WorldWideScience

Sample records for deep water sub-sea

  1. Installation of deep water sub-sea equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, Jack; Demian, Nabil [SBM-IMODCO Inc., Houston, TX (UNited States)

    2004-07-01

    Offshore oil developments are being planned in water depths exceeding 2000 m. Lowering and positioning large, heavy sub sea hardware, using conventional methods, presents new technical challenges in these ultra deep waters. In 3000 m a safe lift using conventional steel cables will require more capacity to support the cable self weight than the static payload. Adding dynamic loads caused by the motions of the surface vessel can quickly cause the safe capacity of the wire to be exceeded. Synthetic ropes now exist to greatly reduce the lowering line weight. The lower stiffness of these synthetic ropes aggravate the dynamic line tensions due to vessel motions and relatively little is known about the interaction of these ropes on the winches and sheaves required for pay-out and haul-in of these lines under dynamic load. Usage of conventional winches would damage the synthetic rope and risk the hardware being deployed. Reliable and economic installation systems that can operate from existing installation vessels are considered vital for ultra deep-water oil development. The paper describes a Deep Water Sub-Sea Hardware Deployment system consisting of a buoy with variable, pressure-balanced buoyancy, which is used to offset most of the payload weight as it is lowered. The buoyant capacity is controlled by air pumped into the tank from the surface vessel through a reinforced hose. The buoy and payload motion are isolated from the deployment line surface dynamics using a simple passive heave compensator mounted between the buoy and the bottom of the deployment rope. The system components, functionality and dynamic behavior are presented in the paper. (author)

  2. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  3. Deep Water Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The deep water biodiversity surveys explore and describe the biodiversity of the bathy- and bentho-pelagic nekton using Midwater and bottom trawls centered in the...

  4. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-19

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT...understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water ambient ...of 19000 km. This is an incredible data set as the source shot times and locations were recorded as were the source levels using a monitor

  5. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-17

    understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water ambient noise ...and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2): High-Resolution Global-Ocean and Sea-Ice Data Synthesis) model re- analysis for the years 1992 and 1993...the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) to the available satellite and in-situ data5. The ECCO2 product is the

  6. Meeting the flow assurance challenges of deep water developments - from CAPEX development to field start up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, M.M.; Feasey, N.D. [National Aluminium Company Ltd. (Nalco), Cheshire (United Kingdom); Afonso, M.; Silva, D. [NALCO Brasil Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    As oil accumulations in easily accessible locations around the world become less available developments in deeper water become a more common target for field development. Deep water projects, particularly sub sea development, present a host of challenges in terms of flow assurance and integrity. In this paper the focus will be on the chemical control of flow assurance challenges in hydrate control, scale control and wax/asphaltene control within deep water (>750 meter) developments. The opportunities for kinetic hydrate control vs. conventional thermodynamic hydrate control will be outlined with examples of where these technologies have been applied and the limitations that still exist. The development of scale control chemical formulations specifically for sub sea application and the challenges of monitoring such control programs will be highlighted with developments in real time and near real time monitoring. Organic deposit control (wax/asphaltene) will focus on the development of new chemicals that have higher activity but lower viscosity than currently used chemicals hence allowing deployment at colder temperatures and over longer distances. The factors that need to be taken into account when selecting chemicals for deep water application will be highlighted. Fluid viscosity, impact of hydrostatic head on injectivity, product stability at low temperature and interaction with other production chemicals will be reviewed as they pertain to effective flow assurance. This paper brings learning from other deep water basins with examples from the Gulf of Mexico, West Africa and Brazil, which will be used to highlight these challenges and some of the solutions currently available along with the technology gaps that exist. (author)

  7. Deep Water Compositions From the Los Angeles Basin and the Origin of Formation Water Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, J.; Giles, G.; Lockman, D.

    2005-12-01

    Deep basin formation waters represent original depositional waters that have been modified by diagenetic processes at elevated temperatures and pressures. In addition, they may be diluted by meteoric incursion from elevated structural blocks along basin flanks. It has long been thought that deep basin formation waters have salinities greater than sea water due to various processes like clay membrane filtration or other types of water-rock interaction. However, our work and similar studies in the San Joaquin basin show that formation waters in deep basins are more likely to become diluted rather than concentrated in the absence of soluble evaporite deposits that might underlie the basin. The idea of increased salinity with depth arose from studies in which the underpinning of the basin consisted of soluble evaporate deposits such as the Texas Gulf Coast, Illinois, Michigan, and some North Sea areas. There are very few deep formation water analyses from the Los Angeles Basin. Furthermore, very few of the current produced waters from any depth can be considered pristine because of the widespread formation water injection programs and commingling of fluids from different levels. Here, we describe the first analyses from a deep, previously untouched part of the basin that is currently being developed in the Inglewood Oil Field. We have analyzed a suite of formation waters from the mid-Miocene marine Sentous sandstone from sub-sea level depths of 2250 m to 2625 m at temperatures of about 110 to 126°C and pressures of about 27 MPa. The original depositional waters in the Sentous Formation were sea water whereas the sampled waters are diluted by about 20% from sea water and some show as much as 50% dilution. Based on comparison of oxygen and deuterium isotopes between the meteoric water trend and these waters, we conclude that the smectite to illite dehydration reaction is the major cause of dilution to the original formation water. Other notable differences include

  8. Innovative sub sea pipeline maintenance in line with emerging offshore trends and maintenance safety standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, George [T.D. Williamson, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Sub sea hot tapping of pipelines is performed for a variety of reasons, including tie-ins, pipeline repair, insertion of instrumentation, facilitating chemical injection or providing access for temporary isolation tools. The full hot tap process - that is, installing the hot tap assembly, performing the tap and recovering the hot tap machine - is normally conducted with diver assistance. After bolting the assembly of the machine, isolation valve and fitting to the pipeline (or machine and isolation valve to a pre-installed flanged membrane on the pipeline), the divers then operate the machine to perform the tap, under instructions from - and supervision by - hot tap technicians located on deck of the diving support vessel (DSV). Subsequent unbolting and removal of the hot tap machine is also carried out by the divers. The demands of deep water have necessitated development of a totally diver-less, remote-controlled system. Diver operations are limited to a maximum of 300 meters of water depth, whereas a significant portion of existing sub sea field infrastructure, as well as projected future developments, are in deeper waters in depths up to 3,000 meters. In addition, diver safety concerns in shallow water, as well as impaired diver efficiency in difficult environmental conditions such as wave breaking zones, prompts the call for a reduction of diver exposure or complete elimination of diver assistance. The recent completion of a remote-controlled hot tap machine (the Sub sea 1200RC Tapping Machine) is a first step toward developing a totally diver-less system. The installation of the hot tap assembly and subsequent removal of the machine still require diver assistance, but the performance of the tap itself is remotely controlled by a hot tap technician from the deck of the DSV. The concept is a topside-driven hot tap machine with 'passive Remote Operating Vehicle (ROV) interface', which means a stationary ROV with its hydraulics and control system

  9. The physiology of deep-water running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas; Dowzer, Clare N; Cable, N T

    2003-12-01

    Deep-water running is performed in the deep end of a swimming pool, normally with the aid of a flotation vest. The method is used for purposes of preventing injury and promoting recovery from strenuous exercise and as a form of supplementary training for cardiovascular fitness. Both stroke volume and cardiac output increase during water immersion: an increase in blood volume largely offsets the cardiac decelerating reflex at rest. At submaximal exercise intensities, blood lactate responses to exercise during deep-water running are elevated in comparison to treadmill running at a given oxygen uptake (VO2). While VO2, minute ventilation and heart rate are decreased under maximal exercise conditions in the water, deep-water running nevertheless can be justified as providing an adequate stimulus for cardiovascular training. Responses to training programmes have confirmed the efficacy of deep-water running, although positive responses are most evident when measured in a water-based test. Aerobic performance is maintained with deep-water running for up to 6 weeks in trained endurance athletes; sedentary individuals benefit more than athletes in improving maximal oxygen uptake. There is some limited evidence of improvement in anaerobic measures and in upper body strength in individuals engaging in deep-water running. A reduction in spinal loading constitutes a role for deep-water running in the prevention of injury, while an alleviation of muscle soreness confirms its value in recovery training. Further research into the applications of deep-water running to exercise therapy and athletes' training is recommended.

  10. Converter fed sub sea motor drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raad, R.O.

    1995-09-01

    Minor offshore gas and oil resources located 20-50 km from existing installations may often be commercially exploited only by use of complete sub sea solutions. This thesis deals with analyses of a sub sea adjustable speed electric motor which is fed by a frequency converter via a long cable (up to 50 km) between the converter and the motor. The author develops a general model for analysing such motor drive systems with the objective of verifying the feasibility of specific applications and of specifying the requirements on the system components. The simulation model is used to identify the critical frequency ranges in which the converter must not generate significant harmonics, to verify the start-up strategy chosen, and to verify the stability with potential disturbances applied to the system. Simulation models are developed for both transient and steady state analyses. They are accurate up to 5 kHz and can incorporate the frequency dependency of the motor and cable parameters. Ideal thyristors and diodes are used. The models are implemented in existing simulation tools. Most of the results relate to a base case with a 670 kW squirrel cage motor fed from a 30 km long cable, but cases with 3 MW rating or with 50 km cable have also been analyzed and found to be feasible. Each specific application must be separately studied. Results of simulation calculations are presented and conclusions given. 53 refs., 124 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. Deep Water Horizon (HB1006, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monitor and measure the biological, chemical, and physical environment in the area of the oil spill from the deep water horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico. A wide...

  12. Deep-water sediment bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Christopher J.; Jackson, Christopher A L; Hodgson, David M.; Hubbard, Stephen M.; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.

    2015-01-01

    Submarine gravity flows are a key process for transporting large volumes of sediment from the continents to the deep sea. The location, volume, and character of the sediment bypassed by these flows dictates the areal extent and thickness of the associated deposits. Despite its importance, sediment b

  13. Serre-type equations in deep water

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Chhay, Marx

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript is devoted to the modelling of water waves in the deep water regime with some emphasis on the underlying variational structures. The present article should be considered as a review of some existing models and modelling approaches even if new results are presented as well. Namely, we derive the deep water analogue of the celebrated Serre-Green-Naghdi equations which have become the standard model in shallow water environments. The relation to existing models is discussed. Moreover, the multi-symplectic structure of these equations is reported as well. The results of this work can be used to develop various types of robust structure-preserving variational integrators in deep water. The methodology of constructing approximate models presented in this study can be naturally extrapolated to other physical flow regimes as well.

  14. Hybrid'S'Riser (HySR{sup TM}) designed and tested for deep waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luppi, Ange; Cousin, Gilles; Degenatais, Gwladys; Haldy, Claire [Seal Engineering Inc., Sheffield, South Yorkshire (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Robby [Technip, Paris -La Defense Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    The HySR{sup TM} system combining flexible risers with steel catenary risers (SCRs) supported by a buoyant mid water arch is considered as a solution for the ultra deep water oil fields in Brazil; 2000 m and beyond. Model tests results are used to validate the computer model and the riser system design. Towing and oscillations tests have provided the hydrodynamic coefficients of the sub sea buoy and the completed riser system basin tests form part of the concept development. A preliminary series of 'large scale' model tests of the sub sea arch confirmed the hydrodynamic coefficients of the arch. A further series of smaller scale model tests, this time incorporating the entire HySR{sup TM} system were used to validate the behaviour and dynamic analysis of the system. For Brazilian offshore conditions, the HySR{sup TM} general arrangement comprises a submerged buoy located 150 m below sea surface, to mitigate waves excitation and resonance phenomenon. Storm, fatigue, and riser clashing analyses performed on time domain simulation program confirm all mechanical and structural integrity of the HySR{sup TM} system (API and DNV). This paper will also present an outline installation procedure, the simplicity of which forms part of the many advantages of the HySR{sup TM} system. (author)

  15. Deep Water Coral (HB1402, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The cruise will survey and collect samples of deep-sea corals and related marine life in the canyons in the northern Gulf of Maine in U.S. and Canadian waters. The...

  16. Infrastructure for regional development in deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.W. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    Exploration in deep water has revealed a number of finds in the 0.5--1.0 billion barrel range, plus more in the 100--500 million barrel range. Surprisingly few of the latter will be viable as stand-alone developments. Comparative economic feasibility studies will be described, seeking to quantify the benefits of providing infrastructure for coordinated regional of these significant resources, rather than stand-alone development on a field-by-field basis. Realistic generic examples will be presented, rather than announcement of actual development plans. The studies cover west of Shetlands, drawing on concepts developed for turbidite trend in deep water Gulf of Mexico. The approach could also be applicable to other deep-water areas, e.g. West Africa. Central platform water depths are 400--900 m, with satellite fields in much deeper water being within reach using current technology. Design requirements include heavy payloads (40,000 tons), long life (80 years), and large numbers of preferably hardpipe risers (up to 100, both wells and pipelines). Adaptability to unpredicted and changing operational requirements is featured. This work presents an alternative to the Deepstar approach, in that it covers sites beyond the reach of shallow-water facilities, and does not presume that ``gunky crude`` problems on the petroleum engineering side, which have been intractable for 100 years, will suddenly by solved. 11 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Degrading Sub-Sea Permafrost and Sedimentary Methane Release in the Southern Laptev Sea, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Dudarev, O.; Tumskoy, V.; Kosmach, D.; Samarkin, V.; Joye, S. B.; Charkin, A.; Bukhanov, B.; Chuvilin, E.; Romanovskii, N.

    2012-12-01

    There remains substantial uncertainty regarding several aspects of CH4 release from the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS). To accurately predict future CH4 releases, we must understand the size of the reservoir (the amount of trapped CH4 that potentially could be released: hydrates, free gas, modern production), as well the processes that have kept it trapped and those that control its release. The main results to be considered here are related to permafrost stability and biological methane production: 1) Are changing ESAS thermal conditions causing the permafrost to thaw? 2) Do accelerated rates of permafrost degradation lead to development of taliks that act as CH4 vents to the overlying seawater and to the atmosphere? 3) Does biological CH4 production occur in permafrost and the overlying sediments? 4) How do CH4 oxidation rates compare to CH4 production rates? To address these questions, in April of 2011 and March-April of 2012 we drilled five boreholes (with depth up to 58 m below sediment surface) in the seasonally ice-covered eastern part of the shallow shelf, east off the Lena Delta, where specific geochemical and geophysical surveys were conducted in summer 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011. The study area includes three main types of sub-sea degradation and talik formation: 1) fault zones, with significant upward heat flux, 2) areas impacted by a river, with downward heating effect, and 3) background areas (with more-or-less stable sub-sea permafrost). Therefore, we can extend the obtained results to the entire ESAS. The thermal regime at different sites differed significantly between sites. We did not encounter sub-sea permafrost at four sites from five. At site located east of the Sardahskaya channel of the Lena River mouth the temperature along the borehole was positive and increased from 0.5C in the sediment upper boundary layer to 2.7C at 15 m depth while the temperature at the freezing point deviated between -.08C and -1.3C, decreasing with depth, assuming

  18. Diverless pipeline repair system for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, Carlo M. [Eni Gas and Power, Milan (Italy); Fabbri, Sergio; Bachetta, Giuseppe [Saipem/SES, Venice (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    SiRCoS (Sistema Riparazione Condotte Sottomarine) is a diverless pipeline repair system composed of a suite of tools to perform a reliable subsea pipeline repair intervention in deep and ultra deep water which has been on the ground of the long lasting experience of Eni and Saipem in designing, laying and operating deep water pipelines. The key element of SiRCoS is a Connection System comprising two end connectors and a repair spool piece to replace a damaged pipeline section. A Repair Clamp with elastomeric seals is also available for pipe local damages. The Connection System is based on pipe cold forging process, consisting in swaging the pipe inside connectors with suitable profile, by using high pressure seawater. Three swaging operations have to be performed to replace the damaged pipe length. This technology has been developed through extensive theoretical work and laboratory testing, ending in a Type Approval by DNV over pipe sizes ranging from 20 inches to 48 inches OD. A complete SiRCoS system has been realised for the Green Stream pipeline, thoroughly tested in workshop as well as in shallow water and is now ready, in the event of an emergency situation.The key functional requirements for the system are: diverless repair intervention and fully piggability after repair. Eni owns this technology and is now available to other operators under Repair Club arrangement providing stand-by repair services carried out by Saipem Energy Services. The paper gives a description of the main features of the Repair System as well as an insight into the technological developments on pipe cold forging reliability and long term duration evaluation. (author)

  19. Testing time for deep water[Deep water test facility in Rotterdam, NL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snieckus, Darius

    2000-06-01

    A new deep water test facility in Rotterdam in the Netherlands is described. The construction is a basin measuring 45m by 36m and some 10.5m deep: it can accommodate large scale model tests at depths equivalent to 1000m by using a hydraulic 'moveable' floor buoyed by syntactic foam. For simulation of depths of 3000m it opens its 'deep pit' - a well 5m diameter and 20m deep. The facility can also simulate the winds, waves and currents met offshore in places such as the Shetlands, West Africa and the Gulf of Mexico. The article includes pictures and diagrams of the facility.

  20. Alternative techniques for deep-water monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveev, Viktor A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Zheleznykh, Igor M., E-mail: zhelezny@minus.inr.ac.r [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Korotin, Pavel I. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul' yanov Str., 46, Nizhnii Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Paka, Vadim T. [P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology - Atlantic Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Mir Prospect 1, Kaliningrad 236022 (Russian Federation); Surin, Nikolai M. [N.S. Enikolopov Institute of Synthetic Polymer Materials, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsojuznaya Str. 70, Moscow 117393 (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-21

    A cruise of the Soviet R/V 'Dmitry Mendeleyev' in the Mediterranean Sea in 1989 is mentioned as the first step towards an international cooperation for high energy neutrino astrophysics in the Mediterranean. New proposals are considered related to carrying out common investigations connected with the construction of a large-scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean. In these investigations new techniques, which were developed in the last years or are being developed now by the Russian institutes, could be used, and in particular: (1) a system of multi-parameter non-tethered probes for deep-water hydrographic measurements, (2) a bottom-mounted acoustical antenna consisting of smart digital hydrophones, and (3) a deep-water scintillation spectrometer for the determination of the composition and for measuring the concentration of dissolved radionuclides. Given the necessity of making a best choice for the KM3 Neutrino Telescope construction, the idea of using light-weight flexible elements for making a 'flexible tower' presented at the Taormina Workshop in 1997 is reviewed.

  1. Deep water challenges for drilling rig design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M. [Transocean Sedco Forex, Houston, TX (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Drilling rigs designed for deep water must meet specific design considerations for harsh environments. The early lessons for rig design came from experiences in the North Sea. Rig efficiency and safety considerations must include structural integrity, isolated/redundant ballast controls, triple redundant DP systems, enclosed heated work spaces, and automated equipment such as bridge cranes, pipe handling gear, offline capabilities, subsea tree handling, and computerized drill floors. All components must be designed to harmonize man and machine. Some challenges which are unique to Eastern Canada include frequent storms and fog, cold temperature, icebergs, rig ice, and difficult logistics. This power point presentation described station keeping and mooring issues in terms of dynamic positioning issues. The environmental influence on riser management during forced disconnects was also described. Design issues for connected deep water risers must insure elastic stability, and control deflected shape. The design must also keep stresses within acceptable limits. Codes and standards for stress limits, flex joints and tension were also presented. tabs., figs.

  2. Power, fresh water, and food from cold, deep sea water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmer, D F; Roels, O A

    1973-10-12

    Many times more solar heat energy accumulates in the vast volume of warm tropic seas than that produced by all of our power plants. The looming energy crisis causes a renewal of interest in utilizing this stored solar heat to give, in addition to electric power, vast quantities of fresh water. Warm surface water, when evaporated, generates steam, to power a turbine, then fresh water when the steam is condensed by the cold water. A great increase in revenues over that from power and fresh water is shown by a substantial mariculture pilot plant. Deep sea water contains large quantities of nutrients. These feed algae which feed shellfish, ultimately shrimps and lobsters, in shallow ponds. Wastes grow seaweed of value; and combined revenues from desalination, power generation, and mariculture will give substantial profit.

  3. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory and Deep Water Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Acoustic Lab and Deep Water Acoustics” Encl: (1) Final Technical Report for Subject Grant (2) SF298 for Enclosure Enclosure (1) is the Final...North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory and Deep Water Acoustics Final Report PI James A. Mercer Applied Physics Laboratory...During FY16 the primary effort has been working on manuscripts as summarized below: 1) A test of deep water Rytov theory at 284 Hz and 107 km in

  4. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Deep-Water Breaking Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Brucker, Kyle A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Adams, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The formulation of a canonical deep-water breaking wave problem is introduced, and the results of a set of three-dimensional numerical simulations for deep-water breaking waves are presented. In this paper fully nonlinear progressive waves are generated by applying a normal stress to the free surface. Precise control of the forcing allows for a systematic study of four types of deep-water breaking waves, characterized herein as weak plunging, plunging, strong plunging, and very strong plunging.

  5. Behavior of modulated wavetrains in deep water

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Long-time evolution of a weakly perturbed wavetrain near the modulational instability threshold is investigated within the framework of the compact Zakharov equation for unidirectional deep-water waves, recently derived by Zakharov & Dyachenko (2011). Multiple-scale solutions reveal that a perturbation to a slightly unstable uniform wavetrain of steepness \\mu slowly evolves according to a Nonlinear Schrodinger equation. In particular, for small carrier wave steepness \\mu\\mu_1, predictions seem to foreshadow a dynamical trend to wave breaking. In particular, the perturbation dynamics becomes of defocussing type, and nonlinearities tend to stabilize a linearly unstable wavetrain as Fermi-Pasta-Ulam recurrence is suppressed. At \\mu=\\mu_c~0.577, subharmonic perturbations restabilize and superharmonic instability appears, possibly indicating that wave dynamic behavior changes at large steepness, in qualitative agreement with the numerical simulations of Longuet-Higgins and Cokelet (1978) for steep waves. Indee...

  6. Dalia integrated production bundle (IPB): an innovative riser solution for deep water fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reals, Th Boscals de; Gloaguen, M.; Roche, F. [Total E and P (Angola); Marion, A.; Poincheval, A. [Technip, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Dalia field is located 210 km north west of Luanda (Angola), about 140 km from shore in 1400 meter water-depth. It was the second major discovery out of 15 made in the block 17 operated by Total. The Dalia Umbilical, Flow lines and Risers EPCI Contract was awarded in 2003. The sea-line network to connect and control the 71 wells and 9 manifolds consist of the following: 40 km of insulated pipe in pipe (12 inches into 17 inches) production flow lines; 45 km of 12 inches water and gas injection lines; 6 off 1.7 km flexible water and gas injection risers; 8 off 1.65 km flexible Integrated Production Bundle (IPB) risers; 75 km of control umbilicals. The flow assurance and associated insulation requirement of the production transport system was one of the main challenges of the project. With a crude temperature of 45 deg C at the wellhead and the required minimum temperature of 35 deg C on arrival at the FPSO, this problem was complex. Understanding that, due to the Joule Thompson effect of the riser gas lift, a 'built in' loss of about 5 deg C is induced and together with further losses through the sub sea pipelines, some up to 6 km long, the agreed solution was 'pipe in pipe' for the production flow lines. The innovative flexible IPB riser, incorporating gas lift and heating to keep the fluid temperature above hydrate formation zone, was the selected riser solution. The IPB is new technology for deep water, developed by Technip for Dalia, and consists of a 12 inches nominal central flexible, surrounded by layers of heat tracing cables, small bore gas lift lines, optical fibres and many insulation layers with an Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient of approximately 3,4 W/m{sup 2}K. After an earlier research and development programme, a further extensive qualification programme was conducted during the course of the project, culminating with the deep water testing phase offshore Brazil. The IPB was then approved for fabrication and installation

  7. Deep South Atlantic carbonate chemistry and increased interocean deep water exchange during last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jimin; Anderson, Robert F.; Jin, Zhangdong; Menviel, Laurie; Zhang, Fei; Ryerson, Fredrick J.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2014-04-01

    Carbon release from the deep ocean at glacial terminations is a critical component of past climate change, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We present a 28,000-year high-resolution record of carbonate ion concentration, a key parameter of the global carbon cycle, at 5-km water depth in the South Atlantic. We observe similar carbonate ion concentrations between the Last Glacial Maximum and the late Holocene, despite elevated concentrations in the glacial surface ocean. This strongly supports the importance of respiratory carbon accumulation in a stratified deep ocean for atmospheric CO2 reduction during the last ice age. After ˜9 μmol/kg decline during Heinrich Stadial 1, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion concentration rose by ˜24 μmol/kg from the onset of Bølling to Pre-boreal, likely caused by strengthening North Atlantic Deep Water formation (Bølling) or increased ventilation in the Southern Ocean (Younger Drays) or both (Pre-boreal). The ˜15 μmol/kg decline in deep water carbonate ion since ˜10 ka is consistent with extraction of alkalinity from seawater by deep-sea CaCO3 compensation and coral reef growth on continental shelves during the Holocene. Between 16,600 and 15,000 years ago, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion values converged with those at 3.4-km water depth in the western equatorial Pacific, as did carbon isotope and radiocarbon values. These observations suggest a period of enhanced lateral exchange of carbon between the deep South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, probably due to an increased transfer of momentum from southern westerlies to the Southern Ocean. By spreading carbon-rich deep Pacific waters around Antarctica for upwelling, invigorated interocean deep water exchange would lead to more efficient CO2 degassing from the Southern Ocean, and thus to an atmospheric CO2 rise, during the early deglaciation.

  8. Movement characteristics of Karst water in a deep mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Chen-ming; BAI Hai-bo; MIAO Xie-xing; YAO Bang-hua

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the movement characteristics of groundwater in a deep mining area and solve the dispute of the distri-bution rule of hydro-chemical zoning which is contradicted by lixiviation water zoning in a horizontal direction, we directed our attention to the source of deep groundwater, its seepage and hydro-chemical characteristics in a typical mining area. We used a neotectonic water-control theory, chemical and isotope methods, as well as a method for analyzing dynamic groundwater conditions. The results indicate that 1) Karst water in the deep and medium parts of this mining area is recharged by vertical leakage through neotectonic fractures rather than seepage along strata from subcrop parts or surrounding flows; 2) from surface to deep leakage paths, the variation in the types of chemical groundwater agrees with the normal lixiviation water distribution rule and the age of mixed groundwater increases; 3) the water-rich zones along neotectonic fractures correspond with water-diluted zones in a hori-zontal direction; 4) the leakage coefficient and water capacity of aquifers increases during the flow process of Kant water along the antidip direction (from west to east) and 5) Karst water in shallow mining areas forms a strong runoff belt along strikes and quickly dilutes the water from deep and medium mining areas. Overall, chemical and dynamic water characteristics actually agree with in terms of the entire consideration for differences in vertical leakage and abnormalities in the zone of water chemical distribution, along a horizontal runoff direction.

  9. New optimized drill pipe size for deep-water, extended reach and ultra-deep drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellison, Michael J.; Delgado, Ivanni [Grant Prideco, Inc., Hoston, TX (United States); Falcao, Jose Luiz; Sato, Ademar Takashi [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moura, Carlos Amsler [Comercial Perfuradora Delba Baiana Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    A new drill pipe size, 5-7/8 in. OD, represents enabling technology for Extended Reach Drilling (ERD), deep water and other deep well applications. Most world-class ERD and deep water wells have traditionally been drilled with 5-1/2 in. drill pipe or a combination of 6-5/8 in. and 5-1/2 in. drill pipe. The hydraulic performance of 5-1/2 in. drill pipe can be a major limitation in substantial ERD and deep water wells resulting in poor cuttings removal, slower penetration rates, diminished control over well trajectory and more tendency for drill pipe sticking. The 5-7/8 in. drill pipe provides a significant improvement in hydraulic efficiency compared to 5-1/2 in. drill pipe and does not suffer from the disadvantages associated with use of 6-5/8 in. drill pipe. It represents a drill pipe assembly that is optimized dimensionally and on a performance basis for casing and bit programs that are commonly used for ERD, deep water and ultra-deep wells. The paper discusses the engineering philosophy behind 5-7/8 in. drill pipe, the design challenges associated with development of the product and reviews the features and capabilities of the second-generation double-shoulder connection. The paper provides drilling case history information on significant projects where the pipe has been used and details results achieved with the pipe. (author)

  10. Natural/mine water deep treatment modular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averin, G.V.; Biochenko, V. [Makeyevka Safety in Mines Research Institute, Makeyevka (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Shortage of water of service and drinking standards is heavily felt in some industries and residential areas in Donetsk region. Modifications of a natural/mine water deep treatment modular system can be used: to produce service water from mine and natural water sources for further use in industry and household applications; to restore industrial waste waters to ecological standards; to provide tertiary treatment, producing the highest quality of drinking water. The system is briefly described and its specifications are given. Three modifications of modular design are expected to be made of the mine/natural water treatment system. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Real time wave measurements and wave hindcasting in deep waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Mandal, S.; SanilKumar, V.; Nayak, B.U.

    Deep water waves off Karwar (lat. 14~'45.1'N, long. 73~'34.8'E) at 75 m water depth pertaining to peak monsoon period have been measured using a Datawell waverider buoy. Measured wave data show that the significant wave height (Hs) predominantly...

  12. The bimodality of the Luzon Strait deep water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qingsong; ZHAO Jianru; ZHANG Junbiao; SHI Weiyong; LIU Chunqiu

    2014-01-01

    Combined conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) casts and Argo profiles, 3 086 historical hydrocasts were used to quantify the water column characteristics in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and its adjacent waters. Based on a two-dimensional“gravest empirical mode”(GEM), a gravitational potential (׋, a verti-cally integrated variable) was used as proxy for the vertical temperature profiles TG(p,׋).׋integrated from 8 MPa to the surface shows a close relationship with the temperature, except in the deep layer greater than 15 MPa, which was caused by the bimodal deep water in the region. The GEM temperature profiles successfully revealed the bimodality of the Luzon Strait deep water, that disparate hydrophic vertical profiles can pro-duce distinct specific volume anomaly (į) in the SCS and the western Philippine Sea (WPS), but failed in the Luzon Strait, where different temperature profiles may produce a sameį. A significant temperature diver-gence between the SCS water and the WPS water confirmed that the bimodal structure is strong. The deep-water bifurcation starts at about 15 MPa, and gets stronger with increasing depth . As the only deep channel connecting the bimodal-structure waters, water column characteristics in the Luzon Strait is in between, but much closer to the SCS water because of its better connectivity with the SCS. A bimodal temperature structure below 15 MPa reveals that there was a persistent baroclinic pressure gradient driving flow through the Luzon Strait. A volume flux predicted through the Bashi Channel with the hydraulic theory yields a value of 5.62×106 m3/s using all available profiles upstream and downstream of the overflow region, and 4.03×106 and 2.70×106 m3/s by exclusively using the profiles collected during spring and summer, respectively. No volume flux was calculated during autumn and winter because profiles are only available for the upstream of the Bashi Channel during the corresponding period.

  13. Deep challenges for China's war on water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J; Cao, Guoliang

    2016-11-01

    China's Central government has released an ambitious plan to tackle the nation's water pollution crisis. However, this is inhibited by a lack of data, particularly for groundwater. We compiled and analyzed water quality classification data from publicly available government sources, further revealing the scale and extent of the crisis. We also compiled nitrate data in shallow and deep groundwater from a range of literature sources, covering 52 of China's groundwater systems; the most comprehensive national-scale assessment yet. Nitrate pollution at levels exceeding the US EPA's maximum contaminant level (10 mg/L NO3N) occurs at the 90th percentile in 25 of 36 shallow aquifers and 10 out of 37 deep or karst aquifers. Isotopic compositions of groundwater nitrate (δ(15)N and δ(18)ONO3 values ranging from -14.9‰ to 35.5‰ and -8.1‰ to 51.0‰, respectively) indicate many nitrate sources including soil nitrogen, agricultural fertilizers, untreated wastewater and/or manure, and locally show evidence of de-nitrification. From these data, it is clear that contaminated groundwater is ubiquitous in deep aquifers as well as shallow groundwater (and surface water). Deep aquifers contain water recharged tens of thousands of years before present, long before widespread anthropogenic nitrate contamination. This groundwater has therefore likely been contaminated due to rapid bypass flow along wells or other conduits. Addressing the issue of well condition is urgently needed to stop further pollution of China's deep aquifers, which are some of China's most important drinking water sources. China's new 10-point Water Pollution Plan addresses previous shortcomings, however, control and remediation of deep groundwater pollution will take decades of sustained effort. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Innovative Application of Needle-beam Full-circular Formwork Jumbos in Construction of Lining of Sub-sea Water-diversion Tunnel%针梁式全圆模板台车在海底引水隧洞工程衬砌施工中的创新应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈启伟; 王亚利; 张建

    2013-01-01

    Needle-beam full-circular formwork jumbos are used in the construction of the secondary lining of the intake tunnel of Taishan Nuclear Power Plant,so as to realize once-for-all and rapid construction of the full-circular concrete lining of the sub-sea water-diversion tunnel.In this paper,the method and procedure of the construction of the secondary lining are analyzed,the main structure and technical parameters of the formwork jumbos are presented,and the key construction technologies are described.Furthermore,three innovative points of the application of the formwork jumbos,including the construction arrangement and design inside and outside of the tunnel in the case of 3 formwork jumbos,the continuous construction of the lining by means of 3 formwork jumbos and the cautions for the continuous construction of the lining by 3 formwork jumbos,are summarized.%为了解决海底引水隧洞衬砌混凝土施工全圆一次成型和长距离隧洞衬砌施工短工期内快速完成等诸多问题,选用针梁式全圆模板台车对台山核电站取水隧洞工程进行二次衬砌施工.分析长大隧洞二次衬砌总体施工方法及流程,详细介绍模板台车的构造及主要技术参数,阐述模板台车关键施工工艺和技术.结合工程概况和工期要求,总结了以下3个创新应用结论:在3台模板台车连续跳板作业条件下,隧道内、外的施工布局和流程设计;3台模板台车一次性灌注整体模板连续跳板衬砌施工的工艺和方法;3台模板台车连续跳板流水线作业施工注意事项.

  15. Deep water periodic waves as Hamiltonian relative equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Lie She Liam, L.S.L.; Lakhturov, I.; Andonowati, A.; Biggs, N.

    2007-01-01

    We use a recently derived KdV-type of equation for waves on deep water to study Stokes waves as relative equilibria. Special attention is given to investigate the cornered Stokes-120 degree wave as a singular solution in the class of smooth steady wave profiles.

  16. On the kurtosis of ocean waves in deep water

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Janssen's (2003) formulation for the dynamic excess kurtosis of weakly nonlinear gravity waves in deep water. For narrowband directional spectra, the formulation is expressed as a sixfold integral that depends upon the Benjamin-Feir index and the parameter $R=\

  17. Deep-water Oligocene pollen record from South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guoxuan; QIN Jungan; MAO Shaozhi

    2003-01-01

    Leg 184 of ODP recovered a record of deep- water sediments spanning the past 32.8 Ma from the South China Sea (SCS). The sediments of the Oligocene (32.8 - 23.8 Ma) at Site 1148 contain relatively abundant fossil pollen. The pollen analysis at Site 1148 has established the first pollen assemblage sequence of deep-water Oligocene in the China Sea. The pollen assemblages of the Oligocene are dominated by montane conifer tree pollen. The abundances of broad-leaved tree pollen are lower in the assemblages. Both of the montane conifer and broad-leaved tree pollen groups include mainly tropical-subtropical components. The pollen of cold and drought-enduring plants is present in lower content. The distinct change in pollen assemblage sequence of deep-water Oligocene of the SCS occurred at 32.0 Ma, indicative of an important shift of the Oligocene climate in the SCS region. The characteristics of the pollen flora of the deep-water Oligocene indicate the tropical montane rainforest and lowland rainforest developed on the areas around the SCS before 32.0 Ma, reflecting the warm and wet climatic condition. In the pollen flora of the Oligocene after 32.0 Ma, the temperate montane conifer and cool and drought-en- during deciduous tree taxa remarkably increased, indicating that the climate in the SCS region became comparatively cool and dry.

  18. Seismic Evaluation of Hydorcarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-10-31

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  19. Hydrate prevention in petroleum production sub sea system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Paula L.F.; Rocha, Humberto A.R. [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, Antonio P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In spite of the merits of the several hydrate prevention techniques used nowadays, such as: chemical product injection for inhibition and use of thick thermal insulate lines; hydrates per times happen and they are responsible for considerable production losses. Depressurization techniques can be used so much for prevention as in the remediation. Some hydrate removal techniques need a rig or vessel, resources not readily available and with high cost, reason that limits such techniques just for remediation and not for prevention. In the present work it is proposed and described an innovative depressurization system, remote and resident, for hydrate prevention and removal, applicable as for individual sub sea wells as for grouped wells by manifold. Based on low cost jet pumps, without movable parts and with a high reliability, this technique allows hydrate prevention or remediation in a fast and remote way, operated from the production unit. The power fluid line and fluid return line can be integrated in the same umbilical or annulus line structure, without significant increase in the construction costs and installation. It is not necessary to wait for expensive resource mobilization, sometimes not available quickly, such as: vessels or rigs. It still reduces the chemical product consumption and permits to depressurized stopped lines. Other additional advantage, depressurization procedure can be used in the well starting, removing fluid until riser emptying. (author)

  20. New subsea X tree generation brings innovative features providing efficiency for ultra deep waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Gustavo Bellot de Almeida; Labes, Alan Zaragoza [FMC Technologies, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The EVDT has been developed for global applications. Based upon the widely field proven 10 K Vertical Tree and 15 K HPHT Tree, the system has incorporated the latest technological advancements. The Tubing Hanger System and installation tooling are available up to a 7 inch bore for 10,000 psi applications and a 5 inch bore for 15,000 psi applications. The Tubing Hanger can be installed using a Tubing Head when flexibility for sequencing of events is required during offshore installations. Or it can simply land into the wellhead, eliminating the Tubing Head. This allows for a more efficient installation when completion and drilling operations are conducted without retrieving the Sub sea Blow Out Preventer (BOP) and Riser. The EVDT incorporates a retrievable Flow Module downstream of the wing valve that can be configured to project specific variances such as production, gas injection and water injection service. The Flow Module can also be configured to include Multi-Phase Flow Meters, sensors, and gauges. This allows an upgrade sub sea without having to pull and re-run the entire Tree system. These features allowed the system to hit the mark regarding what the industry needs today and also allowed to accommodate technologies that will arise in the years to come. (author)

  1. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Shallow and Deep Water Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Shallow and Deep Water...Siderius.php LONG-TERM GOALS The objective of this research is to study the ocean ambient noise field by means of new physics-based processing... ambient -noise field using a vertical line array has been developed by Harrison and Simons [Harrison, 2002]. The advantages of passive bottom-survey

  2. Water transparency measurements in the deep Ionian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A long optical base line spectrophotometer designed to measure light transmission in deep sea waters is described. The variable optical path length allows measurements without the need for absolute or external calibration. The spectrophotometer uses eight groups of uncollimated light sources emitting in the range 370 nm-530 nm and was deployed at various depths at two locations in the Ionian Sea that are candidate sites for a future underwater neutrino telescope. Light tra...

  3. Water transparency measurements in the deep Ionian Sea

    CERN Document Server

    Anassontzis, E G; Belias, A; Fotiou, A; Grammatikakis, G; Kontogiannis, H; Koske, P; Koutsoukos, S; Lykoussis, V; Markopoulos, E; Psallidas, A; Resvanis, L K; Siotis, I; Stavrakakis, S; Stavropoulos, G; Zhukov, V A

    2010-01-01

    A long optical base line spectrophotometer designed to measure light transmission in deep sea waters is described. The variable optical path length allows measurements without the need for absolute or external calibration. The spectrophotometer uses eight groups of uncollimated light sources emitting in the range 370–530 nm and was deployed at various depths at two locations in the Ionian Sea that are candidate sites for a future underwater neutrino telescope. Light transmission spectra at the two locations are presented and compared.

  4. The hydrography of the mid-latitude northeast Atlantic Ocean. I: The deep water masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aken, Hendrik M.

    2000-05-01

    The circulation of the deep water masses in the mid-latitude northeast Atlantic Ocean was studied by analysis of the distributions of potential temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, and silicate. Pre-formed nutrients were used to allow a quantitative description of the deep water masses, especially the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water, in terms of four local source water types: Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water, Lower Deep Water, Labrador Sea Water, and Mediterranean Sea Water. Over the Porcupine Abyssal Plain between 2500 and 2900 dbar Northeast Atlantic Deep Water appears to be a mixture of mainly Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and Labrador Sea Water (˜80%), with minor contributions of Lower Deep Water and Mediterranean Sea Water. When the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water re-circulates in the north-eastern Atlantic and flows southwards towards the Madeira Abyssal Plain, contributions of the former two water types of northern origin diminish to about 50% due to diapycnal mixing with the overlying and underlying water masses. The observed meridional and zonal trends of dissolved oxygen and nutrients in the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water appear to be caused both by diapycnal mixing with the underlying Lower Deep Water and by mineralization of organic matter. The eastward decrease of oxygen and increase of nutrients especially require considerable mineralization of organic matter near the European continental margin. At deeper levels (˜4100 dbar), where the nutrient rich Lower Deep Water is found near the bottom, the meridional gradients of oxygen and nutrients are opposite to those found between 2500 and 2900 dbar. Diapycnal mixing cannot explain this change in gradients, which is therefore considered to be a qualitative indication of ageing of the Lower Deep Water when it flows northwards. A considerable part of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and the Lower Deep Water that enter the northeast Atlantic may be removed by deep upwelling in the Bay

  5. ELF propagation in deep and shallow sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, C. P.; Llanwynjones, D.

    1993-05-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic wave propagation at Extremely Low Frequencies (ELF) in deep and shallow sea water is considered. The term 'ELF' is used here somewhat loosely to refer to the frequency band 0-3 kHz. The radiation source is considered to be located in the sea water and is taken to be a horizontal electric dipole (HED) or a vertical electric dipole (VED). For the deep water ease, a comparison is made between results computed using complex image theory and results calculated using the full Sommerfeld integral formulation. Both of these formulations include the lateral waves which propagate along the air-sea interface. Moving on to the case of shallow water, there are two lateral wave modes of propagation-lateral waves which propagate on the sea surface and along the seabed. These modes are included by numerical evaluation of the Sommerfeld integrals which appear in the complete solution. We also compare the relative efficacy of subsurface horizontal electric dipoles and vertical electric dipoles as radiators. For the case of zero frequency (dc), the Sommerfeld integrals simplify considerably enabling the fields to be evaluated as the sums of infinite series. This dc formulation leads to much reduced computation time. Finally, the effects on propagation of long-wavelength water gravity waves or tides on the surface of the sea are examined by considering these waves as a perturbation to the sea-air interface.

  6. Exploring deep potential aquifer in water scarce crystalline rocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subash Chandra; E Nagaiah; D V Reddy; V Ananda Rao; Shakeel Ahmed

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of the shear zone with pole–pole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was carried out to explore deep groundwater potential zone in a water scarce granitic area. As existing field conditions does not always allow to plant the remote electrodes at sufficiently far of distance, the effect of insufficient distance of remote electrodes on apparent resistivity measurement was studied and shown that the transverse pole–pole array affects less compared to the collinear pole–pole array. Correction factor have been computed for transverse pole–pole array for various positions of the remote electrodes. The above results helped in exploring deep aquifer site, where a 270 m deep well was drilled. Temporal hydro-chemical samples collected during the pumping indicated the hydraulic connectivity between the demarcated groundwater potential fractures. Incorporating all the information derived from different investigations, a subsurface model was synthetically simulated and generated 2D electrical resistivity response for different arrays and compared with the field responses to further validate the geoelectrical response of deep aquifer set-up associated with lineament.

  7. Exploring deep potential aquifer in water scarce crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subash; Nagaiah, E.; Reddy, D. V.; Rao, V. Ananda; Ahmed, Shakeel

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of the shear zone with pole-pole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was carried out to explore deep groundwater potential zone in a water scarce granitic area. As existing field conditions does not always allow to plant the remote electrodes at sufficiently far of distance, the effect of insufficient distance of remote electrodes on apparent resistivity measurement was studied and shown that the transverse pole-pole array affects less compared to the collinear pole-pole array. Correction factor have been computed for transverse pole-pole array for various positions of the remote electrodes. The above results helped in exploring deep aquifer site, where a 270 m deep well was drilled. Temporal hydro-chemical samples collected during the pumping indicated the hydraulic connectivity between the demarcated groundwater potential fractures. Incorporating all the information derived from different investigations, a subsurface model was synthetically simulated and generated 2D electrical resistivity response for different arrays and compared with the field responses to further validate the geoelectrical response of deep aquifer set-up associated with lineament.

  8. Is Centrophorus squamosus a highly migratory deep-water shark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabello, Cristina; Sánchez, Francisco

    2014-10-01

    Deep-water sharks are considered highly vulnerable species due to their life characteristics and very low recovery capacity against overfishing. However, there is still limited information on the ecology or population connectivity of these species. The aim of this study was to investigate if the species Centrophorus squamosus could make long displacements and thus confirm the existence of connectivity between different deep-water areas. In addition, the study was the first attempt to use tagging techniques on deep-water sharks, since it has never been undertaken before. Five C. squamosus were tagged with satellite tags (PAT) in the El Cachucho Marine Protected Area (Le Danois Bank) located in waters of the North of Spain, Cantabrian Sea (NE Atlantic). Data from four of these tags were recovered. One of the sharks travelled approximately 287 nm toward the north east (French continental shelf) hypothetically following the continental slope at a mean depth of 901±109 m for 45 days. Two other sharks spent almost 4 months traveling, in which time they moved 143 and 168 nm, respectively, to the west (Galician coast). Finally, another leafscale gulper shark travelled to the NW (Porcupine Bank) during a period of 3 months at a mean depth of 940±132 m. Depth and temperature preferences for all the sharks are discussed. Minimum and maximum depths recorded were 496 and 1848 m, respectively. The temperature range was between 6.2 and 11.4 °C, but the mean temperature was approximately 9.9±0.7 °C. The sharks made large vertical displacements throughout the water column with a mean daily depth range of 345±27 m. These preliminary results support the suggestion of a whole population in the NE Atlantic and confirm the capacity of this species to travel long distances.

  9. Chronobiology of deep-water decapod crustaceans on continental margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Company, Joan B

    2010-01-01

    Species have evolved biological rhythms in behaviour and physiology with a 24-h periodicity in order to increase their fitness, anticipating the onset of unfavourable habitat conditions. In marine organisms inhabiting deep-water continental margins (i.e. the submerged outer edges of continents), day-night activity rhythms are often referred to in three ways: vertical water column migrations (i.e. pelagic), horizontal displacements within benthic boundary layer of the continental margin, along bathymetric gradients (i.e. nektobenthic), and endobenthic movements (i.e. rhythmic emergence from the substrate). Many studies have been conducted on crustacean decapods that migrate vertically in the water column, but much less information is available for other endobenthic and nektobenthic species. Also, the types of displacement and major life habits of most marine species are still largely unknown, especially in deep-water continental margins, where steep clines in habitat factors (i.e. light intensity and its spectral quality, sediment characteristics, and hydrography) take place. This is the result of technical difficulties in performing temporally scheduled sampling and laboratory testing on living specimens. According to this scenario, there are several major issues that still need extensive research in deep-water crustacean decapods. First, the regulation of their behaviour and physiology by a biological clock is almost unknown compared to data for coastal species that are easily accessible to direct observation and sampling. Second, biological rhythms may change at different life stages (i.e. size-related variations) or at different moments of the reproductive cycle (e.g. at egg-bearing) based on different intra- and interspecific interactions. Third, there is still a major lack of knowledge on the links that exist among the observed bathymetric distributions of species and selected autoecological traits that are controlled by their biological clock, such as the

  10. Grouting Control for Deep-Water Jacket Skirt Pile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing; ZHANG Jianxin; XU Lianjiang

    2006-01-01

    Deep-water jacket skirt pile grouting is a critical step in ocean platform construction. Because of the complexity of the skirt pile structure and grouting pipeline, the calculation of grouting pressure and the control of output pressure are involved. Beginning with the jacket skirt pile grouting construction scheme, grouting pressure is estimated on the basis of engineering fluid mechanics theory and variable frequency control technique. Programmable logic controller is the center of grouting pressure control system, which accomplishes the flow control of cement buffer tank water buffer tank, additive buffer tank, cement metering tank, water metering tank, additive metering tank, mixer and agitator. Based on PROFIBUS-DP network, the output pressure of the slurry pump is controlled by the inverter. This method has been applied successfully in JZ20-2 Nor. high spot jacket platform construction.

  11. Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G. (Mobil Exploration Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States))

    1996-01-01

    The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T[sub a], T[sub b], T[sub c], T[sub d], and T[sub e] divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub a][close quotes]) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub b], T[sub c] and T[sub d][close quotes]). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term [open quotes]high-density turbidity current[close quotes] commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies

  12. Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration & Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T{sub a}, T{sub b}, T{sub c}, T{sub d}, and T{sub e} divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub a}{close_quotes}) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub b}, T{sub c} and T{sub d}{close_quotes}). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term {open_quotes}high-density turbidity current{close_quotes} commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies!

  13. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and

  14. Bermuda Deep Water Caves 2011: Dives of Discovery between 20110607 and 20110627

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the three week NOAA Ocean Exploration project, Bermuda Deep Water Caves 2011: Dives of Discovery, our four member deep team, aided by numerous assistants,...

  15. Ferruginous conditions dominated later neoproterozoic deep-water chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E; Poulton, Simon W; Knoll, Andrew H; Narbonne, Guy M; Ross, Gerry; Goldberg, Tatiana; Strauss, Harald

    2008-08-15

    Earth's surface chemical environment has evolved from an early anoxic condition to the oxic state we have today. Transitional between an earlier Proterozoic world with widespread deep-water anoxia and a Phanerozoic world with large oxygen-utilizing animals, the Neoproterozoic Era [1000 to 542 million years ago (Ma)] plays a key role in this history. The details of Neoproterozoic Earth surface oxygenation, however, remain unclear. We report that through much of the later Neoproterozoic (<742 +/- 6 Ma), anoxia remained widespread beneath the mixed layer of the oceans; deeper water masses were sometimes sulfidic but were mainly Fe2+-enriched. These ferruginous conditions marked a return to ocean chemistry not seen for more than one billion years of Earth history.

  16. Nonlinear vibration behaviors of casing pipe in the deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, You-Gang; Zhang, Su-Xia; Yi, Cong

    2006-10-01

    The vortex-induced nonlinear vibration of casing pipes in the deep water was investigated considering the loads of current and combined wave-current. The vortex-induced vibration equation of a casing pipe was set up with considering the beam mode and Morison's nonlinear fluid loads as well as the vortex-excited loads. The approach of calculating vortex-excited nonlinear vibration by Galerkin's method was proposed. The natural vibration frequencies and modes were obtained, and the response including primary resonance induced by current and the composite resonance under combined wave-current for the 170 m long casing pipe in the 160 m depth of water were investigated. The results show that the dynamics response of casing pipe obviously increases, and the complicated response behaviors of casing pipe are described under combined wave-current.

  17. Competition for water between deep- and shallow-rooted grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, J.L.; Black, R.A. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)); Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Competition between root systems of neighboring plants may be altered by seasonal variation in precipitation and soil moisture. Competitive effects of a deep-rooted, perennial grass, Pseudoroegneria spicata, on a shallow-rooted, perennial grass, Poa sandbergii, were monitored over two growing seasons by isolating the root system of P. sandbergii individuals within PVC tubes and comparing plant and soil characteristics to controls. When isolated for the entire growing season, P. sandbergii continued vegetative growth three weeks longer and later season soil water content was significantly greater than controls. Differences in soil water content were greatest between 30 and 50cm, below P. sandbergii's typical rooting depth. Flowering phenology was unchanged. When plants were isolated late in the season, treated plants showed more negative predown xylem pressure potential the morning after isolatron. Compared to controls, soil water content was reduced the day after tube insertion. These immediate effects on plant and soil water status may be due to removal of water supplied nightly by hydraulic lift.

  18. Robust, Optimal Water Infrastructure Planning Under Deep Uncertainty Using Metamodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, H. R.; Beh, E. H. Y.; Zheng, F.; Dandy, G. C.; Kapelan, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Optimal long-term planning plays an important role in many water infrastructure problems. However, this task is complicated by deep uncertainty about future conditions, such as the impact of population dynamics and climate change. One way to deal with this uncertainty is by means of robustness, which aims to ensure that water infrastructure performs adequately under a range of plausible future conditions. However, as robustness calculations require computationally expensive system models to be run for a large number of scenarios, it is generally computationally intractable to include robustness as an objective in the development of optimal long-term infrastructure plans. In order to overcome this shortcoming, an approach is developed that uses metamodels instead of computationally expensive simulation models in robustness calculations. The approach is demonstrated for the optimal sequencing of water supply augmentation options for the southern portion of the water supply for Adelaide, South Australia. A 100-year planning horizon is subdivided into ten equal decision stages for the purpose of sequencing various water supply augmentation options, including desalination, stormwater harvesting and household rainwater tanks. The objectives include the minimization of average present value of supply augmentation costs, the minimization of average present value of greenhouse gas emissions and the maximization of supply robustness. The uncertain variables are rainfall, per capita water consumption and population. Decision variables are the implementation stages of the different water supply augmentation options. Artificial neural networks are used as metamodels to enable all objectives to be calculated in a computationally efficient manner at each of the decision stages. The results illustrate the importance of identifying optimal staged solutions to ensure robustness and sustainability of water supply into an uncertain long-term future.

  19. Maximal and submaximal physiological responses to adaptation to deep water running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Liane B; Lambert, Mike I; Zogaib, Paulo S; Barros Neto, Turibio L

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare physiological responses between runners adapted and not adapted to deep water running at maximal intensity and the intensity equivalent to the ventilatory threshold. Seventeen runners, either adapted (n = 10) or not adapted (n = 7) to deep water running, participated in the study. Participants in both groups undertook a maximal treadmill running and deep water running graded exercise test in which cardiorespiratory variables were measured. Interactions between adaptation (adapted vs. non-adapted) and condition (treadmill running vs. deep water running) were analysed. The main effects of adaptation and condition were also analysed in isolation. Runners adapted to deep water running experienced less of a reduction in maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) in deep water running compared with treadmill running than runners not adapted to deep water running. Maximal oxygen consumption, maximal heart rate, maximal ventilation, VO2max at the ventilatory threshold, heart rate at the ventilatory threshold, and ventilation at the ventilatory threshold were significantly higher during treadmill than deep water running. Therefore, we conclude that adaptation to deep water running reduces the difference in VO2max between the two modalities, possibly due to an increase in muscle recruitment. The results of this study support previous findings of a lower maximal and submaximal physiological response on deep water running for most of the measured parameters.

  20. Calculations of Asteroid Impacts into Deep and Shallow Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, Galen; Weaver, Robert; Gittings, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Contrary to received opinion, ocean impacts of small (impacts, just as for land impacts, are the atmospheric effects. We present illustrative hydrodynamic calculations of impacts into both deep and shallow seas, and draw conclusions from a parameter study in which the size of the impactor and the depth of the sea are varied independently. For vertical impacts at 20 km/s, craters in the seafloor are produced when the water depth is less than about 5-7 times the asteroid diameter. Both the depth and the diameter of the transient crater scale with the asteroid diameter, so the volume of water excavated scales with the asteroid volume. About a third of the crater volume is vaporised, because the kinetic energy per unit mass of the asteroid is much larger than the latent heat of vaporisation of water. The vaporised water carries away a considerable fraction of the impact energy in an explosively expanding blast wave which is responsible for devastating local effects and may affect worldwide climate. Of the remaining energy, a substantial portion is used in the crown splash and the rebound jet that forms as the transient crater collapses. The collapse and rebound cycle leads to a propagating wave with a wavelength considerably shorter than classical tsunamis, being only about twice the diameter of the transient crater. Propagation of this wave is hindered somewhat because its amplitude is so large that it breaks in deep water and is strongly affected by the blast wave's perturbation of the atmosphere. Even if propagation were perfect, however, the volume of water delivered per metre of shoreline is less than was delivered by the Boxing Day 2004 tsunami for any impactor smaller than 500 m diameter in an ocean of 5 km depth or less. Near-field effects are dangerous for impactors of diameter 200 m or greater; hurricane-force winds can extend tens of kilometers from the impact point, and fallout from the initial splash can be extremely violent. There is some indication that

  1. Cestodes from deep-water squaliform sharks in the Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, Janine N.; Pickering, Maria

    2013-12-01

    The majority of our knowledge on marine tapeworms (cestodes) is limited to taxa that are relatively easy to obtain (i.e., those that parasitize shallower-water species). The invitation to participate in a deep-water research survey off the Condor seamount in the Azores offered the opportunity to gain information regarding parasites of the less often studied sharks of the mesopelagic and bathypelagic zone. All tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) found parasitizing the spiral intestine of squaliform shark species (Elasmobranchii: Squaliformes) encountered as part of this survey, as well as some additional Azorean sampling from previous years obtained from local fishermen are reported. In total, 112 shark specimens of 12 species of squaliform sharks representing 4 different families from depths ranging between 400 and 1290 m were examined. Cestodes were found in the spiral intestines from 11 of the 12 squaliform species examined: Deania calcea, D. cf. profundorum, D. profundorum, Etmopterus princeps, E. pusillus, E. spinax, Centroscyllium fabricii, Centroscymnus coelolepis, C. cryptacanthus, C. crepidater, and Dalatias licha. No cestodes were found in the spiral intestines of Centrophorus squamosus. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed several potentially novel trypanorhynch and biloculated tetraphyllidean species. Aporhynchid and gilquiniid trypanorhynchs dominated the adult cestode fauna of Etmopterus and Deania host species, respectively, while larval phyllobothriids were found across several host genera, including, Deania, Centroscyllium, and Centroscymnus. These results corroborate previous findings that deep-water cestode faunas are relatively depauperate and consist primarily of trypanorhynchs of the families Gilquiniidae and Aporhynchidae and larval tetraphyllideans. A subset of specimens of most cestode species was preserved in ethanol for future molecular analysis to allow more definitive determinations of the identification of the

  2. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; O. Djordjevic

    2003-03-20

    The ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342) began September 1, 2002. During this second quarter: A Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator (DHI) symposium was held at UH; Current DHI methods were presented and forecasts made on future techniques; Dr. Han moved his laboratory from HARC to the University of Houston; Subcontracts were re-initiated with UH and TAMU; Theoretical and numerical modeling work began at TAMU; Geophysical Development Corp. agreed to provide petrophysical data; Negotiations were begun with Veritas GDC to obtain limited seismic data; Software licensing and training schedules were arranged with Paradigm; and Data selection and acquisition continues. The broad industry symposium on Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators was held at the University of Houston as part of this project. This meeting was well attended and well received. A large amount of information was presented, not only on application of the current state of the art, but also on expected future trends. Although acquisition of appropriate seismic data was expected to be a significant problem, progress has been made. A 3-D seismic data set from the shelf has been installed at Texas A&M University and analysis begun. Veritas GDC has expressed a willingness to provide data in the deep Gulf of Mexico. Data may also be available from TGS.

