA. Iron (1s and 2p) and carbon (1s) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and imaging for particles revealed that: (1) in comparison to the above plume sample, organic carbon is abundant in particles within and below the plume, as well as in surface sediments; (2) iron sulfides are not detectable in any water column sample investigated so far; (3) the fraction of non-sulfide reduced iron is highest in the below plume samples; and (4) the below plume sample is rich in free-living microbial cells.

  1. Deep sea mining: Environmental monitoring and management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    an environmental impact in the mining area. The sediment plume due to 'digging up' of these minerals from seabed and disposal of the waste material, will not only disturb the ecology of the seafloor, but also of the entire water column. Increase in turbidity...

  2. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Yakimov, Michail M.; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons within deep-sea environments remain unanswered, as well as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil bioassimilation are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar), hydrocarbon degradation rates and the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico have been largely overlooked. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation. PMID:27536290

  3. Challenging oil bioremediation at deep-sea hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Scoma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (biotechnology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons at deep-sea remain unanswered, as much as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil take up are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled-oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar and that of hydrocarbons degradation rates was largely overlooked, as the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea, despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation.

  4. Challenging Oil Bioremediation at Deep-Sea Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Yakimov, Michail M; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident has brought oil contamination of deep-sea environments to worldwide attention. The risk for new deep-sea spills is not expected to decrease in the future, as political pressure mounts to access deep-water fossil reserves, and poorly tested technologies are used to access oil. This also applies to the response to oil-contamination events, with bioremediation the only (bio)technology presently available to combat deep-sea spills. Many questions about the fate of petroleum-hydrocarbons within deep-sea environments remain unanswered, as well as the main constraints limiting bioremediation under increased hydrostatic pressures and low temperatures. The microbial pathways fueling oil bioassimilation are unclear, and the mild upregulation observed for beta-oxidation-related genes in both water and sediments contrasts with the high amount of alkanes present in the spilled oil. The fate of solid alkanes (tar), hydrocarbon degradation rates and the reason why the most predominant hydrocarbonoclastic genera were not enriched at deep-sea despite being present at hydrocarbon seeps at the Gulf of Mexico have been largely overlooked. This mini-review aims at highlighting the missing information in the field, proposing a holistic approach where in situ and ex situ studies are integrated to reveal the principal mechanisms accounting for deep-sea oil bioremediation.

  5. WHATS-3: An Improved Flow-Through Multi-bottle Fluid Sampler for Deep-Sea Geofluid Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Miyazaki

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea geofluid systems, such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, are key to understanding subseafloor environments of Earth. Fluid chemistry, especially, provides crucial information toward elucidating the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in these ecosystems. To accurately assess fluid and gas properties of deep-sea geofluids, well-designed pressure-tight fluid samplers are indispensable and as such they are important assets of deep-sea geofluid research. Here, the development of a new flow-through, pressure-tight fluid sampler capable of four independent sampling events (two subsamples for liquid and gas analyses from each is reported. This new sampler, named WHATS-3, is a new addition to the WHATS-series samplers and a major upgrade from the previous WHATS-2 sampler with improvements in sample number, valve operational time, physical robustness, and ease of maintenance. Routine laboratory-based pressure tests proved that it is suitable for operation up to 35 MPa pressure. Successful field tests of the new sampler were also carried out in five hydrothermal fields, two in Indian Ocean, and three in Okinawa Trough (max. depth 3,300 m. Relations of Mg and major ion species demonstrated bimodal mixing trends between a hydrothermal fluid and seawater, confirming the high quality of fluids sampled. The newly developed WHATS-3 sampler is well-balanced in sampling capability, field usability, and maintenance feasibility, and can serve as one of the best geofluid samplers available at present to conduct efficient research of deep-sea geofluid systems.

  6. WHATS-3: An improved flow-through multi-bottle fluid sampler for deep-sea geofluid research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Junichi; Makabe, Akiko; Matsui, Yohei; Ebina, Naoya; Tsutsumi, Saki; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Chen, Chong; Kaneko, Sho; Takai, Ken; Kawagucci, Shinsuke

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea geofluid systems, such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, are key to understanding subseafloor environments of Earth. Fluid chemistry, especially, provides crucial information towards elucidating the physical, chemical and biological processes that occur in these ecosystems. To accurately assess fluid and gas properties of deep-sea geofluids, well-designed pressure-tight fluid samplers are indispensable and as such they are important assets of deep-sea geofluid research. Here, the development of a new flow-through, pressure-tight fluid sampler capable of four independent sampling events (two subsamples for liquid and gas analyses from each) is reported. This new sampler, named WHATS-3, is a new addition to the WHATS-series samplers and a major upgrade from the previous WHATS-2 sampler with improvements in sample number, valve operational time, physical robustness, and ease of maintenance. Routine laboratory-based pressure tests proved that it is suitable for operation up to 35 MPa pressure. Successful field tests of the new sampler were also carried out in five hydrothermal fields, two in Indian Ocean and three in Okinawa Trough (max. depth 3,300 m). Relations of Mg and major ion species demonstrated bimodal mixing trends between a hydrothermal fluid and seawater, confirming the high-quality of fluids sampled. The newly developed WHATS-3 sampler is well-balanced in sampling capability, field usability, and maintenance feasibility, and can serve as one of the best geofluid samplers available at present to conduct efficient research of deep-sea geofluid systems.

  7. Evolutionary process of deep-sea bathymodiolus mussels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichi Miyazaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since the discovery of deep-sea chemosynthesis-based communities, much work has been done to clarify their organismal and environmental aspects. However, major topics remain to be resolved, including when and how organisms invade and adapt to deep-sea environments; whether strategies for invasion and adaptation are shared by different taxa or unique to each taxon; how organisms extend their distribution and diversity; and how they become isolated to speciate in continuous waters. Deep-sea mussels are one of the dominant organisms in chemosynthesis-based communities, thus investigations of their origin and evolution contribute to resolving questions about life in those communities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We investigated worldwide phylogenetic relationships of deep-sea Bathymodiolus mussels and their mytilid relatives by analyzing nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated sequence data showed that mussels of the subfamily Bathymodiolinae from vents and seeps were divided into four groups, and that mussels of the subfamily Modiolinae from sunken wood and whale carcasses assumed the outgroup position and shallow-water modioline mussels were positioned more distantly to the bathymodioline mussels. We provisionally hypothesized the evolutionary history of Bathymodilolus mussels by estimating evolutionary time under a relaxed molecular clock model. Diversification of bathymodioline mussels was initiated in the early Miocene, and subsequently diversification of the groups occurred in the early to middle Miocene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The phylogenetic relationships support the "Evolutionary stepping stone hypothesis," in which mytilid ancestors exploited sunken wood and whale carcasses in their progressive adaptation to deep-sea environments. This hypothesis is also supported by the evolutionary transition of

  8. Fungi and macroaggregation in deep-sea sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damare, Samir; Raghukumar, Chandralata

    2008-07-01

    Whereas fungi in terrestrial soils have been well studied, little is known of them in deep-sea sediments. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of fungal hyphae in such sediments but in low abundance. We present evidence in this study that one of the apparent reasons for the poor detection of fungi in deep-sea sediments is their cryptic presence in macroaggregates. Fungal biomass carbon from different core sections of deep-sea sediments from approximately 5000 m depth in the Central Indian Ocean was estimated based on direct microscopic detection of fungal mycelia. Treatment of sediment samples with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) enabled more frequent detection and significantly higher biomass than in samples without such treatment. Treatment with EDTA resulted in detecting various stages of breakdown of aggregates in the sediments, gradually revealing the presence of fungal hyphae within them. Experimental studies of a deep-sea, as well as three terrestrial isolates of fungi, showed that all could grow at 200 bar and 5 degrees C in a nutrient medium and in deep-sea sediment extract. Hyphae of fungi grown in sediment extract under the above conditions showed various stages of accretion of particles around them, leading to the formation of aggregates. Such aggregates showed the presence of humic material, carbohydrate, and proteins. We suggest that fungi in deep-sea sediments may be involved in humic aggregate formation by processes very similar to those in terrestrial sediments. The importance of such a process in carbon sequestration and food web in the deep sea needs to be examined.

  9. Deep-sea coral research and technology program: Alaska deep-sea coral and sponge initiative final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooper, Chris; Stone, Robert P.; Etnoyer, Peter; Conrath, Christina; Reynolds, Jennifer; Greene, H. Gary; Williams, Branwen; Salgado, Enrique; Morrison, Cheryl; Waller, Rhian G.; Demopoulos, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Deep-sea coral and sponge ecosystems are widespread throughout most of Alaska’s marine waters. In some places, such as the central and western Aleutian Islands, deep-sea coral and sponge resources can be extremely diverse and may rank among the most abundant deep-sea coral and sponge communities in the world. Many different species of fishes and invertebrates are associated with deep-sea coral and sponge communities in Alaska. Because of their biology, these benthic invertebrates are potentially impacted by climate change and ocean acidification. Deepsea coral and sponge ecosystems are also vulnerable to the effects of commercial fishing activities. Because of the size and scope of Alaska’s continental shelf and slope, the vast majority of the area has not been visually surveyed for deep-sea corals and sponges. NOAA’s Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSCRTP) sponsored a field research program in the Alaska region between 2012–2015, referred to hereafter as the Alaska Initiative. The priorities for Alaska were derived from ongoing data needs and objectives identified by the DSCRTP, the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC), and Essential Fish Habitat-Environmental Impact Statement (EFH-EIS) process.This report presents the results of 15 projects conducted using DSCRTP funds from 2012-2015. Three of the projects conducted as part of the Alaska deep-sea coral and sponge initiative included dedicated at-sea cruises and fieldwork spread across multiple years. These projects were the eastern Gulf of Alaska Primnoa pacifica study, the Aleutian Islands mapping study, and the Gulf of Alaska fish productivity study. In all, there were nine separate research cruises carried out with a total of 109 at-sea days conducting research. The remaining projects either used data and samples collected by the three major fieldwork projects or were piggy-backed onto existing research programs at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC).

  10. Effects of Hemagglutination Activity in the Serum of a Deep-Sea Vent Endemic Crab, Shinkaia Crosnieri, on Non-Symbiotic and Symbiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, So; Tateno, Hiroaki; Watsuji, Tomoo; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Daisuke; Mino, Sayaka; Sugimura, Makoto; Sawabe, Tomoo; Takai, Ken; Sawayama, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In deep-sea hydrothermal environments, most invertebrates associate with dense populations of symbiotic microorganisms in order to obtain nutrition. The molecular interactions between deep-sea animals and environmental microbes, including their symbionts, have not yet been elucidated in detail. Hemagglutinins/lectins, which are carbohydrate-binding proteins, have recently been reported to play important roles in a wide array of biological processes, including the recognition and control of non-self materials. We herein assessed hemagglutination activity in the serum of a deep-sea vent endemic crab, Shinkaia crosnieri, which harbors chemosynthetic epibionts on its plumose setae. Horse and rabbit erythrocytes were agglutinated using this serum (opt. pH 7.5 and opt. temperature 15°C). Agglutinating activity was inhibited by eight kinds of sugars and several divalent cations, did not require any divalent metal ions, and remained detectable even after heating the serum at 100°C for 30 min. By using fluorescently labeled serum, we demonstrated that deep-sea crab serum components bound to the epibionts even in the presence of sugars. This study represents the first immunological assessment of a deep-sea vent endemic crab and demonstrated the possibility of a non-lectin-mediated symbiont-host interaction.

  11. Stabilization of dissolved trace metals at hydrothermal vent sites: Impact on their marine biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Sylvia G.; Powell, Zach D.; Koschinsky, Andrea; Kuzmanovski, Stefan; Kleint, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal vents have long been neglected as a significant source of several bioactive trace metals as it was assumed that elements such as Fe, Mn, and Cu etc., precipitate in extensor forming poly-metallic sulfide and oxy-hydroxy sediments in the relative vicinity of the emanation site. However, recently this paradigm has been reviewed since the stabilization of dissolved Fe and Cu from hydrothermal vents was observed [1, 2] and increased concentrations of trace metals can be traced from their hydrothermal source thousands of kilometres through the ocean basins [3]. Furthermore several independent modelling attempts have shown that not only a stabilization of dissolved hydrothermal Fe and Cu is possible [4] but also that hydrothermalism must be a significant source of Fe to be able to balance the Fe-biogeochemical cycle [5]. Here we present new data that gives further evidence of the presence of copper stabilising organic and inorganic compounds in samples characterized by hydrothermal input. We can show that there are systematic differences in copper-complexing ligands at different vent sites such as 5°S on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, Brother Volcano on the Kermadec Arc, and some shallow hydrothermal CO2 seeps in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand and the Mediterranean Sea. Quantitative and qualitative voltammetric data convincingly indicates that inorganic sulphur and organic thiols form the majority of the strong copper-complexing ligand pool in many of these hydrothermal samples. On average, the high temperature vents had a significantly higher copper binding capacity than the diffuse vents due to higher inorganic sulphur species concentrations. References: [1] Sander, S. G., et al. 2007. Organic complexation of copper in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems. Environmental Chemistry 4: 81-89 [2] Bennett, S. A., et al. 2008. The distribution and stabilisation of dissolved Fe in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 270: 157-167. [3] Wu J

  12. Orbital forcing of deep-sea benthic species diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Raymo, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    Explanations for the temporal and spatial patterns of species biodiversity focus on stability-time, disturbance-mosaic (biogenic microhabitat heterogeneity) and competition-predation (biotic interactions) hypotheses. The stability-time hypothesis holds that high species diversity in the deep sea and in the tropics reflects long-term climatic stability. But the influence of climate change on deep-sea diversity has not been studied and recent evidence suggests that deep-sea environments undergo changes in climatically driven temperature and flux of nutrients and organic-carbon during glacial-interglacial cycles. Here we show that Pliocene (2.85-2.40 Myr) deep-sea North Atlantic benthic ostracod (Crustacea) species diversity is related to solar insolation changes caused by 41,000-yr cycles of Earth's obliquity (tilt). Temporal changes in diversity, as measured by the Shannon- Weiner index, H(S), correlate with independent climate indicators of benthic foraminiferal oxygen-isotope ratios (mainly ice volume) and ostracod Mg:Ca ratios (bottomwater temperature). During glacial periods, H(S) = 0.2-0.6, whereas during interglacials, H(S) = 1.2-1.6, which is three to four times as high. The control of deep-sea benthic diversity by cyclic climate change at timescales of 103-104 yr does not support the stability-time hypothesis because it shows that the deep sea is a temporally dynamic environment. Diversity oscillations reflect large-scale response of the benthic community to climatically driven changes in either thermohaline circulation, bottom temperature (or temperature-related factors) and food, and a coupling of benthic diversity to surface productivity.

  13. Species distribution models of tropical deep-sea snappers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Gomez

    Full Text Available Deep-sea fisheries provide an important source of protein to Pacific Island countries and territories that are highly dependent on fish for food security. However, spatial management of these deep-sea habitats is hindered by insufficient data. We developed species distribution models using spatially limited presence data for the main harvested species in the Western Central Pacific Ocean. We used bathymetric and water temperature data to develop presence-only species distribution models for the commercially exploited deep-sea snappers Etelis Cuvier 1828, Pristipomoides Valenciennes 1830, and Aphareus Cuvier 1830. We evaluated the performance of four different algorithms (CTA, GLM, MARS, and MAXENT within the BIOMOD framework to obtain an ensemble of predicted distributions. We projected these predictions across the Western Central Pacific Ocean to produce maps of potential deep-sea snapper distributions in 32 countries and territories. Depth was consistently the best predictor of presence for all species groups across all models. Bathymetric slope was consistently the poorest predictor. Temperature at depth was a good predictor of presence for GLM only. Model precision was highest for MAXENT and CTA. There were strong regional patterns in predicted distribution of suitable habitat, with the largest areas of suitable habitat (> 35% of the Exclusive Economic Zone predicted in seven South Pacific countries and territories (Fiji, Matthew & Hunter, Nauru, New Caledonia, Tonga, Vanuatu and Wallis & Futuna. Predicted habitat also varied among species, with the proportion of predicted habitat highest for Aphareus and lowest for Etelis. Despite data paucity, the relationship between deep-sea snapper presence and their environments was sufficiently strong to predict their distribution across a large area of the Pacific Ocean. Our results therefore provide a strong baseline for designing monitoring programs that balance resource exploitation and

  14. Light and vision in the deep-sea benthos: II. Vision in deep-sea crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Tamara M; Johnsen, Sönke; Cronin, Thomas W

    2012-10-01

    Using new collecting techniques with the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible, eight species of deep-sea benthic crustaceans were collected with intact visual systems. Their spectral sensitivities and temporal resolutions were determined shipboard using electroretinography. Useable spectral sensitivity data were obtained from seven species, and in the dark-adapted eyes, the spectral sensitivity peaks were in the blue region of the visible spectrum, ranging from 470 to 497 nm. Under blue chromatic adaptation, a secondary sensitivity peak in the UV portion of the spectrum appeared for two species of anomuran crabs: Eumunida picta (λ(max)363 nm) and Gastroptychus spinifer (λ(max)383 nm). Wavelength-specific differences in response waveforms under blue chromatic adaptation in these two species suggest that two populations of photoreceptor cells are present. Temporal resolution was determined in all eight species using the maximum critical flicker frequency (CFF(max)). The CFF(max) for the isopod Booralana tricarinata of 4 Hz proved to be the lowest ever measured using this technique, and suggests that this species is not able to track even slow-moving prey. Both the putative dual visual pigment system in the crabs and the extremely slow eye of the isopod may be adaptations for seeing bioluminescence in the benthic environment.

  15. Microbial community structure in three deep-sea carbonate crusts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, S. K.; Aloisi, G.; Bouloubassi, I.; Pancost, R. D.; Pierre, C.; Damste, J. S. Sinninghe; Gottschal, J. C.; van Elsas, J. D.; Forney, L. J.

    2006-01-01

    Carbonate crusts in marine environments can act as sinks for carbon dioxide. Therefore, understanding carbonate crust formation could be important for understanding global warming. In the present study, the microbial communities of three carbonate crust samples from deep-sea mud volcanoes in the eas

  16. Evolution: Ocean Models Reveal Life in Deep Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2016-09-26

    Even though the deep sea represents the largest area in the world, evolution of species from those environments remains largely unstudied. A series of recent papers indicate that combining molecular tools with biophysical models can help us resolve some of these deep mysteries.

  17. Fungi and macroaggregation in deep-sea sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.; Raghukumar, C.

    such treatment. Treatment with EDTA resulted in detecting various stages of breakdown of aggregates in the sediments, gradually revealing the presence of fungal hyphae within them. Experimental studies of a deep-sea, as well as three terrestrial isolates of fungi...

  18. Deep sea benthos of the western and central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H; Ingole, B.S.; Harkantra, S.N; Ansari, Z.A.

    Quantitative investigations on deep sea benthos from 112 stations between lat. 21 degrees N-21 degrees S and long. 51 degrees E-94 degrees E and in the depth range of 1500 to 6000 m, revealed a rich biota having relatively low species diversity...

  19. The deep sea is a major sink for microplastic debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lucy C; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Paterson, Gordon L J; Coppock, Rachel; Sleight, Victoria; Calafat, Antonio; Rogers, Alex D; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E; Thompson, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that is unaccounted for in surveys tracking the fate of environmental plastics. Even the discovery of widespread accumulation of microscopic fragments (microplastics) in oceanic gyres and shallow water sediments is unable to explain the missing fraction. Here, we show that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics. Microplastic, in the form of fibres, was up to four orders of magnitude more abundant (per unit volume) in deep-sea sediments from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean than in contaminated sea-surface waters. Our results show evidence for a large and hitherto unknown repository of microplastics. The dominance of microfibres points to a previously underreported and unsampled plastic fraction. Given the vastness of the deep sea and the prevalence of microplastics at all sites we investigated, the deep-sea floor appears to provide an answer to the question-where is all the plastic?

  20. Extreme Enrichment of Tellurium in Deep-Sea Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yanhe; WANG Yimin; SONG Hebin; YUE Guoliang

    2005-01-01

    Tellurium is a sort of scattered rare element on the earth.Its concentration is very low in earth's crust,only 1.0 ng/g.However,it has extremely high abundance in Co-rich crusts,marine polymetallic nodules,deep-sea sediments and aerolites.To find out the origin of tellurium enrichment in deep-sea sediments,we analyzed and compared tellurium concentrations and helium isotope compositions in the magnetic parts and those in the bulk parts of deep-sea sediments.The result indicates that the helium content,3He/4He ratio and tellurium concentration are obviously higher in the magnetic parts than those in the bulk parts.The 3He abundance varies synchronously with the tellurium concentration.3He and Te have a distinct positive correlation with each other.It is the first time that the paper brings forward that the extreme enrichment of tellurium in deep-sea sediments,like helium isotope anomalies,probably results from the input of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs).Similarly,the extreme enrichment of tellurium in marine polymetallic nodules and Co-rich crusts is possibly related to IDPs.

  1. The deep sea is a major sink for microplastic debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lucy C.; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Paterson, Gordon L.J.; Coppock, Rachel; Sleight, Victoria; Calafat, Antonio; Rogers, Alex D.; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable proportion of the manufactured plastic that is unaccounted for in surveys tracking the fate of environmental plastics. Even the discovery of widespread accumulation of microscopic fragments (microplastics) in oceanic gyres and shallow water sediments is unable to explain the missing fraction. Here, we show that deep-sea sediments are a likely sink for microplastics. Microplastic, in the form of fibres, was up to four orders of magnitude more abundant (per unit volume) in deep-sea sediments from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean than in contaminated sea-surface waters. Our results show evidence for a large and hitherto unknown repository of microplastics. The dominance of microfibres points to a previously underreported and unsampled plastic fraction. Given the vastness of the deep sea and the prevalence of microplastics at all sites we investigated, the deep-sea floor appears to provide an answer to the question—where is all the plastic? PMID:26064573

  2. Bipolar gene flow in deep-sea benthic foraminifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, J.; Fahrni, J.; Lecroq, B.

    2007-01-01

    Despite its often featureless appearance, the deep-ocean floor includes some of the most diverse habitats on Earth. However, the accurate assessment of global deep-sea diversity is impeded by a paucity of data on the geographical ranges of bottom-dwelling species, particularly at the genetic leve...

  3. Reproductive biology in two species of deep-sea squids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laptikhovsky, V. V.; Arkhipkin, A. I.; Hoving, H. J. T.

    2007-01-01

    Deep-sea squids, Moroteuthis ingens and Gonatus antarcticus, were collected in the slope waters off the Falkland Islands and their reproductive systems preserved and investigated onshore. Changes in oocyte length-frequencies at maturation and spawning, and their fecundity were studied. These squids,

  4. Design of Low-Power Data Logger of Deep Sea for Long-Term Field Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; CHEN Ying; YANG Can-jun; CAO Jian-wei; GU Lin-yi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a data logger for the real-time in-situ monitoring of hydrothermal systems.A compact mechanical structure ensures the security and reliability of data logger when used under deep sea.The data logger is a battery powered instrument,which can connect chemical sensors ( pH electrode,H2S electrode,H2 electrode) and temperature sensors.In order to achieve major energy savings,dynamic power management is implemented in hardware design and software design.The working current of the data logger in idle mode and active mode is 15 μA and 1.44 mA respectively,which greatly extends the working time of battery.The data logger has been successfully tested in the first Sino-American Cooperative Deep Submergence Project from August 13 to September 3,2005.

  5. Stronger, Bigger,and more Professional—An Introduction to Shanghai Deep Sea Fisheries Co. Ltd

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Shanghai Deep Sea Fisheries Co. Ltd, formerlyShanghai Deep Sea Fisheries Co., which was setup in 1985, is a big industrial State-ownedfishing company combining fishing, industrieration and development

  6. Monitoring the impact of simulated deep-sea mining in Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.; Jaisankar, S.

    Monitoring of deep-sea disturbances, natural or man-made, has gained significance due to the associated sediment transport and for the ensuing alterations in environmental conditions. During the Indian Deep-sea Environment Experiment (INDEX...

  7. Ecosystem function and services provided by the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, A. R.; Sweetman, A. K.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Jones, D. O. B.; Ingels, J.; Hansman, R. L.

    2014-07-01

    The deep sea is often viewed as a vast, dark, remote, and inhospitable environment, yet the deep ocean and seafloor are crucial to our lives through the services that they provide. Our understanding of how the deep sea functions remains limited, but when treated synoptically, a diversity of supporting, provisioning, regulating and cultural services becomes apparent. The biological pump transports carbon from the atmosphere into deep-ocean water masses that are separated over prolonged periods, reducing the impact of anthropogenic carbon release. Microbial oxidation of methane keeps another potent greenhouse gas out of the atmosphere while trapping carbon in authigenic carbonates. Nutrient regeneration by all faunal size classes provides the elements necessary for fueling surface productivity and fisheries, and microbial processes detoxify a diversity of compounds. Each of these processes occur on a very small scale, yet considering the vast area over which they occur they become important for the global functioning of the ocean. The deep sea also provides a wealth of resources, including fish stocks, enormous bioprospecting potential, and elements and energy reserves that are currently being extracted and will be increasingly important in the near future. Society benefits from the intrigue and mystery, the strange life forms, and the great unknown that has acted as a muse for inspiration and imagination since near the beginning of civilization. While many functions occur on the scale of microns to meters and timescales up to years, the derived services that result are only useful after centuries of integrated activity. This vast dark habitat, which covers the majority of the globe, harbors processes that directly impact humans in a variety of ways; however, the same traits that differentiate it from terrestrial or shallow marine systems also result in a greater need for integrated spatial and temporal understanding as it experiences increased use by society. In

  8. Deep-sea diversity patterns are shaped by energy availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Skipton N. C.; Tittensor, Derek P.; Dunstan, Piers K.; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Lahoz-Monfort, José J.; Wintle, Brendan A.; Worm, Boris; O'Hara, Timothy D.

    2016-05-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least-explored ecosystem on Earth, and a uniquely energy-poor environment. The distribution, drivers and origins of deep-sea biodiversity remain unknown at global scales. Here we analyse a database of more than 165,000 distribution records of Ophiuroidea (brittle stars), a dominant component of sea-floor fauna, and find patterns of biodiversity unlike known terrestrial or coastal marine realms. Both patterns and environmental predictors of deep-sea (2,000-6,500 m) species richness fundamentally differ from those found in coastal (0-20 m), continental shelf (20-200 m), and upper-slope (200-2,000 m) waters. Continental shelf to upper-slope richness consistently peaks in tropical Indo-west Pacific and Caribbean (0-30°) latitudes, and is well explained by variations in water temperature. In contrast, deep-sea species show maximum richness at higher latitudes (30-50°), concentrated in areas of high carbon export flux and regions close to continental margins. We reconcile this structuring of oceanic biodiversity using a species-energy framework, with kinetic energy predicting shallow-water richness, while chemical energy (export productivity) and proximity to slope habitats drive deep-sea diversity. Our findings provide a global baseline for conservation efforts across the sea floor, and demonstrate that deep-sea ecosystems show a biodiversity pattern consistent with ecological theory, despite being different from other planetary-scale habitats.

  9. Deep-sea diversity patterns are shaped by energy availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Skipton N C; Tittensor, Derek P; Dunstan, Piers K; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Lahoz-Monfort, José J; Wintle, Brendan A; Worm, Boris; O'Hara, Timothy D

    2016-05-19

    The deep ocean is the largest and least-explored ecosystem on Earth, and a uniquely energy-poor environment. The distribution, drivers and origins of deep-sea biodiversity remain unknown at global scales. Here we analyse a database of more than 165,000 distribution records of Ophiuroidea (brittle stars), a dominant component of sea-floor fauna, and find patterns of biodiversity unlike known terrestrial or coastal marine realms. Both patterns and environmental predictors of deep-sea (2,000-6,500 m) species richness fundamentally differ from those found in coastal (0-20 m), continental shelf (20-200 m), and upper-slope (200-2,000 m) waters. Continental shelf to upper-slope richness consistently peaks in tropical Indo-west Pacific and Caribbean (0-30°) latitudes, and is well explained by variations in water temperature. In contrast, deep-sea species show maximum richness at higher latitudes (30-50°), concentrated in areas of high carbon export flux and regions close to continental margins. We reconcile this structuring of oceanic biodiversity using a species-energy framework, with kinetic energy predicting shallow-water richness, while chemical energy (export productivity) and proximity to slope habitats drive deep-sea diversity. Our findings provide a global baseline for conservation efforts across the sea floor, and demonstrate that deep-sea ecosystems show a biodiversity pattern consistent with ecological theory, despite being different from other planetary-scale habitats.

  10. Temporal change in deep-sea benthic ecosystems: a review of the evidence from recent time-series studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, A G; Gooday, A J; Bailey, D M; Billett, D S M; Chevaldonné, P; Colaço, A; Copley, J; Cuvelier, D; Desbruyères, D; Kalogeropoulou, V; Klages, M; Lampadariou, N; Lejeusne, C; Mestre, N C; Paterson, G L J; Perez, T; Ruhl, H; Sarrazin, J; Soltwedel, T; Soto, E H; Thatje, S; Tselepides, A; Van Gaever, S; Vanreusel, A

    2010-01-01

    Societal concerns over the potential impacts of recent global change have prompted renewed interest in the long-term ecological monitoring of large ecosystems. The deep sea is the largest ecosystem on the planet, the least accessible, and perhaps the least understood. Nevertheless, deep-sea data collected over the last few decades are now being synthesised with a view to both measuring global change and predicting the future impacts of further rises in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. For many years, it was assumed by many that the deep sea is a stable habitat, buffered from short-term changes in the atmosphere or upper ocean. However, recent studies suggest that deep-seafloor ecosystems may respond relatively quickly to seasonal, inter-annual and decadal-scale shifts in upper-ocean variables. In this review, we assess the evidence for these long-term (i.e. inter-annual to decadal-scale) changes both in biologically driven, sedimented, deep-sea ecosystems (e.g. abyssal plains) and in chemosynthetic ecosystems that are partially geologically driven, such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps. We have identified 11 deep-sea sedimented ecosystems for which published analyses of long-term biological data exist. At three of these, we have found evidence for a progressive trend that could be potentially linked to recent climate change, although the evidence is not conclusive. At the other sites, we have concluded that the changes were either not significant, or were stochastically variable without being clearly linked to climate change or climate variability indices. For chemosynthetic ecosystems, we have identified 14 sites for which there are some published long-term data. Data for temporal changes at chemosynthetic ecosystems are scarce, with few sites being subjected to repeated visits. However, the limited evidence from hydrothermal vents suggests that at fast-spreading centres such as the East Pacific Rise, vent communities are impacted on decadal scales

  11. Influence of Hydrodynamics on the Larval Supply to Hydrothermal Vents on the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    dispersal in deep-sea hydrothernal vent animals. Cahier de Biologic Marine, 39:363:366. [37] Witman, J. (1987). Subtidal coexistence: storms, grazing...Sunderland, 2001. [54] R. C. Vrijenhoek, T. M. Shank, and R. Lutz. Gene flow and dispersal in deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals. Cahier de Biologie Marine, 39

  12. Accumulator-Based Deep-Sea Microbe Gastight Sampling Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhong-hua; LIU Shao-jun; JIN Bo

    2006-01-01

    The accumulator is used as a pressure compensation device to realize deep-sea microbe gastight sampling. Four key states of the accumulator are proposed to describe the pressure compensation process and a corresponding mathematical model is established to investigate the relationship between the results of pressure compensation and the parameters of the accumulator. Simulation results show that during the falling process of the sampler, the accumulator's real opening pressure is greater than its precharge pressure; when the sampling depth is 6000 m and the accumulator's precharge pressure is less than 30 MPa, to increase the accumulator's precharge pressure can improve pressure compensation results obviously. Laboratory experiments at 60 MPa show that the accumulator is an effective and reliable pressure compensation device for deep-sea microbe samplers. The success in sea trial at a depth of 2000 m in the South China Sea shows that the mathematical model and laboratory experiment results are reliable.

  13. Plastic microfibre ingestion by deep-sea organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. L.; Gwinnett, C.; Robinson, L. F.; Woodall, L. C.

    2016-09-01

    Plastic waste is a distinctive indicator of the world-wide impact of anthropogenic activities. Both macro- and micro-plastics are found in the ocean, but as yet little is known about their ultimate fate and their impact on marine ecosystems. In this study we present the first evidence that microplastics are already becoming integrated into deep-water organisms. By examining organisms that live on the deep-sea floor we show that plastic microfibres are ingested and internalised by members of at least three major phyla with different feeding mechanisms. These results demonstrate that, despite its remote location, the deep sea and its fragile habitats are already being exposed to human waste to the extent that diverse organisms are ingesting microplastics.

  14. Movement of deep-sea coral populations on climatic timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Gerlach, Dana; Roberts, Mark L.; Burke, Andrea; McNichol, Ann; Jenkins, William J.; Subhas, Adam V.; Thresher, Ronald E.; Adkins, Jess F.

    2013-06-01

    During the past 40,000 years, global climate has moved into and out of a full glacial period, with the deglaciation marked by several millennial-scale rapid climate change events. Here we investigate the ecological response of deep-sea coral communities to both glaciation and these rapid climate change events. We find that the deep-sea coral populations of Desmophyllum dianthus in both the North Atlantic and the Tasmanian seamounts expand at times of rapid climate change. However, during the more stable Last Glacial Maximum, the coral population globally retreats to a more restricted depth range. Holocene populations show regional patterns that provide some insight into what causes these dramatic changes in population structure. The most important factors are likely responses to climatically driven changes in productivity, [O2] and [CO32-].

  15. Controls on the distribution of deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, A.; O'Callaghan, S.; Müller, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Deep-sea sediments represent the largest geological deposit on Earth and provide a record of our planet's response to conditions at the sea surface from where the bulk of material originates. We use a machine learning method to analyze how the distribution of 14,400 deep-sea sediment sample lithologies is connected to bathymetry and surface oceanographic parameters. Our probabilistic Gaussian process classifier shows that the geographic occurrence of five major lithologies in the world's ocean can be predicted using just three parameters. Sea-surface salinity and temperature provide a major control for the growth and composition of plankton and specific ranges are also associated with the influx of non-aerosol terrigenous material into the ocean, while bathymetry is an important parameter for discriminating the occurrence of calcareous sediment, clay and coarse lithogenous sediment from each other. We find that calcareous and siliceous oozes are not linked to high surface productivity. Diatom and radiolarian oozes are associated with low salinities at the surface but with discrete ranges of temperatures, reflecting the diversity of planktonic species in different climatic zones. Biosiliceous sediments cannot be used to infer paleodepth, but are good indicators of paleotemperature and paleosalinity. Our analysis provides a new framework for constraining paleosurface ocean environments from the geological record of deep-sea sediments. It shows that small shifts in salinity and temperature significantly affect the lithology of seafloor sediment. As deep-sea sediments represent the largest carbon sink on Earth these shifts need to be considered in the context of global ocean warming.

  16. Recent results from the ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, Paschal

    2013-02-15

    The ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope has acquired over four years of high quality data. This data has been used to measure the oscillation parameters of atmospheric neutrinos and also to search for neutrinos of a nonterrestrial origin. Competitive upper limits on the fluxes of neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun, a variety of Galactic and extra-galactic sources, both steady and transient, are presented.

  17. Global deep-sea extinctions during the Pleistocene ice ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Bruce W.

    2001-07-01

    The dark, near-freezing environment of the deep oceans is regarded as one of the most stable habitats on Earth, and this stability is generally reflected in the slow turnover rates (extinctions and appearances) of the organisms that live there. By far the best fossil record of deep-sea organisms is provided by the shells of benthic foraminifera (Protista). A little-known global extinction of deep-sea benthic foraminifera occurred during the Pleistocene ice ages. In the southwest Pacific, it caused the disappearance of at least two families, 15 genera, and 48 species (˜15% 25% of the fauna) of dominantly uniserial, elongate foraminifera with distinctive apertural modifications. These forms progressively died back and became extinct during glacial periods in the late Pliocene to middle Pleistocene (ca. 2.5 0.6 Ma); most extinctions occurred between 1.0 and 0.6 Ma, at the time of the middle Pleistocene climatic revolution. This first high-resolution study of this extinction event indicates that it was far more significant for deep-sea diversity loss than previously reported (10 species). The middle Pleistocene extinction was the most dramatic last phase of a worldwide decline in the abundance of these elongate forms, a phase that began during cooling near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and continued during the middle Miocene. Clearly these taxa declined when the world cooled, but the reason is yet to be resolved.

  18. How deep-sea wood falls sustain chemosynthetic life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienhold, Christina; Pop Ristova, Petra; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Dittmar, Thorsten; Boetius, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Large organic food falls to the deep sea--such as whale carcasses and wood logs--are known to serve as stepping stones for the dispersal of highly adapted chemosynthetic organisms inhabiting hot vents and cold seeps. Here we investigated the biogeochemical and microbiological processes leading to the development of sulfidic niches by deploying wood colonization experiments at a depth of 1690 m in the Eastern Mediterranean for one year. Wood-boring bivalves of the genus Xylophaga played a key role in the degradation of the wood logs, facilitating the development of anoxic zones and anaerobic microbial processes such as sulfate reduction. Fauna and bacteria associated with the wood included types reported from other deep-sea habitats including chemosynthetic ecosystems, confirming the potential role of large organic food falls as biodiversity hot spots and stepping stones for vent and seep communities. Specific bacterial communities developed on and around the wood falls within one year and were distinct from freshly submerged wood and background sediments. These included sulfate-reducing and cellulolytic bacterial taxa, which are likely to play an important role in the utilization of wood by chemosynthetic life and other deep-sea animals.

  19. Research on the usage of a deep sea fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsubo, Akira; Kowata, Yasuki [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-09-01

    Many new types of fast reactors have been studied in PNC. A deep sea fast reactor has the highest realization probability of the reactors studied because its development is desired by many specialists of oceanography, meteorology, deep sea bottom oil field, seismology and so on and because the development does not cost big budget and few technical problems remain to be solved. This report explains the outline and the usage of the reactor of 40 kWe and 200 to 400 kWe. The reactor can be used as a power source at an unmanned base for long term climate prediction and the earth science and an oil production base in a deep sea region. On the other hand, it is used for heat and electric power supply to a laboratory in the polar region. In future, it will be used in the space. At the present time, a large FBR development plan does not proceed successfully and a realization goal time of FBR has gone later and later. We think that it is the most important to develop the reactor as fast as possible and to plant a fast reactor technique in our present society. (author)

  20. How deep-sea wood falls sustain chemosynthetic life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Bienhold

    Full Text Available Large organic food falls to the deep sea--such as whale carcasses and wood logs--are known to serve as stepping stones for the dispersal of highly adapted chemosynthetic organisms inhabiting hot vents and cold seeps. Here we investigated the biogeochemical and microbiological processes leading to the development of sulfidic niches by deploying wood colonization experiments at a depth of 1690 m in the Eastern Mediterranean for one year. Wood-boring bivalves of the genus Xylophaga played a key role in the degradation of the wood logs, facilitating the development of anoxic zones and anaerobic microbial processes such as sulfate reduction. Fauna and bacteria associated with the wood included types reported from other deep-sea habitats including chemosynthetic ecosystems, confirming the potential role of large organic food falls as biodiversity hot spots and stepping stones for vent and seep communities. Specific bacterial communities developed on and around the wood falls within one year and were distinct from freshly submerged wood and background sediments. These included sulfate-reducing and cellulolytic bacterial taxa, which are likely to play an important role in the utilization of wood by chemosynthetic life and other deep-sea animals.

  1. A new species of deep-sea Tegastidae (Crustacea: Copepoda: Harpacticoida) from 9°50'N on the East Pacific Rise, with remarks on its ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollner, Sabine; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Arbizu, Pedro Martinez

    2008-09-01

    Both male and female of the new deep-sea species Smacigastes barti sp. nov. (Tegastidae, Sars) are described in detail. Copepoda is one of the most diversified taxa at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, but only one species of the family Tegastidae has been described from this habitat and other deep-sea environments. Smacigastes barti is the second species of the genus SmacigastesIvanenko & Defaye, 2004, and was found in artificial substrates deployed in the vicinity of and 0.5 m from tubeworm aggregations at the 9°50'N region on the East Pacific Rise at 2500 meters depth. The derived character states of the new species are the lack of coxal endites on the maxilla, and 2-segmented exopods of swimming legs 2 and 3, the latter being the result of the fusion of the 2 proximal segments. An identification key to all known genera of Tegastidae is provided. Interestingly, the distribution of S. barti showed that it does not tolerate elevated temperatures and/or the presence of hydrogen sulfide or oxygen fluctuations, although both species of this genus were found in deep-sea chemosynthetic environments.

  2. A new species of deep-sea Tegastidae (Crustacea: Copepoda: Harpacticoida) from 9°50’N on the East Pacific Rise, with remarks on its ecology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOLLNER, SABINE; IVANENKO, VIATCHESLAV N.; ARBIZU, PEDRO MARTINEZ

    2010-01-01

    Both male and female of the new deep-sea species Smacigastes barti sp. nov. (Tegastidae, Sars) are described in detail. Copepoda is one of the most diversified taxa at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, but only one species of the family Tegastidae has been described from this habitat and other deep-sea environments. Smacigastes barti is the second species of the genus Smacigastes Ivanenko & Defaye, 2004, and was found in artificial substrates deployed in the vicinity of and 0.5 m from tubeworm aggregations at the 9°50’N region on the East Pacific Rise at 2500 meters depth. The derived character states of the new species are the lack of coxal endites on the maxilla, and 2-segmented exopods of swimming legs 2 and 3, the latter being the result of the fusion of the 2 proximal segments. An identification key to all known genera of Tegastidae is provided. Interestingly, the distribution of S. barti showed that it does not tolerate elevated temperatures and/or the presence of hydrogen sulfide or oxygen fluctuations, although both species of this genus were found in deep-sea chemosynthetic environments. PMID:21151830

  3. Slope and deep-sea abundance across scales: Southern Ocean isopods show how complex the deep sea can be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Stefanie; Barnes, David K. A.; Brandt, Angelika

    2007-08-01

    How animals are distributed in the world's largest surface environment, the deep sea, is poorly understood. The ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) III cruise probed richness and abundance of one group, peracarid crustaceans (isopods, amphipods, cumaceans, tanaidaceans, mysidaceans), as a model of deep-sea fauna across Southern Ocean (SO) sites. Analysis of samples from the ANDEEP cruises reveals SO isopods to be highly abundant, rich and endemic as many other taxa in the region are known to be. Samples taken across three spatial scales include sites tens, hundreds and thousands of kilometers apart, sites stretching from the Southern Cape Basin (South Atlantic) to continental Antarctica and including depths from 1030 to 5000 m. Across these spatial scales we investigated ecological success (abundance) of peracarids at order, family, and species levels. Remarkably no significant relationship was found between abundance and spatial scale at any taxonomic level. That is, the variability in abundance at major regional scale is no different to that across just tens of kilometres. Most taxa were represented in only a few samples, but we suggest most inhabitants of the deep Weddell Sea environment to be very patchy rather than rare. Separate plots of family, genus, and species abundance by sample number revealed this to be true—nearly all genera and species are an order of magnitude more abundant than 'background' levels in just one or two samples. Our isopod and amphipod samples reveal the Atlantic sector of the SO, one of the most dynamic and important regions influencing the global deep-sea environment, to be highly complex. Our study suggests that, at least with regard to the study taxa and area, the typical comparisons of regions that are made by ecologists miss the scale at which crucial ecological variability happens. Even without ice scours creating topographical complexity (as on the shelf) the

  4. Do larval supply and recruitment vary among chemosynthetic environments of the deep sea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Metaxas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The biological communities that inhabit chemosynthetic environments exist in an ephemeral and patchily distributed habitat with unique physicochemical properties that lead to high endemicity. Consequently, the maintenance and recovery from perturbation of the populations in these habitats is, arguably, mainly regulated by larval supply and recruitment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: WE USE DATA FROM THE PUBLISHED SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE TO: (1 compare the magnitudes of and variability in larval supply and settlement and recruitment at hydrothermal vents, seeps, and whale, wood and kelp falls; (2 explore factors that affect these life history processes, when information is available; and (3 explore taxonomic affinities in the recruit assemblages of the different chemosynthetic habitats, using multivariate statistical techniques. Larval supply at vents can vary across segments by several orders of magnitude for gastropods; for bivalves, supply is similar at vents on different segments, and at cold seeps. The limited information on larval development suggests that dispersal potential may be highest for molluscs from cold seeps, intermediate for siboglinids at vents and lowest for the whale-bone siboglinid Osedax. Settlement is poorly studied and only at vents and seeps, but tends to be highest near an active source of emanating fluid in both habitats. Rate of recruitment at vents is more variable among studies within a segment than among segments. Across different chemosynthetic habitats, recruitment rate of bivalves is much more variable than that of gastropods and polychaetes. Total recruitment rate ranges only between 0.1 and 1 ind dm(-2 d(-1 across all chemosynthetic habitats, falling above rates in the non-reducing deep sea. The recruit assemblages at vents, seeps and kelp falls have lower taxonomic breadth, and include more families and genera that have many species more closely related to each other than those at whale and wood

  5. Do larval supply and recruitment vary among chemosynthetic environments of the deep sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Anna; Kelly, Noreen E

    2010-07-19

    The biological communities that inhabit chemosynthetic environments exist in an ephemeral and patchily distributed habitat with unique physicochemical properties that lead to high endemicity. Consequently, the maintenance and recovery from perturbation of the populations in these habitats is, arguably, mainly regulated by larval supply and recruitment. WE USE DATA FROM THE PUBLISHED SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE TO: (1) compare the magnitudes of and variability in larval supply and settlement and recruitment at hydrothermal vents, seeps, and whale, wood and kelp falls; (2) explore factors that affect these life history processes, when information is available; and (3) explore taxonomic affinities in the recruit assemblages of the different chemosynthetic habitats, using multivariate statistical techniques. Larval supply at vents can vary across segments by several orders of magnitude for gastropods; for bivalves, supply is similar at vents on different segments, and at cold seeps. The limited information on larval development suggests that dispersal potential may be highest for molluscs from cold seeps, intermediate for siboglinids at vents and lowest for the whale-bone siboglinid Osedax. Settlement is poorly studied and only at vents and seeps, but tends to be highest near an active source of emanating fluid in both habitats. Rate of recruitment at vents is more variable among studies within a segment than among segments. Across different chemosynthetic habitats, recruitment rate of bivalves is much more variable than that of gastropods and polychaetes. Total recruitment rate ranges only between 0.1 and 1 ind dm(-2) d(-1) across all chemosynthetic habitats, falling above rates in the non-reducing deep sea. The recruit assemblages at vents, seeps and kelp falls have lower taxonomic breadth, and include more families and genera that have many species more closely related to each other than those at whale and wood falls. Vents also have the most uneven taxonomic structure

  6. Deep Sea Benthic Foraminifera: Love Cold, Fear Warm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.

    2007-12-01

    The fossil record provides understanding of possible linkages between long-term environmental changes and evolution of assemblages and morphological species of deep-sea benthic foraminifera, of which the phylogeny is still little known. Deep-sea benthic foraminifera have long morphological species lives and do not commonly suffer massive extinctions: they live in the largest habitat on earth, species have large geographic ranges or are cosmopolitan, and they use motile propagules to rapidly re-populate regions where populations have been destroyed. Extinction occurs only when rapid and severe environmental change affects such a large part of the deep ocean that no refugia exist, even for common species. Deep-sea benthic foraminifera reacted to global cooling (in the earliest Oligocene, middle Miocene and middle Pleistocene) not by extinction, but by a gradual turnover of species. The most extensive turnover occurred in the late Eocene through earliest Oligocene, when some presently important ecological niches were first filled. In contrast, deep-sea benthic foraminifera suffered severe extinction (30-50% of species, including common, cosmopolitan, long-lived species) during the rapid global warming of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a time of high CO2 levels and potential ocean acidification. The extinction was followed by slow recovery of faunas, but diversity never returned to pre-extinction levels. The PETM and later, less severe short-term periods of global warming (hyperthermals ETM1 and ETM2) were characterized by low diversity faunas dominated by small, thin-walled individuals. No significant net extinction occurred during the later hyperthermals. Such faunas might reflect dissolution, low oxygen conditions, or blooming of opportunistic species after environmental disturbance. Most commonly cited causes of the PETM extinction are: 1. low oxygen concentrations, 2. acidification of the oceans, 3. increase or decrease in oceanic productivity and

  7. 75 FR 49420 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Specifications In... (TAC) and corresponding fleet days-at-sea (DAS) allocation for the Atlantic deep- sea red crab fishery... the implementing regulations for the Atlantic Deep- Sea Red Crab Fishery Management Plan...

  8. 75 FR 7435 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Specifications... Atlantic deep-sea red crab fishery, including a target total allowable catch (TAC) and a fleet-wide days-at-sea (DAS) allocation. The implementing regulations for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab...

  9. 75 FR 35435 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Specifications In... finalized 2010 specifications for the Atlantic deep-sea red crab fishery, including a target total allowable... Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery Management Plan (FMP) allow NMFS to make an in-season adjustment to...

  10. Observations of Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Occurrences from the NOAA National Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Database, 1842-Present (NCEI Accession 0145037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA’s Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSC-RTP) compiles a national database of the known locations of deep-sea corals and sponges in U.S....

  11. Exploitation of deep-sea resources: the urgent need to understand the role of high pressure in the toxicity of chemical pollutants to deep-sea organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Nélia C; Calado, Ricardo; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2014-02-01

    The advent of industrial activities in the deep sea will inevitably expose deep-sea organisms to potentially toxic compounds. Although international regulations require environmental risk assessment prior to exploitation activities, toxicity tests remain focused on shallow-water model species. Moreover, current tests overlook potential synergies that may arise from the interaction of chemicals with natural stressors, such as the high pressures prevailing in the deep sea. As pressure affects chemical reactions and the physiology of marine organisms, it will certainly affect the toxicity of pollutants arising from the exploitation of deep-sea resources. We emphasize the need for environmental risk assessments based on information generated from ecotoxicological trials that mimic, as close as possible, the deep-sea environment, with emphasis to a key environmental factor - high hydrostatic pressure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiocarbon Based Ages and Growth Rates: Hawaiian Deep Sea Corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L

    2006-01-13

    The radial growth rates and ages of three different groups of Hawaiian deep-sea 'corals' were determined using radiocarbon measurements. Specimens of Corallium secundum, Gerardia sp., and Leiopathes glaberrima, were collected from 450 {+-} 40 m at the Makapuu deep-sea coral bed using a submersible (PISCES V). Specimens of Antipathes dichotoma were collected at 50 m off Lahaina, Maui. The primary source of carbon to the calcitic C. secundum skeleton is in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Using bomb {sup 14}C time markers we calculate radial growth rates of {approx} 170 {micro}m y{sup -1} and ages of 68-75 years on specimens as tall as 28 cm of C. secundum. Gerardia sp., A. dichotoma, and L. glaberrima have proteinaceous skeletons and labile particulate organic carbon (POC) is their primary source of architectural carbon. Using {sup 14}C we calculate a radial growth rate of 15 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of 807 {+-} 30 years for a live collected Gerardia sp., showing that these organisms are extremely long lived. Inner and outer {sup 14}C measurements on four sub-fossil Gerardia spp. samples produce similar growth rate estimates (range 14-45 {micro}m y{sup -1}) and ages (range 450-2742 years) as observed for the live collected sample. Similarly, with a growth rate of < 10 {micro}m y{sup -1} and an age of {approx}2377 years, L. glaberrima at the Makapuu coral bed, is also extremely long lived. In contrast, the shallow-collected A. dichotoma samples yield growth rates ranging from 130 to 1,140 {micro}m y{sup -1}. These results show that Hawaiian deep-sea corals grow more slowly and are older than previously thought.

  13. CAREER: Hydrothermal vent flow and temperature fluctuations: exploring long-term variability through an integrated research and education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, D.

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic scintillation system was built in partnership with ASL Environmental Sciences (Sidney BC Canada), which provided a unique opportunity for two engineering undergraduate students to live and work abroad. The acoustic instrumentation was tested in coastal waters and then deployed to study deep-sea hydrothermal plume dynamics. Undergraduate students were involved in the deployment of instrumentation and the development of processing software to give vertical velocities and temperature fluctuations from a vigorous hydrothermal vent. A graduate student thesis has yielded insights into the vertical and azimuthal dependence of entrainment and into plume bending and rise height. Teachers and Ocean Science Bowl students also participated in research cruises describing physical oceanography of estuaries, coastal waters, and deep-sea hydrothermal vents and participated in data collection, processing and analysis. Teachers used the knowledge they gained to develop creative educational curricula at their schools, to present their experiences at national conferences and to publish an article in the National Science Teachers Association - The Science Journal. One of the teachers was recently recognized with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Working with the ocean bowl team at Oconee County High School has led to top ten placements in the national championships in 2005 (fourth place) and 2006 (sixth place). In order to increase quantitative methods in an undergraduate class, students acquire data from an ocean observatory and analyze the data for specific quantities of interest. One such project led to the calculation of the upper ocean heat content for the Greenland Sea using 7 years of Argo profiles, which showed a 0.04oC/year trend. These results were then published in JGR.

  14. Space Suit Technologies Protect Deep-Sea Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Working on NASA missions allows engineers and scientists to hone their skills. Creating devices for the high-stress rigors of space travel pushes designers to their limits, and the results often far exceed the original concepts. The technologies developed for the extreme environment of space are often applicable here on Earth. Some of these NASA technologies, for example, have been applied to the breathing apparatuses worn by firefighters, the fire-resistant suits worn by racecar crews, and, most recently, the deep-sea gear worn by U.S. Navy divers.

  15. Deep Sea AUV Navigation Using Multiple Acoustic Beacons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冀大雄; 宋伟; 赵宏宇; 刘健

    2016-01-01

    Navigation is a critical requirement for the operation of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). To estimate the vehicle position, we present an algorithm using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to integrate dead-reckoning position with acoustic ranges from multiple beacons pre-deployed in the operating environment. Owing to high latency, variable sound speed multipath transmissions and unreliability in acoustic measurements, outlier recognition techniques are proposed as well. The navigation algorithm has been tested by the recorded data of deep sea AUV during field operations in a variety of environments. Our results show the improved performance over prior techniques based on position computation.

  16. Deep sea AUV navigation using multiple acoustic beacons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Da-xiong; Song, Wei; Zhao, Hong-yu; Liu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Navigation is a critical requirement for the operation of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). To estimate the vehicle position, we present an algorithm using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to integrate dead-reckoning position with acoustic ranges from multiple beacons pre-deployed in the operating environment. Owing to high latency, variable sound speed multipath transmissions and unreliability in acoustic measurements, outlier recognition techniques are proposed as well. The navigation algorithm has been tested by the recorded data of deep sea AUV during field operations in a variety of environments. Our results show the improved performance over prior techniques based on position computation.

  17. Deep-Sea Mining: Integrating Geology, Oceanography, and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. Michael; Halbach, Peter E.; Martens, Peer N.; Hein, James R.; Scott, Steve

    2008-09-01

    Shaping the Future: Deep-Sea Minerals and Mining Congress; Aachen, Germany, 9-13 March 2008; A strong increase in the global demand for metallic raw materials, coupled with rising market prices, has heightened interest in marine seabed mineral deposits and the feasibility of their extraction for many marine scientists, engineers, and mining companies. This interest focuses not only on base and precious metals but also on strategically important elements needed for high-technology applications, such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, titanium, gallium, selenium, telurium, indium, and the rare earth elements.

  18. Free-Living Tube Worm Endosymbionts Found at Deep-Sea Vents▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Tara L.; Rotjan, Randi D.; Nussbaumer, Andrea D.; Bright, Monika; Ng, Andrew W.; DeChaine, Eric G.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that deep-sea vestimentiferan tube worms acquire their endosymbiotic bacteria from the environment each generation; thus, free-living symbionts should exist. Here, free-living tube worm symbiont phylotypes were detected in vent seawater and in biofilms at multiple deep-sea vent habitats by PCR amplification, DNA sequence analysis, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. These findings support environmental transmission as a means of symbiont acquisition for deep-sea tube worms. PMID:18408062

  19. Ecology and biogeography of free-living nematodes associated with chemosynthetic environments in the deep sea: a review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Vanreusel

    Full Text Available Here, insight is provided into the present knowledge on free-living nematodes associated with chemosynthetic environments in the deep sea. It was investigated if the same trends of high standing stock, low diversity, and the dominance of a specialized fauna, as observed for macro-invertebrates, are also present in the nematodes in both vents and seeps.This review is based on existing literature, in combination with integrated analysis of datasets, obtained through the Census of Marine Life program on Biogeography of Deep-Water Chemosynthetic Ecosystems (ChEss.Nematodes are often thriving in the sulphidic sediments of deep cold seeps, with standing stock values ocassionaly exceeding largely the numbers at background sites. Vents seem not characterized by elevated densities. Both chemosynthetic driven ecosystems are showing low nematode diversity, and high dominance of single species. Genera richness seems inversely correlated to vent and seep fluid emissions, associated with distinct habitat types. Deep-sea cold seeps and hydrothermal vents are, however, highly dissimilar in terms of community composition and dominant taxa. There is no unique affinity of particular nematode taxa with seeps or vents.It seems that shallow water relatives, rather than typical deep-sea taxa, have successfully colonized the reduced sediments of seeps at large water depth. For vents, the taxonomic similarity with adjacent regular sediments is much higher, supporting rather the importance of local adaptation, than that of long distance distribution. Likely the ephemeral nature of vents, its long distance offshore and the absence of pelagic transport mechanisms, have prevented so far the establishment of a successful and typical vent nematode fauna. Some future perspectives in meiofauna research are provided in order to get a more integrated picture of vent and seep biological processes, including all components of the marine ecosystem.

  20. Ecology and biogeography of free-living nematodes associated with chemosynthetic environments in the deep sea: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanreusel, Ann; De Groote, Annelies; Gollner, Sabine; Bright, Monika

    2010-08-27

    Here, insight is provided into the present knowledge on free-living nematodes associated with chemosynthetic environments in the deep sea. It was investigated if the same trends of high standing stock, low diversity, and the dominance of a specialized fauna, as observed for macro-invertebrates, are also present in the nematodes in both vents and seeps. This review is based on existing literature, in combination with integrated analysis of datasets, obtained through the Census of Marine Life program on Biogeography of Deep-Water Chemosynthetic Ecosystems (ChEss). Nematodes are often thriving in the sulphidic sediments of deep cold seeps, with standing stock values ocassionaly exceeding largely the numbers at background sites. Vents seem not characterized by elevated densities. Both chemosynthetic driven ecosystems are showing low nematode diversity, and high dominance of single species. Genera richness seems inversely correlated to vent and seep fluid emissions, associated with distinct habitat types. Deep-sea cold seeps and hydrothermal vents are, however, highly dissimilar in terms of community composition and dominant taxa. There is no unique affinity of particular nematode taxa with seeps or vents. It seems that shallow water relatives, rather than typical deep-sea taxa, have successfully colonized the reduced sediments of seeps at large water depth. For vents, the taxonomic similarity with adjacent regular sediments is much higher, supporting rather the importance of local adaptation, than that of long distance distribution. Likely the ephemeral nature of vents, its long distance offshore and the absence of pelagic transport mechanisms, have prevented so far the establishment of a successful and typical vent nematode fauna. Some future perspectives in meiofauna research are provided in order to get a more integrated picture of vent and seep biological processes, including all components of the marine ecosystem.

  1. Global ocean conveyor lowers extinction risk in the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Frank, Norbert; Hebbeln, Dierk; Weinberg, Claudia; Robinson, Laura; van de Flierdt, Tina; Dahl, Mikael; Douarin, Melanie; Morrison, Cheryl; Correa, Matthias Lopez; Rogers, Alex D.; Ruckelshausen, Mario; Roberts, J. Murray

    2014-01-01

    General paradigms of species extinction risk are urgently needed as global habitat loss and rapid climate change threaten Earth with what could be its sixth mass extinction. Using the stony coral Lophelia pertusa as a model organism with the potential for wide larval dispersal, we investigated how the global ocean conveyor drove an unprecedented post-glacial range expansion in Earth׳s largest biome, the deep sea. We compiled a unique ocean-scale dataset of published radiocarbon and uranium-series dates of fossil corals, the sedimentary protactinium–thorium record of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength, authigenic neodymium and lead isotopic ratios of circulation pathways, and coral biogeography, and integrated new Bayesian estimates of historic gene flow. Our compilation shows how the export of Southern Ocean and Mediterranean waters after the Younger Dryas 11.6 kyr ago simultaneously triggered two dispersal events in the western and eastern Atlantic respectively. Each pathway injected larvae from refugia into ocean currents powered by a re-invigorated AMOC that led to the fastest postglacial range expansion ever recorded, covering 7500 km in under 400 years. In addition to its role in modulating global climate, our study illuminates how the ocean conveyor creates broad geographic ranges that lower extinction risk in the deep sea.

  2. Global ocean conveyor lowers extinction risk in the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Frank, Norbert; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wienberg, Claudia; Robinson, Laura; van de Flierdt, Tina; Dahl, Mikael; Douarin, Mélanie; Morrison, Cheryl L.; López Correa, Matthias; Rogers, Alex D.; Ruckelshausen, Mario; Roberts, J. Murray

    2014-06-01

    General paradigms of species extinction risk are urgently needed as global habitat loss and rapid climate change threaten Earth with what could be its sixth mass extinction. Using the stony coral Lophelia pertusa as a model organism with the potential for wide larval dispersal, we investigated how the global ocean conveyor drove an unprecedented post-glacial range expansion in Earth's largest biome, the deep sea. We compiled a unique ocean-scale dataset of published radiocarbon and uranium-series dates of fossil corals, the sedimentary protactinium-thorium record of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) strength, authigenic neodymium and lead isotopic ratios of circulation pathways, and coral biogeography, and integrated new Bayesian estimates of historic gene flow. Our compilation shows how the export of Southern Ocean and Mediterranean waters after the Younger Dryas 11.6 kyr ago simultaneously triggered two dispersal events in the western and eastern Atlantic respectively. Each pathway injected larvae from refugia into ocean currents powered by a re-invigorated AMOC that led to the fastest postglacial range expansion ever recorded, covering 7500 km in under 400 years. In addition to its role in modulating global climate, our study illuminates how the ocean conveyor creates broad geographic ranges that lower extinction risk in the deep sea.

  3. Activity rhythms in the deep-sea: a chronobiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Company, Joan Batista; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Bahamon, Nixon; Puig, Pere; Sarda, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waters deeper than 200 m cover 70% of the Earth's surface. Light intensity gets progressively weaker with increasing depth and internal tides or inertial currents may be the only remaining zeitgebers regulating biorhythms in deep-sea decapods. Benthopelagic coupling, exemplified by vertically moving shrimps within the water column, may also act as a source of indirect synchronisation to the day-night cycle for species living in permanently dark areas. At the same time, seasonal rhythms in growth and reproduction may be an exogenous response to spring-summer changes in upper layer productivity (via phytoplankton) or, alternatively, may be provoked by the synchronisation mediated by an endogenous controlling mechanism (via melatonin). In our review, we will focus on the behavioural rhythms of crustacean decapods inhabiting depths where the sun light is absent. Potential scenarios for future research on deep-sea decapod behaviour are suggested by new in situ observation technologies. Permanent video observatories are, to date, one of the most important tools for marine chronobiology in terms of species recognition and animals' movement tracking.

  4. Age, growth rates, and paleoclimate studies of deep sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Nancy G; Roark, E. Brendan; Andrews, Allen; Robinson, Laura; Hill, Tessa; Sherwood, Owen; Williams, Branwen; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Fallon, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Deep-water corals are some of the slowest growing, longest-lived skeletal accreting marine organisms. These habitat-forming species support diverse faunal assemblages that include commercially and ecologically important organisms. Therefore, effective management and conservation strategies for deep-sea corals can be informed by precise and accurate age, growth rate, and lifespan characteristics for proper assessment of vulnerability and recovery from perturbations. This is especially true for the small number of commercially valuable, and potentially endangered, species that are part of the black and precious coral fisheries (Tsounis et al. 2010). In addition to evaluating time scales of recovery from disturbance or exploitation, accurate age and growth estimates are essential for understanding the life history and ecology of these habitat-forming corals. Given that longevity is a key factor for population maintenance and fishery sustainability, partly due to limited and complex genetic flow among coral populations separated by great distances, accurate age structure for these deep-sea coral communities is essential for proper, long-term resource management.