  3. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part I. water and solute movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300-480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  4. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Carleton R; Breit, George N; Healy, Richard W; Zupancic, John W; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300–480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  5. Development of HMPE fiber for deep water permanent mooring applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasblom, Martin; Fronzaglia, Bill; Boesten, Jorn [DSM Dyneema, Urmond (Netherlands); Leite, Sergio [Lankhorst Ropes, Sneek (Netherlands); Davies, Peter [Institut Francais de Recherche pour L' Exploration de la Mer (IFREMER) (France)

    2012-07-01

    For a number of years, the creep performance of standard High Modulus Polyethylene (HMPE) fiber types has limited their use in synthetic offshore mooring systems. In 2003, a low creep HMPE fiber was introduced and qualified for semi-permanent MODU moorings. This paper reports on a new High Modulus Polyethylene fiber type with significantly improved creep properties compared to any other HMPE fiber type, which, for the first time, allows its use in permanent offshore mooring systems, for example for deep water FPSO moorings. Results on fiber and rope creep experiments and stiffness measurements are reported. Laboratory testing shows that ropes made with the new fiber type retain the properties characteristic of HMPE such as high static strength, high fatigue resistance and stiffness, and illustrate that stiffness properties determined on HMPE fiber or rope are dependent on the applied load and temperature. (author)

  6. Deep-water antipatharians: Proxies of environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.; Risk, M. J.; Ross, S. W.; Sulak, K. J.

    2006-09-01

    Deep-water (307 697 m) antipatharian (black coral) specimens were collected from the southeastern continental slope of the United States and the north-central Gulf of Mexico. The sclerochronology of the specimens indicates that skeletal growth takes place by formation of concentric coeval layers. We used 210Pb to estimate radial growth rate of two specimens, and to establish that they were several centuries old. Bands were delaminated in KOH and analyzed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Carbon values ranged from -16.4‰ to -15.7‰; the oldest specimen displayed the largest range in values. Nitrogen values ranged from 7.7‰ to 8.6‰. Two specimens from the same location and depth had similar 15N signatures, indicating good reproducibility between specimens.

  7. Manned underwater intervention during deep-water operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothe, Mikal Sjur

    2010-07-01

    The focus for deep and remote areas operations are Remote Operated systems. Manned intervention is generally first choice when looking for intervention methods in most areas of the world. As an industry we need to focus on the most cost effective and safe method for construction, Maintenance and Repair. The focus is on advances in diving methods related to surface oriented and saturation diving, such as shallow water tie-ins of risers and umbilicals, inspection and evaluations of FPSOs including thruster change-out and wet docking. Also, the options for efficient repair scenarios utilizing man's ability to work in low visibility areas by feel etc. Finally the presentation will show new technology in Saturation Diving based on the 24 man saturation systems onboard the 3rd generation Divex systems used by Technip and Subsea 7. (Author)

  8. Potential Health Benefits of Deep Sea Water: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samihah Zura Mohd Nani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea water (DSW commonly refers to a body of seawater that is pumped up from a depth of over 200 m. It is usually associated with the following characteristics: low temperature, high purity, and being rich with nutrients, namely, beneficial elements, which include magnesium, calcium, potassium, chromium, selenium, zinc, and vanadium. Less photosynthesis of plant planktons, consumption of nutrients, and organic decomposition have caused lots of nutrients to remain there. Due to this, DSW has potential to become a good source for health. Research has proven that DSW can help overcome health problems especially related to lifestyle-associated diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and skin problems. This paper reviews the potential health benefits of DSW by referring to the findings from previous researches.

  9. Ireland's deep-water coral carbonate mounds: multidisciplinary research results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozachenko, M.; Wheeler, A.; Beyer, A.; Blamart, D.; Masson, D.; Olu-Le Roy, K.

    2003-04-01

    Recent international research activity, involving a strong Irish collaboration, has shown that coral reefs are not exclusively associated with warm tropical waters but are also present in the deeper and colder Northeast Atlantic. In the Porcupine Seabight west of Ireland, coral-colonised carbonate mounds (up to 350m high) are present at 600-900m water depth. The corals Lophelia pertusa L. and Madrepora oculata L. contribute to this diverse ecosystem that may also play a significant role in expanding deep-water fisheries. New side-scan sonar, multibeam echosounder, sub-bottom profiler and underwater video imagery supplemented with sedimentological sample material were used to map the seabed in the environs of the Belgica Carbonate Mound province, eastern Porcupine Seabight. The data were integrated in a GIS and provides information on sediment pathways and benthic current patterns within the study area. A facies map of the study area highlights differing sedimentary processes showing evidences for strong northward bottom currents whose interaction has an influence on mounds growth and morphology. This survey revealed mound flanks dominated by sediment waves that give way to coral banks towards the mound summits. A form of coral accumulation was also documented. Detailed analyses of sediment properties from long cores through sediment drifts have generated a high-resolution palaeoclimate record revealing temporal patterns in bottom current strength variations. An accurate assessment of this influence on mound through a comparison with coral growth rates is ongoing.

  10. Catwell and Sherdaps for deep-water production fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, H.P.; Rey, R. [Cameron, 34 - Beziers (France)

    2000-07-01

    The names Catwell and SherDaps are derived from: - Catenary Well - Subsea Horizontal Extended Reach Drilling And Production System. Both systems use the technique of being able to drill a well in deep-water either through a platform catenary carrier pipe or a catenary drilling riser. They also offer, in addition, significant advantages when drilling into shallow reservoirs and the ability to enhance production using platform artificial lift systems or easily serviceable pumps either in the well or at the mud-line. Catwell is a platform system with surface wellheads/trees whereas SherDaps uses a group of subsea wellheads/trees/BOP's that are accessible from one permanent catenary drilling riser. Both systems allow drilling/completing and future well intervention from a central location that otherwise would have required several drilling centres (i.e. platforms or subsea) if the conventional approach was followed. It is envisaged that well targets close to a platform will use well conductors possibly with mud-line wellheads, then Catwell to reach the medium range well targets and SherDaps for long range wells. It is considered that this arrangement would allow a single surface drilling/ production centre to have access to well targets giving a foot print range of up to a 20 km diameter. The total Capex savings on a Deep-water Field Development could be in the region of $200 m on a $1 billion development. Opex will be lower with the ability from the drilling center to quickly access any problem well and rectify any faults, minimising lost production. (authors)

  11. From offshore to onshore: multiple origins of shallow-water corals from deep-sea ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lindner

    Full Text Available Shallow-water tropical reefs and the deep sea represent the two most diverse marine environments. Understanding the origin and diversification of this biodiversity is a major quest in ecology and evolution. The most prominent and well-supported explanation, articulated since the first explorations of the deep sea, holds that benthic marine fauna originated in shallow, onshore environments, and diversified into deeper waters. In contrast, evidence that groups of marine organisms originated in the deep sea is limited, and the possibility that deep-water taxa have contributed to the formation of shallow-water communities remains untested with phylogenetic methods. Here we show that stylasterid corals (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Stylasteridae--the second most diverse group of hard corals--originated and diversified extensively in the deep sea, and subsequently invaded shallow waters. Our phylogenetic results show that deep-water stylasterid corals have invaded the shallow-water tropics three times, with one additional invasion of the shallow-water temperate zone. Our results also show that anti-predatory innovations arose in the deep sea, but were not involved in the shallow-water invasions. These findings are the first robust evidence that an important group of tropical shallow-water marine animals evolved from deep-water ancestors.

  12. Behavioral responses of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia: Arcticidae) to simulated leakages of carbon dioxide from sub-sea geological storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Shaw D; Westerlund, Stig

    2016-11-01

    Sub-sea geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) provides a viable option for the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) approach for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. Although generally considered to offer a low risk of major leakage, it remains relevant to establish the possible consequences for marine organisms that live in or on sediments overlying these storage areas if such an event may occur. The present study has used a series of laboratory exposures and behavioral bioassays to establish the sensitivity of Arctica islandica to simulated leakages of CO2. This long-lived bivalve mollusc is widely distributed throughout the North Sea, an area where geological storage is currently taking place and where there are plans to expand this operation significantly. A recently published model has predicted a maximum drop of 1.9pH units in seawater at the point source of a substantial escape of CO2 from sub-sea geological storage in this region. Valve movements of A. islandica exposed to reduced pH seawater were recorded continuously using Hall effect proximity sensors. Valve movement regulation is important for optimising the flow of water over the gills, which supplies food and facilitates respiration. A stepwise reduction in seawater pH showed an initial increase in both the rate and extent of valve movements in the majority of individuals tested when pH fell to 6.2 units. Exposing A. islandica to pH 6.2 seawater continuously for seven days resulted in a clear increase in valve movements during the first 40h of exposure, followed by a gradual reduction in activity intensity over the subsequent five days, suggesting acclimation. The ability of both exposed and control bivalves to burrow successfully into sediment on completion of this exposure was very similar. A final exposure trial, testing whether increased valve movements initiated by reduced pH were related to foot extension during attempted burrowing, found no such association. In summary

  13. Ultra-sonic PIG inspection in crude oil pipeline on deep waters; Inspecao com PIG ultra-sonico em oleodutos de aguas profundas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzoi, Aldo Renato; Melo, Francimario da Silva Vieira; Bueno, Sergio Ibaje Oliveira; Morais, Ricardo Pereira de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    Nowadays, Marlin field is one of the biggest oil production fields in Campos Basin. This field is compound by platforms that produce, storage and export natural gas and crude oil through sub sea pipelines. The pipeline integrity must be assured for operation continuity and safety of the people and environment. The use of smart pigs is a technique applied to verify corrosion and wall thickness loss in PETROBRAS' sub sea pipelines. The crude oil pipelines inspection from a platform to a FPSO was a big challenge due to the high wall thickness, high export temperature, high BSW (Basic Sediments and Water) and wax. This paper presents solutions for the success of this inspection using smart pigs (author)

  14. Carbon Sequestration through Sustainably Sourced Algal Fertilizer: Deep Ocean Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Drawing down carbon from the atmosphere happens in the oceans when marine plants are growing due to the use of carbon dioxide for biological processes and by raising the pH of the water. Macro- and microscopic marine photosynthesizers are limited in their growth by the availability of light and nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorous, iron, etc.) Deep ocean water (DOW), oceanic water from bellow about 1000m, is a natural medium for marine algae, which contains all (except in rare circumstances) necessary components for algal growth and represents over 90% of the volume of the ocean. The introduction of DOW to a tropical or summer sea can increase chlorophyll from near zero to 60 mg per M3 or more. The form of the utilization infrastructure for DOW can roughly be divided into two effective types; the unconstrained release and the open pond system. Unconstrained release has the advantage of having relatively low infrastructure investment and is available to any area of the ocean. The open pond system has high infrastructure costs but enables intensive use of DOW for harvesting macro- and microalgae and sustainable mariculture. It also enables greater concomitant production of DOW's other potential products such as electricity or potable water. However, unlike an unconstrained release the open pond system can capture much of the biomaterial from the water and limits the impact to the surrounding ecosystem. The Tidal Irrigation and Electrical System (TIESystem), is an open pond that is to be constructed on a continental shelf. It harnesses the tidal flux to pump DOW into the pond on the rising tide and then uses the falling tide to pump biologically rich material out of the pond. This biomaterial represents fixed CO2 and can be used for biofuel or fertilizers. The TIESystem benefits from an economy of scale that increases at a rate that is roughly equal to the relationship of the circumference of a circle (the barrier that creates the open pond) to the area of the pond

  15. Flood frequency matters: Why climate change degrades deep-water quality of peri-alpine lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Gabriel; Wessels, Martin; Wüest, Alfred

    2016-09-01

    Sediment-laden riverine floods transport large quantities of dissolved oxygen into the receiving deep layers of lakes. Hence, the water quality of deep lakes is strongly influenced by the frequency of riverine floods. Although flood frequency reflects climate conditions, the effects of climate variability on the water quality of deep lakes is largely unknown. We quantified the effects of climate variability on the potential shifts in the flood regime of the Alpine Rhine, the main catchment of Lake Constance, and determined the intrusion depths of riverine density-driven underflows and the subsequent effects on water exchange rates in the lake. A simplified hydrodynamic underflow model was developed and validated with observed river inflow and underflow events. The model was implemented to estimate underflow statistics for different river inflow scenarios. Using this approach, we integrated present and possible future flood frequencies to underflow occurrences and intrusion depths in Lake Constance. The results indicate that more floods will increase the number of underflows and the intensity of deep-water renewal - and consequently will cause higher deep-water dissolved oxygen concentrations. Vice versa, fewer floods weaken deep-water renewal and lead to lower deep-water dissolved oxygen concentrations. Meanwhile, a change from glacial nival regime (present) to a nival pluvial regime (future) is expected to decrease deep-water renewal. While flood frequencies are not expected to change noticeably for the next decades, it is most likely that increased winter discharge and decreased summer discharge will reduce the number of deep density-driven underflows by 10% and favour shallower riverine interflows in the upper hypolimnion. The renewal in the deepest layers is expected to be reduced by nearly 27%. This study underlines potential consequences of climate change on the occurrence of deep river underflows and water residence times in deep lakes.

  16. Water Impingement Erosion of Deep-Rolled Ti64

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Liquid Impingement Erosion (LIE performances of deep-rolling (DR treated and non-treated Ti64 were investigated. Various erosion stages, from the incubation to the terminal erosion stages, could be observed. A full factorial design of experiments was used to study the effect of DR process parameters (Feed Rate, Spindle Velocity, Number of Passes, Pressure on the residual stress distribution, microhardness and surface roughness of the treated Ti64 specimens. The DR-treated Ti64 specimens exhibited improved surface microhardness, surface roughness, and large magnitude of compressive residual stresses, which were attributed to the amount of cold work induced by the DR process. Although DR improved the mechanical properties of the Ti64, the results showed that the treatment has little or no effect on the LIE performance of Ti64 but different damage modes were observed in these two cases. Evolution of the erosion stages was described based on water-hammer pressure, stress waves, radial wall jetting, and hydraulic penetration modes. The initial erosion stages were mainly influenced by water-hammer pressure and stress waves, whereas the intermediate erosion stages were influenced by the combination of the four modes together. The final erosion stages contain the four modes, however the erosion was greatly driven by the radial jetting and hydraulic penetration modes, where more material was removed. The failure mechanism of the final stages of the LIE test of both DR-treated and non-treated Ti64 was characterized as fatigue fracture. However, a brittle fracture behavior was observed in the initial and intermediate erosion stages of the DR-treated Ti64, whereas a ductile fracture behavior was observed in the non-treated Ti64. This was concluded from the micrographs of the LIE damage through different erosion stages.

  17. Deep-water anoxygenic photosythesis in a ferruginous chemocline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, S A; Maresca, J A; Jones, C; Sturm, A; Henny, C; Fowle, D A; Cox, R P; Delong, E F; Canfield, D E

    2014-07-01

    Ferruginous Lake Matano, Indonesia hosts one of the deepest anoxygenic photosynthetic communities on Earth. This community is dominated by low-light adapted, BChl e-synthesizing green sulfur bacteria (GSB), which comprise ~25% of the microbial community immediately below the oxic-anoxic boundary (OAB; 115-120 m in 2010). The size of this community is dependent on the mixing regime within the lake and the depth of the OAB-at ~117 m, the GSB live near their low-light limit. Slow growth and C-fixation rates suggest that the Lake Matano GSB can be supported by sulfide even though it only accumulates to scarcely detectable (low μm to nm) concentrations. A model laboratory strain (Chlorobaculum tepidum) is indeed able to access HS- for oxidation at nm concentrations. Furthermore, the GSB in Lake Matano possess a full complement of S-oxidizing genes. Together, this physiological and genetic information suggests that deep-water GSB can be supported by a S-cycle, even under ferruginous conditions. The constraints we place on the metabolic capacity and physiology of GSB have important geobiological implications. Biomarkers diagnostic of GSB would be a good proxy for anoxic conditions but could not discriminate between euxinic and ferruginous states, and though GSB biomarkers could indicate a substantial GSB community, such a community may exist with very little metabolic activity. The light requirements of GSB indicate that at light levels comparable to those in the OAB of Lake Matano or the Black Sea, GSB would have contributed little to global ocean primary production, nutrient cycling, and banded iron formation (BIF) deposition in the Precambrian. Before the proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, shallower OABs and lower light absorption in the ocean's surface waters would have permitted greater light availability to GSB, potentially leading to a greater role for GSB in global biogeochemical cycles.

  18. North Atlantic deep water formation and AMOC in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Céline

    2017-07-01

    Deep water formation in climate models is indicative of their ability to simulate future ocean circulation, carbon and heat uptake, and sea level rise. Present-day temperature, salinity, sea ice concentration and ocean transport in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre and Nordic Seas from 23 CMIP5 (Climate Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5) models are compared with observations to assess the biases, causes and consequences of North Atlantic deep convection in models. The majority of models convect too deep, over too large an area, too often and too far south. Deep convection occurs at the sea ice edge and is most realistic in models with accurate sea ice extent, mostly those using the CICE model. Half of the models convect in response to local cooling or salinification of the surface waters; only a third have a dynamic relationship between freshwater coming from the Arctic and deep convection. The models with the most intense deep convection have the warmest deep waters, due to a redistribution of heat through the water column. For the majority of models, the variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is explained by the volumes of deep water produced in the subpolar gyre and Nordic Seas up to 2 years before. In turn, models with the strongest AMOC have the largest heat export to the Arctic. Understanding the dynamical drivers of deep convection and AMOC in models is hence key to realistically forecasting Arctic oceanic warming and its consequences for the global ocean circulation, cryosphere and marine life.

  19. Iron isotopes in bottom waters from the Bransfield Strait: Implications for deep water Fe supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichel, Torben; Homoky, William; Connelly, Douglas; Klar, Jessica; Mills, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    Iron (Fe) is an important micro-nutrient in the global ocean. However, its low bioavailability due to poor solubility in oxygenated waters, leads to a strongly limiting character of this trace metal as a nutrient. The major sources of Fe to seawater are largely known (i.e. aeolian dust deposition, riverine and groundwater input, seawater-sediment interaction, and hydrothermal vents) but the relative significance of these sources to the marine Fe supply are not yet well quantified. Areas with low atmospheric inputs, such as the Southern Ocean, are severely Fe limited in surface waters. Here, strong upwelling and a deeply penetrating surface mixed layer fuel one of the largest biogeochemical cycles of trace metals in the global ocean. One significant pathway to bottom waters is the benthic flux of trace metals from hydrothermal systems, where Fe can be stabilised in the water column by different dissolved species. For example, benthic fauna, such as tube-worms, may enhance transportation of dissolved trace metals from pore waters through oxic surface layers of sediments into the deep ocean. Concentrations of total dissolvable Fe (DFe) in these bottom waters have been reported to be significantly higher than surrounding seawater (Aquilina et al., 2014). Here we present DFe isotope composition of bottom water from the Hook Ridge, a shallow (~1100m) sediment covered volcanic feature within a rifted margin. On the basis of Fe isotopes we will determine whether Fe is released by non-reductive dissolution from poorly oxygenated sediments via the presence of tubeworms Sclerolinum spec. This will help to evaluate whether benthic fluxes from hydrothermal fields can be a major source of bioavailable Fe to the deep Southern Ocean. References: Aquilina, A., Homoky, W.B., Hawkes, J. A., Lyons, T.W., Mills, R. a., 2014. Hydrothermal sediments are a source of water column Fe and Mn in the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 64-80. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.04.003

  20. Deep water overflow in the Faroe Bank Channel; modelling, processes, and impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rullyanto, Arief

    2015-01-01

    More than 70% of the earth surface is covered by the ocean. The ocean is not static; it is in constant motion at many scales and circulates waters in coastal regions, the open seas and across ocean basins. The flow not only occurs in the surface of the ocean, as we can see in the form of waves...... or tides, but also deep beneath the surface, where deep-water currents circulate waters throughout the world’s oceans. In certain very-localized regions, the flow of the deep-water has to travel over a sill in a narrow submarine channel. This overflow process mixes the deep water with overlying waters...... under different circumstances. The focus is on the Faroe Bank Channel, a relatively small region, which has a significant impact on the global ocean circulation and marine organisms that live in its environment....

  1. Iron isotopes in bottom waters from the Bransfield Strait: Implications for deep water Fe supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichel, T.; Lough, A. J. M.; Homoky, W. B.; Connelly, D.; Klar, J. K.; Conway, T. M.; John, S.; Mills, R.

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) is an important micro-nutrient in the global ocean. However, its low bioavailability due to poor solubility in oxygenated waters, leads to a strongly limiting character of this trace metal as a nutrient in areas of low Fe supply. The major sources of Fe into seawater are largely known (i.e. aeolian dust deposition, riverine and groundwater input, seawater-sediment interaction, and hydrothermal vents) but the relative contributions of these sources to the marine Fe supply are not yet well quantified. Areas with low atmospheric inputs, such as the Southern Ocean, are severely Fe-limited in surface waters. Here, strong upwelling and a deeply penetrating surface mixed layer fuel one of the largest biogeochemical cycles of trace metals in the global ocean. Upwelling of deep waters containing larger amounts of Fe can be a likely source for surface waters. One significant pathway to enrich Fe in bottom waters is the benthic flux of trace metals from hydrothermal systems, where Fe can be stabilised in the water column by different dissolved species. Several benthic processes e.g. benthic fauna, may enhance transportation of dissolved trace metals from pore waters through oxic surface layers of sediments into the deep ocean. Concentrations of total dissolvable Fe (DFe) in these bottom waters have been reported to be significantly higher than surrounding seawater (Aquilina et al., 2014). Here we present DFe isotope composition of bottom water from the Hook Ridge, a shallow ( 1100m) sediment covered volcanic feature within a rifted margin in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. On the basis of Fe isotopes we will determine the processes involved that release Fe from sediments. This will help to evaluate whether benthic fluxes from hydrothermal fields can be a major source of bioavailable Fe to the deep Southern Ocean. References: Aquilina, A., Homoky, W.B., Hawkes, J. A., Lyons, T.W., Mills, R. a., 2014. GCA 137, 64-80. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2014.04.003

  2. Deep-water riser fatigue monitoring systems based on acoustic telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojun; Wang, Haiyan; Shen, Xiaohong; Yan, Yongsheng; Yang, Fuzhou; Hua, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Marine risers play a key role in the deep and ultra-deep water oil and gas production. The vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of marine risers constitutes an important problem in deep water oil exploration and production. VIV will result in high rates of structural failure of marine riser due to fatigue damage accumulation and diminishes the riser fatigue life. In-service monitoring or full scale testing is essential to improve our understanding of VIV response and enhance our ability to predict fatigue damage. One marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is proposed and an engineering prototype machine has been developed to monitor deep and ultra-deep water risers' fatigue and failure that can diminish the riser fatigue life and lead to economic losses and eco-catastrophe. Many breakthroughs and innovation have been achieved in the process of developing an engineering prototype machine. Sea trials were done on the 6th generation deep-water drilling platform HYSY-981 in the South China Sea. The inclination monitoring results show that the marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is feasible and reliable and the engineering prototype machine meets the design criterion and can match the requirements of deep and ultra-deep water riser fatigue monitoring. The rich experience and field data gained in the sea trial which provide much technical support for optimization in the engineering prototype machine in the future.

  3. Disparate acidification and calcium carbonate desaturation of deep and shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiming; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Mucci, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is acidifying from absorption of man-made CO2. Current predictive models of that acidification focus on surface waters, and their results argue that deep waters will acidify by downward penetration from the surface. Here we show, with an alternative model, the rapid, near simultaneous, acidification of both surface and deep waters, a prediction supported by current, but limited, saturation data. Whereas Arctic surface water responds directly by atmospheric CO2 uptake, deeper waters will be influenced strongly by intrusion of mid-depth, pre-acidified, Atlantic Ocean water. With unabated CO2 emissions, surface waters will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite by 2105 AD and could remain so for ∼600 years. In deep waters, the aragonite saturation horizon will rise, reaching the base of the surface mixed layer by 2140 AD and likely remaining there for over a millennium. The survival of aragonite-secreting organisms is consequently threatened on long timescales. PMID:27659188

  4. Geochemical records of salt-water inflows into the deep basins of the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, T.; Christiansen, C.; Clasen, S.;

    1997-01-01

    +) accumulating in the deep, anoxic water body. Inflow of oxygenated water causes oxidation of Mn2+ to Mn4+ and precipitation of MnO2, which accumulates in Mn-rich layers at the sediment surface. When the bottom water becomes anoxic again, MnO2 degradation release Mn2+ into the pore water, and alkalinity......The estuarine circulation system of the Baltic Sea promotes stable stratification and bottom water anoxia in sedimentary basins of the Baltic proper. Ingressions of saline, oxygen-rich waters from the North Sea replace the oxygen depleted deep water. Timing and extent of the ingressions vary...... on time-scales of years to decades, and are largely determined by wind-strength and storm frequency over the North Atlantic Ocean and Europe. Mn/Fe-ratios in sediments from a dated sediment core of the Gotland Deep (250 m water depth) record variations in redox conditions that can be linked to historical...

  5. Disparate acidification and calcium carbonate desaturation of deep and shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiming; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Mucci, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    The Arctic Ocean is acidifying from absorption of man-made CO2. Current predictive models of that acidification focus on surface waters, and their results argue that deep waters will acidify by downward penetration from the surface. Here we show, with an alternative model, the rapid, near simultaneous, acidification of both surface and deep waters, a prediction supported by current, but limited, saturation data. Whereas Arctic surface water responds directly by atmospheric CO2 uptake, deeper waters will be influenced strongly by intrusion of mid-depth, pre-acidified, Atlantic Ocean water. With unabated CO2 emissions, surface waters will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite by 2105 AD and could remain so for ~600 years. In deep waters, the aragonite saturation horizon will rise, reaching the base of the surface mixed layer by 2140 AD and likely remaining there for over a millennium. The survival of aragonite-secreting organisms is consequently threatened on long timescales.

  6. Analysis of Water Insulating Effect of Compound Water-Resisting Key Strata in Deep Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mei-mei; MAO Xian-biao; BAI Hai-bo; MIAO Xie-xing

    2007-01-01

    The problem of water preservation in mining and the prevention of water-bursts has been one of the more important issues in deep mining. Based on the concept of water-resisting key strata, the mechanics model of the key strata is established given the structural characteristics and the mechanical properties of the roof rock layers of the working face in a particular coal mine. Four other models were derived from this model by re-arranging the order of the layers in the key strata. The distribution characteristics of stress, deformation, pore pressure and the flow vector of all the models are computed using the analytical module of fluid-structure interaction in the FLAC software and the corresponding risks of a water-burst are analyzed. The results indicate that the water-insulating ability of the key strata is related to the arrangement of soft and hard rocks. The water-insulating ability of the compound water-resisting key strata (CWKS) with a hard-hard-soft-hard-soft compounding order is the best under the five given simulated conditions.

  7. A Multi-model EKF Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Deep Water AUV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel integrated navigation algorithm, multi-model EKF (Extended Kalman Filter integrated navigation algorithm, is presented in this paper for the deep water autonomous underwater vehicle. When a deep water vehicle is performing tasks in the deep sea, the navigation error will accumulate over time, if it relies solely on its own inertial navigation system. In order to get a more accurate position for the deep water vehicle online, an integrated navigation system is constructed by adding the acoustic navigation system. And because it is difficult to establish the kinematic model and the measurement model accurately for the deep water vehicle in the underwater environment, we propose the Multi model EKF integrated navigation algorithm, and estimate the measurement errors of beacons online. Then we can estimate the position of the deep water vehicle more accurately. The new algorithm has been tested by both analyses and field experiment data (the lake and sea trial data, and results show that the multi-model EKF integrated navigation algorithm proposed in this paper significantly improves the navigation accuracy for the deep water vehicle.

  8. A Multi-Model EKF Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Deep Water AUV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel integrated navigation algorithm, multi-model EKF (Extended Kalman Filter integrated navigation algorithm, is presented in this paper for the deep water autonomous underwater vehicle. When a deep water vehicle is performing tasks in the deep sea, the navigation error will accumulate over time, if it relies solely on its own inertial navigation system. In order to get a more accurate position for the deep water vehicle online, an integrated navigation system is constructed by adding the acoustic navigation system. And because it is difficult to establish the kinematic model and the measurement model accurately for the deep water vehicle in the underwater environment, we propose the Multi-model EKF integrated navigation algorithm, and estimate the measurement errors of beacons online. Then we can estimate the position of the deep water vehicle more accurately. The new algorithm has been tested by both analyses and field experiment data (the lake and sea trial data, and results show that the multi-model EKF integrated navigation algorithm proposed in this paper significantly improves the navigation accuracy for the deep water vehicle.

  9. Effects of climate change on deep-water oxygen and winter mixing in a deep lake (Lake Geneva)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, Robert; Alfred, Wüest; Damien, Bouffard

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen is the most important dissolved gas for lake ecosystems. Because low oxygen concentrations are an ongoing problem in many parts of the oceans and numerous lakes, oxygen depletion processes have been intensively studied over the last decades and were mainly attributed to high nutrient loads. Recently, climate-induced changes in stratification and mixing behavior were recognized as additional thread to hypolimnetic oxygen budgets in lakes and reservoirs [Matzinger et al., 2007; Zhang et al., 2015]. Observational data of Lake Geneva, a deep perialpine lake situated between France and Switzerland showed no decreasing trend in hypoxia over the last 43 years, despite an impressive reduction in nutrient input during this period. Instead, hypoxic conditions were predominantly controlled by deep mixing end of winter and in turn by winter temperatures. To test the sensitivity of Lake Geneva on future climate change and changes in water transparency, we simulated the hydrodynamics and temperature of Lake Geneva under varying conditions for atmospheric temperature and water clarity performed with the one-dimensional model SIMSTRAT [Goudsmit, 2002]. The results show, that the stratification in lakes is only weakly affected by changes in light absorption due to varying water quality. For conditions expected for the end of the century, a decrease in the annual mean deep convective mixing of up to 45 m is predicted. Also complete mixing events over the whole lake are less likely to occur. A change in the hypolimnetic oxygen concentration of up to 20% can thus be expected in the future. These results show, that changes in deep mixing have an equally strong impact as eutrophication on the deep-water oxygen development of oligomictic lakes and have to be considered in the prediction of the future development of lakes. References: Goudsmit, G. H., H. Burchard, F. Peeters, and A. Wüest (2002), Application of k-ɛ turbulence models to enclosed basins: The role of internal

  10. Deep Water Circulation during the Past 180 Thousand Years in the Northwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, K. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Some evidence appears to suggest that the North Pacific played a bigger role in forming deep waters during the end of the last ice age (particularly H1) than it does today (Okazaki et al., 2010; Rae et al., 2014). More recent data from the Bering Sea indicates that the relatively well-ventilated intermediate waters might be formed during the late Pleistocene but in a depth shallower than 1000 m. To understand whether the northern source deep-waters affected the deep circulation and its extent in the northwest Pacific in the late Pleistocene, we measured δ13C and δ18O of benthic foraminifera Uvigerina peregrina (300-425 µm) of OPD1210A (32o13.4'N, 158o15.6'E, water depth 2574 m) from the Shatsky Rise. By assembling data collected from the Northwest Pacific and comparing the integrated d13C time-series with others from the Southwest Pacific, North and South Atlantic, we concluded that the δ13C records of 2500 - 4000 m deep in western Pacific during the last 180 kyrs was composed by 60% NADW and 40% AABW modified with a remineralization constant (Lisiecki, 2010). The constant for the western equatorial and northwestern Pacific is -0.5‰ and for the southwestern Pacific is -0.2‰. The transportation of deep waters from the southwestern Pacific to the northern Pacific Basin was faster in glacial times than that during the interglacial times. We consider that the Pacific deep waters were affected mainly by the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) from Atlantic during the past 180 kyrs. The shifts of the deep ocean δ13C minima during glacial times were not caused by any additional freshly-formed water in the form of Glacial North Pacific Intermediate Water (GNPIW) in the North Pacific.

  11. Cardiorespiratory responses during deep water running with and without horizontal displacement at different cadences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Kanitz

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The results indicate that the increase in both cadence and displacement results in significant cardiorespiratory responses as a result of deep water running. This finding is important for adapting exercise prescription to the goals of participants.

  12. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    and Yuen, M. Y. (2015). "Multipurpose acoustic networks in the Integrated Arctic Ocean Observing System," Arctic 68, 11-27. 2. Publications...the "Special Issue on Deep-water Ocean Acoustics" in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (Vol. 134, No . 4, Pt. 2 of 2 , October20 13...15. SUBJECT TERMS ocean acoustics, deep water acousti c propagati on 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c

  13. Ecogeochemistry potential in deep time biodiversity illustrated using a modern deep-water case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, Clive N; Chung, Ming-Tsung; Shores, Diana

    2016-04-05

    The fossil record provides the only direct evidence of temporal trends in biodiversity over evolutionary timescales. Studies of biodiversity using the fossil record are, however, largely limited to discussions of taxonomic and/or morphological diversity. Behavioural and physiological traits that are likely to be under strong selection are largely obscured from the body fossil record. Similar problems exist in modern ecosystems where animals are difficult to access. In this review, we illustrate some of the common conceptual and methodological ground shared between those studying behavioural ecology in deep time and in inaccessible modern ecosystems. We discuss emerging ecogeochemical methods used to explore population connectivity and genetic drift, life-history traits and field metabolic rate and discuss some of the additional problems associated with applying these methods in deep time.

  14. Potential Osteoporosis Recovery by Deep Sea Water through Bone Regeneration in SAMP8 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hen-Yu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the therapeutic potential of deep sea water (DSW on osteoporosis. Previously, we have established the ovariectomized senescence-accelerated mice (OVX-SAMP8 and demonstrated strong recovery of osteoporosis by stem cell and platelet-rich plasma (PRP. Deep sea water at hardness (HD 1000 showed significant increase in proliferation of osteoblastic cell (MC3T3 by MTT assay. For in vivo animal study, bone mineral density (BMD was strongly enhanced followed by the significantly increased trabecular numbers through micro-CT examination after a 4-month deep sea water treatment, and biochemistry analysis showed that serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity was decreased. For stage-specific osteogenesis, bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs were harvested and examined. Deep sea water-treated BMSCs showed stronger osteogenic differentiation such as BMP2, RUNX2, OPN, and OCN, and enhanced colony forming abilities, compared to the control group. Interestingly, most untreated OVX-SAMP8 mice died around 10 months; however, approximately 57% of DSW-treated groups lived up to 16.6 months, a life expectancy similar to the previously reported life expectancy for SAMR1 24 months. The results demonstrated the regenerative potentials of deep sea water on osteogenesis, showing that deep sea water could potentially be applied in osteoporosis therapy as a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.

  15. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as “open-sea convection”. It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts. PMID:23874425

  16. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J M; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G F; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  17. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tamburini

    Full Text Available The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  18. Research Progress of Buckling Propagation Experiment of Deep-Water Pipelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余建星; 吴梦宁; 孙震洲; 段晶辉

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the extraction of fossil resources, especially oil and gas in deep and ultra-deep water areas has been playing a more important role and been paid more attention to. For this reason, the working depth of subma-rine pipelines, which are used for the transportation of oil and gas, has been increasing sharply. As the main failure pattern of deep-water pipelines, buckling and its propagation problem have drawn more attention of many research institutions and engineering units around the world. Based on the existing research, the summary of experiments and their outcomes of deep-water pipeline buckling failure is made in this paper. Research status and developing prospects of the experiments of buckling propagation and buckle arrestor are discussed in detail.

  19. Application of a water balance model for estimating deep infiltration in a karstic watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Calijuri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current scenario of water scarcity evidences the need for an adequate management of water resources. In karstic regions, the water flow through fractures significantly increases the water infiltration rate, which explains the small number of rivers and the importance of groundwater for urban supply. Therefore, the water balance is necessary since it may aid decision making processes and guide water management projects. The objective of this paper was to perform the water balance of a watershed situated in a karstic region quantifying infiltration, runoff and evapotranspiration. The study area is located near the Tancredo Neves International Airport in Confins, in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Most of the area consists of forest formations (40.9%, and pastures (34.5%. In order to estimate deep infiltration, the BALSEQ model was used. BALSEQ is a numeric model of sequential water balance in which deep infiltration at the end of the day is given by the difference between daily precipitation and the sum of surface runoff, evapotranspiration and the variation of the amount of water stored in the soil. The results show that approximately 60% of total annual precipitation result in deep infiltration, considering the recharge period from September to March. After the dry period, the areas with no vegetal cover present higher deep infiltration. However, over the months, the contribution of the vegetated areas becomes greater, showing the importance of these areas to aquifer recharge.

  20. Dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM in the Mediterranean surface and deep waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotnik J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM was studied in surface and deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea for last 12 years during several oceanographic cruises on board the Italian research vessel Urania and covered both Western and Eastern Mediterranean Basins as well as Adriatic Sea. DGM was measured together with other mercury species (RHg - reactive Hg, THg - total Hg, MeHg - monomethyl Hg and DMeHg - dimethylmercury, and with some water quality parameters in coastal and open sea deep water profiles, however only DGM will be discussed here. DGM represents a considerable portion of THg (average of about 20 % in Mediterranean waters. Spatial and seasonal variations of measured DGM concentrations were observed in different indentified water masses as well as iwere observed. DGM was the highest in the northern Adriatic, most polluted part of the Mediterranean Sea as the consequence of Hg mining in Idrija and heavy industry of northern Italy.Generally, average DGM concentration was higher in W and E Mediteranean Deep Waters (WMDW and EMDW and Leavantine Intermediate Water (LIW than overlaying Modified Atlantic Water (MAW, however it was the highest in N Adriatic Surface waters and consequently in out flowing Adriatic Deep Waters (ADW. In deep water profiles the portion of DGM typically increased at depths with oxygen minimum and then towards the bottom, especially in areas with strong tectonic activity (Alboran Sea, Strait of Sicily, Tyrrhenian Sea, indicating its bacterial and/or geotectonic origin. A comparison of the results obtained in this study to others performed in the Mediterranean shows no significant differences. Results were also compared to the results obtained in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. During last oceanographic cruise in 2011 covering area between Livorno and Lipari Islands a novel method for continuous DGM determination in surface waters (Wangberg and Gardfeldt, 2011 was applied and compared to standard method.

  1. Pathways of upwelling deep waters to the surface of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamsitt, Veronica; Drake, Henri; Morrison, Adele; Talley, Lynne; Dufour, Carolina; Gray, Alison; Griffies, Stephen; Mazloff, Matthew; Sarmiento, Jorge; Wang, Jinbo; Weijer, Wilbert

    2017-04-01

    Upwelling of Atlantic, Indian and Pacific deep waters to the sea surface in the Southern Ocean closes the global overturning circulation and is fundamentally important for oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon and heat, nutrient resupply for sustaining oceanic biological production, and the melt rate of ice shelves. Here we go beyond the two-dimensional view of Southern Ocean upwelling, to show detailed Southern Ocean upwelling pathways in three dimensions, using hydrographic observations and particle tracking in high-resolution ocean and climate models. The northern deep waters enter the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) via narrow southward currents along the boundaries of the three ocean basins, before spiraling southeastward and upward through the ACC. Upwelling is greatly enhanced at five major topographic features, associated with vigorous mesoscale eddy activity. Deep water reaches the upper ocean predominantly south of the southern ACC boundary, with a spatially nonuniform distribution, regionalizing warm water supply to Antarctic ice shelves and the delivery of nutrient and carbon-rich water to the sea surface. The timescale for half of the deep water to upwell from 30°S to the mixed layer is on the order of 60-90 years, which has important implications for the timescale for signals to propagate through the deep ocean. In addition, we quantify the diabatic transformation along particle trajectories, to identify where diabatic processes are important along the upwelling pathways.

  2. Multi-Objective Optimization of A Semisubmersible for Ultra-Deep Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin-quan; TAN Jia-hua

    2008-01-01

    Semisubmersible will work well when oil exploitation goes to ultra-deep water because of its variable load capacities, and good motion performance in extreme waves. It is considered to be a main type of platform while the water depth is more than 3000 meters. This paper establishes a multi-objective optimization model of semisubmersible for ultra-deep water, and it is solved by a multi-objective genetic algorithm-NSGA-II. The model is applied to a practical design, and Pareto results are obtained. The effectiveness of the method is verified by hydrodynamic analysis.

  3. Rapid respiratory responses of the deep-water sponge Geodia barretti exposed to suspended sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Tjensvoll, Ingrid; Kutti, Tina; Fosså, Jan Helge; Bannister, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Sponges often dominate deep-water benthic faunal communities and can comprise up to 90% of the benthic biomass. Due to the large amount of water that they filter daily, sponges are an important link between benthic and pelagic ecosystems. Across the Tromsø-flaket, Barents Sea, Norway, there are high biomasses of deep-water sponges. This area is also an important fishing ground, with fishing activity in some areas >27000 trawl hours yr–1. Bottom trawling suspends large quantities of sediment i...

  4. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep Water Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    to assess global warming trends (1) and calibrate climate change models (2,3). However, contrary to ocean surface temperatures, deep ocean...ocean surface in the Polar Regions (e.g. due to loud iceberg cracking events with levels up to 245 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m) can efficiently couple directly...compare Fig 1C to 1D). An additional factor driving this difference in the peak-to-variance ratios is that the concentration of icebergs –which

  5. Deep undercooling of tissue water and winter hardiness limitations in timberline flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becwar, M R; Rajashekar, C; Bristow, K J; Burke, M J

    1981-07-01

    Deep undercooled tissue water, which froze near -40 C, was found in winter collected stem and leaf tissue of the dominant timberline tree species of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii (Parry) Engelm.) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.), and in numerous other woody species in and below the subalpine vegetation zone. Previous work on numerous woody plants indicates that deep undercooling in xylem makes probable a -40 C winter hardiness limit in stem tissue. Visual injury determinations and electrolyte loss measurements on stem tissue revealed injury near -40 C associated with the freezing of the deep undercooled stem tissue water. These results suggest that the winter hardiness limit of this woody flora is near -40 C. The relevance of deep undercooling in relation to timberline, the upper elevational limit of the subalpine forest, is discussed.

  6. A New Calculation Method of Dynamic Kill Fluid Density Variation during Deep Water Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghai Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are plenty of uncertainties and enormous challenges in deep water drilling due to complicated shallow flow and deep strata of high temperature and pressure. This paper investigates density of dynamic kill fluid and optimum density during the kill operation process in which dynamic kill process can be divided into two stages, that is, dynamic stable stage and static stable stage. The dynamic kill fluid consists of a single liquid phase and different solid phases. In addition, liquid phase is a mixture of water and oil. Therefore, a new method in calculating the temperature and pressure field of deep water wellbore is proposed. The paper calculates the changing trend of kill fluid density under different temperature and pressure by means of superposition method, nonlinear regression, and segment processing technique. By employing the improved model of kill fluid density, deep water kill operation in a well is investigated. By comparison, the calculated density results are in line with the field data. The model proposed in this paper proves to be satisfactory in optimizing dynamic kill operations to ensure the safety in deep water.

  7. The Structure of Sea Water and Gelatinous Water in the Deep Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Wojciechowicz, M.; Brewer, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    Gelatinous life forms are common in the deep sea and are able to maintain a careful combination of body integrity and easy fluidity of motion over a wide range of T and P. They accomplish this in part by modifying the molecular structure of water. Both the transparent body of the organism (the mesoglea) and the structure of the immediate surrounding sea water were investigated by in situ laser Raman spectroscopy at depths from 300m to 2,800m. The structure of water is reasonably well known; the basic unit is a hydrogen bonded pentamer with defined stretching and bending modes. The spectrum of the bending band is separable into two components while the stretching band spectrum is composed of five components representing both intra- and inter-molecular vibrations. The effect of temperature on the various vibrational modes is complex. While the effect of pressure on the bending modes is small, but the effect of temperature and pressure on the stretching modes is significant and can be modeled as a van `t Hoff function. Our in situ experiments were conducted using MBARI's ROV Ventana and ROV Doc Ricketts. We collected cnidarians and ctenophores into a 6 L glass detritus sampler fitted with a metal grid plate. Once the animal was captured, we introduced argon gas through the lid of the sampler displacing the contained sea water and leaving a motionless sea water free specimen for spectroscopy. The laser beam was focused through the glass wall of the container and the focal point adjusted to be inside the gelatinous body. Our results very clearly show that:i) The gelatinous mass effectively excludes salts with zero sulfate ion being detected.ii) The water bending modes are absent from the gelatinous spectra.iii) The water stretching modes are highly modified from the typical 5 band liquid pentamer structure with only 3 vibrational modes observable. These results stand in marked contrast to the familiar household gelatin which is typically derived from bovine sources

  8. Application of Low cost Spirulina growth medium using Deep sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae-hack; Kim, Bong-ju; Lee, Sung-jae; Choi, Nag-chul; Park, Cheon-young

    2017-04-01

    Deep-sea water has a relatively constant temperature, abundant nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, nitrates, and phosphates, etc., and stable water quality, even though there might be some variations of their compositions according to collection places. Thus, deep-sea water would be a good substrate for algal growth and biomass production since it contains various nutrients, including a fluorescent red pigment, and β-carotene, etc. The aim of this study was to investigate the economics of a culture condition through comparative analysis to Spirulina platensis growth characteristic under various medium conditions for cost-effective production of Spirulina sp.. Growth experiments were performed with S. platensis under various culture medium conditions (deep sea water + SP medium). Growth tests for culture medium demonstrated that the deep sea water to SP medium ratio of 50:50(W/W) was effective in S. platensis with the maximum biomass (1.35g/L) and minimum medium making cost per production mass (133.28 KRW/g). Parameter estimation of bio-kinetics (maximum growth rate and yield) for low cost medium results showed that the maximum growth rate and yield of N, P, K were obtained under deep sea water to SP medium ratio of 50:50(W/W) of 0.057 1/day and 0.151, 0.076, 0.123, respectively. Acknowledgment : "This research was a part of the project titled 'Development of microalgae culture technique for cosmetic materials based on ocean deep sea water(20160297)', funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea."

  9. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  10. Deep cavitand receptors with pH-independent water solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lledó, Agustí; Rebek, Julius

    2010-12-07

    Pendant oligoethyleneglycol groups confer water solubility to a cavitand over a wide pH range. The kinetic stability of the host-guest complexes reveals an effective stabilization through hydrogen bonding even in the highly competitive aqueous environment.

  11. Deep-water Circulation: Processes & Products (16-18 June 2010, Baiona): introduction and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Molina, Francisco Javier; Stow, Dorrik A. V.; Llave, Estefanía; Rebesco, Michele; Ercilla, Gemma; van Rooij, David; Mena, Anxo; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Voelker, Antje H. L.

    2011-12-01

    Deep-water circulation is a critical part of the global conveyor belt that regulates Earth's climate. The bottom (contour)-current component of this circulation is of key significance in shaping the deep seafloor through erosion, transport, and deposition. As a result, there exists a high variety of large-scale erosional and depositional features (drifts) that together form more complex contourite depositional systems on continental slopes and rises as well as in ocean basins, generated by different water masses flowing at different depths and at different speeds either in the same or in opposite directions. Yet, the nature of these deep-water processes and the deposited contourites is still poorly understood in detail. Their ultimate decoding will undoubtedly yield information of fundamental importance to the earth and ocean sciences. The international congress Deep-water Circulation: Processes & Products was held from 16-18 June 2010 in Baiona, Spain, hosted by the University of Vigo. Volume 31(5/6) of Geo-Marine Letters is a special double issue containing 17 selected contributions from the congress, guest edited by F.J. Hernández-Molina, D.A.V. Stow, E. Llave, M. Rebesco, G. Ercilla, D. Van Rooij, A. Mena, J.-T. Vázquez and A.H.L. Voelker. The papers and discussions at the congress and the articles in this special issue provide a truly multidisciplinary perspective of interest to both academic and industrial participants, contributing to the advancement of knowledge on deep-water bottom circulation and related processes, as well as contourite sedimentation. The multidisciplinary contributions (including geomorphology, tectonics, stratigraphy, sedimentology, paleoceanography, physical oceanography, and deep-water ecology) have demonstrated that advances in paleoceanographic reconstructions and our understanding of the ocean's role in the global climate system depend largely on the feedbacks among disciplines. New insights into the link between the biota of

  12. WATER TABLE AND REDOX CONDITIONS IN DEEP TROPICAL PEAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajah Dulima Jali

    2007-01-01

    Redox potential in the well developed tropical peat swamp in Brunei was studied for a year. Generally the redox potential measurements showed a large variation, ranging from -234 mV to 727 mV. The expected rise in redox values did not take place following the drop of water table during the dry months of June to September. The redox value at 100 cm depth indicated that the soil remained reduced throughout the year in spite of the lowering of water table below 150 cm in all sites during dry period. Similarly the redox values did not decrease rapidly following flooding when the water table rose to the surface. This phenomenon could be attributed to the topography of the peat dome which facilitated the fast lateral movement of water and thus promoted oxygen supply down the peat profile, though not great enough to reach the 100 cm depth. The rapid lateral flow of water in the outer Alan batu site facilitated aeration, but in the inner sites remained which was reduced because of the slower water movement. The slower initiation of the reducing condition was likely due to the presence of nitrate which has accumulated as a result of ammonium oxidation during the relatively long aerobic period. Differences in the distribution of redox potential with depth are possibly explained by the different permeability of peat affecting flow patterns and residence time of water. The nature and compactibility of the peat might have slowed the diffusion rates of O2 into the lower layer. Though the bulk density of the peat was low, the composition of the peat might influence the peat permeability and hydraulic conductivity. The tree trunks are not decomposed or large branches must have lowered permeability compared to the other peat material.

  13. An Aquifer Reflections on Deep Clay Conditions for Water Quantity Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabariah Musa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the on-site testing of deep clay area through the well response and aquifer reflection analysis. The analysis was conducted using AQTESOLV software on pumping and recovery data to determine the well responses and aquifer characteristics of deep clay area. A simple experimental model was installed at the site using deep well of REWES (Recharge Well System model assists with four monitoring wells around the model. The monitoring wells were located at 4m, 10m, 20m and 35m from the model. The site has been identified identified to have the unconfined aquifer with deep compacted clay. Due to flatten and low flow, pumping analysis and ground water response were used to evaluate water quantity and potential prospective of circulate water cycle for urban stormwater management. As reflection on water cycle, almost 20% from withdrawal capacity able to refill the ground system with limited space. It was found that the available storage, S and hydraulic conductivity, K  of the clayey area are 0.001 and 32 m/day respectively. Therefore, the response on water cycle indicate some potential space to restore and withdrawal at peak time and thus, the  water can be used in safely conditions.

  14. Inflow waters in the deep regions of the southern Baltic Sea - transport and transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Beszczyńska-Möller

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A medium-sized inflow (about 200 km3 according to IOW data, - personal communication of saline water into the southern Baltic Sea occurred during January 2003. Unlike any previously observed inflow, this one brought very cold water, of temperatures around 1-2oC and less. Since the temperature of the deep water in the southern Baltic before the inflow was exceptionally high (11-12oC, the inflowing waters produced dramatic changes and a steep temperature gradient. The movement of the inflowing waters through the deep basins and channels of the Baltic Sea from the Arkona Basin to the Gdańsk Deep during next 4-8 months is described. Frequent mesoscale structures and intensive mixing followed the eastward transport of the inflow water, particularly in the Bornholm Deep and Słupsk Furrow. The present paper is based on data collected during 6 cruises r/v "Oceania" between December 2002 and August 2003. The last cruise in August took place in order to assess the long-term consequences of the inflow.

  15. Inflow waters in the deep regions of the southern Baltic Sea - transport and transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Piechura

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A medium-sized inflow (about 200 km3 according to IOW data, - personal communication of saline water into the southern Baltic Sea occurred during January 2003. Unlike any previously observed inflow, this one brought very cold water, of temperatures around 1-2°C and less. Since the temperature of the deep water in the southern Baltic before the inflow was exceptionally high (11-12°C, the inflowing waters produced dramatic changes and a steep temperature gradient. The movement of the inflowing waters through the deep basins and channels of the Baltic Sea from the Arkona Basin to the Gdansk Deep during next 4-8 months is described. Frequent mesoscale structures and intensive mixing followed the eastward transport of the inflow water, particularly in the Bornholm Deep and Słupsk Furrow. The present paper is based on data collected during of 6 cruises r/v "Oceania" between December 2002 and August 2003. The last cruise in August took place in order to assess the long-term consequences of the inflow.

  16. Prokaryotic phylogenetic diversity of Hungarian deep subsurface geothermal well waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Andrea; Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Janurik, Endre; Kosáros, Tünde; Pekár, Ferenc; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    Geothermal wells characterized by thermal waters warmer than 30°C can be found in more than 65% of the area of Hungary. The examined thermal wells located nearby Szarvas are used for heating industrial and agricultural facilities because of their relatively high hydrocarbon content. The aim of this study was to reveal the prokaryotic community structure of the water of SZR18, K87 and SZR21 geothermal wells using molecular cloning methods and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Water samples from the outflow pipes were collected in 2012 and 2013. The phylogenetic distribution of archaeal molecular clones was very similar in each sample, the most abundant groups belonged to the genera Methanosaeta, Methanothermobacter and Thermofilum. In contrast, the distribution of bacterial molecular clones was very diverse. Many of them showed the closest sequence similarities to uncultured clone sequences from similar thermal environments. From the water of the SZR18 well, phylotypes closely related to genera Fictibacillus and Alicyclobacillus (Firmicutes) were only revealed, while the bacterial diversity of the K87 well water was much higher. Here, the members of the phyla Thermodesulfobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospira, Chlorobi, OP1 and OPB7 were also detected besides Firmicutes.

  17. Numerical comparison between deep water and intermediate water depth expressions applied to a wave energy converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Beirão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The energy that can be captured from the sea waves and converted into electricity should be seen as a contribution to decrease the excessive dependency and growing demand of fossil fuels. Devices suitable to harness this kind of renewable energy source and convert it into electricity—wave energy converters (WECs—are not yet commercially competitive. There are several types of WECs, with different designs and working principles. One possible classification is their distance to the shoreline and thus their depth. Near-shore devices are one of them since they are typically deployed at intermediate water depth (IWD. The selection of the WEC deployment site should be a balance between several parameters; water depth is one of them. Another way of classifying WECs is grouping them by their geometry, size and orientation. Considering a near-shore WEC belonging to the floating point category, this paper is focused on the numerical study about the differences arising in the power captured from the sea waves when the typical deep water (DW assumption is compared with the more realistic IWD consideration. Actually, the production of electricity will depend, among other issues, on the depth of the deployment site. The development of a dynamic model including specific equations for the usual DW assumption as well as for IWD is also described. Derived equations were used to build a time domain simulator (TDS. Numerical results were obtained by means of simulations performed using the TDS. The objective is to simulate the dynamic behavior of the WEC due to the action of sea waves and to characterize the wave power variations according with the depth of the deployment site.