  5. Deep-sea Hexactinellida (Porifera) of the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janussen, Dorte; Tabachnick, Konstantin R.; Tendal, Ole S.

    2004-07-01

    New Hexactinellida from the deep Weddel Sea are described. This moderately diverse hexactinellid fauna includes 14 species belonging to 12 genera, of which five species and one subgenus are new to science: Periphragella antarctica n. sp., Holascus pseudostellatus n. sp., Caulophacus (Caulophacus) discohexactinus n. sp., C. ( Caulodiscus) brandti n. sp., C. ( Oxydiscus) weddelli n. sp., and C. ( Oxydiscus) n. subgen. So far, 20 hexactinellid species have been reported from the deep Weddell Sea, 15 are known from the northern part and 10 only from here, while 10 came from the southern area, and five of these only from there. However, this apparent high "endemism" of Antarctic hexactinellid sponges is most likely the result of severe undersampling of the deep-sea fauna. We find no reason to believe that a division between an oceanic and a more continental group of species exists. The current poor database indicates that a substantial part of the deep hexactinellid fauna of the Weddell Sea is shared with other deep-sea regions, but it does not indicate a special biogeographic relationship with any other ocean.

  6. Deep Sea Coral voucher sequence dataset - Identification of deep-sea corals collected during the 2009 - 2014 West Coast Groundfish Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data for this project resides in the West Coast Groundfish Bottom Trawl Survey Database. Deep-sea corals are often components of trawling bycatch, though their...

  7. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, K M; Sievert, S M; Abril, F N; Ball, L A; Barrett, C J; Blake, R A; Boller, A J; Chain, P G; Clark, J A; Davis, C R; Detter, C; Do, K F; Dobrinski, K P; Faza, B I; Fitzpatrick, K A; Freyermuth, S K; Harmer, T L; Hauser, L J; Hugler, M; Kerfeld, C A; Klotz, M G; Kong, W W; Land, M; Lapidus, A; Larimer, F W; Longo, D L; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S A; Massey, S E; Martin, D D; McCuddin, Z; Meyer, F; Moore, J L; Ocampo Jr., L H; Paul, J H; Paulsen, I T; Reep, D K; Ren, Q; Ross, R L; Sato, P Y; Thomas, P; Tinkham, L E; Zerugh, G T

    2007-01-10

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kb prophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed, which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relatives in check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome.

  8. Substantial iron sequestration during green-clay authigenesis in modern deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldermann, A.; Warr, L. N.; Letofsky-Papst, I.; Mavromatis, V.

    2015-11-01

    In much of the global ocean, iron is a limiting nutrient for marine productivity. The formation of pyrite has been considered the most important sink of reactive iron in modern, organic-rich sediments. However, clay mineral transformations can also lead to long-term sequestration of iron during late diagenesis and in hydrothermal settings. Here we present evidence for substantial iron sequestration during the early diagenetic formation of ferruginous clay minerals, also called green-clay authigenesis, in the deep-sea environment of the Ivory Coast-Ghana Marginal Ridge. Using high-resolution electron microscopic methods and sequential sediment extraction techniques, we demonstrate that iron uptake by green-clay authigenesis can amount to 76 +/- 127 μmol Fe cm-2 kyr-1, which is on average six times higher than that of pyrite in suboxic subsurface sediments 5 m below the sea floor or shallower. Even at depths of 15 m below the sea floor or greater, rates of iron burial by green clay and pyrite are almost equal at ~80 μmol Fe cm-2 kyr-1. We conclude that green-clay formation significantly reduces the pore water inventory of dissolved iron in modern and ancient pelagic sediments, which challenges the long-standing conceptual view that clay mineral diagenesis is of little importance in current biogeochemical models of the marine iron cycle.

  9. The genome of deep-sea vent chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Scott

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 base pairs, and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of coding sequences (CDSs encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. Thiom. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome.

  10. Dancing for food in the deep sea: bacterial farming by a new species of Yeti crab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Thurber

    Full Text Available Vent and seep animals harness chemosynthetic energy to thrive far from the sun's energy. While symbiont-derived energy fuels many taxa, vent crustaceans have remained an enigma; these shrimps, crabs, and barnacles possess a phylogenetically distinct group of chemosynthetic bacterial epibionts, yet the role of these bacteria has remained unclear. We test whether a new species of Yeti crab, which we describe as Kiwa puravida n. sp, farms the epibiotic bacteria that it grows on its chelipeds (claws, chelipeds that the crab waves in fluid escaping from a deep-sea methane seep. Lipid and isotope analyses provide evidence that epibiotic bacteria are the crab's main food source and K. puravida n. sp. has highly-modified setae (hairs on its 3(rd maxilliped (a mouth appendage which it uses to harvest these bacteria. The ε- and γ- proteobacteria that this methane-seep species farms are closely related to hydrothermal-vent decapod epibionts. We hypothesize that this species waves its arm in reducing fluid to increase the productivity of its epibionts by removing boundary layers which may otherwise limit carbon fixation. The discovery of this new species, only the second within a family described in 2005, stresses how much remains undiscovered on our continental margins.

  11. Worldwide Analysis of Sedimentary DNA Reveals Major Gaps in Taxonomic Knowledge of Deep-Sea Benthos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinniger, Frédéric; Pawlowski, Jan; Harii, Saki

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments represent the largest but least known ecosystem on earth. With increasing anthropogenic pressure, it is now a matter of urgency to improve our understanding of deep-sea biodiversity. Traditional morpho-taxonomic studies suggest that the ocean floor hosts extraordinarily diverse...

  12. Authigenic gypsum in a deep sea core from Southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.

    Authigenic gypsum has been encountered in a deep sea core RC9-157 from the southeastern Arabian Sea at a depth of 4111 m which is a zone of lysocline. The formation of gypsum in the deep sea region is attributed to the prevailing sulphate rich...

  13. Morphotype patterns of Norwegian Sea deep-sea benthic foraminifera and ecological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, Bruce H.; Chen, Christina

    1988-08-01

    Deep-sea benthic foraminifera from Norwegian Sea surface sediments are classified into morphotypes on the basis of test shape and nature of test coiling and show distinct patterns with water depth. The morphotype data are used to determine microhabitat patterns of the foraminifera, which are suggested to be related to the organic-carbon content of the surficial deep-sea sediments.

  14. 47 CFR 32.6424 - Submarine and deep sea cable expense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submarine and deep sea cable expense. 32.6424 Section 32.6424 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Submarine and deep sea cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with submarine...

  15. NOAA National Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Database 1842-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Program (DSC-RTP) is compiling a national geodatabase of the known locations of deep-sea corals and sponges in U.S....

  16. Impact of Deepwater Horizon spill on food supply to deep-sea benthos communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prouty, N.G.; Campbell, P.L.; Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Demopoulos, A.W.J.; Ross, S.W.; Brooke, S.

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems encompass unique and often fragile communities that are sensitive to a variety of anthropogenic and natural impacts. After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, sampling efforts documented the acute impact of the spill on some deep-sea coral colonies. To investigate the imp

  17. Catalysis of carbon monoxide methanation by deep sea manganate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Maple, M. B.; Arrhenius, G.

    1990-01-01

    The catalytic activity of deep sea manganese nodule minerals for the methanation of carbon monoxide was measured with a microcatalytic technique between 200 and 460 degrees C. The manganate minerals were activated at 248 degrees C by immersion into a stream of hydrogen in which pulses of carbon monoxide were injected. Activation energies for the methanation reaction and hydrogen desorption from the manganate minerals were obtained and compared with those of pure nickel. Similar energy values indicate that the activity of the nodule materials for the reaction appears to be related to the amount of reducible transition metals present in the samples (ca. 11 wt.-%). Since the activity of the nodule minerals per gram is comparable to that of pure nickel, most of the transition metal ions located between manganese oxide layers appear to be exposed and available to catalyze the reaction.

  18. Underwater Laboratories for Astroparticle Physics and Deep Sea Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Piattelli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of deep sea environments is presently at the dawn of a new era: underwater laboratories, permanently installed on the sea floor and offering power and on-line data transmission links to the shore, will allow to continuously monitor oceanographical properties. An important boost in this direction has been provided by the high energy physics scientific community, that aims at the realization of an underwater detector for cosmic high energy neutrinos. Neutrinos are considered a very promising probe for high energy astrophysics and many indications suggest that some of the most energetic sources known in the universe could also be high energy neutrino sources. The expected neutrino fluxes indicate that a km3-scale detector must be realised to achieve this ambitious aim. The quest for the realization of such a detector in the Mediterranean Sea has already started.

  19. Power, fresh water, and food from cold, deep sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmer, D F; Roels, O A

    1973-10-12

    Many times more solar heat energy accumulates in the vast volume of warm tropic seas than that produced by all of our power plants. The looming energy crisis causes a renewal of interest in utilizing this stored solar heat to give, in addition to electric power, vast quantities of fresh water. Warm surface water, when evaporated, generates steam, to power a turbine, then fresh water when the steam is condensed by the cold water. A great increase in revenues over that from power and fresh water is shown by a substantial mariculture pilot plant. Deep sea water contains large quantities of nutrients. These feed algae which feed shellfish, ultimately shrimps and lobsters, in shallow ponds. Wastes grow seaweed of value; and combined revenues from desalination, power generation, and mariculture will give substantial profit.

  20. NESTOR Deep Sea Neutrino Telescope. Deployment and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggouras, G.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Ball, A. E.; Bourlis, G.; Chinowsky, W.; Fahrun, E.; Grammatikakis, G.; Green, C.; Grieder, P.; Katrivanos, P.; Koske, P.; Leisos, A.; Markopoulos, E.; Minkowsky, P.; Nygren, D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Przybylski, G.; Resvanis, L. K.; Siotis, I.; Sopher, J.; Staveris-Polikalas, A.; Tsagli, V.; Tsirigotis, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Zhukov, V. A.; Nestor Collaboration

    2006-01-01

    One module of NESTOR, the Mediterranean deep-sea neutrino telescope, was deployed at a depth of 4000m, 14km off the Sapienza Island, off the South West coast of Greece. The deployment site provides excellent environmental characteristics. The deployed NESTOR module is constructed as a hexagonal star like latticed titanium star with 12 Optical Modules and an one-meter diameter titanium sphere which houses the electronics. Power and data were transferred through a 30km electro-optical cable to the shore laboratory. In this report we describe briefly the detector and the detector electronics and discuss the first physics data acquired and give the zenith angular distribution of the reconstructed muons.

  1. Potential Health Benefits of Deep Sea Water: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samihah Zura Mohd Nani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea water (DSW commonly refers to a body of seawater that is pumped up from a depth of over 200 m. It is usually associated with the following characteristics: low temperature, high purity, and being rich with nutrients, namely, beneficial elements, which include magnesium, calcium, potassium, chromium, selenium, zinc, and vanadium. Less photosynthesis of plant planktons, consumption of nutrients, and organic decomposition have caused lots of nutrients to remain there. Due to this, DSW has potential to become a good source for health. Research has proven that DSW can help overcome health problems especially related to lifestyle-associated diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and skin problems. This paper reviews the potential health benefits of DSW by referring to the findings from previous researches.

  2. Alchemy or Science? Compromising Archaeology in the Deep Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    In the torrid debate between archaeology and treasure hunting, compromise is often suggested as the pragmatic solution, especially for archaeology carried out either in deep water or beyond the constraints that commonly regulate such activities in territorial seas. Both the wisdom and the need for such compromise have even been advocated by some archaeologists, particularly in forums such as the internet and conferences. This paper argues that such a compromise is impossible, not in order to fuel confrontation but simply because of the nature of any academic discipline. We can define what archaeology is in terms of its aims, theories, methods and ethics, so combining it with an activity founded on opposing principles must transform it into something else. The way forward for archaeology in the deep sea does not lie in a contradictory realignment of archaeology’s goals but in collaborative research designed to mesh with emerging national and regional research and management plans.

  3. Patterns of rod proliferation in deep-sea fish retinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, E; Negishi, K; Wagner, H J

    1995-07-01

    In a sample of 37 species of deep-sea fish species from the sea floor of the Porcupine Seabight and the Gobal spur (North Atlantic) we investigated the overall structure of the retina with special respect for the organization of rods, their length and their arrangement in multiple banks. Using an immunocytochemical marker for cell proliferation (PCNA) we studied the mechanisms of rod proliferation, and, by means of serial section reconstruction followed their integration into the existing population of rods. Furthermore, in three different species we have observed growth related changes in retinal thickness, rod density and proliferation activity. We found evidence for two different principles for the organization of rods in these deep-sea fish retinae. In the first group of species represented by Nematonurus armatus and Coryphaenoides guentheri we found rods to be rather short (20-30 microns) and arranged in three and more banks. In these species rod proliferation occurred in a single band of cells immediately vitread of the external limiting membrane, thus showing a high degree of spatial and temporal order. In these species, young rods are inserted just sclerad of the external limiting membrane and the older outer segments pushed away from the incoming light towards the back of the eye. This may be linked to a progressive loss of function of the older rods and might represent an alternative mechanism to the disk shedding in other vertebrates. In the second population (e.g. Conocara macroptera, Alepocephalus agassizii) we observed considerably longer rod outer segments (60-80 microns) forming no more than two layers. These retinae had rod precursors arranged in disseminated clusters throughout the outer nuclear layer indicating the lack of clear spatio-temporal order in mitotic activity along with a more statistical pattern of integration of the newly formed outer segments. In our sample of species both populations were of about equal size suggesting that the two

  4. Activity syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Szekeres, Petra; Violich, Mackellar; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Eliason, Erika J.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-03-01

    Despite growing interest, the behavioural ecology of deep-sea organisms is largely unknown. Much of this scarcity in knowledge can be attributed to deepwater animals being secretive or comparatively 'rare', as well as technical difficulties associated with accessing such remote habitats. Here we tested whether two species of giant marine isopod (Bathynomus giganteus, Booralana tricarinata) captured from 653 to 875 m in the Caribbean Sea near Eleuthera, The Bahamas, exhibited an activity behavioural syndrome across two environmental contexts (presence/absence of food stimulus) and further whether this syndrome carried over consistently between sexes. We also measured routine metabolic rate and oxygen consumption in response to a food stimulus in B. giganteus to assess whether these variables are related to individual differences in personality. We found that both species show an activity syndrome across environmental contexts, but the underlying mechanistic basis of this syndrome, particularly in B. giganteus, is unclear. Contrary to our initial predictions, neither B. giganteus nor B. tricarinata showed any differences between mean expression of behavioural traits between sexes. Both sexes of B. tricarinata showed strong evidence of an activity syndrome underlying movement and foraging ecology, whereas only male B. giganteus showed evidence of an activity syndrome. Generally, individuals that were more active and bolder, in a standard open arena test were also more active when a food stimulus was present. Interestingly, individual differences in metabolism were not related to individual differences in behaviour based on present data. Our study provides the first measurements of behavioural syndromes and metabolism in giant deep-sea isopods.

  5. Global diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Guillem; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Benítez-Barrios, Verónica; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio; Álvarez-Salgado, X Antón; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Acinas, Silvia G

    2016-01-01

    The deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean's microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (~3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered. PMID:26251871

  6. Global diversity and biogeography of deep-sea pelagic prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Salazar, Guillem

    2015-08-07

    The deep-sea is the largest biome of the biosphere, and contains more than half of the whole ocean\\'s microbes. Uncovering their general patterns of diversity and community structure at a global scale remains a great challenge, as only fragmentary information of deep-sea microbial diversity exists based on regional-scale studies. Here we report the first globally comprehensive survey of the prokaryotic communities inhabiting the bathypelagic ocean using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. This work identifies the dominant prokaryotes in the pelagic deep ocean and reveals that 50% of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belong to previously unknown prokaryotic taxa, most of which are rare and appear in just a few samples. We show that whereas the local richness of communities is comparable to that observed in previous regional studies, the global pool of prokaryotic taxa detected is modest (∼3600 OTUs), as a high proportion of OTUs are shared among samples. The water masses appear to act as clear drivers of the geographical distribution of both particle-attached and free-living prokaryotes. In addition, we show that the deep-oceanic basins in which the bathypelagic realm is divided contain different particle-attached (but not free-living) microbial communities. The combination of the aging of the water masses and a lack of complete dispersal are identified as the main drivers for this biogeographical pattern. All together, we identify the potential of the deep ocean as a reservoir of still unknown biological diversity with a higher degree of spatial complexity than hitherto considered.

  7. Environmental controls on chemoautotrophic primary producers at deep-sea vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Nadine; Mullineaux, Lauren; Sievert, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    High biomasses and fast growth rates of dominant chemosynthetic species characterize hydrothermal ecosystems, raising the issue of their contribution to energy transfer and carbon cycling in the deep-sea. Addressing this issue, however, needs to account for the temporal instability of hydrothermal systems, both, in terms of biological colonization and habitat conditions. Volcanic eruptions on mid-ocean ridges offer the opportunity to investigate the environmental conditions favoring the successive modes of chemoautotrophic primary production (i.e. free living microbes and symbiotic invertebrates). In that perspective, habitat-scale approaches distinguish from vent field-scale approaches based on fluid composition and provide relevant information on environmental constraints exerted at different stages of colonization focusing on parameters linked with physiological limits and available energy. Investigation of habitat physicochemical properties along a typical successional sequence of recolonization at 9°50'N EPR diffuse-flow vents, between 2006 and 2014, was performed in order to examine potential changes in environmental features associated with chemoautotrophic primary producers, from early microbial colonizers to symbiotic invertebrates. Combined in situ measurements of temperature, pH and hydrogen sulfide were used and their variability documented over a series of assemblages characterizing recolonization stages. The distributions of mature assemblages of dominant invertebrate species associate with substantial differences in habitat conditions, pointing to a strong influence of habitat properties on potential productivity. Among the differences observed, however, the amplitude and rate of environmental fluctuation appear more important than average conditions in the succession, highlighting the role of spatial heterogeneity and temporal dynamics as a control on primary producers. Invertebrate species acting as engineer species are expected to play a primary

  8. First biological measurements of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Roder, Cornelia

    2013-10-03

    It is usually assumed that metabolic constraints restrict deep-sea corals to cold-water habitats, with \\'deep-sea\\' and \\'cold-water\\' corals often used as synonymous. Here we report on the first measurements of biological characters of deep-sea corals from the central Red Sea, where they occur at temperatures exceeding 20°C in highly oligotrophic and oxygen-limited waters. Low respiration rates, low calcification rates, and minimized tissue cover indicate that a reduced metabolism is one of the key adaptations to prevailing environmental conditions. We investigated four sites and encountered six species of which at least two appear to be undescribed. One species is previously reported from the Red Sea but occurs in deep cold waters outside the Red Sea raising interesting questions about presumed environmental constraints for other deep-sea corals. Our findings suggest that the present understanding of deep-sea coral persistence and resilience needs to be revisited.

  9. First biological measurements of deep-sea corals from the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, C; Berumen, M L; Bouwmeester, J; Papathanassiou, E; Al-Suwailem, A; Voolstra, C R

    2013-10-03

    It is usually assumed that metabolic constraints restrict deep-sea corals to cold-water habitats, with 'deep-sea' and 'cold-water' corals often used as synonymous. Here we report on the first measurements of biological characters of deep-sea corals from the central Red Sea, where they occur at temperatures exceeding 20°C in highly oligotrophic and oxygen-limited waters. Low respiration rates, low calcification rates, and minimized tissue cover indicate that a reduced metabolism is one of the key adaptations to prevailing environmental conditions. We investigated four sites and encountered six species of which at least two appear to be undescribed. One species is previously reported from the Red Sea but occurs in deep cold waters outside the Red Sea raising interesting questions about presumed environmental constraints for other deep-sea corals. Our findings suggest that the present understanding of deep-sea coral persistence and resilience needs to be revisited.

  10. Total oxyradical scavenging capacity of the deep-sea amphipod Eurythenes gryllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, L; Gulliksen, B

    2004-01-01

    Environmental concern for the deep-sea ecosystem is increasing as contaminants, originating from anthropogenic activities, have been detected in deep-sea biota. However, little is known on the xenobiotics metabolising capability of deep-sea fauna. In this study, the deep-sea amphipod Eurythenes gryllus was selected as sentinel species to measure the total oxyradical scavenging capacity (TOSC). Individuals of E. gryllus were sampled at 2000 m depth in the Arctic Ocean. The TOSC assay was measured on the cytosolic fraction and the soluble fraction (3 kDa) of the digestive gland and on the cell-free haemolymph toward peroxyl, hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals according to the method of Winston et al. [Free Radical Biology and Medicine 24 (3) (1998) 480] and Regoli and Winston [Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 156 (1999) 96]. These results provide the first baseline data set for total antioxidant capacity in a deep-sea amphipod.

  11. Dates and rates of major pelagic deep-sea fish radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jan Yde; Miya, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The pelagic realm of the deep-sea is home to some of the most spectacular fishes in terms of morphological adaptations, a probable consequence of the distinct hostile living conditions in this poorly known habitat. Detecting speciation patterns in open ocean fishes is often complicated from...... view of actinopterygian phylogeny. Taxon sampling was chosen with special emphasis on recent results, that showed phylogeny and age estimates from nuclear evidence, allowing us to compare the ages of stem- and crown group nodes of all major deep-sea pelagic fish radiations. Two extreme extinction rates...... were used to calculate the diversification rates of all major deep-sea fish radiations using the different phylogenetic hypotheses and associated estimates of divergence time. Two deep-sea radiations, the order Stomiiformes and the deep-sea Anglerfishes in the suborder Ceratoidei, were found to present...

  12. Distribution of Mg and Li in Deep-Sea Scleractinian Corals: Implications for "Vital Effects" and Deep-Sea Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, D. H.; Robinson, L. F.; Auro, M. E.; Gagnon, A. C.

    2009-12-01

    The deep ocean is an important component of the climate system, but high resolution records of its behavior are difficult to obtain. Deep-sea corals that form carbonate skeletons have the potential to provide decadal resolution records of the deep ocean. Unfortunately, paleoceanographic approaches to reconstructing temperature in other marine carbonates, including Mg/Ca and ∂18O, are inconsistent with inorganic predictions due to biological mediation, or so called “vital effects." Inspired by a strong Mg/Li to temperature correlation observed in aragonitic and calcitic foraminifera, this study investigated Mg/Li ratios in deep-sea corals as a possible paleothermometer. Two approaches were applied: laser ablation and solution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For solution analyses Mg/Li was measured to an uncertainty of ~1%, and for laser analyses this uncertainty increased to ~5%. In situ laser analyses across septae and thecae show that Li fractionates similarly to Mg in deep-sea corals relative to Ca, such that the Li/Ca vs. Mg/Ca ratio within a single coral lies on a line with a slope of 3.9 for Balanophyllia and 2.8 for D. dianthus. For D. dianthus, Mg/Ca varies by a factor of nearly three across coral density bands, with high Mg at centers of calcification. Mg/Li varies by only 1.6 times across the same regions. Biomineralization models including a Rayleigh model and a simple open system model are invoked in an attempt to explain these behaviors. As a test of Mg/Li temperature sensitivity twenty-one scleractinian corals, representing five species with a temperature range of 1.8 to 17°C were thoroughly cleaned before dissolution and analysis. Mg/Li correlates to temperature in these corals with R2 values of 0.47 and 0.99 obtained for D. dianthus and Caryophyllia respectively, a significant improvement compared to Mg/Ca. This finding is promising for use of Mg/Li in paleoclimate reconstructions, but further work is required to understand the

  13. Iron, manganese, and lead at Hawaii Ocean Time-series station ALOHA: Temporal variability and an intermediate water hydrothermal plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Edward A.; Bergquist, Bridget A.; Kayser, Richard A.; Mahowald, Natalie

    2005-02-01

    Trace metal clean techniques were used to sample Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) station ALOHA on seven occasions between November 1998 and October 2002. On three occasions, full water-column profile samples were obtained; on the other four occasions, surface and near-surface euphotic zone profiles were obtained. Together with three other published samplings, this site may have been monitored for "dissolved" (≤0.4 or ≤0.2 μm) Fe more frequently than any other open ocean site in the world. Low Fe concentrations (2500 m), the concentrations we observe (0.4-0.5 nmol kg -1) are significantly lower than some other deep North Pacific stations but are similar to values that have been reported for a station 350 miles to the northeast. We attribute these low deepwater values to transport of low-Fe Antarctic Bottom Water into the basin and a balance between Fe regeneration and scavenging in the deep water. Near-surface waters have higher Fe levels than observed in the lower euphotic zone. Significant temporal variability is seen in near-surface Fe concentrations (ranging from 0.2-0.7 nmol kg -1); we attribute these surface Fe fluctuations to variable dust deposition, biological uptake, and changes in the mixed layer depth. This variability could occur only if the surface layer Fe residence time is less than a few years, and based on that constraint, it appears that a higher percentage of the total Fe must be released from North Pacific aerosols compared to North Atlantic aerosols. Surprisingly, significant temporal variability and high particulate Fe concentrations are observed for intermediate waters (1000-1500 m). These features are seen in the depth interval where high δ 3He from the nearby Loihi Seamount hydrothermal fields has been observed; the total Fe/ 3He ratio implies that the hydrothermal vents are the source of the high and variable Fe. The vertical profile of Mn at ALOHA qualitatively resembles other North Pacific Mn profiles with surface and intermediate

  14. Comparison of intact polar lipid with microbial community composition of vent deposits of the Rainbow and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, R.A.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of twelve hydrothermal vent deposits from the Rainbow (RHF) and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields (LSHF) has been investigated in order to assess its utility as a proxy for microbial community composition associated with deep-sea hydrothermal locations. Gene-b

  15. Comparison of intact polar lipid with microbial community composition of vent deposits of the Rainbow and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, R.A.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Hopmans, E.C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The intact polar lipid (IPL) composition of twelve hydrothermal vent deposits from the Rainbow (RHF) and Lucky Strike hydrothermal fields (LSHF) has been investigated in order to assess its utility as a proxy for microbial community composition associated with deep-sea hydrothermal locations.

  16. 75 FR 27219 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Specifications...), Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: NMFS issues final specifications for the 2010 Atlantic deep- sea red..., the NMFS Assistant Administrator has determined that this rule is consistent with the Atlantic...

  17. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  18. Deep-sea ecosystems of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Koslow, J.A.

    macrofaunal biomass decreased away from the shore, the meiofaunal biomass increased with distance. The discovery of 'Kairei' and Edmond hydrothermal field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction suggests that mid-ocean ridge systems in the Indian Ocean...

  19. Microbial diversity in the deep-sea sediments of Iheya North and Iheya Ridge, Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Qing-lei; Zeng, Zhi-gang; Chen, Shuai; Sun, Li

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we analyzed the bacterial and archaeal diversities of the deep-sea sediments in Iheya North and Iheya Ridge, Okinawa Trough, using the high-throughput sequencing technology of Illumina MiSeq 2500 platform. Four samples (IN1, IN2, IR1 and IR2) were used in this study, of which IN1 and IN2 were located at regions close to and distant, respectively, from the active hydrothermal vents in Iheya North, while IR1 and IR2 were located at regions close to and distant, respectively, from the active hydrothermal vents in Iheya Ridge. The four samples were rich in different metal elements. Sequence analysis based on the V3-V4 regions of 16S rDNA gene obtained 170,363 taxon tags, including 122,920 bacterial tags and 47,433 archaeal tags, which cover 31 phyla, 50 classes, 59 orders, 87 families, and 138 genera. Overall, the microbial communities in all samples were dominated by bacteria, in which Proteobacteria was the largest phylum, followed by Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Nitrospirae, which together accounted for 64.6% of the total taxon tags. In contrast to the high bacterial diversities, the archaeal diversity was low and dominated by Thaumarchaeota, which accounted for 22.9% of the total taxon tags. Comparative analysis showed that (i) IN2 and IR2 exhibited more microbial richness than IN1 and IR1, (ii) IR1 and IR2 exhibited higher microbial diversities than IN1 and IN2, (iii) samples from Iheya Ridge and Iheya North fell into two groups based on principle component analysis. Furthermore, microbes potentially involved in sulfur, nitrogen, and metal metabolism and cycling were detected in all samples. These results provide for the first time a comparative picture of the microbial diversities in the sediments of Iheya North and Iheya Ridge and indicate that geological features and distance from active hydrothermal vents likely play important roles in the shaping of microbial community structure. Copyright

  20. Biodiversity Science In The Deep Sea: The ESF EuroDEEP Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2007-12-01

    What little we know of deep-sea ecosystems indicates that they host one of the highest biodiversities on the planet as well as important mineral and biological resources, which are increasingly being exploited. Understanding deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, from viruses to megafauna, is essential to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic factors and provide management options. The aim of the multidisciplinary ESF EUROCORES Programme EuroDEEP, Ecosystem Functioning and Biodiversity in Deep Sea, is to further explore and identify the different deep-sea habitats, assessing both the abiotic and biotic processes that sustain and maintain deep-sea communities. The scope is to interpret variations of biodiversity within and between deep-sea habitats, and the interactions of the biota with the ecosystems in which they live. The resulting scientific data are a prerequisite for the sustainable use and the development of management and conservation options aiming at the sustainable use of marine resources that will benefit society as a whole. The Programme aims at providing the necessary framework and funding for the development of top-quality deep- sea research at the European level in a global context (Census of Marine Life and SCOR/IGBP). In particular, it builds on sharing of national large-scale resources, which are essential for deep-sea research (i.e. ships, ROVs, submersibles, AUVs, deep-towed vehicles, deep-sea sampling equipment, new sensors, etc.) as well as the coordination of efforts amongst scientists and laboratories from the countries involved and links with ongoing projects. EuroDEEP will participate in the development of new technologies as well as data management, analysis and modelling. Most of all, EuroDEEP will catalyse excellent research on what biodiversity exists in the deep sea, how it is generated and maintained by abiotic and biotic processes, and what the role of the deep-sea is in the biogeochemical processes affecting the

  1. Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep-sea basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David S; Takahashi, Taro; Slagle, Angela L

    2008-07-22

    Developing a method for secure sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in geological formations is one of our most pressing global scientific problems. Injection into deep-sea basalt formations provides unique and significant advantages over other potential geological storage options, including (i) vast reservoir capacities sufficient to accommodate centuries-long U.S. production of fossil fuel CO2 at locations within pipeline distances to populated areas and CO2 sources along the U.S. west coast; (ii) sufficiently closed water-rock circulation pathways for the chemical reaction of CO2 with basalt to produce stable and nontoxic (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+))CO(3) infilling minerals, and (iii) significant risk reduction for post-injection leakage by geological, gravitational, and hydrate-trapping mechanisms. CO2 sequestration in established sediment-covered basalt aquifers on the Juan de Fuca plate offer promising locations to securely accommodate more than a century of future U.S. emissions, warranting energized scientific research, technological assessment, and economic evaluation to establish a viable pilot injection program in the future.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF THE DEEP SEA WRECK USS INDEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Symons

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of ongoing efforts to better understand the nature of shipwrecks in National Marine Sanctuaries which may pose some level of pollution risk, and in this case, to definitively locate what is likely the only shipwreck in a sanctuary involved in both nuclear testing and nuclear waste disposal, NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries collaborated with NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and The Boeing Company, which provided their autonomous underwater vehicle, Echo Ranger, to conduct the first deep-water archaeological survey of the scuttled aircraft carrier USS Independence in the waters of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS in March 2015. The presence of the deep-sea scuttled radioactive aircraft carrier USS Independence off the California coast has been the source of consistent media speculation and public concern for decades. The survey confirmed that a sonar target charted at the location was Independence, and provided details on the condition of the wreck, and revealed no detectable levels of radioactivity. At the same time, new information from declassified government reports provided more detail on Independence’s use as a naval test craft for radiological decontamination as well as its use as a repository for radioactive materials at the time of its scuttling in 1951. While further surveys may reveal more, physical assessment and focused archival work has demonstrated that the level of concern and speculation of danger from either a radioactive or oil pollution threat posed may be exaggerated.