  18. Reducing production of taste and odor by deep-living cyanobacteria in drinking water reservoirs by regulation of water level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming; Jia, Dongmin; Yu, Jianwei; Vogt, Rolf D; Wang, Jingshi; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Abatement and control of algae, producing toxins and creating taste & odor (T&O) in drinking water sources, is a major challenge for water supply. In this study we proposed a strategy based on water level regulation for the control of odor-producing cyanobacteria in source water. Miyun Reservoir, the main surface water source for Beijing, has been suffering from 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) induced T&O problems caused by deep-living Planktothrix sp. since 2002. The biomass of deep-living Planktothrix in Miyun Reservoir was found to be mainly governed by the water depth above its sediment habitat. An algorithm for water level regulation aiming to minimize the risk for T&O in different types of reservoirs is proposed. The study demonstrates that risk for T&O can be minimized by increasing the water level in Miyun Reservoir. The high-risk area can be reduced by about 2.91% (0.61% to 5.76%) of surface area for each meter increase in the water level, when the water level is lower than 145m. More specifically, the water level needs to be raised to higher than 147.7ma.s.l. from 131.0m in order to obtain an acceptable risk level (ARL) of 10%. This management strategy to abate T&O problems is simpler and cheaper to implement compared to traditional physical, chemical and biological techniques. Moreover, it has no apparent negative impact on water quality and aquatic organisms.

  19. Deep water dissolution in Marine Isotope Stage 3 from the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.

    2015-12-01

    The production, transport, deposition, and dissolution of carbonate profoundly implicate the global carbon cycle affect the inventory and distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (ALK), which drive atmospheric CO2 change on glacial-interglacial timescale. the process may provide significant clues for improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the global climate system. In this study, we calculate and analyze the foraminiferal dissolution index (FDX) and the fragmentation ratios of planktonic foraminifera over 60-25 ka based on samples from 17924 and ODP 1144 in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS) to reconstruct the deep water carbonate dissolution during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3). Result shows that the dissolution of carbonate increases gradually at 17924 but keeps stable at ODP 1144. The changes of FDX coincidence with that of fragmentation ratios at 17924 and ODP 1144 suggest both indexes can be used as reliable dissolving proxies of planktonic foraminifera. Comparing FDX and fragmentation ratios at both sites, we find the FDX and fragmentation ratios at 17924 are higher than those at 1144, indicating that carbonate dissolution is intenser in 17924 core during MIS 3. The increasing total percentage of both N. dutertrei and G. bulloides during MIS 3 reveals the rising primary productivity that may lead to deep water [CO32-] decrease. The slow down of thermohaline circulation may increase deep water residence time and accelerate carbonate dissolution. In addition, the covering of ice caps, iron supply and increased surface-water stratification also contribute to atmosphere CO2 depletion and [CO32-] decrease in deep water. In the meanwhile, regression result from colder temperature increases the input of ALK and DIC to the deep ocean and deepens the carbonate saturation depth, which makes the deep water [CO32-] rise. In ODP Site 1144, the decrease in [CO32-] caused by more CO2 restored in deep water is equal to the increase in

  20. Cardiorespiratory responses during deep water running with and without horizontal displacement at different cadences

    OpenAIRE

    A.C. Kanitz; G.V. Liedtke; Pinto, S.S.; C.L. Alberton; L.F.M. Kruel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the cardiorespiratory responses during deep water running with and without displacement at different cadences. Methods: Twelve young women performed deep water running with and without displacement during 4 min at three separate cadences: (a) 60 bpm; (b) 80 bpm; and (c) 100 bpm. The heart rate (HR), ventilation (Ve) and oxygen uptake (VO2) were collected in the last minute of each test. Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was used with Bonferroni's post hoc test (p 

  1. Sedimentary evolution models of Lower Triassic deep-water carbonate rocks of west Qinling Mts.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晋慧娟; 李育慈

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of Lower Triassic deep-water carbonate rock sequence of west Qinling Mts . deep-water carbonate rock sequence is divided into lower fine-grain euxinic deposits of a carbonate gentle slope type and upper bathyal and abyssal sediments of carbonate steep slope type. The upper member is emphatically analysed and synthesized into five fades associations. They comprise four fining- and thinning-upward megacycles, each of them representing a sedimentary column which accumulated after a tensional fault subsidence event, which recorded a whole rifting process of west Qinling ocean trough during Lower Triassic.

  2. The persistence of oceans on Earth-like planets: insights from the deep-water cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a series of models for the deep water cycle on super-Earths experiencing plate tectonics. The deep water cycle can be modeled through parameterized convection models coupled with a volatile recycling model. The convection of the silicate mantle is linked to the volatile cycle through the water-dependent viscosity. Important differences in surface water content are found for different parameterizations of convection. Surface oceans are smaller and more persistent for single layer convection, rather than convection by boundary layer instability. Smaller planets have initially larger oceans but also return that water to the mantle more rapidly than larger planets. Super-Earths may therefore be less habitable in their early years than smaller planets, but their habitability (assuming stable surface conditions), will persist much longer.

  3. Deep-water longline fishing has reduced impact on Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christopher K; Diogo, Hugo; Menezes, Gui; Porteiro, Filipe; Braga-Henriques, Andreia; Vandeperre, Frederic; Morato, Telmo

    2014-04-29

    Bottom trawl fishing threatens deep-sea ecosystems, modifying the seafloor morphology and its physical properties, with dramatic consequences on benthic communities. Therefore, the future of deep-sea fishing relies on alternative techniques that maintain the health of deep-sea ecosystems and tolerate appropriate human uses of the marine environment. In this study, we demonstrate that deep-sea bottom longline fishing has little impact on vulnerable marine ecosystems, reducing bycatch of cold-water corals and limiting additional damage to benthic communities. We found that slow-growing vulnerable species are still common in areas subject to more than 20 years of longlining activity and estimate that one deep-sea bottom trawl will have a similar impact to 296-1,719 longlines, depending on the morphological complexity of the impacted species. Given the pronounced differences in the magnitude of disturbances coupled with its selectivity and low fuel consumption, we suggest that regulated deep-sea longlining can be an alternative to deep-sea bottom trawling.

  4. Geology as destiny: cold waters run deep in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally. Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The summer of 2001 brought the second-worst drought on record in Oregon, resulting in historically low streamflows and reservoir levels, stressed aquatic ecosystems, and even dramatic confrontations between irrigators and federal resource agencies in the Klamath basin. These events underscore the critical and growing importance of water availability and allocation in...

  5. America’s Water Future and Deep Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    and other Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), radium, thorium , and uranium.60 These substances are considered to be health...and arsenic and/or Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), radium, thorium and uranium then migrate into USDW supplies.62 The opportunity...definitive scientific proof linking exposure of HF chemicals in water to human disease. Two factors determine biological human impact; toxicity and

  6. Global rates of marine sulfate reduction and implications for sub-sea-floor metabolic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Marshall W.; Mogollón, José M.; Kasten, Sabine; Zabel, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Sulfate reduction is a globally important redox process in marine sediments, yet global rates are poorly quantified. We developed an artificial neural network trained with 199 sulfate profiles, constrained with geomorphological and geochemical maps to estimate global sulfate-reduction rate distributions. Globally, 11.3 teramoles of sulfate are reduced yearly (~15% of previous estimates), accounting for the oxidation of 12 to 29% of the organic carbon flux to the sea floor. Combined with global cell distributions in marine sediments, these results indicate a strong contrast in sub-sea-floor prokaryote habitats: In continental margins, global cell numbers in sulfate-depleted sediment exceed those in the overlying sulfate-bearing sediment by one order of magnitude, whereas in the abyss, most life occurs in oxic and/or sulfate-reducing sediments.

  7. The CMEKF Method for Sub-Sea Pipeline Monitoring and Leak Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白莉; 岳前进; 崔莉; 李洪升; 金兆玉; 王庆国

    2004-01-01

    A practical approach is discussed for sub-sea pipeline monitoring and leak detection based on the real time transient model (RTTM). The characteristic method (CM) of transient simulation is coupled with the Extended Kalman Filter(EKF) to estimate the system state where the only observed data are inlet and outlet flow rate and pressure. Because EKF has a time variant track under the non-stationary stochastic process with additive Gaussian noise, the high sensitivity of RTTM to non-stationary operating condition is reduced. A leak location recursion estimation formula is presented based on the real time observed data. The results of 27 groups of test data indicate that the procedure presented is sensitive to a wide range of detectable leak sizes ( 1.5% ~ 57% of inlet flow rate) and has a low average relative error of leak location(<5%).

  8. Clean subglacial access: prospects for future deep hot-water drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinson, Keith; Pearce, David; Hodgson, Dominic A; Bentley, Michael J; Smith, Andrew M; Tranter, Martyn; Rose, Mike; Ross, Neil; Mowlem, Matt; Parnell, John; Siegert, Martin J

    2016-01-28

    Accessing and sampling subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, drilling down to this environment must conform to international agreements on environmental stewardship and protection, making clean hot-water drilling the most viable option. Such a drill, and its water recovery system, must be capable of accessing significantly greater ice depths than previous hot-water drills, and remain fully operational after connecting with the basal hydrological system. The Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) project developed a comprehensive plan for deep (greater than 3000 m) subglacial lake research, involving the design and development of a clean deep-ice hot-water drill. However, during fieldwork in December 2012 drilling was halted after a succession of equipment issues culminated in a failure to link with a subsurface cavity and abandonment of the access holes. The lessons learned from this experience are presented here. Combining knowledge gained from these lessons with experience from other hot-water drilling programmes, and recent field testing, we describe the most viable technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into SLE and other deep subglacial access targets.

  9. Distinctive Microbial Community Structure in Highly Stratified Deep-Sea Brine Water Columns

    KAUST Repository

    Bougouffa, Salim

    2013-03-29

    Atlantis II and Discovery are two hydrothermal and hypersaline deep-sea pools in the Red Sea rift that are characterized by strong thermohalo-stratification and temperatures steadily peaking near the bottom. We conducted comprehensive vertical profiling of the microbial populations in both pools and highlighted the influential environmental factors. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes revealed shifts in community structures vis-à-vis depth. High diversity and low abundance were features of the deepest convective layers despite the low cell density. Surprisingly, the brine interfaces had significantly higher cell counts than the overlying deep-sea water, yet they were lowest in diversity. Vertical stratification of the bacterial populations was apparent as we moved from the Alphaproteobacteria-dominated deep sea to the Planctomycetaceae- or Deferribacteres-dominated interfaces to the Gammaproteobacteria-dominated brine layers. Archaeal marine group I was dominant in the deep-sea water and interfaces, while several euryarchaeotic groups increased in the brine. Across sites, microbial phylotypes and abundances varied substantially in the brine interface of Discovery compared with Atlantis II, despite the near-identical populations in the overlying deep-sea waters. The lowest convective layers harbored interestingly similar microbial communities, even though temperature and heavy metal concentrations were very different. Multivariate analysis indicated that temperature and salinity were the major influences shaping the communities. The harsh conditions and the low-abundance phylotypes could explain the observed correlation in the brine pools.

  10. DP systems for offshore vessel positioning in deep water

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Current industry practices and the suggestions from the literature are that offshore oil exploration and production activities will move into deeper water further from shore. To achieve that, dynamic positioning systems are indispensible. In the past 5 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of offshore installations equipped with DP systems. This thesis is focused on comprehensive characteristics, utilities, risk analysis and future trends regarding positioning systems in...

  11. A Dataset of Deep-Sea Fishes Surveyed by Research Vessels in the Waters around Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Tsao Shao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of deep-sea fish fauna is hampered by a lack of data due to the difficulty and high cost incurred in its surveys and collections. Taiwan is situated along the edge of the Eurasia fig, at the junction of three Large Marine Ecosystems or Ecoregions of the East China Sea, South China Sea and the Philippines. As nearly two-thirds of its surrounding marine ecosystems are deep-sea environments, Taiwan is expected to hold a rich diversity of deep-sea fish. However, in the past, no research vessels were employed to collect fish data on site. Only specimens, caught by bottom trawl fishing in the waters hundreds of meters deep and missing precise locality information, were collected from Dasi and Donggang fishing harbors. Began in 2001, with the support of National Science Council, research vessels were made available to take on the task of systematically collecting deep-sea fish specimens and occurrence records in the waters surrounding Taiwan. By the end of 2006, a total of 3,653 specimens, belonging to 26 orders, 88 families, 198 genera and 366 species, were collected in addition to data such as sampling site geographical coordinates and water depth, and fish body length and weight. The information, all accessible from the “Database of Taiwan’s Deep-Sea Fauna and Its Distribution (http://deepsea.biodiv.tw/” as part of the “Fish Database of Taiwan,” can benefit the study of temporal and spatial changes in distribution and abundance of fish fauna in the context of global deep-sea biodiversity.

  12. Habitat, Fauna, and Conservation of Florida's Deep-Water Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J. K.; Pomponi, S. A.; Messing, C. G.; Brooke, S.

    2008-05-01

    Various types of deep-water coral habitats are common off the southeastern United States from the Blake Plateau through the Straits of Florida to the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Expeditions in the past decade with the Johnson-Sea- Link manned submersibles, ROVs, and AUVs have discovered, mapped and compiled data on the status, distribution, habitat, and biodiversity for many of these relatively unknown deep-sea coral ecosystems. We have discovered over three hundred, high relief (15-152-m tall) coral mounds (depth 700-800 m) along the length of eastern Florida (700 km). The north Florida sites are rocky lithoherms, whereas the southern sites are primarily classic coral bioherms, capped with dense 1-2 m tall thickets of Lophelia pertusa and Enallopsammia profunda. Off southeastern Florida, the Miami Terrace escarpment (depth 300-600 m) extends nearly 150 km as a steep, rocky slope of Miocene-age phosphoritic limestone, which provides habitat for a rich biodiversity of fish and benthic invertebrates. Off the Florida Keys, the Pourtalès Terrace (depth 200- 460 m) has extensive high-relief bioherms and numerous deep-water sinkholes to depths of 250-610 m and diameters up to 800 m. The dominant, deep-water, colonial scleractinian corals in this region include Oculina varicosa, L. pertusa, E. profunda, Madrepora oculata, and Solenosmilia variabilis. Other coral species include hydrozoans (Stylasteridae), bamboo octocorals (Isididae), numerous other gorgonians, and black corals (Antipatharia). These structure-forming taxa provide habitat and living space for a relatively unknown but biologically rich and diverse community of crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, polychaete and sipunculan worms, and associated fishes. We have identified 142 taxa of benthic macro-invertebrates, including 66 Porifera and 57 Cnidaria. Nearly 100 species of fish have been identified to date in association with these deep-water coral habitats. Paull et al. (2000) estimated that over 40

  13. Reduced North Atlantic deep water coeval with the glacial Lake Agassiz freshwater outburst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiven, Helga Kikki Flesche; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Ninnemann, Ulysses S; Richter, Thomas O; Cortijo, Elsa

    2008-01-04

    An outstanding climate anomaly 8200 years before the present (B.P.) in the North Atlantic is commonly postulated to be the result of weakened overturning circulation triggered by a freshwater outburst. New stable isotopic and sedimentological records from a northwest Atlantic sediment core reveal that the most prominent Holocene anomaly in bottom-water chemistry and flow speed in the deep limb of the Atlantic overturning circulation begins at approximately 8.38 thousand years B.P., coeval with the catastrophic drainage of Lake Agassiz. The influence of Lower North Atlantic Deep Water was strongly reduced at our site for approximately 100 years after the outburst, confirming the ocean's sensitivity to freshwater forcing. The similarities between the timing and duration of the pronounced deep circulation changes and regional climate anomalies support a causal link.

  14. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Study of Deep Bed Corn Drying Based on Water Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept and the model of water potential, which were widely used in agricultural field, have been proved to be beneficial in the application of vacuum drying model and have provided a new way to explore the grain drying model since being introduced to grain drying and storage fields. Aiming to overcome the shortcomings of traditional deep bed drying model, for instance, the application range of this method is narrow and such method does not apply to systems of which pressure would be an influential factor such as vacuum drying system in a way combining with water potential drying model. This study established a numerical simulation system of deep bed corn drying process which has been proved to be effective according to the results of numerical simulation and corresponding experimental investigation and has revealed that desorption and adsorption coexist in deep bed drying.

  15. Rapid reductions in North Atlantic Deep Water during the peak of the last interglacial period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaasen, Eirik Vinje; Ninnemann, Ulysses S; Irvalı, Nil; Kleiven, Helga Kikki F; Rosenthal, Yair; Kissel, Catherine; Hodell, David A

    2014-03-07

    Deep ocean circulation has been considered relatively stable during interglacial periods, yet little is known about its behavior on submillennial time scales. Using a subcentennially resolved epibenthic foraminiferal δ(13)C record, we show that the influence of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was strong at the onset of the last interglacial period and was then interrupted by several prominent centennial-scale reductions. These NADW transients occurred during periods of increased ice rafting and southward expansions of polar water influence, suggesting that a buoyancy threshold for convective instability was triggered by freshwater and circum-Arctic cryosphere changes. The deep Atlantic chemical changes were similar in magnitude to those associated with glaciations, implying that the canonical view of a relatively stable interglacial circulation may not hold for conditions warmer and fresher than at present.

  16. Insight into the microbial community structure of a Norwegian deep-water coral reef environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Neufeld, Josh D.; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Hovland, Martin; Murrell, J. Colin

    2008-11-01

    Deep-water coral reefs support rich biological communities below the photic zone of fjords and continental shelves around the world. In this environment, life is enclosed within cold permanent darkness, in stark contrast to life in tropical coral reefs. We collected samples of water, sediment and a Desmacidon sp. sponge from a deep-water coral reef off the coast of Norway, and characterised bacterial communities with focus on primary producers in the dark. Following DNA extraction, PCR amplification and 16S rRNA gene library sequencing, bioinformatic analyses demonstrated significant differences between bacterial communities associated with the three samples. The finding that 50% of the clones showed cultured bacteria reflects the novel and uncharacterised diversity associated with these deep-water coral reefs. A total of 13 bacterial phyla were identified. Acidobacteria dominated the sponge library and Proteobacteria dominated the bacterioplankton and sediment libraries. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a possible new clade of sponge-associated Acidobacteria, which includes representatives from the Desmacidon sp. (Norway), Rhopaloeides odorabile (Australia) and Discodermia dissoluta (Curacao). Furthermore, the targeted recovery of a particulate methane monooxygenase ( pmoA) gene from the Desmacidon sp. DNA extract suggests that as yet uncultivated type I methanotrophs may mediate methane oxidation in this deep-water coral reef. Methanotrophs were not identified in the 16S rRNA gene libraries, but the presence of a high number (8%) of clones related to sulfide-, nitrite- and iodide-oxidising bacteria suggests chemosynthesis to be involved with maintenance of the deep-water coral reef ecosystem.

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  18. Explosive deep water basalt in the sumisu backarc rift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J; Torssander, P; Lapierre, H; Taylor, R; Kaiho, K; Koyama, M; Kusakabe, M; Aitchison, J; Cisowski, S; Dadey, K; Fujioka, K; Klaus, A; Lovell, M; Marsaglia, K; Pezard, P; Taylor, B; Tazaki, K

    1990-06-08

    Eruption of 1-million-year-old tholeiitic basalt >1800 meters below sea level (>18 megapascals) in a backarc rift behind the Bonin arc produced a scoriaceous breccia similar in some respects to that formed during subaerial eruptions. Explosion of the magma is thought to have produced frothy agglutinate which welded either on the sea floor or in a submarine eruption column. The resulting 135-meter-thick pyroclastic deposit has paleomagnetic inclinations that are random at a scale of <2.5 meters. High magmatic water content, which is about 1.3 percent by weight after vesiculation, contributed to the explosivity.

  19. Deep-water anoxygenic photosythesis in a ferruginous chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crowe, Sean; Maresca, J. A.; Jones, CarriAyne

    2014-01-01

    (OAB; 115-120 m in 2010). The size of this community is dependent on the mixing regime within the lake and the depth of the OAB-at ~117 m, the GSB live near their low-light limit. Slow growth and C-fixation rates suggest that the Lake Matano GSB can be supported by sulfide even though it only......, GSB would have contributed little to global ocean primary production, nutrient cycling, and banded iron formation (BIF) deposition in the Precambrian. Before the proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, shallower OABs and lower light absorption in the ocean's surface waters would have permitted...

  20. Design and construction of Sutong Bridge deep-water main-pylon foundations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Huixing; Ouyang Xiaoyong; He Maosheng; Nie Qinlong; Wang Xiali

    2009-01-01

    This paper, from three aspects including construction conditions, foundation design and construction, introduces some considerations in the designing of main-pylon foundations and some practical measures to deal with certain unfavorable construction conditions, such as deep water, tidal effect, soft stratum and heavy traffic, during the construction of main-pylon foundations.

  1. CCS to conduct Construction survey for China's first deep water semi-submersible drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On March 15,the grand signing ceremony on the contract between China National Offshore Oil Corp.(CNOOC)and China Classification Society(CCS)for the construction survey of deep water semi-submersible drilling unit was held at CCS Headquarters in Beijing.

  2. CCS to conduct construction survey for China's first deep water semi-submersible drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On March 15,the grand signing ceremony on the contract between China National Offshore Oil Corp.(CNOOC) and China Classification Society(CCS) for the construction survey of deep water semi-submersible drilling unit was held at CCS Headquarters in Beijing.

  3. Classification of human activity on water through micro-Dopplers using deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwook; Moon, Taesup

    2016-05-01

    Detecting humans and classifying their activities on the water has significant applications for surveillance, border patrols, and rescue operations. When humans are illuminated by radar signal, they produce micro-Doppler signatures due to moving limbs. There has been a number of research into recognizing humans on land by their unique micro-Doppler signatures, but there is scant research into detecting humans on water. In this study, we investigate the micro-Doppler signatures of humans on water, including a swimming person, a swimming person pulling a floating object, and a rowing person in a small boat. The measured swimming styles were free stroke, backstroke, and breaststroke. Each activity was observed to have a unique micro-Doppler signature. Human activities were classified based on their micro-Doppler signatures. For the classification, we propose to apply deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN), a powerful deep learning technique. Rather than using conventional supervised learning that relies on handcrafted features, we present an alternative deep learning approach. We apply the DCNN, one of the most successful deep learning algorithms for image recognition, directly to a raw micro-Doppler spectrogram of humans on the water. Without extracting any explicit features from the micro-Dopplers, the DCNN can learn the necessary features and build classification boundaries using the training data. We show that the DCNN can achieve accuracy of more than 87.8% for activity classification using 5- fold cross validation.

  4. A Three Dimensional Sea Facility for Deep and Shallow Water Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a low-cost wave tank for the testing of structures in short crested seas and current. The paddle system is of the snake type and used for the generation of both deep and shallow water waves. The quality of the waves and scale problems related to small scale tests are discussed...

  5. Development of study on the dynamic characteristics of deep water mooring system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG You-gang; ZHANG Su-xia; ZHANG Ruo-yu; LIU Hai-xiao

    2007-01-01

    To meet the needs of those exploiting deepwater resources, TLP and SPAR platforms are used in some areas and are considered excellent platforms in deep water. However, many problems remain to be resolved. The design of mooring systems is a key issue for deep water platforms. Environmental loads in deep water effect the physical characteristics of mooring line materials. The configuration and analysis of mooting systems involve nonlinearity due to this fluid-solid coupling, nonlinear hydrodynamic forces, and their effects on stability of motion. In this paper, some pivotal theories and technical questions are presented, including modeling of mooring lines, the theory and method of coupled dynamics analysis on the mooring system, and the development of methodologies for the study of nonlinear dynamics of mooring systems. Further study on mooring systems in deep water are recommended based on current knowledge, particularly dynamic parameters of different materials and cable configuration, interactions between seabed and cable, mechanisms of mooring system response induced by taut/slack mooring cables, discontinuous stiffness due to system materials, mooting construction, and motion instability, etc.

  6. Impact of deep-water fish farms on benthic macrofauna communities under different hydrodynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas; Hansen, Pia Kupka; Ervik, Arne; Bannister, Raymond J

    2015-12-30

    In this study the environmental impacts of two fish farms located over deep water (180-190 m) were compared. MC-Farm was located at a site with slightly higher water currents (mean current speed 3-5 cms(-1)) than LC-farm (fish farms should not be sited in low current areas (fish farming at slightly more dynamic sites can lead to stimulated benthic macrofauna communities and only moderate environmental impacts.

  7. A randomized controlled trial of deep water running: Clinical effectiveness of aquatic exercise to treat fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    de ASSIS, Marcos Renato; Silva, Luciana Eduardo [UNIFESP; Alves, Adriana Martins Barros [UNIFESP; Pessanha, Ana Paula [UNIFESP; Valim,Valeria; Pollak, Daniel Feldman [UNIFESP; De Barros Neto, Turibio Leite; Natour,Jamil

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To compare the clinical effectiveness of aerobic exercise in the water with walking/jogging for women with fibromyalgia (FM).Methods. Sixty sedentary women with FM, ages 18-60 years, were randomly assigned to either deep water running (DWR) or land-based exercises (LBE). Patients were trained for 15 weeks at their anaerobic threshold. Visual analog scale of pain, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Beck Depression Inventory, Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and a patient's...

  8. Hydrogeochemical signatures of thermal springs compared to deep formation water of North Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozau, Elke; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Thermal springs and hot deep formation waters can be used for geothermal energy production. Depending on the chemical composition of the used waters, geothermal power plants have to deal with scaling and corrosion effects. Therefore, the understanding of the hydrogeochemical behaviour of such waters can be helpful to enhance the efficiency of the energy production. This study is comparing hydrogeochemical characteristics of thermal springs in the Harz Mountains (North Germany) and deep formation water of the North German Basin. The Harz Mountains consist of uplifted Palaeozoic rocks, whereas the North German Basin consists of sedimentary layers of Permian, Mesozoic and Cenozoic age. Volcanic rocks are included in the Permian layers. The thickness of the sedimentary basin varies between 2 km and more than 8 km. The deep aquifers of the North German Basin are mostly not involved in the recent meteoric water cycle. Their waters have contents of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) up to about 400 g/L. Thermal springs of the Harz Mountains are situated close to the main fracture system of the region. These springs are connected to the meteoric water cycle and display lower contents of TDS (transformation (albitisation) in the thermal springs as well as in the deep formation waters. Based on today's knowledge hydrochemical and stratigraphical data from the North German Basin can be used to elucidate the geological origin of the thermal springs in the Harz Mountains. Acknowledgements. The presented data are results of the collaborative research program "gebo" (Geothermal energy and high performance drilling), financed by the Ministry of Science and Culture of the State of Lower Saxony and the company Baker Hughes.

  9. Dianeutral mixing, transformation and transport of the deep water of the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuzhu

    1999-01-01

    The realization of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) replacement in the deep northern Indian Ocean is crucial to the "conveyor belt" scheme. This was investigated with the updated 1994 Levitus climatological atlas. The study was performed on four selected neutral surfaces, encompassing the Indian deep water from 2000 to 3500 m. The Indian deep water comprises three major water masses: NADW, Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) and North Indian Deep Water (NIDW). Since NADW flowing into the southwest Indian Ocean is largely blocked by the ridges (the Madagascar Ridge in the east and Davie Ridge in the north in the Mozambique Channel) and NIDW is the only source in the northern Indian Ocean that cannot provide a large amount of volume transport, CDW has to be a major source for the Indian deep circulation and ventilation in the north. Thus the question of NADW replacement becomes that of how the advective flows of CDW from the south are changed to be upwelled flows in the north—a water-mass transformation scenario. This study considered various processes causing motion across neutral surfaces. It is found that dianeutral mixing is vital to achieve CDW transformation. Basin-wide uniform dianeutral upwelling is detected in the entire Indian deep water north of 32°S, somewhat concentrated in the eastern Indian Ocean on the lowest surface. However, the integrated dianeutral transport is quite low, about a net of 0.2 Sv (1 Sv=10 6 m 3 s -1) across the lowermost neutral surface upward and 0.4 Sv across the uppermost surface upward north of 32°S with an error band of about 10-20% when an uncertainty of half-order change in diffusivities is assumed. Given about 10-15% of rough ridge area where dianeutral diffusivity could be about one order of magnitude higher (10 -4 m 2 s -1) due to internal-wave breaking, the additional amount of increased net dianeutral transport across the lowest neutral surface is still within that error band. The averaged net upward transport in the north

  10. The Impact of a Deep-Water Plunging Breaker

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Christine; Brucker, Kyle A; Drazen, David A; Dommermuth, Douglas G; Fu, Thomas; Fullerton, Anne M; Duncan, James H

    2014-01-01

    The impact of a plunging breaking wave (wavelength approximately 1.3m) on a rigidly mounted rigid cube structure (dimension 0.31m) that is partially submerged is explored through experiments and numerical calculations. The experiments are carried out in a wave tank and the breaker is generated with a mechanical wave maker using a dispersive focusing technique. The water-surface profile upstream of the front face of the cube and in its vertical centerplane is measured using a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique. The three-dimensional flow in the wave tank is simulated directly using the Numerical Flow Analysis (NFA) code. The experiments and the calculations are used to explore the details of the wave-impact process and, in particular, the formation of the high-speed vertical jet that is found on the front face of the cube under some impact conditions.

  11. The structure and circulation of intermediate, deep and bottom water masses of the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelnitskaya, Olga

    2014-05-01

    Water mass is one of the basic concepts of oceanography. Changing the characteristics of the main water masses in the North Atlantic can be causes of climate variability. The purpose of the present study is a quantitative assessment of the characteristics of water masses using the Optimum multiparameter (OMP) analysis. OMP analysis of water masses is a continuation of the thermohaline analysis. To study water mass mixing besides temperature and salinity such advanced features as concentration of nutrients, CFCs, isotopes, Redfield ratios and potential vorticity are used. Mathematically the OMP analysis is a system of linear equations for each point of the observations. Using four parameters of the water masses one can find the ratio of five water masses in the volume of water being under investigation. To study the structure of the North Atlantic Ocean we were identified eight major water masses: 1) ABW - Antarctic Bottom Water; 2) DSOW - Denmark Strait Overflow Water; 3) ISOW - Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water; 4) LSW - Labrador Sea Water; 5) MW - Mediterranean Water; 6) AIW - Antarctic Intermediate Water; 7) SPMW - Subpolar Mode Water; 8) STMW - Subtropical Mode Water. Percentage of each water mass was calculated for each section. Upon solving equation systems a data array was performed using the algorithm written in Fortran. The calculations were performed for 12 oceanographic sections made in the North Atlantic (24-64°N) in 1980-2004. We investigated the water masses located deeper than 500 m where there are practically no seasonal changes. On analysis of the water mass percentage in the vertical water sections pathways of intermediate and deep waters can be traced. Comparison of the percentage in the different sections gives an indication of the variability in the intermediate and deep circulation. We calculated the volume of each water mass in the North Atlantic Ocean (24-64°N, 0-77°W) below 500 meters on the basis of data on the percentage of water masses

  12. Extending one-dimensional models for deep lakes to simulate the impact of submerged macrophytes on water quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachse, R.; Petzoldt, T.; Blumstock, M.; Moreira, S.; Pätzig, M.; Rücker, J.; Janse, J.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Hilt, S.

    2014-01-01

    Submerged macrophytes can stabilise clear water conditions in shallow lakes. However, many existing models for deep lakes neglect their impact. Here, we tested the hypothesis that submerged macrophytes can affect the water clarity in deep lakes. A one-dimensional, vertically resolved macrophyte mode

  13. Distribution of Quercus agrifolia mycorrhizae deep within weathered bedrock: a potential mechanism for transport of stored water

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Bornyasz; R. Graham; M. Allen

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern California, Quercus agrifolia distribution closely matches regions of granitic regolith. High annual evapotranspiration demand and inherent shallow soil conditions lead to a dependence on a deep rooting system and an ability to access water from deep within the regolith. Most of the plant available water in weathered granitic rock is...

  14. Contributions of the Siberian shelf polynyas to the Arctic Ocean intermediate and deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Seelye; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of Siberian Shelf polynyas in water mass formation, and that of Whalers Bay in the cooling of the West Spitsbergen Current, satellite observations from the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer are used to determine the size and location of polynyas for November-March, 1978-1982. If salt contributes only to the Arctic Intermediate Water, the results show that the continental shelves can produce 20-60 percent of this water. Alternatively, if the salt contributes only to the deep water of the Eurasian Basin, then without consideration of the mixing of the bottom water with the Greenland and Norwegian Sea water, the contribution from the shelves yields a renewal time of about 100 years. These results imply that there is insufficient water produced in the shelf polynyas to perform all of the roles that have historically been assigned to it.

  15. Deep-water bedforms induced by refracting Internal Solitary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Federico; Droghei, Riccardo; Casalbore, Daniele; Martorelli, Eleonora; Mosetti, Renzo; Sannino, Gianmaria; Santoleri, Rosalia; Latino Chiocci, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Subaqueous bedforms (or sand waves) are typically observed in those environments that are exposed to strong currents, characterized by a dominant unidirectional flow. However, sand-wave fields may be also observed in marine environments where no such current exists; the physical processes driving their formation are enigmatic or not well understood. We propose that internal solitary waves (ISWs), induced by tides, can produce an effective, unidirectional boundary flow filed that forms asymmetric sand waves. We test this idea by examining a sand-wave field off the Messina Strait, where we hypothesize that ISWs formed at the interface between intermediate and surface waters are refracted by topography. Hence, we argue that the deflected pattern (i.e., the depth-dependent orientation) of the sand-wave field is due to refraction of such ISWs. Combining field observations and numerical modelling, we show that ISWs can account for three key features: ISWs produce fluid velocities capable of mobilizing bottom sediments; the predicted refraction pattern resulting from the interaction of ISWs with bottom topography matches the observed deflection of the sand waves; and predicted migration rates of sand waves match empirical estimates. This work shows how ISWs may contribute to sculpting the structure of continental margins and it represents a promising link between the geological and oceanographic communities.

  16. Deep-focus earthquakes and recycling of water into the earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Charles; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    For more than 50 years, observations of earthquakes to depths of 100 to 650 kilometers inside earth have been enigmatic: at these depths, rocks are expected to deform by ductile flow rather than brittle fracturing or frictional sliding on fault surfaces. Laboratory experiments and detailed calculations of the pressures and temperatures in seismically active subduction zones indicate that this deep-focus seismicity could originate from dehydration and high-pressure structural instabilities occurring in the hydrated part of the lithosphere that sinks into the upper mantle. Thus, seismologists may be mapping the recirculation of water from the oceans back into the deep interior of the planet.

  17. Concept design and key technology of new deep-water SPAR and TLP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ The study of Concept Design and Key Technology of New DeepWater SPAR and TLP came to an end successfully after scientific and technical personnel had made two years' endeavor.The study, which was sponsored by CSIC Ship Design and Research Center Company with the participation of CSIC no 702 Institute, Shanghai LICE Company and Dalian SHI, is part of the national hi-tech study program (863), category Ocean Technology, project key technology and equipment for deep-sea oil and gas prospecting and exploration in South China Sea, subject concept design and key technology of new deepwater SPAR and TLP.

  18. High-order Boussinesq-type modelling of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we start with a review of the development of Boussinesq theory for water waves covering the period from 1872 to date. Previous reviews have been given by Dingemans,1 Kirby,2,3 and Madsen & Schäffer.4 Next, we present our most recent high-order Boussinesq-type formulation valid...... for fully nonlinear and highly dispersive waves traveling over a rapidly varying bathymetry. Finally, we cover applications of this Boussinesq model, and we study a number of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water. These include (1) Kinematics in highly nonlinear progressive deep-water waves; (2......) Kinematics in progressive solitary waves; (3) Reflection of solitary waves from a vertical wall; (4) Reflection and diffraction around a vertical plate; (5) Quartet and quintet interactions and class I and II instabilities; (6) Extreme events from focused directionally spread waveelds; (7) Bragg scattering...

  19. Analysis of Origin of Multi-Ring Basins by Theory of Deep Water Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Chun; MA Yue-Hua; CHEN Dao-Han; BAO Gang

    2008-01-01

    The tsunami model of the origin of multi-ring basins is analysed with the theory of deep water waves generated by an initial surface deformation,which is set as a parabolic crater.We obtain an approximate formula for calculating the ring radius.The formula applied to some multi-ring basins on the Moon,Mercury and Mars gives almost equidistant spacing of the rings within the main ring (the IV ring); this agrees with the previous conclusion that the IV ring marks the end of the fluidized region.Besides this,the theory of deep water waves does not require similar crustal structure at each basin-impact site on all three planets which is required in the theory of shallow water waves.

  20. High-order Boussinesq-type modelling of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we start with a review of the development of Boussinesq theory for water waves covering the period from 1872 to date. Previous reviews have been given by Dingemans,1 Kirby,2,3 and Madsen & Schäffer.4 Next, we present our most recent high-order Boussinesq-type formulation valid...... for fully nonlinear and highly dispersive waves traveling over a rapidly varying bathymetry. Finally, we cover applications of this Boussinesq model, and we study a number of nonlinear wave phenomena in deep and shallow water. These include (1) Kinematics in highly nonlinear progressive deep-water waves; (2......) Kinematics in progressive solitary waves; (3) Reflection of solitary waves from a vertical wall; (4) Reflection and diffraction around a vertical plate; (5) Quartet and quintet interactions and class I and II instabilities; (6) Extreme events from focused directionally spread waveelds; (7) Bragg scattering...

  1. Prospects of Dark Matter Direct Search under Deep Sea Water in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Singh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence from cosmological and astrophysical observations that about one quarter of the energy density of the universe can be attributed to cold dark matter (CDM, whose nature and properties are still unknown. Around the world large numbers of experiments are using different techniques of dark matter direct and indirect detections. According to their experimental requirements location of the experiment prefer to use either underground, under ice, or under sea water. In a country like India, digging underground cavern and long tunnel is not very convenient. Therefore, authors look from the other solutions of this problem preferring to use deep sea water. In this article, we discuss the pros and corns of use of deep sea water in the dark matter search.

  2. Multidecadal freshening and lightening in the deep waters of the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, Tiago S.; Kerr, Rodrigo; Mata, Mauricio M.; Garcia, Carlos A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The deep waters of the Bransfield Strait receive considerable amounts of water from the Weddell Sea continental shelf. The restricted connections to the surrounding ocean and relatively easier access makes the Bransfield Strait an important proxy region for monitoring changes in the dense Weddell Sea shelf water masses, which are an important precursor of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Long-term hydrographic data from the period 1960s-2010s showed freshening and lightening of the deep water masses of the Bransfield Strait, which was likely caused by large freshwater inputs originating from the western shelf of the Weddell Sea. The rates of freshening and lightening were -0.0010 ± 0.0005 yr-1 and -0.0016 ± 0.0014 kg m-3 yr-1 for the central basin, respectively, and -0.0010 ± 0.0006 yr-1 and -0.0029 ± 0.0013 kg m-3 yr-1 for the eastern basin, respectively. The deep waters showed a high degree of interannual thermohaline variability, which appeared to be caused by changes in the proportions of source water mass mixing between the years. Statistically significant negative correlations between salinity/neutral density fields and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) were observed (-0.56 and -0.62 for the central basin, respectively, and -0.58 and -0.68 for the eastern basin, respectively) between 1980 and 2014. During SAM positive phases, communication between the Weddell Sea and the Bransfield Strait is reduced, which leads to less saline and lighter water masses in the Bransfield Strait; however, the opposite trends are observed during SAM negative phases.

  3. Property changes of deep and bottom waters in the Western Tropical Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrford, Josefine; Brandt, Peter; Zenk, Walter

    2017-06-01

    The flow of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) contributes to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Changes in the associated water mass formation might impact the deep ocean's capacity to take up anthropogenic CO2 while a warming of the deep ocean significantly contributes to global sea level rise. Here we compile historic and recent shipboard measurements of hydrography and velocity to provide a comprehensive view of water mass distribution, pathways, along-path transformation and long-term temperature changes of NADW and AABW in the western South and Equatorial Atlantic. We confirm previous results which show that the northwest corner of the Brazil Basin represents a splitting point for the southward/northward flow of NADW/AABW. The available measurements sample water mass transformation along the two major routes for deep and bottom waters in the tropical to South Atlantic - along the deep western boundary and eastward, parallel to the equator - as well as the hot-spots of extensive mixing. We find lower NADW and lighter AABW to form a highly interactive transition layer in the northern Brazil Basin. The AABW north of 5°S is relatively homogeneous with only lighter AABW being able to pass through the Equatorial Channel (EQCH) into the North Atlantic. Spanning a period of 26 years, our data also allow an estimation of long-term temperature trends in abyssal waters. We find a warming of 2.5±0.7•10-3 °C yr-1 of the waters in the northern Brazil Basin at temperatures colder than 0.6 °C throughout the period 1989-2014 and can relate this warming to a thinning of the dense AABW layer. Whereas isopycnal heave is the dominant effect which defines the vertical distribution of temperature trends on isobars, we also find temperature changes on isopycnals in the lower NADW and AABW layers. There temperatures on isopycnals exhibit decadal variations with warming in the 1990s and cooling in the 2000s - the contributions to the

  4. Horizontal single-trip gravel pack and selective simulation system for deep water extended reach wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda, Francisco [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Vilela, Alvaro; Montanha, Roberto; Acosta, Marco; Farias, Rodrigo [BJ Services do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Most of the reservoirs located in the deep water and ultra-deep water offshore South America are described as unconsolidated sandstone that require sand control on both producers and water injection wells. Horizontal Open Hole Gravel Pack completions are the preferred method of development. If completing heavy oil reservoirs, there is a necessity of longer horizontal open hole sections. Low fracture gradients may limit the length of gravel pack in the open hole section because of the pressure increase during the Beta wave proppant deposition phase. This system allows the gravel pack assembly to be installed and the gravel pack to be pumped during the alpha and beta wave deposition phases without the limitation of high pressures that could fracture the well. The benefits of the Horizontal Single-Trip Gravel Pack and Selective Stimulation System (HSTSSS) using the differential valve include the ability to complete longer horizontal intervals, valuable rig-time savings and, efficient mechanical diversion of the stimulation fluid. This paper outlines the application of the HSTSSS system using a differential valve to complete a horizontal well in offshore deep waters. The need for a differential valve is primarily in horizontal gravel packing operations when normal circulating rates and pressures around the open hole would exceed formation break down pressure. The valve is intended to be easily spaced out and run in the wash pipe. At a predetermined differential pressure the valve opens and the return flow path distance around the bottom of the tailpipe is shortened, thus reducing back pressure preventing filter cake damage without slowing the pump rate. In addition the said valve has to close to allow the selective stimulation to take place. Economic considerations along with completion efficiencies are especially important on deep water, subsea completions. The utilization of differential valves allows completion of extended-reach open hole wells and/or low fracture

  5. Nonlinear Creep Model for Deep Rock under High Stress and High Pore Water Pressure Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yuanguang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional triaxial compression creep experiments for deep sandstone under high confining pressure and high pore water pressure were carried out, in order to predict the creep response of deep rock under these conditions. A nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic creep constitutive model was proposed based on the experimental results. The theory of component model was used as a basis for the formulation of this model. First, by using mathematical fitting and analogy, a new nonlinear viscous component was introduced based on the properties of the creep curves during the tertiary stage. Second, a timer component to judge whether the creep can get into the tertiary stage was presented. Finally, a nonlinear creep model was proposed. Results showed good agreement between theory curves from the nonlinear creep model and experimental data. This model can be applied to predict deep rock creep responses under high stress and high pore water pressure conditions. Hence, the obtained conclusions in this study are beneficial to deep rock engineering.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide in deep waters from the Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Mark J.; Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2017-03-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present ubiquitously in marine surface waters where it is a reactive intermediate in the cycling of many trace elements. Photochemical processes are considered the dominant natural H2O2 source, yet cannot explain nanomolar H2O2 concentrations below the photic zone. Here, we determined the concentration of H2O2 in full depth profiles across three ocean basins (Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans). To determine the accuracy of H2O2 measurements in the deep ocean we also re-assessed the contribution of interfering species to ‘apparent H2O2’, as analysed by the luminol based chemiluminescence technique. Within the vicinity of coastal oxygen minimum zones, accurate measurement of H2O2 was not possible due to interference from Fe(II). Offshore, in deep (>1000 m) waters H2O2 concentrations ranged from 0.25 ± 0.27 nM (Mediterranean, Balearics-Algeria) to 2.9 ± 2.2 nM (Mediterranean, Corsica-France). Our results indicate that a dark, pelagic H2O2 production mechanism must occur throughout the deep ocean. A bacterial source of H2O2 is the most likely origin and we show that this source is likely sufficient to account for all of the observed H2O2 in the deep ocean.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide in deep waters from the Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Mark J.; Rapp, Insa; Schlosser, Christian; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present ubiquitously in marine surface waters where it is a reactive intermediate in the cycling of many trace elements. Photochemical processes are considered the dominant natural H2O2 source, yet cannot explain nanomolar H2O2 concentrations below the photic zone. Here, we determined the concentration of H2O2 in full depth profiles across three ocean basins (Mediterranean Sea, South Atlantic and South Pacific Oceans). To determine the accuracy of H2O2 measurements in the deep ocean we also re-assessed the contribution of interfering species to ‘apparent H2O2’, as analysed by the luminol based chemiluminescence technique. Within the vicinity of coastal oxygen minimum zones, accurate measurement of H2O2 was not possible due to interference from Fe(II). Offshore, in deep (>1000 m) waters H2O2 concentrations ranged from 0.25 ± 0.27 nM (Mediterranean, Balearics-Algeria) to 2.9 ± 2.2 nM (Mediterranean, Corsica-France). Our results indicate that a dark, pelagic H2O2 production mechanism must occur throughout the deep ocean. A bacterial source of H2O2 is the most likely origin and we show that this source is likely sufficient to account for all of the observed H2O2 in the deep ocean. PMID:28266529

  8. Numerical Analysis of Deteriorated Sub-sea Pipelines under Environmental Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GÜCÜYEN Engin

    2015-01-01

    The significant point is the bidirectional interaction technique in FSI analysis while investigating subsea corrosion effect. By this way, pipe environment is accurately modelled and fluid effects are also considered. The effect of external corrosion defects on structural behaviour of a pipeline is studied by creating a nonlinear numerical model based on the finite element method according to ABAQUS analysis program. Corrosion losses of sections are obtained from experimental results and applied to the model. Numerical model is formed by a span of sub-sea pipeline that is subjected to environmental loads. Seismic and wind-generated irregular wave loads are considered as environmental loads. Irregular wave is represented with equivalent eight regular waves via FFT. The pipe is modelled according to two different types which are non-corroded(intact) and corroded (deteriorated) to demonstrate corrosion effects on it. The visible type of corrosion in marine environment is named ‘pitting’ corrosion, in which the material loss is locally interpenetrated over the surface. By considering this situation, the corroded and non-corroded pipes are modelled as 3D solid elements. The main point is revealing how the subsea corrosion affects the structural behaviour of pipelines on the basis of implementation of experimental results to a model structure due to changes of stresses and displacement.

  9. Warming in Arctic intermediate and deep waters around Chukchi Plateau and its adjacent regions in 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Jinping; GAO; Guoping

    2005-01-01

    Based on the data measured during Arctic scientific expedition of China in 1999, the characteristics of temperature and salinity distributions around the Chukchi Plateau and its adjacent regions have been studied. It was found that the intermediate water with temperature higher than 0.5℃ existed in all parts of a 640 km section with a maximum temperature of 0.85℃ indicating a strong signal of the warming in Arctic Intermediate Water in 1999. Two important phenomena are described in this paper. First, the temperature of warm water was horizontally nonuniform. In the area of Chukchi Plateau, the temperature was higher, the layer of warm water was thicker and the depth of the warm water core was shallower than those in the area of continental slope. The horizontal nonuniformity of the temperature distribution of warming water implies that the upward heat flux should also be nonuniform, thus exerting different effects on sea ice thickness, ice extent, and air-sea heat exchange. The mechanism to generate higher temperature in the plateau region was the bypassing of current around the plateau area caused by the special local topography, which restricted water exchange across the plateau and conserved heat in the water body. Second, the deep water down to 1400 m was also warming with a temperature increase of 0.2℃. The warming in deep water reflects the occurrence of complicated heat redistribution processes in the intermediate water, which altered the thermal structure in the upper 1400 m. The warming data embody the obvious impact of global climate change on the Arctic Ocean and further studies are wanted.

  10. Mapping cold seeps with high-resolution deep water multibeam echosounders in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintersteller, P.; dos Santos Ferreira, C.; Klaucke, I.; Ivanov, M.; Sahling, H.; Bohrmann, G.

    2011-12-01

    Cold seeps are locations at the seafloor where gas and/or fluids are emitting. In contrast to mud volcanoes, which distinctly change the seafloor morphology, cold seeps often lack significant relief. However, in comparison with surrounding sediments seep locations on the sea floor are often characterized by high acoustic backscatter intensity. This was documented during several investigations with deep towed side-scan sonar (SSS) systems in recent years. Authigenic carbonates, free gas and gas hydrates, as evidenced by ground truthing, are responsible for the high backscatter values. Last year's upgrade of the 1°x2° KONGSBERG deep water echosounder EM120 to EM122 on RV Meteor enhanced the system to almost 4 times the previous resolution due to multi-ping and high density signal processing. Based on the physics of sound propagation in the water column, multibeam echosounders (MBES) for deep water use relatively low frequencies of about 12-15 kHz. Apparently highly water-saturated sediments are penetrated by these signals and can cause artificial offsets in bottom detection in comparison to high-frequency echosounders. Nevertheless the effect of the slightly penetrating signal has a useful side effect on the backscatter. Investigations on several seep sites in the Black Sea, carried out with both EM122 and EM710 during Meteror cruise M84-2, resulted in maps of remarkable bathymetric resolution but also showed multibeam backscatter information of a 12 kHz signal to be an excellent tool to map seep-influenced seafloor areas. New seep locations have been mapped in regions of the western Turkish continental margin close to Eregli and of the eastern Turkish margin off Samsun. In both areas high backscatter patches were mapped with nearly comparable resolution as achieved by deep-tow SSS systems. At Eregli the new data is compared with data from a deep-towed EdgeTech SSS system recorded with a frequency of 75 kHz. At Samsun the results are compared with data from a MAK-1

  11. Dynamic Autoinoculation and the Microbial Ecology of a deep Water Hydrocarbon Irruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    fundamental principles of chemistry , microbiology, and ocean physics without the need for tuning or optimization. In light of the model’s overall success...diagnostics for mixing (16) that have not been used in previous models of deep water circu- lation (17). We defined a dairy input flux of hydrocarbons dis...daily Dux estimates of oil and natural gas from the well based on rcf. 1 and subtracted the dairy recovery volumes reported from active collection

  12. Prediction of natural gas hydrate formation region in wellbore during deep- water gas well testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-yuan; SUN Bao-jiang; WANG Xue-rui; ZHANG Zhen-nan

    2014-01-01

    Wellbore temperature field equations are established with considerations of the enthalpy changes of the natural gas during the deep-water gas well testing. A prediction method for the natural gas hydrate formation region during the deep-water gas well testing is proposed, which combines the wellbore temperature field equations, the phase equilibrium conditions of the natural gas hydrate formation and the calculation methods for the pressure field. Through the sensitivity analysis of the parameters that affect the hydrate formation region, it can be concluded that during the deep-water gas well testing, with the reduction of the gas production rate and the decrease of the geothermal gradient, along with the increase of the depth of water, the hydrate formation region in the wellbore enlarges, the hydrate formation regions differ with different component contents of natural gases, as compared with the pure methane gas, with the increase of ethane and propane, the hydrate formation region expands, the admixture of inhibitors, the type and the concentrations of which can be optimized through the method proposed in the paper, will reduce the hydrate formation region, the throttling effect will lead to the abrupt changes of temperature and pressure, which results in a variation of the hydrate formation region, if the throttling occurs in the shallow part of the wellbore, the temperature will drop too much, which enlarges the hydrate formation region, otherwise, if the throttling occurs in the deep part of the wellbore, the hydrate formation region will be reduced due to the decrease of the pressure.

  13. The Fractional Power Law of Wind Wave Growth in Deep Water for Short Fetch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Changlong; SUN Qun; Philippe Fraunie

    2002-01-01

    Combining the 3/2 power law proposed by Toba with the significant wave energy balance equation for windwaves, wave growth in deep water for short fetch is investigated. It is found that the variations of wave height and periodwith fetch have the form of power function with fractional exponents 3/8 and 1/4 respectively. Using these exponents in thepower functions and through data fitting, the concise wind wave growth relations for short fetch are obtained.

  14. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    relatively benign northeast and north central Pacific Ocean. During 2009–2011 the methods developed to study long-range, deep water broadband...These papers include results from the 2004–2005 NPAL experiment in the central North Pacific, in addition to results from the NPAL Philippine Sea...PERFORMANCE BY MAN” Award Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Facultad de Ciencias Marinas (Ensenada, Mexico) XXI Student Congress (May 14–16, 2013) W. H

  15. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part II. geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Waters with low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios (SARs) present a challenge to irrigation because they degrade soil structure and infiltration capacity. In the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, such low salinity (electrical conductivity, EC 2.1 mS cm-1) and high-SAR (54) waters are co-produced with coal-bed methane and some are used for subsurface drip irrigation(SDI). The SDI system studied mixes sulfuric acid with irrigation water and applies water year-round via drip tubing buried 92 cm deep. After six years of irrigation, SAR values between 0 and 30 cm depth (0.5-1.2) are only slightly increased over non-irrigated soils (0.1-0.5). Only 8-15% of added Na has accumulated above the drip tubing. Sodicity has increased in soil surrounding the drip tubing, and geochemical simulations show that two pathways can generate sodic conditions. In soil between 45-cm depth and the drip tubing, Na from the irrigation water accumulates as evapotranspiration concentrates solutes. SAR values >12, measured by 1:1 water-soil extracts, are caused by concentration of solutes by factors up to 13. Low-EC (-1) is caused by rain and snowmelt flushing the soil and displacing ions in soil solution. Soil below the drip tubing experiences lower solute concentration factors (1-1.65) due to excess irrigation water and also contains relatively abundant native gypsum (2.4 ± 1.7 wt.%). Geochemical simulations show gypsum dissolution decreases soil-water SAR to 14 and decreasing EC in soil water to 3.2 mS cm-1. Increased sodicity in the subsurface, rather than the surface, indicates that deep SDI can be a viable means of irrigating with sodic waters.

  16. Study on Structure of Arched Longitudinal Beams of Deep Water Wharf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High-pile and beam-slab quays have been widely used after several years development. They are mature enough to be one of the most important structural types of wharves in China coastal areas. In order to accommodate large tonnage vessels, wharves should be constructed in deep water gradually. However, conventional high-pile and beam-slab structures are hard to meet the requirements of large deep-water wharf. According to arch's stress characteristics, a new type of wharf with catenary arched longitudinal beams is presented in this paper. The new wharf structure can make full use of arch's overhead crossing and reinforced concrete compression resistance, improve the interval between transverse bents greatly, and decrease underwater construction quantity. Thus, the construction cost cab be reduced. Take the third phase project of the Yangshan Deep-water Port for example, comparative analysis on catenary arched longitudinal beams and conventional longitudinal beams has been made. The result shows that with the same wharf length and width, the same loads and same longitudinal beam moment, catenary arch structure can improve the interval between bents up to 28 m, decrease the number of piles and underwater construction quantity.

  17. Deep Mediterranean Water footprint measured in the Strait of Gibraltar during the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo Rosa, Cristina; García Lafuente, Jesús; Sammartino, Simone; Sánchez Garrido, José Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Deep Mediterranean Water is formed during winter in the Mediterranean Sea due to atmospheric cooling of salty Mediterranean waters. When it reaches the Strait of Gibraltar it finally flows westward into the Atlantic, from where it begins to descend the continental slope by gravity while it mixes with the overlying waters and becomes lighter. Far beyond the strait itself it maintains a recognizable signal and so affects the thermohaline circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. Thus, the Strait of Gibraltar is the perfect site to monitor the interannual changes occurring over the whole Mediterranean Sea just before Mediterranean Waters incorporate to the Atlantic circulation. From October 2004 until today the Temperature and Salinity of the Mediterranean outflow through the Strait of Gibraltar have been monitored, resulting in a long-term temporal series with more than 11 years of measurements. A Conductivity-Temperature sensor is placed around 12 meters above the seafloor in the Espartel Sill (35°56'N 5°45'W), the last constriction the Mediterranean deep water finds before leaving the Mediterranean, and is configured to take measurements every 30 minutes. The instrument has been collecting data almost continuously from 2004, except for a 2.5 month gap in 2009 and a 5 months gap during 2011. This record allows the study of the long-term trend and the interannual changes occurring over the whole Mediterranean during the last 11 years. First results show a mean temperature of the deep Mediterranean waters of 13.20±0.06 °C and a mean salinity of 38.39±0.02. It is noteworthy the cold signals registered in 2006 and 2013, which could be the result of the severe winters of 2005 and 2012 in Europe, and the positive trend in 2015 toward warmer values. No significant trends have been found for the whole period. On the other hand, the time series exhibits a noticeable interannual variability that merits a deeper analysis.