  3. The influence of buried nodules on the mobility of metals in deep sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Christina; Kuhn, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal fluids can extract significant amounts of heat from oceanic lithosphere by lateral fluid flow through permeable basaltic crust of an age of up to 65 Ma. Fluid recharge and discharge occur at basement outcrops in between impermeable pelagic deep sea sediments. Recharge of oxic seawater causes upward oxygen diffusion into sediments overlying the permeable basalt in areas proximal to recharge sites. It is suggested that this oxygen has a strong impact on sediments and Mn-nodules during fluid exposure time. The aim of this study is to investigate if/how fluid flow through oceanic crust influence the distribution and element budget of Mn-nodules. Nodules occur widespread at the seafloor of the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) in the equatorial North Pacific and were analyzed in many studies worldwide. Nodules buried in the deep sea sediments could be found only rarely (von Stackelberg, 1997, Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ., 119: 153-176). High resolution side-scan sonar recordings (unpublished Data BGR Hannover) indicate that there exist a coherent layer of nodules buried in the sediments of the working area. During the expedition SO 240/FLUM nodules were found on the sediment surface in 4200 to 4300 m water depth as well as in the sediment down to 985 cm below seafloor. In general, nodules consist of different nm- to µm-thick, dense and porous layers. The geochemical composition of bulk nodules and single nodule layers were determined by XRF, ICP-MS/OES, XRD and by high resolution analyses with electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS. Dense layers have low Mn/Fe ratios ( 10) and high Ni+Cu and Li concentrations. The different compositions depend on different formation processes of the layers. They were formed by metal precipitation from oxic (hydrogenetic) and suboxic (diagenetic) bottom-near seawater and/or pore water (Wegorzewski and Kuhn, 2014, Mar. Geol. 357, 123-138). Preliminary results show that there are significant differences between the geochemical composition

  4. Indian deep-sea environment experiment (INDEX): Monitoring the restoration of marine enviroment after artificial disturbance to simulate deep-sea mining in central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    of the experiment on the benthic ecosystem that were published in Marine Georesources and Geotechnology (Volume 18, No. 3, 2000) and Deep-Sea Research (Volume 48, No. 16, 2001). The correct order of the papers should have been: Monitoring the Impact of Simulated... of the National Institute of Oceanography, India, has been published in the Marine Georesources and Geotechnology journal, vol. 23 (September–December 2005). It has 11 papers dealing with different aspects of deep-sea environment asso- ciated with polymetallic...

  5. Ship Track for Deep Sea Medicines 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ship track of the Ronald H. Brown during the "Deep Sea Medicines 2003: Exploring the Gulf of Mexico" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  6. Ship Sensor Observations for Deep Sea Medicines 2003 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown during the "Deep Sea Medicines 2003: Exploration of the Gulf of Mexico" expedition...

  7. Dining in the Deep: The Feeding Ecology of Deep-Sea Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Sutton, Tracey T.

    2017-01-01

    Deep-sea fishes inhabit ˜75% of the biosphere and are a critical part of deep-sea food webs. Diet analysis and more recent trophic biomarker approaches, such as stable isotopes and fatty-acid profiles, have enabled the description of feeding guilds and an increased recognition of the vertical connectivity in food webs in a whole-water-column sense, including benthic-pelagic coupling. Ecosystem modeling requires data on feeding rates; the available estimates indicate that deep-sea fishes have lower per-individual feeding rates than coastal and epipelagic fishes, but the overall predation impact may be high. A limited number of studies have measured the vertical flux of carbon by mesopelagic fishes, which appears to be substantial. Anthropogenic activities are altering deep-sea ecosystems and their services, which are mediated by trophic interactions. We also summarize outstanding data gaps.

  8. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Rooper: Deep sea coral and sponge distribution

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of a series of ongoing research projects, the AFSC has been mapping and modeling the distribution of deep-sea coral and sponge communities throughout Alaska....

  9. Environmental studies for mining of deep-sea polymetallic nodules - Accomplishments and future plans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    Environmental studies for mining of deep-sea polymetallic nodules were initiated to evaluate the possible impacts of mining on benthic environment and develop protocols for environmental studies, to fulfill one of the obligations of the country as a...

  10. Chemosynthetic activity prevails in deep-sea sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, A.; Sujith, P.P.; Mourya, B.S.; Biche, S.U.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    It is hypothesized that in the deep-sea, under psychrophilic, barophilic and oligotrophic conditions, microbial community of Central Indian Basin (CIB) sediments could be chemosynthetic. In the dark, at near ambient temperature, 4 + or –2 degrees C...

  11. A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Ting; Xue, Ya-Rong; Liu, Chang-Hong

    2015-07-23

    Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

  12. Dining in the Deep: The Feeding Ecology of Deep-Sea Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazen, Jeffrey C; Sutton, Tracey T

    2017-01-03

    Deep-sea fishes inhabit ∼75% of the biosphere and are a critical part of deep-sea food webs. Diet analysis and more recent trophic biomarker approaches, such as stable isotopes and fatty-acid profiles, have enabled the description of feeding guilds and an increased recognition of the vertical connectivity in food webs in a whole-water-column sense, including benthic-pelagic coupling. Ecosystem modeling requires data on feeding rates; the available estimates indicate that deep-sea fishes have lower per-individual feeding rates than coastal and epipelagic fishes, but the overall predation impact may be high. A limited number of studies have measured the vertical flux of carbon by mesopelagic fishes, which appears to be substantial. Anthropogenic activities are altering deep-sea ecosystems and their services, which are mediated by trophic interactions. We also summarize outstanding data gaps.

  13. Electromagnetic fields induced by surface ring waves in the deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic effects associated with a radially symmetric system of progressive surface waves in the deep sea, induced by underwater oscillating sources or by dispersive decay of the initial localized perturbations of the sea surface.

  14. A Brief Review of Bioactive Metabolites Derived from Deep-Sea Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ting Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea fungi, the fungi that inhabit the sea and the sediment at depths of over 1000 m below the surface, have become an important source of industrial, agricultural, and nutraceutical compounds based on their diversities in both structure and function. Since the first study of deep-sea fungi in the Atlantic Ocean at a depth of 4450 m was conducted approximately 50 years ago, hundreds of isolates of deep-sea fungi have been reported based on culture-dependent methods. To date more than 180 bioactive secondary metabolites derived from deep-sea fungi have been documented in the literature. These include compounds with anticancer, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, and antiviral activities. In this review, we summarize the structures and bioactivities of these metabolites to provide help for novel drug development.

  15. Iron oxidation and biomineralization by Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a deep-sea microaerophilic lithoautotroph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C. S.; Emerson, D.; Fakra, S.; Edwards, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    The ocean crust contains a large reservoir of reduced iron, available for microbial energy generation. Some of this ferrous iron is mobilized by fluids in hydrothermal fields at seamounts and mid-ocean ridges. A microaerophilic iron oxidizer, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans has been identified (by molecular methods and microscopy) at various sites, and appears to be a key iron-oxidizing bacterium (FeOB) in the deep sea. Originally isolated from microbial mats near vents at the Loihi Seamount in Hawaii, Mariprofundus is distinctive because it forms an extracellular iron-mineralized stalk-like structure. We aim to understand its metabolism and mineral formation using a multidisciplinary approach, including electron microscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, time-lapse light microscopic imaging of live cells, and genomic and biochemical analyses. Microscopy and spectroscopy work shows that as the cells grow, they excretes iron and organic-rich fibrils that make up the stalk, at a rate of ~2 microns/hr. Stalk growth appears to be parallel to the direction of Fe and oxygen gradients. The Mariprofundus genome contains several terminal oxidases/peroxidases, including two cbb3-type cytochrome oxidases with a high affinity for oxygen, consistent with the microaerophilic lifestyle of these organisms. However, we have not identified genes for metabolisms other than aerobic iron oxidation, nor have we found any genes similar to known or suspected iron oxidases, though the genome (2.87 Mb) is rich in cytochromes (32 of 2922 genes). Thus, we are performing experiments to extract and analyze proteins from both cultured and environmental samples in order to find ones that will oxidize iron. UV-Vis spectra of extracts suggest that c-type cytochromes are particularly abundant, so these are candidates for further investigation. In combination with the microscopy and spectroscopy studies, these are the first steps towards understanding the complete pathway of iron from uptake through mineral

  16. The contribution of deep-sea macrohabitat heterogeneity to global nematode diversity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vanreusel, A.; Fonseca, G.; Danovaro, R.; DaSilva, M.C.; Esteves, A.M.; Ferrero, T.; Gad, G.; Galtsova, V.; Gambi, C.; Genevois, V.F.; Ingels, J.; Ingole, B.S.; Lampadariou, N.; Merckx, B.; Miljutina, M.; Muthumbi, A.; Netto, S.; Portnova, D.; Radziejewska, T.; Raes, M.; Tchesunov, A.; Vanaverbeke, J.; Van Gaever, S.; Venekey, V.; Bezerra, T.N.; Flint, H.; Copley, J.; Pape, E.; Zeppilli, D.; Martinez, P.A.; Galeron, J.

    -sampled in order to fully understand the contribution of habitat heterogeneity versus regional differences to global nematode diversity. Keywords: deep-sea, habitat heterogeneity, nematodes, biodiversity, census of marine life Problem The deep-sea floor has... part of a bathymetric transect which covered a significant part of the continental slope. Samples were collected quantitatively (using different types of corers) and treated with standardized extraction procedures in order to guarantee the most...

  17. Deep-sea genetic resources: New frontiers for science and stewardship in areas beyond national jurisdiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden-Davies, Harriet

    2017-03-01

    The deep-sea is a large source of marine genetic resources (MGR), which have many potential uses and are a growing area of research. Much of the deep-sea lies in areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), including 65% of the global ocean. MGR in ABNJ occupy a significant gap in the international legal framework. Access and benefit sharing of MGR is a key issue in the development of a new international legally-binding instrument under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) for the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in ABNJ. This paper examines how this is relevant to deep-sea scientific research and identifies emerging challenges and opportunities. There is no internationally agreed definition of MGR, however, deep-sea genetic resources could incorporate any biological material including genes, proteins and natural products. Deep-sea scientific research is the key actor accessing MGR in ABNJ and sharing benefits such as data, samples and knowledge. UNCLOS provides the international legal framework for marine scientific research, international science cooperation, capacity building and marine technology transfer. Enhanced implementation could support access and benefit sharing of MGR in ABNJ. Deep-sea scientific researchers could play an important role in informing practical new governance solutions for access and benefit sharing of MGR that promote scientific research in ABNJ and support deep-sea stewardship. Advancing knowledge of deep-sea biodiversity in ABNJ, enhancing open-access to data and samples, standardisation and international marine science cooperation are significant potential opportunity areas.

  18. Species-energy relationship in the deep sea: A test using the Quaternary fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G.; Cronin, T. M.; Roy, K.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the processes regulating species richness in deep-sea communities. Here we take advantage of natural experiments involving climate change to test whether predictions of the species-energy hypothesis hold in the deep sea. In addition, we test for the relationship between temperature and species richness predicted by a recent model based on biochemical kinetics of metabolism. Using the deep-sea fossil record of benthic foraminifera and statistical meta-analyses of temperature-richness and productivity-richness relationships in 10 deep-sea cores, we show that temperature but not productivity is a significant predictor of species richness over the past c. 130 000 years. Our results not only show that the temperature-richness relationship in the deep-sea is remarkably similar to that found in terrestrial and shallow marine habitats, but also that species richness tracks temperature change over geological time, at least on scales of c. 100 000 years. Thus, predicting biotic response to global climate change in the deep sea would require better understanding of how temperature regulates the occurrences and geographical ranges of species. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Potential Osteoporosis Recovery by Deep Sea Water through Bone Regeneration in SAMP8 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hen-Yu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the therapeutic potential of deep sea water (DSW on osteoporosis. Previously, we have established the ovariectomized senescence-accelerated mice (OVX-SAMP8 and demonstrated strong recovery of osteoporosis by stem cell and platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Deep sea water at hardness (HD 1000 showed significant increase in proliferation of osteoblastic cell (MC3T3 by MTT assay. For in vivo animal study, bone mineral density (BMD was strongly enhanced followed by the significantly increased trabecular numbers through micro-CT examination after a 4-month deep sea water treatment, and biochemistry analysis showed that serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity was decreased. For stage-specific osteogenesis, bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs were harvested and examined. Deep sea water-treated BMSCs showed stronger osteogenic differentiation such as BMP2, RUNX2, OPN, and OCN, and enhanced colony forming abilities, compared to the control group. Interestingly, most untreated OVX-SAMP8 mice died around 10 months; however, approximately 57% of DSW-treated groups lived up to 16.6 months, a life expectancy similar to the previously reported life expectancy for SAMR1 24 months. The results demonstrated the regenerative potentials of deep sea water on osteogenesis, showing that deep sea water could potentially be applied in osteoporosis therapy as a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.

  20. Horizontal distribution patterns in Arctic deep-sea macrobenthic communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaeva, Nataliya E.; Mokievsky, Vadim O.; Soltwedel, Thomas; Gebruk, Andrey V.

    2008-09-01

    Horizontal distribution patterns of macrobenthos were studied based on the material collected at the deep-sea long-term observatory HAUSGARTEN in Fram Strait, west of Spitsbergen (79°N), during the R.V. Polarstern expedition ARK XIX/3c in July-August 2003. Macrofauna was obtained with a giant box corer at water depths of about 2500-2600 m. Samples were arranged using a hierarchical approach to analyze benthic fauna distribution at different scales. Three stations were distributed along the 26 km transect. Three cores (0.25 m 2) were taken at each station. Five subcores (156.25 cm 2) were taken from each core. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of statistical analysis showed that all samples belong to one benthic community dominated by three species, Tetractinomorpha gen.sp. A, Myriochele heeri, and Galathowenia fragilis. Total biomasses varied from 2.31 to 6.41 g ww m -2 and densities ranged from 1976 to 3254 ind. m -2. Multivariate analysis showed the division of all samples into two distinct groups (species assemblages) on the core and subcore levels. These assemblages occupied an area several kilometers across, and differed from each other. The second level of heterogeneity occurs between cores and subcores of assemblage B and reflects variations in the abundance of sponge species Tetractinomorpha gen. sp. A. The size of these small patches appears to be about 150 cm 2. The hierarchical organization of benthic macrofauna on the continental slope off Spitsbergen includes at least three levels: communities, which replace each other along the depth gradient, species assemblages, which make up the orthogonal inner mosaics in each vertical zone, and patches of certain species, which form the lowest level of the hierarchy.

  1. Development of a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for in situ multi-element chemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Blair; Takahashi, Tomoko; Sato, Takumi; Sakka, Tetsuo; Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ohki, Toshihiko; Ohki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is emerging as a technique that can expand the envelope of modern oceanographic sensors. The selectivity of spectroscopic techniques enables a single instrument to measure multiple components of the marine environment and can form the basis for versatile tools to perform in situ geochemical analysis. We have developed a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (ChemiCam) and successfully deployed the instrument from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to perform in situ multi-element analysis of both seawater and mineral deposits at depths of over 1000 m. The instrument consists of a long-nanosecond duration pulse-laser, a spectrometer and a high-speed camera. Power supply, instrument control and signal telemetry are provided through a ROV tether. The instrument has two modes of operation. In the first mode, the laser is focused directly into seawater and spectroscopic measurements of seawater composition are performed. In the second mode, a fiber-optic cable assembly is used to make spectroscopic measurements of mineral deposits. In this mode the laser is fired through a 4 m long fiber-optic cable and is focused onto the target's surface using an optical head and a linear stage that can be held by a ROV manipulator. In this paper, we describe the instrument and the methods developed to process its measurements. Exemplary measurements of both seawater and mineral deposits made during deployments of the device at an active hydrothermal vent field in the Okinawa trough are presented. Through integration with platforms such as underwater vehicles, drilling systems and subsea observatories, it is hoped that this technology can contribute to more efficient scientific surveys of the deep-sea environment.

  2. Venting formation fluids from deep-sea boreholes in a ridge flank setting: ODP Sites 1025 and 1026

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Jannasch, Hans W.; Kastner, Miriam; Plant, Josh N.; Decarlo, Eric H.; Lebon, Geoff

    2004-08-01

    During ODP Leg 168, two of ten boreholes, ODP Holes 1025C and 1026B, were cased through the sediment section, penetrated basaltic crust that is overpressured, and sealed. In 1999 and 2000 the seals were removed, allowing crustal formation fluids to vent and be sampled. The composition of these fluids is compared to those of basal deep-sea pore waters, which have been the basis for estimating geochemical fluxes from low-temperature ridge flank hydrothermal systems. Estimates for the composition of the major ions in formation fluids based on basal pore waters are within 5% of the values measured in borehole fluids. Similar comparisons for minor and trace elements are not as good; some are reactive in the sediment section, resulting in large uncertainties in the pore water extrapolation, while others are influenced by a variety of contaminants, including steel, grease, drilling muds, and basal sediment. Evidence for contamination includes high dissolved and particulate concentrations of several metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb) and measurable changes in concentration during the past four years in response to reaction with basal sediment. This new confidence in estimating the primary composition of formation fluids, coupled with advances in thermodynamic and kinetic models, reveals the possibility of anhydrite precipitation in ridge flank hydrothermal systems at temperatures of ˜70°C. Such new insights allow us to address the timing and conditions under which seawater-crustal reactions occur, leading to more accurate models of crustal evolution.

  3. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent bacteria related to human pathogenic Vibrio species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nur A. Hasan; Christopher J. Grim; Erin K. Lipp; Irma N. G. Rivera; Jongsik Chun; Bradd J. Haley; Elisa Taviani; Seon Young Choi; Mozammel Hoq; A. Christine Munk; Thomas S. Brettin; David Bruce; Jean F. Challacombe; J. Chris Detter; Cliff S. Han; Jonathan A. Eisen; Anwar Huq; Rita R. Colwell

    2015-01-01

    .... antiquarius is closely related to pathogenic Vibrio species, namely Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio vulnificus, but sufficiently divergent to warrant a separate species status. The V...

  4. Aestuariivita atlantica sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guizhen; Lai, Qiliang; Du, Yaping; Liu, Xiupian; Sun, Fengqin; Shao, Zongze

    2015-10-01

    A novel strain, 22II-S11-z3T, was isolated from the deep-sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean. The bacterium was aerobic, Gram-staining-negative, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative, oval- to rod-shaped, and non-motile. Growth was observed at salinities of 1-9 % NaCl and temperatures of 10-45 °C. The isolate could hydrolyse aesculin and Tweens 20, 40 and 80, but not gelatin. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 22II-S11-z3T belonged to the genus Aestuariivita, with highest sequence similarity to Aestuariivita boseongensis KCTC 42052T (97.5 %). The average nucleotide identity and digital DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain 22II-S11-z3T and A. boseongensis KCTC 42052T were 71.5 % and 20.0 ± 2.3 %, respectively. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 65.5 mol%. The principal fatty acids (>5 %) were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c/ω6c) (35.2 %), C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c (20.9 %), C16 : 0 (11.8 %), 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c (11.4 %) and C12 : 1 3-OH (9.4 %). The respiratory quinone was determined to be Q-10. Diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, nine unidentified phospholipids, one unidentified aminolipid and two unidentified lipids were present. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain 22II-S11-z3T represents a novel species of the genus Aestuariivita, for which the name Aestuariivita atlantica sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 22II-S11-z3T ( = KCTC 42276T = MCCC 1A09432T).

  5. Groundtruthing the Neodymium Isotope Proxy in Deep-Sea Corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Flierdt, T.; Robinson, L. F.; Adkins, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    The Nd isotopic composition of marine precipitates is increasingly recognized as a powerful tool in paleoceanography. Unlike nutrient proxies such as δ13C or Cd/Ca, Nd isotopes are not thought to be altered by biological processes, and thus may serve as a quasi-conservative water mass mixing tracer. However, any archive, which is used to extract authigenic Nd isotopes, needs careful examination, to test the integrity of the inferred seawater signal. Here we present first data on cleaning experiments and modern calibration experiments on different species of deep-sea corals. Seven different coral samples ranging in age from modern to ~220ka were selected for experiments designed to remove ferromanganese crusts and / or organic residues that may contain high concentrations of Nd and Th. The aim was to determine whether the rigorous chemical procedure we use to remove Th associated with these crusts is effective at removing Nd, and whether it causes any fractionation in the Nd isotopic composition of the coral aragonite. Crusts were found to contain Th-232 concentrations of up to ~160ppm, with 232Th/230Th ratios dependent on the oceanic location of the coral. Un-cleaned corals had Th-232 concentrations of up to 8ppb and the cleaning procedure reduced these values to less than 0.2ppb in both modern and fossil specimens. Neodymium isotopic compositions reveal that for modern corals, with no visible coating, a pre-cleaning step is sufficient to yield the isotopic composition of ambient seawater. The ferromanganese coating around fossil corals however may have a very different isotopic composition than the coral aragonite since it may be a time-integrated signal biased towards modern values. This bias is observed for intermediate water depth D. dianthus corals from stage 3 in the northwest Atlantic. Modern D. dianthus skeletons from the northwest Atlantic and the Drake Passage reflect the seawater Nd isotopic composition, and we are extending this modern calibration to

  6. Man and the last great wilderness: human impact on the deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Tyler, Paul A; Baker, Maria C; Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Malcolm R; Escobar, Elva; Levin, Lisa A; Menot, Lenaick; Rowden, Ashley A; Smith, Craig R; Van Dover, Cindy L

    2011-01-01

    The deep sea, the largest ecosystem on Earth and one of the least studied, harbours high biodiversity and provides a wealth of resources. Although humans have used the oceans for millennia, technological developments now allow exploitation of fisheries resources, hydrocarbons and minerals below 2000 m depth. The remoteness of the deep seafloor has promoted the disposal of residues and litter. Ocean acidification and climate change now bring a new dimension of global effects. Thus the challenges facing the deep sea are large and accelerating, providing a new imperative for the science community, industry and national and international organizations to work together to develop successful exploitation management and conservation of the deep-sea ecosystem. This paper provides scientific expert judgement and a semi-quantitative analysis of past, present and future impacts of human-related activities on global deep-sea habitats within three categories: disposal, exploitation and climate change. The analysis is the result of a Census of Marine Life--SYNDEEP workshop (September 2008). A detailed review of known impacts and their effects is provided. The analysis shows how, in recent decades, the most significant anthropogenic activities that affect the deep sea have evolved from mainly disposal (past) to exploitation (present). We predict that from now and into the future, increases in atmospheric CO(2) and facets and consequences of climate change will have the most impact on deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Synergies between different anthropogenic pressures and associated effects are discussed, indicating that most synergies are related to increased atmospheric CO(2) and climate change effects. We identify deep-sea ecosystems we believe are at higher risk from human impacts in the near future: benthic communities on sedimentary upper slopes, cold-water corals, canyon benthic communities and seamount pelagic and benthic communities. We finalise this review with a short

  7. Stakeholder perspectives on the importance of rare-species research for deep-sea environmental management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Phillip J.; Campbell, Lisa M.; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2017-07-01

    The apparent prevalence of rare species (rarity) in the deep sea is a concern for environmental management and conservation of biodiversity. Rare species are often considered at risk of extinction and, in terrestrial and shallow water environments, have been shown to play key roles within an ecosystem. In the deep-sea environment, current research focuses primarily on abundant species and deep-sea stakeholders are questioning the importance of rare species in ecosystem functioning. This study asks whether deep-sea stakeholders (primarily scientists) view rare-species research as a priority in guiding environmental management. Delphi methodology (i.e., an iterative survey approach) was used to understand views about whether or not 'deep-sea scientists should allocate more resources to research on rare species in the deep sea, even if this means less resources might be available for abundant-species research.' Results suggest little consensus regarding the prioritization of resources for rare-species research. From Survey 1 to Survey 3, the average participant response shifted toward a view that rare-species research is not a priority if it comes at a cost to research on abundant species. Participants pointed to the need for a balanced approach and highlighted knowledge gaps about even the most fundamental questions, including whether rare species are truly 'rare' or simply under-sampled. Participants emphasized the lack of basic biological knowledge for rare and abundant species, particularly abundant meio- and microscopic species, as well as uncertainty in the roles rare and abundant species play in ecosystem processes. Approaches that jointly consider the role of rare and abundant species in ecosystem functioning (e.g., biological trait analysis) may help to clarify the extent to which rare species need to be incorporated into deep-sea environment management in order to maintain ecosystem functioning.

  8. Man and the last great wilderness: human impact on the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ramirez-Llodra

    Full Text Available The deep sea, the largest ecosystem on Earth and one of the least studied, harbours high biodiversity and provides a wealth of resources. Although humans have used the oceans for millennia, technological developments now allow exploitation of fisheries resources, hydrocarbons and minerals below 2000 m depth. The remoteness of the deep seafloor has promoted the disposal of residues and litter. Ocean acidification and climate change now bring a new dimension of global effects. Thus the challenges facing the deep sea are large and accelerating, providing a new imperative for the science community, industry and national and international organizations to work together to develop successful exploitation management and conservation of the deep-sea ecosystem. This paper provides scientific expert judgement and a semi-quantitative analysis of past, present and future impacts of human-related activities on global deep-sea habitats within three categories: disposal, exploitation and climate change. The analysis is the result of a Census of Marine Life--SYNDEEP workshop (September 2008. A detailed review of known impacts and their effects is provided. The analysis shows how, in recent decades, the most significant anthropogenic activities that affect the deep sea have evolved from mainly disposal (past to exploitation (present. We predict that from now and into the future, increases in atmospheric CO(2 and facets and consequences of climate change will have the most impact on deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Synergies between different anthropogenic pressures and associated effects are discussed, indicating that most synergies are related to increased atmospheric CO(2 and climate change effects. We identify deep-sea ecosystems we believe are at higher risk from human impacts in the near future: benthic communities on sedimentary upper slopes, cold-water corals, canyon benthic communities and seamount pelagic and benthic communities. We finalise this

  9. Man and the Last Great Wilderness: Human Impact on the Deep Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Tyler, Paul A.; Baker, Maria C.; Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Malcolm R.; Escobar, Elva; Levin, Lisa A.; Menot, Lenaick; Rowden, Ashley A.; Smith, Craig R.; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2011-01-01

    The deep sea, the largest ecosystem on Earth and one of the least studied, harbours high biodiversity and provides a wealth of resources. Although humans have used the oceans for millennia, technological developments now allow exploitation of fisheries resources, hydrocarbons and minerals below 2000 m depth. The remoteness of the deep seafloor has promoted the disposal of residues and litter. Ocean acidification and climate change now bring a new dimension of global effects. Thus the challenges facing the deep sea are large and accelerating, providing a new imperative for the science community, industry and national and international organizations to work together to develop successful exploitation management and conservation of the deep-sea ecosystem. This paper provides scientific expert judgement and a semi-quantitative analysis of past, present and future impacts of human-related activities on global deep-sea habitats within three categories: disposal, exploitation and climate change. The analysis is the result of a Census of Marine Life – SYNDEEP workshop (September 2008). A detailed review of known impacts and their effects is provided. The analysis shows how, in recent decades, the most significant anthropogenic activities that affect the deep sea have evolved from mainly disposal (past) to exploitation (present). We predict that from now and into the future, increases in atmospheric CO2 and facets and consequences of climate change will have the most impact on deep-sea habitats and their fauna. Synergies between different anthropogenic pressures and associated effects are discussed, indicating that most synergies are related to increased atmospheric CO2 and climate change effects. We identify deep-sea ecosystems we believe are at higher risk from human impacts in the near future: benthic communities on sedimentary upper slopes, cold-water corals, canyon benthic communities and seamount pelagic and benthic communities. We finalise this review with a short

  10. An in-situ Mobile pH Calibrator for application with HOV and ROV platform in deep sea environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, a novel in-situ sensor calibration instrument, Mobile pH Calibrator (MpHC), was developed for application with HOV Alvin. It was specifically designed to conduct in-situ pH measurement in deep sea hydrothermal diffuse fluids with in-situ calibration function. In general, the sensor calibrator involves three integrated electrodes (pH, dissolved H2 and H2S) and a temperature sensor, all of which are installed in a cell with a volume of ~ 1 ml. A PEEK check valve cartridge is installed at the inlet end of the cell to guide the flow path during the measurement and calibration processes. Two PEEK tubes are connected at outlet end of the cell for drawing out hydrothermal fluid and delivering pH buffer fluids. During its measurement operation, the pump draws in hydrothermal fluid, which then passes through the check valve directly into the sensing cell. When in calibration mode, the pump delivers pH buffers into the cell, while automatically closing the check valve to the outside environment. This probe has two advantages compared to our previous unit used during KNOX18RR MAR cruise in 2008 and MARS cabled observatory deployment in 2012. First, in the former design, a 5 cm solenoid valve was equipped with the probe. This enlarged size prevented its application in specific point or small area. In this version, the probe has only a dimension of 1.6 cm for an easy access to hydrothermal biological environments. Secondly, the maximum temperature condition of the earlier system was limited by the solenoid valve precluding operation in excess of 50 ºC. The new design avoids this problem, which improves its temperature tolerance. The upper limit of temperature condition is now up to 100oC, therefore enabling broader application in hydrothermal diffuse flow system on the seafloor. During SVC cruise (AT26-12) in the Gulf of Mexico this year, the MpHC was successfully tested with Alvin dives at the depth up to 2600 m for measuring pH with in-situ calibration in seafloor

  11. Theoretical constraints of physical and chemical properties of hydrothermal fluids on variations in chemolithotrophic microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Takai, Ken

    2014-12-01

    In the past few decades, chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents have received attention as plausible analogues to the early ecosystems of Earth, as well as to extraterrestrial ecosystems. These ecosystems are sustained by chemical energy obtained from inorganic redox substances (e.g., H2S, CO2, H2, CH4, and O2) in hydrothermal fluids and ambient seawater. The chemical and isotope compositions of the hydrothermal fluid are, in turn, controlled by subseafloor physical and chemical processes, including fluid-rock interactions, phase separation and partitioning of fluids, and precipitation of minerals. We hypothesized that specific physicochemical principles describe the linkages among the living ecosystems, hydrothermal fluids, and geological background in deep-sea hydrothermal systems. We estimated the metabolic energy potentially available for productivity by chemolithotrophic microorganisms at various hydrothermal vent fields. We used a geochemical model based on hydrothermal fluid chemistry data compiled from 89 globally distributed hydrothermal vent sites. The model estimates were compared to the observed variability in extant microbial communities in seafloor hydrothermal environments. Our calculations clearly show that representative chemolithotrophic metabolisms (e.g., thiotrophic, hydrogenotrophic, and methanotrophic) respond differently to geological and geochemical variations in the hydrothermal systems. Nearly all of the deep-sea hydrothermal systems provide abundant energy for organisms with aerobic thiotrophic metabolisms; observed variations in the H2S concentrations among the hydrothermal fluids had little effect on the energetics of thiotrophic metabolism. Thus, these organisms form the base of the chemosynthetic microbial community in global deep-sea hydrothermal environments. In contrast, variations in H2 concentrations in hydrothermal fluids significantly impact organisms with aerobic and anaerobic hydrogenotrophic metabolisms

  12. Deep-sea palaeoceanography of the Maldives Islands (ODP Hole 716A), equatorial Indian Ocean during MIS 12–6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sarkar; A K Gupta

    2009-11-01

    Deep-sea benthic foraminifera, planktic foraminifer Globigerina bulloides and pteropods have been quantitatively analysed in 451 samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 716A, to understand both surface and deep-sea palaeoceanographic changes in the equatorial Indian Ocean basin during the late Quaternary (∼444–151 Kyrs). Benthic foraminifera were analysed from > 125 m size fraction whereas Globigerina bulloides and pteropods were analysed from > 150 m size fraction. Factor analysis of most dominant benthic foraminiferal species over the studied time span made it possible to identify three biofacies characterizing distinct deep-sea environmental settings at Hole 716A. The environmental interpretation of each species is based on the ecology of recent deep-sea benthic foraminifera. The faunal record indicates fluctuating deep-sea conditions including changes in surface productivity, organic food supply and deep-sea oxygenation linked to changing wind intensities. These changes are pronounced on glacial-interglacial time scales driven by summer monsoon winds.

  13. Advances in deep-sea biology: biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and conservation. An introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Marina R.; Hilário, Ana; Santos, Ricardo S.

    2017-03-01

    Once considered as monotonous and devoid of life, the deep sea was revealed during the last century as an environment with a plethora of life forms and extremely high species richness (Rex and Etter, 2010). Underwater vehicle developments allowed direct observations of the deep, disclosing unique habitats and diverse seascapes, and other technological advances enabled manipulative experimentation and unprecedented prospects to pursue novel research topics (Levin and Sibuet, 2012; Danovaro et al., 2014). Alongside, the growing human population greatly increased the pressure on deep-sea ecosystems and the services they provide (Ramirez-Llodra et al., 2011; Thurber et al., 2014; Levin et al., 2016). Societal changes further intensified worldwide competition for natural resources, extending the present footprint of impacts over most of the global ocean (Halpern et al., 2008). In this socio-economic context, and in tandem with cutting edge technological advances and an unclear legal framework to regulate access to natural resources (Boyes and Elliott, 2014), the deep sea has emerged as a new opportunity for industrial exploitation and novel economic activities. The expanding use of the deep sea prompted a rapid reply from deep-sea scientists that recommended ;a move from a frontier mentality of exploitation and single-sector management to a precautionary system that balances use of living marine resources, energy, and minerals from the deep ocean with maintenance of a productive and healthy marine environment, while improving knowledge and collaboration; and proposed ;three directions to advance deep-ocean stewardship: i) protection and mitigation, ii) research, and iii) collaborative governance; (Mengerink et al., 2014). The European Marine Board position paper 22 (Rogers et al., 2015) further examined the key societal and environmental drivers confronting the deep sea and the role of deep-sea research to deliver future knowledge needs for science and society; a clear

  14. From offshore to onshore: multiple origins of shallow-water corals from deep-sea ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lindner

    Full Text Available Shallow-water tropical reefs and the deep sea represent the two most diverse marine environments. Understanding the origin and diversification of this biodiversity is a major quest in ecology and evolution. The most prominent and well-supported explanation, articulated since the first explorations of the deep sea, holds that benthic marine fauna originated in shallow, onshore environments, and diversified into deeper waters. In contrast, evidence that groups of marine organisms originated in the deep sea is limited, and the possibility that deep-water taxa have contributed to the formation of shallow-water communities remains untested with phylogenetic methods. Here we show that stylasterid corals (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Stylasteridae--the second most diverse group of hard corals--originated and diversified extensively in the deep sea, and subsequently invaded shallow waters. Our phylogenetic results show that deep-water stylasterid corals have invaded the shallow-water tropics three times, with one additional invasion of the shallow-water temperate zone. Our results also show that anti-predatory innovations arose in the deep sea, but were not involved in the shallow-water invasions. These findings are the first robust evidence that an important group of tropical shallow-water marine animals evolved from deep-water ancestors.

  15. Shear creep parameters of simulative soil for deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马雯波; 饶秋华; 李鹏; 郭帅成; 冯康

    2014-01-01

    Based on mineral component and in-situ vane shear strength of deep-sea sediment, four kinds of simulative soils were prepared by mixing different bentonites with water in order to find the best simulative soil for the deep-sea sediment collected from the Pacific C-C area. Shear creep characteristics of the simulative soil were studied by shear creep test and shear creep parameters were determined by Burgers creep model. Research results show that the shear creep curves of the simulative soil can be divided into transient creep, unstable creep and stable creep, where the unstable creep stage is very short due to its high water content. The shear creep parameters increase with compressive stress and change slightly or fluctuate to approach a constant value with shear stress, and thus average creep parameters under the same compressive stress are used as the creep parameters of the simulative soil. Traction of the deep-sea mining machine walking at a constant velocity can be calculated by the shear creep constitutive equation of the deep-sea simulative soil, which provides a theoretical basis for safe operation and optimal design of the deep-sea mining machine.

  16. Microsporidia-nematode associations in methane seeps reveal basal fungal parasitism in the deep sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir eSapir

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep sea is Earth’s largest habitat but little is known about the nature of deep-sea parasitism. In contrast to a few characterized cases of bacterial and protistan parasites, the existence and biological significance of deep-sea parasitic fungi is yet to be understood. Here we report the discovery of a fungus-related parasitic microsporidium, Nematocenator marisprofundi n. gen. n. sp. that infects benthic nematodes at Pacific Ocean methane seeps on the Pacific Ocean floor. This infection is species-specific and has been temporally and spatially stable over two years of sampling, indicating an ecologically consistent host-parasite interaction. A high distribution of spores in the reproductive tracts of infected males and females and their absence from host nematodes’ intestines suggests a sexual transmission strategy in contrast to the fecal-oral transmission of most microsporidia. N. marisprofundi targets the host’s body wall muscles causing cell lysis, and in severe infection even muscle filament degradation. Phylogenetic analyses placed N. marisprofundi in a novel and basal clade not closely related to any described microsporidia clade, suggesting either that microsporidia-nematode parasitism occurred early in microsporidia evolution or that host specialization occurred late in an ancient deep-sea microsporidian lineage. Our findings reveal that methane seeps support complex ecosystems involving interkingdom interactions between bacteria, nematodes, and parasitic fungi and that microsporidia parasitism exists also in the deep sea biosphere.

  17. Microsporidia-nematode associations in methane seeps reveal basal fungal parasitism in the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Amir; Dillman, Adler R.; Connon, Stephanie A.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Ingels, Jeroen; Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Levin, Lisa A.; Baldwin, James G.; Orphan, Victoria J.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    The deep sea is Earth's largest habitat but little is known about the nature of deep-sea parasitism. In contrast to a few characterized cases of bacterial and protistan parasites, the existence and biological significance of deep-sea parasitic fungi is yet to be understood. Here we report the discovery of a fungus-related parasitic microsporidium, Nematocenator marisprofundi n. gen. n. sp. that infects benthic nematodes at methane seeps on the Pacific Ocean floor. This infection is species-specific and has been temporally and spatially stable over 2 years of sampling, indicating an ecologically consistent host-parasite interaction. A high distribution of spores in the reproductive tracts of infected males and females and their absence from host nematodes' intestines suggests a sexual transmission strategy in contrast to the fecal-oral transmission of most microsporidia. N. marisprofundi targets the host's body wall muscles causing cell lysis, and in severe infection even muscle filament degradation. Phylogenetic analyses placed N. marisprofundi in a novel and basal clade not closely related to any described microsporidia clade, suggesting either that microsporidia-nematode parasitism occurred early in microsporidia evolution or that host specialization occurred late in an ancient deep-sea microsporidian lineage. Our findings reveal that methane seeps support complex ecosystems involving interkingdom interactions between bacteria, nematodes, and parasitic fungi and that microsporidia parasitism exists also in the deep-sea biosphere. PMID:24575084

  18. The KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margiotta, Annarita

    2014-12-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will complement IceCube in its field of view and exceed it substantially in sensitivity. Its main goal is the detection of high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. The detector will have a modular structure with six building blocks, each consisting of about 100 Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared in offshore Toulon, France and offshore Capo Passero on Sicily, Italy. The technological solutions for the neutrino detector of KM3NeT and the expected performance of the neutrino telescope are presented and discussed. - Highlights: • A deep-sea research infrastructure is being built in the Mediterranean Sea. • It will host a km{sup 3}-size neutrino telescope and a deep-sea multidisciplinary observatory. • The main goal of the neutrino telescope is the search for Galactic neutrino sources. • A major innovation is adopted in the design of the optical module. • 31 3 in. photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) will be hosted in the same glass sphere.

  19. Latitudinal gradients of species richness in the deep-sea benthos of the North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, M A; Stuart, C T; Coyne, G

    2000-04-11

    Latitudinal species diversity gradients (LSDGs) in the Northern Hemisphere are the most well established biogeographic patterns on Earth. Despite long-standing interest in LSDGs as a central problem in ecology, their explanation remains uncertain. In terrestrial as well as coastal and pelagic marine ecosystems, these poleward declines in diversity typically have been represented and interpreted in terms of species richness, the number of coexisting species. Newly discovered LSDGs in the bathyal (500-4,000 m) benthos of the North Atlantic may help to resolve the underlying causes of these large-scale trends because the deep sea is such a physically distinct environment. However, a major problem in comparing surface and deep-sea LSDGs is that the latter have been measured differently, by using species diversity indices that are affected by both species richness and the evenness of relative abundance. Here, we demonstrate that deep-sea isopods, gastropods, and bivalves in the North Atlantic do exhibit poleward decreases in species richness, just as those found in other environments. A comprehensive systematic revision of the largest deep-sea gastropod family (Turridae) has provided a unique database on geographic distributions that is directly comparable to those used to document LSDGs in surface biotas. This taxon also shows a poleward decline in the number of species. Seasonal organic enrichment from sinking phytodetritus is the most plausible ecological explanation for deep-sea LSDGs and is the environmental factor most consistently associated with depressed diversity in a variety of bathyal habitats.

  20. Iron sequestration in young deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldermann, Andre; Warr, Laurence; Letofsky-Papst, Ilse; Böttcher, Michael

    2014-05-01

    average) within the upper 25 m of sediment. Within the first 3 meters of the sedimentary pile, iron sequestration related to green clay formation is ~11 times higher than that of pyritization. Even at greater depths ≥ 3 mbsf, where the pyritization reaction becomes progressively more important and 29 to 66% of the initial detrital ferrihydrite input is almost dissolved, ~50% of iron sequestration can be attributed to glauconitization. Initial mass balance calculations of the sediment's iron budget indicate that iron sequestration at ODP Site 959 is mainly controlled by the competing rates of pyritization and glauconitization. Iron sequestration associated with early diagenetic green clay formation could significantly impact the bioavailability of reactive iron in marine aqueous systems and thus influence both the marine iron cycle and deep biosphere environment. The role of deep-water glauconitization on iron availability and sequestration should be considered in future ocean-atmospheric models of the iron biogeochemical cycle. Baldermann, A., Warr, L.N., Grathoff, G.H. & Dietzel, M. (2013) The rate and mechanism of deep-sea glauconite formation at the Ivory Coast-Ghana Marginal Ridge. Clays and Clay Minerals, 61, 258-276.

  1. Dates and rates of major pelagic deep-sea fish radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jan Yde; Miya, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    view of actinopterygian phylogeny. Taxon sampling was chosen with special emphasis on recent results, that showed phylogeny and age estimates from nuclear evidence, allowing us to compare the ages of stem- and crown group nodes of all major deep-sea pelagic fish radiations. Two extreme extinction rates......The pelagic realm of the deep-sea is home to some of the most spectacular fishes in terms of morphological adaptations, a probable consequence of the distinct hostile living conditions in this poorly known habitat. Detecting speciation patterns in open ocean fishes is often complicated from...... sexual encounters, comparing species richness and habitat alone tells us little about successful speciation in the pelagic deep-sea environment. The last two decades has expanded our knowledge on teleostean phylogeny from molecular data, although comparing nuclear, mitochondrial and hundreds of years...

  2. Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Stepanova, Anna; Okahashi, Hisayo; Cronin, Thomas M.; Brouwers, Elisabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic revision of deep-sea Ostracoda from the Arctic Ocean was conducted to reduce taxonomic uncertainty that will improve our understanding of species ecology, biogeography and relationship to faunas from other deep-sea regions. Fifteen genera and 40 species were examined and (re-)illustrated with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy images, covering most of known deep-sea species in the central Arctic Ocean. Seven new species are described: Bythoceratina lomonosovensis n. sp., Cytheropteron parahamatum n. sp., Cytheropteron lanceae n. sp.,Cytheropteron irizukii n. sp., Pedicythere arctica n. sp., Cluthiawhatleyi n. sp., Krithe hunti n. sp. This study provides a robust taxonomic baseline for application to paleoceanographical reconstruction and biodiversity analyses in this climatically sensitive region.

  3. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsumi Nakamura

    Full Text Available We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes, indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  4. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Itsumi; Meyer, Carl G; Sato, Katsufumi

    2015-01-01

    We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei) in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes), indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath) or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  5. A Dataset of Deep-Sea Fishes Surveyed by Research Vessels in the Waters around Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Tsao Shao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of deep-sea fish fauna is hampered by a lack of data due to the difficulty and high cost incurred in its surveys and collections. Taiwan is situated along the edge of the Eurasia fig, at the junction of three Large Marine Ecosystems or Ecoregions of the East China Sea, South China Sea and the Philippines. As nearly two-thirds of its surrounding marine ecosystems are deep-sea environments, Taiwan is expected to hold a rich diversity of deep-sea fish. However, in the past, no research vessels were employed to collect fish data on site. Only specimens, caught by bottom trawl fishing in the waters hundreds of meters deep and missing precise locality information, were collected from Dasi and Donggang fishing harbors. Began in 2001, with the support of National Science Council, research vessels were made available to take on the task of systematically collecting deep-sea fish specimens and occurrence records in the waters surrounding Taiwan. By the end of 2006, a total of 3,653 specimens, belonging to 26 orders, 88 families, 198 genera and 366 species, were collected in addition to data such as sampling site geographical coordinates and water depth, and fish body length and weight. The information, all accessible from the “Database of Taiwan’s Deep-Sea Fauna and Its Distribution (http://deepsea.biodiv.tw/” as part of the “Fish Database of Taiwan,” can benefit the study of temporal and spatial changes in distribution and abundance of fish fauna in the context of global deep-sea biodiversity.

  6. Impact of Deepwater Horizon spill on food supply to deep-sea benthos communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, N. G.; Campbell, P. L.; Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G.; Demopoulos, A. W. J.; Ross, S. W.; Brooke, S.

    2016-02-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems encompass unique and often fragile communities that are sensitive to a variety of anthropogenic and natural impacts. After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, sampling efforts documented the acute impact of the spill on some deep-sea coral colonies. To investigate the impact of the DWH spill on quality and quantity of biomass delivered to the deep-sea, a suite of geochemical tracers (e.g., stable and radio-isotopes, lipid biomarkers, and compound-specific isotopes) was measured from monthly sediment trap samples deployed near a high-density deep-coral site in the Viosca Knoll area of the north-central Gulf of Mexico prior to (Oct-2008 to Sept-2009) and after the spill (Oct-10 to Sept-11). Marine (e.g., autochthonous) sources of organic matter (OM) dominated the sediment traps in both years, however after the spill, there was a pronounced reduction in marine-sourced OM, including a reduction in marine-sourced sterols and n-alkanes and a concomitant decrease in sediment trap organic carbon and pigment flux. Results from this study indicate a reduction in primary production and carbon export to the deep-sea in 2010-2011, at least 6-18 months after the spill started. Whereas satellite observations indicate an initial increase in phytoplankton biomass, results from this sediment trap study define a reduction in primary production and carbon export to the deep-sea community. In addition, a dilution from a low-14C carbon source (e.g., petro-carbon) was detected in the sediment trap samples after the spill, in conjunction with a change in the petrogenic composition. The data presented here fills a critical gap in our knowledge of biogeochemical processes and sub-acute impacts to the deep-sea that ensued after the 2010 DWH spill.

  7. Cosmopolitanism and Biogeography of the Genus Manganonema (Nematoda: Monhysterida in the Deep Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Danovaro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns of species diversity provide information about the mechanisms that regulate biodiversity and are important for setting conservation priorities. Present knowledge of the biogeography of meiofauna in the deep sea is scarce. This investigation focuses on the distribution of the deep-sea nematode genus Manganonema, which is typically extremely rare in deep-sea sediment samples. Forty-four specimens of eight different species of this genus were recorded from different Atlantic and Mediterranean regions. Four out of the eight species encountered are new to science. We report here that this genus is widespread both in the Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new findings together with literature information indicate that Manganonema is a cosmopolitan genus, inhabiting a variety of deep-sea habitats and oceans. Manganonema shows the highest diversity at water depths >4,000 m. Our data, therefore, indicate that this is preferentially an abyssal genus that is able, at the same time, to colonize specific habitats at depths shallower than 1,000 m. The analysis of the distribution of the genus Manganonema indicates the presence of large differences in dispersal strategies among different species, ranging from locally endemic to cosmopolitan. Lacking meroplanktonic larvae and having limited dispersal ability due to their small size, it has been hypothesized that nematodes have limited dispersal potential. However, the investigated deep-sea nematodes were present across different oceans covering macro-scale distances. Among the possible explanations (hydrological conditions, geographical and geological pathways, long-term processes, specific historical events, their apparent preference of colonizing highly hydrodynamic systems, could suggest that these infaunal organisms are transported by means of deep-sea benthic storms and turbidity currents over long distances.

  8. Application of Low cost Spirulina growth medium using Deep sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae-hack; Kim, Bong-ju; Lee, Sung-jae; Choi, Nag-chul; Park, Cheon-young

    2017-04-01

    Deep-sea water has a relatively constant temperature, abundant nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, nitrates, and phosphates, etc., and stable water quality, even though there might be some variations of their compositions according to collection places. Thus, deep-sea water would be a good substrate for algal growth and biomass production since it contains various nutrients, including a fluorescent red pigment, and β-carotene, etc. The aim of this study was to investigate the economics of a culture condition through comparative analysis to Spirulina platensis growth characteristic under various medium conditions for cost-effective production of Spirulina sp.. Growth experiments were performed with S. platensis under various culture medium conditions (deep sea water + SP medium). Growth tests for culture medium demonstrated that the deep sea water to SP medium ratio of 50:50(W/W) was effective in S. platensis with the maximum biomass (1.35g/L) and minimum medium making cost per production mass (133.28 KRW/g). Parameter estimation of bio-kinetics (maximum growth rate and yield) for low cost medium results showed that the maximum growth rate and yield of N, P, K were obtained under deep sea water to SP medium ratio of 50:50(W/W) of 0.057 1/day and 0.151, 0.076, 0.123, respectively. Acknowledgment : "This research was a part of the project titled 'Development of microalgae culture technique for cosmetic materials based on ocean deep sea water(20160297)', funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea."

  9. Nd isotopes in deep-sea corals in the Northeastern Atantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, K.; Colin, C.; Freiwald, A.; Douville, E.; Gudmundsson, G.; de Mol, B.; Frank, N.

    2009-12-01

    Nd, Mn and Ca concentrations and ɛNd have been investigated on living and fossil L. pertusa, D. dianthus and M. oculata deep-sea corals located between the Strait of Gibraltar and the Norwegian Sea. ɛNd has been also analysed on seawater collected at similar location and water depth than living deep-sea corals in the Bay of Biscay. A rigorous cleaning technique has been developed to remove Nd contamination of the deep-sea corals from manganese-oxide and iron hydroxide coatings. Nd isotopic compositions have been analysed using mass spectrometric Nd-oxide measurements. Mn and Nd concentrations have been systematically analysed to control the efficiency of the applied cleaning protocol. Nd concentration of living deep-sea corals incorporated in the aragonite skeleton varies between 6 and 90 ppb. A slight increasing trend of Nd/Ca ratios is observed along with water depth, qualitatively in agreement with Nd behaviour in seawater. Nd isotopic compositions of living deep-sea corals located from the Strait of Gibraltar to the Norwegian Sea vary from -9.8 to -14.1 and match Nd of seawater bathing the corals. These observed Nd isotopic gradients demonstrate the capability of various corals species to record the Atlantic mid depth Nd isotopic gradients influenced by ocean circulation pattern and Nd fluxes. Consequently, solitary and constructional deep-water corals species can serve as archive of past seawater Nd isotopic compositions. In addition, we demonstrate that ɛNd of fossils deep-sea corals, dated by 230Th/U method, indicate strong hydrological changes at ~700m in the NE Atlantic during the last 2000 yrs that may be linked to changes of the inflow into the Nordic Seas.

  10. Impact of Deepwater Horizon Spill on food supply to deep-sea benthos communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Swarzenski, Pamela; Mienis, Furu; Duineveld, Gerald; Demopoulos, Amanda; Ross, Steve W.; Brooke, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems encompass unique and often fragile communities that are sensitive to a variety of anthropogenic and natural impacts. After the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, sampling efforts documented the acute impact of the spill on some deep-sea coral colonies. To investigate the impact of the DWH spill on quality and quantity of biomass delivered to the deep-sea, a suite of geochemical tracers (e.g., stable and radio-isotopes, lipid biomarkers, and compound specific isotopes) was measured from monthly sediment trap samples deployed near a high-density deep-coral site in the Viosca Knoll area of the north-central Gulf of Mexico prior to (Oct-2008 to Sept-2009) and after the spill (Oct-10 to Sept-11). Marine (e.g., autochthonous) sources of organic matter dominated the sediment traps in both years, however after the spill, there was a pronounced reduction in marinesourced OM, including a reduction in marine-sourced sterols and n-alkanes and a concomitant decrease in sediment trap organic carbon and pigment flux. Results from this study indicate a reduction in primary production and carbon export to the deep-sea in 2010-2011, at least 6-18 months after the spill started. Whereas satellite observations indicate an initial increase in phytoplankton biomass, results from this sediment trap study define a reduction in primary production and carbon export to the deep-sea community. In addition, a dilution from a low-14C carbon source (e.g., petrocarbon) was detected in the sediment trap samples after the spill, in conjunction with a change in the petrogenic composition. The data presented here fills a critical gap in our knowledge of biogeochemical processes and sub-acute impacts to the deep-sea that ensued after the 2010 DWH spill.

  11. Development of Zr/ZrO2 high temperature and high pressure sensors for in-situ measuring chemical parameters of deep-sea water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In order to in situ measure chemical parameters of deep-sea water and hydrothermal fluids at midocean ridge(MOR), it is necessary to use high temperature and high pressure chemical sensors.Developing new sensors is essential to measure in-situ pH and other chemical parameters(dissolved H2, dissolved H2S) of deep-sea water and hydrothermal fluids in a wide temperature range(2℃―400℃) at MOR vents.The YSZ(Yttria Stabilized Zirconia, 9%Y2O3) ceramic-based(HgO/Hg) chemical sensors possess excellent electrochemical properties at high temperatures, which have been used to measure chemical parameters of hydrothermal fluids above 200℃.A novel Zr/ZrO2 oxidation/reduction electrode was constructed by oxidation of Zr wire in Na2CO3 melt.This Zr/ZrO2 electrode has good chemical stability while measuring pH of high-temperature aqueous solutions, combined with a Ag/AgCl reference electrode.Potentials of the Zr/ZrO2 sensor in association with a Ag/AgCl reference electrode vary linearly with pH over a wide pH range, as tested by various NaCl-HCl-H2O solutions(NaOH-NaCl-H2O for basic solutions), at temperatures in the range of 20℃―200℃.Thus, the Zr/ZrO2 sensors can be utilized in monitoring the fluids over the temperature range of 2℃―200℃.The Zr/ZrO2 electrode combined with Ag/AgCl, Ag/Ag2S, and Au electrodes has been used to measure pH and other chemical parameters(dissolved H2, dissolved H2S) of aqueous fluids from low to high temperatures and high pressures in the laboratory and to monitor those parameters of deep-sea water in South China Sea.

  12. Water-column geochemical anomalies associated with the remnants of a mega plume: A case study after CR-2003 hydrothermal event in Carlsberg Ridge, NW Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; Mirza, I.H.; Prakash, L.S.; Kaisary, S.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, B.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Drolia, R.K.; KameshRaju, K.A.

    to analyse certain geochemical aspects of a plume. The oxidative particulates make plume waters turbid and this turbidity in turn can be detected with optical sensors mounted on a CTD or attached to deep tow. The optical backscatter profiles along... below 2400 m, we restricted our water sampling mainly in deep (>2000 m) water. A Seabird CTD system (SBE 9/11 plus), bottle rosette along with light scattering sensors (WET Labs 633 and 634) was used for water-column survey. Water samples were...

  13. The National Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Database: A Comprehensive Resource for United States Deep-Sea Coral and Sponge Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornback, M.; Hourigan, T.; Etnoyer, P.; McGuinn, R.; Cross, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Research on deep-sea corals has expanded rapidly over the last two decades, as scientists began to realize their value as long-lived structural components of high biodiversity habitats and archives of environmental information. The NOAA Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program's National Database for Deep-Sea Corals and Sponges is a comprehensive resource for georeferenced data on these organisms in U.S. waters. The National Database currently includes more than 220,000 deep-sea coral records representing approximately 880 unique species. Database records from museum archives, commercial and scientific bycatch, and from journal publications provide baseline information with relatively coarse spatial resolution dating back as far as 1842. These data are complemented by modern, in-situ submersible observations with high spatial resolution, from surveys conducted by NOAA and NOAA partners. Management of high volumes of modern high-resolution observational data can be challenging. NOAA is working with our data partners to incorporate this occurrence data into the National Database, along with images and associated information related to geoposition, time, biology, taxonomy, environment, provenance, and accuracy. NOAA is also working to link associated datasets collected by our program's research, to properly archive them to the NOAA National Data Centers, to build a robust metadata record, and to establish a standard protocol to simplify the process. Access to the National Database is provided through an online mapping portal. The map displays point based records from the database. Records can be refined by taxon, region, time, and depth. The queries and extent used to view the map can also be used to download subsets of the database. The database, map, and website is already in use by NOAA, regional fishery management councils, and regional ocean planning bodies, but we envision it as a model that can expand to accommodate data on a global scale.

  14. Thermodynamic and functional characteristics of deep-sea enzymes revealed by pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Eiji; Miyashita, Yurina; Kato, Chiaki

    2013-09-01

    Hydrostatic pressure analysis is an ideal approach for studying protein dynamics and hydration. The development of full ocean depth submersibles and high pressure biological techniques allows us to investigate enzymes from deep-sea organisms at the molecular level. The aim of this review was to overview the thermodynamic and functional characteristics of deep-sea enzymes as revealed by pressure axis analysis after giving a brief introduction to the thermodynamic principles underlying the effects of pressure on the structural stability and function of enzymes.

  15. Deep-sea biodiversity in the Mediterranean Sea: the known, the unknown, and the unknowable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Danovaro

    Full Text Available Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest biome of the global biosphere, but knowledge of their biodiversity is still scant. The Mediterranean basin has been proposed as a hot spot of terrestrial and coastal marine biodiversity but has been supposed to be impoverished of deep-sea species richness. We summarized all available information on benthic biodiversity (Prokaryotes, Foraminifera, Meiofauna, Macrofauna, and Megafauna in different deep-sea ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea (200 to more than 4,000 m depth, including open slopes, deep basins, canyons, cold seeps, seamounts, deep-water corals and deep-hypersaline anoxic basins and analyzed overall longitudinal and bathymetric patterns. We show that in contrast to what was expected from the sharp decrease in organic carbon fluxes and reduced faunal abundance, the deep-sea biodiversity of both the eastern and the western basins of the Mediterranean Sea is similarly high. All of the biodiversity components, except Bacteria and Archaea, displayed a decreasing pattern with increasing water depth, but to a different extent for each component. Unlike patterns observed for faunal abundance, highest negative values of the slopes of the biodiversity patterns were observed for Meiofauna, followed by Macrofauna and Megafauna. Comparison of the biodiversity associated with open slopes, deep basins, canyons, and deep-water corals showed that the deep basins were the least diverse. Rarefaction curves allowed us to estimate the expected number of species for each benthic component in different bathymetric ranges. A large fraction of exclusive species was associated with each specific habitat or ecosystem. Thus, each deep-sea ecosystem contributes significantly to overall biodiversity. From theoretical extrapolations we estimate that the overall deep-sea Mediterranean biodiversity (excluding prokaryotes reaches approximately 2805 species of which about 66% is still undiscovered. Among the biotic components

  16. Molecular analyses reveal high levels of eukaryotic richness associated with enigmatic deep-sea protists (Komokiacea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecroq, Beatrice; Gooday, Andrew John; Cedhagen, Tomas;

    2009-01-01

    Komokiaceans are testate agglutinated protists, extremely diverse and abundant in the deep sea. About 40 species are described and share the same main morpholog- ical feature: a test consisting of narrow branching tubules forming a complex system. In some species, the interstices between the tubu......Komokiaceans are testate agglutinated protists, extremely diverse and abundant in the deep sea. About 40 species are described and share the same main morpholog- ical feature: a test consisting of narrow branching tubules forming a complex system. In some species, the interstices between...

  17. Revealing Holobiont Structure and Function of Three Red Sea Deep-Sea Corals

    KAUST Repository

    Yum, Lauren

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea corals have long been regarded as cold-water coral; however a reevaluation of their habitat limitations has been suggested after the discovery of deep-sea coral in the Red Sea where temperatures exceed 20˚C. To gain further insight into the biology of deep-sea corals at these temperatures, the work in this PhD employed a holotranscriptomic approach, looking at coral animal host and bacterial symbiont gene expression in Dendrophyllia sp., Eguchipsammia fistula, and Rhizotrochus sp. sampled from the deep Red Sea. Bacterial community composition was analyzed via amplicon-based 16S surveys and cultured bacterial strains were subjected to bioprospecting in order to gauge the pharmaceutical potential of coralassociated microbes. Coral host transcriptome data suggest that coral can employ mitochondrial hypometabolism, anaerobic glycolysis, and surface cilia to enhance mass transport rates to manage the low oxygen and highly oligotrophic Red Sea waters. In the microbial community associated with these corals, ribokinases and retron-type reverse transcriptases are abundantly expressed. In its first application to deep-sea coral associated microbial communities, 16S-based next-generation sequencing found that a single operational taxonomic unit can comprise the majority of sequence reads and that a large number of low abundance populations are present, which cannot be visualized with first generation sequencing. Bioactivity testing of selected bacterial isolates was surveyed over 100 cytological parameters with high content screening, covering several major organelles and key proteins involved in a variety of signaling cascades. Some of these cytological profiles were similar to those of several reference pharmacologically active compounds, which suggest that the bacteria isolates produce compounds with similar mechanisms of action as the reference compounds. The sum of this work offers several mechanisms by which Red Sea deep-sea corals cope with environmental

  18. Deep-Sea Biodiversity in the Mediterranean Sea: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Company, Joan Batista; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; D'Onghia, Gianfranco; Galil, Bella; Gambi, Cristina; Gooday, Andrew J.; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Luna, Gian Marco; Morigi, Caterina; Olu, Karine; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Sabbatini, Anna; Sardà, Francesc; Sibuet, Myriam; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2010-01-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest biome of the global biosphere, but knowledge of their biodiversity is still scant. The Mediterranean basin has been proposed as a hot spot of terrestrial and coastal marine biodiversity but has been supposed to be impoverished of deep-sea species richness. We summarized all available information on benthic biodiversity (Prokaryotes, Foraminifera, Meiofauna, Macrofauna, and Megafauna) in different deep-sea ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea (200 to more than 4,000 m depth), including open slopes, deep basins, canyons, cold seeps, seamounts, deep-water corals and deep-hypersaline anoxic basins and analyzed overall longitudinal and bathymetric patterns. We show that in contrast to what was expected from the sharp decrease in organic carbon fluxes and reduced faunal abundance, the deep-sea biodiversity of both the eastern and the western basins of the Mediterranean Sea is similarly high. All of the biodiversity components, except Bacteria and Archaea, displayed a decreasing pattern with increasing water depth, but to a different extent for each component. Unlike patterns observed for faunal abundance, highest negative values of the slopes of the biodiversity patterns were observed for Meiofauna, followed by Macrofauna and Megafauna. Comparison of the biodiversity associated with open slopes, deep basins, canyons, and deep-water corals showed that the deep basins were the least diverse. Rarefaction curves allowed us to estimate the expected number of species for each benthic component in different bathymetric ranges. A large fraction of exclusive species was associated with each specific habitat or ecosystem. Thus, each deep-sea ecosystem contributes significantly to overall biodiversity. From theoretical extrapolations we estimate that the overall deep-sea Mediterranean biodiversity (excluding prokaryotes) reaches approximately 2805 species of which about 66% is still undiscovered. Among the biotic components investigated

  19. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide.