  18. APL-UW Deep Water Propagation: Philippine Sea Signal Physics and North Pacific Ambient Noise and NPANL Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    APL-UW Deep Water Propagation: Philippine Sea Signal Physics and North Pacific Ambient Noise and NPANL Support Rex K. Andrew Principal...signals evolve during propagation through a dynamically-varying deep ocean, and how the oceanic ambient noise field varies throughout deep ocean...specifically the Philippine Sea. The second objective is to continue an 18-year long experiment utilizing the North Pacific Ambient Noise Laboratory to

  19. Methane emission from sub-sea permafrost in the East Siberian Arctic shelf: model-based evaluation of potential impact on global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, O. A.; Lavrov, S. A.; Borzenkova, I. I.

    2011-12-01

    Several recent publications suggest that the observed high concentration of methane over the East Siberian Shelf (ESS) may be attributed to thawing and increased gas permeability (through taliks) of the sub-sea permafrost. Methane is released from unstable gas hydrates and propagates through newly formed taliks in the bottom sediments to the water and further to the atmosphere. Under sustained warming in the following decades it may have potentially dramatic effect on global climate. In this study we examine this hypothesis using comprehensive modelling approach. Direct observations indicate that since the mid-1980s bottom waters over the ESS warmed by ca. 2.1°C. We used the model to examine whether such changes may have caused substantial degradation of methane bearing sub-sea permafrost and CH4 supersaturation of the ESS sea waters. The model is based on the heat transfer equation and explicitly accounts for the effect of salt diffusion in the bottom sediments by coupling the thermal and mass fluxes. We forced the model by the prescribed seasonal bottom water temperature and salinity to calculate changes in the thermal state of permafrost after the inundation of the ESS, and to predict the changes in the following 1000 years. We used a climate scenario suggesting that at the time of inundation (ca 8 Ky BP) the top sediment layer warmed by ca. 12 °C from -13.5 °C (mean annual air temperature) to -1.5 °C (bottom water temperature). Afterwards temperature remained unchanged until 1985. Since then in accord with modern observations we imposed 0.09°C/year trend until 2100, and prescribed temperature to constant value of 11.5 °C afterwards. The rate of temperature change in the 21st century in this highly schematic scenario by far exceeds all IPCC projections. We did it intentionally to explore the most extreme pathway for potential sub-see permafrost degradation underneath the ESS. Model results indicated ca 1 m deepening of the upper sub-sea permafrost boundary

  20. Vibration mechanism research of large-scale and deep-water caisson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Haihua; Han Jingjing

    2011-01-01

    According to the construction method of Taizhou Bridge, numerical simulation is conducted to analyze the vibration of caisson under wind and water flows to determine the main factors of the caisson vibration. Meanwhile, the localization system of caissons and anchors of Taizhou Bridge is modeled in order to summarize the vibration mechanism of caissons under deep-water and jet-flow condition, and further pertinent vibration-control measures are proposed. The obtained results are well verified in engineering practice, and consequently the safety risk of positioning the caisson is reduced.

  1. Pliocene and Pleistocene chronostratigraphy and paleoenvironment of the Central Arctic Ocean, using deep water agglutinated foraminifera

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J. R.; Kaminski, M.A

    1998-01-01

    Deep-water agglutinated foraminifera (DWAF) were studied from Cores PS2177-5, PS2200-5, PS2212-3 and PS2185-6; from the R/V POLARSTERN ARK-VIII/3 Cruise in the central Arctic Ocean. The sediments were non-calcareous containing a sparse assemblage of eleven DWAF species. A chronostratigraphic framework is presented for Cores PS2200-5 and PS2185-6. Paleoenvironmental data suggests a bathyal environment (2000-4000m) affected by water masses in the Arctic Ocean. The taxonomy of all of the DWAF fo...

  2. Offshore support vessel developments for deep water oil and gas E and P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dielen, Baldo A.M. [SMIT, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The worldwide trend to move towards more exposed locations and deeper waters for O and G exploration and production activities resulted in an increased need for larger and more powerful tugs and offshore support vessels. These vessels must meet higher operational requirements under higher wind and sea-state conditions. This market-driven need, together with technological developments, is leading towards a new generation of powerful and sophisticated offshore support vessels (OSV's). This paper will describe the actual and future trends in OSV design for deep water offshore use. (author)

  3. Optimal Duration of Submersible Pump Equipped Deep Water Borehole Project in Ikwuano, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwankwojike, B. Nduka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimal duration for constructing a submersible pump equipped deep water borehole in Ikwuano and optimal durations of distinct jobs in this project were determined to aid effective planning and implementation of borehole projects in this area. The investigation was conducted and analyzed using network modeling procedure. Results revealed 13days as the optimal duration of the borehole project when construction of overhead water distribution tank stantion constitutes part of the contract and 12days when the overhead structure is not involved. The optimal duration in hours for the distinct jobs involved in this borehole construction include 25.92 for site preparation/mobilization of geophysical survey team, 36 for geophysical analysis/selection of the best water yielding point in the site, 72 for mobilizing labour and materials to the selected site, 168 for constructing overhead water distribution tank stantion, 3.12 for placement of overhead tank(s on its stantion/installation of its water conveying pipes/accessories, 4.56 for casing/gravel packing/flushing materials preparation, 19.44 for well drilling, 1.92 for casing, 1.92 for gravel packing, 1.2 for flushing, 25.92 for water collection/analysis, 1.2 for water treatment, 13.44 for pumping test, 25.92 for platforming, 77.04 for pump installation/integration of water conveying systems, 4.8 for test running and 0.96 for training end users/project commission. Thus, a guide for effective planning to ensure adequate and timely implementation of deep borehole water supply projects in Ikwuano is set.

  4. Source and transport of human enteric viruses in deep municipal water supply wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Kenneth R; Borchardt, Mark A; Gotkowitz, Madeline; Spencer, Susan K; Zhu, Jun; Hunt, Randall J

    2013-05-07

    Until recently, few water utilities or researchers were aware of possible virus presence in deep aquifers and wells. During 2008 and 2009 we collected a time series of virus samples from six deep municipal water-supply wells. The wells range in depth from approximately 220 to 300 m and draw water from a sandstone aquifer. Three of these wells draw water from beneath a regional aquitard, and three draw water from both above and below the aquitard. We also sampled a local lake and untreated sewage as potential virus sources. Viruses were detected up to 61% of the time in each well sampled, and many groundwater samples were positive for virus infectivity. Lake samples contained viruses over 75% of the time. Virus concentrations and serotypes observed varied markedly with time in all samples. Sewage samples were all extremely high in virus concentration. Virus serotypes detected in sewage and groundwater were temporally correlated, suggesting very rapid virus transport, on the order of weeks, from the source(s) to wells. Adenovirus and enterovirus levels in the wells were associated with precipitation events. The most likely source of the viruses in the wells was leakage of untreated sewage from sanitary sewer pipes.

  5. The Deep Cool Terrestrial Biosphere: Habitability of ancient fracture waters of the Canadian Shield (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Ballentine, C. J.; Holland, G.; Li, L.; Slater, G. F.; Moser, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    Ancient saline fractures waters in Precambrian rocks of the Canadian Shield contain mM concentrations of dissolved CH4 and higher hydrocarbons, and in particular up to 7 mM H2 derived from radiolysis and/or serpentinization. At 2.8 km depths in the Mponeng gold mine in the Witwatersrand basin South Africa, similar groundwater systems host some of the deepest communities of H2-utilizing sulphate-reducing microbes yet identified, in waters with noble gas derived residence times on the order of tens of Ma [1, 2]. Such H2-rich environments, in fracture waters in gold mines in South Africa, in deep groundwaters from the Canadian and Fennoscandian Shields, in hydrothermal marine vents and terrestrial hot springs, are the focus of research programs designed to expand our understanding of the habitability of Earth. Results on the geochemistry and geobiology of these systems are providing important insights into the habitability of Mars and other planets and moons in our solar system. Despite the fact that Precambrian cratons constitute > 30% of the Earth's exposed continents, the habitability of deep saline fractures waters in these rocks has been significantly under-investigated to date. Unlike high-temperature hydrothermal systems on the seafloor or continental hot springs, where extensive fluid circulation and mixing with ocean or surface waters respectively rapidly deplete the products of water-rock reaction such as H2, the hydrogeologically isolated fracture waters in tectonically quiescent Precambrian Shield rock provide virtual 'time capsules'. Therein, despite the slower rates of water-gas-rock reactions, the products of water-rock reaction, and potential substrates for microbial life can accumulate and build up high concentrations over geologically long time scales. Recent results from a copper-zinc mine near Timmins Ontario Canada revealed free flowing fracture waters at 2.4 km below surface of an unparalleled antiquity. Coupling geochemical evidence from the

  6. Temporal and spatial evolution of the Baltic deep water renewal in spring 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Feistel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In January 2003, a deep-water renewal process in the Baltic Sea commenced with an inflow of about 200 km3 of cold and well oxygenated water from the Kattegat, half of which was of salinity >17 PSU; it is considered to be the most important inflow since 1993. Related front propagation and the ventilation of anoxic waters between the western and the central Baltic were recorded by the Darss Sill measuring mast, the Arkona Basin buoy, a subsurface mooring in the Eastern Gotland Basin, and hydrographic research cruises conducted in January, February, March, May and August 2003. Already in May, the central Gotland Basin was reached by water with near-bottom oxygen concentrations among the highest ever recorded there. A comprehensive review of the observed spatial and temporal structures together with additional background data is presented. Estimates of the intensity of the present inflow are discussed.

  7. Deep water pipe, pump, and mooring study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, T.E.; Marks, J.D.; Wellman, K.H.

    1976-06-01

    The ocean engineering issues affecting the design, construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants are of key importance. This study addressed the problems associated with the conceptual design of the deep-water pipe, cold-water-pumping, and platform mooring arrangements. These subsystems fall into a natural grouping since the parameters affecting their design are closely related to each other and to the ocean environment. Analysis and evaluations are provided with a view toward judging the impact of the various subsystems on the overall plant concept and to provide an estimate of material and construction cost. Parametric data is provided that describes mooring line configurations, mooring line loads, cold water pipe configurations, and cold water pumping schemes. Selected parameters, issues, and evaluation criteria are used to judge the merits of candidate concepts over a range of OTEC plant size from 100 MWe to 1000 MWe net output power.

  8. Asymmetric oceanic response to a hurricane: Deep water observations during Hurricane Isaac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Laura J.; DiMarco, Steven F.; Wang, Zhankun; Kuehl, Joseph J.; Brooks, David A.

    2016-10-01

    The eye of Hurricane Isaac passed through the center of an array of six deep water water-column current meter moorings deployed in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The trajectory of the hurricane provided for a unique opportunity to quantify differences in the full water-column oceanic response to a hurricane to the left and right of the hurricane trajectory. Prior to the storm passage, relative vorticity on the right side of the hurricane was strongly negative, while on the left, relative vorticity was positive. This resulted in an asymmetry in the near-inertial frequencies oceanic response at depth and horizontally. A shift in the response to a slightly larger inertial frequencies ˜1.11f was observed and verified by theory. Additionally, the storm passage coincided with an asymmetric change in relative vorticity in the upper 1000 m, which persisted for ˜15 inertial periods. Vertical propagation of inertial energy was estimated at 29 m/d, while horizontal propagation at this frequency was approximately 5.7 km/d. Wavelet analysis showed two distinct subinertial responses, one with a period of 2-5 days and another with a period of 5-12 days. Analysis of the subinertial bands reveals that the spatial and temporal scales are shorter and less persistent than the near-inertial variance. As the array is geographically located near the site of the Deep Water Horizon oil spill, the spatial and temporal scales of response have significant implications for the fate, transport, and distribution of hydrocarbons following a deep water spill event.

  9. Environmental setting of deep-water oysters in the Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooij, D.; De Mol, L.; Le Guilloux, E.; Wisshak, M.; Huvenne, V. A. I.; Moeremans, R.; Henriet, J.-P.

    2010-12-01

    We report the northernmost and deepest known occurrence of deep-water pycnodontine oysters, based on two surveys along the French Atlantic continental margin to the La Chapelle continental slope (2006) and the Guilvinec Canyon (2008). The combined use of multibeam bathymetry, seismic profiling, CTD casts and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) made it possible to describe the physical habitat and to assess the oceanographic control for the recently described species Neopycnodonte zibrowii. These oysters have been observed in vivo in depths from 540 to 846 m, colonizing overhanging banks or escarpments protruding from steep canyon flanks. Especially in the Bay of Biscay, such physical habitats may only be observed within canyons, where they are created by both long-term turbiditic and contouritic processes. Frequent observations of sand ripples on the seabed indicate the presence of a steady, but enhanced bottom current of about 40 cm/s. The occurrence of oysters also coincides with the interface between the Eastern North Atlantic Water and the Mediterranean Outflow Water. A combination of this water mass mixing, internal tide generation and a strong primary surface productivity may generate an enhanced nutrient flux, which is funnelled through the canyon. When the ideal environmental conditions are met, up to 100 individuals per m² may be observed. These deep-water oysters require a vertical habitat, which is often incompatible with the requirements of other sessile organisms, and are only sparsely distributed along the continental margins. The discovery of these giant oyster banks illustrates the rich biodiversity of deep-sea canyons and their underestimation as true ecosystem hotspots.

  10. Depleted Radiocarbon in Deep Water in the Southwest Pacific and Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, E. L.; Cook, M. S.; Elmore, A. C.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    The relative 14C ages of surface and deep marine waters reflect the balance between air-sea exchange of 14CO2 in deep-water formation areas, the radioactive decay of 14C during subsurface circulation, and the mixing between adjacent water masses. The Δ14C of the interior ocean is known to vary due to the major reorganization of circulation and CO2 sequestration associated with glacial to interglacial climate changes. Using benthic and planktonic 14C ages from deep-sea sediment cores from the southwest Pacific, east of New Zealand, we have constructed a composite depth profile of 14C ages from the late glaciation through the early deglaciation. By using regionally widespread tepha layers as independent stratigraphic markers we can estimate atmosphere- ocean Δ14C differences. Relative to the atmosphere, our estimates of the Δ14C at intermediate depths (above 1600 m) are broadly consistent with ventilation similar to today. In contrast, the Δ14C of upper and mid-depth deep water (~2000-3800 m) at several points between the late glacial and early deglaciation (24-15 ka) indicate a deep water mass with significantly lower Δ14C than we would expect for a deep circulation similar to today's. The Δ14C depletions are range from 50-500%, with the gradient between deep and intermediate waters both shallower and steeper than today. Below 3800 m, deep water Δ14C appear less depleted. Benthic-planktonic Δ14C differences at all depths show greater relative differences than modern, with the largest differences in upper deep waters. The data from these deep Pacific cores may be susceptible to biases from dissolution and/or bioturbation. However, our consistently low Δ14C estimates of deep water during the late glacial support the hypothesis that there was a 14C-depleted CO2 rich water mass in the deep Pacific Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum that was released to the atmosphere through exchange in the Southern Ocean during the deglaciation.

  11. Characteristics of the deep ocean carbon system during the past 150,000 years: SigmaCO2 distributions, deep water flow patterns, and abrupt climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, E A

    1997-08-05

    Studies of carbon isotopes and cadmium in bottom-dwelling foraminifera from ocean sediment cores have advanced our knowledge of ocean chemical distributions during the late Pleistocene. Last Glacial Maximum data are consistent with a persistent high-SigmaCO2 state for eastern Pacific deep water. Both tracers indicate that the mid-depth North and tropical Atlantic Ocean almost always has lower SigmaCO2 levels than those in the Pacific. Upper waters of the Last Glacial Maximum Atlantic are more SigmaCO2-depleted and deep waters are SigmaCO2-enriched compared with the waters of the present. In the northern Indian Ocean, delta13C and Cd data are consistent with upper water SigmaCO2 depletion relative to the present. There is no evident proximate source of this SigmaCO2-depleted water, so I suggest that SigmaCO2-depleted North Atlantic intermediate/deep water turns northward around the southern tip of Africa and moves toward the equator as a western boundary current. At long periods (>15,000 years), Milankovitch cycle variability is evident in paleochemical time series. But rapid millennial-scale variability can be seen in cores from high accumulation rate series. Atlantic deep water chemical properties are seen to change in as little as a few hundred years or less. An extraordinary new 52.7-m-long core from the Bermuda Rise contains a faithful record of climate variability with century-scale resolution. Sediment composition can be linked in detail with the isotope stage 3 interstadials recorded in Greenland ice cores. This new record shows at least 12 major climate fluctuations within marine isotope stage 5 (about 70,000-130,000 years before the present).

  12. Dynamic autoinoculation and the microbial ecology of a deep water hydrocarbon irruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, David L; Mezić, Igor; Maćešić, Senka; Črnjarić-Žic, Nelida; Ivić, Stefan; Hogan, Patrick J; Fonoberov, Vladimir A; Loire, Sophie

    2012-12-11

    The irruption of gas and oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon event fed a deep sea bacterial bloom that consumed hydrocarbons in the affected waters, formed a regional oxygen anomaly, and altered the microbiology of the region. In this work, we develop a coupled physical-metabolic model to assess the impact of mixing processes on these deep ocean bacterial communities and their capacity for hydrocarbon and oxygen use. We find that observed biodegradation patterns are well-described by exponential growth of bacteria from seed populations present at low abundance and that current oscillation and mixing processes played a critical role in distributing hydrocarbons and associated bacterial blooms within the northeast Gulf of Mexico. Mixing processes also accelerated hydrocarbon degradation through an autoinoculation effect, where water masses, in which the hydrocarbon irruption had caused blooms, later returned to the spill site with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria persisting at elevated abundance. Interestingly, although the initial irruption of hydrocarbons fed successive blooms of different bacterial types, subsequent irruptions promoted consistency in the structure of the bacterial community. These results highlight an impact of mixing and circulation processes on biodegradation activity of bacteria during the Deepwater Horizon event and suggest an important role for mixing processes in the microbial ecology of deep ocean environments.

  13. Applying ultrasonic in-line inspection technology in a deep water environment: exploring the challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielager, N.; Nadler, M.; Pieske, M.; Beller, M. [NDT Systems and Services AG, Stutensee (Germany)

    2009-12-19

    The demand for higher inspection accuracies of in-line inspection tools (ILI tools) is permanently growing. As integrity assessment procedures are being refined, detection performances, sizing accuracies and confidence levels regarding detection and sizing play an ever increasing role. ILI tools utilizing conventional ultrasound technology are at the forefront of technology and fulfill the market requirements regarding sizing accuracies and the ability to provide quantitative measurements of wall thickness as well as crack inspection capabilities. Data from ultrasonic tools is ideally suited for advanced integrity assessment applications and run comparisons. Making this technology available for a deep-water environment of heavy wall, high pressures and temperatures comes with a wide range of challenges which have to be addressed. This paper will introduce developments recently made in order to adapt and modify ultrasonic in-line inspection tools for the application in a heavy wall, high pressure and high temperature environment as encountered in deep offshore pipelines. The paper will describe necessary design modifications and new conceptual approaches especially regarding tool electronics, cables, connectors and the sensor carrier. A tool capable of deep-water inspection with a pressure bearing capability of 275 bar will be introduced and data from inspection runs will be presented. As an outlook, the paper will also discuss future inspection requirements for offshore pipelines with maximum pressure values of up to 500 bar. (author)

  14. Genetic divergence correlates with morphological and ecological subdivision in the deep-water elk kelp, Pelagophycus porra (phaeophyceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, KA; Olsen, JL; Stam, WT

    2000-01-01

    Pelagophycus porra (Leman) Setchell has a narrow distribution confined to deep water from the Channel Islands off the southern California coast to central Baja California, Mexico. Distinct morphotypes are consistently correlated with distinctive habitats, that is, windward exposures characterized by

  15. Bermuda: Search for Deep Water Caves 2009 on the R/V Endurance between 20090905 and 20090930

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deep-water marine caves are one of the Earth's last largely unexplored frontiers of undiscovered fauna (animal life). More than 150 limestone caves are known to...

  16. Cathodic protection of mild steel and copper in deep waters of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.; Wagh, A.B.

    Performance of cathodic protection system to mild steel and copper in deep (> 1000 m) oceanic waters of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal has been assessed using aluminium and mild steel sacrificial anodes. The corrosion rates of unprotected metals...

  17. Assessing the authenticity of commercial deep-sea drinking water by chemical and isotopic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tsung-Ren; Liang, Wen-Jui; Liu, Tsang-Sen; Lin, Yu-Wen; Zhan, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study combines stable isotopes and chemical elements with statistical principal component analysis (PCA) to assess the authenticity of bottled commercial drinking water desalinized from deep seawater in the Taiwan market. Isotopic results indicate that true bottled deep-sea drinking water (DSDW) exhibits about 0 ‰ for both δ(2)H and δ(18)O values, which are values similar to those of open seawater. By comparison, suspected counterfeit DSDW products display δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of around -51 ‰ and -8 ‰, respectively. These values are representative of terrestrial freshwater. In addition, suspected counterfeit DSDWs have δ and electrical conductivity values similar to a mixed water (MW) product that was manufactured by purifying terrestrial freshwater and adulterating this with small amounts of brine. Furthermore, PCA results indicate the chemical constitution of suspected DSDW products to be similar to the MW product which falls between purified terrestrial freshwater and desalinized open seawater. These similarities imply that suspected counterfeit DSDW products are manufactured in a similar manner to the declared MW product. This study demonstrates how combining knowledge of stable water isotopes and PCA can be used in assessing the authenticity of commercial DSDW products. The method should be of great interest to similar investigations elsewhere.

  18. Deep-water running: a practical review of the literature with an emphasis on biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, Garry L

    2012-02-01

    Deep-water running (DWR) is used as an adjunct to training and conditioning, and as an injury-rehabilitation technique. It is important for the physician or sports medicine practitioner to focus on the underlying physics and biomechanics of running in water in order to better produce the desired physiological, metabolic, and psychological outcomes. Deep-water running maximal heart rate and oxygen consumption values have been consistently shown to be lower than those found during treadmill running. However, recent evidence reveals that there is less of a difference between these maximal values relative to treadmill running and DWR with increased DWR experience. Submaximal values have been shown to be strikingly similar. The skill level of DWR technique, psychological comfort, perception of work, muscular recruitment patterns, and running kinematics are all affected by the physics (ie, temperature, buoyancy, hydrostatic pressure, specific gravity, and drag) of running in water. Therefore, the relationship between the biomechanics and the corollary practical physiological indicators of workload found in DWR must be factored into the appropriate prescription of training and conditioning workloads and rehabilitation protocols.

  19. Geophysical Contribution in the Characterization of Deep Water Tables Geometry (Sidi Bouzid, Central Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Khazri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical data combined with geological and hydrogeological data were analyzed to characterize the geometry of Oued El Hajel and Ouled Asker deep water tables (Sidi Bouzid. The obtained results allowed refining the geostructural schema by highlighting the individualization of the NE-SW underground convexity of Ouled Asker and the anticline of axis Es Souda-Hmaeima and Ezaouia on either sides of two hydrogeological thresholds. The geometrical analysis determined the spatial extension of Ouled Asker and Oued El Hajel subbasins. The seismic cartography of semideep and deep reservoirs (Oligo-Miocene; Eocene and upper Cretaceous associated with the main subbasins contributed to proposing hydrogeological prospect zones for a rationalized groundwater exploitation.

  20. Antarctic climate, Southern Ocean circulation patterns, and deep water formation during the Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Claire E.; van de Flierdt, Tina; Bohaty, Steven M.; Hammond, Samantha J.

    2017-07-01

    We assess early-to-middle Eocene seawater neodymium (Nd) isotope records from seven Southern Ocean deep-sea drill sites to evaluate the role of Southern Ocean circulation in long-term Cenozoic climate change. Our study sites are strategically located on either side of the Tasman Gateway and are positioned at a range of shallow (chemistry toward the composition of bulk sediments at these sites. This erosional event coincides with the termination of peak global warmth following the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum and is associated with documented cooling across the study region and increased export of Antarctic deep waters, highlighting the complexity and importance of Southern Ocean circulation in the greenhouse climate of the Eocene.

  1. Effectiveness of a deep-sea cold-water coral Marine Protected Area, following eight years of fisheries closure

    OpenAIRE

    Huvenne, V.A.I; B. J. Bett; Masson, D.G.; Le Bas, T.P; A. J. Wheeler

    2016-01-01

    Pressure on deep-sea ecosystems continues to increase as anthropogenic activities move into ever deeper waters. To mitigate impacts on vulnerable habitats, various conservation measures exist, such as the designation of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). So far, however, little evidence is available about their effectiveness. This paper presents a unique follow-up study assessing the status and recovery of a deep-sea fisheries closure and MPA at ~1000 m water depth in the NE Atlantic, eight years...

  2. Deep-water zooplankton in the Mediterranean Sea: Results from a continuous, synchronous sampling over different regions using sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, R.; Carugati, L.; Boldrin, A.; Calafat, A.; Canals, M.; Fabres, J.; Finlay, K.; Heussner, S.; Miserocchi, S.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.

    2017-08-01

    Information on the dynamics of deep-sea biota is extremely scant particularly for long-term time series on deep-sea zooplankton. Here, we present the results of a deep-sea zooplankton investigation over one annual cycle based on samples from sediment trap moorings in three sub-basins along the Mediterranean Sea. Deep-sea zooplankton assemblages were dominated by copepods, as in shallow waters, only in the Adriatic Sea (>60% of total abundance), but not in the deep Ionian Sea, where ostracods represented >80%, neither in the deep Alboran Sea, where polychaetes were >70%. We found that deep-sea zooplankton assemblages: i) are subjected to changes in their abundance and structure over time, ii) are characterized by different dominant taxa in different basins, and iii) display clear taxonomic segregation between shallow and near-bottom waters. Zooplankton biodiversity decreases with increasing water depth, but the equitability increases. We suggest here that variations of zooplankton abundance and assemblage structure are likely influenced by the trophic condition characterizing the basins. Our findings provide new insights on this largely unknown component of the deep ocean, and suggest that changes in the export of organic matter from the photic zone, such as those expected as a consequence of global change, can significantly influence zooplankton assemblages in the largest biome on Earth.

  3. An Algorithm to Detect Tropical Deep Convective Clouds Through AMSU-B Water Vapor Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xu; Georg Heygster; ZHANG Suping

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm to detect tropical deep convective clouds and deep convective overshootings based on the measurements from the three water vapor channels (183.3GHz±1 GHz, 183.3GHz±3GHz and 183.3GHz±7GHz) of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) is presented. This algorithm is an improved version of the method of Hong et al. (2005). The proposed procedure is based on the statistical analysis of seven years'(2001-2007) measurements from AMSU-B on NOAA-16 From the 1-d histograms of the brightness temperature of the three water vapor channels and the 2-d tustograms of the brightness temperature dif-ference between these channels, new thresholds for brightness temperature differences and the brightness temperature of channel 18 (183.3 GHz±1 GHz) are suggested. The new algorithm is employed to investigate the mean distribution of tropical deep convective clouds and convective overshootings from 30°S to 30°N for the years 2001 to 2007. The major concentration of deep convective clouds and convective overshootings is found over the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), tropical Africa, South America, the Indian Ocean and Indonesia with an average fraction of 0.4%. In terms of these clouds we identify the secondary Intertropical Convergence Zone located in the eastern South Pacific and parallel to the main ITCZ in the North Pacific. The convective overshooting is more frequently observed over land than over the ocean.

  4. Multibeam sonar mapping of Siberian seeps: Evaluating trends in methane flux from shallow sub-sea permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Christopher; Leifer, Ira; Luyendyk, Bruce; Semiletov, Igor

    2010-05-01

    The East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) contains an estimated 1400 GT (109 tons = 1 GT) of carbon sequestered within and beneath a sub-sea permafrost unit that is overlain by thin sediments. This carbon pool includes methane (CH4) as free and dissolved gas, potentially extensive methane hydrate deposits, and carbon dioxide (CO2), yet its contribution has traditionally been ignored in global carbon stocks because of its assumed stability. The ESAS is very shallow averaging loss have been identified from widespread bubble ebullition and enhanced aqueous methane levels well above atmospheric equilibrium. The resulting thaw sediments (taliks) and structural breaches facilitate fluid and gas migration within the permafrost to overlying sediments where some microbial methane oxidation occurs. These destabilizing features may also provide a mechanism for enhanced heat transfer to methane hydrate deposits. The shallow nature of the ESAS means ascending bubbles in the water column experience minimal dissolution before venting to the atmosphere. Additionally, storm mixing extends to the seabed so that virtually all dissolved methane gas from bubbles and sediment fluid exchange is stripped from the oceanic waters and vented to the atmosphere prior to the microbial oxidation. Emission of CH4 and CO2 largely remain unquantified but potentially contribute significantly to atmospheric budgets. Further, rapid Arctic warming suggests these gas emissions could present a significant positive warming feedback. Given the rapid climate changes occurring and predicted to occur in the Arctic, there is a strong need for baseline measurements of ebullition to allow identification of emission trends. Baseline data were collected in Fall 2009 using multibeam sonar surveying techniques developed at UCSB. Data analysis has identified spatial and temporal controls on seepage bubble flux including geologic structure, and currents. Two sonar techniques were used in the ESAS. The first method used a

  5. Cardiovascular protection of deep-seawater drinking water in high-fat/cholesterol fed hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chin-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Yen; Chiu, Chih-Hsien; Yang, Kuo-Tai; Wang, Yu; Fu, Shih-Guei; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2011-08-01

    Cardiovascular protection of deep-seawater (DSW) drinking water was assessed using high-fat/cholesterol-fed hamsters in this study. All hamsters were fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet (12% fat/0.2% cholesterol), and drinking solutions were normal distiled water (NDW, hardness: 2.48ppm), DSW300 (hardness: 324.5ppm), DSW900 (hardness: 858.5ppm), and DSW1500 (hardness: 1569.0ppm), respectively. After a 6-week feeding period, body weight, heart rates, and blood pressures of hamsters were not influenced by DSW drinking waters. Serum total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (TAG), atherogenic index, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were decreased (pdrinking-water groups, as compared to those in the NDW group. Additionally, increased (pdrinking-water groups. Hepatic low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDL receptor) and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene expressions were upregulated (pdrinking waters. These results demonstrate that DSW drinking water benefits the attenuation of high-fat/cholesterol-diet-induced cardiovascular disorders in hamsters.

  6. The Relationship of the Smectite-Illite Conversion to Pore Water Salinity Trends, Deep Water Offshore Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, T. G.; Summa, L. L.

    2002-12-01

    Petroleum exploration in the deepwater Niger Delta has produced an abundance of physical property data and geochemical information in the section from 500 to 4000m below the seafloor. These have improved our understanding of the links between diagenetic processes and changes in pore fluid chemistry, and further suggest that smectite dehydration is not a major contributor to overpressure in the section. Literature data, coupled with new log, x-ray diffraction and surface area measurements, suggest that smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite are major components of Miocene to Recent shales in key deep water wells. The smectite-illite transformation is generally complete by 2000m bml, corresponding to 80-90 degrees C. Such high percentages of hydrated clays result in sediments with low shallow overburden stresses, permeabilities and thermal conductivities. Because of the large contribution of smectite interlayer water to the total water content, diagenetic alteration of smectite more strongly affects density and pore fluid chemistry profiles here than in areas with less hydrated clay. Coincident with the conversion of smectite to illite, the total dissolved solids in the pore waters from several wells in the deepwater Niger Delta decrease from near seawater values at the sea floor to approximatly 10,000 ppm at 2000m bml. Pore fluid composition estimates are derived primarily from log calculation of water resistivity, with limited confirmation from pressure gradients in water legs, and uncontaminated MDT fluid samples. There are two models that could account for the observed decrease in salinity with depth: freshwater incursion via long-distance lateral fluid flow through continuous aquifers, and release of interlayer water from smectite during diagenesis. The available data suggest that release of interlayer water is the most likely explanation for the salinity observations from deep water Nigeria. Freshwater incursions are more likely on the shallow water shelf

  7. Bearing splitting and near-surface source ranging in the direct zone of deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Nan; Zhou, Shi-Hong; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    Sound multipath propagation is very important for target localization and identification in different acoustical zones of deep water. In order to distinguish the multipath characteristics in deep water, the Northwest Pacific Acoustic Experiment was conducted in 2015. A low-frequency horizontal line array towed at the depth of around 150 m on a receiving ship was used to receive the noise radiated by the source ship. During this experiment, a bearing-splitting phenomenon in the direct zone was observed through conventional beamforming of the horizontal line array within the frequency band 160 Hz-360 Hz. In this paper, this phenomenon is explained based on ray theory. In principle, the received signal in the direct zone of deep water arrives from two general paths including a direct one and bottom bounced one, which vary considerably in arrival angles. The split bearings correspond to the contributions of these two paths. The bearing-splitting phenomenon is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the bearing-time records and experimental results, and they are well consistent with each other. Then a near-surface source ranging approach based on the arrival angles of direct path and bottom bounced path in the direct zone is presented as an application of bearing splitting and is verified by experimental results. Finally, the applicability of the proposed ranging approach for an underwater source within several hundred meters in depth in the direct zone is also analyzed and demonstrated by simulations. Project supported by the Program of One Hundred Talented People of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434012 and 41561144006).

  8. Detailed anatomy of a deep-water carbonate breccia lobe (Upper Jurassic, French subalpine basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courjault, Thomas; Grosheny, Danièle; Ferry, Serge; Sausse, Judith

    2011-06-01

    Detailed correlations across Tithonian carbonate breccia deposits in the Drôme River area (northern part of the so-called "Vocontian Through") suggest the depositional system was that of an elongated deep-water lobe, up to 70 km long and 20 to 30 km wide, for a thickness reaching 200 m. The Drôme lobe, as it is now called, is mainly made of slope to basinal mudstones breccias with minor platform components, interpreted as debris flow and mud flow deposits, associated with slump deposits. It is basically a base-of-slope system, whose elongated depositional area implies it was a "point-sourced" gravity system, thus perhaps connected to a small canyon cut onto the western slope of the basin. But the mostly mudstone material of the breccias also suggests that the walls of this inferred canyon were the main supplier of the lobe, not the carbonate platform proper. The updip part of the lobe has a complex internal geometry as the deposition of breccia bed packages is interrupted by scourings locally 50 m-deep, indicating maybe a canyon mouth environment. The middle part of the lobe is dominated by pure vertical aggradation of breccia beds with minor intervening erosion. In the downdip part of the system a morphological compensation mechanism occurs as breccia beds tend to spread laterally. A huge slump carrying large mudstone olistoliths ends the breccia deposition at the beginning of the Berriasian. This megaslump deposit was mostly emplaced on the right side of the breccia lobe supporting the idea of a depositional relief. Our observations thus show that previous interpretations as a submarine canyon infilling or as shallow-water breccias formed in-situ by cyclic loading under attenuating hurricane waves approaching the platform are not consistent with our observations. The internal geometry of the system studied brings new data about a poorly-studied kind of "turbidite" systems that of deep-water carbonate breccias.

  9. Gulf Coast Deep Water Port Facilities Study. Appendix C. Eastern Gulf Hydrobiological Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    namely, activities regarding deep water ports including those for oil tankers). However, there are local populations, particularly in coastal zones...to eutrophication , pesticides. and petrochemical loads present in sediments. The Pensacola-Escamnbia-East BaY stsem has been gnrel ’re damaged. About...River 671 646.4 Palm River 62 45.2 Alatia River 384 418.2 Additional Area -92.6 Lower Tampa Bay 2.0- 2.3 Little Manatee River 186 205.2 Manatee River

  10. Total mercury and its distribution in blue crab and deep water pink shrimp from Alexandria coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moustafa, E.K.; Moharram, Y.G.; El-Sokkary, I.; Telb, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    Total mercury content and its distribution in muscles and viscera of male and female blue grab (Callinectes sapidus Rothbum) and deep water pink shrimp (Parapenacus longirostris) collected from the 3 main fishing grounds near the Alexandria coast in the Mediterranean sea was estimated. The results indicate that the mercury content in the muscles of both species differ according to fishing areas, size, sex, and species. More than 75% of total mercury were accumulated in the viscera of both species which indicates that the mercury entered in these organisms via the feed chain.

  11. Lepidapedon sereti n. sp. (Digenea: Lepidapedidae) in Coelorinchus sereti (Gadiformes: Macrouridae) from deep waters off Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Rodney A; Faliex, Elisabeth; Allienne, Jean François; Mouahid, Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    Lepidapedon sereti n. sp. is described from the macrourid Coelorinchus sereti from the deep water off Vanuatu. It is placed in the Elongatum group and Elongatum subgroup. It differs from the other species described in this subgroup by the distinctly dorsally subterminal excretory pore. It also differs from other species in combinations of size, excretory vesicle length, proportions of forebody, post-testicular region and other metric features. This constitutes the first record of a Lepidapedon (sensu stricto) from the Central Western Pacific Ocean.

  12. Long-Term Monitoring of Dolphin Biosonar Activity in Deep Pelagic Waters of the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Francesco; Alonge, Giuseppe; Bellia, Giorgio; De Domenico, Emilio; Grammauta, Rosario; Larosa, Giuseppina; Mazzola, Salvatore; Riccobene, Giorgio; Pavan, Gianni; Papale, Elena; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Sciacca, Virginia; Simeone, Francesco; Speziale, Fabrizio; Viola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa

    2017-06-28

    Dolphins emit short ultrasonic pulses (clicks) to acquire information about the surrounding environment, prey and habitat features. We investigated Delphinidae activity over multiple temporal scales through the detection of their echolocation clicks, using long-term Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM). The Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare operates multidisciplinary seafloor observatories in a deep area of the Central Mediterranean Sea. The Ocean noise Detection Experiment collected data offshore the Gulf of Catania from January 2005 to November 2006, allowing the study of temporal patterns of dolphin activity in this deep pelagic zone for the first time. Nearly 5,500 five-minute recordings acquired over two years were examined using spectrogram analysis and through development and testing of an automatic detection algorithm. Echolocation activity of dolphins was mostly confined to nighttime and crepuscular hours, in contrast with communicative signals (whistles). Seasonal variation, with a peak number of clicks in August, was also evident, but no effect of lunar cycle was observed. Temporal trends in echolocation corresponded to environmental and trophic variability known in the deep pelagic waters of the Ionian Sea. Long-term PAM and the continued development of automatic analysis techniques are essential to advancing the study of pelagic marine mammal distribution and behaviour patterns.

  13. Influence of Conowingo Reservoir Infill on Chesapeake Bay Deep Water Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, L. C.; Cerco, C. F.; Batiuk, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) requires the reduction of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads in the Chesapeake watershed because of the tidal water quality impairments and the damage to living resources they cause. Within the Chesapeake watershed the Conowingo Reservoir has been filling in with sediment for almost a century, and is now in a state of near-full capacity called dynamic equilibrium. The development of the Chesapeake TMDL in 2010 was with the hydrology of a 1991-2000 simulation period, and carried with this simulation period the implicit model calibration assumption, based on the 1991-2000 nutrient and sediment observations, of a Conowingo Reservoir that was still effectively trapping sediment. In a TMDL, pollutant loads beyond the TMDL allocation, which are brought about by growth or other conditions, must be offset. Using the analysis tools of the Chesapeake TMDL for assessing the degree of attainment of living resource based water quality standards, the estimated nutrient and sediment loads from a simulated infill of the Conowingo Reservoir was determined. The influence on Chesapeake water quality by a large storm and scour event of January 1996 on the Susquehanna was estimated and the same storm and scour events were also evaluated in the more critical living resource periods of June and October. An analysis was also made on the estimated influence of more moderate but frequent high flow events. The infill of the Conowingo reservoir had estimated impairments of water quality at both the simulated high flow scour events and at the more frequent moderate storm flows. The estimated impairment was primarily on the deep water and deep channel dissolved oxygen because of increased scour and transport of dissolved particulate organic nutrients under conditions of Conowingo infill. Figure 1 describes the linked models used to assess the impact of Conowingo Reservoir infill on Chesapeake hypoxia.

  14. Overflow Water Pathways in the Subpolar North Atlantic Observed with Deep Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Amy; Furey, Heather; Lozier, Susan

    2017-04-01

    As part of the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP), a total of 135 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been deployed in the deep boundary currents of the Iceland, Irminger and Labrador Basins, and in the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone, to investigate the pathways of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) and Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW). Floats were released annually in 2014, 2015 and 2016 at depths between 1800 and 2800 m for two-year missions. The array of sound sources used for tracking was expanded from 10 to 13 moorings in 2016 when it was discovered that wintertime surface roughness was negatively impacting acoustic ranges. The floats from the first setting reveal several examples of persistent , deep coherent eddy motion, including a cyclonic eddy spinning off the tip of Eirik Ridge (southwest of Cape Farewell), a cyclonic eddy in the northeastern Labrador Basin near where anticyclonic Irminger Rings are formed, and an anticyclonic eddy under the North Atlantic Current (NAC) in the central Iceland Basin. A consistent region of boundary-interior exchange was observed near Hamilton Bank on the western boundary of the Labrador Sea. Deep cyclonic recirculation gyres are revealed in all three basins. Floats released in the southward-flowing deep boundary current over the eastern flank of the Reykjanes Ridge show that shallower layers of ISOW peel off to the west and cross the Ridge into the Irminger Basin through various gaps south of 60°N, including the Bight Fracture Zone. These floats tend to turn northward and continue along the slope in the Irminger Basin. Interestingly, floats released at the ISOW level in the CGFZ did not turn into the Irminger Basin as often depicted in deep circulation schematics, but rather drifted west-northwestward toward the Labrador Sea, or eddied around west of the CGFZ and (in some cases) turned southward. This result is consistent with some previous hydrographic and high-resolution model results

  15. Factors Influencing the Iterative Accuracy of Ground Water Level in Forecasting the Water Burst of Deep Drawdown Mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铎; 杨小荟; 武强; 张志忠

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the influential factors of iteration accuracy when we use iteration to determine the numerical model for predicting water yield of deep drawdown mines and calculating the groundwater level. The relationship among the calculation error of groundwater level, the pumping rate, the limit of iteration convergence error, the calculation time, and the aquifer parameters were discussed by using an ideal model. Finally, the water yield of Dianzi iron mine was predicted using the testified numerical model. It is indicated that the calculation error of groundwater level is related to the limit of iteration convergence error, the calculation time and the aquifer parameters, but not to the pumping rate and the variation of groundwater level.

  16. Deep and bottom water export from the Southern Ocean to the Pacific over the past 38 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Flierdt, T.; Frank, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Hattendorf, B.; Gunther, D.; Kubik, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    The application of radiogenic isotopes to the study of Cenozoic circulation patterns in the South Pacific Ocean has been hampered by the fact that records from only equatorial Pacific deep water have been available. We present new Pb and Nd isotope time series for two ferromanganese crusts that grew from equatorial Pacific bottom water (D137-01, "Nova," 7219 m water depth) and southwest Pacific deep water (63KD, "Tasman," 1700 m water depth). The crusts were dated using 10Be/9Be ratios combined with constant Co-flux dating and yield time series for the past 38 and 23 Myr, respectively. The surface Nd and Pb isotope distributions are consistent with the present-day circulation pattern, and therefore the new records are considered suitable to reconstruct Eocene through Miocene paleoceanography for the South Pacific. The isotope time series of crusts Nova and Tasman suggest that equatorial Pacific deep water and waters from the Southern Ocean supplied the dissolved trace metals to both sites over the past 38 Myr. Changes in the isotopic composition of crust Nova are interpreted to reflect development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and changes in Pacific deep water circulation caused by the build up of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Nd isotopic composition of the shallower water site in the southwest Pacific appears to have been more sensitive to circulation changes resulting from closure of the Indonesian seaway. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25°C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken

  18. Continuous structural monitoring of oil rig sub-sea structures for flooded member detection using underwater ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijarez, R. [Gerencia de Control e Instrumentacion, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico). Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas; Gaydecki, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Burdekin, M. [Fatigue Monitoring Bureau, Macclesfield (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    An underwater ultrasound system for detecting flooding in the hollow sub-sea structures of offshore steel oil-rigs is presented. A sensor, attached to a subsea structure and powered by seawater, transmits underwater ultrasound chirpencoded signals to a real-time digital signal processing monitoring system at surface level. Experiments performed using a jointed steel pipe structure 1 ton in weight, with dimensions of 7 m x 0.5 m x 16 mm, completely immersed in seawater showed excellent performance using a central excitation frequency of 38 kHz, over distances of 100 m. (orig.)

  19. Noble gas residence times of saline waters within crystalline bedrock, Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.; Niedermann, Samuel; Wiersberg, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Noble gas residence times of saline groundwaters from the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, located within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of the Fennoscandian Shield in Finland, are presented. The accumulation of radiogenic (4He, 40Ar) and nucleogenic (21Ne) noble gas isotopes in situ together with the effects of diffusion are considered. Fluid samples were collected from depths between 180 and 2480 m below surface, allowing us to compare the modelled values with the measured concentrations along a vertical depth profile. The results show that while the concentrations in the upper part are likely affected by diffusion, there is no indication of diffusive loss at or below 500 m depth. Furthermore, no mantle derived gases were found unequivocally. Previous studies have shown that distinct vertical variation occurs both in geochemistry and microbial community structuring along the drill hole, indicating stagnant waters with no significant exchange of fluids between different fracture systems or with surface waters. Therefore in situ accumulation is the most plausible model for the determination of noble gas residence times. The results show that the saline groundwaters in Outokumpu are remarkably old, with most of the samples indicating residence times between ∼20 and 50 Ma. Although being first order approximations, the ages of the fluids clearly indicate that their formation must predate more recent events, such as Quaternary glaciations. Isolation within the crust since the Eocene-Miocene epochs has also direct implications to the deep biosphere found at Outokumpu. These ecosystems must have been isolated for a long time and thus very likely rely on energy and carbon sources such as H2 and CO2 from groundwater and adjacent bedrock rather than from the ground surface.

  20. Deep-water Earliest Oligocene Glacial Maximum (EOGM) in South Atlantic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhifei; TUO Shouting; ZHAO Quanhong; CHENG Xinrong; HUANG Wei

    2004-01-01

    The most prominent cooling event of the Earth surface during Cenozoic in the long-term transition from a non-glaciated planet, or "green-house world", to a polar, glaciated planet, or "ice-house world", is the Earliest Oligocene Glacial Maximum (EOGM) above the Eocene/Oligocene boundary at about 33.7 Ma. Planktonic and benthic foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotopes, carbonate content, and coarse fraction, along with high-resolution color reflectance and magnetic susceptibility records during 35-30 Ma, from deep-water Sites 1262 and 1265, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 208 in South Atlantic, reveal the global cooling event occurring in both surface and deep oceans. The results show that the earliest Oligocene δ18O values during 33.5-33.1 Ma represent the magnitude of continental ice sheets on east Antarctica and indicate the large decrease in both surface and deep water temperatures of worldwide oceans. The δ13C records show the large excursion during the period of EOGM event and indicate some types of shift in global carbon reservoir, probably demonstrating the sudden increase in organic carbon burial rates and the changes in the distribution and timing of production. At the same time, lithologic composition, carbonate content, color reflectance, and coarse fraction brought about significant changes close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, reflecting the abrupt deepening in the carbonate compensation depth (CCD). Changes in carbonate content were revealed from the color reflectance identify periodicities associated with eccentricity of the Earth's orbit (100 and 400 ka), further indicating orbitally forced global climate variations in the Early Oligocene.

  1. Four Climate Cycles of Recurring Deep and Surface Water Destabilizations on the Iberian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martrat, Belen; Grimalt, Joan O.; Shackleton, Nicholas J.; de Abreu, Lucia; Hutterli, Manuel A.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2007-07-01

    Centennial climate variability over the last ice age exhibits clear bipolar behavior. High-resolution analyses of marine sediment cores from the Iberian margin trace a number of associated changes simultaneously. Proxies of sea surface temperature and water mass distribution, as well as relative biomarker content, demonstrate that this typical north-south coupling was pervasive for the cold phases of climate during the past 420,000 years. Cold episodes after relatively warm and largely ice-free periods occurred when the predominance of deep water formation changed from northern to southern sources. These results reinforce the connection between rapid climate changes at Mediterranean latitudes and century-to-millennial variability in northern and southern polar regions.

  2. Extreme diving behaviour in devil rays links surface waters and the deep ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorrold, Simon R; Afonso, Pedro; Fontes, Jorge; Braun, Camrin D; Santos, Ricardo S; Skomal, Gregory B; Berumen, Michael L

    2014-07-01

    Ecological connections between surface waters and the deep ocean remain poorly studied despite the high biomass of fishes and squids residing at depths beyond the euphotic zone. These animals likely support pelagic food webs containing a suite of predators that include commercially important fishes and marine mammals. Here we deploy pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags on 15 Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) in the central North Atlantic Ocean, which provide movement patterns of individuals for up to 9 months. Devil rays were considered surface dwellers but our data reveal individuals descending at speeds up to 6.0 m s(-1) to depths of almost 2,000 m and water temperatures <4 °C. The shape of the dive profiles suggests that the rays are foraging at these depths in deep scattering layers. Our results provide evidence of an important link between predators in the surface ocean and forage species occupying pelagic habitats below the euphotic zone in ocean ecosystems.

  3. High biodiversity on a deep-water reef in the eastern Fram Strait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin S Meyer

    Full Text Available We report on the distribution and abundance of megafauna on a deep-water rocky reef (1796-2373 m in the Fram Strait, west of Svalbard. Biodiversity and population density are high, with a maximum average of 26.7±0.9 species m(-2 and 418.1±49.6 individuals m(-2 on the east side of the reef summit. These figures contrast with the surrounding abyssal plain fauna, with an average of only 18.1±1.4 species and 29.4±4.3 individuals m(-2 (mean ± standard error. The east side of the reef summit, where the highest richness and density of fauna are found, faces into the predominant bottom current, which likely increases in speed to the summit and serves as a source of particulate food for the numerous suspension feeders present there. We conclude that the observed faunal distribution patterns could be the result of hydrodynamic patterns and food availability above and around the reef. To our knowledge, this study is the first to describe the distribution and diversity of benthic fauna on a rocky reef in deep water.

  4. Extreme diving behaviour in devil rays links surface waters and the deep ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Thorrold, Simon R.

    2014-07-01

    Ecological connections between surface waters and the deep ocean remain poorly studied despite the high biomass of fishes and squids residing at depths beyond the euphotic zone. These animals likely support pelagic food webs containing a suite of predators that include commercially important fishes and marine mammals. Here we deploy pop-up satellite archival transmitting tags on 15 Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) in the central North Atlantic Ocean, which provide movement patterns of individuals for up to 9 months. Devil rays were considered surface dwellers but our data reveal individuals descending at speeds up to 6.0 ms-1 to depths of almost 2,000 m and water temperatures <4 C. The shape of the dive profiles suggests that the rays are foraging at these depths in deep scattering layers. Our results provide evidence of an important link between predators in the surface ocean and forage species occupying pelagic habitats below the euphotic zone in ocean ecosystems. 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Major types of deep-water reservoirs from the Eastern Brazilian rift and passive margin basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Carlos H.L. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao

    1999-07-01

    Turbidites and associated deep-water facies comprise the most important petroleum reservoirs in Brazil. They contain in place volumes of 57.2 billion bbl of oil, and 27.5 trillion cubic feet of gas, and total reserves of 12.5 billion bbl of oil, and 8.3 trillion cubic feet of gas. Brazilian petroleum-bearing turbidites occur in Carboniferous/Permian, glaciomarine pre-rift (interior cratonic) successions, Neocomian to Aptian, lacustrine rift successions and Upper Albian to Lower Miocene, marine passive margin successions. Most of the petroleum accumulations are distributed along the eastern Brazilian margin, which tectonic and sedimentary evolution is linked to the Neocomian breakup of Gondwana and the subsequent opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Turbidites comprise 553 production zones from 171 oil and/or gas fields, mostly concentrated in the Campos, Reconcavo, Sergipe/Alagoas, and Espirito Santo basins. This paper presents an overview of the sedimentary facies, high-resolution stratigraphy, sand body geometry, and reservoir heterogeneities of the major types of Brazilian deep-water reservoirs, which include gravel/sand-rich, turbidite channel complexes, though-confined, gravel/sand-rich turbidite lobes, gravel/sand-rich turbidite and debrite aprons, deposits of sand-rich, lacustrine density underflows, deposits of sand/mud-rich debris flows, and deposits of sandy bottom currents. (author)

  6. Vertical distribution of a deep-water moss and associated epiphytes in Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, C.D.; Phinney, H.K.; Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    A one-person submersible was used to examine the vertical distribution of the deep-water moss Drepanocladus aduncus (Hedw.) Warnst in Crater Lake (Oregon). Living specimens were found attached to sediment and rocks at depths between 25 m and 140 m. Dense beds of the moss were observed at depths between 30 m and 80 m, a region that corresponded roughly to the zone of maximum primary production by phytoplankton. The moss population supported a diverse assemblage of epiphytic algae, of which the most abundant genera included Cladophora,Oedogonium, Rhizoclonium, Tribonema, Vaucheria, and the diatoms Cocconeis, Cymbella, Epithemia, Fragilaria, Gomphonema, Melosira, Navicula, and Synedra. Chemical and physical data supported the hypothesis that the lower limit of distribution of the moss is determined by light limitation, whereas the upper limit is related to the availability of nutrients, particularly nitrate-nitrogen and trace elements. Deep-water videotapes of the moss population indicated that D. aduncus with its epiphytic algae was abundant enough in regions associated with the metalimnion and upper hypolimnion to have a potential influence on the nutrient dynamics of the Crater Lake ecosystem. Although the maximum depth at which living bryophytes occur in Crater Lake is similar to that found for Lake Tahoe, conditions in Lake Tahoe allow the growth and survival of a much more diverse assemblage of bryophytes and charophytes than is present in Crater Lake.

  7. The Deep Water Abundance on Jupiter: New Constraints from Thermochemical Kinetics and Diffusion Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, Channon; Saslow, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a one-dimensional thermochemical kinetics and diffusion model for Jupiter's atmosphere that accurately describes the transition from the thermochemical regime in the deep troposphere (where chemical equilibrium is established) to the quenched regime in the upper troposphere (where chemical equilibrium is disrupted). The model is used to calculate chemical abundances of tropospheric constituents and to identify important chemical pathways for CO-CH4 interconversion in hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. In particular, the observed mole fraction and chemical behavior of CO is used to indirectly constrain the Jovian water inventory. Our model can reproduce the observed tropospheric CO abundance provided that the water mole fraction lies in the range (0.25-6.0) x 10^-3 in Jupiter's deep troposphere, corresponding to an enrichment of 0.3 to 7.3 times the protosolar abundance (assumed to be H2O/H2 = 9.61 x 10^-4). Our results suggest that Jupiter's oxygen enrichment is roughly similar to that for carb...

  8. A new deep-water goatfish of the genus Upeneus (Mullidae) from Vanuatu, South Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uiblein, Franz; Causse, Romain

    2013-01-01

    A new goatfish, Upeneus vanuatu (Mullidae), is described based on five specimens collected off two islands of Vanuatu (South Pacific), at depths of 191-321 m, and compared with five closely related species: Upeneus davidaroni (Red Sea), U. mascareinsis (Western Indian Ocean), U. stenopsis (northern Australia, Philippines, 127-275 m), and the more shallow-occurring Indo-West Pacific species U. subvittatus (26-120 m) and U. vittatus (deep-water Upeneus species, the so-called "stenopsis" species group can be distinguished from four other species groups that were established in earlier studies in order to facilitate intrageneric comparisons. The ecological and evolutionary significance of deep-water goatfishes is briefly discussed.

  9. A trophic ecology of two grenadier species (Macrouridae, Pisces) in deep waters of the Southwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptikhovsky, V. V.

    2005-08-01

    The feeding habits of slope-dwelling macrourid fishes from the southern Southwest Atlantic is unknown. In this study the feeding ecology of the two most abundant species, Macrourus carinatus and M. holotrachys, was investigated. Both these grenadiers fed on a variety of prey, including gelatinous plankton, crustaceans, mesopelagic and benthic fish and cephalopods, echinoderms, as well as fishery discards. M. carinatus forage mostly in depths shallower than 900 m and its feeding spectrum and hunting strategy display important seasonal variability. It consumes more pelagic fish, squid and crustaceans than M. holotrachys, which probably indicates occasional feeding in the water column and higher availability of pelagic prey. M. holotrachys forages mostly in depths deeper than 1100 m and is a specialised bottom feeder. Macrourids are able to switch their feeding strategy from browsing on abundant food sources in summer and autumn (a narrow niche breadth and high number of prey per stomach) to hunting occasional prey in winter and spring (a wide niche breadth, low number of prey per stomach). Both species are of similar size and hard to distinguish morphologically, but in deep water M. holotrachys males are smaller than, and females larger than, those of M. carinatus. A probable reason for such energy re-distribution within a population in M. holotrachys is to achieve a higher reproductive output in a food-poor and harsh deep-sea environment.

  10. Study on dynamic characteristics of coupled model for deep-water lifting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunxia; Lu, Jianhui; Zhang, Chunlei

    2016-10-01

    The underwater installation of marine equipment in deep-water development requires safe lifting and accurate positioning. The heave compensation system is an important technology to ensure normal operation and improve work accuracy. To provide a theoretical basis for the heave compensation system, in this paper, the continuous modeling method is employed to build up a coupled model of deep-water lifting systems in vertical direction. The response characteristics of dynamic movement are investigated. The simulation results show that the resonance problem appears in the process of the whole releasing load, the lifting system generates resonance and the displacement response of the lifting load is maximal when the sinking depth is about 2000 m. This paper also analyzes the main influencing factors on the dynamic response of load including cable stiffness, damping coefficient of the lifting system, mass and added mass of lifting load, among which cable stiffness and damping coefficient of the lifting system have the greatest influence on dynamic response of lifting load when installation load is determined. So the vertical dynamic movement response of the load is reduced by installing a damper on the lifting cable and selecting the appropriate cable stiffness.