  20. Resilience of benthic deep-sea fauna to mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollner, Sabine; Kaiser, Stefanie; Menzel, Lena; Jones, Daniel O B; Brown, Alastair; Mestre, Nelia C; van Oevelen, Dick; Menot, Lenaick; Colaço, Ana; Canals, Miquel; Cuvelier, Daphne; Durden, Jennifer M; Gebruk, Andrey; Egho, Great A; Haeckel, Matthias; Marcon, Yann; Mevenkamp, Lisa; Morato, Telmo; Pham, Christopher K; Purser, Autun; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Vanreusel, Ann; Vink, Annemiek; Martinez Arbizu, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    With increasing demand for mineral resources, extraction of polymetallic sulphides at hydrothermal vents, cobalt-rich ferromanganese crusts at seamounts, and polymetallic nodules on abyssal plains may be imminent. Here, we shortly introduce ecosystem characteristics of mining areas, report on recent mining developments, and identify potential stress and disturbances created by mining. We analyze species' potential resistance to future mining and perform meta-analyses on population density and diversity recovery after disturbances most similar to mining: volcanic eruptions at vents, fisheries on seamounts, and experiments that mimic nodule mining on abyssal plains. We report wide variation in recovery rates among taxa, size, and mobility of fauna. While densities and diversities of some taxa can recover to or even exceed pre-disturbance levels, community composition remains affected after decades. The loss of hard substrata or alteration of substrata composition may cause substantial community shifts that persist over geological timescales at mined sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Trace metals associated with deep-sea tailings placement at the Batu Hijau copper-gold mine, Sumbawa, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Brad M; Simpson, Stuart L; Jarolimek, Chad V; Jung, Rob; Waworuntu, Jorina; Batterham, Grant

    2013-08-15

    The Batu Hijau copper-gold mine on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia operates a deep-sea tailings placement (DSTP) facility to dispose of the tailings within the offshore Senunu Canyon. The concentrations of trace metals in tailings, waters, and sediments from locations in the vicinity of the DSTP were determined during surveys in 2004 and 2009. In coastal and deep seawater samples from Alas Strait and the South Coast of Sumbawa, the dissolved concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb and Zn were in the sub μg/L range. Dissolved copper concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 0.65 μg/L for all depths at these sites. Dissolved copper concentrations were the highest in the bottom-water from within the tailings plume inside Senunu Canyon, with up to 6.5 μg Cu/L measured in close proximity to the tailings discharge. In general, the concentrations of dissolved and particulate metals were similar in 2004 and 2009. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of a thermostable lipase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanbing; Li, Hebin; Ni, Hui; Xiao, Anfeng; Li, Lijun; Cai, Huinong

    2015-02-01

    A gene (1,254 bp) encoding a lipase was identified from a deep-sea hydrothermal field thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT9. The open reading frame of this gene encoded 417 amino acid residues. The gene was cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the target protein was purified to homogeneity. The purified recombinant enzyme presented a molecular mass of 44.8 kDa. When p-nitrophenyl palmitate was used as a substrate, the recombinant lipase was optimally active at 55 °C and pH 8.5. The recombinant enzyme retained 44 % residual activity after incubation at 80 °C for 1 h, which indicated that Geobacillus sp. EPT9 lipase was thermostable. Homology modeling of strain EPT9 lipase was developed with the lipase from Bacillus sp. L2 as a template. The core structure exhibits an α/β-hydrolase fold and the typical catalytic triad might consist of Ser142, Asp346, and His387. The enzymatic activity of EPT9 lipase was inhibited by addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, indicating that it contains serine residue, which plays an important role in the catalytic mechanism.

  3. Purification and biochemical characterization of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yanbing; LI Hebin; NI Hui; LIU Jingwen; XIAO Anfeng; CAI Huinong

    2014-01-01

    Thermostable SOD is a promising enzyme in biotechnological applications. In the present study, thermo-phileGeobacillussp.EPT3 was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal field in the East Pacific. A thermo-stable superoxide dismutase (SOD) from this strain was purified to homogeneity by steps of fractional am-monium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and Phenyl-Sepharose chromatography. SOD was purified 13.4 fold to homogeneity with a specific activity of 3 354 U/mg and 11.1% recovery. SOD fromGeobacillussp. EPT3 was of the Mn-SOD type, judged by the insensitivity of the enzyme to both KCN and H2O2. SOD was determined to be a homodimer with monomeric molecular mass of 26.0 kDa. It had high thermostability at 50°C and 60°C. At tested conditions,SOD was relatively stable in the presence of some inhibitors and denaturants, such asβ-mercaptoethanol (β-ME), dithiothreitol (DTT), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), urea, and guanidine hydrochloride.Geobacillussp. EPT3 SOD showed striking stability across a wide pH range from 5.0 to 11.0. It could withstand denaturants of extremely acidic and alkaline conditions, which makes it useful in the industrial applications.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a new manganese superoxide dismutase from deep-sea thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanbing; Wang, Guohong; Ni, Hui; Xiao, Anfeng; Cai, Huinong

    2014-04-01

    A new gene encoding a superoxide dismutase (SOD) was identified from a thermophile Geobacillus sp. EPT3 isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal field in east Pacific. The open reading frame of this gene encoded 437 amino acid residues. It was cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli (DE3), and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Geobacillus sp. EPT3 SOD was of the manganese-containing SOD type, as judged by the insensitivity of the recombinant enzyme to both KCN and H₂O₂, and the activity analysis of Fe or Mn reconstituted SODs by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The recombinant SOD was determined to be a homodimer with monomeric molecular mass of 59.0 kDa. In comparison with other Mn-SODs, the manganese-binding sites are conserved in the sequence (His260, His308, Asp392, His396). The recombinant enzyme had high thermostability at 50 °C. It retained 57 % residual activity after incubation at 90 °C for 1 h, which indicated that this SOD was thermostable. The enzyme also showed striking stability over a wide range of pH 5.0-11.0. At tested conditions, the recombinant SOD from Geobacillus sp. EPT3 showed a relatively good tolerance to some inhibitors, detergents, and denaturants, such as β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, Chaps, Triton X-100, urea, and guanidine hydrochloride.

  5. Respiratory Ammonification of Nitrate Coupled to Anaerobic Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Deep-Sea Autotrophic Thermophilic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodkina, Galina B.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Frolova, Anastasia A.; Chernyh, Nikolay A.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Slobodkin, Alexander I.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory ammonification of nitrate is the microbial process that determines the retention of nitrogen in an ecosystem. To date, sulfur-dependent dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium has been demonstrated only with sulfide as an electron donor. We detected a novel pathway that couples the sulfur and nitrogen cycles. Thermophilic anaerobic bacteria Thermosulfurimonas dismutans and Dissulfuribacter thermophilus, isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, grew autotrophically with elemental sulfur as an electron donor and nitrate as an electron acceptor producing sulfate and ammonium. The genomes of both bacteria contain a gene cluster that encodes a putative nitrate ammonification enzyme system. Nitrate reduction occurs via a Nap-type complex. The reduction of produced nitrite to ammonium does not proceed via the canonical Nrf system because nitrite reductase NrfA is absent in the genomes of both microorganisms. The genome of D. thermophilus encodes a complete sulfate reduction pathway, while the Sox sulfur oxidation system is missing, as shown previously for T. dismutans. Thus, in high-temperature environments, nitrate ammonification with elemental sulfur may represent an unrecognized route of primary biomass production. Moreover, the anaerobic oxidation of sulfur compounds coupled to growth has not previously been demonstrated for the members of Thermodesulfobacteria or Deltaproteobacteria, which were considered exclusively as participants of the reductive branch of the sulfur cycle. PMID:28194142

  6. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics.

  7. In Situ Raman Spectral Characteristics of Carbon Dioxide in a Deep-Sea Simulator of Extreme Environments Reaching 300 ℃ and 30 MPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianfu; Du, Zengfeng; Zhang, Xin; Xi, Shichuan; Wang, Bing; Luan, Zhendong; Lian, Chao; Yan, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Deep-sea carbon dioxide (CO2) plays a significant role in the global carbon cycle and directly affects the living environment of marine organisms. In situ Raman detection technology is an effective approach to study the behavior of deep-sea CO2. However, the Raman spectral characteristics of CO2 can be affected by the environment, thus restricting the phase identification and quantitative analysis of CO2. In order to study the Raman spectral characteristics of CO2 in extreme environments (up to 300 ℃ and 30 MPa), which cover most regions of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps around the world, a deep-sea extreme environment simulator was developed. The Raman spectra of CO2 in different phases were obtained with Raman insertion probe (RiP) system, which was also used in in situ Raman detection in the deep sea carried by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) "Faxian". The Raman frequency shifts and bandwidths of gaseous, liquid, solid, and supercritical CO2 and the CO2-H2O system were determined with the simulator. In our experiments (0-300 ℃ and 0-30 MPa), the peak positions of the symmetric stretching modes of gaseous CO2, liquid CO2, and supercritical CO2 shift approximately 0.6 cm(-1) (1387.8-1388.4 cm(-1)), 0.7 cm(-1) (1385.5-1386.2 cm(-1)), and 2.5 cm(-1) (1385.7-1388.2 cm(-1)), and those of the bending modes shift about 1.0 cm(-1) (1284.7-1285.7 cm(-1)), 1.9 cm(-1) (1280.1-1282.0 cm(-1)), and 4.4 cm(-1) (1281.0-1285.4 cm(-1)), respectively. The Raman spectral characteristics of the CO2-H2O system were also studied under the same conditions. The peak positions of dissolved CO2 varied approximately 4.5 cm(-1) (1282.5-1287.0 cm(-1)) and 2.4 cm(-1) (1274.4-1276.8 cm(-1)) for each peak. In comparison with our experiment results, the phases of CO2 in extreme conditions (0-3000 m and 0-300 ℃) can be identified with the Raman spectra collected in situ. This qualitative research on CO2 can also support the further quantitative

  8. Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2014-01-01

    Book review of: Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything. London :Portobello Books, 2013. 320 pp. ISBN 9781846272639......Book review of: Rose George: Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry that Brings you 90% of Everything. London :Portobello Books, 2013. 320 pp. ISBN 9781846272639...

  9. 76 FR 36511 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab; Amendment 3 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... Fishery Management Council (Council) has submitted Amendment 3 to the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery... proposed to modify the existing trap limit regulations. The current trap limit regulations state that...

  10. Exploring fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Guang-Hua; Xu, Xin-Ya; Nong, Xu-Hua; Wang, Jie; Amin, Muhammad; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the fungal diversity in four different deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1). A total of 40,297 fungal ITS1 sequences clustered into 420 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 97% sequence similarity and 170 taxa were recovered from these sediments. Most ITS1 sequences (78%) belonged to the phylum Ascomycota, followed by Basidiomycota (17.3%), Zygomycota (1.5%) and Chytridiomycota (0.8%), and a small proportion (2.4%) belonged to unassigned fungal phyla. Compared with previous studies on fungal diversity of sediments from deep-sea environments by culture-dependent approach and clone library analysis, the present result suggested that Illumina sequencing had been dramatically accelerating the discovery of fungal community of deep-sea sediments. Furthermore, our results revealed that Sordariomycetes was the most diverse and abundant fungal class in this study, challenging the traditional view that the diversity of Sordariomycetes phylotypes was low in the deep-sea environments. In addition, more than 12 taxa accounted for 21.5% sequences were found to be rarely reported as deep-sea fungi, suggesting the deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough harbored a plethora of different fungal communities compared with other deep-sea environments. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing.

  11. Deep-sea seabed habitats: Do they support distinct mega-epifaunal communities that have different vulnerabilities to anthropogenic disturbance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, David A.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Leduc, Daniel; Beaumont, Jennifer; Clark, Malcolm R.

    2016-01-01

    Growing economic interest in seabed resources in the deep-sea highlights the need for information about the spatial distribution and vulnerability to disturbance of benthic habitats and fauna. Categorisation of seabed habitats for management is often based on topographic features such as canyons and seamounts that can be distinguished using regional bathymetry ('mega-habitats'). This is practical but because such habitats are contiguous with others, there is potential for overlap in the communities associated with them. Because concepts of habitat and community vulnerability are based on the traits of individual taxa, the nature and extent of differences between communities have implications for strategies to manage the environmental effects of resource use. Using towed video camera transects, we surveyed mega-epifaunal communities of three topographically-defined habitats (canyon, seamount or knoll, and continental slope) and two physico-chemically defined meso-scale habitats (cold seep and hydrothermal vent) in two regions off New Zealand to assess whether each supports a distinct type of community. Cold seep and hydrothermal vent communities were strongly distinct from those in other habitats. Across the other habitats, however, distinctions between communities were often weak and were not consistent between regions. Dissimilarities among communities across all habitats were stronger and the density of filter-feeding taxa was higher in the Bay of Plenty than on the Hikurangi Margin, whereas densities of predatory and scavenging taxa were higher on the Hikurangi Margin. Substratum diversity at small spatial scales (<1 km) and trawl history were significantly correlated with community composition in both regions. We conclude that, (1) a lack of consistent distinction between communities raises questions about the general utility of topographically-defined mega-habitats in environmental management, (2) fine-scale survey of individual features is necessary to

  12. From principles to practice: a spatial approach to systematic conservation planning in the deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedding, L M; Friedlander, A M; Kittinger, J N; Watling, L; Gaines, S D; Bennett, M; Hardy, S M; Smith, C R

    2013-12-22

    Increases in the demand and price for industrial metals, combined with advances in technological capabilities have now made deep-sea mining more feasible and economically viable. In order to balance economic interests with the conservation of abyssal plain ecosystems, it is becoming increasingly important to develop a systematic approach to spatial management and zoning of the deep sea. Here, we describe an expert-driven systematic conservation planning process applied to inform science-based recommendations to the International Seabed Authority for a system of deep-sea marine protected areas (MPAs) to safeguard biodiversity and ecosystem function in an abyssal Pacific region targeted for nodule mining (e.g. the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone, CCZ). Our use of geospatial analysis and expert opinion in forming the recommendations allowed us to stratify the proposed network by biophysical gradients, maximize the number of biologically unique seamounts within each subregion, and minimize socioeconomic impacts. The resulting proposal for an MPA network (nine replicate 400 × 400 km MPAs) covers 24% (1 440 000 km(2)) of the total CCZ planning region and serves as example of swift and pre-emptive conservation planning across an unprecedented area in the deep sea. As pressure from resource extraction increases in the future, the scientific guiding principles outlined in this research can serve as a basis for collaborative international approaches to ocean management.

  13. Correcting the Cenozoic δ18O deep-sea temperature record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    The oxygen isotope signal in benthic foraminifera from deep-sea cores is mainly determined by deep-ocean temperature and land ice volume. Separating the temperature and ice volume signals is a key step in understanding the evolution of Cenozoic climate. Except for the last few million years, fluctua

  14. Experiment and Simulation for Articulated Lifting Subsystem of 1000 m Deep Sea Mining System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The experiment system of 1000 m deep sea mining system is built up with the similarity theory. Sine mechanism is used to simulate mining ship to generate lateral shock excitation by ocean wave. Simulation and experiment of spherical joint connecting deep sea mining system has been done in band six marine conditions. The results indicate that the moment of spherical joint connecting deep sea mining is smaller than that of the thread connected ones, the lifting pipe of spherical joint is "flexible pipe". The flexural torque of the articulated lifting pipe system in pump and buffer is generally periodic variation with some irregularity, the value is stable on 60 N·S, and it is obviously smaller than that of the fixed lifting pipe system; The total displacement exhibits cyclic variation pattern, and the periodicity of them is longer than that of sea current. The results of experiment and simulation are basically consistent. And the analysis in the paper offers theoretical foundation of 1000 m deep sea mining system in China.

  15. Comparison of deep-sea sediment microbial communities in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, Sander K.; Laverman, Anniet M.; Forney, Larry J.; Hardoim, Pablo R.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    Bacterial and archaeal communities in sediments obtained from three geographically-distant mud volcanoes, a control site and a microbial mat in the Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea were characterized using direct 16S rRNA gene analyses. The data were thus in relation to the chemical characteristics of

  16. Modeling food web interactions in benthic deep-sea ecosystems. A practical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Van Oevelen, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea benthic systems are notoriously difficult to sample. Even more than for other benthic systems, many flows among biological groups cannot be directly measured, and data sets remain incomplete and uncertain. In such cases, mathematical models are often used to quantify unmeasured biological

  17. Vertical hydraulic transport for deep sea mining: A study into flow assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Deep sea mining activities require excavation of material at the sea floor, transport of the material from the sea floor to the sea surface and processing of the material afterwards. One way to transport the material from the sea floor to sea surface is by means of a riser with centrifugal pump

  18. Dynamic and static elastic moduli of North Sea and deep sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    We have established an empirical relationship between the dynamic and the static mechanical properties of North Sea and deep sea chalk for a large porosity interval with respect to porosity, effective stress history and textural composition. The chalk investigated is from the Tor and Hod Formations...

  19. Geotechnical properties of deep-sea sediments from central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khadge, N.H.

    Physical and geotechnical properties of 2 sediment cores from the nodule rich area of the Central Indian Ocean Basin are studied to know the sediment characteristics. Average water content of sediment from 2 deep-sea cores is 289% with 151...

  20. Assessing benthic oxygen fluxes in oligotrophic deep sea sediments (HAUSGARTEN observatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donis, Daphne; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Holtappels, Moritz; Felden, Janine; Wenzhoefer, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Benthic oxygen fluxes, an established proxy for total organic carbon mineralization, were investigated in oligotrophic deep sea sediments. We used three different in situ technologies to estimate the benthic oxygen fluxes at an Arctic deep sea site (2500 m depth, HAUSGARTEN observatory) with limiting conditions of low oxygen gradients and fluxes, low turbulence and low particle content in the benthic boundary layer. The resolved eddy covariance turbulent oxygen flux (-0.9±0.2 (SD) mmol O2 m-2 d-1) compared well with simultaneous dissolved oxygen flux measurements carried out with a microprofiler (-1.02±0.3 (SD) mmol O2 m-2 d-1) and total oxygen uptake obtained by benthic chamber incubations (-1.1±0.1 (SD) mmol O2 m-2 d-1). The agreement between these different techniques revealed that microbial-mediated oxygen consumption was dominant at this site. The average benthic flux equals a carbon mineralization rate of 4.3 g C m-2 yr-1, which exceeds the annual sedimentation of particulate organic matter measured by sediment traps. The present study represents a detailed comparison of different in situ technologies for benthic flux measurements at different spatial scales in oligotrophic deep sea sediments. The use of eddy covariance, so far rarely used for deep sea investigations, is presented in detail.

  1. An approach for in situ studies of deep-sea amphipods and their microbial gut flora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannasch, H. W.; Cuhel, R. L.; Wirsen, C. O.; Taylor, C. D.

    1980-10-01

    A technique has been developed and field-tested for the trapping, feeding, and timed incubation of amphipods on the deep-sea floor. Data obtained from experiments using radiolabeled foodstuffs indicate that shifts within the labeled fractions of the major biological polymers make it possible to distinguish between the metabolism of the amphipods and that of their intestinal microflora.

  2. AMADEUS-The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Jesus, A. C. Assis; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. -J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cassano, B.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Sen, N. Chon; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J. -P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. -L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchneri, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Le Provost, H.; Lefevre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schoeck, F.; Schuller, J. -P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    2011-01-01

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic se

  3. Multiple colonization of the deep sea by the Asellota (Crustacea: Peracarida: Isopoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Michael J.; Held, Christoph; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang

    2004-07-01

    Despite its extreme environmental conditions the deep sea harbors a unique and species-rich fauna of mostly unknown age and phylogeny. Asellote isopods have undergone their most impressive radiation in the deep sea, being found at all depths down to the deepest trench. Here we present the first molecular evidence for the phylogenetic origin of this remarkable array of deep-sea crustaceans, based on 30 new DNA-sequences of the complete 18s rRNA gene of specimens collected at depths down to 4543 m in the South Atlantic and South Polar Ocean. The results show that most of these isopod lineages belong to a single ancient clade. They evolved in situ in large oceanic depths and survived several climatic changes, but the lack of fossils and of a suitable molecular clock model prevents a precise dating of this radiation. The monophyly of typical deep-sea families, for example the Haploniscidae, Ischnomesidae or Munnopsidae, is well supported by different methods of analysis, while the monophyly of the Janiridae is rejected.

  4. Impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem by a severe coastal storm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sanchez-Vidal

    Full Text Available Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26(th of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem.

  5. Impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem by a severe coastal storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26(th) of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem.

  6. Physiological effects of hypercapnia in the deep-sea bivalve Acesta excavata (Fabricius, 1779) (Bivalvia; Limidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karen M.; Kristiansen, Erlend; Zachariassen, Karl Erik

    2011-01-01

    The option of storing CO(2) in subsea rock formations to mitigate future increases in atmospheric CO(2) may induce problems for animals in the deep sea. In the present study the deep-sea bivalve Acesta excavata was subjected to environmental hypercapnia (pHSW 6.35, P(CO2), =33,000 mu atm) corresp......The option of storing CO(2) in subsea rock formations to mitigate future increases in atmospheric CO(2) may induce problems for animals in the deep sea. In the present study the deep-sea bivalve Acesta excavata was subjected to environmental hypercapnia (pHSW 6.35, P(CO2), =33,000 mu atm......) corresponding to conditions reported from natural CO(2) seeps. Effects on acid base status and metabolic rate were related to time of exposure and subsequent recovery. During exposure there was an uncompensated drop in both hemolymph and intracellular pH. Intracellular pH returned to control values, while...... extracellular pH remained significantly lower during recovery. Intracellular non-bicarbonate buffering capacity of the posterior adductor muscle of hypercapnic animals was significantly lower than control values, but this was not the case for the remaining tissues analyzed. Oxygen consumption initially dropped...

  7. Trophic Dynamics of Deep-Sea Megabenthos Are Mediated by Surface Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tecchio, S.; van Oevelen, D.; Soetaert, K.; Navarro, J.; Ramírez-Llodra, E.

    2013-01-01

    Most deep-sea benthic ecosystems are food limited and, in the majority of cases, are driven by the organic matter falling from the surface or advected downslope. Species may adapt to this scarceness by applying a wide variety of responses, such as feeding specialisation, niche width variation, and r

  8. Vertical hydraulic transport for deep sea mining: A study into flow assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Deep sea mining activities require excavation of material at the sea floor, transport of the material from the sea floor to the sea surface and processing of the material afterwards. One way to transport the material from the sea floor to sea surface is by means of a riser with centrifugal pump boos

  9. Limitations of microbial hydrocarbon degradation at the Amon mud volcano (Nile deep-sea fan)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felden, J.; Lichtschlag, A.; Wenzhöfer, F.; de Beer, D.; Feseker, T.; Pop Ristova, P.; de Lange, G.; Boetius, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Amon mud volcano (MV), located at 1250m water depth on the Nile deep-sea fan, is known for its active emission of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons into the hydrosphere. Previous investigations showed a low efficiency of hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microbial communities inhabiting the Amo

  10. LVP modeling and dynamic characteristics prediction of a hydraulic power unit in deep-sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xue-peng; Ye, Min; Deng, Bin; Zhang, Cui-hong; Yu, Zu-ying

    2013-03-01

    A hydraulic power unit (HPU) is the driving "heart" of deep-sea working equipment. It is critical to predict its dynamic performances in deep-water before being immerged in the seawater, while the experimental tests by simulating deep-sea environment have many disadvantages, such as expensive cost, long test cycles, and difficult to achieve low-temperature simulation, which is only used as a supplementary means for confirmatory experiment. This paper proposes a novel theoretical approach based on the linear varying parameters (LVP) modeling to foresee the dynamic performances of the driving unit. Firstly, based on the varying environment features, dynamic expressions of the compressibility and viscosity of hydraulic oil are derived to reveal the fluid performances changing. Secondly, models of hydraulic system and electrical system are accomplished respectively through studying the control process and energy transfer, and then LVP models of the pressure and flow rate control is obtained through the electro-hydraulic models integration. Thirdly, dynamic characteristics of HPU are obtained by the model simulating within bounded closed sets of varying parameters. Finally, the developed HPU is tested in a deep-sea imitating hull, and the experimental results are well consistent with the theoretical analysis outcomes, which clearly declare that the LVP modeling is a rational way to foresee dynamic performances of HPU. The research approach and model analysis results can be applied to the predictions of working properties and product designs for other deep-sea hydraulic pump.

  11. Modeling food web interactions in benthic deep-sea ecosystems. A practical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Van Oevelen, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea benthic systems are notoriously difficult to sample. Even more than for other benthic systems, many flows among biological groups cannot be directly measured, and data sets remain incomplete and uncertain. In such cases, mathematical models are often used to quantify unmeasured biological i

  12. Similar rapid response to phytodetritus deposition in shallow and deep-sea sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moodley, L.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Herman, P.M.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    The short-term benthic response to an input of fresh organic matter was examined in vastly contrasting benthic environments (estuarine intertidal to deep-sea) using 13C-labeled diatoms as a tracer of labile carbon. Benthic processing was assessed in major compartments through 13C-enrichment in CO2,

  13. Preferred use of bacteria over phytoplankton by deep-sea nematodes in polar regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingels, J.; Driessche, Van den P.; Mesel, de I.G.; Vanhove, S.; Moens, T.; Vanreusel, A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the selective feeding properties of Antarctic and Arctic deep-sea nematodes within an experimental setup. Nematodes are assumed to play an important role in the carbon flux within the polar bathyal food webs, but knowledge about their natural diets is limited. For the firs

  14. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 201

  15. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 201

  16. Current State and Development Trends of Deep Sea Oil and Gas Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wenli

    2011-01-01

    As people probe deeply into submarine exploration and development of oil, gas hydrates and other mineral reserves, deepwater oil and gas development has become a hotspot for world petroleum industry and the frontier of technological innovation. In the past few years, petroleum companies engaged in deep sea exploration put more effort on exploration and development of marine resources.

  17. Sedimentary processes and development of the Zenisu deep-sea channel, Philippine Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUShiguo; SakamotoIzumi

    2003-01-01

    Zenisu deep-sea channel originated from a volcanic arc region, Izu-Ogasawara Island Arc, and vanished in the Shikoku Basin of the Philippine Sea. According to the swath bathymetry, the deep-sea channel can be divided into three segments. They are Zenisu canyon, E-W fan channel and trough-axis channel. A lot of volcanic detritus were deposited in the Zenisu Trough via the deep-sea channel because it originated from volcanic arc settings. On the basis of the swath bathymetry, submersible and seismic reflection data, the deposits are characterized by turbidite and debrite deposits as those in the other major deep-sea channels. Erosion or few sediments were observed in the Zenisu canyon,whereas a lot of turbidites and debrites occurred in the E-W channel and trough axis channel. Cold seep communities,active fault and fluid flow were discovered along the lower slope of the Zenisu Ridge. Vertical sedimentary sequences in the Zenisu Trough consist of the four post-rift sequence units of the Shikoku Basin, among which Units A and B are two turbidite units. The development of Zenisu canyon is controlled by the N-S shear fault, the E-W fan channel is related to the E-W shear fault, and the trough-axis channel is related to the subsidence of central basin.

  18. Sedimentary processes and development of the Zenisu deep-sea channel, Philippine Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Zenisu deep-sea channel originated from a volcanic arc region, Izu-Ogasawara Island Arc, and vanished in the Shikoku Basin of the Philippine Sea. According to the swath bathymetry, the deep-sea channel can be divided into three segments. They are Zenisu canyon, E-W fan channel and trough-axis channel. A lot of volcanic detritus were deposited in the Zenisu Trough via the deep-sea channel because it originated from volcanic arc settings. On the basis of the swath bathymetry, submersible and seismic reflection data, the deposits are characterized by turbidite and debrite deposits as those in the other major deep-sea channels. Erosion or few sediments were observed in the Zenisu canyon, whereas a lot of turbidites and debrites occurred in the E-W channel and trough axis channel. Cold seep communities, active fault and fluid flow were discovered along the lower slope of the Zenisu Ridge. Vertical sedimentary sequences in the Zenisu Trough consist of the four post-rift sequence units of the Shikoku Basin, among which Units A and B are two turbidite units. The development of Zenisu canyon is controlled by the N-S shear fault, the E-W fan channel is related to the E-W shear fault, and the trough-axis channel is related to the subsidence of central basin.

  19. Challenges of deep-sea biodiversity assessments in the Southern Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angelika Brandt; Huw Griffiths; Julian Gutt; Katrin Linse; Stefano Schiaparelli; Tosca Ballerini; Bruno Danis; Olaf Pfannkuche

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent progress in deep-sea biodiversity assessments in the Southern Ocean (SO), there remain gaps in our knowledge that hamper efficient deep-sea monitoring in times of rapid climate change. These include geographical sampling bias, depth and size-dependent faunal gaps in biology, ecology, distribution, and phylogeography, and the evolution of SO species. The phenomena of species patchiness and rarity are still not well understood, possibly because of our limited understanding of physiological adaptations and thresholds. Even though some shallow water species have been investigated physiologically, community-scale studies on the effects of multiple stressors related to ongoing environmental change, including temperature rise, ocean acidification, and shifts in deposition of phytoplankton, are completely unknown for deep-sea organisms. Thus, the establishment of long-term and coordinated monitoring programs, such as those rapidly growing under the umbrella of the Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS) or the Deep Ocean Observing Strategy (DOOS), may represent unique tools for measuring the status and trends of deep-sea and SO ecosystems.

  20. Temporal dynamics of deep-sea latitudinal species diversity gradient based on paleoceanographic/micropaleontologic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, M.; Hunt, G.; Okahashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    Macroecology investigates large-scale ecological phenomena, such as regional-global trends in ecosystem properties and biodiversity, and is used to better understand recent human-induced ecosystem degradation. Paleoceanography investigates physical/chemical parameters, biogeochemical cycles, ocean circulation, and ocean-atmosphere interaction, but rarely includes ecosystem-scale biological processes. Here we adopt a macroecological approach to paleoceanography and present sediment core records of the temporal dynamics of deep-sea species diversity gradients using ostracodes from the equatorial Atlantic Ocean for the past four glacial-interglacial cycles. Results show unexpected instability and high amplitude fluctuations in species diversity in the tropical deep ocean. The results imply that the modern deep-sea latitudinal species diversity gradient is unexpectedly dynamic over short time intervals and collapsed during glacial periods. Unstable tropical diversity requires reconsideration of current ecological hypotheses about the generation and maintenance of biodiversity as they apply to the deep sea, and underscores the potential vulnerability and conservation importance of tropical deep-sea ecosystems.

  1. Recovery of deep-sea meiofauna after artificial disturbance in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Goltekar, N.R.; Gonsalves, S.; Ansari, Z.A.

    ., Vanaverbeke, J., Heip, C., Herman, P.M.J., Middelburg, J.J., Sandee, A., Duineveld, G., 1997. Nematode distribution in ocean margin sediments of the Goban Spur (Northeast Atlantic) in relation to sediment geochemistry. Deep-Sea Research I,44...

  2. Spore germination of fungi belonging to Aspergillus species under deep-sea conditions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.; Nagarajan, M.; Raghukumar, C.

    Wind-blown dry fungal spores and mycelial fragments from the nearest landmass or terrestrial run-off may find their way to the deep sea by hitching a ride on other sinking detrital particles. Once in the deep, they are affected by elevated...

  3. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June

  4. A synthesis of genetic connectivity in deep-sea fauna and implications for marine reserve design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baco, Amy R; Etter, Ron J; Ribeiro, Pedro A; von der Heyden, Sophie; Beerli, Peter; Kinlan, Brian P

    2016-07-01

    With anthropogenic impacts rapidly advancing into deeper waters, there is growing interest in establishing deep-sea marine protected areas (MPAs) or reserves. Reserve design depends on estimates of connectivity and scales of dispersal for the taxa of interest. Deep-sea taxa are hypothesized to disperse greater distances than shallow-water taxa, which implies that reserves would need to be larger in size and networks could be more widely spaced; however, this paradigm has not been tested. We compiled population genetic studies of deep-sea fauna and estimated dispersal distances for 51 studies using a method based on isolation-by-distance slopes. Estimates of dispersal distance ranged from 0.24 km to 2028 km with a geometric mean of 33.2 km and differed in relation to taxonomic and life-history factors as well as several study parameters. Dispersal distances were generally greater for fishes than invertebrates with the Mollusca being the least dispersive sampled phylum. Species that are pelagic as adults were more dispersive than those with sessile or sedentary lifestyles. Benthic species from soft-substrate habitats were generally less dispersive than species from hard substrate, demersal or pelagic habitats. As expected, species with pelagic and/or feeding (planktotrophic) larvae were more dispersive than other larval types. Many of these comparisons were confounded by taxonomic or other life-history differences (e.g. fishes being more dispersive than invertebrates) making any simple interpretation difficult. Our results provide the first rough estimate of the range of dispersal distances in the deep sea and allow comparisons to shallow-water assemblages. Overall, dispersal distances were greater for deeper taxa, although the differences were not large (0.3-0.6 orders of magnitude between means), and imbalanced sampling of shallow and deep taxa complicates any simple interpretation. Our analyses suggest the scales of dispersal and connectivity for reserve design

  5. Model output for deep-sea coral habitat suitability in the U.S. North and Mid-Atlantic from 2013 (NCEI Accession 0145923)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was created for potential use as an environmental predictor in spatial predictive models of deep-sea coral habitat suitability. Deep-sea corals are of...