  11. Stochastic Plume Simulations for the Fukushima Accident and the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, E.; Peggion, G.; Rowley, C.; Hogan, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant suffered damage leading to radioactive contamination of coastal waters. Major issues in characterizing the extent of the affected waters were a poor knowledge of the radiation released to the coastal waters and the rather complex coastal dynamics of the region, not deterministically captured by the available prediction systems. Equivalently, during the Gulf of Mexico Deep Water Horizon oil platform accident in April 2010, significant amounts of oil and gas were released from the ocean floor. For this case, issues in mapping and predicting the extent of the affected waters in real-time were a poor knowledge of the actual amounts of oil reaching the surface and the fact that coastal dynamics over the region were not deterministically captured by the available prediction systems. To assess the ocean regions and times that were most likely affected by these accidents while capturing the above sources of uncertainty, ensembles of the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) were configured over the two regions (NE Japan and Northern Gulf of Mexico). For the Fukushima case tracers were released on each ensemble member; their locations at each instant provided reference positions of water volumes where the signature of water released from the plant could be found. For the Deep Water Horizon oil spill case each ensemble member was coupled with a diffusion-advection solution to estimate possible scenarios of oil concentrations using perturbed estimates of the released amounts as the source terms at the surface. Stochastic plumes were then defined using a Risk Assessment Code (RAC) analysis that associates a number from 1 to 5 to each grid point, determined by the likelihood of having tracer particle within short ranges (for the Fukushima case), hence defining the high risk areas and those recommended for monitoring. For the Oil Spill case the RAC codes were determined by the likelihood of reaching oil concentrations as defined in the Bonn Agreement

  12. The consolidation of deep tube well technology in safe drinking water provision: the case of arsenic mitigation in rural Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kundu, D.K.; Vliet, van B.J.M.; Gupta, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explains why and how deep tube well as a safe drinking water technology has become dominant in mitigating the arsenic crisis in rural Bangladesh. We do so by applying insights from the Multi-Level Perspective on transitions in explaining changes in the safe socio-technical drinking water

  13. Deep-water Fan Systems and Petroleum Resources on the Northern Slope of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiong; YANG Shaokun; ZHU Ming; LI Jinsong

    2004-01-01

    The shallow shelf delta/strand arenaceous-pelitic deposit region in the north of the Pearl River mouth basin,sitting on the northern continental shelf of the South China Sea, has already become an important oil production base in China. Recent researched has revealed that a great deal of deep-water fans of great petroleum potentiality exist on the Baiyun deep-water slope below the big palco Pearl River and its large delta. Based on a mass of exploration wells and 2-D seismic data of the shallow shelf region, a interpretation of sequence stratigraphy confirmed the existence of deep-water fans. The cyclic falling of sea level, abundant detrital matter from the paleo Pearl River and the persistent geothermal subsidence in the Baiyun sag are the three prerequisites for the formation and development of deep-water fans. There are many in common between the deep-water shelf depositional system of the northern South China Sea and the exploration hotspots region on the two banks of the Atlantic. For example, both are located on passive continent margins, and persistent secular thermal subsidence and large palco rivers have supplied abundant material sources and organic matter.More recently, the discovery of the big gas pool on the northern slope of the Baiyun sag confirms that the Lower Tertiary lacustrine facies in the Baiyun sag has a great potentiality of source rocks. The fans overlying the Lower Tertiary source rocks should become the main exploration areas for oil and gas resources.

  14. Packaged FBG sensors for real-time stress monitoring on deep-water riser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Yang, Dexing; Jiang, Yajun; Wang, Meirong; Zhai, Huailun; Bai, Yang

    2014-11-01

    The safety of under-water risers in drilling platform is of great significance. A packaged fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for real-time stress monitoring is designed for the applications on oil drilling risers under 3000 meters deep water. A copper tube which is the main component of the sensor has a small hole along its axes and a groove at its each end. The bare FBG is passed through the small hole and fixed to its ends by epoxy resin. Then the copper tube is packaged by filling the groove with structural adhesive. In order to avoid that the outer water-pressure is applied on the epoxy resin through the structural adhesive, a gap between the two types of glues is left. The relationships between the stress of the riser and the tension, pressure, temperature of the single sensor are discussed, respectively. The measured tension sensitivity is 136.75 pm/KN while the minimum R-square value is 0.99997. The experimental results also show that there is a good linear response between water-pressure and the Bragg wavelength from 0 to 30MPa, and the sensor can even survive under the pressure more than 30MPa. In addition, the Bragg wavelength shifts linearly with the increasing temperature from 0 to 40°C. So, the pressure and temperature can be easily compensated if another sensor without tension is used.

  15. Slab mantle dehydrates beneath Kamchatka—Yet recycles water into the deep mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Halama, Ralf; Manea, Vlad C.

    2016-08-01

    The subduction of hydrated slab mantle is the most important and yet weakly constrained factor in the quantification of the Earth's deep geologic water cycle. The most critical unknowns are the initial hydration state and the dehydration behavior of the subducted oceanic mantle. Here we present a combined thermomechanical, thermodynamic, and geochemical model of the Kamchatka subduction zone that indicates significant dehydration of subducted slab mantle beneath Kamchatka. Evidence for the subduction of hydrated oceanic mantle comes from across-arc trends of boron concentrations and isotopic compositions in arc volcanic rocks. Our thermodynamic-geochemical models successfully predict the complex geochemical patterns and the spatial distribution of arc volcanoes in Kamchatka assuming the subduction of hydrated oceanic mantle. Our results show that water content and dehydration behavior of the slab mantle beneath Kamchatka can be directly linked to compositional features in arc volcanic rocks. Depending on hydration depth of the slab mantle, our models yield water recycling rates between 1.1 × 103 and 7.4 × 103 Tg/Ma/km corresponding to values between 0.75 × 106 and 5.2 × 106 Tg/Ma for the entire Kamchatkan subduction zone. These values are up to one order of magnitude lower than previous estimates for Kamchatka, but clearly show that subducted hydrated slab mantle significantly contributes to the water budget in the Kamchatkan subduction zone.

  16. Subsurface microbial diversity in deep-granitic-fracture water in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahl, J.W.; Schmidt, R.; Swanner, E.D.; Mandernack, K.W.; Templeton, A.S.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Smith, R.L.; Sanford, W.E.; Callaghan, R.L.; Mitton, J.B.; Spear, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    A microbial community analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed on borehole water and a granite rock core from Henderson Mine, a >1,000-meter-deep molybdenum mine near Empire, CO. Chemical analysis of borehole water at two separate depths (1,044 m and 1,004 m below the mine entrance) suggests that a sharp chemical gradient exists, likely from the mixing of two distinct subsurface fluids, one metal rich and one relatively dilute; this has created unique niches for microorganisms. The microbial community analyzed from filtered, oxic borehole water indicated an abundance of sequences from iron-oxidizing bacteria (Gallionella spp.) and was compared to the community from the same borehole after 2 weeks of being plugged with an expandable packer. Statistical analyses with UniFrac revealed a significant shift in community structure following the addition of the packer. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis suggested that Nitrosomonadales dominated the oxic borehole, while PLFAs indicative of anaerobic bacteria were most abundant in the samples from the plugged borehole. Microbial sequences were represented primarily by Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and a lineage of sequences which did not group with any identified bacterial division; phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of a novel candidate division. This "Henderson candidate division" dominated the clone libraries from the dilute anoxic fluids. Sequences obtained from the granitic rock core (1,740 m below the surface) were represented by the divisions Proteobacteria (primarily the family Ralstoniaceae) and Firmicutes. Sequences grouping within Ralstoniaceae were also found in the clone libraries from metal-rich fluids yet were absent in more dilute fluids. Lineage-specific comparisons, combined with phylogenetic statistical analyses, show that geochemical variance has an important effect on microbial community structure in deep, subsurface systems. Copyright ?? 2008, American Society for Microbiology

  17. The petroleum potential of deep-water northwestPalawan Block GSEC 66

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Alessandro O.; Jacobsen, Eric C.; Morado, Arturo A.; Benavidez, Jeciel J.; Navarro, F. A.; Lim, Antonette E.

    This paper presents the results of the evaluation of the petroleum, potential of thedeep-water acreage of Philodrill, GSEC 66, or what the authors call the "Northwest Malampaya Block". All the elements necessary for a major hydrocarbon accumulation are believed to be present in the block. Probable source rocks are the deep-water Nido Limestone, the pre-Nido Early Tertiary syn-rift section, and pre-Tertiary sediments. Potential reservoirs include the Nido reefal buildups, Nido and pre-Nido detrital and/or fractured carbonates, Early Miocene Galoc elastic equivalent turbidites and pre-Nido sediments. The principal play-types recognized in the area are the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene reefs and the erosional/karsted carbonate highs. After evaluation of available pre-1982 seismic data, an acquisition program of 1625 km was undertaken. Eleven leads/prospects were delineated in the area after the interpretation of this new seismic data. Two prospects were upgraded to drillable status (the Santa Monica Prospect and the Ipil Prospect). The Santa Monica Prospect is a well-defined four-way dip closure on the Nido Limestone with a vertical closure of over 1500 feet and an areal closure of over 20,500 acres. The Ipil Prospect is a gently closed feature developed at the Nido Limestone platform level with an areal closure of over 11,600 acres and a vertical relief of 400 feet. The technical merits of the delineated huge prospects, combined with the very favorable deep-water exploration terms of the Philippines and their proximity to the soon-to-be-developed Malampaya-Camago Field, make this block a very promising area for further exploration work.

  18. Magnetic Susceptibility in Surface Sediments in the Southern South China Sea and Its Implication for Sub-sea Methane Venting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhong; Yan Wen; Tang Xianzan; Liu Jianguo; Chen Muhong; Yang Huaping

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of magnetic variability and their possible implication for sub-sea methane venting,magnetic susceptibility (MS) of 145 surface sediment samples from the southern South China Sea (SCS) was investigated.Magnetic particles extracted from 20 representative samples were also examined for their mineral,chemical compositions and micromorphology.Results indicate that MS values range between -7.73×10-8 and 45.06x10-8 m3/kg.The high MS zones occur at some hydrecarbon-bearing basins and along main tectonic zones,and low ones are distributed mainly within the river delta or along continental shelves.Iron concretions and manganese concretions are not main contributors for high MS values in sediments,while authigenic iron sulphide minerals are possibly responsible for the MS enhancement.This phenomenon is suspected to be produced by the reducing environment where the high upward venting methane beneath the seafloor reacts with seawater sulfate,resulting in seep precipitation of highly susceptible intermediate mineral pyrrhotite,greigite and paramagnetic pyrite.It suggests that MS variability is possibly one of the geochemical indicators for mapping sub-sea zones of methane venting in the southern SCS.

  19. Chemistry and origin of deep ground water in crystalline rocks; Kemi och genes av djupa grundvatten i kristallint berg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the interactions between water and crystalline rocks and its consequences for the chemical composition of the water. It also treats how flows of different types of water are modified by the rock, and the possible consequences for the ground water near a nuclear waste repository. The focus of the work is the changes in composition that ground water gets at deep levels in the rock. Data from Finnsjoen and Aespoe in Sweden show higher salinity in deep rock, which has been interpreted as a result of marine inflow of water during glaciation. Data from other, deeper boreholes in Finland, Canada, Russia, England and Sweden show that the increasing salinity is a rule and very high at great depths, higher than marine water can produce. Therefore, the deep waters from Finnsjoen and Aespoe are probably very old, and the high salinity a result from geological processes. Differing cation and isotopic composition than seawater also indicate geologic water. Differing theories on the origin of the ground water should be regarded in the safety analysis for a repository. 36 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  20. Constraints on water cycling in a deep mountain valley from stable water isotope and sap flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in water are unequally partitioned during phase changes, with environmental conditions controlling the degree of partitioning. As a result, the isotopic composition of water reflects the thermodynamic history of water parcels in the water cycle. Recent advances in cavity ringdown spectrometry allow for the continuous measurement of water vapor isotope compositions, and provide insight into the processes influencing the concentration of near-surface water vapor at high resolution. We used stable water isotopes to investigate the processes controlling water vapor cycling in a deep mountain valley in northwestern Wyoming. A Picarro L2120-i Cavity Ring-Down spectrometer was deployed to measure the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor at the University of Michigan Camp Davis Field Station near Jackson, WY for three consecutive summers (2012-2014) and during winter 2013. We also constructed a network of Granier-style sap flux probes to estimate the local transpiration flux from regionally dominant tree species in July 2014. A prominent diurnal cycle was observed during the summer that was mostly absent in the winter. Summer specific humidity, δD, δ18O, and sap flux all reach daily maximum values in the mid-to-late morning that we associate with the onset of transpiration. The mountain valley is capped by an inversion, which limits atmospheric mixing during the morning. After the breakup of the inversion, the atmospheric boundary layer develops quickly and results in decreases in near-surface specific humidity and δ18O. δD appears to be less affected following the inversion breakup, resulting in a strong diurnal cycle in d-excess. Specific humidity, δD, and δ18O all return to their morning values rapidly near sunset, marking the cessation of mixing and atmospheric stratification. This absence of this diurnal cycle in the winter is consistent with reduced transpiration and atmospheric mixing anticipated for the

  1. Elephant overflows: Multi-annual variability in Weddell Sea Deep Water driven by surface forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Andrew; Meredith, Michael; Abrahamsen, Povl; Naviera-Garabato, Alberto; Ángel Morales Maqueda, Miguel; Polzin, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The volume of the deepest and densest water mass in Drake Passage, Lower Weddell Sea Deep Water (LWSDW), is shown to have been decreasing over the last 20 years of observations, with an associated reduction in density driven by freshening. Superimposed on this long term trend is a multi-annual oscillation with a period of 3-5 years. This variability only appears in Drake Passage; observations in the east of the Scotia Sea show a similar long term trend, but with no apparent multi-annual variability. Clues as to the source of this variability may be found on the continental slope at approximately 1000 m immediately north of Elephant Island on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here there is an intermittent westward flowing cold/fresh slope current whose volume and properties are strongly correlated with the LWSDW multi-annual variability, although leading the LWSDW by around one year. As the slope current and LWSDW are separated from each other both geographically and in water mass characteristics, their co-variability implies that they are responding to a common forcing, while the lag between deep LWSDW and shallow slope current provides information on the timescale of this response. A newly available high resolution temperature and salinity multi-year time series from the Elephant Island slope at 1000 m is compared with reanalysis and model derived surface fluxes, sea ice extent and wind stress. We find that there are strong positive relationships between the surface wind stress and heat flux over the shelf at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula and the properties of the slope current at 1000 m on seasonal to annual timescales. We use tracer release experiments in the Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) model to investigate the lag between the slope current and LWSDW timeseries and hypothesise that the observed multi-annual variability in both water masses is driven by surface forcing over the shelf and the overflow of modified water from the slope in

  2. Late Holocene intermediate water variability in the northeastern Atlantic as recorded by deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, K.; Colin, C.; Henderson, G. M.; Scholten, J.; Douville, E.; Sicre, M.-A.; Frank, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Nd isotopic composition of the aragonite skeleton of fossil deep-sea corals ( Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and Desmophyllum dianthus) located in the northeastern Atlantic at water depths between 635 and 1300 m was investigated to reconstruct changes in the Atlantic mid-depth gyre circulation during the past millennium. The coral ɛNd values varied systematically from - 11.8 to - 14.4 during the past 1500 years, reflecting variations in seawater ɛNd and thus water mass provenance. Low ɛNd values (ɛNd = - 14) occurred during the warm Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA) (between 1000 AD and 1250 AD) and during the most recent period (1950 AD to 2000 AD), interrupted by a period of significantly higher ɛNd values (~-12.5) during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (between 1350 AD and 1850 AD). One long-lived branching coral even recorded an abrupt systematic rise from low to high ɛNd values around 1250 AD over the course of its 10-year growth period. These variations are interpreted to result from variable contributions of the subpolar and subtropical Atlantic intermediate water masses, which today are characterized by ɛNd values of - 15 and ~-11, respectively. The low ɛNd values observed during the warm MCA and during recent times imply a strong eastward extension of the mid-depth subpolar gyre (SPG) induced by a dominant positive phase of the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO). During the LIA, water from the subtropical gyre (STG) and potentially from the Mediterranean Sea Water (MSW) propagated further northward, as indicated by the higher coral ɛNd values. This pattern suggests a negative mean state of the NAO during the LIA, with weaker and more southerly located Westerlies and a westward contraction of the SPG. Variations in the contributions of the two gyres imply changes in the heat and salt budgets at intermediate depths during the past millennia that may have contributed to changes in the properties of North Atlantic inflow into the Nordic Seas and thus

  3. Growth response of a deep-water ferromanganese crust to evolution of the Neogene Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    A deep-water ferromanganese crust from a Central Indian Ocean seamount dated previously by 10Be and 230Th(excess) was studied for compositional and textural variations that occurred throughout its growth history. The 10Be/9Be dated interval (upper 32 mm) yields an uniform growth rate of 2.8 ?? 0.1 mm/Ma [Frank, M., O'Nions, R.K., 1998. Sources of Pb for Indian Ocean ferromanganese crusts: a record of Himalayan erosion. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 158, pp. 121-130.] which gives an extrapolated age of ~ 26 Ma for the base of the crust at 72 mm and is comparable to the maximum age derived from the Co-model based growth rate estimates. This study shows that Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide precipitation did not occur from the time of emplacement of the seamount during the Eocene (~ 53 Ma) until the late Oligocene (~ 26 Ma). This paucity probably was the result of a nearly overlapping palaeo-CCD and palaeo-depth of crust formation, increased early Eocene productivity, instability and reworking of the surface rocks on the flanks of the seamount, and lack of oxic deep-water in the nascent Indian Ocean. Crust accretion began (older zone) with the formation of isolated cusps of Fe-Mn oxide during a time of high detritus influx, probably due to the early-Miocene intense erosion associated with maximum exhumation of the Himalayas (op. cit.). This cuspate textured zone extends from 72 mm to 42 mm representing the early-Miocene period. Intense polar cooling and increased mixing of deep and intermediate waters at the close of the Oligocene might have led to the increased oxygenation of the bottom-water in the basin. A considerable expansion in the vertical distance between the seafloor depth and the CCD during the early Miocene in addition to the influx of oxygenated bottom-water likely initiated Fe-Mn crust formation. Pillar structure characterises the younger zone, which extends from 40 mm to the surface of the crust, i.e., ~ 15 Ma to Present. This zone is characterised by > 25% higher

  4. Analyses on the tectonic thermal evolution and influence factors in the deep-water Qiongdongnan Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhenfeng; SHI Xiaobin; YANG Jun; HUANG Baojia; SUN Zhen; WANG Yahui; JIANG Haiyan; YU Chuanhai; YANG Xiaoqiu

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the tectonic thermal evolution and influence factors on the present heat flow distribution, based on 154 heat flow data, the present heat flow distribution features of the main tectonic units are first analyzed in detail, then the tectonic thermal evolution histories of 20 profiles are reestablished crossing the main deep-water sags with a structural, thermal and sedimentary coupled numerical model. On the basis of the present geothermal features, the Qiongdongnan Basin could be divided into three regions: the northern shelf and upper slope region with a heat flow of 50–70 mW/m2, most of the central depression zone of 70–85 mW/m2, and a NE trending high heat flow zone of 85–105 mW/m2 lying in the eastern basin. Numerical modeling shows that during the syn-rift phase, the heat flow increases generally with time, and is higher in basement high area than in its adjacent sags. At the end of the syn-rift phase, the heat flow in the deep-water sags was in a range of 60–85 mW/m2, while in the basement high area, it was in a range of 75–100 mW/m2. During the post-rift phase, the heat flow decreased gradually, and tended to be more uniform in the basement highs and sags. However, an extensive magmatism, which equivalently happened at around 5 Ma, has greatly increased the heat flow values, and the relict heat still contributes about 10–25 mW/m2to the present surface heat flow in the central depression zone and the southern uplift zone. Further analyses suggested that the present high heat flow in the deep-water Qiongdongnan Basin is a combined result of the thermal anomaly in the upper mantle, highly thinning of the lithosphere, and the recent extensive magma-tism. Other secondary factors might have affected the heat flow distribution features in some local regions. These factors include basement and seafloor topography, sediment heat generation, thermal blanketing, local magmatic injecting and hydrothermal activities related to faulting and

  5. Stirring by deep cyclones and the evolution of Denmark strait overflow water observed at line W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, M.; Toole, J. M.; Torres, D. J.; Smethie, W. M.; Joyce, T. M.; Curry, R. G.

    2016-03-01

    Shipboard velocity and water property data from 18 transects across the North Atlantic Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) near 40 °N are examined to study the evolution of the Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW) component of the DWBC and mixing between DSOW and the interior. The examined transects along Line W - which stretches from the continental shelf south of New England to Bermuda - were made between 1994 and 2014. The shipboard data comprise measurements at regular stations of velocity from lowered acoustic Doppler current profilers, CTD profiles and trace gas chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentrations from bottle samples at discrete depths. Comparison of the Line W velocity sections with concurrent sea surface height maps from satellite altimetry indicates that large cyclones in the deep ocean accompany intermittent quasi-stationary meander troughs in the Gulf Stream path at Line W. A composite of 5 velocity sections along Line W suggests that a typical cyclone reaches swirl speeds of greater than 30 cm s-1 at 3400-m depth and has a radius (distance between the center and the maximum velocity) of 75 km. Tracer data suggest that these cyclones affect not only the deep velocity structure along Line W, but also provide a mechanism for water exchange between the DWBC's DSOW and the interior. Vigorous exchange is corroborated by a mismatch in the CFC-11:CFC-12 and CFC-113:CFC-12 ratio ages calculated for DSOW at Line W. During the most recent 5-year period (2010-2014), a decrease in DSOW density has been driven by warming (increasing by almost 0.1 °C) as salinity has increased only slightly (by 0.003, which is close to the 0.002 uncertainty of the measurements). The abyssal ocean offshore of the DWBC and Gulf Stream and deeper than 3000-m depth has freshened at a rate of 6×10-4 yr-1 since at least 2003. Density here remains nearly unchanged over this period, due to temperature compensation, though a linear cooling trend in the abyssal ocean (to compensate the

  6. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of deep-water carbonate mound initiation in the Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Margreth, S.; Eisenhauer, A.; Dullo, C.

    2009-12-01

    The understanding of the paleoenvironment during initiation and early development of deep-water carbonate mounds in the NE Atlantic is still under debate. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307 sailed in 2005 to the Porcupine Seabight in order to investigate for the first time sediments from the base of a giant carbonate mound (155 m, Challenger Mound). First results indicate initiation and start-up phase of this carbonate mound coincides with the beginning of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) at around 2.7 Ma. Further carbonate mound development seems to be strongly dependent on rapid changes in paleoceanographic and climatic conditions at the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary, especially characterized and caused by intermediate water masses. To investigate this specific time interval of ~2.7 Ma we use well-developed proxies such as δ18O and δ13C of planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) and a collection of benthic foraminifera (Fontbotia wuellerstorfi, Discanomalina coronata, Lobatula lobatula, Lobatula antartica, and Planulina ariminensis) as well as grain size analysis. Additionally we provide δ88/86Sr paleotemperatures from cold water coral Lophelia pertusa. This multi proxy approach made it possible to determine the paleoenvironmental and paleoecological setting favourable for the initial coral colonization. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope records of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages indicate that Lobatula lobatula provides a reliable isotopic signature for paleoenvironmental reconstructions and that enhanced bottom currents of intermediate water masses of southern origin (Mediterranean, Bay of Biscay) intensified at the start-up of the NHG. During initiation and early mound development, temperatures of these intermediate waters decreased to favourable 9 °C and reconstructed current strength and nutrient concentrations (phosphate and nitrate) stayed in the range of reported tolerance supporting the rapid growth of cold-water corals and

  7. Evidence of Enhanced Respired Carbon in Eastern Equatorial Pacific Deep-Waters over the last 30,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umling, N. E.; Thunell, R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid decreases in glacial deep water reservoir ages have been observed in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP; this study), North Pacific (Rae et al., 2014), Southwest Pacific (Sikes et al., 2016), and North Atlantic (Skinner et al., 2013). It has been hypothesized that release of a deep ocean 14C-depleted, respired-carbon reservoir to the surface ocean and atmosphere is the most likely mechanism for the observed increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations recorded in ice cores during the last glacial-interglacial transition (Broecker and Barker, 2007). This study examines whether oxygenation, organic carbon flux, and carbonate chemistry in the EEP deep-waters reflect an increase in respired carbon associated with recorded 14C-depletions using isotopic and trace element records from three Panama Basin cores (2,650-3,200 m water-depth). An increase in glacial deep-water respired carbon storage would result in a shift of DIC speciation towards lower carbonate ion concentrations along with deoxygenation of bottom waters. Specifically, we use the boron to calcium (B/Ca) and uranium to calcium (U/Ca) ratios of the benthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi to reconstruct deep-water carbonate ion concentration (Yu and Elderfield, 2007; Raizsch et al., 2011). Additionally, bottom water oxygenation is estimated from the difference in δ13C of benthic foraminifera living in pore waters at the anoxic boundary and of those living in bottom water (Δ δ13C; Hoogakker et al., 2015, 2016), while carbon flux was assessed from the U/Ca and Cd/Ca of foraminiferal authigenic coatings.

  8. Ventilation of the Baltic Sea deep water: A brief review of present knowledge from observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Burchard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The ventilation of the Baltic Sea deep wateris driven by either gale-forced barotropic or baroclinic salt water inflows.During the past two decades, the frequency of large barotropic inflows(mainly in winter has decreased and the frequency of medium-intensity baroclinic inflows(observed in summer has increased. As a result of entrainment of ambient oxygen-rich water,summer inflows are also important for the deep water ventilation.Recent process studies of salt water plumes suggest that the entrainmentrates are generally smaller than those predicted by earlier entrainment models.In addition to the entrance area, the Słupsk Sill andthe Słupsk Furrow are important locations for the transformation of water masses. Passing the Słupsk Furrow, both gravity-driven dense bottom flows and sub-surface cyclonic eddies,which are eroded laterally by thermohaline intrusions,ventilate the deep water of the eastern Gotland Basin.A recent study of the energy transfer from barotropic to baroclinicwave motion using a two-dimensional shallow water model suggests thatabout 30% of the energy needed below the halocline for deep water mixingis explained by the breaking of internal waves.In the deep water decade-long stagnation periods with decreasingoxygen and increasing hydrogen sulphide concentrations might be caused by anomalously largefreshwater inflows and anomalously high mean zonal wind speeds. In differentstudies the typical response time scale of average salinity was estimated tobe between approximately 20 and 30 years.The review summarizes recent research resultsand ends with a list of open questions and recommendations.

  9. Role of Deep Convection in Establishing the Isotopic Composition of Water Vapor in the Tropical Transition Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jamison A.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.

    2006-01-01

    The transport of H2O and HDO within deep convection is investigated with 3-D large eddy simulations (LES) using bin microphysics. The lofting and sublimation of HDO-rich ice invalidate the Rayleigh fractionation model of isotopologue distribution within deep convection. Bootstrapping the correlation of the ratio of HDO to H2O (deltaD) to water vapor mixing ratio (q(sub v)) through a sequence of convective events produced non-Rayleigh correlations resembling observations. These results support two mechanisms for stratospheric entry. Deep convection can inject air with water vapor of stratospheric character directly into the tropical transition layer (TTL). Alternatively, moister air detraining from convection may be dehydrated via cirrus formation n the TTL to produce stratospheric water vapor. Significant production of subsaturated air in the TTL via convective dehydration is not observed in these simulations, nor is it necessary to resolve the stratospheric isotope paradox.

  10. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  11. Role of Deep Convection in Establishing the Isotopic Composition of Water Vapor in the Tropical Transition Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jamison A.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.

    2006-01-01

    The transport of H2O and HDO within deep convection is investigated with 3-D large eddy simulations (LES) using bin microphysics. The lofting and sublimation of HDO-rich ice invalidate the Rayleigh fractionation model of isotopologue distribution within deep convection. Bootstrapping the correlation of the ratio of HDO to H2O (deltaD) to water vapor mixing ratio (q(sub v)) through a sequence of convective events produced non-Rayleigh correlations resembling observations. These results support two mechanisms for stratospheric entry. Deep convection can inject air with water vapor of stratospheric character directly into the tropical transition layer (TTL). Alternatively, moister air detraining from convection may be dehydrated via cirrus formation n the TTL to produce stratospheric water vapor. Significant production of subsaturated air in the TTL via convective dehydration is not observed in these simulations, nor is it necessary to resolve the stratospheric isotope paradox.

  12. The diet and feeding ecology of Conger conger (L. 1758 in the deep waters of the Eastern Ionian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. ANASTASOPOULOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The diet of the European conger eel Conger conger was investigated for the first time in the Eastern Mediterranean. Fish dominated the European conger eel diet in the deep waters of E. Ionian Sea. All other prey taxa were identified as accidental preys. However, intestine analysis showed that Natantia, Brachyura and Cephalopoda might have a more important contribution in the diet of the species. C. conger exhibited a benthopelagic feeding behavior as it preyed upon both demersal and mesopelagic taxa. The high vacuity index and the low stomach and intestine fullness indicated that the feeding intensity of the species in the deep waters of Eastern Ionian Sea was quite low. C. conger feeding strategy was characterised by specialisation in various resource items. A between-phenotype contribution to niche width was observed for some prey categories. European Conger eel feeding specialisation seemed to be an adaptation to a food-scarce environment, as typified in deep-water habitats

  13. Clean hot water drilling for exploration of the Antarctic deep subglacial environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinson, K.; Pearce, D.; Hodgson, D.; Bentley, M.; Smith, A.; Tranter, M.; Rose, M. C.; Ross, N.; Mowlem, M. C.; Parnell, J.; Siegert, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Overlain by several kilometres of ice, the subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet are regarded as extreme habitats for microbial life and repositories of important paleoclimate records. Of significant scientific interest, yet remaining largely unexplored, accessing and sampling these environments presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, much of it part of a hydrological drainage network, accessing of this environment must conform to international environmental contamination protocols. This makes hot water drilling the most viable option for clean, fast, access through thick ice. After two decades of planning, involving the development of drilling techniques for subglacial access, instrument design and logistics set up, significant progress has been made in attempts to directly access, measure, and sample subglacial lakes and sediments. Combining the experiences from the notable setbacks and successes, as well as recent field testing for this drilling technique, the most practical technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into Subglacial Lake Ellsworth and other deep (>3000 m) access targets will be presented.

  14. Photosynthetic use of inorganic carbon in deep-water kelps from the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Fernández, José Antonio; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of inorganic carbon assimilation were investigated in the four deep-water kelps inhabiting sea bottoms at the Strait of Gibraltar; these species are distributed at different depths (Saccorhiza polysiches at shallower waters, followed by Laminaria ochroleuca, then Phyllariopsis brevipes and, at the deepest bottoms, Phyllariopsis purpurascens). To elucidate the capacity to use HCO3(-) as a source of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis in the kelps, different experimental approaches were used. Specifically, we measured the irradiance-saturated gross photosynthetic rate versus pH at a constant dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration of 2 mM, the irradiance-saturated apparent photosynthesis (APS) rate versus DIC, the total and the extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CAext), the observed and the theoretical photosynthetic rates supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3(-) to CO2, and the δ(13)C signature in tissues of the algae. While S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca showed photosynthetic activity at pH 9.5 (around 1.0 µmol O2 m(-2) s(-1)), the activity was close to zero in both species of Phyllariopsis. The APS versus DIC was almost saturated for the DIC values of natural seawater (2 mM) in S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca, but the relationship was linear in P. brevipes and P. purpurascens. The four species showed total and CAext activities but the inhibition of the CAext originated the observed photosynthetic rates at pH 8.0 to be similar to the theoretical rates that could be supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3(-). The isotopic (13)C signatures ranged from -17.40 ± 1.81 to -21.11 ± 1.73 ‰ in the four species. Additionally, the δ(13)C signature was also measured in the deep-water Laminaria rodriguezii growing at 60-80 m, showing even a more negative value of -26.49 ± 1.25 ‰. All these results suggest that the four kelps can use HCO3(-) as external carbon source for photosynthesis mainly by the action of external CAext, but

  15. Deep water masses and sediments are main compartments for polychlorinated biphenyls in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, Anna; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-06-17

    There is a wealth of studies of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in surface water and biota of the Arctic Ocean. Still, there are no observation-based assessments of PCB distribution and inventories in and between the major Arctic Ocean compartments. Here, the first water column distribution of PCBs in the central Arctic Ocean basins (Nansen, Amundsen, and Makarov) is presented, demonstrating nutrient-like vertical profiles with 5-10 times higher concentrations in the intermediate and deep water masses than in surface waters. The consistent vertical profiles in all three Arctic Ocean basins likely reflect buildup of PCBs transported from the shelf seas and from dissolution and/or mineralization of settling particles. Combined with measurement data on PCBs in other Arctic Ocean compartments collected over the past decade, the total Arctic Ocean inventory of ∑7PCB was estimated to 182 ± 40 t (±1 standard error of the mean), with sediments (144 ± 40 t), intermediate (5 ± 1 t) and deep water masses (30 ± 2 t) storing 98% of the PCBs in the Arctic Ocean. Further, we used hydrographic and carbon cycle parametrizations to assess the main pathways of PCBs into and out of the Arctic Ocean during the 20th century. River discharge appeared to be the major pathway for PCBs into the Arctic Ocean with 115 ± 11 t, followed by ocean currents (52 ± 17 t) and net atmospheric deposition (30 ± 28 t). Ocean currents provided the only important pathway out of the Arctic Ocean, with an estimated cumulative flux of 22 ± 10 t. The observation-based inventory of ∑7PCB of 182 ± 40 t is consistent with the contemporary inventory based on cumulative fluxes for ∑7PCB of 173 ± 36 t. Information on the concentration and distribution of PCBs in the deeper compartments of the Arctic Ocean improves our understanding of the large-scale fate of POPs in the Arctic and may also provide a means to test and improve models used to assess the fate of organic pollutants in the Arctic.

  16. Transmission of light in deep sea water at the site of the Antares neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, J A; Amram, P; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardellier-Desages, F E; Aslanides, E; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Azoulay, R; Bailey, D; Basa, S; Battaglieri, M; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Beltramelli, J; Bertin, V; Billault, M; Blaes, R; Blanc, F; Bland, R W; De Botton, N R; Boulesteix, J; Bouwhuis, M C; Brooks, C B; Bradbury, S M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Bugeon, F; Burgio, G F; Cafagna, F; Calzas, A; Caponetto, L; Carmona, E; Carr, J; Cartwright, S L; Cecchini, S; Charvis, P; Circella, M; Colnard, C; Compere, C; Croquette, J; Cooper, S; Coyle, P; Cuneo, S; Damy, G; Van Dantzig, R; Deschamps, A; De Marzo, C; Destelle, J J; De Vita, R; Dinkelspiler, B; Dispau, G; Drougou, J F; Druillole, F; Engelen, J; Favard, S; Feinstein, F; Ferry, S; Festy, D; Fopma, J; Fuda, J L; Gallone, J M; Giacomelli, G; Girard, N; Goret, P; Gournay, J F; Hallewell, G D; Hartmann, B; Heijboer, A; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrouin, G; Hossl, J; Hoffmann, C; Hubbard, John R; Jaquet, M; De Jong, M; Jouvenot, F; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karkar, S; Karolak, M; Katz, U; Keller, P; Kooijman, P; Korolkova, E V; Kouchner, A; Kretschmer, W; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lafoux, H; Lagier, P; Lamare, P; Languillat, J C; Laubier, L; Legou, T; Le Guen, Y; Le Provost, H; Le Van-Suu, A; Lo Nigro, L; Lo Presti, D; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Louis, F; Lyashuk, V; Magnier, P; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Maron, C; Massol, A; Mazéas, F; Mazeau, B; Mazure, A; McMillan, J E; Michel, J L; Millot, C; Milovanovic, A; Montanet, François; Montaruli, T; Morel, J P; Moscoso, L; Nezri, E; Niess, V; Nooren, G J; Ogden, P; Olivetto, C; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Payre, P; Petta, C; Pineau, J P; Poinsignon, J; Popa, V; Potheau, R; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Randazzo, N; Real, D; Van Rens, B; Rethore, F; Ripani, M; Roca-Blay, V; Romeyer, A; Rollin, J F; Romita, M; Rose, H J; Ruppi, M; Russo, G V; Sacquin, Yu; Saouter, S; Schuller, J P; Schuster, W; Sokalski, I A; Suvorova, O; Spooner, N J C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, T; Stubert, D; Taiuti, M; Thompson, L F; Tilav, S; Usik, A; Valdy, P; Vallage, B; Vaudaine, G; Vernin, P; Virieux, J; Vladimirsky, E; De Vries, G J; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; De Wolf, E; Zaborov, D; Zaccone, Henri; Zakharov, V; Zavatarelli, S; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan; Zúñiga, J

    2005-01-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope is a large photomultiplier array designed to detect neutrino-induced upward-going muons by their Cherenkov radiation. Understanding the absorption and scattering of light in the deep Mediterranean is fundamental to optimising the design and performance of the detector. This paper presents measurements of blue and UV light transmission at the ANTARES site taken between 1997 and 2000. The derived values for the scattering length and the angular distribution of particulate scattering were found to be highly correlated, and results are therefore presented in terms of an absorption length lambda_abs and an effective scattering length lambda_sct^eff. The values for blue (UV) light are found to be lambda_abs ~ 60(26) m, lambda_sct^eff ~ 265(122) m, with significant (15%) time variability. Finally, the results of ANTARES simulations showing the effect of these water properties on the anticipated performance of the detector are presented.

  17. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  18. Deep ultraviolet photoluminescence of water-soluble self-passivated graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Libin; Ji, Rongbin; Cao, Xiangke; Lin, Jingyu; Jiang, Hongxing; Li, Xueming; Teng, Kar Seng; Luk, Chi Man; Zeng, Songjun; Hao, Jianhua; Lau, Shu Ping

    2012-06-26

    Glucose-derived water-soluble crystalline graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with an average diameter as small as 1.65 nm (∼5 layers) were prepared by a facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The GQDs exhibits deep ultraviolet (DUV) emission of 4.1 eV, which is the shortest emission wavelength among all the solution-based QDs. The GQDs exhibit typical excitation wavelength-dependent properties as expected in carbon-based quantum dots. However, the emission wavelength is independent of the size of the GQDs. The unique optical properties of the GQDs are attributed to the self-passivated layer on the surface of the GQDs as revealed by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The photoluminescence quantum yields of the GQDs were determined to be 7-11%. The GQDs are capable of converting blue light into white light when the GQDs are coated onto a blue light emitting diode.

  19. New deep-water cnidarian sites in the southern Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. ANGELETTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle exploration and bottom sampling in the southern Adriatic Sea (Apulian and Montenegrin margins resulted in the discovery of cnidarian-rich deep-sea habitats in the depth range of ca. 400-700 m. In particular, ROV inspection of Montenegrin canyons reveals the existence of megabenthic communities dominated by a variety of cnidarians, including scleractinians (Madrepora oculata, Lophelia pertusa, Dendrophyllia cornigera, antipatharians (Leiopathes glaberrima and gorgonians (Callogorgia verticillata as major habitat forming taxa, often in association with sponges and, subordinately, serpulids. All such cnidarians are new records for the southeastern side of the Adriatic Sea. Our investigation indicates that an almost continuous belt of patchy cold water coral sites occurs along the entire southwestern margin (Apulian, basically connecting the Adriatic populations with those inhabiting the Ionian margin (Santa Maria di Leuca coral province.

  20. Functionalization of CNTs surface with phosphonuim based deep eutectic solvents for arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlOmar, Mohamed Khalid; Alsaadi, Mohammed Abdulhakim; Hayyan, Maan; Akib, Shatirah; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we present the use of deep eutectic solvent (DES) as functionalization agents for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form novel adsorbents for removal of arsenic ions (As3+) from water. Two DESs systems were prepared using methyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (MTPB) and benzyltriphenylphosphonium chloride (BTPC) as salts, in conjugation with glycerol (Gly) as a hydrogen bond donor. The resulting novel adsorbents were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Zeta potential, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, XRD, EDX, FESEM, and BET surface area. Optimization studies were carried out utilizing RSM-CCD experimental design to estimate the optimum removal conditions for each adsorbent. The adsorption experimental data of both adsorbents were found to fit well with pseudo-second-order kinetics model, as well as with Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity of a MTPB-DES-functionalized CNTs adsorbent was 23.4 mg/g.

  1. A relationship between wave steepness and wave age for wind waves in deep water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; DING Yun; GUAN Changlong

    2007-01-01

    Studying the relationship between wave steepness and wave age is import ant for describing wind wave growth with energy balance equation of significant waves. After invoking the dispersion relation of surface gravity wave in deep water, a new relationship between wave steepness and wave age is revealed based on the "3/2-power law" (Toba, 1972), in which wave steepness is a function of wave age with a drag coefficient as a parameter. With a given wave age, a larger drag coefficient would lead to larger wave steepness. This could be interpreted as the result of interaction between wind and waves.Comparing with previous relationships, the newly proposed one is more consistent with observational data in field and laboratory.

  2. Short-crested waves in deep water: a numerical investigation of recent laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of quasi-steady, doubly-periodic monochromatic short-crested wave patterns in deep water is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. Simulations using linear wavemaker conditions in the nonlinear model are initially used to approximate conditions from recent laboratory...... experiments. The computed patterns share many features with those observed in wavetanks, including bending (both frontwards and backwards) of the wave crests, dipping at the crest centerlines, and a pronounced long modulation in the direction of propagation. A new and simple explanation for these features...... is provided, involving the release of spurious free first harmonics, due to the neglect of steady third-order components in the three-dimensional wave generation. A comparison with the experimentally observed beat length and amplitude matches the theoretical/numerical predictions well. Additionally, direct...

  3. Speciation of mercury in surface and deep-sea waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Logar, Martina; Fajon, Vesna; Zvonarić, Tomislav; Pirrone, Nicola

    depth was only measured at two stations, and indicated variability comparing the eastern and the western leg of the Urania cruise. The depth profile pattern confirms the importance of dynamic processes at the surface layers, while deep water continuously supplies DGM to the surface layer. The importance of analytical quality control is also discussed in this paper.

  4. Nonlinear quasi-static analysis of ultra-deep-water top-tension riser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guanghai; Qiu, Xingqi; Wang, Ke; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-09-01

    In order to analyse the ultra-deep-water top-tension riser deformation in drilling conditions, a nonlinear quasi-static analysis model and equation are established. The riser in this model is regarded as a simply supported beam located in the vertical plane and is subjected to non-uniform axial and lateral forces. The model and the equation are solved by the finite element method. The effects of riser outside diameter, top tension ratio, sea surface current velocity, drag force coefficient, floating system drift distance and water depth on the riser lateral displacement are discussed. Results show that the riser lateral displacement increase with the increase in the sea surface current velocity, drag force coefficient and water depth, whereas decrease with the increase in the riser outside diameter, top tension ratio. The top tension ratio has an important influence on the riser deformation and it should be set reasonably under different circumstances. The drift of the floating system has a complicated influence on the riser deformation and it should avoid a large drift distance in the proceedings of drilling and production.

  5. Investigation of jack-up leg extension for deep water operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousri M.A. Welaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the first jack-up was built, jackups have become the most popular type of mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU for offshore exploration and development purposes in shallow water. The most pivotal component of the jack-up unit is the leg, which can directly affect the global performance of the unit. In this paper, an investigation into extending the length of the jack up leg is carried out in order to study the enhancement of the rig capability to drill in deeper water approaching the range of the Semisubmersible Drilling Unit (SSDU (300-1000ft. A study of the performance of a deep-water jack-up unit is performed with different leg lengths. Typical leg scantling dimensions and identical external loads are assigned, and then a detailed Finite Element Analysis (FEA model is created in order to simulate the jack-up leg unit’s structural behavior. A Multi-point Constraint (MPC element together with the spring element is used to deal with the boundary conditions. Finally, a comparative analysis for five leg lengths is carried out to illustrate their performance, including the ultimate static strength, and weight.

  6. On the Impacts of Different Surface Forcing Regimes for Deep Water Formation in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josey, S.; Tsimplis, M.; Gomis, D.; Ruiz, S.; Marcos, M.; Somot, S.

    2009-04-01

    Deep water formation is known to occur at 3 major sites (the Gulf of Lions, Adriatic and Aegean Seas) in the Mediterranean basin. However, the role played by air-sea interaction in setting the frequency and strength of formation events (including major transient episodes such as that experienced in the Aegean sea in the early 1990s) is not well understood. We will explore this relationship using air-sea heat, freshwater and density flux fields, including output from downscaled versions (HIPOCAS and ARPERA) of the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses. The downscaled fields reveal small scale forcing features (including jet-like structures over the dense water formation sites) that are not present in the coarser resolution reanalysis datasets. They also show greater variability in the forcing of the Aegean and the Gulf of Lions than the Adriatic Sea. The differences between the forcing distributions of the Aegean and Adriatic will be discussed in detail and will be advanced as a potential cause for variations in frequency of dense water formation in these two regions.

  7. Quantifying Deep Vadose Zone Soil Water Potential Changes at a Waste Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel M. Hubbell; Deborah L. McElroy

    2007-08-01

    Recent advances in moisture monitoring using tensiometers has resulted in long-duration, high quality data sets from within the deep vadose zone. A network of about 30 advanced tensiometers in 18 wells provided field-scale data to monitor soil water potential conditions and movement in the subsurface in and around a mixed waste disposal site at depths ranging from 6 to over 67 m below land surface (bls). Sensors are located in both sediments and fractured rock within the geologic profile and some have been in operation for over 10 years. The moisture monitoring was able to detect long term declines in soil water potential in response to lower than normal precipitation and resultant infiltration over the time period from 2000 to 2004. This trend was reversed in 2005 and 2006 in more than half of the monitoring sites over the 6 to 33 m depth interval and in several monitoring sites from 33 to 67 m, in response to above normal precipitation. These tensiometer data have the potential to effectively and rapidly validate that a remedial action such as placement of an ET cover would be successful in reducing the water moisture movement inside the disposal area to levels similar to those in undisturbed sites outside of the disposal area. This paper will describe the instrument design, how the instruments were installed, and the resultant data from this monitoring system.

  8. Markov chains and entropy tests in genetic-based lithofacies analysis of deep-water clastic depositional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borka Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between structural elements and the so-called genetic lithofacies in a clastic deep-water depositional system. Process-sedimentology has recently been gaining importance in the characterization of these systems. This way the recognized facies attributes can be associated with the depositional processes establishing the genetic lithofacies. In this paper this approach was presented through a case study of a Tertiary deep-water sequence of the Pannonian-basin.

  9. Investigation of Surface Waves in Deep and Shallow Water using Coherent Radars at Grazing Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M.; Horstmann, J.; Carrasco, R.; Seemann, J.; Stresser, M.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent microwave radars operating at X-band near grazing incidence are utilized to measure the backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity from the small-scale surface roughness of the ocean. The radar backscatter is dependent on the wind and strongly modulated by the surface waves and therefore enables to retrieve the surface wind as well as surface waves. The radar measured Doppler velocities are also modulated by contributions from the wind, current and waves and allow getting additional information on these parameters. In addition coherent marine radars allow to observe breaking waves, which lead to a increase in radar backscatter as well as a strong change of the Doppler speed.Within this presentation we will introduce and validate new methods to measure spectral wave properties such as wave directions, periods and significant wave height from coherent marine radars. The methods have been applied in deep and shallow water and validated to measurements of directional wave riders as well as an Acoustic Wave and Current Profiler. These comparisons show an overall excellent performance of coherent radars for the retrieval of spectral wave properties (e.g. Hs rms of 0.2 m). Furthermore, new methodologies will be presented that enable to observe and quantify wave breaking in deep water as well as in the littoral zone. The above mentioned methods have been applied to investigate the influence of Offshore Wind Farms (OWF) on the wave field with respect to the spectral properties as well as the amount of wave breaking. We will present the results obtained during a cruise in May 2015 within and around the OWF Dantysk in the German Bight of the North Sea, which consist of eighty 3.5 MW wind turbines. In addition we will present our initial results on the investigation of wave dissipation in the littoral zone at the coast of the island Sylt using marine radars, pressure gauges as well as directional wave riders.

  10. In situ growth rates of deep-water octocorals determined from 3D photogrammetric reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennecke, Swaantje; Kwasnitschka, Tom; Metaxas, Anna; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2016-12-01

    Growth rates of deep-water corals provide important information on the recovery potential of these ecosystems, for example from fisheries-induced impacts. Here, we present in situ growth dynamics that are currently largely unknown for deep-water octocorals, calculated by applying a non-destructive method. Videos of a boulder harbouring multiple colonies of Paragorgia arborea and Primnoa resedaeformis in the Northeast Channel Coral Conservation Area at the entrance to the Gulf of Maine at 863 m depth were collected in 2006, 2010 and 2014. Photogrammetric reconstructions of the boulder and the fauna yielded georeferenced 3D models for all sampling years. Repeated measurements of total length and cross-sectional area of the same colonies allowed the observation of growth dynamics. Growth rates of total length of Paragorgia arborea decreased over time with higher rates between 2006 and 2010 than between 2010 and 2014, while growth rates of cross-sectional area remained comparatively constant. A general trend of decreasing growth rates of total length with size of the coral colony was documented. While no growth was observed for the largest colony (165 cm in length) between 2010 and 2014, a colony 50-65 cm in length grew 3.7 cm yr-1 between 2006 and 2010. Minimum growth rates of 1.6-2.7 cm yr-1 were estimated for two recruits (<23 cm in 2014) of Primnoa resedaeformis. We successfully extracted biologically meaningful data from photogrammetric models and present the first in situ growth rates for these coral species in the Northwest Atlantic.

  11. Six new deep-water sternaspid species (Annelida, Sternaspidae from the Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Salazar-Vallejo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most sternaspid species have been described from shallow water, and Caulleryaspis Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 includes one deep water species: C. gudmundssoni Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 from Iceland. In Sternaspis Otto, 1821, the most speciose genus, most species were described from shallow water and only three thrive in deep water: S. maior Chamberlin, 1919 from the Gulf of California, S. princeps Selenka, 1885 from New Zealand, and S. riestchi Caullery, 1944 from Indonesia. The study of some deep sea sternaspids from the Pacific Ocean in the collections of six research institutions resulted in the discovery of six undescribed species, and for three of them there were abundant materials showing ventro-caudal shield development. Caulleryaspis fauchaldi sp. n. is described based on specimens from Oregon and California; it differs from the known species because it has a shield with rounded anterior margins and its peg chaetae form thin, small spines. Caulleryaspis nuda sp. n. was collected off Oregon; it is unique because its shield lacks a layer of sediment particles firmly attached, but has instead a thin layer of small particles loosely attached. Four other species are newly described in Sternaspis: S. annenkovae sp. n. was collected east off the northern Kurile Islands in about 4,000 m depth; it differs from other species bya bicolored body, with the introvert darker than the abdomen, and its ventro-caudal shield plates are divergent resulting in a divided fan. The second species, S. maureri sp.n. was found off Peru in 1296–6489 m water depths and in the Southwestern Pacific in 795–3830 m; it resembles S. williamsae sp. n. but differs because its shield has better-developed ribs, the fan has a shallow or indistinct median notch and has lateral notches well-developed. The third species, S. uschakovi sp. n., was found in the Okhotsk Sea in 592–1366 m, off California in 1585 m, Gulf of California in 1200–1274 m, and Western

  12. Six new deep-water sternaspid species (Annelida, Sternaspidae) from the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I; Buzhinskaja, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Most sternaspid species have been described from shallow water, and Caulleryaspis Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 includes one deep water species: C. gudmundssoni Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 from Iceland. In Sternaspis Otto, 1821, the most speciose genus, most species were described from shallow water and only three thrive in deep water: S. maior Chamberlin, 1919 from the Gulf of California, S. princeps Selenka, 1885 from New Zealand, and S. riestchi Caullery, 1944 from Indonesia. The study of some deep sea sternaspids from the Pacific Ocean in the collections of six research institutions resulted in the discovery of six undescribed species, and for three of them there were abundant materials showing ventro-caudal shield development. Caulleryaspis fauchaldi sp. n. is described based on specimens from Oregon and California; it differs from the known species because it has a shield with rounded anterior margins and its peg chaetae form thin, small spines. Caulleryaspis nuda sp. n. was collected off Oregon; it is unique because its shield lacks a layer of sediment particles firmly attached, but has instead a thin layer of small particles loosely attached. Four other species are newly described in Sternaspis: S. annenkovae sp. n. was collected east off the northern Kurile Islands in about 4,000 m depth; it differs from other species by having a bicolored body, with the introvert darker than the abdomen, and its ventro-caudal shield plates are divergent resulting in a divided fan. The second species, S. maureri sp. n. was found off Peru in 1296-6489 m water depths and in the Southwestern Pacific in 795-3830 m; it resembles S. williamsae sp. n. but differs because its shield has better-developed ribs, the fan has a shallow or indistinct median notch and has lateral notches well-developed. The third species, S. uschakovi sp. n., was found in the Okhotsk Sea in 592-1366 m, off California in 1585 m, Gulf of California in 1200-1274 m, and Western Mexico in 2548 m; it

  13. Is substrate composition a suitable predictor for deep-water coral occurrence on fine scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennecke, Swaantje; Metaxas, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Species distribution modelling can be applied to identify potentially suitable habitat for species with largely unknown distributions, such as many deep-water corals. Important variables influencing species occurrence in the deep sea, e.g. substrate composition, are often not included in these modelling approaches because high-resolution data are unavailable. We investigated the relationship between substrate composition and the occurrence of the two deep-water octocoral species Primnoa resedaeformis and Paragorgia arborea, which require hard substrate for attachment. On a scale of 10s of metres, we analysed images of the seafloor taken at two locations inside the Northeast Channel Coral Conservation Area in the Northwest Atlantic. We interpolated substrate composition over the sampling areas and determined the contribution of substrate classes, depth and slope to describe habitat suitability using maximum entropy modelling (Maxent). Substrate composition was similar at both sites - dominated by pebbles in a matrix of sand (>80%) with low percentages of suitable substrate for coral occurrence. Coral abundance was low at site 1 (0.9 colonies of P. resedaeformis per 100 m2) and high at site 2 (63 colonies of P. resedaeformis per 100 m2) indicating that substrate alone is not sufficient to explain varying patterns in coral occurrence. Spatial interpolations of substrate classes revealed the difficulty to accurately resolve sparsely distributed boulders (3-5% of substrate). Boulders were by far the most important variable in the habitat suitability model (HSM) for P. resedaeformis at site 1, indicating the fundamental influence of a substrate class that is the least abundant. At site 2, HSMs identified cobbles and sand/pebble as the most important variables for habitat suitability. However, substrate classes were correlated making it difficult to determine the influence of individual variables. To provide accurate information on habitat suitability for the two coral

  14. Beyond optimality: Multistakeholder robustness tradeoffs for regional water portfolio planning under deep uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jonathan D.; Zeff, Harrison B.; Reed, Patrick M.; Characklis, Gregory W.

    2014-10-01

    While optimality is a foundational mathematical concept in water resources planning and management, "optimal" solutions may be vulnerable to failure if deeply uncertain future conditions deviate from those assumed during optimization. These vulnerabilities may produce severely asymmetric impacts across a region, making it vital to evaluate the robustness of management strategies as well as their impacts for regional stakeholders. In this study, we contribute a multistakeholder many-objective robust decision making (MORDM) framework that blends many-objective search and uncertainty analysis tools to discover key tradeoffs between water supply alternatives and their robustness to deep uncertainties (e.g., population pressures, climate change, and financial risks). The proposed framework is demonstrated for four interconnected water utilities representing major stakeholders in the "Research Triangle" region of North Carolina, U.S. The utilities supply well over one million customers and have the ability to collectively manage drought via transfer agreements and shared infrastructure. We show that water portfolios for this region that compose optimal tradeoffs (i.e., Pareto-approximate solutions) under expected future conditions may suffer significantly degraded performance with only modest changes in deeply uncertain hydrologic and economic factors. We then use the Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) to identify which uncertain factors drive the individual and collective vulnerabilities for the four cooperating utilities. Our framework identifies key stakeholder dependencies and robustness tradeoffs associated with cooperative regional planning, which are critical to understanding the tensions between individual versus regional water supply goals. Cooperative demand management was found to be the key factor controlling the robustness of regional water supply planning, dominating other hydroclimatic and economic uncertainties through the 2025 planning horizon. Results

  15. On the deep water masses outflow in the Aegean Sea: a pre- and post-EMT analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellacicco, Marco; Falcini, Federico; Salusti, Ettore

    2017-04-01

    In the last decades, the Aegean Sea (AS) has drawn attention and interest from the oceanographic community about the role that this sea has played in the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT), with the key result of a "new" deep-water formation site in the eastern Mediterranean basin. This deep-water formation was due to different reasons: i) water budget anomalies that increased salinity of the surface and intermediate water masses; ii) the enters of these waters in the AS from Eastern Mediterranean Sea thought the Cretan Straits, and iii) episodes of strong winter cooling. Here, we explore the importance of deep water masses outflow from Aegean Sea throughout the Cretan Sea into the oriental basin of the Mediterranean Sea, in relation to last recent studies, focusing on the EMT event and its time table. To such goal we use all available, in situ, hydrologic data collected in the period 1985-1999, by trying to describe the outflow of the deep-water masses in the Levantine basin. Preliminary results revealed that the main source of dense water was beween Samarcande and its northern coast while the entrance of dense water in the Cyclades Plateau was essentially a flow between the Islands of Euboea and Andros, confirming what found by Bellacicco et al. (2016) from numerical results and marine geological evidences. The new analysis, moreover, points out the presence of a dense water mass debouching in the Levantine from the Cretean Sea during the spring time (i.e., maximum mixing period)of 1986-1988.Our results may allow to open new research question on the actual EMT timing and triggering, also considering theoretical model analyses (Smith 1975, Bellacicco et al., 2016).

  16. Occurrence and biogeography of hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) from deep-water coral habitats off the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Nizinski, Martha S.; Ross, Steve W.

    2008-06-01

    Deep-water coral habitats off the southeastern USA (SEUS) support diverse fish and invertebrate assemblages, but are poorly explored. This study is the first to report on the hydroids collected from these habitats in this area. Thirty-five species, including two species that are likely new to science, were identified from samples collected primarily by manned submersible during 2001-2005 from deep-water coral habitats off North Carolina to east-central Florida. Eleven of the species had not been reported since the 19th to mid-20th century. Ten species, and one family, the Rosalindidae, are documented for the first time in the SEUS. Latitudinal ranges of 15 species are extended, and the deepest records in the western North Atlantic for 10 species are reported. A species accumulation curve illustrated that we continue to add to our knowledge of hydroid diversity in these habitats. Sexually mature individuals were collected for 19 species during the summer to early autumn months. Most of the observed species (89%) liberate planula larvae as part of their life cycles, suggesting that these species exhibit a reproductive strategy that reduces the risk of dispersal to sub-optimal habitats. Hydroids occurred across various substrata including coral rubble, live corals, rock and other animal hosts including hydroids themselves. All observed species were regionally widespread with typically deep-neritic to bathyal sub-tropical/tropical distributions. Hydroid assemblages from deep-water SEUS coral habitats were most similar to those from adjacent deep-water habitats off the SEUS (17 shared species), and those in the Straits of Florida/Bahamas and Caribbean/West Indian regions (14 and 8 shared species, respectively). The similarity to sub-tropical and tropical assemblages and the richness of plumularioids in the SEUS deep-water coral habitats support the idea of a Pleistocene intrusion of tropical species northwards following an intensification of the Gulf Stream from the

  17. Geochemistry and sedimentary environments Deep-water carbonate dissolution in the northern South China Sea during Marine Isotope Stage 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Wang; Bao-Qi Huang; He Li

    2016-01-01

    The production, transportation, deposition, and dissolution of carbonate profoundly form part of the global carbon cycle and affect the amount and distribution of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (ALK), which drive atmospheric CO2 changes during glacial/interglacial cycles. These processes may provide significant clues for better understanding of the mechanisms that control the global climate system. In this study, we calculate and analyze the foraminiferal dissolution index (FDX) and the fragmentation ratios of planktonic foraminifera for the 60-25 ka B.P. time-span, based on samples from Core 17924 and ODP Site 1144 in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), so as to reconstruct the deep-water car-bonate dissolution during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3). Our analysis shows that the dissolution of carbonate increases gradually in Core 17924, whereas it remains stable at ODP Site 1144. This difference is caused by the deep-sea carbonate ion concentration﹙[CO32-]﹚that affected the dissolution in Core 17924 where the depth of 3440 m is below the saturation horizon. However, the depth of ODP Site 1144 is 2037 m, which is above the lysocline where the water is always saturated with calcium carbonate; the dissolution is therefore less dependent of chemical changes of the seawater. The combined effect of the productivity and the deep-water chemical evolution may decrease deep-water [CO32-] and accelerate car-bonate dissolution. The fall of the sea-level increased the input of DIC and ALK to the deep ocean and deepened the carbonate saturation depth, which caused an increase of the deep-water [CO32-]. The elevated [CO32-] partially neutralized the reduced [CO32-] contributed by remineralization of organic matter and slowdown of thermohaline. These consequently are the fundamental reasons for the difference in dissolution rate between these two sites.

  18. 煤矿深部含水层突水规律的研究%Study on water bursting regular pattern at deep water-bearing strata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢会安

    2012-01-01

    In the early stage of coal mine production, the shallow water-bearing strata are the main factors that affect the mining safety, whereas the deep water-bearing strata have little effect on coal production. The water pressure of the coal mine is increasing quickly with the increase of the mining depth. Therefore, the impacts of deep water-bearing strata on coal production become more and more serious. The high water pressure and quosity in deep water-bearing strata not only cause the water inrush become more violent and swift, but also gush much more water. All of them greatly enhance the difficult of controlling water inrush. Major characteristics and the water bursting regular pattern in deep water-bearing strata were systematically summarized in this paper. Therefore, this paper has an important meaning to the mine water control work.%在煤矿生产的初期,对煤矿生产有影响的是浅部含水层,深部含水层对煤矿生产影响不大.随着煤矿生产开采深度的增加,矿井水压越来越大,因此深部含水层对煤矿生产的影响越来越严重.深部含水层由于水压高,含水性强,所以出水不仅量大、迅猛,而且治理难度大.本文总结了深部含水层的特点和突水规律.这些规律对于搞好煤矿防治水工作具有十分重要的意义.

  19. Benthic foraminifera (Protista) as tools in deep-water palaeoceanography: environmental influences on faunal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooday, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    Foraminiferal research lies at the border between geology and biology. Benthic foraminifera are a major component of marine communities, highly sensitive to environmental influences, and the most abundant benthic organisms preserved in the deep-sea fossil record. These characteristics make them important tools for reconstructing ancient oceans. Much of the recent work concerns the search for palaeoceanographic proxies, particularly for the key parameters of surface primary productivity and bottom-water oxygenation. At small spatial scales, organic flux and pore-water oxygen profiles are believed to control the depths at which species live within the sediment (their 'microhabitats'). Epifaunal/shallow infaunal species require oxygen and labile food and prefer relatively oligotrophic settings. Some deep infaunal species can tolerate anoxia and are closely linked to redox fronts within the sediment; they consume more refractory organic matter, and flourish in relatively eutrophic environments. Food and oxygen availability are also key factors at large (i.e. regional) spatial scales. Organic flux to the sea floor, and its seasonality, strongly influences faunal densities, species compositions and diversity parameters. Species tend to be associated with higher or lower flux rates and the annual flux range of 2-3 g Corg m-2 appears to mark an important faunal boundary. The oxygen requirements of benthic foraminifera are not well understood. It has been proposed that species distributions reflect oxygen concentrations up to fairly high values (3 ml l-1 or more). Other evidence suggests that oxygen only begins to affect community parameters at concentrations < 0.5 ml l-1. Different species clearly have different thresholds, however, creating species successions along oxygen gradients. Other factors such as sediment type, hydrostatic pressure and attributes of bottom-water masses (particularly carbonate undersaturation and current flow) influence foraminiferal distributions

  20. A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayusman

    2000-12-01

    A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

  1. Fully nonlinear internal waves in a system of two fluids. 1: Shallow water configuration; 2: Deep water configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, W.; Camassa, R.

    1998-12-31

    The authors derive model equations that govern the evolution of internal gravity waves at the interface of two immiscible fluids. These models follow from the original Euler equations under the sole assumption that the waves are long compared to the undisturbed thickness of one of the fluid layers. No smallness assumption on the wave amplitude is made. Here the shallow water configuration is first considered, whereby the waves are taken to be long with respect to the total undisturbed thickness of the fluids. In part 2, the authors derive models for the configuration in which one of the two fluids has a thickness much larger than the wavelength. The fully nonlinear models contain the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and the intermediate-long-wave (ILW) equation, for shallow and deep water configurations respectively, as special cases in the limit of weak nonlinearity and unidirectional wave propagation. In particular, for a solitary wave of given amplitude, the characteristic wavelength is larger and the wave speed smaller than their counterparts for solitary wave solutions of the weakly nonlinear equations. These features are compared and found in overall good agreement with available experimental data for solitary waves of large amplitude in two-fluid systems.

  2. Enhanced Anti-Obesity Activities of Red Mold Dioscorea When Fermented Using Deep Ocean Water as the Culture Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Ming Pan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep ocean water (DOW has, in previous studies, been found to be a novel anti-obesity drink and useful in raising Monascus-produced monascin and ankaflavin levels. This may resolve the limited anti-obesity ability of red mold dioscorea (RMD known as the Monascus purpureus-fermented Disocorea batatas. This study aims to compare the anti-obesity effect of DOW-cultured RMD (DOW-RMD and ultra-pure water-cultured RMD (UPW-RMD in rats fed on a high fat diet. Moreover, the effect of ions composition of DOW and DOW-influenced functional metabolites change of RMD on the differentiation and lipogenesis regulation were investigated using 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes. In the animal test, compared to UPW-RMD, DOW-RMD possessed better ability to inhibit increases in weight gain, and better feed efficiency, body-fat pad and cross-sectional area of adipocytes. In the cell test, the anti-obesity abilities of DOW-RMD in inhibiting PPARγ and C/EBPα expression in differentiation and lipoprotein lipase activity in lipogenesis were contributed to by the DOW-increased monascin and ankaflavin levels and the ions of DOW, respectively.

  3. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  4. Modeling wind waves from deep to shallow waters in Lake Michigan using unstructured SWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Miaohua; van der Westhuysen, André J.; Xia, Meng; Schwab, David J.; Chawla, Arun

    2016-06-01

    Accurate wind-wave simulations are vital for evaluating the impact of waves on coastal dynamics, especially when wave observations are sparse. It has been demonstrated that structured-grid models have the ability to capture the wave dynamics of large-scale offshore domains, and the recent emergence of unstructured meshes provides an opportunity to better simulate shallow-water waves by resolving the complex geometry along islands and coastlines. For this study, wind waves in Lake Michigan were simulated using the unstructured-grid version of Simulating Waves Nearshore (un-SWAN) model with various types of wind forcing, and the model was calibrated using in situ wave observations. Sensitivity experiments were conducted to investigate the key factors that impact wave growth and dissipation processes. In particular, we considered (1) three wind field sources, (2) three formulations for wind input and whitecapping, (3) alternative formulations and coefficients for depth-induced breaking, and (4) various mesh types. We find that un-SWAN driven by Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) wind data reproduces significant wave heights reasonably well using previously proposed formulations for wind input, recalibrated whitecapping parameters, and alternative formulations for depth-induced breaking. The results indicate that using GEM wind field data as input captures large waves in the midlake most accurately, while using the Natural Neighbor Method wind field reproduces shallow-water waves more accurately. Wind input affects the simulated wave evolution across the whole lake, whereas whitecapping primarily affects wave dynamics in deep water. In shallow water, the process of depth-induced breaking is dominant and highly dependent upon breaker indices and mesh types.

  5. Ecosystem engineering creates a direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water coral mounds and surface productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Karline; Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; Grehan, Anthony; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-10-01

    Cold-water corals (CWCs) form large mounds on the seafloor that are hotspots of biodiversity in the deep sea, but it remains enigmatic how CWCs can thrive in this food-limited environment. Here, we infer from model simulations that the interaction between tidal currents and CWC-formed mounds induces downwelling events of surface water that brings organic matter to 600-m deep CWCs. This positive feedback between CWC growth on carbonate mounds and enhanced food supply is essential for their sustenance in the deep sea and represents an example of ecosystem engineering of unparalleled magnitude. This ’topographically-enhanced carbon pump’ leaks organic matter that settles at greater depths. The ubiquitous presence of biogenic and geological topographies along ocean margins suggests that carbon sequestration through this pump is of global importance. These results indicate that enhanced stratification and lower surface productivity, both expected consequences of climate change, may negatively impact the energy balance of CWCs.

  6. Flow control behind a circular cylinder via a porous cylinder in deep water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akilli H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this present work, the effects of surrounding outer porous cylinder on vortex structure downstream of a circular inner cylinder are investigated experimentally in deep water flow. The porosity of outer cylinder were selected as β = 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.65, 0.7, 0.75, 0.8 and 0.85. Porosity is defined as the ratio of the gap area on the body to the whole body surface area. The ratio of outer cylinder diameter to inner cylinder diameter, Do/Di was selected as 2.0, i.e. the inner cylinder diameter is Di = 30 mm where the outer cylinder diameter is Do = 60 mm. All experiments were carried out above a platform. The water height between the base of the platform and the free surface was adjusted as 340 mm. Free stream velocity is U = 156 mm/s, which corresponds to the Reynolds number of Rei = 5,000 based on the inner cylinder diameter. It has been observed that the outer porous cylinders have influence on the attenuation of vortex shedding in the wake region for all porosities. The turbulent intensity of the flow is reduced at least 45% by the presence of outer porous cylinder compared to the bare cylinder case. The porosities β = 0.4 and 0.5 are most suitable cases to control the flow downstream of the circular cylinder.

  7. Effects of process conditions on chlorine generation and storage stability of electrolyzed deep ocean water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoo-Shyng Wang Hsu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. We investigated the effects of platinum plating of electrode, electrode size, cell potential, and additional stirring on electrolysis properties of deep ocean water (DOW and DOW concentration products. We also studied the relationships between quality properties of electrolyzed DOW and their storage stability. Results indicated that concentrating DOW to 1.7 times increased chlorine level in the electrolyzed DOW without affecting electric and current efficiencies of the electrolysis process. Increasing magnesium and potassium levels in DOW decreased chlorine level in the electrolyzed DOW as well as electric and current efficiencies of the electrolysis process. Additional stirring could not increase electrolysis efficiency of small electrolyzer. Large electrode, high electric potential and/or small electrolyzing cell increased chlorine production rate but decreased electric and current efficiencies. High electrolysis intensity decreased storage stability of the electrolyzed seawater and the effects of electrolysis on DOW gradually subsided in storage. DOW has similar electrolysis properties to surface seawater, but its purity and stability are better. Therefore, electrolyzed DOW should have better potential for applications on postharvest cleaning and disinfection of ready-to-eat fresh produce.

  8. On the interaction of gravity-capillary lumps in deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Duncan, James

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear response of a water surface to a pressure source moving at a speed just below the minimum phase speed of linear gravity-capillary waves in deep water (cmin = 23 . 1 cm/s) consists of periodic generation of pairs of three-dimensional solitary waves (lumps) in a V-shaped pattern downstream of the source. In the reference frame of the laboratory, these unsteady lumps propagate in a direction oblique to the motion of the source and are damped by viscosity. In the current study, the interaction of lumps generated by two equal strength pressure sources moving side by side in parallel straight lines is investigated experimentally via photography-based techniques. The first lump generated by each source, collides with the lump from the other source in the center-plane of the two sources. It is observed that a steep depression is formed during the collision. Soon after the collision, this depression radiates energy in the form of small-amplitude radial waves. After the radiation, a quasi-stable pattern is formed with several rows of localized depressions that are qualitatively similar to lumps but exhibit periodic oscillations in depth, similar to a "breather". The shape of the wave pattern and the period of oscillations depend strongly on the distance between the soures.

  9. Analysis on shock wave speed of water hammer of lifting pipes for deep-sea mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-jin; Yang, Ning; Wang, Zhao

    2013-04-01

    Water hammer occurs whenever the fluid velocity in vertical lifting pipe systems for deep-sea mining suddenly changes. In this work, the shock wave was proven to play an important role in changing pressures and periods, and mathematical and numerical modeling technology was presented for simulated transient pressure in the abnormal pump operation. As volume concentrations were taken into account of shock wave speed, the experiment results about the pressure-time history, discharge-time history and period for the lifting pipe system showed that: as its concentrations rose up, the maximum transient pressure went down, so did its discharges; when its volume concentrations increased gradually, the period numbers of pressure decay were getting less and less, and the corresponding shock wave speed decreased. These results have highly coincided with simulation results. The conclusions are important to design lifting transporting system to prevent water hammer in order to avoid potentially devastating consequences, such as damage to components and equipment and risks to personnel.

  10. Analysis on Shock Wave Speed of Water Hammer of Lifting Pipes for Deep-Sea Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-jin; YANG Ning; WANG Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Water hammer occurs whenever the fluid velocity in vertical lifting pipe systems for deep-sea mining suddenly changes.In this work,the shock wave was proven to play an important role in changing pressures and periods,and mathematical and numerical modeling technology was presented for simulated transient pressure in the abnormal pump operation.As volume concentrations were taken into account of shock wave speed,the experiment results about the pressure-time history,discharge-time history and period for the lifting pipe system showed that:as its concentrations rose up,the maximum transient pressure went down,so did its discharges; when its volume concentrations increased gradually,the period numbers of pressure decay were getting less and less,and the corresponding shock wave speed decreased.These results have highly coincided with simulation results.The conclusions are important to design lifting transporting system to prevent water hammer in order to avoid potentially devastating consequences,such as damage to components and equipment and risks to personnel.

  11. Calculation and Experiment for Dynamic Response of Bridge in Deep Water Under Seismic Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳春光; 孙国帅

    2014-01-01

    The-fluid-structure-interaction-under-seismic-excitation-is-very-complicated,-and-thus-the-damage-identification-of-the-bridge-in-deep-water-is-the-key-technique-to-ensure-the-safe-service.-Based-on-nonlinear-Morison-equation-considering-the-added-mass-effect-and-the-fluid-structure-interaction-effect,-the-effect-of-hydrodynamic-pressure-on-the-structure-is-analyzed.-A-series-of-underwater-shaking-table-tests-are-conducted-in-the-air-and-in-water.-The-dynamic-characteristics-affected-by-hydrodynamic-pressure-are-discussed-and-the-distribution-of-hydrodynamic-pressure-is-also-analyzed.-In-addition,-the-damage-of-structure-is-distinguished-through-the-natural-frequency-and-the-difference-of-modal-curvature,-and-is-then-compared-with-the-test-results.-The-numerical-simulation-and-test-of-this-study-indicate-that-the-effect-of-hydrodynamic-pressure-on-the-structure-should-not-be-neglected.-It-is-also-found-that-the-presence-of-the-damage,-the-location-of-the-damage-and-the-degree-of-the-severity-can-be-judged-through-the-variation-of-structure-frequency-and-the-difference-of-modal-curvature.

  12. Hybrid Model Testing Technique for Deep-Sea Platforms Based on Equivalent Water Depth Truncation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an inner turret moored FPSO which works in the water of 320 m depth, is selected to study the so-called "passively-truncated + numerical-simulation" type of hybrid model testing technique while the truncated water depth is 160 m and the model scale λ=80. During the investigation, the optimization design of the equivalent-depth truncated system is performed by using the similarity of the static characteristics between the truncated system and the full depth one as the objective function. According to the truncated system, the corresponding physical test model is made. By adopting the coupling time domain simulation method, the truncated system model test is numerically reconstructed to carefully verify the computer simulation software and to adjust the corresponding hydrodynamic parameters. Based on the above work, the numerical extrapolation to the full depth system is performed by using the verified computer software and the adjusted hydrodynamic parameters. The full depth system model test is then performed in the basin and the results are compared with those from the numerical extrapolation. At last, the implementation procedure and the key technique of the hybrid model testing of the deep-sea platforms are summarized and printed. Through the above investigations, some beneficial conclusions are presented.

  13. Deep water bottom current deposition in the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There are some active bottom currents on the northern continental slope of the South China Sea (SCS). Reflection seismic profiles show that the bottom current channels occur in the water depth range of 1000 to 2700 m,extending from the NE to the SW,leading to accumulation of discontinuous drifts with higher sedimentation rates on the eastern side of the channel. The stacking pattern of the layers sug-gests that these drifts propagated southwestward,following the direction of the bottom currents. One sedimentary drift to the southeast of the Dongsha Islands has the highest sedimentation rate of 97cm/ka in the last 12 ka. The sedimentary characteristics of the sediment layers indicate that these bottom currents are most likley caused by the water movement of a branch of the West Pacific Ocean Current,which enters the northern SCS via the Bashi Strait. Once formed,the bottom currents trans-port sediments along the northern slope of SCS southwestward and finally disappear into the central basin of the SCS. Due to the bottom current activity,the deep-sea sedimentary process in the northern SCS is complex.

  14. Enhancement of Immune Activation Activities of Spirulina maxima Grown in Deep-Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the immuno-modulatory and anticancer activities of marine algae, Spirulina maxima grown in deep-sea water (DSW), were investigated. It was found that the extract of S. maxima, cultured in DSW, effectively suppressed the expression of Bcl2 in A549 cells as well as inhibiting various human cancer cells with concentration dependency, which possibly implies that the extracts may play more important roles in controlling cancer cell growth. The secretion of cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α from human B cells was also greatly increased, compared to those of the extract grown in conventional sea-water. The growth of Human Natural Killer (NK) cells in the presence of the extracts from DSW was significantly higher (12.2 × 104 viable cells/mL) when compared to the control (1.1 × 104 viable cells/mL). Based on HPLC analysis, the increase in the biological activities of the extracts from DSW was caused by considerably high amounts of β-carotene and ascorbic acid because the DSW contained high concentrations and good ratios of several key minerals for biosynthesizing β-carotene and ascorbic acid, as well as maintaining high cell growth. PMID:23743830

  15. Deep karstified dolomite aquifer as a source of drinking water - isotopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracic Zeleznik, Branka; Cencur Curk, Barbara; Zvab Rozic, Petra; Torkar, Anja; Vreca, Polona; Brencic, Mihael

    2017-04-01

    The Ljubljana Moor extends from the southern part of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, to Krim-Mokrc karstic mountains. The sedimentation basin of Ljubljana Moor is filled up in the central part with lacustrine and marshy sediments and on the borders of the basin are the gravel fans. In the base of sedimentation basin is prequaternary karstified upper triasic dolomite. Ljubljana Moor aquifer is one of the biggest and very important drinking water sources in the central part of Slovenia. The water field Brest with 13 wells is situated in southern part of Moor, on I\\vska fan. The wells of different depth, from 28 m to 200 m, pump groundwater from various geological units, quaternary sediments and karstified dolomite. The land use on recharge area is agriculture and urbanization and in the last decade we monitor the deterioration of groundwater quality in quaternary sediments. In 2011 the 200 m deep well (VD Brest-3a) was drilled to catch the groundwater better quality in triasic dolomite that is in hydraulic connection with the karstic area in hinterland. To determine the recharge dynamic, origin and age of groundwater in dolomite, we provide several isotopic samplings on different depths. We measured oxygen (δ18O), deuterium (δ2H) and inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC). .

  16. The role of carrion supply in the abundance of deep-water fish off California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Drazen

    Full Text Available Few time series of deep-sea systems exist from which the factors affecting abyssal fish populations can be evaluated. Previous analysis showed an increase in grenadier abundance, in the eastern North Pacific, which lagged epibenthic megafaunal abundance, mostly echinoderms, by 9-20 months. Subsequent diet studies suggested that carrion is the grenadier's most important food. Our goal was to evaluate if changes in carrion supply might drive the temporal changes in grenadier abundance. We analyzed a unique 17 year time series of abyssal grenadier abundance and size, collected at Station M (4100 m, 220 km offshore of Pt. Conception, California, and reaffirmed the increase in abundance and also showed an increase in mean size resulting in a ∼6 fold change in grenadier biomass. We compared this data with abundance estimates for surface living nekton (pacific hake and jack mackerel eaten by the grenadiers as carrion. A significant positive correlation between Pacific hake (but not jack mackerel and grenadiers was found. Hake seasonally migrate to the waters offshore of California to spawn. They are the most abundant nekton species in the region and the target of the largest commercial fishery off the west coast. The correlation to grenadier abundance was strongest when using hake abundance metrics from the area within 100 nmi of Station M. No significant correlation between grenadier abundance and hake biomass for the entire California current region was found. Given the results and grenadier longevity, migration is likely responsible for the results and the location of hake spawning probably is more important than the size of the spawning stock in understanding the dynamics of abyssal grenadier populations. Our results suggest that some abyssal fishes' population dynamics are controlled by the flux of large particles of carrion. Climate and fishing pressures affecting epipelagic fish stocks could readily modulate deep-sea fish dynamics.

  17. The role of carrion supply in the abundance of deep-water fish off California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazen, Jeffrey C; Bailey, David M; Ruhl, Henry A; Smith, Kenneth L

    2012-01-01

    Few time series of deep-sea systems exist from which the factors affecting abyssal fish populations can be evaluated. Previous analysis showed an increase in grenadier abundance, in the eastern North Pacific, which lagged epibenthic megafaunal abundance, mostly echinoderms, by 9-20 months. Subsequent diet studies suggested that carrion is the grenadier's most important food. Our goal was to evaluate if changes in carrion supply might drive the temporal changes in grenadier abundance. We analyzed a unique 17 year time series of abyssal grenadier abundance and size, collected at Station M (4100 m, 220 km offshore of Pt. Conception, California), and reaffirmed the increase in abundance and also showed an increase in mean size resulting in a ∼6 fold change in grenadier biomass. We compared this data with abundance estimates for surface living nekton (pacific hake and jack mackerel) eaten by the grenadiers as carrion. A significant positive correlation between Pacific hake (but not jack mackerel) and grenadiers was found. Hake seasonally migrate to the waters offshore of California to spawn. They are the most abundant nekton species in the region and the target of the largest commercial fishery off the west coast. The correlation to grenadier abundance was strongest when using hake abundance metrics from the area within 100 nmi of Station M. No significant correlation between grenadier abundance and hake biomass for the entire California current region was found. Given the results and grenadier longevity, migration is likely responsible for the results and the location of hake spawning probably is more important than the size of the spawning stock in understanding the dynamics of abyssal grenadier populations. Our results suggest that some abyssal fishes' population dynamics are controlled by the flux of large particles of carrion. Climate and fishing pressures affecting epipelagic fish stocks could readily modulate deep-sea fish dynamics.

  18. Estimating trans-seasonal variability in water column biomass for a highly migratory, deep diving predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm D O'Toole

    Full Text Available The deployment of animal-borne electronic tags is revolutionizing our understanding of how pelagic species respond to their environment by providing in situ oceanographic information such as temperature, salinity, and light measurements. These tags, deployed on pelagic animals, provide data that can be used to study the ecological context of their foraging behaviour and surrounding environment. Satellite-derived measures of ocean colour reveal temporal and spatial variability of surface chlorophyll-a (a useful proxy for phytoplankton distribution. However, this information can be patchy in space and time resulting in poor correspondence with marine animal behaviour. Alternatively, light data collected by animal-borne tag sensors can be used to estimate chlorophyll-a distribution. Here, we use light level and depth data to generate a phytoplankton index that matches daily seal movements. Time-depth-light recorders (TDLRs were deployed on 89 southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina over a period of 6 years (1999-2005. TDLR data were used to calculate integrated light attenuation of the top 250 m of the water column (LA(250, which provided an index of phytoplankton density at the daily scale that was concurrent with the movement and behaviour of seals throughout their entire foraging trip. These index values were consistent with typical seasonal chl-a patterns as measured from 8-daySea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFs images. The availability of data recorded by the TDLRs was far greater than concurrent remotely sensed chl-a at higher latitudes and during winter months. Improving the spatial and temporal availability of phytoplankton information concurrent with animal behaviour has ecological implications for understanding the movement of deep diving predators in relation to lower trophic levels in the Southern Ocean. Light attenuation profiles recorded by animal-borne electronic tags can be used more broadly and routinely to estimate

  19. New species and new records of deep-water Pectinoidea (Bivalvia: Propeamussiidae, Entoliidae and Pectinidae) from the South Pacific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.H.; Maestrati, P.

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-two deep-water species of Pectinoidea (37 Propeamussiidae, 1 Entoliidae, 14 Pectinidae) are listed from Norfolk Ridge (11 species), Loyalty Islands (4 species), Fiji Islands (30 species), Tonga (26 species), Solomon Islands (26 species) and the Marquesas archipelago (8 species). All species fr

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Nutrient Cycling Pathways in the Microbiota of Deep-Sea and Shallow-Water Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Jinlong; Liu, Fang; He, Liming; He, Ying; Wang, Shenyue

    2016-12-01

    Sponges host complex symbiotic communities, but to date, the whole picture of the metabolic potential of sponge microbiota remains unclear, particularly the difference between the shallow-water and deep-sea sponge holobionts. In this study, two completely different sponges, shallow-water sponge Theonella swinhoei from the South China Sea and deep-sea sponge Neamphius huxleyi from the Indian Ocean, were selected to compare their whole symbiotic communities and metabolic potential, particularly in element transformation. Phylogenetically diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi, and algae were detected in both shallow-water sponge T. swinhoei and deep-sea sponge N. huxleyi, and different microbial community structures were indicated between these two sponges. Metagenome-based gene abundance analysis indicated that, though the two sponge microbiota have similar core functions, they showed different potential strategies in detailed metabolic processes, e.g., in the transformation and utilization of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur by corresponding microbial symbionts. This study provides insight into the putative metabolic potentials of the microbiota associated with the shallow-water and deep-sea sponges at the whole community level, extending our knowledge of the sponge microbiota's functions, the association of sponge- microbes, as well as the adaption of sponge microbiota to the marine environment.

  1. Reproductive biology of the deep-water coral Acanella arbuscula (Phylum Cnidaria: Class Anthozoa: Order Alcyonacea), northwest Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazley, Lindsay I.; Kenchington, Ellen L.

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the reproductive life-history of deep-water corals is important for assessing their vulnerability to anthropogenic impacts. Yet, the reproductive biology of many deep-water corals, especially members of the subclass Octocorallia, has not been examined. We used histological techniques to describe the reproductive biology of the deep-water gorgonian coral Acanella arbuscula from the northwest Atlantic. All colonies examined were gonochoric, and no embryos or planula larvae were observed in the polyps. Mean polyp-level fecundity (females: 21.0±17.5 oocytes polyp-1, and males: 13.9±13.5 sperm sacs polyp-1) is high compared to other deep-water gorgonians, and polyps closer to the branch tips had the highest fecundities in both females and males. The presence of large oocytes (maximum diameter 717.8 μm) suggests that A. arbuscula produces lecithotrophic larvae. Despite the potentially high fecundity and small size at first reproduction, the paucity of information on dispersal and recruitment, combined with its longevity, vulnerability to bottom fishing gear, and ecological role as a structure-forming species, still warrants the classification of A. arbuscula as a vulnerable marine ecosystem indicator.

  2. Study of the mechanical properties of welded joints by wet sub sea welding technique with tubular electrode; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas de juntas soldadas pela tecnica de soldagem subaquatica molhada com eletrodo tubular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, Erwin Werner; Baixo, Carlos Eduardo Iconomos; Dutra, Jair Carlos [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Soldagem e Mecatronica - LABSOLDA]. E-mail: erwin@labsolda.ufsc.br; Santos, Valter Rocha dos [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Teixeira, Jose Claudio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1997-07-01

    Some experiments conducted at LABSOLDA/UFSC - a welding laboratory of Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, Brazil - in order to identify mechanical properties, weld bead geometry and the quantity and dimensions of pores in weld beads produced by sub sea wet FCAW are described. Welding in shallow water with power source adjusted to operate in constant current characteristic mode and a set of parameters to establish an open arc transfer mode it was obtained weld beads with regular geometry and an acceptable profile, with low level of defects incidence, no pores and crack free. The tenacity measured by Charpy tests (0C) was 34 J and hardness of 119 HV-10 measured by Vickers tests. The methodology used in the experiments and the results obtained are discussed in the paper. (author)

  3. Biochemical Mechanism of the Eutrophication and Its Prevention--the Deep Treatment of Waste Water and Its Denitrification and Dephosphorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongshan; Li Songqiang

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical mechanism of forming the red tide is discussed in this paper. The existence of a large number of nitrates and phosphates in the eutrophic water is the prerequisite of explosive increase of algae and the forming of red tide. Reduction of eutrophication is an important approach to preventing the red tide. The method of deep treatment of the waste water and its denitrification and dephosphorization are introduced, and a new opinion on the red tide formation and fundamental prevention is put forward.

  4. A Glimpse at South Atlantic Deep and Surface Water Evolution over the Last 40 Ky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelbroeck, C.; Vazquez Riveiros, N.; Arz, H. W.; Gottschalk, J.; Skinner, L. C.; Dokken, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    intermediate water, and circumpolar deep water. We further compare core MD08-3167 records with benthic isotopic and surface records from other well-dated South Atlantic cores of comparable temporal resolution, i.e. western tropical Atlantic core GeoB3910, and Sub-Antarctic cores MD07-3076Q and TNO57-21 (Barker and Diz, 2014).

  5. 1,3-propanediol binds deep inside the channel to inhibit water permeation through aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lili; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Chen, L Laurie; Chen, Liao Y; Perry, George; McHardy, Stanton F; Yeh, Chih-Ko

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins (AQPs) are membrane channel proteins responsible for transport of water and for transport of glycerol in addition to water across the cell membrane, respectively. They are expressed throughout the human body and also in other forms of life. Inhibitors of human AQPs have been sought for therapeutic treatment for various medical conditions including hypertension, refractory edema, neurotoxic brain edema, and so forth. Conducting all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we computed the binding affinity of acetazolamide to human AQP4 that agrees closely with in vitro experiments. Using this validated computational method, we found that 1,3-propanediol (PDO) binds deep inside the AQP4 channel to inhibit that particular aquaporin efficaciously. Furthermore, we used the same method to compute the affinities of PDO binding to four other AQPs and one aquaglyceroporin whose atomic coordinates are available from the protein data bank (PDB). For bovine AQP1, human AQP2, AQP4, AQP5, and Plasmodium falciparum PfAQP whose structures were resolved with high resolution, we obtained definitive predictions on the PDO dissociation constant. For human AQP1 whose PDB coordinates are less accurate, we estimated the dissociation constant with a rather large error bar. Taking into account the fact that PDO is generally recognized as safe by the US FDA, we predict that PDO can be an effective diuretic which directly modulates water flow through the protein channels. It should be free from the serious side effects associated with other diuretics that change the hydro-homeostasis indirectly by altering the osmotic gradients.

  6. Large-scale geographic variation in distribution and abundance of Australian deep-water kelp forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel M Marzinelli

    Full Text Available Despite the significance of marine habitat-forming organisms, little is known about their large-scale distribution and abundance in deeper waters, where they are difficult to access. Such information is necessary to develop sound conservation and management strategies. Kelps are main habitat-formers in temperate reefs worldwide; however, these habitats are highly sensitive to environmental change. The kelp Ecklonia radiate is the major habitat-forming organism on subtidal reefs in temperate Australia. Here, we provide large-scale ecological data encompassing the latitudinal distribution along the continent of these kelp forests, which is a necessary first step towards quantitative inferences about the effects of climatic change and other stressors on these valuable habitats. We used the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV facility of Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS to survey 157,000 m2 of seabed, of which ca 13,000 m2 were used to quantify kelp covers at multiple spatial scales (10-100 m to 100-1,000 km and depths (15-60 m across several regions ca 2-6° latitude apart along the East and West coast of Australia. We investigated the large-scale geographic variation in distribution and abundance of deep-water kelp (>15 m depth and their relationships with physical variables. Kelp cover generally increased with latitude despite great variability at smaller spatial scales. Maximum depth of kelp occurrence was 40-50 m. Kelp latitudinal distribution along the continent was most strongly related to water temperature and substratum availability. This extensive survey data, coupled with ongoing AUV missions, will allow for the detection of long-term shifts in the distribution and abundance of habitat-forming kelp and the organisms they support on a continental scale, and provide information necessary for successful implementation and management of conservation reserves.

  7. Significance of water fluxes in a deep arid-region vadose zone to waste disposal strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnejack, K.R.; Blout, D.O.; Sully, M.J.; Emer, D.F.; Hammermeister, D.P. [Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Dever, L.G.; O`Neill, L.J. [DOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Waste Management Div.; Tyler, S.W. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Chapman, J. [Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1994-03-01

    Recently collected subsurface site characterization data have led to the development of a conceptual model of water movement beneath the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that differs significantly from the conceptual model of water movement inherent in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. At the Area 5 RWMS, water fluxes in approximately the upper 75 m (250 ft) of the vadose zone point in the upward direction (rather than downward) which effectively isolates this region from the deep (approximately 250 m (820 ft)) uppermost aquifer. Standard RCRA approaches for detection and containment (groundwater monitoring and double liners/leachate collection/leak detection systems) are not able to fulfill their intended function in this rather unique hydrogeologic environment. In order to better fulfill the waste detection and containment intentions of RCRA for mixed waste disposal at the Area 5 RWMS, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) is preparing a single petition for both a waiver from groundwater monitoring and an exemption from double liners with leachate collection/leak detection. DOE/NV proposes in this petition that the containment function of liners and leachate collection is better accomplished by the natural hydrogeologic processes operating in the upper vadose zone; and the detection function of groundwater monitoring and the leak detection system in liners is better fulfilled by an alternative vadose zone monitoring system. In addition, an alternative point of compliance is proposed that will aid in early detection, as well as limit the extent of potential contamination before detection. Finally, special cell design features and operation practices will be implemented to limit leachate formation, especially while the cell is open to the atmosphere during waste emplacement.

  8. INJECTION PROFILE MODIFICATION IN A HOT, DEEP MINNELUSA WATER INJECTION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2001-09-01

    As oil fields in the United States age, production enhancements and modifications will be needed to increase production from deeper and hotter oil reservoirs. New techniques and products must be tested in these areas before industry will adapt them as common practice. The Minnelusa fields of northeastern Wyoming are relatively small, deep, hot fields that have been developed in the past ten to twenty years. As part of the development, operators have established waterfloods early in the life of the fields to maximize cumulative oil production. However, channeling between injectors and producers does occur and can lead to excessive water production and bypassed oil left in the reservoir. The project evaluated the use of a recently developed, high-temperature polymer to modify the injection profiles in a waterflood project in a high-temperature reservoir. The field is the Hawk Point field in Campbell County, Wyoming. The field was discovered in 1986 and initially consisted of eight producing wells with an average depth of 11,500 feet and a temperature of 260 F (127 C). The polymer system was designed to plug the higher permeable channels and fractures to provide better conformance, i.e. sweep efficiency, for the waterflood. The project used a multi-well system to evaluate the treatment. Injection profile logging was used to evaluate the injection wells both before and after the polymer treatment. The treatment program was conducted in January 2000 with a treatment of the four injection wells. The treatment sizes varied between 500 bbl and 3,918 bbl at a maximum allowable pressure of 1,700 psig. Injection in three of the wells was conducted as planned. However, the injection in the fourth well was limited to 574 bbl instead of the planned 3,750 bbl because of a rapid increase in injection pressure, even at lower than planned injection rates. Following completion of polymer placement, the injection system was not started for approximately one week to permit the gel to

  9. Deep-water sediment transport processes in the northeastern South China Sea: Mooring and shipboard-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Li, X.; Wang, W.; Xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Six moorings equipped with acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP), recording current meter (RCM), and sediment trap have been deployed in the northeastern South China Sea at water depths ranging from 1700-3900 m to collect time-series data that can hopefully help better characterize the bottom current system and transport process in the region. Shipboard-based measurements including CTD, transmissometer, optical backscatter (OBS), and in-situ layered suspended particle sampling using large volume pump (LVP) were undertaken along three deep-water transects in the region during two cruises in the spring of 2012 and 2013. Preliminary results show for the first time the presence of continuous and relative stable contour currents and widespread deep-water nepheloid layers in the deep South China Sea. The contour currents flow southwestwards with average speeds of 2-4 cm/s (occasionally up to 11 cm/s) along lower slope of the northern South China Sea at depths of 1700-2500 m. The large-scale sediment waves recorded by high-resolution multibeam bathymetry appear to be related to activities of the contour currents. Intermediate and bottom nepheloid layers with an average suspended particle concentration of 0.6 mg/l are extended from the lower slope to the deep basin of the South China Sea. The intermediate nepheloid layers in depths ranging from 900 to 1100 m are thought to be controlled mainly by the interaction between the North Pacific Intermediate Water and the Pacific Deep Water masses. A sedimentary core (MD01-2905) previously collected on the sediment drift of ODP Site 1144, where three of the mooring systems are located, indicates that 60% of total fine-grained terrigenous sediment budget since the last glacial time have sourced from Taiwan. Our data suggest that the observed contour currents are the major carrier for transporting Taiwan-derived sediments to the northern slope of the South China Sea.

  10. Architecture of deep-water reservoirs; Arquitetura de reservatorios de aguas profundas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Marco Antonio Schreiner [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Sedimentologia e Petrologia], E-mail: masmoraes@petrobras.com.br; Blaskovski, Paulo Roberto; Paraizo, Paulo Lopes Brandao

    2005-11-15

    The integration of subsurface observations with analog data (outcrop and modern systems) permits three basic architectural types of deep-water reservoirs to be defined; which are: discrete-channel complexes, amalgamated-channel complexes, and distributary-channel and lobe complexes. Discrete-channel complex is the type of deep-water reservoir in which channel fills occur as spatially segregated (discrete) elements. Amalgamated-channel complexes are reservoirs formed by laterally-stacked shallow channels. Distributary-channel and lobe complexes are formed by a network of radial distributary channels and associated lateral (spill) and frontal (terminal) lobes. In terms of facies, discrete channel complexes are characterized by the intercalation of thick-bedded, coarse-grained channel-fill deposits, and thin-bedded, fine-grained over bank deposits. Amalgamated channel complexes are characterized by thick sandstone sequences, with relative absence of fine-grained over bank deposits, while lobe complexes present a better preservation the upper parts of the sand beds, including the interbedded fines. A repetitive hierarchy of architectural elements has been recognized, including individual elements, composite elements, and complexes. Although initially defined for channel complexes, such hierarchy has also been observed in lobe complexes. In addition, the hierarchical scheme can also be related to the different orders of high-resolution stratigraphy. In most cases individual elements would commonly be found within sixth-order units, and composite elements within firth-order units. Fourth-order units would then envelope channel and/or lobe complexes. The three reservoir types presented here are common in the basins of the Brazilian continental margin. Even though all types are found at different ages, in the Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary (Paleocene-Eocene), narrow troughs generated by salt-tectonics are predominantly filled by amalgamated- channel complexes, which form

  11. Detecting potential impacts of deep subsurface CO2 injection on shallow drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, R. C.; Yang, C.; Romanak, K.; Mickler, P. J.; Lu, J.; Hovorka, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Presented here are results from one aspect of collective research conducted at Gulf Coast Carbon Center, BEG, Jackson School at UT Austin. The biggest hurdle to public acceptance of CCS is to show that drinking water resources will not be impacted. Since late 1990s our group has been supported by US DOE NETL and private industry to research how best to detect potential impacts to shallow (0 to ~0.25 km) subsurface drinking water from deep (~1 to 3.5 km) injection of CO2. Work has and continues to include (1) field sampling and testing, (2) laboratory batch experiments, (3) geochemical modeling. The objective has been to identify the most sensitive geochemical indicators using data from research-level investigations, which can be economically applied on an industrial-scale. The worst-case scenario would be introduction of CO2 directly into drinking water from a leaking wellbore at a brownfield site. This is unlikely for a properly screened and/or maintained site, but needs to be considered. Our results show aquifer matrix (carbonate vs. clastic) to be critical to interpretation of pH and carbonate (DIC, Alkalinity, and δ13C of DIC) parameters because of the influence of water-rock reaction (buffering vs. non-buffering) on aqueous geochemistry. Field groundwater sampling sites to date are Cranfield, MS and SACROC, TX CO2-EOR oilfields. Two major aquifer types are represented, one dominated by silicate (Cranfield) and the other by carbonate (SACROC) water-rock reactions. We tested sensitivity of geochemical indicators (pH, DIC, Alkalinity, and δ13C of DIC) by modeling the effects of increasing pCO2 on aqueous geochemistry, and laboratory batch experiments, both with partial pressure of CO2 gas (pCO2) at 1x105 Pa (1 atm). Aquifer matrix and groundwater data provided constraints for the geochemical models. We used results from modeling and batch experiments to rank geochemical parameter sensitivity to increased pCO2 into weakly, mildly and strongly sensitive

  12. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca E; Bower, Amy S; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX) float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012), the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62). Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49) was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87). In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing network for

  13. First autonomous bio-optical profiling float in the Gulf of Mexico reveals dynamic biogeochemistry in deep waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Green

    Full Text Available Profiling floats equipped with bio-optical sensors well complement ship-based and satellite ocean color measurements by providing highly-resolved time-series data on the vertical structure of biogeochemical processes in oceanic waters. This is the first study to employ an autonomous profiling (APEX float in the Gulf of Mexico for measuring spatiotemporal variability in bio-optics and hydrography. During the 17-month deployment (July 2011 to December 2012, the float mission collected profiles of temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, particulate backscattering (bbp, and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM fluorescence from the ocean surface to a depth of 1,500 m. Biogeochemical variability was characterized by distinct depth trends and local "hot spots", including impacts from mesoscale processes associated with each of the water masses sampled, from ambient deep waters over the Florida Plain, into the Loop Current, up the Florida Canyon, and eventually into the Florida Straits. A deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM occurred between 30 and 120 m, with the DCM depth significantly related to the unique density layer ρ = 1023.6 (R2 = 0.62. Particulate backscattering, bbp, demonstrated multiple peaks throughout the water column, including from phytoplankton, deep scattering layers, and resuspension. The bio-optical relationship developed between bbp and chlorophyll (R2 = 0.49 was compared to a global relationship and could significantly improve regional ocean-color algorithms. Photooxidation and autochthonous production contributed to CDOM distributions in the upper water column, whereas in deep water, CDOM behaved as a semi-conservative tracer of water masses, demonstrating a tight relationship with density (R2 = 0.87. In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, this research lends support to the use of autonomous drifting profilers as a powerful tool for consideration in the design of an expanded and integrated observing

  14. North Atlantic demersal deep-water fish distribution and biology: present knowledge and challenges for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstad, O A

    2013-12-01

    This paper summarizes knowledge and knowledge gaps on benthic and benthopelagic deep-water fishes of the North Atlantic Ocean, i.e. species inhabiting deep continental shelf areas, continental and island slopes, seamounts and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. While several studies demonstrate that distribution patterns are species specific, several also show that assemblages of species can be defined and such assemblages are associated with circulatory features and water mass distributions. In many subareas, sampling has, however, been scattered, restricted to shallow areas or soft substrata, and results from different studies tend to be difficult to compare quantitatively because of sampler differences. Particularly, few studies have been conducted on isolated deep oceanic seamounts and in Arctic deep-water areas. Time series of data are very few and most series are short. Recent studies of population structure of widely distributed demersal species show less than expected present connectivity and considerable spatial genetic heterogeneity and complexity for some species. In other species, genetic homogeneity across wide ranges was discovered. Mechanisms underlying the observed patterns have been proposed, but to test emerging hypotheses more species should be investigated across their entire distribution ranges. Studies of population biology reveal greater diversity in life-history strategies than often assumed, even between co-occurring species of the same family. Some slope and ridge-associated species are rather short-lived, others very long-lived, and growth patterns also show considerable variation. Recent comparative studies suggest variation in life-history strategies along a continuum correlated with depth, ranging from shelf waters to the deep sea where comparatively more species have extended lifetimes, and slow rates of growth and reproduction. Reproductive biology remains too poorly known for most deep-water species, and temporal variation in recruitment has

  15. Microplastic pollution identified in deep-sea water and ingested by benthic invertebrates in the Rockall Trough, North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtene-Jones, Winnie; Quinn, Brian; Gary, Stefan F; Mogg, Andrew O M; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E

    2017-08-12

    Microplastics are widespread in the natural environment and present numerous ecological threats. While the ultimate fate of marine microplastics are not well known, it is hypothesized that the deep sea is the final sink for this anthropogenic contaminant. This study provides a quantification and characterisation of microplastic pollution ingested by benthic macroinvertebrates with different feeding modes (Ophiomusium lymani, Hymenaster pellucidus and Colus jeffreysianus) and in adjacent deep water > 2200 m, in the Rockall Trough, Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Despite the remote location, microplastic fibres were identified in deep-sea water at a concentration of 70.8 particles m(-3), comparable to that in surface waters. Of the invertebrates examined (n = 66), 48% ingested microplastics with quantities enumerated comparable to coastal species. The number of ingested microplastics differed significantly between species and generalized linear modelling identified that the number of microplastics ingested for a given tissue mass was related to species and not organism feeding mode or the length or overall weight of the individual. Deep-sea microplastics were visually highly degraded with surface areas more than double that of pristine particles. The identification of synthetic polymers with densities greater and less than seawater along with comparable quantities to the upper ocean indicates processes of vertical re-distribution. This study presents the first snapshot of deep ocean microplastics and the quantification of microplastic pollution in the Rockall Trough. Additional sampling throughout the deep-sea is required to assess levels of microplastic pollution, vertical transportation and sequestration, which have the potential to impact the largest global ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deep-water chemosynthetic ecosystem research during the census of marine life decade and beyond: a proposed deep-ocean road map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R German

    Full Text Available The ChEss project of the Census of Marine Life (2002-2010 helped foster internationally-coordinated studies worldwide focusing on exploration for, and characterization of new deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystem sites. This work has advanced our understanding of the nature and factors controlling the biogeography and biodiversity of these ecosystems in four geographic locations: the Atlantic Equatorial Belt (AEB, the New Zealand region, the Arctic and Antarctic and the SE Pacific off Chile. In the AEB, major discoveries include hydrothermal seeps on the Costa Rica margin, deepest vents found on the Mid-Cayman Rise and the hottest vents found on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It was also shown that the major fracture zones on the MAR do not create barriers for the dispersal but may act as trans-Atlantic conduits for larvae. In New Zealand, investigations of a newly found large cold-seep area suggest that this region may be a new biogeographic province. In the Arctic, the newly discovered sites on the Mohns Ridge (71 °N showed extensive mats of sulfur-oxidisng bacteria, but only one gastropod potentially bears chemosynthetic symbionts, while cold seeps on the Haakon Mossby Mud Volcano (72 °N are dominated by siboglinid worms. In the Antarctic region, the first hydrothermal vents south of the Polar Front were located and biological results indicate that they may represent a new biogeographic province. The recent exploration of the South Pacific region has provided evidence for a sediment hosted hydrothermal source near a methane-rich cold-seep area. Based on our 8 years of investigations of deep-water chemosynthetic ecosystems worldwide, we suggest highest priorities for future research: (i continued exploration of the deep-ocean ridge-crest; (ii increased focus on anthropogenic impacts; (iii concerted effort to coordinate a major investigation of the deep South Pacific Ocean - the largest contiguous habitat for life within Earth's biosphere, but

  17. Deep-water chemosynthetic ecosystem research during the census of marine life decade and beyond: a proposed deep-ocean road map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher R; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Baker, Maria C; Tyler, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    The ChEss project of the Census of Marine Life (2002-2010) helped foster internationally-coordinated studies worldwide focusing on exploration for, and characterization of new deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystem sites. This work has advanced our understanding of the nature and factors controlling the biogeography and biodiversity of these ecosystems in four geographic locations: the Atlantic Equatorial Belt (AEB), the New Zealand region, the Arctic and Antarctic and the SE Pacific off Chile. In the AEB, major discoveries include hydrothermal seeps on the Costa Rica margin, deepest vents found on the Mid-Cayman Rise and the hottest vents found on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It was also shown that the major fracture zones on the MAR do not create barriers for the dispersal but may act as trans-Atlantic conduits for larvae. In New Zealand, investigations of a newly found large cold-seep area suggest that this region may be a new biogeographic province. In the Arctic, the newly discovered sites on the Mohns Ridge (71 °N) showed extensive mats of sulfur-oxidisng bacteria, but only one gastropod potentially bears chemosynthetic symbionts, while cold seeps on the Haakon Mossby Mud Volcano (72 °N) are dominated by siboglinid worms. In the Antarctic region, the first hydrothermal vents south of the Polar Front were located and biological results indicate that they may represent a new biogeographic province. The recent exploration of the South Pacific region has provided evidence for a sediment hosted hydrothermal source near a methane-rich cold-seep area. Based on our 8 years of investigations of deep-water chemosynthetic ecosystems worldwide, we suggest highest priorities for future research: (i) continued exploration of the deep-ocean ridge-crest; (ii) increased focus on anthropogenic impacts; (iii) concerted effort to coordinate a major investigation of the deep South Pacific Ocean - the largest contiguous habitat for life within Earth's biosphere, but also the

  18. Hydrocarbon accumulation conditions and exploration direction of Baiyun–Liwan deep water areas in the Pearl River Mouth Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heming Lin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An integrated geologic study was performed in the Baiyun–Liwan deep water areas, Pearl River Mouth Basin, based on the achievements obtained during the past five exploration stages. The following understandings were obtained. (1 The Baiyun Sag has superior source rock conditions and has experienced three tectonic evaluation stages like rifting, rifting-depression and depression. The Wenchang–Enping Fms deposited during the rifting stage have large hydrocarbon generation potentials. During the rifting-depression and depression stages, the deposition in the study area was controlled by the Oligocene and Miocene shelf slope break zones. The Oligocene Zhuhai Fm shallow marine delta-longshore depositional system and the Miocene Zhujiang–Hanjiang Fms deep fan depositional system were formed, and they are the most favorable reservoir-caprock assemblages in the study area. (2 The Hydrocarbon accumulation pattern in the deep waters is different from that in the northern shallow waters. Shelf slope break zone, composite conduction system consisting of structural ridge, fault, sandbody, unconformity and fluid diapir as well as late tectonic movement are the three major factors controlling hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the study area. (3 The Liwan 3-1 gas field is a typical example. The superior trapping conditions, high-quality reservoirs of delta distributary channel controlled by shelf slope break zone, vertical conduction system consisting of fault and diapir, as well as the overlying massive marine mudstone caprock provide favorable geologic conditions for the formation of large gas fields. Four areas were identified as the targets of gas exploration in the near future: the deep water fan system in the central sag, the structural-stratigraphic traps in the uplifted areas on both sides of the main sag of Baiyun, a series of large structural traps on the fault terrace to the southwest of the main sag, and the ultra-deep frontiers in

  19. The distribution of Cretaceous and Paleocene deep-water reservoirs in the Norwegian Sea basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara, L. [RWE-DEA AG, Hamburg (Germany); Wreglesworth, I. [IWA Associates, Colwyn Bay (United Kingdom); Trayfoot, M. [PGS Reservoir Consultants, Lysaker (Norway); Richardsen, G. [RWE-DEA Norge, Oslo (Norway)

    2001-07-01

    Facies maps for selected Cretaceous and Paleocene deep-water sandstone reservoirs in the Norwegian Sea constitute an exploration tool and allow description of the basin infill in relation to tectonic phases. Sequences K40 (middle-late Albian) and K60 (middle-late Cenomanian) formed in an immature basin where most of the fan systems and slumps were derived from local highs. Sequence K80 (Coniacian-late Santonian) contains sandstones interpreted to be slumped deposits in parts of the Halten and Donna terraces (Lysing Formation), but with fans of widespread extent in the Voring and northern More Basin. The K85-K90 sequence set (early Santonian-late Campanian) contains sandstones equivalent to the Nise Formation that are the main potential reservoirs in the Voring Basin; they were fed by multiple entry points and developed into areally extensive basin floor thicks. Sequence Pg10 (Danian-Selandian: 'Egga' Member) is interpreted to comprise a basin floor fan in the Ormen Lange discovery. During this cycle the Halten Terrace rotated eastwards exposing Upper Cretaceous mudstones. Vast amounts of sediment were deposited in the western More and Voring Basin around new exposed areas. (author)

  20. The advantages of deep ocean water for the development of functional fermentation food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Deep ocean water (DOW) is obtained from 600 m below the sea surface. In recent years, DOW has been applied in the development of fermentation biotechnologies and functional foods. DOW is rich in trace minerals, comprises multiple physiological and health functions, and is able to promote microbe growth; therefore, the application of DOW directly benefits the development of the fermentation industry and functional foods. This study integrated the current health functions and applications of DOW with the latest results from studies related to fermentation biotechnology. Subsequently, the influence of applying DOW in fermented functional food development and the effects in health function improvements were summarized. According to the previous studies, the main reasons for the increased effect of fermented functional foods through the application of DOW are increased generation of functional metabolite contents in the microbes, intrinsic health functions of DOW, and the microbial use of mechanisms of converting the absorbed inorganic ions into highly bioavailable organic ions for the human body. These combined advantages not only enhance the health functions of fermentation products but also provide fermentation products with the intrinsic health functions of DOW.