  6. Fe stable isotope fractionation in modern and ancient hydrothermal Fe-Si deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, K.; Schoenberg, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Øvreås, L.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Modern iron-silica deposits of small yellow to rust coloured mounds and chimney-like structures were found in a low-temperature venting area distal to a white smoker type hydrothermal vent site at the south-western part of the Mohns Ridge, North Atlantic. Individual stratified mm to cm thick laminated layers within these structures are largely composed of branching, twisted filaments resembling encrusted stalks of Fe-oxidising bacteria. DNA analyses have confirmed the presence of both Fe-oxidising (Mariprofundus ferrooxidans and other ζ-Proteobacteria) and Fe-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaceae). Similar morphologic features, such as several mm thick red hematite-rich laminae and micron-scale filamentous structures concentrated in discrete laminae, have also been found in Early Ordovician volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) hosted jasper deposits in the Løkken-Høydal area, Norway [1]. These filamentous structures are believed to be formed by Fe-oxidising bacteria similar to Mariprofundus ferrooxidans [2]. Here, we compare the Fe isotope composition of these two different types of Fe-Si deposits with the aim to gain further information about deposition mechanisms and the role of microorganisms in Fe redox cycling of deep-sea hydrothermal systems. Fe isotope compositions of the modern biogenic Fe-Si deposit vary between -2.09 and -0.66 ‰ in δ56Fe values, a range that is comparable to late Archaean to early Proterozoic banded iron formations. The ~490 Ma old Løkken jaspers show a similar variation, but with significantly higher δ56Fe values ranging from -0.39 to +0.89 ‰. The Fe isotopic composition of the Løkken jaspers clearly correlates with morphological features with the lowest δ56Fe values in layered and the highest ones in brecciform jaspers. Our data demonstrate that variations in Fe isotope compositions of the modern Fe-Si deposit cannot be explained by a single process, but rather reflect the full complexity of Fe redox cycling within deep-sea

  7. Fungi associated with chimney and sulfide samples from a South Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal site: Distribution, diversity and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Shuangshuang; Pang, Ka-Lai; Luo, Zhu-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems are known to support remarkably diverse microbial communities, ranging from chemoautotrophic prokaryotes to heterotrophic prokaryotes and microeukaryotes. While fungi have generally been identified as an important component of various microbial communities in the environment, little is known about the species richness and abundance of such microorganisms in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. In this study, a combined culture-dependent and culture-independent sequence-based approach was used to investigate fungal distribution and diversity at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent site located at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge of the South Atlantic Ocean. Sequence analyses showed that the fungal community was dominated by members of the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota. Several new phylotypes (28 of 65 total fungal OTUs and 2 of 19 culturable fungal phylotypes) were identified, contributing to the literally unknown diversity of fungi in this understudied habitat. The fungal community structures in the chimney samples were distinct from those in three sulfide samples. The qPCR results revealed that fungal LSU rRNA gene copy numbers ranged from 5.88×105 to 6.77×106 copies/gram rock (wet weight), and the Ascomycota was significantly more abundant 2-3 orders) than the Basidiomycota. Our findings provide new insights into the diversity and abundance of fungi in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems, which increases our knowledge and understanding of the fungal diversity in deep-sea environments.

  8. Surface oceanographic fronts influencing deep-sea biological activity: Using fish stable isotopes as ecological tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzao, Maite; Navarro, Joan; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; de Sola, Luis Gil; Forero, Manuela G.

    2017-06-01

    Ecotones can be described as transition zones between neighbouring ecological systems that can be shaped by environmental gradients over a range of space and time scales. In the marine environment, the detection of ecotones is complex given the highly dynamic nature of marine systems and the paucity of empirical data over ocean-basin scales. One approach to overcome these limitations is to use stable isotopes from animal tissues since they can track spatial oceanographic variability across marine systems and, in turn, can be used as ecological tracers. Here, we analysed stable isotopes of deep-sea fishes to assess the presence of ecological discontinuities across the western Mediterranean. We were specifically interested in exploring the connection between deep-sea biological activity and particular oceanographic features (i.e., surface fronts) occurring in the pelagic domain. We collected samples for three different abundant deep-sea species in May 2004 from an experimental oceanographic trawling cruise (MEDITS): the Mictophydae jewel lanternfish Lampanyctus crocodilus and two species of the Gadidae family, the silvery pout Gadiculus argenteus and the blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou. The experimental survey occurred along the Iberian continental shelf and the upper and middle slopes, from the Strait of Gibraltar in the SW to the Cape Creus in the NE. The three deep-sea species were highly abundant throughout the study area and they showed geographic variation in their isotopic values, with decreasing values from north to south disrupted by an important change point around the Vera Gulf. Isotopic latitudinal gradients were explained by pelagic oceanographic conditions along the study area and confirm the existence of an ecotone at the Vera Gulf. This area could be considered as an oceanographic boundary where waters of Atlantic origin meet Mediterranean surface waters forming important frontal structures such as the Almeria-Oran front. In fact, our results

  9. A continuum of life histories in deep-sea demersal fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Haedrich, Richard L.

    2012-03-01

    It is generally perceived that all deep-sea fishes have great longevity, slow growth, and low reproductive output in comparison to shelf dwelling species. However, such a dichotomy is too simplistic because some fishes living on continental slopes are relatively fecund and fast growing, important considerations in respect to the management of expanding deep-sea fisheries. We tested two hypotheses that might explain variation in life history attributes of commercially exploited demersal fishes: (1) phylogeny best explains the differences because deep-sea species are often in different families from shelf dwelling ones and, alternatively, (2) environmental factors affecting individual life history attributes that change with depth account for the observed variation. Our analysis was based on 40 species from 9 orders, including all major commercially exploited deep-sea fishes and several phylogenetically related shelf species. Depth of occurrence correlated significantly with age at 50% maturity increasing linearly with depth (r2=0.46), while the von Bertalanffy growth coefficient, maximum fecundity and potential rate of population increase declined significantly and exponentially with depth (r2=0.41, 0.25 and 0.53, respectively). These trends were still significant when phylogenetically independent contrasts were applied. The trends were also consistent with similar slopes amongst members of the order Gadiformes and the order Scorpaeniformes. Reduced temperatures, predation pressure, food availability, or metabolic rates may all contribute to such changes with depth. Regardless of the mechanisms, by analyzing a suite of fishes from the shelves to the slope the present analysis has shown that rather than a simple dichotomy between deep-sea fishes and shelf fishes there is a continuum of life history attributes in fishes which correlate strongly with depth of occurrence.

  10. Development of Zr/ZrO2 high temperature and high pressure sensors for in-situ measuring chemical parameters of deep-sea water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XueTong; ZHANG RongHua; HU ShuMin; WANG Yong

    2009-01-01

    In order to in situ measure chemical parameters of deep-sea water and hydrothermal fluids at midocean ridge(MOR),it is necessary to use high temperature and high pressure chemical sensors.Developing new sensors is essential to measure in-situ pH and other chemical parameters(dissolved H2,dissolved H2S)of deep-sea water and hydrothermal fluids in a wide temperature range(2℃-400℃)at MOR vents.The YSZ(Yttria Stabilized Zirconia,9%Y2O3)ceramic-based(HgO/Hg)chemical sensors possess excellent electrochemical properties at high temperatures,which have been used to measure chemical parameters of hydrothermsl fluids above 200℃.A novel Zr/ZrO2 oxidation/reduction electrode was constructed by oxidation of Zr wire in Na2CO3 melt.This Zr/ZrO2 electrode has good chemical stability while measuring pH of high-temperature aqueous solutions,combined with a Ag/AgCl reference electrode.Potentials of the Zr/ZrO2 sensor in association with a Ag/AgCl reference electrode vary linearly with pH over a wide pH range,as tested by various NaCI-HCI-H2O solutions(NaOH-NaCI-H2O for basic solutions),at temperatures in the range of 20℃-200℃.Thus,the Zr/ZrO2 sensors can be utilized in monitoring the fluids over the temperature range of 2℃-200℃.The Zr/ZrO2 electrode combined with Ag/AgCI,Ag/Ag2S,and Au electrodes has been used to measure pH and other chemical parameters (dissolved H2,dissolved H2S)of aqueous fluids from low to high temperatures and high pressures in the laboratory and to monitor those parameters of deep-sea water in South China Sea.

  11. The economic implications of changing regulations for deep sea fishing under the European Common Fisheries Policy: UK case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangi, Stephen C; Kenny, Andrew; Readdy, Lisa; Posen, Paulette; Ribeiro-Santos, Ana; Neat, Francis C; Burns, Finlay

    2016-08-15

    Economic impact assessment methodology was applied to UK fisheries data to better understand the implications of European Commission proposal for regulations to fishing for deep-sea stocks in the North-East Atlantic (EC COM 371 Final 2012) under the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). The aim was to inform the on-going debate to develop the EC proposal, and to assist the UK fishing industry and Government in evaluating the most effective options to manage deep sea fish stocks. Results indicate that enforcing the EC proposal as originally drafted results in a number of implications for the UK fleet. Because of the proposed changes to the list of species defined as being deep sea species, and a new definition of what constitutes a vessel targeting deep sea species, a total of 695 active UK fishing vessels would need a permit to fish for deep sea species. However, due to existing and capped capacity limits many vessels would potentially not be able to obtain such a permit. The economic impact of these changes from the status quo reveals that in the short term, landings would decrease by 6540 tonnes, reducing gross value added by £3.3 million. Alternative options were also assessed that provide mitigation measures to offset the impacts of the proposed regulations whilst at the same time providing more effective protection of deep sea Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (VMEs). The options include setting a 400m depth rule that identifies a depth beyond which vessels would potentially be classified as fishing for deep sea species and designating 'core areas' for deep sea fishing at depths>400m to minimise the risk of further impacts of bottom fishing gear on deep sea habitats. Applying a 400m depth limit and 'core fishing' area approach deeper than 400m, the impact of the EC proposal would essentially be reduced to zero, that is, on average no vessels (using the status quo capacity baseline) would be impacted by the proposal.

  12. Deep-sea pennatulaceans (sea pens) - recent discoveries, morphological adaptations, and responses to benthic oceanographic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Pennatulaceans are sessile, benthic marine organisms that are bathymetrically wide-ranging, from the intertidal to approximately 6300 m in depth, and are conspicuous constituents of deep-sea environments. The vast majority of species are adapted for anchoring in soft sediments by the cylindrical peduncle - a muscular hydrostatic skeleton. However, in the past decade a few species ("Rockpens") have been discovered and described that can attach to hard substratum such as exposed rocky outcrops at depths between 669 and 1969 m, by a plunger-like adaptation of the base of the peduncle. Of the thirty-six known genera, eleven (or 30%) have been recorded from depths greater than 1000 m. The pennatulacean depth record holders are an unidentified species of Umbellula from 6260 m in the Peru-Chile Trench and a recently-discovered and described genus and species, Porcupinella profunda, from 5300 m the Porcupine Abyssal Plain of the northeastern Atlantic. A morphologically-differentiated type of polyp (acrozooid) have recently been discovered and described in two genera of shallow-water coral reef sea pens. Acrozooids apparently represent asexual buds and presumably can detach from the adult to start clonal colonies through asexual budding. Acrozooids are to be expected in deep-sea pennatulaceans, but so far have not been observed below 24 m in depth. Morphological responses at depths greater than 1000 m in deep-sea pennatulaceas include: fewer polyps, larger polyps, elongated stalks, and clustering of polyps along the rachis. Responses to deep-ocean physical parameters and anthropogenic changes that could affect the abundance and distribution of deep-sea pennatulaceans include changes in bottom current flow and food availability, changes in seawater temperature and pH, habitat destruction by fish trawling, and sunken refuse pollution. No evidence of the effects of ocean acidification or other effects of anthropogenic climate change in sea pens of the deep-sea has been

  13. Sensitivity of the deep-sea amphipod Eurythenes gryllus to chemically dispersed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Gro Harlaug; Coquillé, Nathalie; Le Floch, Stephane; Geraudie, Perrine; Dussauze, Matthieu; Lemaire, Philippe; Camus, Lionel

    2016-04-01

    In the context of an oil spill accident and the following oil spill response, much attention is given to the use of dispersants. Dispersants are used to disperse an oil slick from the sea surface into the water column generating a cloud of dispersed oil droplets. The main consequence is an increasing of the sea water-oil interface which induces an increase of the oil biodegradation. Hence, the use of dispersants can be effective in preventing oiling of sensitive coastal environments. Also, in case of an oil blowout from the seabed, subsea injection of dispersants may offer some benefits compared to containment and recovery of the oil or in situ burning operation at the sea surface. However, biological effects of dispersed oil are poorly understood for deep-sea species. Most effects studies on dispersed oil and also other oil-related compounds have been focusing on more shallow water species. This is the first approach to assess the sensitivity of a macro-benthic deep-sea organism to dispersed oil. This paper describes a toxicity test which was performed on the macro-benthic deep-sea amphipod (Eurythenes gryllus) to determine the concentration causing lethality to 50% of test individuals (LC50) after an exposure to dispersed Brut Arabian Light (BAL) oil. The LC50 (24 h) was 101 and 24 mg L(-1) after 72 h and 12 mg L(-1) at 96 h. Based on EPA scale of toxicity categories to aquatic organisms, an LC50 (96 h) of 12 mg L(-1) indicates that the dispersed oil was slightly to moderately toxic to E. gryllus. As an attempt to compare our results to others, a literature study was performed. Due to limited amount of data available for dispersed oil and amphipods, information on other crustacean species and other oil-related compounds was also collected. Only one study on dispersed oil and amphipods was found, the LC50 value in this study was similar to the LC50 value of E. gryllus in our study. Since toxicity data are important input to risk assessment and net environmental

  14. Hydrothermal Vents and Methane Seeps: Rethinking the Sphere of Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ann Levin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by benthic background fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as

  15. Hydrothermal vents and methane seeps: Rethinking the sphere of influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Baco, Amy; Bowden, David; Colaco, Ana; Cordes, Erik E.; Cunha, Marina; Demopoulos, Amanda; Gobin, Judith; Grupe, Ben; Le, Jennifer; Metaxas, Anna; Netburn, Amanda; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vanreusel, Ann; Watling, Les

    2016-01-01

    Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by “benthic background” fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as well as

  16. Phylogenetic characterization of episymbiotic bacteria hosted by a hydrothermal vent limpet (Lepetodrilidae, Vetigastropoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bates, A.E.; Harme, T.L.; Roeselers, G.; Cavanaugh, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Marine invertebrates hosting chemosynthetic bacterial symbionts are known from multiple phyla and represent remarkable diversity in form and function. The deep-sea hydrothermal vent limpet Lepetodrilus fucensis from the Juan de Fuca Ridge complex hosts a gill symbiosis of particular interest because

  17. Pump-lockage ore transportation system for deep sea flexible mining system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai-liang; YIN Ping-wei; XU Shao-jun; YANG Fang-qiong

    2008-01-01

    Based on characteristics of deep sea flexible mining system, a new pump-lockage ore transportation system was designed. According to Bernoulli equation and two-phase hydrodynamics theory, parameters of the new system were obtained and four ore transportation systems were analyzed. The results indicate that the pump head of 1000 m mining system is 100-150 m and that of 5 000 m mining system is 660-750 m. In addition, based on similarity theory, a model of the new transportation system was made,which can simulate more than 5 000 m actual ore transportation system. So both theory and experiment prove that the new pump-lockage ore transportation system is an ideal design for deep sea flexible mining system.

  18. Path Following Control of A Deep-Sea Manned Submersible Based upon NTSM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ling; CUI Wei-cheng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a robust path following control law is proposed for a deep-sea manned submersible maneuvering along a predeterminated path. Developed in China, the submersible is underactuated in the horizontal plane in that it is actuated by two perpendicular thrusts in this plane. The advanced non-singular terminal sliding mode (NTSM) is implemented for the design of the path following controller, which can ensure the convergence of the motion system in finite time and improve its robustness against parametric uncertainties and environmental disturbances. In the process of controller design, the close-loop stability is considered and proved by Lyapunov's stability theory. With the experimental data, numerical simulations are provided to verify the control law for path following of the deep-sea manned submersible.

  19. Deep-sea lebensspuren: remarks on some echiuran traces in the Porcupine Seabight, northeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vaugelas, Jean

    1989-06-01

    During an exploration of the Porcupine Seabight aboard the French submersible Cyana, large rosettes attributed to echiurans were observed on the muddy bottom, sometimes associated with clumped mounds showing tension gashes. The intrusion of cores into the gashed mounds resulted in the creation of a fountain-like current of water flowing out of the center hole of the rosette, illustrating a direct connection. These two types of traces, which are classified under distinct generic names in recent classifications of deep-sea lebensspuren, are presumed to be produced by the echiuroid worm, being the two ends of an L-shaped burrow. A sketch of deep-sea echiurans' mode of life is proposed.

  20. Adaptive Neural Network Control with Control Allocation for A Manned Submersible in Deep Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jian-cheng; ZHANG Ai-qun; WANG Xiao-hui; WU Bao-ju

    2007-01-01

    This paper thoroughly studies a control system with control allocation for a manned submersible in deep sea being developed in China. The proposed control system consists of a neural-network-based direct adaptive controller and a dynamic control allocation module. A control energy cost function is used as the optimization criteria of the control allocation module, and weighted pseudo-inverse is used to find the solution of the control allocation problem. In the presence of bounded unknown disturbance and neural networks approximation error, stability of the closed-loop control system of manned submersible is proved with Lyaponov theory. The feasibility and validity of the proposed control system is further verified through experiments conducted on a semi-physical simulation platform for the manned submersible in deep sea.

  1. Coextraction of microbial metagenomic DNA and RNA from deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A protocol to coextract the microbial metagenomic DNA and RNA from deep-sea sediment was developed for the microbiological study of environmental samples. The obtained pure metagenomic DNA with the size larger than 23 kb and stable RNA could be used directly for PCR and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) respectively. The direct lysis including the treatments of SDS, proteinase and lysozyme was applied to acquiring the metagenomic DNA and RNA furthest. Prior to the lysis treatment, the glass bead and denaturing solution were added to enhance the lysis efficiency and keep the integrity of RNA respectively. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was applied in accessing the microbial 16S rRNA diversity by PCR and RT-PCR amplification from a single extraction. The pattern obtained by this analysis revealed some differences between them, indicating the efficiency of the protocol in extracting the metagenomic DNA and total RNA from deep-sea sediment.

  2. The Southern Ocean deep sea: first insights into biodiversity and biogeography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Brix, S.; Brökeland, W.

    2007-01-01

    environmental features, including a very deep continental shelf2 and a weakly stratified water column, and are the source for much of the deep water in the world ocean. These features suggest that deep-sea faunas around the Antarctic may be related both to adjacent shelf communities and to those in other oceans......Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa1. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique....... Unlike shallow-water Antarctic benthic communities, however, little is known about life in this vast deep-sea region2,3. Here, we report new data from recent sampling expeditions in the deep Weddell Sea and adjacent areas (748–6,348 m water depth) that reveal high levels of new biodiversity; for example...

  3. Prospects of Dark Matter Direct Search under Deep Sea Water in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Singh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence from cosmological and astrophysical observations that about one quarter of the energy density of the universe can be attributed to cold dark matter (CDM, whose nature and properties are still unknown. Around the world large numbers of experiments are using different techniques of dark matter direct and indirect detections. According to their experimental requirements location of the experiment prefer to use either underground, under ice, or under sea water. In a country like India, digging underground cavern and long tunnel is not very convenient. Therefore, authors look from the other solutions of this problem preferring to use deep sea water. In this article, we discuss the pros and corns of use of deep sea water in the dark matter search.

  4. Estimation of the Iron Loss in Deep-Sea Permanent Magnet Motors considering Seawater Compressive Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM. The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress.

  5. Food web structure and vulnerability of a deep-sea ecosystem in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Tecchio, Samuele; Coll, Marta; Christensen, Villy; Company, Joan B.; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva; Sardà, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing fishing pressure on the continental margins of the oceans, and this raises concerns about the vulnerability of the ecosystems thriving there. The current knowledge of the biology of deep-water fish species identifies potential reduced resilience to anthropogenic disturbance. However, there are extreme difficulties in sampling the deep sea, resulting in poorly resolved and indirectly obtained food-web relationships. Here, we modelled the flows and biomasses of a Mediterrane...

  6. The Deep-Sea Microbial Community from the Amazonian Basin Associated with Oil Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana E. Campeão

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One consequence of oil production is the possibility of unplanned accidental oil spills; therefore, it is important to evaluate the potential of indigenous microorganisms (both prokaryotes and eukaryotes from different oceanic basins to degrade oil. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial response during the biodegradation process of Brazilian crude oil, both with and without the addition of the dispersant Corexit 9500, using deep-sea water samples from the Amazon equatorial margin basins, Foz do Amazonas and Barreirinhas, in the dark and at low temperatures (4°C. We collected deep-sea samples in the field (about 2570 m below the sea surface, transported the samples back to the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions (5°C in the dark and subsequently performed two laboratory biodegradation experiments that used metagenomics supported by classical microbiological methods and chemical analysis to elucidate both taxonomic and functional microbial diversity. We also analyzed several physical–chemical and biological parameters related to oil biodegradation. The concomitant depletion of dissolved oxygen levels, oil droplet density characteristic to oil biodegradation, and BTEX concentration with an increase in microbial counts revealed that oil can be degraded by the autochthonous deep-sea microbial communities. Indigenous bacteria (e.g., Alteromonadaceae, Colwelliaceae, and Alcanivoracaceae, archaea (e.g., Halobacteriaceae, Desulfurococcaceae, and Methanobacteriaceae, and eukaryotic microbes (e.g., Microsporidia, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota from the Amazonian margin deep-sea water were involved in biodegradation of Brazilian crude oil within less than 48-days in both treatments, with and without dispersant, possibly transforming oil into microbial biomass that may fuel the marine food web.

  7. Distribution of deep-sea benthos in the proposed mining area of Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.

    . Althoughthey did not yield any definite correlation with quantitative macrobenthic data,increases inmeiofaunal density were recorded with increases in organic flux in the area. In the study of deep-sea meiobenthos,the importance of nutrients as a limiting... content,which may provide the source of oxygen. Vertical distribution of meiofauna wascorrelated with vertical profiles of TOM and LOM in the sediment,but no definite regression was found with bacterial abundance. Shirayama (1984) has reported a definite...

  8. The Deep-Sea Microbial Community from the Amazonian Basin Associated with Oil Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeão, Mariana E; Reis, Luciana; Leomil, Luciana; de Oliveira, Louisi; Otsuki, Koko; Gardinali, Piero; Pelz, Oliver; Valle, Rogerio; Thompson, Fabiano L; Thompson, Cristiane C

    2017-01-01

    One consequence of oil production is the possibility of unplanned accidental oil spills; therefore, it is important to evaluate the potential of indigenous microorganisms (both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) from different oceanic basins to degrade oil. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial response during the biodegradation process of Brazilian crude oil, both with and without the addition of the dispersant Corexit 9500, using deep-sea water samples from the Amazon equatorial margin basins, Foz do Amazonas and Barreirinhas, in the dark and at low temperatures (4°C). We collected deep-sea samples in the field (about 2570 m below the sea surface), transported the samples back to the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions (5°C in the dark) and subsequently performed two laboratory biodegradation experiments that used metagenomics supported by classical microbiological methods and chemical analysis to elucidate both taxonomic and functional microbial diversity. We also analyzed several physical-chemical and biological parameters related to oil biodegradation. The concomitant depletion of dissolved oxygen levels, oil droplet density characteristic to oil biodegradation, and BTEX concentration with an increase in microbial counts revealed that oil can be degraded by the autochthonous deep-sea microbial communities. Indigenous bacteria (e.g., Alteromonadaceae, Colwelliaceae, and Alcanivoracaceae), archaea (e.g., Halobacteriaceae, Desulfurococcaceae, and Methanobacteriaceae), and eukaryotic microbes (e.g., Microsporidia, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota) from the Amazonian margin deep-sea water were involved in biodegradation of Brazilian crude oil within less than 48-days in both treatments, with and without dispersant, possibly transforming oil into microbial biomass that may fuel the marine food web.

  9. LVP Modeling and Dynamic Characteristics Prediction of A Hydraulic Power Unit in Deep-Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Xue-peng; YE Min; DENG Bin; ZHANG Cui-hong; YU Zu-ying

    2013-01-01

    A hydraulic power unit (HPU) is the driving "heart" of deep-sea working equipment.It is critical to predict its dynamic performances in deep-water before being immerged in the seawater,while the experimental tests by simulating deep-sea environment have many disadvantages,such as expensive cost,long test cycles,and difficult to achieve low-temperature simulation,which is only used as a supplementary means for confirmatory experiment.This paper proposes a novel theoretical approach based on the linear varying parameters (LVP) modeling to foresee the dynamic performances of the driving unit.Firstly,based on the varying environment features,dynamic expressions of the compressibility and viscosity of hydraulic oil are derived to reveal the fluid performances changing.Secondly,models of hydraulic system and electrical system are accomplished respectively through studying the control process and energy transfer,and then LVP models of the pressure and flow rate control is obtained through the electro-hydraulic models integration.Thirdly,dynamic characteristics of HPU are obtained by the model simulating within bounded closed sets of varying parameters.Finally,the developed HPU is tested in a deep-sea imitating hull,and the experimental results are well consistent with the theoretical analysis outcomes,which clearly declare that the LVP modeling is a rational way to foresee dynamic performances of HPU.The research approach and model analysis results can be applied to the predictions of working properties and product designs for other deep-sea hydraulic pump.

  10. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as “open-sea convection”. It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts. PMID:23874425

  11. Dynamic response of deep-sea sediments to seasonal variations: a model

    OpenAIRE

    Soetaert, K.; Herman, P.M.J.; Middelburg, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    We present a dynamic, numerical model of early diagenetic processes that can be used to examine the response of different organic carbon mineralization pathways, concentration vs. depth profiles, and the resultant fluxes to seasonally varying carbon deposition. We show that there can be substantial temporal variability in sediment-water fluxes as well as in the relative contribution of different organic carbon mineralization pathways and oxygen consumption processes in deep-sea sediments. The...

  12. Man and the Last Great Wilderness: Human Impact on the Deep Sea

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The deep sea, the largest ecosystem on Earth and one of the least studied, harbours high biodiversity and provides a wealth of resources. Although humans have used the oceans for millennia, technological developments now allow exploitation of fisheries resources, hydrocarbons and minerals below 2000 m depth. The remoteness of the deep seafloor has promoted the disposal of residues and litter. Ocean acidification and climate change now bring a new dimension of global effects. Thus the challeng...

  13. Nd isotopes in deep-sea corals in the North-eastern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, Kevin; Colin, Christophe; Douville, Eric; Freiwald, Andre; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur; De Mol, Ben; Frank, Norbert

    2010-09-01

    Neodymium (Nd) concentrations and isotopic signatures of living and fossil deep-sea coral species Lophelia pertusa, Desmophyllum dianthus and Madrepora oculata from the northeast Atlantic Ocean have been investigated in order to test the ability of deep-sea corals to reconstruct the seawater Nd isotopic signature and past changes of ocean circulation in the eastern North Atlantic. Small quantities of Nd—less than 45 ng/g—are incorporated into the aragonite skeleton of living deep-sea corals that dwell at upper intermediate depths throughout the Northeast Atlantic. Rigorous cleaning techniques are needed in order to avoid Nd contamination from manganese-oxide and iron hydroxide coatings. Moreover, Nd isotopic compositions have been measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) by Nd-oxide method. Our data indicate that the isotopic signatures of modern corals are similar to those of adjacent water masses, implying that deep-sea corals can serve as an archive of the seawater Nd isotopic compositions in the past. The first results from few fully-cleaned fossils corals collected within the Porcupine Seabight and the southwest Rockall Bank reveal significantly higher ɛNd for corals dated between 150 ± 40 and 3060 ± 90 yrs than those of the living corals located in similar areas. This suggests rapid hydrological variations along the eastern margin of the North Atlantic Ocean at intermediate water depth with higher contribution of the Mediterranean Overflow Waters (MOW) or other temperate Atlantic mid-depth water masses (ENACW or NAC) in the past.

  14. Higher and lower-level relationships of the deep-sea fish order alepocephaliformes (Teleostei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jan Y.; Møller, Peter R.; Lavoué, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Fishes of the order Alepocephaliformes, slickheads and tubeshoulders, constitute a group of deep-sea fishes poorly known in respect to most areas of their biology and systematics. Morphological studies have found alepocephaliform fishes to display a mosaic of synapomorphic and symplesiomorphic...... are alepocephaliforms and unambiguously aligned sequences were subjected to partitioned maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses. Results from the present study support Alepocephaliformes as a genetically distinct otocephalan order as sister clade to Ostariophysi (mostly freshwater fishes comprising Gonorynchiformes...

  15. First insights into the biodiversity and biogeography of the Southern Ocean deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, A.; Gooday, A. J.; Brandão, S.N.; Brix, S.; Brökeland, W.; Cedhagen, T.; Choudhury, M.; Cornelius, N.; Danis, B; Mesel, I. de; Diaz, R. J.; Gillan, D.C.; Ebbe, B.; Howe, J.A.; Janussen, D.

    2007-01-01

    Shallow marine benthic communities around Antarctica show high levels of endemism, gigantism, slow growth, longevity and late maturity, as well as adaptive radiations that have generated considerable biodiversity in some taxa1. The deeper parts of the Southern Ocean exhibit some unique environmental features, including a very deep continental shelf2 and a weakly stratified water column, and are the source for much of the deep water in the world ocean. These features suggest that deep-sea faun...

  16. Strategies for molecular genetic studies of preserved deep-sea macrofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Elizabeth E.; Zardus, John D.; Chase, Michael R.; Etter, Ron J.; Rex, Michael A.

    2004-10-01

    With the development of new methods to sequence DNA from preserved organisms, existing archival collections can be used to document the population genetic structure of deep-sea species. This has made possible the first direct inferences about patterns of evolutionary diversification in the soft-sediment macrofauna. Here we report protocols and success rates for amplifying and sequencing regions of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA, Cytochrome oxidase I (COI), and Cytochrome b (cytb) genes from formalin-fixed protobranch bivalves and gastropods, major components of the deep-sea benthos. DNA was extracted from 1532 individuals of 12 common bathyal and abyssal species that had been fixed in formalin and preserved in alcohol for up to 36 years. DNA was also extracted from 53 individuals that were dried upon collection, some of which were collected more than 100 years ago. The overall success rate for amplification by PCR was 44%, but this varied considerably among species, stations, and cruises. When DNA amplified, sequencing success was generally high, averaging 85% and ranging from 19% to 100%. The reliability of amplification and sequencing depend strongly on how samples are treated during collection and storage. Amplification success was similar among samples collected from the same station and samples collected on the same cruise. We provide recommendations on strategies for primer design, PCR, and sample selection to improve success rates for genetic analysis of preserved deep-sea organisms. The success rates from different collections, sampling stations, and cruises provide important guidance for selecting material for future genetic work on deep-sea collections examined here.

  17. Use of floating surface detector stations for the calibration of a deep-sea neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Tsirigotis, A G; Gizani, N A B; Leisos, A; Tzamarias, S E; 10.1016/j.nima.2008.07.011

    2011-01-01

    We propose the operation of floating Extensive Air Shower (EAS) detector stations in coincidence with the KM3NeT Mediterranean deep-sea neutrino telescope to determine the absolute position and orientation of the underwater detector and to investigate possible systematic angular errors. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed calibration strategies using a detailed simulation of the EAS and KM3NeT detectors.