  1. Evidence of lipofuscin accumulation in the deep-water red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. MEZZASALMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipofuscin, a non-degradable, degenerative fluorescent pigment which accumulates in post-mitotic cells, represents a promising method for ageing marine crustaceans. The presence and accumulation of lipofuscin has been studied in the deep-water red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827 to assess its use as a tool for ageing larger (i.e., older specimens and thus improve knowledge of the growth and longevity of this species. Specimens, gathered during experimental trawl surveys carried out in the Strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea, were stored directly on-board in 10% buffered formaldehyde solution; their brain was thereafter removed, prepared with various current histological techniques and examined with a binocular microscope. Thin sections of the olfactory lobe cell mass were also analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, and the lipofuscin concentration was measured through image analysis. Various indices were computed for each individual by pooling data from many images: number and coverage of the lipofuscin granules per unit area, and mean individual area of the granules. Lipofuscin was detected in all specimens investigated with characteristics (grain typology and dimension strictly resembling those already described in other crustacean species. The present preliminary results encourage further studies to develop and validate a methodology based on the use of lipofuscin for improving the relative ageing of large A. foliacea shrimps.

  2. Spectrum response estimation for deep-water floating platforms via retardation function representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fushun; Liu, Chengcheng; Chen, Jiefeng; Wang, Bin

    2017-08-01

    The key concept of spectrum response estimation with commercial software, such as the SESAM software tool, typically includes two main steps: finding a suitable loading spectrum and computing the response amplitude operators (RAOs) subjected to a frequency-specified wave component. In this paper, we propose a nontraditional spectrum response estimation method that uses a numerical representation of the retardation functions. Based on estimated added mass and damping matrices of the structure, we decompose and replace the convolution terms with a series of poles and corresponding residues in the Laplace domain. Then, we estimate the power density corresponding to each frequency component using the improved periodogram method. The advantage of this approach is that the frequency-dependent motion equations in the time domain can be transformed into the Laplace domain without requiring Laplace-domain expressions for the added mass and damping. To validate the proposed method, we use a numerical semi-submerged pontoon from the SESAM. The numerical results show that the responses of the proposed method match well with those obtained from the traditional method. Furthermore, the estimated spectrum also matches well, which indicates its potential application to deep-water floating structures.

  3. Tsukamurella spongiae sp. nov., a novel actinomycete isolated from a deep-water marine sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Julie B; Harmody, Dedra K; Bej, Asim K; McCarthy, Peter J

    2007-07-01

    A Gram-positive, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain K362(T)) was isolated from a deep-water marine sponge collected off the coast of Curaçao in the Netherlands Antilles. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, strain K362(T) was shown to belong to the genus Tsukamurella, being most closely related to Tsukamurella pulmonis (99.2 %), Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens (98.9 %), Tsukamurella strandjordii (98.8 %), Tsukamurella pseudospumae (98.8 %) and Tsukamurella spumae (98.8 %). A combination of the substrate utilization patterns, the fatty acid and mycolic acid profiles and the DNA-DNA hybridization results supported the affiliation of strain K362(T) to the genus Tsukamurella and enabled the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain K362(T) from the seven recognized Tsukamurella species. Strain K362(T) therefore represents a novel species of the genus Tsukamurella, for which the name Tsukamurella spongiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is K362(T) (=DSM 44990(T)=NRRL B-24467(T)).

  4. Evidence of lipofuscin accumulation in the deep-water red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. MEZZASALMA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipofuscin, a non-degradable, degenerative fluorescent pigment which accumulates in post-mitotic cells, represents a promising method for ageing marine crustaceans. The presence and accumulation of lipofuscin has been studied in the deep-water red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827 to assess its use as a tool for ageing larger (i.e., older specimens and thus improve knowledge of the growth and longevity of this species. Specimens, gathered during experimental trawl surveys carried out in the Strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea, were stored directly on-board in 10% buffered formaldehyde solution; their brain was thereafter removed, prepared with various current histological techniques and examined with a binocular microscope. Thin sections of the olfactory lobe cell mass were also analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, and the lipofuscin concentration was measured through image analysis. Various indices were computed for each individual by pooling data from many images: number and coverage of the lipofuscin granules per unit area, and mean individual area of the granules. Lipofuscin was detected in all specimens investigated with characteristics (grain typology and dimension strictly resembling those already described in other crustacean species. The present preliminary results encourage further studies to develop and validate a methodology based on the use of lipofuscin for improving the relative ageing of large A. foliacea shrimps.

  5. Norwegian deep-water coral reefs: cultivation and molecular analysis of planktonic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Lynch, Michael D J; Ray, Jessica L; Neufeld, Josh D; Hovland, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Deep-sea coral reefs do not receive sunlight and depend on plankton. Little is known about the plankton composition at such reefs, even though they constitute habitats for many invertebrates and fish. We investigated plankton communities from three reefs at 260-350 m depth at hydrocarbon fields off the mid-Norwegian coast using a combination of cultivation and small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and transcript sequencing. Eight months incubations of a reef water sample with minimal medium, supplemented with carbon dioxide and gaseous alkanes at in situ-like conditions, enabled isolation of mostly Alphaproteobacteria (Sulfitobacter, Loktanella), Gammaproteobacteria (Colwellia) and Flavobacteria (Polaribacter). The relative abundance of isolates in the original sample ranged from ∼ 0.01% to 0.80%. Comparisons of bacterial SSU sequences from filtered plankton of reef and non-reef control samples indicated high abundance and metabolic activity of primarily Alphaproteobacteria (SAR11 Ia), Gammaproteobacteria (ARCTIC96BD-19), but also of Deltaproteobacteria (Nitrospina, SAR324). Eukaryote SSU sequences indicated metabolically active microalgae and animals, including codfish, at the reef sites. The plankton community composition varied between reefs and differed between DNA and RNA assessments. Over 5000 operational taxonomic units were detected, some indicators of reef sites (e.g. Flavobacteria, Cercozoa, Demospongiae) and some more active at reef sites (e.g. Gammaproteobacteria, Ciliophora, Copepoda). © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Larvae from deep-sea methane seeps disperse in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arellano, Shawn M; Van Gaest, Ahna L; Johnson, Shannon B; Vrijenhoek, Robert C; Young, Craig M

    2014-07-07

    Many species endemic to deep-sea methane seeps have broad geographical distributions, suggesting that they produce larvae with at least episodic long-distance dispersal. Cold-seep communities on both sides of the Atlantic share species or species complexes, yet larval dispersal across the Atlantic is expected to take prohibitively long at adult depths. Here, we provide direct evidence that the long-lived larvae of two cold-seep molluscs migrate hundreds of metres above the ocean floor, allowing them to take advantage of faster surface currents that may facilitate long-distance dispersal. We collected larvae of the ubiquitous seep mussel "Bathymodiolus" childressi and an associated gastropod, Bathynerita naticoidea, using remote-control plankton nets towed in the euphotic zone of the Gulf of Mexico. The timing of collections suggested that the larvae might disperse in the water column for more than a year, where they feed and grow to more than triple their original sizes. Ontogenetic vertical migration during a long larval life suggests teleplanic dispersal, a plausible explanation for the amphi-Atlantic distribution of "B." mauritanicus and the broad western Atlantic distribution of B. naticoidea. These are the first empirical data to demonstrate a biological mechanism that might explain the genetic similarities between eastern and western Atlantic seep fauna. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. On the difficulty of modeling Circumpolar Deep Water intrusions onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Y.; Timmermann, R.; Schröder, M.; Hellmer, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea, warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) intrudes onto the continental shelf and flows into the ice shelf cavities of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, resulting in high basal melt rates. However, none of the high resolution global models resolving all the small ice shelves around Antarctica can reproduce a realistic CDW flow onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf, and previous studies show simulated bottom potential temperature at the Pine Island Ice Shelf front of about -1.8 °C. In this study, using the Finite-Element Sea ice-ice shelf-Ocean Model (FESOM), we reproduce warm CDW intrusions onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf and realistic melt rates of the ice shelves in West Antarctica. To investigate the importance of horizontal resolution, forcing, horizontal diffusivity, and the effect of grounded icebergs, eight sensitivity experiments are conducted. To simulate the CDW intrusion realistically, a horizontal resolution of about 5 km or smaller is required. The choice of forcing is also important and the cold bias in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis over the eastern Amundsen Sea prevents warm CDW from intruding onto the continental shelf. On the other hand, the CDW intrusion is not highly sensitive to the strength of horizontal diffusion. The effect of grounded icebergs located off Bear Peninsula is minor, but may act as a buffer to an anomalously cold year.

  8. Clinical effect of deep water running on non-specific low back pain: A randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Cuesta-Vargas

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate clinical effect of deep water running(DW R on non-specific low back pain. Outcome measures were pain, disability,general health and physical fitness.  Materials and methods: Experimental, randomized,  controlled trial involving 46 persons with CLBP over 15 weekswith two experimental processes, each three times a week. Evidence-basedProgram (EBP, personalized physical exercise program, manual therapy andhealth educa tion was the common process to which was added 20 minutes ofpersonalized intensity DW R at the aerobic threshold. Measurements were made at the beginning and end of the studyof pain, disability, general health and physical fitness.  R esults: The pain of CLBP were homogeneous at baseline.Significant changes between group were don’t found for pain in favour of the EBP+DW R group (p<0.3. The within-group differences were highly significant for all clinical and functional variables. The effect was clinically relevant forpain in the EBP+DW R group (0.70 and in the EBP group (0.58, and for disability degree it was also relevant in theEBP+DW R group (0.48 and relevant for the EBP group (0.36. Conclusion: Significant improvement was seen inCLBP when EBP was complemented with the high-intensity exercise of DW R.

  9. Annular multiphase flow behavior during deep water drilling and the effect of hydrate phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiyuan; Sun Baojiang

    2009-01-01

    It is very important to understand the annular multiphase flow behavior and the effect of hydrate phase transition during deep water drilling. The basic hydrodynamic models, including mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, were established for annular flow with gas hydrate phase transition during gas kick. The behavior of annular multiphase flow with hydrate phase transition was investigated by analyzing the hydrate-forming region, the gas fraction in the fluid flowing in the annulus, pit gain, bottom hole pressure, and shut-in casing pressure. The simulation shows that it is possible to move the hydrate-forming region away from sea floor by increasing the circulation rate. The decrease in gas volume fraction in the annulus due to hydrate formation reduces pit gain, which can delay the detection of well kick and increase the risk of hydrate plugging in lines. Caution is needed when a well is monitored for gas kick at a relatively low gas production rate, because the possibility of hydrate presence is much greater than that at a relatively high production rate. The shut-in casing pressure cannot reflect the gas kick due to hydrate formation, which increases with time.

  10. Deep-Water Resedimented Carbonate Exploration Play Types: Controls and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzoni, M.; Janson, X.; Kerans, C.; Playton, T.; Winefield, P.; Burgess, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Deepwater resedimented deposits have been described in both modern and ancient carbonate sequences, many with good reservoir potential, for example the giant Cretaceous Poza Rica field in Mexico ( 40 MMBoe), the Mississippian Tangiz field in Kazakhstan, and several fields in the U.S. Permian basin (several Tcf gas). Nevertheless, carbonate slope and basin systems remain poorly understood when compared to their siliciclastic counterparts. Legacy published and unpublished work, combined with a global database of surface and sub-surface examples of resedimented carbonates, has highlighted that downslope resedimentation of carbonate material is in large part controlled by the evolution of the parent platform margin, which in turn is best characterized in terms of various controlling processes such as the carbonate factory type, tectonic setting, eustatic variations, and prevailing wind direction and ocean current patterns. Two generic play types emerge: (i) attached carbonate slope play -developed immediately adjacent to the parent carbonate platform and dominated by rock fall and platform collapse deposits or in situ boundstone; and (ii) detached carbonate slope play - deposited further from the platform margin via channelized turbidity currents and other mass-flow processes. High-rising, steep, bypass platform margins with collapse scars and grain-dominated factories have the highest potential to generate channelized and detached deep-water reservoirs with high initial porosity and permeability. Best reservoirs are aragonitic grainstones transported from the platform into the adjacent basin, and undergoing dissolution in submarine undersaturated water with early formation of secondary porosity to further enhance reservoir properties. Any exploration model aiming at identifying potential resedimented carbonate plays should be based on carbonate platform configurations and factory types favorable for re-sedimentation of large sedimentary bodies and preservation or

  11. Temporal variability of the Circumpolar Deep Water inflow onto the Ross Sea continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagno, Pasquale; Falco, Pierpaolo; Dinniman, Michael S.; Spezie, Giancarlo; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-02-01

    The intrusion of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) is the primary source of heat, salt and nutrients onto Antarctica's continental shelves and plays a major role in the shelf physical and biological processes. Different studies have analyzed the processes responsible for the transport of CDW across the Ross Sea shelf break, but until now, there are no continuous observations that investigate the timing of the intrusions. Also, few works have focused on the effect of the tides that control these intrusions. In the Ross Sea, the CDW intrudes onto the shelf in several locations, but mostly along the troughs. We use hydrographic observations and a mooring placed on the outer shelf in the middle of the Drygalski Trough in order to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of CDW inflow onto the shelf. Our data span from 2004 to the beginning of 2014. In the Drygalski Trough, the CDW enters as a 150 m thick layer between 250 and 400 m, and moves upward towards the south. At the mooring location, about 50 km from the shelf break, two main CDW cores can be observed: one on the east side of the trough spreading along the west slope of Mawson Bank from about 200 m to the bottom and the other one in the central-west side from 200 m to about 350 m depth. A signature of this lighter and relatively warm water is detected by the instruments on the mooring at bottom of the Drygalski Trough. High frequency periodic CDW intrusion at the bottom of the trough is related to the diurnal and spring/neap tidal cycles. At lower frequency, a seasonal variability of the CDW intrusion is noticed. A strong inflow of CDW is observed every year at the end of December, while the CDW inflow is at its seasonal minimum during the beginning of the austral fall. In addition an interannual variability is also evident. A change of the CDW intrusion before and after 2010 is observed.

  12. Wave-current interactions in deep water conditions: field measurements and analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Gilles; Rey, Vincent; Molcard, Anne

    2015-04-01

    The study of wave - current interaction has drawn interest in oceanography, ocean engineering, maritime navigation and for tides or waves power device design. In the context of the hydrodynamics study along the French Mediterranean coast, a current profiler was deployed near Toulon at the south of the "Port Cros" island. This coastal zone is characterized by a steep slope, the water depth varying from tens meters to several thousand meters over few kilometers from the coast. An ambient current, the "Northern Current", coming from the Ligurian sea (area of Genoa, Italy) and following the coast up to Toulon, is present all over the year. Its mean surface velocity is of about 0.30 m/s, its flow rate of about 1.5 Sv. The region is exposed to two dominating winds: the Mistral, coming from North-West, and Eastern winds. Both generate swell and/or wind waves in either following or opposing current conditions with respect to the Northern Current. A current profiler equipped with a wave tracking system (ACPD workhorse from RDI) was deployed from July to October 2014 in deep water conditions (depth of about 500m). The mooring system allowed the ADCP to measure the current profile from the sea surface down to 25m depth, which corresponds more or less to the depth of influence of waves of periods up to 10s. The collected data include energetic wave conditions in either following or opposing current conditions. The current intensity and its vertical profiles have shown a significant temporal variability according to the meteorological conditions. Effects of the wave conditions on the current properties are discussed. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was supported by the program BOMBYX and the ANR grant No ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  13. Millennial-scale oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Raj

    2015-11-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasiperiodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the North Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal-scale small-amplitude oscillations and a large-amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually, an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection and polar warming. The unstable convective state relaxes back to the small-amplitude oscillations from where the process repeats in a self-sustained manner. Freshwater pulses mimicking Heinrich events cause the oscillations to be grouped into packets of progressively weaker fluctuations, as observed in proxy records. Modulation of this stable oscillation mechanism by freshwater and insolation variations could account for the distribution and pacing of D-O and Bond events. Physical aspects of the system such as sea ice extent and oceanic advective flow rates could determine the characteristic 1500 year time scale of D-O events. The model results with respect to the structure of the water column in the Nordic seas during stadial and interstadial phases are in agreement with paleoproxy observations.

  14. New glass sponges (Porifera: Hexactinellida) from deep waters of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiswig, Henry M; Stone, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Hexactinellida from deep-water communities of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska, are described. They were mostly collected by the remotely operated vehicle 'Jason II' from 494–2311 m depths during a 2004 RV 'Roger Revelle' expedition, but one shallow-water species collected with a shrimp trawl from 155 m in the same area is included. The excellent condition of the ROV-collected specimens enabled valuable redescription of some species previously known only from badly damaged specimens. New taxa include one new genus and eight new species in five families. Farreidae consist of two new species, Farrea aleutiana and F. aspondyla. Euretidae consists of only Pinulasma fistulosum n. gen., n. sp. Tretodictyidae include only Tretodictyum amchitkensis n. sp. Euplectellidae consists of only the widespread species Regadrella okinoseana Ijima, reported here over 3,700 km from its closest previously known occurrence. The most diverse family, Rossellidae, consists of Aulosaccus ijimai (Schulze), Aulosaccus schulzei Ijima, Bathydorus sp. (young stage not determinable to species), Caulophacus (Caulophacus) adakensis n. sp., Acanthascus koltuni n. sp., Staurocalyptus psilosus n. sp., Staurocalyptus tylotus n. sp. and Rhabdocalyptus mirabilis Schulze. We present argument for reinstatement of the abolished rossellid subfamily Acanthascinae and return of the subgenera  Staurocalyptus Ijima and Rhabdocalyptus Schulze to their previous generic status. These fauna provides important complexity to the hard substrate communities that likely serve as nursery areas for the young stages of commercially important fish and crab species, refuge from predation for both young and adult stages, and also as a focal source of prey for juvenile and adult stages of those same species.

  15. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curaçao, Southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soest, Rob W M; Meesters, Erik H W G; Becking, Leontine E

    2014-10-29

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5-242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are Plakinastrella stinapa n. sp., Pachastrella pacoi n. sp., Characella pachastrelloides n. sp., Geodia curacaoensis n. sp., Caminus carmabi n. sp., Discodermia adhaerens n. sp., Clathria (Microciona) acarnoides n. sp., Antho (Acarnia) pellita n. sp., Parahigginsia strongylifera n. sp., Calyx magnoculata n. sp., Neopetrosia dutchi n. sp., Neopetrosia ovata n. sp. and Neopetrosia eurystomata n. sp. We also report an euretid hexactinellid, which belongs to the rare genus Verrucocoeloidea, recently described (2014) as V. liberatorii Reiswig & Dohrmann. The remaining 18 already known species are all illustrated by photos of the habit, either in situ or 'on deck', but only briefly characterized in an annotated table to confirm their occurrence in the Southern Caribbean. The habitat investigated-steep limestone rocks, likely representing Pleistocene fossil reefs--is similar to deep-water fossil reefs at Barbados of which the sponges were sampled and studied by Van Soest and Stentoft (1988). A comparison is made between the two localities, showing a high degree of similarity in sponge composition: 53% of the present Bonaire-Klein Curaçao species were also retrieved at Barbados. At the level of higher taxa (genera, families) Bonaire-Klein Curaçao shared approximately 80% of its lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponge fauna with Barbados, despite a distance between them of 1000 km, indicating high faunal homogeneity. We also preliminarily compared the shallow-water (euphotic) sponge fauna of Curaçao with the combined data available for the Barbados, Bonaire and Klein Curaçao mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponges, which resulted in the conclusion that the two faunas show only

  16. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 201

  17. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 201

  18. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; de Madron, Xavier Durrieu; Houpert, Loic; Lefevre, Dominique; Martini, Verine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Al Samarai, Imen; Albert, Arnaud; Andre, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stephane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, Jose; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Carloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stephanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galata, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernandez-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hossl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Lo Presti, Domenico; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Pavalas, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Riviere, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sanchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schoeck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Veronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; Zornoza, Juan De Dios; Zuniga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June

  19. Lateral supply and downward export of particulate matter from upper waters to the seafloor in the deep eastern Fram Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Catherine; Nöthig, Eva-Maria; Bauerfeind, Eduard; Hardge, Kristin; Beszczynska-Möller, Agnieszka; Fahl, Kirsten

    2016-08-01

    Time-series sediment traps were deployed at 4 depths in the eastern Fram Strait from July 2007 to June 2008 to investigate variations in the magnitude and composition of the sinking particulate matter from upper waters to the seafloor. Sediment traps were deployed at 196 m in the Atlantic Water layer, at 1296 and 2364 m in the intermediate and deep waters, and at 2430 m on a benthic lander in the near-bottom layer. Fluxes of total particulate matter, particulate organic carbon, particulate organic nitrogen, biogenic matter, lithogenic matter, biogenic particulate silica, calcium carbonate, dominant phytoplankton cells, and zooplankton fecal pellets increased with depth, indicating the importance of lateral advection on fluxes in the deep Fram Strait. The lateral supply of particulate matter was further supported by the constant fluxes of biomarkers such as brassicasterol, alkenones, campesterol, β-sitosterol, and IP25 at all depths sampled. However, enhanced fluxes of diatoms and appendicularian fecal pellets from the upper waters to the seafloor in the presence of ice during spring indicated the rapid export (15-35 days) of locally-produced large particles that likely contributed most of the food supply to the benthic communities. These results show that lateral supply and downward fluxes are both important processes influencing the transport of particulate matter to the seafloor in the deep eastern Fram Strait, and that particulate matter size dictates the prevailing sinking process.

  20. THE OPTIMAL RATIO OF NILE TILAPIA (Oreochromis niloticus AND COMMON CARP (Cyprinus carpio FOR IMPROVING PRODUCTIVITY ON DEEP WATER POND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Taufik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pond productivity can be increased by applied polyculture system in the deep pond. The purpose of this experiment is to examine the optimal ratio between nile tilapia and common carp, in order to increase the productivity. Nine concrete tanks (15 m2 with water depth of 2.2 m and were completed by water inlet, water outlet, and aeration. Both of nile tilapia and common carp with size ranging of 5-8 cm in total length were used. Stock density was 150 ind./m2. The difference ratio of both fish tilapia and carp of fish stocked as a treatment. The fish ratio this experiment were as followed: A 100%; B 80%:20%; C 60%:40%. Fish fed by pellet until at ad libitum. The duration of experiment was 100 days. Parameters such as survival, growth, and productivity were observed every ten days during the experiment period. Water quality parameters were also periodically observed. The results showed that survival of nile tilapia among the treatments were not significantly different (P>0.05 where survival of common carp at B treatment was better than C treatment (P<0.05. The highest of growth of absolute weight (94.86±2.85 g and total length (14.71±1 cm of nile tilapia at B treatment was found (P<0.05 where the best of growth of absolute weight (106.52±10.47 g and total length (11.57±1.78 cm of common carp was also found at B treatment (P<0.05. Biomass productivity at B treatment was the highest compared with A treatment (P<0.05. Combination between polyculture and the deep water pond technology could increase productivity. The polyculture system and the deep water pond technology would be able to keep constant water quality within in the threshold accordance with the regulation for fish culture.

  1. Formation of three-dimensional surface waves on deep-water using elliptic solutions of nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation

    CERN Document Server

    Sajjadi, Shahrdad G; Drullion, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    A review of three-dimensional waves on deep-water is presented. Three forms of three dimensionality, namely oblique, forced and spontaneous type, are identified. An alternative formulation for these three-dimensional waves is given through cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The periodic solutions of the cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation are found using Weierstrass elliptic $\\wp$ functions. It is shown that the classification of solutions depends on the boundary conditions, wavenumber and frequency. For certain parameters, Weierstrass $\\wp$ functions are reduced to periodic, hyperbolic or Jacobi elliptic functions. It is demonstrated that some of these solutions do not have any physical significance. An analytical solution of cubic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with wind forcing is also obtained which results in how groups of waves are generated on the surface of deep water in the ocean. In this case the dependency on the energy-transfer parameter, from wind to waves, make either the groups of wav...

  2. The cell spar for development of deep water fields offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, Jim; Finn, Lyle [Technip/Floater Product Line, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The Cell Spar is the third generation of the highly successful spar technology and has many of the characteristics of its predecessors, the Classic and Truss Spars, including similar in-place performance. Unlike the two preceding generations, which were suited to larger developments, the Cell Spar is designed to be competitive in the smaller range of floating production systems and is best suited for small deck weights and well counts. What distinguishes the Cell Spar from the other Spars is the fabrication method. The design utilizes a familiar rolling procedure and high speed welding process, to promote competitive fabrication costs and cycle times. A shorter cycle time from discovery to first production, coupled with a lower cost structure improves development economics, making the concept suitable for consideration for smaller (less than 75 MMBE) deep water field developments. The fabrication method employs tubular rolling and welding techniques that have been used successfully for years to fabricate conventional steel jacket structures. This tubular rolling and welding capability is available at many locations around the world and this capability could be established for a modest cost at other locations. As a result, it is feasible to fabricate the structure at many locations around the world, including Brazil, and thus increase the local content for the field development, as well as reduce transportation risks and expense of the final hull form. The first Cell Spar has already been delivered earlier this year. Based on the experience on this initial design, a number of product improvements have been implemented. Most of these product improvements have focused on reducing the number of required details, standardizing components, and enabling more outfitting work to be done early in the process. The first application has been classified as an ABS A1 Floating Offshore Installation (FOI). The product improvements that have been recently implemented have received

  3. Stimulatory Effects of Balanced Deep Sea Water on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Geun Ha

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence of metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes, is increasing. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized as a core feature of these diseases. Emerging evidence also suggests that defects in mitochondrial biogenesis, number, morphology, fusion, and fission, contribute to the development and progression of metabolic diseases. Our previous studies revealed that balanced deep-sea water (BDSW has potential as a treatment for diabetes and obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which BDSW regulates diabetes and obesity by studying its effects on mitochondrial metabolism. To determine whether BDSW regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function, we investigated its effects on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and the expression of transcription factors and mitochondria specific genes, as well as on the phosphorylation of signaling molecules associated with mitochondria biogenesis and its function in C2C12 myotubes. BDSW increased mitochondrial biogenesis in a time and dose-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that BDSW enhances gene expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, and TFAM for mitochondrial transcription; MFN1/2 and DRP1 for mitochondrial fusion; OPA1 for mitochondrial fission; TOMM40 and TIMM44 for mitochondrial protein import; CPT-1α and MCAD for fatty acid oxidation; CYTC for oxidative phosphorylation. Upregulation of these genes was validated by increased mitochondria staining, CS activity, CytC oxidase activity, NAD+ to NADH ratio, and the phosphorylation of signaling molecules such as AMPK and SIRT1. Moreover, drinking BDSW remarkably improved mtDNA content in the muscles of HFD-induced obese mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the stimulatory effect of BDSW on mitochondrial biogenesis and function may provide further insights into the regulatory mechanism of BDSW-induced anti-diabetic and anti-obesity action.

  4. Event sedimentation in low-latitude deep-water carbonate basins, Anegada passage, northeast Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, Jason D.; ten Brink, Uri S.

    2015-01-01

    The Virgin Islands and Whiting basins in the Northeast Caribbean are deep, structurally controlled depocentres partially bound by shallow-water carbonate platforms. Closed basins such as these are thought to document earthquake and hurricane events through the accumulation of event layers such as debris flow and turbidity current deposits and the internal deformation of deposited material. Event layers in the Virgin Islands and Whiting basins are predominantly thin and discontinuous, containing varying amounts of reef- and slope-derived material. Three turbidites/sandy intervals in the upper 2 m of sediment in the eastern Virgin Islands Basin were deposited between ca. 2000 and 13 600 years ago, but do not extend across the basin. In the central and western Virgin Islands Basin, a structureless clay-rich interval is interpreted to be a unifite. Within the Whiting Basin, several discontinuous turbidites and other sand-rich intervals are primarily deposited in base of slope fans. The youngest of these turbidites is ca. 2600 years old. Sediment accumulation in these basins is low (−1) for basin adjacent to carbonate platform, possibly due to limited sediment input during highstand sea-level conditions, sediment trapping and/or cohesive basin walls. We find no evidence of recent sediment transport (turbidites or debris flows) or sediment deformation that can be attributed to the ca. M7.2 1867 Virgin Islands earthquake whose epicentre was located on the north wall of the Virgin Islands Basin or to recent hurricanes that have impacted the region. The lack of significant appreciable pebble or greater size carbonate material in any of the available cores suggests that submarine landslide and basin-wide blocky debris flows have not been a significant mechanism of basin margin modification in the last several thousand years. Thus, basins such as those described here may be poor recorders of past natural hazards, but may provide a long-term record of past oceanographic

  5. Emergence of coherent wave groups in deep-water random sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, C; Dutykh, D; Dudley, J M; Dias, F

    2013-06-01

    Extreme surface waves in a deep-water long-crested sea are often interpreted as a manifestation in the real world of the so-called breathing solitons of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. While the spontaneous emergence of such coherent structures from nonlinear wave dynamics was demonstrated to take place in fiber-optics systems, the same point remains far more controversial in the hydrodynamic case. With the aim to shed further light on this matter, the emergence of breatherlike coherent wave groups in a long-crested random sea is investigated here by means of high-resolution spectral simulations of the fully nonlinear two-dimensional Euler equations. The primary focus of our study is to parametrize the structure of random wave fields with respect to the Benjamin-Feir index, which is a nondimensional measure of the energy localization in Fourier space. This choice is motivated by previous results, showing that extreme-wave activity in a long-crested sea is highly sensitive to such a parameter, which is varied here by changing both the characteristic spectral bandwidth and the average wave steepness. It is found that coherent wave groups, closely matching realizations of Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in Euler dynamics, develop within wave fields characterized by sufficiently narrow-banded spectra. The characteristic spatial and temporal scales of wave group dynamics, and the corresponding occurrence of extreme events, are quantified and discussed by means of space-time autocorrelations of the surface elevation envelope and extreme-event statistics.

  6. An Aquifer Reflections on Deep Clay Conditions for Water Quantity Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Sabariah Musa; Nor Azazi Zakaria; Lau Tze Liang

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the on-site testing of deep clay area through the well response and aquifer reflection analysis. The analysis was conducted using AQTESOLV software on pumping and recovery data to determine the well responses and aquifer characteristics of deep clay area. A simple experimental model was installed at the site using deep well of REWES (Recharge Well System) model assists with four monitoring wells around the model. The monitoring wells were located at 4m, 10m, 20m an...

  7. Paraffin dispersant application for cleaning subsea flow lines in the deep water Gulf of Mexico cottonwood development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, David; White, Jake; Pogoson, Oje [Baker Hughes Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Barros, Dalmo; Ramachandran, Kartik; Bonin, George; Waltrich, Paulo; Shecaira, Farid [PETROBRAS America, Houston, TX (United States); Ziglio, Claudio [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses a paraffin dispersant (in seawater) application to clean paraffin deposition from a severely restricted 17.4-mile dual subsea flow line system in the Gulf of Mexico Cottonwood development. In principle, dispersant treatments are simple processes requiring effective dispersant packages and agitation to break-up and disperse deposition. Dispersants have been used onshore for treating wax deposition for decades. Implementation of a treatment in a long deep water production system, however, poses numerous challenges. The Cottonwood application was one of the first ever deep water dispersant applications. The application was designed in four separate phases: pre-treatment displacement for hydrate protection, dispersant treatment for paraffin deposition removal, pigging sequence for final flow line cleaning, and post-treatment displacement for hydrate protection. In addition, considerable job planning was performed to ensure the application was executed in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. Two dynamically positioned marine vessels were used for pumping fluids and capturing returns. The application was extremely successful in restoring the deep water flow lines back to near pre-production state. Final pigging operations confirmed the flow lines were cleaned of all restrictions. Significant paraffin deposition was removed in the application. Approximately 900 bbls of paraffin sludge was recovered from the 4000 bbl internal volume flow line loop. Furthermore, the application was completed with zero discharge of fluids. The application provided significant value for the Cottonwood development. It allowed production from wells to be brought on-line at a higher capacity, thereby generating increased revenue. It also allowed resumption of routine pigging operations. As such, the Cottonwood dispersant application illustrates that with proper planning and execution, paraffin dispersant treatments can be highly effective solutions for cleaning

  8. Exploring surface waves vortex interaction in deep water: a classical analog of the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm effect

    CERN Document Server

    Vivanco, F

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple experiment to study the interaction of surface waves with a vertical vortex in the deep water regime. Similarly to what occurs in the Quantum Mechanics Aharonov-Bohm problem for electron interacting with a magnetic potential, the effect of the vortex circulation is to introduce dislocations in the wavefront. These defects are explained taken into account the effects of advection on the propagating wavefront, due to the fluid motion. (Author)

  9. Piping coarse-grained sediment to a deep water fan through a shelf-edge delta bypass channel: Tank experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuri; Kim, Wonsuck; Cheong, Daekyo; Muto, Tetsuji; Pyles, David R.

    2013-12-01

    is now generally accepted that deltas that prograde to the shelf edge are able to transport coarse sediment to deep water either with or without sea level changes. However, it is still unclear how feeder rivers behave differently in the shelf-edge delta case to rivers found in a delta that progrades over the shelf. A series of nine shelf-edge delta experiments are presented to investigate the lateral mobility of the feeder channel at the shelf edge and the associated deep water depositional system under a range of sediment supply rates and shelf-front depths. In the experiments, constant sediment supply from an upstream point source under static sea level led the fluviodeltaic system to prograde over the shallow shelf surface and advance beyond the shelf edge into deep water. The feeder river of the fluviodeltaic system became a bypass system once the toe of the delta front reached the shelf edge. After the delta front was perched at the shelf edge, a submarine fan developed in deep water although remaining disconnected from the delta. In this bypass stage, no regional avulsion or lateral migration of the feeder river occurred and all sediment from the upstream source bypassed the river, delta front, and shelf-front slope. The duration of the bypass stage is proportional to shelf-front depth and inversely proportional to sediment discharge. The combined duration of the shelf-transit phase of the fluviodeltaic system and the bypass phase is the characteristic time scale for the continental margin to "anneal" transgression-inducing perturbation due to high-frequency and/or high-amplitude relative sea level rise. The sequential evolution in the experiment compares favorably to the Eocene Sobrarbe Formation, a shelf-edge delta in Spain, although natural variations are noted. This comparison justifies the application of concepts proposed herein to natural systems and provides insight into interpreting processes from ancient shelf-edge delta systems.

  10. The Role of Ceased Deep Water Ventilation in Massive Organic Carbon Sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, G.; Rohling, E. J.; Rijpstra, I. W.; Sangiorgi, F.; Brinkhuis, H.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Sapropels reflect periods of widespread deposition of organic-carbon in the eastern Mediterranean (eMed) in response to positive shifts in the freshwater budget of the basin driven by distinct minima in the precession cycle that led to increased primary productivity and/or improved organic matter preservation. Last interglacial sapropel S5 is intensively developed and holds excellent potential for high-resolution studies. This is essential to track the major changes that led the eMed thermohaline circulation to its sapropel mode and, in turn, to the massive organic sedimentation. However, to date, no S5 has been recovered and studied from the marginal basins of the eMed (Adriatic and the Aegean Sea), which currently play a critical role in the basin's deep-water ventilation. Here we present the first systematic high-resolution multi-proxy study of an extremely organic-rich (up to 14% Corg) sapropel S5 from the Aegean Sea (core LC21) and discuss it in the context of previously described contemporaneous records from key locations in the open eMed. Our results unequivocally support the previous notion that the increased runoff (160-300% greater than today), largely discharged into the open eMed along the North African margin, crucially forced the anoxic event with profound oceanographic and biotic reorganizations throughout the basin. The Aegean subsurface circulation collapsed shortly after the onset of the freshwater flooding, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of benthic fossils and major increase in the organic carbon accumulation. In a few centuries, the occurrence of large amounts of isorenieratene marks the development of euxinic conditions throughout the Aegean water-column up to 200 m or shallower. Similar conditions successively spread over the open eMed. This reconstruction provides an unprecedented decadal-scale insight into the actual processes involved in the S5 deposition and, in a more general sense, in other episodes of massive carbon burial (e

  11. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Sayles, F.L.

    1971-01-01

    Sediments from Leg 6 sites, west of the Hawaiian Islands, consisted primarily of various combinations of deep-sea biogenic oozes, volcanic ash, and its breakdown products. Pore fluids from most of the sites were similar in composition to present day ocean water, and in some sties almost identical. However, interstitial fluids from Site 53 (Philippine Sea) showed changes in ionic composition which were beyond those previously considered attributable to diagenetic influence. These samples show the beginnings of metamorphism by dramatic increases in calcium concentrations and corresponding decreases in alkali concentrations. Analytical methods were similar to those outlined in previous Leg Reports. However, obvious contamination of aliquots for sodium determination in the laboratory made it necessary to determine all sodium values by difference between anion and cation balances. These values are, if anything, more accurate than direct determinations which have been discussed in earlier legs. However, the authors will continue to analyze sodium directly, and in the future they may be able to improve the precision of the determinations to the point where small losses and gains of sodium in the pore fluids may be established accurately. Agreement between colorimetric and spectrometric determinations of silicon has improved, but there are still occasional marked differences for which the writers have no explanation. T. Takahashi has allowed the authors to compare total Carbon Dioxide (CO2) measurements from his laboratory with their alkalinity determinations: both sets of data were obtained from fluids from the same squeezings of sediments and should give similar values at the indicated pH levels. Some disturbingly large discrepancies in the two sets of data are evident. The authors do not think that their back-titration alkalinity technique alone is responsible for the differences. However, they have not evaluated the possible influence of the heat-sealed polyethylene

  12. Transient deep-water oxygenation in the early Cambrian Nanhua Basin, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng; Li, Chao; Zhou, Lian; Feng, LianJun; Algeo, Thomas J.; Zhang, FeiFei; Romaniello, Stephen; Jin, ChengSheng; Ling, HongFei; Jiang, ShaoYong

    2017-08-01

    Many late Neoproterozoic to early Cambrian fossils of multicellular eukaryotes, including those of benthic animals, are found preserved under anoxic and even euxinic bottom-water conditions, which is contradictory to the consensus that oxygen is essential to eukaryotes. To investigate this conundrum, we conducted an integrated study of iron speciation, redox-sensitive trace elements, and Mo isotopes (δ98Mo) on the black shale interval of the lower Cambrian Hetang Formation (∼535-521 Ma) at Lantian, South China, in which benthic sponge fossils are abundant in the lower member (LM) but absent in the upper member (UM). Iron speciation data point to uniformly anoxic-ferruginous conditions in the LM and euxinic conditions in the UM, whereas the trace-element and δ98Mo data show greater secular variation in redox conditions. The LM shows higher mean trace element concentrations (Mo: 108 ppm, U: 36 ppm, V: 791 ppm) and lower and more variable δ98Mo (+0.13 to +1.76‰) relative to the UM (Mo: 45 ppm, U: 18 ppm, V: 265 ppm, δ98Mo: +1.59 to +1.67‰), and ratios of redox-sensitive trace element concentrations to total organic carbon are significantly more variable and higher on average in the LM relative to the UM. The appearance of sponge fossils and lower δ98Mo values correlate strongly with gray (i.e., lighter-colored) layers in the LM. These patterns can best be interpreted as recording mainly euxinic conditions throughout deposition of the study units, with more intense background euxinia in the LM relative to the UM, but also with frequent transient oxygenation events in the LM that do not appear in the UM. The transient oxygenation events of the LM led to the initial colonization of the deep Nanhua Basin by sponges, and the termination of these events in the UM caused sponge faunas to disappear until a general rise in O2 levels later in the Cambrian permitted their return to deeper-water habitats. Our study also illustrates that multiple geochemical and

  13. An open reversed Brayton cycle with regeneration using moist air for deep freeze cooled by circulating water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Shaobo [Guangdong Ocean University, College of Engineering, East Jiefang Rd. No. 40, Xiashan, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524006 (China); Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Aeroengine and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Zhang, Hefei [Northwestern Polytechnical University, School of Aeroengine and Thermal Power Engineering, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents an open reversed Brayton cycle with regeneration using moist air for deep freeze cooled by circulating water, and proves its feasibility through performance simulation. Pinch technology is used to analyze the cooling of the wet air after compressor and the water used for cooling wet air after compressor. Its refrigeration depends mainly on the sensible heat of air and the latent heat of water vapor, its performance is more efficient than a conventional air-cycle, and the utilization of turbo-machinery makes it possible. The adoption of this cycle will make deep freeze easily and reduce initial cost because very low temperature, about -55 C, air is obtained. The sensitivity analysis of coefficient of performance to the efficiency of compressor and the efficiency of compressor, and the results of the cycle are also given. The simulation results show that the COP of this system depends on the temperature before turbine, the efficiency of compressor and the efficiency of compressor, and varies with the wet bulb temperature of the outdoor air. Humid air is a perfect working fluid for deep freeze with no cost to the user. (author)

  14. Impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep-water coral community in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Helen K; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Cho, Walter; Shank, Timothy M; Cordes, Erik E; Quattrini, Andrea M; Nelson, Robert K; Camilli, Richard; Demopoulos, Amanda W J; German, Christopher R; Brooks, James M; Roberts, Harry H; Shedd, William; Reddy, Christopher M; Fisher, Charles R

    2012-12-11

    To assess the potential impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on offshore ecosystems, 11 sites hosting deep-water coral communities were examined 3 to 4 mo after the well was capped. Healthy coral communities were observed at all sites >20 km from the Macondo well, including seven sites previously visited in September 2009, where the corals and communities appeared unchanged. However, at one site 11 km southwest of the Macondo well, coral colonies presented widespread signs of stress, including varying degrees of tissue loss, sclerite enlargement, excess mucous production, bleached commensal ophiuroids, and covering by brown flocculent material (floc). On the basis of these criteria the level of impact to individual colonies was ranked from 0 (least impact) to 4 (greatest impact). Of the 43 corals imaged at that site, 46% exhibited evidence of impact on more than half of the colony, whereas nearly a quarter of all of the corals showed impact to >90% of the colony. Additionally, 53% of these corals' ophiuroid associates displayed abnormal color and/or attachment posture. Analysis of hopanoid petroleum biomarkers isolated from the floc provides strong evidence that this material contained oil from the Macondo well. The presence of recently damaged and deceased corals beneath the path of a previously documented plume emanating from the Macondo well provides compelling evidence that the oil impacted deep-water ecosystems. Our findings underscore the unprecedented nature of the spill in terms of its magnitude, release at depth, and impact to deep-water ecosystems.

  15. Impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on a deep-water coral community in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Helen K.; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Cho, Walter; Shank, Timothy M.; Cordes, Erik E.; Quattrini, Andrea M.; Nelson, Robert K.; Camilli, Richard; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; German, Christopher R.; Brooks, James M.; Roberts, Harry H.; Shedd, William; Reddy, Christopher M.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the potential impact of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on offshore ecosystems, 11 sites hosting deep-water coral communities were examined 3 to 4 mo after the well was capped. Healthy coral communities were observed at all sites >20 km from the Macondo well, including seven sites previously visited in September 2009, where the corals and communities appeared unchanged. However, at one site 11 km southwest of the Macondo well, coral colonies presented widespread signs of stress, including varying degrees of tissue loss, sclerite enlargement, excess mucous production, bleached commensal ophiuroids, and covering by brown flocculent material (floc). On the basis of these criteria the level of impact to individual colonies was ranked from 0 (least impact) to 4 (greatest impact). Of the 43 corals imaged at that site, 46% exhibited evidence of impact on more than half of the colony, whereas nearly a quarter of all of the corals showed impact to >90% of the colony. Additionally, 53% of these corals’ ophiuroid associates displayed abnormal color and/or attachment posture. Analysis of hopanoid petroleum biomarkers isolated from the floc provides strong evidence that this material contained oil from the Macondo well. The presence of recently damaged and deceased corals beneath the path of a previously documented plume emanating from the Macondo well provides compelling evidence that the oil impacted deep-water ecosystems. Our findings underscore the unprecedented nature of the spill in terms of its magnitude, release at depth, and impact to deep-water ecosystems.

  16. 深水钻井船水消防系统的设计%Water fire-fighting system for deep water drilling ship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐天晓; 于再红

    2013-01-01

    There are great differences between the design of water fire-fighting system in deep water drilling ships and that in common ships. The design and calculation is more complex due to the configuration of watering pressure stabilization system and supply of fire-fighting water for water spray system ,foam fire-fighting system and other subsystems for fire-fighting. This paper discusses the design and calculation key points of its water fire-fighting system for a deep water drilling ship with ABS classification.%深水钻井船水消防系统的设计与常规船舶有较大不同,湿式稳压系统的配置以及为水喷淋系统和泡沫消防系统等其他消防子系统提供消防水的要求,导致其设计和计算相对复杂。文中以某型入级ABS的深水钻井船为例,论述其水消防系统的设计与计算要点。

  17. Nutrient regeneration in the water column and at the sediment-water interface in pearl oyster culture (Pinctada margaritifera) in a deep atoll lagoon (Ahe, French Polynesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Élise; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a first estimation of the overall contribution of pearl oyster culture to nutrient regeneration in a deep atoll lagoon. Nutrient release by pearl oyster culture in the water column and nutrient fluxes at the sediment-water interface were compared in two contrasted conditions (i.e. under the influence or not of pearl oyster farming) in the Ahe atoll (French Polynesia). Nitrogen flux intensity was higher in the water column than at the benthic interface. Nitrogen was released at a rate of 31.36 μmol h-1 m-2 in the water column and 12.05 μmol h-1 m-2 at the sediment-water interface. Average phosphorus flux was 2.85 μmol h-1 m-2 at the sediment-water interface and 2.16 μmol h-1 m-2 in the water column. In this deep lagoon, pearl oyster culture exerted more influence in the pelagic compartment than at the benthic interface where flux rate seemed not to be influenced by the presence of pearl oyster culture. These results demonstrate that it is essential to study these two interfaces in concert when assessing the impact of suspended shellfish farming on nutrient dynamics. Overall, the impact of pearl oyster culture may stimulate phytoplankton growth near cultivation areas through the rapid recycling of inorganic nutrients.

  18. Surface water iron supplies in the Southern Ocean sustained by deep winter mixing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tagliabue, A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of iron limit primary productivity across much of the Southern Ocean. At the basin scale, most dissolved iron is supplied to surfacewaters from subsurface reservoirs, because land inputs are spatially limited. Deep mixing in winter...

  19. Microfacies of Deep-water Deposits and Forming Models of the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling-SKII

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Extensive transgression of lake water occurred during the Cretaceous Qingshankou Stage and the Nengjiang Stage in the Songliao basin, forming widespread deep-water deposits. Eleven types of microfacies of deep-water deposits have been recognized in the continuous core rocks from the SKII,including mudstone of still water, marlite, dolostone, oil shale, volcanic ashes, turbidite, slump sediment, tempestite, seismite, ostracoda limestone and sparry carbonate, which are divided into two types: microfacies generated due to gradually changing environments (Ⅰ) and microfacies generated due to geological events (Ⅱ). Type Ⅰ is composed of some special fine grain sediments such as marlite,dolomite stone and oil shale as well as mudstone and Type Ⅱ is composed of some sediments related to geological events, such as volcanic ashes, turbiditie, slump sediment, tempestite, seismite, ostracoda limestone. The formation of sparry carbonate may be controlled by factors related to both environments and events. Generally, mudstone sediments of still water can be regarded as background sediments, and the rest sediments are all event sediments, which have unique forming models, which may reflect controlling effects of climatics and tectonics.

  20. Investigation of O2, NO3-, and associated parameters as indicators of Canadian Basin Deep Water ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, J. A.; Orians, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Ventilation of Canadian Basin Deep Waters (CBDW) may provide a mechanism to export and preserve organic matter in the Arctic Ocean. Ventilation mechanisms of CBDW, however, are not fully understood. Multiple age models suggest CBDW ages of 300 -500 years. These ages may represent a single renewal event 500 years ago, a steady state average, indicative of ongoing ventilation processes, or a combination of past renewal and a possible recent cessation or decrease in the renewal of Canadian Basin Deep Water (CBDW). Past ventilation of CBDW may have been allowed by cooler, more dense, Atlantic waters. Current potential sources to CBDW include brine rejection during sea ice formation or prospective inputs from the Eurasian Basin via the Makarov Basin. This work examines utilization of O2 and NO3- data to identify markers of CBDW ventilation. Parameters investigated also include the calculated values of apparent oxygen utilization (AOU), NO (NO = 9NO3- + O2), and preformed NO3-. Calculation of conservative NO and preformed NO3- provide indicators of potential distinctive water mass sources along isopycnal surfaces across the Basin. Interannual comparisons allow evaluation of potentially differing source water mass signatures in different years. Application of this method is performed based on data from Louis S. St.-Laurent cruises from 2003 - 2009. Determination of CBDW ventilation is important to assess opportunities for carbon sequestration in the Arctic resulting from climate change, modification of spatial and temporal sea ice extent, and potential primary productivity shifts in the Arctic.

  1. Numerical simulations of viscous flow around the obliquely towed KVLCC2M model in deep and shallow water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆杰; 万德成

    2016-01-01

    By solving the unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations in combination with thek-ω SST turbulence model, the unsteady viscous flow around the obliquely towed tanker KVLCC2M model in both deep and shallow waters is simulated and the hydrodynamic forces, the surface pressure distribution, and the wake field are calculated. The overset grid technology is used to avoid the grid distortion in large drift angle cases. The effects of the free surface are taken into account. At the first stage, the deep water cases with five oblique angles are designed as the benchmark test cases. The predicted wake field, the surface pressure distribution and the hydrodynamic forces acting on the hull agree well with the corresponding experimental data, implying the capability of the present method in the prediction of the viscous flow around the tanker drifting in shallow water. A set of systematic computations with varying water depths and drift angles are then carried out to study the viscous flow around the model drifting in shallow water. The forces and moments, as well as the surface pressure distribution are predicted and analyzed. The most significant changes such as the increased stagnation pressure in the bow, the acceleration of the flow along the ship’s sides and in the gap between ship and seabed, the lower hull pressure and finally, the stronger vortices along the bilges and weaker vortices with larger diameters in the wake are noticed.

  2. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea): Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K.A.; Goñi-Urriza, M.S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Gremare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Durán, R.; Reichart, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (d18O and d13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up f

  3. Benthic foraminifera from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea) : Assessing present-day and past activity of hydrate pockmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanier, C.; Koho, K. A.; Goñi-Urriza, M. S.; Deflandre, B.; Galaup, S.; Ivanovsky, A.; Gayet, N.; Dennielou, B.; Grémare, A.; Bichon, S.; Gassie, C.; Anschutz, P.; Duran, R.; Reichart, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present ecological and isotopic (δ18O and δ13C) data on benthic foraminifera sampled from 4 deep-sea stations in a pockmark field from the deep-water Niger delta (Gulf of Guinea, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean). In addition, a series of sedimentological and (bio)geochemical data are shown to back up f

  4. Bacterial biomass and activity in the deep waters of the eastern Atlantic—evidence of a barophilic community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patching, J. W.; Eardly, D.

    1997-09-01

    Bacterial biomass and activity were investigated in deep waters at two sites in the eastern Atlantic, of similar depth (4560-4800 m), but varying in their nutritional status. The Northern (N) site was eutrophic and subject to a strong seasonal input of surface derived organic matter (phytodetritus) to the sediment. The Southern (S) site was oligotrophic. Deep water at this site does not appear to receive any strong seasonal input. Bacterial numbers in the deep water column at the N site showed no significant seasonal variation but were greater than those at the S site. Deep water bacteria were typically small and free-living. From biovolume determinations, it was estimated that mean concentrations of bacterial organic carbon at depths greater than 500 m were 0.12 (0.03-0.29) μg C 1 -1 and 0.02 (0.01-0.04) μg C 1 -1 at the N and S sites, respectively. Rates of thymidine and leucine incorporation were used as indicators of bacterial activity. Bacterial communities in water in contact with the sediment (SCW; sediment contact water) at both sites (but especially at the S site) were strongly barophilic at in situ temperatures (2.5-4.1°C). The barophilic response of thymidine incorporation was enhanced when SCW samples from the N site were incubated at 11.5°C. It is proposed that this result indicated an elevating effect of pressure on cardinal temperatures and that the SCW community was obligately psychrophilic when unpressurised. Comparison of cell-specific incorporation rates determined under in situ conditions showed bacteria in the SCW to have levels of activity comparable with bacteria from a depth of 150 m. Thymidine incorporation rates were highest in SCW samples taken at the N site in May 1988 and September 1989. Thymidine incorporation by SCW samples taken immediately before (10 April 1994) the main spring-bloom-associated deposition of phytodetritus was significantly lower and comparable with that determined for the oligotrophic S site. The attributes

  5. Carbonate mound evolution and coral diagenesis viewed by U-series dating of deep water corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, N.; Ricard, E.; Blamart, D.; van der Land, C.; Colin, C.; Foubert, A.; van Rooij, D.; van Weering, T.

    2007-12-01

    U-series dating of constructional deep sea corals is a powerful tool to reconstruct the evolution of carbonate mound sediments driven by coral growth, sediment trapping and diagenesis. Here we have investigated in great detail the time framework of constructional corals such as L. pertusa and M. oculata on 5 different mounds of the eastern North Atlantic (on Rockall Bank and in Porcupine Seabight) taken at variable depth and location (610 to 880m water depth). Periods favorable for coral growth are the Holocene and prior interglacials such as marine isotope stage 5 and 7, while glacial coral growth seems inhibited or extremely reduced. Coral development is almost continuous throughout the Holocene since mound re-colonization about 10,500 years ago. Mound accumulation rates vary between 20 and 220 cm/kyr determined from the coral age - depth relationship in each core. Those changes are most likely driven by changes between horizontal and vertical mound accumulation, food supply and ocean circulation. In addition, coral dating allowed to identify an important erosional event recorded in core MD01-2455G from Rockall Bank. Here a 1m thick sediment layer containing ancient corals likely from the start of Holocene re-colonization was displaced (collapsed) from further upslope on top of younger corals of ~2500 to 3000 years age. Prior to the initiation of coral growth diagenesis occurred frequently resulting in (1) the construction of so called carbonate hardgrounds and/or (2) the dissolution of the pre-Holocene coral framework. Solely, the deepest selected core in Porcupine Seabight (MD01-2463G at 880m depth) reveals coral re-colonization on an undisturbed ancient reef structure that dates back to 250,000 years. Diagenesis of earlier coral reef generations leading to coral dissolution leads to a loss of magnetic susceptibility and open system behavior of the coral skeletons with respect to U-series dating. While the processes causing such diagenetic layers are barely

  6. Long Term Geoelectrical Monitoring of Deep-water Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenan, J. W.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ross, C.; Nolan, J. T.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    In the aftermath of the catastrophic Deep-water Horizon (DWH) spill in the Gulf Coast, opportunities exist to study the evolution of fresh crude oil contamination in beach sediments and marshes. Grand Terre 1 Island, off the coast of Grand Isle in southern Louisiana, is an uninhabited barrier island, heavily impacted by the DWH spill, and ideal for undisturbed long term monitoring of crude oil degradation processes. A 10 channel Syscal-Pro resistivity / IP instrument (IRIS Instruments, France) is the heart of the fully autonomous geoelectrical monitoring system; the system, which is housed in a weatherproof container, relies solely on solar power, is controlled by an energy efficient PC and can be accessed remotely via web tools. The monitoring scheme involves collecting bi-daily resistivity measurements from surface and shallow boreholes, ranging from January 2011 to the present; environmental parameters, such as T, are continuously recorded at several depths. During regular field trips we perform larger scale geophysical surveys, and geochemical measurements (pH, DO, T, fluid C) to support the continuous geophysical monitoring. The contaminated layer on site is a visually distinctive layer of crude oil, isolated by cleaner sands above and below which is identified by a clear and obvious resistive anomaly in preliminary surveys. Early results show a decrease in average of the resistance values of each dataset over time. Further processing of the data yields a linearly shaped resistive anomaly, which coincides with the location of the oil layer. The changes in subsurface resistivity appear to be focused within this anomaly. Time filtering of the data by the time that they were collected, morning or evening, reveals a diurnal variation. While both time frames follow the same overall trend, the measurements in the morning are slightly more resistive than those in the evening. This indicates that there are environmental factors, such as temperature, that need to be

  7. Unusual Deep Water sponge assemblage in South China-Witness of the end-Ordovician mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Feng, Hongzhen; Janussen, Dorte; Reitner, Joachim

    2015-11-05

    There are few sponges known from the end-Ordovician to early-Silurian strata all over the world, and no records of sponge fossils have been found yet in China during this interval. Here we report a unique sponge assemblage spanning the interval of the end-Ordovician mass extinction from the Kaochiapien Formation (Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian) in South China. This assemblage contains a variety of well-preserved siliceous sponges, including both Burgess Shale-type and modern type taxa. It is clear that this assemblage developed in deep water, low energy ecosystem with less competitors and more vacant niches. Its explosion may be related to the euxinic and anoxic condition as well as the noticeable transgression during the end-Ordovician mass extinction. The excellent preservation of this assemblage is probably due to the rapid burial by mud turbidites. This unusual sponge assemblage provides a link between the Burgess Shale-type deep water sponges and the modern forms. It gives an excellent insight into the deep sea palaeoecology and the macroevolution of Phanerozoic sponges, and opens a new window to investigate the marine ecosystem before and after the end-Ordovician mass extinction. It also offers potential to search for exceptional fossil biota across the Ordovician-Silurian boundary interval in China.