  18. Deep-sea fungi as a source of alkaline and cold-tolerant proteases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.; Raghukumar, C.; Muraleedharan, U.; Raghukumar, S.

    and Chang CS. Bleach resistant alkaline protease produced by a Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Korean polychaete, Periserrula leucophryna. Proc Biochem 2004;39:1441-7. [12] Turkiewicz M, Gromek E, Kalinowska H and Zielinska M, Biosynthesis and properties... o C Serine protease [33] Paecilomyces lilacinus Biocontrol agent Azocasein [34] Bacillus sp Korean polychaete Casein 1?g tyrosine min -1 10.0 45-50 o C Serine protease [11] Aspergillus ustus NIOCC #20 Deep-sea sediment Azocasein 1639 ACU m...

  19. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J M; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G F; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  20. How can we identify and communicate the ecological value of deep-sea ecosystem services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobstvogt, Niels; Townsend, Michael; Witte, Ursula; Hanley, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Submarine canyons are considered biodiversity hotspots which have been identified for their important roles in connecting the deep sea with shallower waters. To date, a huge gap exists between the high importance that scientists associate with deep-sea ecosystem services and the communication of this knowledge to decision makers and to the wider public, who remain largely ignorant of the importance of these services. The connectivity and complexity of marine ecosystems makes knowledge transfer very challenging, and new communication tools are necessary to increase understanding of ecological values beyond the science community. We show how the Ecosystem Principles Approach, a method that explains the importance of ocean processes via easily understandable ecological principles, might overcome this challenge for deep-sea ecosystem services. Scientists were asked to help develop a list of clear and concise ecosystem principles for the functioning of submarine canyons through a Delphi process to facilitate future transfers of ecological knowledge. These ecosystem principles describe ecosystem processes, link such processes to ecosystem services, and provide spatial and temporal information on the connectivity between deep and shallow waters. They also elucidate unique characteristics of submarine canyons. Our Ecosystem Principles Approach was successful in integrating ecological information into the ecosystem services assessment process. It therefore has a high potential to be the next step towards a wider implementation of ecological values in marine planning. We believe that successful communication of ecological knowledge is the key to a wider public support for ocean conservation, and that this endeavour has to be driven by scientists in their own interest as major deep-sea stakeholders.

  1. Iron-rich basal sediments from the eastern equatorial pacific: Leg 16, deep sea drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronan, D.S.; Van Andel, T. H.; Ross, Heath G.; Dinkelman, M.G.; Bennett, R.H.; Bukry, D.; Charleston, S.; Kaneps, A.; Rodolfo, K.S.; Yeats, R.S.

    1972-01-01

    Iron-rich sediments chemically similar to those forming at present on the crest of the East Pacific Rise have been found just above basement at widely separated drill sites in the eastern equatorial Pacific, including three sites of Leg 16 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. These sediments were probably formed when the basement was at the crest of this rise and have moved to their present location as a result of sea-floor spreading.

  2. The Current State of Global Activities Related to Deep-sea Mineral Exploration and Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Sven; Krätschell, Anna; Hannington, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea mining is seen as a potential way to provide future secure metal supply to global markets. The current rush to the seafloor in areas beyond national jurisdiction indicates that sound knowledge of the geological characteritics of the various commodities, a realistic resource assessment, and a social and political discussion about the cons and pros of their exploitation that is based on facts, not myths, is required. This contribution provides the most recent information on...

  3. Extreme Red Sea: Life in the deep-sea anoxic brine lakes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Tectonic splitting of the Arabian and African plates originated the Red Sea together with one of the most unique, remote, and extreme environments on Earth: deep-sea anoxic brine lakes. They combine multiple extremes namely increased salinity (7-fold), temperature (up to 70°C), concentration of heavy metals (1,000- to 10,000-fold), and hydrostatic pressure [1]. Despite such harsh conditions, they harbor an unexpectedly high biodiversity and are teeming with life. Increased i...

  4. Man and the last great wilderness: human impact on the deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Ramirez-Llodra; Paul A Tyler; Baker, Maria C.; Odd Aksel Bergstad; Clark, Malcolm R.; Elva Escobar; Levin, Lisa A.; Lenaick Menot; Rowden, Ashley A.; Smith, Craig R; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2011-01-01

    The deep sea, the largest ecosystem on Earth and one of the least studied, harbours high biodiversity and provides a wealth of resources. Although humans have used the oceans for millennia, technological developments now allow exploitation of fisheries resources, hydrocarbons and minerals below 2000 m depth. The remoteness of the deep seafloor has promoted the disposal of residues and litter. Ocean acidification and climate change now bring a new dimension of global effects. Thus the challeng...

  5. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tamburini

    Full Text Available The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  6. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Isabel C; Schwing, Patrick T; Brooks, Gregg R; Larson, Rebekka A; Hastings, David W; Ellis, Greg; Goddard, Ethan A; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000-1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals) in order to evaluate the concentration, composition and input of hydrocarbons to the seafloor. Specifically, we analyzed total organic carbon (TOC), aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), and biomarker (hopanes, steranes, diasteranes) compounds to elucidate possible sources and transport pathways for deposition of hydrocarbons. Results showed higher hydrocarbon concentrations during 2010-2011 compared to years prior to 2010. Hydrocarbon inputs in 2010-2011 were composed of a mixture of sources including terrestrial, planktonic, and weathered oil. Our results suggest that after the DWH event, both soluble and highly insoluble hydrocarbons were deposited at enhanced rates in the deep-sea. We proposed two distinct transport pathways of hydrocarbon deposition: 1) sinking of oil-particle aggregates (hydrocarbon-contaminated marine snow and/or suspended particulate material), and 2) advective transport and direct contact of the deep plume with the continental slope surface sediments between 1000-1200 m. Our findings underline the complexity of the depositional event observed in the aftermath of the DWH event in terms of multiple sources, variable concentrations, and spatial (depth-related) variability in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead.

  7. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C Romero

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000-1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals in order to evaluate the concentration, composition and input of hydrocarbons to the seafloor. Specifically, we analyzed total organic carbon (TOC, aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs, and biomarker (hopanes, steranes, diasteranes compounds to elucidate possible sources and transport pathways for deposition of hydrocarbons. Results showed higher hydrocarbon concentrations during 2010-2011 compared to years prior to 2010. Hydrocarbon inputs in 2010-2011 were composed of a mixture of sources including terrestrial, planktonic, and weathered oil. Our results suggest that after the DWH event, both soluble and highly insoluble hydrocarbons were deposited at enhanced rates in the deep-sea. We proposed two distinct transport pathways of hydrocarbon deposition: 1 sinking of oil-particle aggregates (hydrocarbon-contaminated marine snow and/or suspended particulate material, and 2 advective transport and direct contact of the deep plume with the continental slope surface sediments between 1000-1200 m. Our findings underline the complexity of the depositional event observed in the aftermath of the DWH event in terms of multiple sources, variable concentrations, and spatial (depth-related variability in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead.

  8. Hydrocarbons in Deep-Sea Sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout in the Northeast Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Isabel C.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Hastings, David W.; Ellis, Greg; Goddard, Ethan A.; Hollander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill released 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) over 87 days. Sediment and water sampling efforts were concentrated SW of the DWH and in coastal areas. Here we present geochemistry data from sediment cores collected in the aftermath of the DWH event from 1000 – 1500 m water depth in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. Cores were analyzed at high-resolution (at 2 mm and 5 mm intervals) in order to evaluate the concentration, composition and input of hydrocarbons to the seafloor. Specifically, we analyzed total organic carbon (TOC), aliphatic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), and biomarker (hopanes, steranes, diasteranes) compounds to elucidate possible sources and transport pathways for deposition of hydrocarbons. Results showed higher hydrocarbon concentrations during 2010-2011 compared to years prior to 2010. Hydrocarbon inputs in 2010-2011 were composed of a mixture of sources including terrestrial, planktonic, and weathered oil. Our results suggest that after the DWH event, both soluble and highly insoluble hydrocarbons were deposited at enhanced rates in the deep-sea. We proposed two distinct transport pathways of hydrocarbon deposition: 1) sinking of oil-particle aggregates (hydrocarbon-contaminated marine snow and/or suspended particulate material), and 2) advective transport and direct contact of the deep plume with the continental slope surface sediments between 1000-1200 m. Our findings underline the complexity of the depositional event observed in the aftermath of the DWH event in terms of multiple sources, variable concentrations, and spatial (depth-related) variability in the DeSoto Canyon, NE of the DWH wellhead. PMID:26020923

  9. Feeding in deep-sea demosponges: Influence of abiotic and biotic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Leah M.; Hamel, Jean-François; Mercier, Annie

    2017-09-01

    In shallow benthic communities, sponges are widely recognized for their ability to contribute to food webs by cycling nutrients and mediating carbon fluxes through filter feeding. In comparison, little is known about filter feeding in deep-sea species and how it may be modulated by environmental conditions. Here, a rare opportunity to maintain live healthy deep-sea sponges for an extended period led to a preliminary experimental study of their feeding metrics. This work focused on demosponges collected from the continental slope of eastern Canada at 1000 m depth. Filtration rates (as clearance of phytoplankton cells) at holding temperature (6 °C) were positively correlated with food particle concentration, ranging on average from 18.8 to 160.6 cells ml-1 h-1 at nominal concentrations of 10,000-40,000 cells ml-1. Cell clearance was not significantly affected by decreasing seawater temperature, from 6 °C to 3 °C or 0 °C, although two of the sponges showed decreased filtration rates. Low pH ( 7.5) and the presence of a predatory sea star markedly depressed or inhibited feeding activity in all sponges tested. While performed under laboratory conditions on a limited number of specimens, this work highlights the possible sensitivity of deep-sea demosponges to various types and levels of biotic and abiotic factors, inferring a consequent vulnerability to natural and anthropogenic disturbances.

  10. Starvation and recovery in the deep-sea methanotroph Methyloprofundus sedimenti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavormina, Patricia L; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Tocheva, Elitza I; Dalleska, Nathan F; Jensen, Ashley J; Valentine, David L; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Jensen, Grant J; Dubilier, Nicole; Orphan, Victoria J

    2017-01-01

    In the deep ocean, the conversion of methane into derived carbon and energy drives the establishment of diverse faunal communities. Yet specific biological mechanisms underlying the introduction of methane-derived carbon into the food web remain poorly described, due to a lack of cultured representative deep-sea methanotrophic prokaryotes. Here, the response of the deep-sea aerobic methanotroph Methyloprofundus sedimenti to methane starvation and recovery was characterized. By combining lipid analysis, RNA analysis, and electron cryotomography, it was shown that M. sedimenti undergoes discrete cellular shifts in response to methane starvation, including changes in headgroup-specific fatty acid saturation levels, and reductions in cytoplasmic storage granules. Methane starvation is associated with a significant increase in the abundance of gene transcripts pertinent to methane oxidation. Methane reintroduction to starved cells stimulates a rapid, transient extracellular accumulation of methanol, revealing a way in which methane-derived carbon may be routed to community members. This study provides new understanding of methanotrophic responses to methane starvation and recovery, and lays the initial groundwork to develop Methyloprofundus as a model chemosynthesizing bacterium from the deep sea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Bacterial and archaeal community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qun; LI Chaolun; DONG Yi; ZHANG Wenyan; ZHANG Wuchang; XIAO Tian

    2015-01-01

    Microbial community structures in the Arctic deep-sea sedimentary ecosystem are determined by organic matter input, energy availability, and other environmental factors. However, global warming and earlier ice-cover melting are affecting the microbial diversity. To characterize the Arctic deep-sea sediment microbial diversity and its rela-tionship with environmental factors, we applied Roche 454 sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons from Arctic deep-sea sediment sample. Both bacterial and archaeal communities’ richness, compositions and structures as well as tax-onomic and phylogenetic affiliations of identified clades were characterized. Phylotypes relating to sulfur reduction and chemoorganotrophic lifestyle are major groups in the bacterial groups;while the archaeal community is domi-nated by phylotypes most closely related to the ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota (96.66%) and methanogenic Euryarchaeota (3.21%). This study describes the microbial diversity in the Arctic deep marine sediment (>3 500 m) near the North Pole and would lay foundation for future functional analysis on microbial metabolic processes and pathways predictions in similar environments.

  12. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi from deep sea sediments of Peruvian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spormann, A.; Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. These strictly anaerobic microbes depend on a supporting microbial community to mitigate electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environments.

  13. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.; Spormann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. They are strictly anaerobic microbes that depend on a supporting microbial community for electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbsf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  14. The KM3NeT deep-sea neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Margiotta, Annarita

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a deep-sea research infrastructure being constructed in the Mediterranean Sea. It will host the next generation Cherenkov neutrino telescope and nodes for a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory, providing oceanographers, marine biologists, and geophysicists with real time measurements. The neutrino telescope will complement IceCube in its field of view and exceed it substantially in sensitivity. Its main goal is the detection of high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. The detector will have a modular structure with six building blocks, each consisting of about one hundred Detection Units (DUs). Each DU will be equipped with 18 multi-PMT digital optical modules. The first phase of construction has started and shore and deep-sea infrastructures hosting the future KM3NeT detector are being prepared offshore Toulon, France and offshore Capo Passero on Sicily, Italy. The technological solutions for the neutrino detector of KM3NeT and the expected performance of the neutrino telescope are present...

  15. [Deep-sea research ground for the study of living matter properties in extreme conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikarpov, G G

    2011-01-01

    The Black Sea hollow bottom is a promising research ground in the field of deep-sea radiochemoecology and exobiology. It has turned out to be at the intersection of the earth and cosmic scientific interests such as deep-sea marine radiochemoecology from the perspective of the study of extreme biogeocenological properties of the Earth biosphere and exobiology from the standpoint of the study of life phenomena (living matter) outside the Earth biosphere, i.e. on other planets and during hypothetical transfer of spores in the outer space. The potential of this ground is substantiated with the data published by the author and co-workers on accumulation of 90Sr, 137Cs and Pu isotopes with silts of bathyal pelo-contour, on the quality of deep-sea hydrogen sulphide waters (after their contact with air) for vital functions of planktonic and benthic aerobes, as well as the species composition of marine, freshwater and terrestrial plants grown from the spores collected from the bottom sediments of the Black Sea bathyal. Discussion was based on V.I. Vernadsky's ideas about the living matter and biosphere, which allowed conclusions about the biospheric and outer space role of the described phenomena.

  16. Uncommon pelagic and deep-sea cephalopods in the Mediterranean: new data and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. QUETGLAS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Compared to their shelf-living relatives, the biology and ecology of most pelagic and deep-sea cephalopods is currently rather unknown owing to the difficulties to catch them. To cover the lack of information on these cephalopods, scientists have to make use of the limited and fragmentary data gathered from different sources such as sporadic captures, strandings or stomach contents of their predators. Here, we give some biological and ecological information on eleven uncommon pelagic and deep-sea cephalopods collected during more than fifteen years of fisheries surveys in the western Mediterranean Sea. The cephalopods investigated include two epipelagic octopuses (Ocythoe tuberculata and Tremoctopus violaceus, one deep-sea cirrate octopus (Opisthoteuthis calypso, the sepiolid Stoloteuthis leucoptera and seven teuthoid species inhabiting preferentially mesopelagic and bathypelagic waters (Abraliopsis morisii, Ancistrocheirus lesueurii, Brachioteuthis riisei, Chiroteuthis veranyi, Chtenopteryx sicula, Onychoteuthis banksii and Taonius pavo. Although all of these species are either cosmopolitan or present a wide distribution in other oceans, they are nevertheless relatively rare in catches, and therefore remain poorly known. The finding of T. pavo represents the first record of this cephalopod in the Mediterranean.

  17. Velocities, turbulence, and skin friction in a deep-sea logarithmic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Giselher; Weatherly, Georges L.

    1985-05-01

    Speed, turbulence, skin friction, and drag measurements made with metal-clad hot wires, epoxy-coated hot films, and Savonius rotors are reported for a deep-sea boundary layer at a water depth of ˜5000 m. They include data from heights z < 30 cm, a region hitherto only investigated in detail by Chriss and Caldwell (1982) for a shelf site. A mean speed logarithmic layer was observed at 3 < z < 200 cm. The difference between the friction velocity u*log determined from the speed profiles and the skin friction u*skin measured by flush-mounted hot films was statistically significant at the 95% level in five out of eight analyzed burst intervals. This result suggests form-drag influence on the vertical mean flow profile. Although identified from the mean speed data as a hydrodynamically rough boundary layer, the turbulence and bottom stress intensities at the deep-sea site were found to be reduced by more than 40% compared to smooth-wall open-channel flow and planetary boundary layers. Applicability of the universal law of the wall has not been confirmed for this deep-sea boundary layer.

  18. Report of epibiont Thecacineta calix (Ciliophora: Suctorea) on deep sea Desmodora (Nematoda) from the Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Singh; Sautya, S.; Dovgal, I.; Chatterjee, T.

    of epibiont Thecacineta calix (Ciliophora: Suctorea) on deep-sea Desmodora (Nematoda) from the Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean baban ingole 1 , ravail singh 1 , sabyasachi sautya 1 , igor dovgal 2 and tapas chatterjee 3 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona...

  19. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected]. indicated by metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-27

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected] . at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Neamphius huxleyi [corrected]. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi [corrected].

  20. Metabolic profiles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities in deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. indicated by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Zhu; He, Li-Ming; Zheng, Hua-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The whole metabolism of a sponge holobiont and the respective contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with the sponge host remain largely unclear. Meanwhile, compared with shallow water sponges, deep-sea sponges are rarely understood. Here we report the metagenomic exploration of deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp. at the whole community level. Metagenomic data showed phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes and eukaryotes in Lamellomorpha sp.. MEGAN and gene enrichment analyses indicated different metabolic potentials of prokaryotic symbionts from eukaryotic symbionts, especially in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms, and their molecular interactions with the sponge host. These results supported the hypothesis that prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts have different ecological roles and relationships with sponge host. Moreover, vigorous denitrification, and CO2 fixation by chemoautotrophic prokaryotes were suggested for this deep-sea sponge. The study provided novel insights into the respective potentials of prokaryotic and eukaryotic symbionts and their associations with deep-sea sponge Lamellomorpha sp..

  1. Enumeration of viruses and prokaryotes in deep-sea sediments and cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the distribution and abundance of viruses in deep-sea cold-seep environments. Like hydrothermal vents, seeps support communities of macrofauna that are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria. Sediments close to these communities are hypothesized to be more microbiologically active and therefore to host higher numbers of viruses than non-seep areas. Push cores were taken at five types of Gulf of Mexico habitats at water depths below 1000 m using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The habitats included non-seep reference sediment, brine seeps, a microbial mat, an urchin field, and a pogonophoran worm community. Samples were processed immediately for enumeration of viruses and prokaryotes without the addition of a preservative. Prokaryote counts were an order of magnitude lower in sediments directly in contact with macrofauna (urchins, pogonophorans) compared to all other samples (107 vs. 108 cells g-1 dry weight) and were highest in areas of elevated salinity (brine seeps). Viral-Like Particle (VLP) counts were lowest in the reference sediments and pogonophoran cores (108 VLP g-1 dry wt), higher in brine seeps (109 VLP g-1 dry wt), and highest in the microbial mats (1010 VLP g-1 dry wt). Virus-prokaryote ratios (VPR) ranged from 30 in the microbial mats and >60 in the urchin field. VLP counts and VPR were all significantly greater than those reported from sediments in the deep Mediterranean Sea and in most cases were higher than recent data from a cold-seep site near Japan. The high VPR suggest that greater microbial activity in or near cold-seep environments results in greater viral production and therefore higher numbers of viruses.

  2. Deep-sea benthic megafaunal habitat suitability modelling: A global-scale maximum entropy model for xenophyophores

    OpenAIRE

    Ashford, Oliver S; Davies, Andrew J.; Jones, Daniel O. B.

    2014-01-01

    Xenophyophores are a group of exclusively deep-sea agglutinating rhizarian protozoans, at least some of which are foraminifera. They are an important constituent of the deep-sea megafauna that are sometimes found in sufficient abundance to act as a significant source of habitat structure for meiofaunal and macrofaunal organisms. This study utilised maximum entropy modelling (Maxent) and a high-resolution environmental database to explore the environmental factors controlling the presence of X...

  3. Effectiveness of a deep-sea cold-water coral Marine Protected Area, following eight years of fisheries closure

    OpenAIRE

    Huvenne, V.A.I; B. J. Bett; Masson, D.G.; Le Bas, T.P; A. J. Wheeler

    2016-01-01

    Pressure on deep-sea ecosystems continues to increase as anthropogenic activities move into ever deeper waters. To mitigate impacts on vulnerable habitats, various conservation measures exist, such as the designation of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). So far, however, little evidence is available about their effectiveness. This paper presents a unique follow-up study assessing the status and recovery of a deep-sea fisheries closure and MPA at ~1000 m water depth in the NE Atlantic, eight years...

  4. Development of an in situ fiber optic Raman system to monitor hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Tina M; Dunn, Eileen E; Lilley, Marvin D; Holloway, John; Dable, Brian K; Marquardt, Brian J; Booksh, Karl S

    2004-07-01

    The development of a field portable fiber optic Raman system modified from commercially available components that can operate remotely on battery power and withstand the corrosive environment of the hydrothermal vents is discussed. The Raman system is designed for continuous monitoring in the deep-sea environment. A 785 nm diode laser was used in conjunction with a sapphire ball fiber optic Raman probe, single board computer, and a CCD detector. Using the system at ambient conditions the detection limits of SO(4)(2-), CO(3)(2-) and NO(3)(-) were determined to be approximately 0.11, 0.36 and 0.12 g l(-1) respectively. Mimicking the cold conditions of the sea floor by placing the equipment in a refrigerator yielded slightly worse detection limits of approximately 0.16 g l(-1) for SO(4)(-2) and 0.20 g l(-1) for NO(3)(-). Addition of minerals commonly found in vent fluid plumes also decreased the detection limits to approximately 0.33 and 0.34 g l(-1) respectively for SO(4)(-2) and NO(3)(-).

  5. The snails' tale in deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génio, L.; Warén, A.; Matos, F. L.; Cunha, M. R.

    2013-07-01

    Bridging the Atlantic and Mediterranean continental margins, the South Iberian region has recently been the focus for geological and biological investigations. In this region, the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC) encompasses a great variety of deep-sea habitats that harbour highly diverse biological communities. In this study, we describe the composition of gastropod assemblages obtained from in situ colonization experiments and benthic sampling of deep-sea habitats in the GoC. Gastropod distributional patterns, such as bathymetric ranges, bathymetric turnover, affinity to substrate types and abundance-occupancy relationships, are analysed and interpreted in relation to their inferred dispersal capabilities and substrate availability. Overall, the GoC comprises a high diversity of gastropods (65 species), and distinct assemblages were found in typical sedimentary environments at mud volcanoes and in association with carbonate and coral samples or organic substrata. The number of taxa peaked at the Carbonate Province in the middle slope (600-1200 m depth), a highly heterogeneous area with numerous mud volcanoes, carbonate mounds and corals. Darwin (1100 m) and Captain Arutyunov (1300 m) mud volcanoes harboured the most species-rich and abundant gastropod assemblages, respectively. Colonization experiments with organic substrata (wood and alfalfa grass) also yielded diverse and abundant gastropod assemblages. These organic inputs allowed the recruitment of local species but mainly of wood specialist taxa that were not previously known from the GoC. Our results suggest that the distribution of gastropod assemblages may be primarily determined by the occurrence of suitable habitats, probably due to the effect of the substrate type on the structural complexity of the habitat and availability and diversity of adequate food sources. The type of larval development is apparently not a limiting factor for colonization of deep-sea habitats. However, the predominance of non

  6. The snails' tale at deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génio, L.; Warén, A.; Matos, F. L.; Cunha, M. R.

    2013-02-01

    Bridging the Atlantic and Mediterranean continental margins, the South Iberian region has recently been the focus for geological and biological investigations. The Gulf of Cadiz (GoC) encompasses a great variety of deep-sea habitats that harbour highly diverse biological communities. In this study, we describe the taxa composition of gastropod assemblages from deep-sea habitats in the GoC and analyse the species distributional patterns in relation to their dispersal capabilities and substrate availability. Distinct gastropod assemblages were found at mud volcanoes, carbonate and coral sites, and organic-falls. Overall, the GoC comprises a high diversity of gastropods that include 65 taxa representing 32 families, 48 genera and 30 named species. The highest number of taxa was found at the highly heterogeneous carbonate province in the middle slope (500-1500 m depth), and higher abundance of individuals was observed in Captain Arutyunov mud volcano, one of the most active sites found in the GoC. Faunal similarities were found with Mediterreanean cold-seeps (species- and genus-level) and other chemosynthetic environments in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (genus-level). Colonization experiments with organic substrata (wood and alfalfa grass) yielded high abundances of gastropod species. These organic inputs allowed the recruitment of local species but also of wood specialist taxa that were not known to occur in the GoC. Our results suggest that distribution of gastropod assemblages may be primarily determined by the occurrence of suitable habitats probably due to effect of the substrate type on feeding strategies and that larval development is not a limiting factor for colonization of the deep sea. However, the predominance of non-planktotrophy, and especially lecithotrophy, suggests that the trade-off between a more limited dispersal capability and the higher potential for self-recruitment may be favoured by the gastropod species inhabiting reducing environments and

  7. The snails' tale in deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Génio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bridging the Atlantic and Mediterranean continental margins, the South Iberian region has recently been the focus for geological and biological investigations. In this region, the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC encompasses a great variety of deep-sea habitats that harbour highly diverse biological communities. In this study, we describe the composition of gastropod assemblages obtained from in situ colonization experiments and benthic sampling of deep-sea habitats in the GoC. Gastropod distributional patterns, such as bathymetric ranges, bathymetric turnover, affinity to substrate types and abundance-occupancy relationships, are analysed and interpreted in relation to their inferred dispersal capabilities and substrate availability. Overall, the GoC comprises a high diversity of gastropods (65 species, and distinct assemblages were found in typical sedimentary environments at mud volcanoes and in association with carbonate and coral samples or organic substrata. The number of taxa peaked at the Carbonate Province in the middle slope (600–1200 m depth, a highly heterogeneous area with numerous mud volcanoes, carbonate mounds and corals. Darwin (1100 m and Captain Arutyunov (1300 m mud volcanoes harboured the most species-rich and abundant gastropod assemblages, respectively. Colonization experiments with organic substrata (wood and alfalfa grass also yielded diverse and abundant gastropod assemblages. These organic inputs allowed the recruitment of local species but mainly of wood specialist taxa that were not previously known from the GoC. Our results suggest that the distribution of gastropod assemblages may be primarily determined by the occurrence of suitable habitats, probably due to the effect of the substrate type on the structural complexity of the habitat and availability and diversity of adequate food sources. The type of larval development is apparently not a limiting factor for colonization of deep-sea habitats. However, the predominance of non

  8. Potential Mechanisms for Microbial Energy Acquisition in Oxic Deep-Sea Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Benjamin J; Heidelberg, John F

    2016-07-15

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) possesses the lowest rates of sedimentation, surface chlorophyll concentration, and primary productivity in the global oceans. As a direct result, deep-sea sediments are thin and contain small amounts of labile organic carbon. It was recently shown that the entire SPG sediment column is oxygenated and may be representative of up to a third of the global marine environment. To understand the microbial processes that contribute to the removal of the labile organic matter at the water-sediment interface, a sediment sample was collected and subjected to metagenomic sequencing and analyses. Analysis of nine partially reconstructed environmental genomes, which represent approximately one-third of the microbial community, revealed that the members of the SPG surface sediment microbial community are phylogenetically distinct from surface/upper-ocean organisms. These genomes represent a wide distribution of novel organisms, including deep-branching Alphaproteobacteria, two novel organisms within the Proteobacteria, and new members of the Nitrospirae, Nitrospinae, and candidate phylum NC10. These genomes contain evidence for microbially mediated metal (iron/manganese) oxidation and carbon fixation linked to nitrification. Additionally, despite hypothesized energy limitation, members of the SPG microbial community had motility and chemotaxis genes and possessed mechanisms for the degradation of high-molecular-weight organic matter. This study contributes to our understanding of the metabolic potential of microorganisms in deep-sea oligotrophic sediments and their impact on local carbon geochemistry. This research provides insight into the microbial metabolic potential of organisms inhabiting oxygenated deep-sea marine sediments. Current estimates suggest that these environments account for up to a third of the global marine sediment habitat. Nine novel deep-sea microbial genomes were reconstructed from a metagenomic data set and expand the limited

  9. Reproduction of deep-sea reef-building corals from the southwestern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, D. O.; Silva, J. C.; Bastos, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    The logistics of research on deep-sea organisms imposes restrictions on studies that require repetitive long-term collections. Studies on the reproduction of deep-water corals have commonly been made without appropriate temporal series. This study included Madrepora oculata, Solenosmilia variabilis, Lophelia pertusa, and Enallopsammia rostrata, which are among the primary deep-sea reef building corals off Brazil. Samples were collected during 13 consecutive months by the Campos Basin Deep-Sea Corals Assessment Project (R&D Center of the Brazilian Energy Company, Petrobras) in Campos Basin (CB) off Rio de Janeiro State through a remotely-operated-vehicle at approximately 600 m depth. Of every monthly sampling campaign, an average of four to five colonies of all four species were investigated histologically. Colonies of both sexes were observed, indicating that all four species are gonochoric. For now, this appears to be the predominant reproductive pattern observed in corals in the area, as well as in deep-sea corals in general, where 80% of coral species are gonochoric. Although considered functionally gonochoric, M. oculata and L. pertusa presented a few colonies with different hermaphroditism patterns. E. rostrata and M. oculata presented continuous reproduction. Although fertile year-round, S. variabilis presents a reproductive peak between April and September (Autumn-Spring) in contrast with the seasonal reproduction recorded in the southwestern Pacific. L. pertusa had a seasonal reproductive peak, confirming previous observations of periodic reproduction in this species in the northeastern Atlantic. The possible spawning season of L. pertusa from CB concentrates between May and July (high frequency of mature gametes), while spawning occurs between January and March in the North Atlantic and between September and November in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results suggest that the studied species are broadcast spawners because no embryos or larvae were observed in any

  10. The snails' tale at deep-sea habitats in the Gulf of Cadiz (NE Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Génio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bridging the Atlantic and Mediterranean continental margins, the South Iberian region has recently been the focus for geological and biological investigations. The Gulf of Cadiz (GoC encompasses a great variety of deep-sea habitats that harbour highly diverse biological communities. In this study, we describe the taxa composition of gastropod assemblages from deep-sea habitats in the GoC and analyse the species distributional patterns in relation to their dispersal capabilities and substrate availability. Distinct gastropod assemblages were found at mud volcanoes, carbonate and coral sites, and organic-falls. Overall, the GoC comprises a high diversity of gastropods that include 65 taxa representing 32 families, 48 genera and 30 named species. The highest number of taxa was found at the highly heterogeneous carbonate province in the middle slope (500–1500 m depth, and higher abundance of individuals was observed in Captain Arutyunov mud volcano, one of the most active sites found in the GoC. Faunal similarities were found with Mediterreanean cold-seeps (species- and genus-level and other chemosynthetic environments in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans (genus-level. Colonization experiments with organic substrata (wood and alfalfa grass yielded high abundances of gastropod species. These organic inputs allowed the recruitment of local species but also of wood specialist taxa that were not known to occur in the GoC. Our results suggest that distribution of gastropod assemblages may be primarily determined by the occurrence of suitable habitats probably due to effect of the substrate type on feeding strategies and that larval development is not a limiting factor for colonization of the deep sea. However, the predominance of non-planktotrophy, and especially lecithotrophy, suggests that the trade-off between a more limited dispersal capability and the higher potential for self-recruitment may be favoured by the gastropod species inhabiting reducing

  11. Gene flow between Atlantic and Pacific Ocean basins in three lineages of deep-sea clams (Bivalvia: Vesicomyidae: Pliocardiinae) and subsequent limited gene flow within the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBella, Abigail Leavitt; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Jollivet, Didier; Cunningham, Clifford W.

    2017-03-01

    Pliocardiin (vesicomyid) clams rely on microbial symbionts for nutrition and are obligate inhabitants of deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems. Unlike many other i