  8. Unusual Deep Water sponge assemblage in South China—Witness of the end-Ordovician mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixia; Feng, Hongzhen; Janussen, Dorte; Reitner, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    There are few sponges known from the end-Ordovician to early-Silurian strata all over the world, and no records of sponge fossils have been found yet in China during this interval. Here we report a unique sponge assemblage spanning the interval of the end-Ordovician mass extinction from the Kaochiapien Formation (Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian) in South China. This assemblage contains a variety of well-preserved siliceous sponges, including both Burgess Shale-type and modern type taxa. It is clear that this assemblage developed in deep water, low energy ecosystem with less competitors and more vacant niches. Its explosion may be related to the euxinic and anoxic condition as well as the noticeable transgression during the end-Ordovician mass extinction. The excellent preservation of this assemblage is probably due to the rapid burial by mud turbidites. This unusual sponge assemblage provides a link between the Burgess Shale-type deep water sponges and the modern forms. It gives an excellent insight into the deep sea palaeoecology and the macroevolution of Phanerozoic sponges, and opens a new window to investigate the marine ecosystem before and after the end-Ordovician mass extinction. It also offers potential to search for exceptional fossil biota across the Ordovician-Silurian boundary interval in China.

  9. Deep water paleo-iceberg scouring on top of Hovgaard Ridge-Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jan Erik; Niessen, Frank; Jokat, Wilfried; Dorschel, Boris

    2014-07-01

    In multibeam echosounder and subbottom profiler data acquired during R/V Polarstern cruise ARK-VII/3a from the Hovgaard Ridge (Fram Strait), we found evidence for very deep (>1200 m) iceberg scouring. Five elongated seafloor features have been detected that are interpreted to be iceberg scours. The scours are oriented in north-south/south-north direction and are about 15 m deep, 300 m wide, and 4 km long crossing the entire width of the ridge. They are attributed to multiple giant paleo-icebergs that most probably left the Arctic Ocean southward through Fram Strait. The huge keel depths are indicative of ice sheets extending into the Arctic Ocean being at least 1200 m thick at the calving front during glacial maxima. The deep St. Anna Trough or grounded ice observed at the East Siberian Continental Margin are likely source regions of these icebergs that delivered freshwater to the Nordic Seas.

  10. Contrasting recovery of shallow and deep water seagrass communities following climate associated losses in tropical north Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Michael A; McKenna, Skye A; Carter, Alexandra B; Coles, Robert G

    2014-06-30

    Tropical seagrass decline and recovery from severe storm impacts was assessed via quarterly measurements of seagrass biomass, species composition and experimental investigations of recovery in north Queensland. Shallow and deep seagrass meadows suffered major declines. Significant recovery in the two years following loss only occurred at deeper sites. Halophila spp. in deep water areas had a high capacity for recovery through the availability of seed banks. In contrast, the shallow species did not recover quickly from experimental disturbance, had poor seed reserves and relied on asexual propagation. The potential for shallow species to recover rapidly from widespread losses was limited as seed banks were limited or non-existent. Understanding inter- and intra-specific differences in seagrass recovery and how this interacts with location is critical to predict the consequences of climate events to tropical seagrasses. This is especially important as more frequent severe storms are predicted as a consequence of climate change.

  11. 30 CFR 203.60 - Who may apply for royalty relief on a case-by-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may apply for royalty relief on a case-by-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or offshore of Alaska? 203.60 Section 203.60 Mineral... basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or offshore of Alaska? You may apply for royalty relief...

  12. The diversity of PAH-degrading bacteria in a deep-sea water column above the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Zheng, Tianling; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria involved in organic pollutant degradation in pelagic deep-sea environments are largely unknown. In this report, the diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria was analyzed in deep-sea water on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). After enrichment with a PAH mixture (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene), nine bacterial consortia were obtained from depths of 3946-4746 m. While the consortia degraded all four PAHs when supplied in a mixture, when PAHs were tested individually, only phenanthrene supported growth. Thus, degradation of the PAH mixture reflected a cometabolism of anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene with phenanthrene. Further, both culture-dependent and independent methods revealed many new bacteria involved in PAH degradation. Specifically, the alpha and gamma subclasses of Proteobacteria were confirmed as the major groups within the communities. Additionally, Actinobacteria, the CFB group and Firmicutes were detected. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed that bacteria closely affiliated with Alcanivorax, Novosphingobium, and Rhodovulum occurred most frequently in different PAH-degrading consortia. By using general heterotrophic media, 51 bacteria were isolated from the consortia and of these 34 grew with the PAH mixture as a sole carbon source. Of these, isolates most closely related to Alterierythrobacter, Citricella, Erythrobacter, Idiomarina, Lutibacterium, Maricaulis, Marinobacter, Martelella, Pseudidiomarina, Rhodobacter, Roseovarius, Salipiger, Sphingopyxis, and Stappia were found to be PAH degraders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these bacteria have been identified in this context. In summary, this report revealed significant diversity among the PAH-degrading bacteria in the deep-sea water column. These bacteria may play a role in PAH removal in deep-sea environments.

  13. Sustained observations in the Weddell Sea spanning more than 20 years show gradual increase of the deep water heat content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strass, Volker; Rohardt, Gerd; Hoppema, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Beginning in 1989, Eberhard Fahrbach established and maintained until his premature death an observational programme in the Weddell Sea, which outstandingly contributed to alleviate the grave problem of undersampling of the Southern Ocean. Continuation of his legacy by the Alfred-Wegener-Institut has yielded a time series that now extends into 2013, hence covers almost 24 years. Here we analyse this data set for long-term changes of the heat content in the deep Weddell Sea. We exclusively evaluate the calibrated temperature records obtained with ship-lowered CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth sonde) casts at repeated hydrographic stations and along repeated sections. Using this approach we avoid introducing potential temperature offsets that can result from combination of different measurement technologies and potential biases resultant from differences in geographic positions. Our results show that the deep water masses below 700 m gradually warmed over the past two decades by 0.001 - 0.004 K a-1. Superimposed inter-annual to multi-annual variations appear as largely uncorrelated horizontally across the Weddell Gyre. The long-term (21 - 24 years) trends of increasing temperatures in different depth layers below 700 m at all stations and sections can be approximated by linear regression that explains between 27 and 91 % of the variance, where the coefficients of correlation tend to increase with depth. No significant trends are found in the top 700 m. The heating rate of the water masses below 700 m is estimated to 0.79 ± 0.14 W m-2, which is more than twice as high as determined for the global deep ocean in general. Our results hence corroborate the view that Southern Ocean processes make an above-average contribution to the deep ocean warming, and so add to bring global estimates of the deep ocean heating rate and of the net energy flux into the Earth's climate system at the top of the atmosphere of 0.5 - 1 W m-2 closer in line with each other. Thus they help

  14. A kind of deep-water broad-band transducer%一种深水宽带换能器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏铁坚; 郝浩琦

    2012-01-01

    深海潜水器是支撑探查和开发深海资源、开展深海科学研究、进行深海工程作业的重要装备,作为深海潜水器上的重要部件,可在超深水工作的声学换能器具有广泛的应用前景.介绍了一种深水宽带换能器的设计方法,采用纵弯换能器,该型换能器利用纵向振动和前盖板弯曲振动相互耦合,具有宽带工作的特点;换能器封装在带有压力平衡装置的耐压外壳中,耐压外壳采用钛合金材料,外壳及换能器内部充有硅油.实际测试表明,换能器最大工作深度可达7000m,最大声源级大于195dB,工作频段7~15kHz,覆盖了深海探测领域常用的频段,具有良好的适应性和广泛的应用前景.%The deep submergence vehicle is very important equipment for ocean exploitation, scientific research and engineering construction in deep ocean. As a key component of the deep submergence vehicle, the deep-water transducer has broad application foreground. This paper presents the design of a deep-water transducer with a feature of broad bandwidth. The tonpilz transducer's head mass is properly designed for coupling the longitudinal and flexural vibration; the bandwidth of the transducer hence can be broadened. The transducer is encapsulated in a pressure-resisted titanium alloy shell, which has pressure balance equipment. The silicon oil is filled between the transducer and the shell. The maximum operating depth is 7000 meters, the maximum source level is beyond 195 dB, and the working frequency band is 7-15 kHz, which contain the usual frequency band in deep ocean detection. It has well adaptability and broad application foreground.

  15. Ra-226 and Ra-226/Ba Signatures of Intermediate and Deep Water Masses of the Labrador Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Branchu, E.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Ghaleb, B.

    2004-05-01

    The Labrador sea plays an important role in the formation of intermediate North Atlantic water, (cf. Labrador Sea Water -LSW) and subsequently, in the general thermohaline circulation of the ocean. In addition, water masses originating from the Norwegian and Greenland seas are present below the LSW, in the deeper part of the basin. Investigations on the geochemistry of radium have been undertaken as a mean to document these deep and intermediate circulation processes. The vertical distribution of Ra-226 and Ba contents has been established for 8 stations located along 2 sections from 48°44 N; 52°58W to 52°23 N 45°17W and from 53.59°N to 60.34°N, 48.13°W. Thermo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry coupled with a new radium extraction and purification technique permitted the measurement of Ra-226 using 200 ml samples (i.e., appr. 10 femtograms of Ra). In parallel, Ba contents were determined using M-C-ICP-MS in order to normalize Ra-226 concentrations, since Ba is often seen as a subrogate stable isotope of Ra, due to their almost similar geochemical behaviour. Large variations in Ra-226 concentrations are observed. They range from 51 fg/g in intermediate and deep water samples to 31 fg/g in surface waters. When normalised to a salinity of 35 or to the Ba contents large discrepancies are still observed. They suggest a specific Ra-signature for each of the major water masses present in the basin. Particular attention has been paid to Ra-226 contents in the LSW in relation to its production rate as well as to the influence of the Western Boundary Under Current (WBUC), which carries the North Atlantic Deep water masses into their gyre along the lower slopes of the Labrador sea. Based on the presently available data set, a peak in Ra-226 and Ba contents seems to characterise the high velocity axis of the WBUC. These data suggest moreover a lower Ra-226 content for the LSW than for the deeper water masses.

  16. Seismic Analysis of Deep Water Pile Foundation Based on Three-Dimensional Potential-Based Fluid Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the use of three-dimensional (3D ϕ-u potential-based fluid elements for seismic analyses of deep water pile foundation. The mathematical derivations of the potential-based formulations are presented for reference. The potential-based modeling technique is studied and validated through experimental data and analytical solutions. Earthquake time history analyses for a 9-pile foundation in dry and different water environments are conducted, respectively. The seismic responses are discussed to investigate the complex effect of earthquake-induced fluid-structure interaction. Through the analyses, the potential-based fluid and interface elements are shown to perform adequately for the seismic analyses of pile foundation-water systems, and some interesting conclusions and recommendations are drawn.

  17. Cool Water Formation and Trout Habitat Use in a Deep Pool in the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    KATHLEEN R. MATTHEWS; NEIL H. BERG; AZUMA DAVID L.

    1994-01-01

    We documented temperature stratification in a deep bedrock pool in the North Fork of the American River, described the diel movement of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and brown trout Salmo trutta. and determined whether these trout used cooler portions of the pool.From July 30 to October 10, 1992, the main study pool and an adjacent pool were stratified(temperature...

  18. Challenge to the model of lake charr evolution: Shallow- and deep-water morphs exist within a small postglacial lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarie, Louise; Muir, Andrew M.; Zimmerman, Mara S.; Baillie, Shauna M.; Hansen, Michael J.; Nate, Nancy A.; Yule, Daniel L.; Middel, Trevor; Bentzen, Paul; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    All examples of lake charr (Salvelinus namaycush) diversity occur within the largest, deepest lakes of North America (i.e. > 2000 km2). We report here Rush Lake (1.3 km2) as the first example of a small lake with two lake charr morphs (lean and huronicus). Morphology, diet, life history, and genetics were examined to demonstrate the existence of morphs and determine the potential influence of evolutionary processes that led to their formation or maintenance. Results showed that the huronicus morph, caught in deep-water, had a deeper body, smaller head and jaws, higher eye position, greater buoyancy, and deeper peduncle than the shallow-water lean morph. Huronicus grew slower to a smaller adult size, and had an older mean age than the lean morph. Genetic comparisons showed low genetic divergence between morphs, indicating incomplete reproductive isolation. Phenotypic plasticity and differences in habitat use between deep and shallow waters associated with variation in foraging opportunities seems to have been sufficient to maintain the two morphs, demonstrating their important roles in resource polymorphism. Rush Lake expands previous explanations for lake charr intraspecific diversity, from large to small lakes and from reproductive isolation to the presence of gene flow associated with strong ecological drivers.

  19. An impaired metabolic response to hydrostatic pressure explains Alcanivorax borkumensis recorded distribution in the deep marine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boon, Nico

    2016-08-01

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an ubiquitous model organism for hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, which dominates polluted surface waters. Its negligible presence in oil-contaminated deep waters (as observed during the Deepwater Horizon accident) raises the hypothesis that it may lack adaptive mechanisms to hydrostatic pressure (HP). The type strain SK2 was tested under 0.1, 5 and 10 MPa (corresponding to surface water, 500 and 1000 m depth, respectively). While 5 MPa essentially inactivated SK2, further increase to 10 MPa triggered some resistance mechanism, as indicated by higher total and intact cell numbers. Under 10 MPa, SK2 upregulated the synthetic pathway of the osmolyte ectoine, whose concentration increased from 0.45 to 4.71 fmoles cell‑1. Central biosynthetic pathways such as cell replication, glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, amino acids metabolism and fatty acids biosynthesis, but not β-oxidation, were upregulated or unaffected at 10 MPa, although total cell number was remarkably lower with respect to 0.1 MPa. Concomitantly, expression of more than 50% of SK2 genes was downregulated, including genes related to ATP generation, respiration and protein translation. Thus, A. borkumensis lacks proper adaptation to HP but activates resistance mechanisms. These consist in poorly efficient biosynthetic rather than energy-yielding degradation-related pathways, and suggest that HP does represent a major driver for its distribution at deep-sea.

  20. Bacterioplankton communities of Crater Lake, OR: Dynamic changes with euphotic zone food web structure and stable deep water populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, E.; Vergin, K.L.; Larson, G.L.; Giovannoni, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of bacterial and archaeal species in Crater Lake plankton varies dramatically over depth and with time, as assessed by hybridization of group-specific oligonucleotides to RNA extracted from lakewater. Nonmetric, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of relative bacterial phylotype densities revealed complex relationships among assemblages sampled from depth profiles in July, August and September of 1997 through 1999. CL500-11 green nonsulfur bacteria (Phylum Chloroflexi) and marine Group I crenarchaeota are consistently dominant groups in the oxygenated deep waters at 300 and 500 m. Other phylotypes found in the deep waters are similar to surface and mid-depth populations and vary with time. Euphotic zone assemblages are dominated either by ??-proteobacteria or CL120-10 verrucomicrobia, and ACK4 actinomycetes. MDS analyses of euphotic zone populations in relation to environmental variables and phytoplankton and zooplankton population structures reveal apparent links between Daphnia pulicaria zooplankton population densities and microbial community structure. These patterns may reflect food web interactions that link kokanee salmon population densities to community structure of the bacterioplankton, via fish predation on Daphnia with cascading consequences to Daphnia bacterivory and predation on bacterivorous protists. These results demonstrate a stable bottom-water microbial community. They also extend previous observations of food web-driven changes in euphotic zone bacterioplankton community structure to an oligotrophic setting. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. An impaired metabolic response to hydrostatic pressure explains Alcanivorax borkumensis recorded distribution in the deep marine water column

    KAUST Repository

    Scoma, Alberto

    2016-08-12

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an ubiquitous model organism for hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, which dominates polluted surface waters. Its negligible presence in oil-contaminated deep waters (as observed during the Deepwater Horizon accident) raises the hypothesis that it may lack adaptive mechanisms to hydrostatic pressure (HP). The type strain SK2 was tested under 0.1, 5 and 10 MPa (corresponding to surface water, 500 and 1000 m depth, respectively). While 5 MPa essentially inactivated SK2, further increase to 10 MPa triggered some resistance mechanism, as indicated by higher total and intact cell numbers. Under 10 MPa, SK2 upregulated the synthetic pathway of the osmolyte ectoine, whose concentration increased from 0.45 to 4.71 fmoles cell-1. Central biosynthetic pathways such as cell replication, glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, amino acids metabolism and fatty acids biosynthesis, but not β-oxidation, were upregulated or unaffected at 10 MPa, although total cell number was remarkably lower with respect to 0.1 MPa. Concomitantly, expression of more than 50% of SK2 genes was downregulated, including genes related to ATP generation, respiration and protein translation. Thus, A. borkumensis lacks proper adaptation to HP but activates resistance mechanisms. These consist in poorly efficient biosynthetic rather than energy-yielding degradation-related pathways, and suggest that HP does represent a major driver for its distribution at deep-sea.

  2. Is Ekman pumping responsible for the seasonal variation of warm circumpolar deep water in the Amundsen Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. W.; Ha, H. K.; Wåhlin, A. K.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, C. S.; Lee, J. H.; Cho, Y. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ekman pumping induced by horizontally varying wind and sea ice drift is examined as an explanation for observed seasonal variation of the warm layer thickness of circumpolar deep water on the Amundsen Sea continental shelf. Spatial and temporal variation of the warm layer thickness in one of the deep troughs on the shelf (Dotson Trough) was measured during two oceanographic surveys and a two-year mooring deployment. A hydrographic transect from the deep ocean, across the shelf break, and into the trough shows a local elevation of the warm layer at the shelf break. On the shelf, the water flows south-east along the trough, gradually becoming colder and fresher due to mixing with cold water masses. A mooring placed in the trough shows a thicker and warmer layer in February and March (late summer/early autumn) and thinner and colder layer in September, October and November (late winter/early spring). The amplitude of this seasonal variation is up to 60 m. In order to investigate the effects of Ekman pumping, remotely sensed wind (Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System wind data) and sea ice velocity and concentration (EASE Polar Pathfinder) were used. From the estimated surface stress field, the Ekman transport and Ekman pumping were calculated. At the shelf break, where the warm layer is elevated, the Ekman pumping shows a seasonal variation correlating with the mooring data. Previous studies have not been able to show a correlation between observed wind and bottom temperature, but it is shown here that when sea ice drift is taken into account the Ekman pumping at the outer shelf correlates with bottom temperature in Dotson Trough. The reason why the Ekman pumping varies seasonally at the shelf break appears to be the migration of the ice edge in the expanding polynya in combination with the wind field which on average is westward south of the shelf break.

  3. Better well control through safe drilling margin identification, influx analysis and direct bottom hole pressure control method for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeningen, Daan [National Oilwell Varco IntelliServ (NOV), Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Currently, well control events are almost exclusively detected by using surface measurements. Measuring a volume increase in the 'closed loop' mud circulation system; a standpipe pressure decrease; or changes in a variety of drilling parameters provide indicators of a kick. Especially in deep water, where the riser comprises a substantial section of the well bore, early kick detection is paramount for limiting the severity of a well bore influx and improve the ability to regain well control. While downhole data is presently available from downhole tools nearby the bit, available data rates are sparse as mud pulse telemetry bandwidth is limited and well bore measurements compete with transmission of other subsurface data. Further, data transfer is one-directional, latency is significant and conditions along the string are unknown. High-bandwidth downhole data transmission system, via a wired or networked drill string system, has the unique capability to acquire real-time pressure and temperature measurement at a number of locations along the drill string. This system provides high-resolution downhole data available at very high speed, eliminating latency and restrictions that typically limit the availability of downhole data. The paper describes well control opportunities for deep water operations through the use of downhole data independent from surface measurements. First, the networked drill string provides efficient ways to identify pore pressure, fracture gradient, and true mud weight that comprise the safe drilling margin. Second, the independent measurement capability provides early kick detection and improved ability to analyze an influx even with a heterogeneous mud column through distributed along-string annular pressure measurements. Third, a methodology is proposed for a direct measurement method using downhole real-time pressure for maintaining constant bottom hole pressure during well kills in deep water. (author)

  4. What is the Nondominated Formulation? A Demonstration of de Novo Water Supply Portfolio Planning Under Deep Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Reed, P. M.; Characklis, G. W.; Kirsch, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    This paper proposes and demonstrates a new interactive framework for sensitivity-informed de Novo programming, in which a learning approach to formulating decision problems can confront the deep uncertainty within water management problems. The framework couples global sensitivity analysis using Sobol’ variance decomposition with multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) to generate planning alternatives and test their robustness to new modeling assumptions and scenarios. We explore these issues within the context of a risk-based water supply management problem, where a city seeks the most efficient use of a water market. The case study examines a single city’s water supply in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) in Texas, using both a 10-year planning horizon and an extreme single-year drought scenario. The city’s water supply portfolio comprises a volume of permanent rights to reservoir inflows and use of a water market through anticipatory thresholds for acquiring transfers of water through optioning and spot leases. Diagnostic information from the Sobol’ variance decomposition is used to create a sensitivity-informed problem formulation testing different decision variable configurations, with tradeoffs for the formulation solved using a MOEA. Subsequent analysis uses the drought scenario to expose tradeoffs between long-term and short-term planning and illustrate the impact of deeply uncertain assumptions on water availability in droughts. The results demonstrate water supply portfolios’ efficiency, reliability, and utilization of transfers in the water supply market and show how to adaptively improve the value and robustness of our problem formulations by evolving our definition of optimality to discover key tradeoffs.

  5. Offshore conversion of associated gas to synthetic crude oil: An economic option for deep water and marginal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antia, D.D.J.; Seddon, D.

    1995-12-31

    A low cost modular Fischer Tropsch gas conversion approach which can add value to associated gas in both deep water and marginal fields is described. The process is suitable for location on vessels (FPSO`s), jackups, platforms and semisubmersibles. It can economically convert >1 to >200 MMCF/D to syncrude. The modules can be used to: Strip value from gas prior to injection; Remove a reinjection or flaring requirement; Reduce carbon dioxide emissions from the field. Conversion ratios depend on the catalyst and process configuration used. They range from 70-->170 Bbls/MMCF.

  6. Dragmacidin G, a Bioactive Bis-Indole Alkaloid from a Deep-Water Sponge of the Genus Spongosorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Amy E.; Killday, K. Brian; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Guzmán, Esther A.; Harmody, Dedra; McCarthy, Peter J.; Pitts, Tara; Pomponi, Shirley A.; Reed, John K.; Roberts, Bracken F.; Rodrigues Felix, Carolina; Rohde, Kyle H.

    2017-01-01

    A deep-water sponge of the genus Spongosorites has yielded a bis-indole alkaloid which we have named dragmacidin G. Dragmacidin G was first reported by us in the patent literature and has recently been reported by Hitora et al. from a sponge of the genus Lipastrotheya. Dragmacidin G is the first in this series of compounds to have a pyrazine ring linking the two indole rings. It also has a rare N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-guanidine side chain. Dragmacidin G shows a broad spectrum of biological activity including inhibition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Plasmodium falciparum, and a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. PMID:28085024

  7. Long Term Effects of Farming System on Soil Water Content and Dry Soil Layer in Deep Loess Proifle of Loess Tableland in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Li-ping; LIU Wen-zhao

    2014-01-01

    Soil water is strongly affected by land use/cover in the Loess Plateau in China. Water stored in thick loessal soils is one of the most important resources regulating vegetation growth. However, soil water in the deep loess proifle, which is critical for maintaining the function of the“soil water pool”is rarely studied because deep proifle soil samples are dififcult to collect. In this study, four experimental plots were established in 2005 to represent different farming systems on the Changwu Tableland:fallow land, fertilized cropland, unfertilized cropland, and continuous alfalfa. The soil water content in the 15-m-deep loess proifles was monitored continuously from 2007 to 2012 with the neutron probe technique. The results showed that temporal variations in soil water proifles differed among the four farming systems. Under fallow land, the soil water content increased gradually over time, ifrst in the surface layers and later in the deep soil layers. In contrast, the soil water content decreased gradually under continuous alfalfa. The distributions of soil water in deep soil layers under both fertilized and unfertilized cropland were relatively stable over time. Thus farming system signiifcantly affected soil water content. Seven years after the start of the experiment, the soil water contents in the 15-m-deep proifles averaged 23.4%under fallow land, 20.3%under fertilized cropland, 21.6%under unfertilized cropland, and 16.0%under continuous alfalfa. Compared to measurements at the start of the experiment, both fallow land and unfertilized cropland increased soil water storage in the 15-m loess proifles. In contrast, continuous alfalfa reduced soil water storage. Fertilized cropland has no signiifcant effect on soil water storage. These results suggest that deep soil water can be replenished under the fallow and unfertilized farming systems. Dry soil layers (i.e., those which have soil water content less than the stable ifeld water capacity) in the subsoil

  8. Inter-annual variability and potential for selectivity in the diets of deep-water Antarctic echinoderms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigham, B. D.; Galley, E. A.; Smith, C. R.; Tyler, P. A.

    2008-11-01

    The continental shelf of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is a highly productive region but also unusually deep as a result of isostatic depression by the polar ice cap. The close coupling of surface processes with those of the benthos would be expected in such a seasonally variable environment; however, the cold, deep conditions of the WAP shelf may allow for the persistence of organic material in the sediments as a "food bank". Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments were determined from the gut contents of seven species of echinoderm and from the surficial sediment on the bathyal continental shelf. Samples were collected as part of the FOODBANCS programme during successive cruises in austral spring (October 2000) and austral autumn (March 2001). Pigments were identified and quantified using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A lack of qualitative selectivity was observed among species, compared to that observed for deep-water assemblages at temperate latitudes, supporting the theory of a persistent "food bank". However, significant quantitative differences were observed among species and between years and sampling location on the shelf. Species differences were marked between those we classified as "true" deposit feeders and those species whose diet also may be supplemented by scavenging and/or grazing.

  9. Influence of Chemical Composition on Microbial Communities in Deep Water Plumes After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, M. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    After the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, large amounts of natural gas and oil remained dissolved or suspended in the deep Gulf of Mexico. These deep water plumes were preferentially enriched in soluble hydrocarbons, including methane, ethane, propane, cyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes. Microbial communities responded rapidly to the influx of hydrocarbons, and were initially dominated by a novel group of Oceanospirillales. As the summer progressed, Colwellia and Cycloclasticus became more abundant, followed by an increase in methanotrophs and methylotrophs. DNA stable isotope probing experiments showed that Colwellia spp. were the primary bacteria assimilating carbon from ethane and propane, suggesting that the presence of natural gas had a significant effect on the microbes that responded to the spill. Additional incubation experiments suggested that Colwellia could also consume benzene and other hydrocarbons in crude oil, but it was unclear whether the presence of natural gas stimulated or inhibited the consumption of other hydrocarbons. In order to determine the effect of natural gas on microbial community composition and the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons, we conducted a series of incubation experiments with seawater from the deep Gulf of Mexico. We also conducted experiments to determine the effect of individual hydrocarbon compounds on the microbial community response. We will present results from both sets of experiments.

  10. WASI-2D: A software tool for regionally optimized analysis of imaging spectrometer data from deep and shallow waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gege, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An image processing software has been developed which allows quantitative analysis of multi- and hyperspectral data from oceanic, coastal and inland waters. It has been implemented into the Water Colour Simulator WASI, which is a tool for the simulation and analysis of optical properties and light field parameters of deep and shallow waters. The new module WASI-2D can import atmospherically corrected images from airborne sensors and satellite instruments in various data formats and units like remote sensing reflectance or radiance. It can be easily adapted by the user to different sensors and to optical properties of the studied area. Data analysis is done by inverse modelling using established analytical models. The bio-optical model of the water column accounts for gelbstoff (coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM), detritus, and mixtures of up to 6 phytoplankton classes and 2 spectrally different types of suspended matter. The reflectance of the sea floor is treated as sum of up to 6 substrate types. An analytic model of downwelling irradiance allows wavelength dependent modelling of sun glint and sky glint at the water surface. The provided database covers the spectral range from 350 to 1000 nm in 1 nm intervals. It can be exchanged easily to represent the optical properties of water constituents, bottom types and the atmosphere of the studied area.

  11. Water mass transformation in the deep basins of the Nordic Seas: Analyses of heat and freshwater budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarius, K.; Quadfasel, D.

    2016-08-01

    In the Arctic Mediterranean a transformation of Atlantic Water, flowing in near the surface, into overflow water, which leaves the area at depth, takes place. For this transformation the Nordic Seas are of particular importance, as they are largely ice-free and thus heat loss to the atmosphere during winter is strong. Since 2001 Argo-type profiling float measurements have been carried out in the region and enable the observation of hydrography during the whole year. The measurements concentrate on the deep basins, the Norwegian Basin, Lofoten Basin, Greenland Sea and Icelandic Plateau. They are analysed with special emphasis on the seasonal cycle in hydrography. Based on the mean seasonal cycle of temperature and salinity and atmospheric fluxes from reanalysis products for the first decade of this century heat and freshwater budgets are calculated. The residuum in the budgets gives the lateral exchange of water between the inner basins and the boundary current, circumnavigating the whole area. This lateral exchange is identified with the contribution of the deep basins to the water mass transformation within the Nordic Seas. Budget calculations, using atmospheric flux data from NCEP with corrections for high latitudes, yield a contribution of 18% to the total temperature decrease and 6% to the total salinity decrease in the Arctic Mediterranean, although the basins account for only 4% of the total area. The density increase nearly exclusively takes place in the eastern basins, whereas the Greenland Sea plays an important role in matching the temperature and salinity characteristic of the overflow water. An increasing amount of freshwater in the surface layer will have only minor effects on the strength of the overflows across the Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge.

  12. Soft sediment deformation associated with the passage of North Atlantic Deep water through the deep Ariel Graben, Mozambique Ridge southwest Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Errol; Green, Andrew; Watkeys, Mike; Jokat, Wilfried; Krocker, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    Interactions between bottom water currents and seafloor sediments are well known. Bottom current generated bedforms are varied both morphologicaly and sedimentologicaly. Sediment transport and deposition, associated with bottom water circulation, plays a significant role is sculpting seafloor morphology in all ocean basins. Indeed, bedforms have been used to great effect to define the presence, direction and strength of bottom water circulation globally. Here we present new multibeam swath bathymetry and high frequency seismic data from the Natal Valley and Mozambique Ridge, southwest Indian Ocean. These data show a deep (-3200 m) channel-like feature (Ariel Graben, situated at 28° 30"S on the Mozambique Ridge) connecting the northern Natal Valley to the Mozambique Basin. A distinct W - E change in seafloor morphology and seismic character is noted moving from the Natal Valley through the Ariel Graben. The northern flank of the graben exhibits smooth plastered drifts which give way to undulating seafloor in the east. The plastered drifts are characterised by distinct bottom echoes, with several discontinuous sub-bottom reflections. In contrast, the undulating seafloor is characterised by distinct hyperbolic echoes, with occasional indistinct sub-bottom reflectors. The W - E orientated undulations are straight crested, parallel / sub-parallel to the local isobaths. Wavelength is variable, ranging from 600 m to 1200 m. Cross-sectional symmetry of these features varies from symmetrical to asymmetrical, with board crests and narrow troughs. When asymmetrical, the lower (south-facing) limb is the longer (511.76 m average) than the upper (north-facing) limb (323.53 m average). The lower limbs are also steeper than the upper limbs; calculated averages being 3.80° and 1.55°, respectively. Overall, the slope on which the undulations are found, is south-facing with a gradient of 1.54°, however, the area affected by undulations is slightly steeper (average slope of 1.75

  13. Grout diffusion characteristics during chemical grouting in a deep water-bearing sand layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Dangliang; Sui Wanghua

    2012-01-01

    The deep,loose bottom aquifer of the eastern air shaft in the Xinglongzhuang Coal Mine was used to develop an experimental model of shaft grouting through Model deep soil.Lab experiments using chemical grouting were done to study the grout.The grouted soil shapes and osmotic pressure were measured during the experiments.The tested characteristics of the grouted soil show that the diffusion mode of grout in saturated sandy soil is a combination of split compaction and osmosis.More specifically,the shape of the grouted soil is determined by split compaction while the size of the grouted soil shape is determined by osmosis.Sensor test results indicate that the main reason for the non-uniform grout diffusion is the anisotropic osmotic pressure field surrounding the grouting holes.

  14. Observation of deep water microseisms in the North Atlantic Ocean using tide modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucler, Éric; Mocquet, Antoine; Schimmel, Martin; Chevrot, Sébastien; Quillard, Olivier; Vergne, Jérôme; Sylvander, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Ocean activity produces continuous and ubiquitous seismic energy mostly in the 2-20 s period band, known as microseismic noise. Between 2 and 10 s period, secondary microseisms (SM) are generated by swell reflections close to the shores and/or by opposing swells in the deep ocean. However, unique conditions are required in order for surface waves generated by deep-ocean microseisms to be observed on land. By comparing short-duration power spectral densities at both Atlantic shoreline and inland seismic stations, we show that ocean tides strongly modulate the seismic energy in a wide period band except between 2.5 and 5 s. This tidal proxy reveals the existence of an ex situ short-period contribution of the SM peak. Comparison with swell spectra at surrounding buoys suggests that the largest part of this extra energy comes from deep ocean-generated microseisms. The energy modulation might be also used in numerical models of microseismic generation to constrain coastal reflection coefficients.

  15. Effect of Capillarity on Fourth Order Nonlinear Evolution Equation for Two Stokes Wave Trains in Deep Water in the Presence of Air Flowing Over Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar A.K.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fourth order nonlinear evolution equations, which are a good starting point for the study of nonlinear water waves, are derived for deep water surface capillary gravity waves in the presence of second waves in which air is blowing over water. Here it is assumed that the space variation of the amplitude takes place only in a direction along which the group velocity projection of the two waves overlap. A stability analysis is made for a uniform wave train in the presence of a second wave train. Graphs are plotted for the maximum growth rate of instability wave number at marginal stability and wave number separation of fastest growing sideband component against wave steepness. Significant improvements are noticed from the results obtained from the two coupled third order nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

  16. The multiple gas-liquid subsea separation system: development and qualification of a novel solution for deep water field production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrand, Stephanie; Butin, Nicolas; Shaiek, Sadia; Hallot, Raymond [Saipem S.p.A., Milano (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Subsea processing is more and more considered as a viable solution for the development of deep and ultra deep water fields. SAIPEM has developed a deep water gas separation and liquid boosting system, based on its proprietary 'Multi pipe' separator concept, providing a good flexibility in handling a wide range of steady and un-steady multiphase input streams using a relatively simple mechanical arrangement. The Multi pipe Concept features an array of vertical pipes for gas/liquid separation by gravity and adequate liquid hold up volumes. The operating principle is the same as standard gravity vessels. Specific inlet pipe arrangements have been worked out to enhance the separation efficiency and internals can be implemented to further optimize the performances. The limited diameter and wall thickness of the vertical pipes make the Multi pipe Concept particularly suited for deep and ultra-deep water applications and/or high pressure conditions where the selection of a single separator vessel could lead to unpractical wall thicknesses. In most cases, standard API or ASME pipes can be utilized for the Multi pipe Separator, thus enabling conventional fabrication methods, and in turn reducing cost and delivery time and opening opportunities for local content. The qualification testing program has seen two subsequent phases. The first qualification phase aimed at the confirmation of the hydrodynamic behavior of the system. In particular, the homogeneous distribution of the multiphase stream into the pipes and the stability of the liquid levels under un-steady inlet conditions were continuously assessed during the tests. This first qualification phase gave confidence in the viability of the Multi pipe and in its good hydrodynamic behavior under the different inlet conditions that can be encountered during field production. It proved that, having the same liquid level in all the separator pipes, whatever the inlet conditions are, the Multi pipe separator can be

  17. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF BED TOPOGRAPHY CHANGES INDUCED BY DEEP WATER NAVIGATION CHANNEL PROJECT IN THE YANGTZE ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jing-xin; Liu Hua; He You-sheng; Zhang Fu-ran; Qi Ding-man

    2003-01-01

    A study on the mathematical modeling of the two dimensional,time-dependent variation of bottom topography caused by the spur dikes of the deep water navigation channel project in the Yangtze estuary is reported. The hydrodynamic flows are computed using the DELFT3D which serves as the base of computation of sediment transport and bottom deformation. A model of fine sediment transport is developed and implemented in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system by the finite difference method. Using the observed water depth of the North Channel of Yangtze estuary from 2001 to 2002, the model is calibrated and validated to determine the parameters in the sediment model. The computational results of the changes of the bed in the North Channel induced by the spur dikes coincide with the measured data except the area near the structures.

  18. Sequentially sampled gas hydrate water, coupled with pore water and bottom water isotopic and ionic signatures at the Kukuy mud volcano, Lake Baikal: ambiguous deep-rooted source of hydrate-forming water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Sakagami, Hirotoshi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Soramoto, Yusuke; Kotake, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Shoji, Hitoshi; Pogodaeva, Tatyana; Khlystov, Oleg; Khabuev, Andrey; Naudts, Lieven; De Batist, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic and ionic composition of pure gas hydrate (GH) water was examined for GHs recovered in three gravity cores (165-193 cm length) from the Kukuy K-9 mud volcano (MV) in Lake Baikal. A massive GH sample from core St6GC4 (143-165 cm core depth interval) was dissociated progressively over 6 h in a closed glass chamber, and 11 sequentially collected fractions of dissociated GH water analyzed. Their hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions, and the concentrations of Cl- and HCO3 - remained essentially constant over time, except that the fraction collected during the first 50 minutes deviated partly from this pattern. Fraction #1 had a substantially higher Cl- concentration, similar to that of pore water sampled immediately above (135-142 cm core depth) the main GH-bearing interval in that core. Like the subsequent fractions, however, the HCO3 - concentration was markedly lower than that of pore water. For the GH water fractions #2 to #11, an essentially constant HCO3 -/Cl- ratio of 305 differed markedly from downcore pore water HCO3 -/Cl- ratios of 63-99. Evidently, contamination of the extracted GH water by ambient pore water probably adhered to the massive GH sample was satisfactorily restricted to the initial phase of GH dissociation. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of hydrate-forming water was estimated using the measured isotopic composition of extracted GH water combined with known isotopic fractionation factors between GH and GH-forming water. Estimated δD of -126 to -133‰ and δ18O of -15.7 to -16.7‰ differed partly from the corresponding signatures of ambient pore water (δD of -123‰, δ18O of -15.6‰) and of lake bottom water (δD of -121‰, δ18O of -15.8‰) at the St6GC4 coring site, suggesting that the GH was not formed from those waters. Observations of breccias in that core point to a possible deep-rooted water source, consistent with published thermal measurements for the neighboring Kukuy K-2 MV. By contrast, the pore

  19. A remote and autonomous continuous monitoring ultrasonic system for flood detection in sub-sea members of offshore steel oil rigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijarez-Castro, Rito

    2006-07-01

    This thesis presents a novel and autonomous continuous monitoring system for flood detection in the hollow sub-sea members of offshore steel oil rigs. The technique offers an alternative to underwater nondestructive testing methods based on ultrasound and x-rays, which have been used to detect the presence of seawater in these applications, often with divers or remote operating vehicles. The research consists of theoretical and experimental work necessary for the development of an integral system that can be used in new fixed offshore oil rig designs. The system employs a single piezoelectric transducer which can be permanently attached to the inner wall of every sub-sea structure and which is powered by a normally inert seawater battery. Upon activation, the sensor transmits ultrasonic chirp or tone encoded pulses in the range of 21 k Hz to 42 k Hz, to a monitoring system at deck level for decoding and identifying flooded members. Two approaches to the system were considered during the investigation, depending on the communication channel exploited. These were based on either using the seawater as a propagation medium or using the steel structure as a wave-guide. A system based on theoretical models was built and field experiments were conducted using a purpose built jointed steel pipe structure, 7 m in length, 0.5 m in diameter and 16 mm in thickness. This structure was flooded by complete immersion in seawater. Results obtained using water as communication medium and a frequency in the order of 38 k Hz yielded an attenuation figure of 0.4 d B m{sub -}1 over 100 m, since losses were predominantly geometric. In contrast, using the tubular structure as a wave-guide and axis symmetric guided waves as the excitation, a gross attenuation figure of 1.3 d B m{sub -}1 was attained. In the straight parts of the structure, the attenuation ranged from 0.3 d B m{sub -} 1 to 0.6 d B m{sub -}1. The modes most likely to have been excited within the structure were L(0,5) - L(0

  20. 深水管汇腐蚀控制工艺%corrosion control of Deep Water Manifold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程国东; 贾红刚; 马永青; 孔琦; 朱玉婷

    2013-01-01

    Manifold is one of the deep water oil production, which is always working in deepwater and it is difficult to maintain and its maintenance cost is high. Meanwhile its safety is critical for deep water oil production and environment pollution. The article presents deepwater manifold corrosion control method based on deepwater oil production material, coating and cathodic protection, which is reference for corrosion control design and construction for deepwater manifold.%  管汇系统是深海采油重要设备之一,其长时间工作在深海海水中维修难度大,成本高,其安全性关系到深海油田的开采和环境的污染。本文根据结合海洋石油工程腐蚀控制经验从深海选材、涂层和阴极保护三个方面介绍了水下管汇腐蚀防护控制措施,为水下结构的防腐蚀设计与施工提供参考。

  1. Endemic Lake Baikal sponges from deep water. 1: Potential cryptic speciation and discovery of living species known only from fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovich, Valeria B; Kaluzhnaya, Oxana V; Veynberg, Elena; Erpenbeck, Dirk

    2015-07-23

    We revealed new deep-water species and cryptic speciation within freshwater sponges of the endemic family Lubomirskiidae (Porifera; Demospongiae; Spongillina) based on molecular and spicule morphology analyses of ITS and CO1 mtDNA. Lubomirskiidae contains a group of closely related species which are a dominant component of the benthos in Lake Baikal, the world's deepest and most ancient lake. Spicule morphology was similar between two Recent samples and species only known previously from fossils in Late Pliocene (3.2-2.8 mya) sediments. Despite the morphological similarity with the cosmopolitan family Spongillidae, molecular analysis of ITS sequences has reliably assigned these species to Lubomirskiidae. This not only indicates that species identification of freshwater fossil sponge spicules should be made with caution, but also suggests that the structure of megascleres may not be a reliable character for interpretations of paleoclimatic reconstructions for the Baikal region. Our results do not support the current classification of Lubomirskiidae into its morphologically defined genera and species, suggesting a strong discrepancy between molecular and morphological variation in Baikalian sponges. This present contribution is the first part of a study on the phylogenetic relationships of the Lake Baikal deep water sponge fauna.

  2. Holocene Development of Greenland Sea Deep Convection: A Comparison of Calcite Surface and Bottom Water δ13c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, H. A.; Telesinski, M. M.; Spielhagen, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The northern polar oceans are a crucially important region to understand the overturning circulation of the North Atlantic within the context of glacial-interglacial climate change. Independent of different water mass properties planktic carbon isotope records (13C/12C) from across the Nordic Seas show a rather consistent pattern over the course of the Holocene. We present data from a number of sediment cores obtained in the central Nordic Seas which show that carbon isotope values were increasing since the early Holocene. They reached a maximum level between 7 and 6 ka and remained relatively stable thereafter. Ca. 3 ka they rapidly decreased. Benthic carbon isotope records from the central Nordic Seas, close to the present-day convection center of the Greenland Sea, reveal a similar trend as the planktic records. Although of lower amplitude, these bottom water data reflect the development of the regional deep convection in this region. A comparison with other proxy records and modelling results supports this presumption. While the early to late Holocene trend apparently reflect the developing deep convection after the last glacial period, the sudden decrease in the convection strength around 3 ka was most probably triggered by a strong solar irradiance minimum. This, combined with low insolation, caused an expansion of the sea ice over the convection center and enhanced stratification, thereby strengthening the entire halocline system.

  3. Biology of a deep-water sea anemone (Anthozoa: Actiniidae) from eastern Canada: Spawning, development, and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Annie; Baillon, Sandrine; Daly, Marymegan; Macrander, Jason; Hamel, Jean-François

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the general biology and reproductive ecology of deep-water species can help predict their resilience to environmental and anthropogenic disturbances. The present study centers on live specimens of a deep-water sea anemone which were collected at bathyal depths between 1100 and 1400 m and kept in a mesocosm for over 6 years. Morphology and DNA sequencing confirmed that the species belongs to the genus Urticina. Male and female (9-10 cm pedal disk diameter, 90 tentacles) spawned 4 years post collection, in early spring (March). Both sexes released gametes through the mouth. The negatively buoyant oocytes (550-600 μm in diameter) quickly settled on the rocks and soft sediments surrounding the female. Lecithotrophic embryonic and larval development occurred on the substratum. Fully developed planula larvae were detected after 17-21 days. Planulae started to crawl and swim around but remained demersal. Metamorphosis and settlement occurred after 30-35 days, exclusively on hard substrata and preferentially on undersurfaces. Offspring grew slowly, developing 8 tentacles after 5 months and 24 tentacles after 12 months (3-4 mm pedal disk diameter). After 2.6 years of growth, the captive-born sea anemones reached 12-16 mm in pedal disk diameter and possessed 48-54 tentacles.

  4. North Atlantic Ocean deep-water processes and depositional environments: A study of the Cenozoic Norway Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oline Hjelstuen, Berit; Andreassen, Elin V.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the enormous areas deep-water basins occupy in modern oceans, our knowledge about them remains poor. At depths of greater than 2000 m, the Cenozoic Norway Basin in the northernmost part of the Atlantic Ocean, is one such basin. Interpretation of 2D multichannel seismic data suggests a three-stage evolution for the Norway Basin. (1) Eocene-Pliocene. This time period is characterised by deposition of ooze-rich sediments in a widening and deepening basin. (2) Early-Middle Pleistocene. A significant shift in sedimentary processes and depositional environments took place in the Early Pleistocene. Mass failures initiated on the Norwegian continental slope, and three Early and Middle Pleistocene slide debrites, with maximum thicknesses of 600 m and sediment volumes of up to 25000 km3, were deposited. With ages estimated at c. 2.7-1.7 Ma, 1.7-1.1 Ma and 0.5 Ma, these slide deposits are among the largest identified worldwide, and among the oldest mapped along the entire NE Atlantic continental margin. (3) Late Pleistocene-Present. Since c. 0.5 Ma the Norway Basin has been effected by glacigenic debris flows, the Storegga Slide and hemipelagic-glacimarine sedimentation. These sedimentary processes were active during a time of repeated shelf-edge ice advances along the NE Atlantic continental margin. This study shows that deep-water basins represent dynamic depositional environments reflecting regional tectonic and climatic changes trough time.

  5. Surface and deep water carbon isotope record of the last one million years in the SW Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriam, Cobianchi; Valeria, Luciani; Claudia, Lupi; Nicoletta, Mancin; Nicola, Pelosi; Mario, Sprovieri; Iacopo, Trattenero

    2010-05-01

    The Pleistocene carbon isotope record from the core MD 97-2114 (SW Pacific Ocean) is used to reconstruct the surface- and deep-water circulation variability during the last one million years. The analyzed core has been recovered from an IMAGES (International Marine Past Global Change Study) cruise, at 1,935 m water depth, on the north eastern slope of Chatham Rise (east of New Zealand). This region represents a key area for investigating the evolution during the Pleistocene of the biogeochemistry and dynamic of the southern oceanic fronts (Subtropical, Subantarctic, Polar Fronts). In fact, in this crucial area the largely wind-driven Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) interacts with the west Pacific Ocean circulation via Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) coming from the Antarctic region. The excellent record of the core MD 97-2114 offers a unique opportunity to investigate the climate and oceanographic evolution of the region at a millenarian time-scale by mean of a high-resolution chemostratigraphic, multi-proxy dataset. Moreover, quantitative data on the calcareous planktic and benthic microfossil record, integrated with the C and O isotope data performed both on planktic and benthic foraminiferal tests, allows to understand coupling or decoupling events between sea surface and bottom waters in terms of productivity, current activity and carbon export dynamics. The northward migration of the Polar Front during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition is particularly focalized for its potential effects on the primary productivity and on the carbon biological pump. This oceanographic event seems to be related to a variation in the volume of the DWBC like a response to changes in the water production from the Antarctic source, as already proposed in previous papers.

  6. Characterizing, modelling and understanding the climate variability of the deep water formation in the North-Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somot, Samuel; Houpert, Loic; Sevault, Florence; Testor, Pierre; Bosse, Anthony; Taupier-Letage, Isabelle; Bouin, Marie-Noelle; Waldman, Robin; Cassou, Christophe; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Adloff, Fanny; Nabat, Pierre; Herrmann, Marine

    2016-08-01

    Observing, modelling and understanding the climate-scale variability of the deep water formation (DWF) in the North-Western Mediterranean Sea remains today very challenging. In this study, we first characterize the interannual variability of this phenomenon by a thorough reanalysis of observations in order to establish reference time series. These quantitative indicators include 31 observed years for the yearly maximum mixed layer depth over the period 1980-2013 and a detailed multi-indicator description of the period 2007-2013. Then a 1980-2013 hindcast simulation is performed with a fully-coupled regional climate system model including the high-resolution representation of the regional atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and rivers. The simulation reproduces quantitatively well the mean behaviour and the large interannual variability of the DWF phenomenon. The model shows convection deeper than 1000 m in 2/3 of the modelled winters, a mean DWF rate equal to 0.35 Sv with maximum values of 1.7 (resp. 1.6) Sv in 2013 (resp. 2005). Using the model results, the winter-integrated buoyancy loss over the Gulf of Lions is identified as the primary driving factor of the DWF interannual variability and explains, alone, around 50 % of its variance. It is itself explained by the occurrence of few stormy days during winter. At daily scale, the Atlantic ridge weather regime is identified as favourable to strong buoyancy losses and therefore DWF, whereas the positive phase of the North Atlantic oscillation is unfavourable. The driving role of the vertical stratification in autumn, a measure of the water column inhibition to mixing, has also been analyzed. Combining both driving factors allows to explain more than 70 % of the interannual variance of the phenomenon and in particular the occurrence of the five strongest convective years of the model (1981, 1999, 2005, 2009, 2013). The model simulates qualitatively well the trends in the deep waters (warming, saltening, increase in the

  7. Paleo-environment of cold-water coral initiation in the NE Atlantic:Implications from a deep-water carbonate mound drilling core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, W.-Chr.,; Margreht, S.

    2009-04-01

    The understanding of the paleo-environment during initiation and early development of deep-water carbonate mounds in the NE Atlantic is still under debate. The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307 sailed in 2005 to the Porcupine Seabight in order to investigate for the first time sediments from the base of a giant carbonate mound (Challenger Mound, 155 m). These results indicate that the initiation and start-up phase of this carbonate mound coincides with the beginning of the Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (NHG) at around 2.6 Ma (Kano et al. 2007). Further carbonate mound development seems to be strongly dependent on rapid changes in paleo-oceanographic and climatic conditions around the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary, especially characterized and caused by intermediate water masses. To characterise the paleo-environmental and paleo-ecological setting favourable for the initial coral colonization at 2.6 Ma, we use well-developed proxies such as δ18O and δ13C of planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) and of a collection of benthic foraminifera (Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, Discanomalina coronata, Cibicides lobatulus, Lobatulua antarctica, Planulina ariminensis), benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as grain size analysis. These proxies indicate variability in seawater temperature, salinity and density of intermediate water masses from southern origin (Mediterranean, Bay of Biscay) supporting cold-water coral settlement and initial development in the Porcupine Seabight. References: Kano et al. (2007) Age constraints on the origin and growth history of a deep-water coral mound in the northeast Atlantic drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. Geology, 35(11):1051-1054.

  8. Intermediate to deep water hydrographic changes of the Japan Sea over the past 10 Myr, inferred from radiolarian data (IODP Exp. 346, Site U1425)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kenji M.; Itaki, Takuya; Tada, Ryuji; Kurokawa, Shunsuke

    2017-04-01

    The Japan Sea is a back-arc basin opened under a continental rifting during the Early to Middle Miocene (ca. 25-13 Ma). This area is characterized by active tectonism, which drastically modified the Japan Sea paleogeography such as the sill depth of its key straits. In modern condition, the Japan Sea is connected to adjacent marginal seas and the Pacific Ocean by four straits shallower than 130 m. These straits are the Tsushima Strait connecting to the East China Sea, the Tsugaru Strait connecting to the Pacific, and the Soya and Mamiya Straits connecting to the Sea of Okhotsk. Therefore, the intermediate and deep water of the Japan Sea is isolated, leading the formation of a unique and regional deep sea water, known as the Japan Sea Proper Water. However, past studies show that during the late Miocene and Pliocene, only the Tsugaru Strait connecting to the North Pacific was opened. This strait was deeper during Plio-Miocene and have likely enable inflow of deep to intermediate water of the North Pacific in the Japan Sea. Radiolarians are one of the planktic micro-organisms group bearing siliceous skeletons. Their species comprise shallow to deep water dwellers, sensitive to changes in sea water physical/ecological properties forced by climate changes. Their fossils are known for be well preserved in the deep-sea sediments of the North Pacific. Therefore, in this study we propose to monitor changes in intermediate to deep water hydrography of the Japan Sea since the late Miocene, using radiolarian as an environmental proxy. In 2013 the IODP Expedition 346 retrieved sediment cores at different sites in the Japan Sea. In this study, we have analyzed 139 core sediments samples collected at Site U1425. This site is situated in the middle of the Yamato Bank. We selected this site because the past 10 Myr could be recovered continuously without hiatuses. Changes in radiolarian assemblages reveal that the oceanographic setting of the Japan Sea changed drastically at ca. 2

  9. The demise of the early Eocene greenhouse - Decoupled deep and surface water cooling in the eastern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, André; D'haenens, Simon; Norris, Richard D.; Speijer, Robert P.

    2016-10-01

    Early Paleogene greenhouse climate culminated during the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 50 to 53 Ma). This episode of global warmth is subsequently followed by an almost 20 million year-long cooling trend leading to the Eocene-Oligocene glaciation of Antarctica. Here we present the first detailed planktic and benthic foraminiferal isotope single site record (δ13C, δ18O) of late Paleocene to middle Eocene age from the North Atlantic (Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 401, Bay of Biscay). Good core recovery in combination with well preserved foraminifera makes this site suitable for correlations and comparison with previously published long-term records from the Pacific Ocean (e.g. Allison Guyot, Shatsky Rise), the Southern Ocean (Maud Rise) and the equatorial Atlantic (Demerara Rise). Whereas our North Atlantic benthic foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C data agree with the global trend showing the long-term shift toward heavier δ18O values, we only observe minor surface water δ18O changes during the middle Eocene (if at all) in planktic foraminiferal data. Apparently, the surface North Atlantic did not cool substantially during the middle Eocene. Thus, the North Atlantic appears to have had a different surface ocean cooling history during the middle Eocene than the southern hemisphere, whereas cooler deep-water masses were comparatively well mixed. Our results are in agreement with previously published findings from Tanzania, which also support the idea of a muted post-EECO surface-water cooling outside the southern high-latitudes.

  10. A study on chemical interactions between waste fluid, formation water, and host rock during deep well injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spycher, Nicolas; Larkin, Randy

    2004-05-14

    A new disposal well was drilled in the vicinity of an injection well that had been in operation for 12 years. The drilling activities provided an opportunity to assess the fate and transport of waste products injected in the nearby well, and the impact, if any, on the host geologic formation. The origin of the fluid collected while drilling the new well and the interaction between injected waste and the formation were investigated using analyses of formation waters, waste, and formation minerals, by applying traditional graphical methods and sophisticated numerical models. This approach can be used to solve a wide range of geochemical problems related to deep well injection of waste. Trilinear Piper diagrams, Stiff diagrams, and correlation plots show that the chemical characteristics of recovered fluid at the new well are similar to those of formation water. The concentrations of most major constituents in the fluid appear diluted when compared to formation water sampled at other locations. This could be explained by mixing with waste, which is less saline than formation water. However, the waste injected near the new well consists primarily of ammonia and sulfate, and these waste constituents are not found at concentrations elevated enough to suggest that significant mixing of formation water with waste has occurred. To determine whether chemical interactions between injected waste and formation could explain the chemistry of fluid recovered from the new well, we simulated the chemical reaction between waste, formation water, and the formation rock by numerical modeling. Initial modeling calculations were done using a multicomponent geochemical reaction-path model to simulate fresh waste reacting with the formation. A more complex simulation coupling flow, transport, and reaction was then run using a multicomponent geochemical reactive transport model. These numerical simulations were carried out to calculate porosity changes and evaluate chemical processes

  11. Spatial variability of surface-sediment porewater pH and related water-column characteristics in deep waters of the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Changgao; Sui, Yi; Tang, Danling; Legendre, Louis

    2016-12-01

    This study analyzes the pH of surface-sediment porewater (i.e. 2-3 cm below the water-sediment interface), and concentrations of CaCO3 and organic carbon (OC) in 1192 sediment cores from the northern South China Sea, in water depths ranging from 137 to 3702 m. This is the first study in the literature to analyze the large-scale spatial variability of deep-water surface-sediment pH over a large ocean basin. The data showed strong spatial variations in pH. The lowest pH values (Pearl and Red Rivers. Moderately low pH values (generally 7.3-7.5) occurred in two other areas: a submarine canyon, where sediments originated partly from the Pearl River and correspond to a paleo-delta front during the last glacial period; and southwest of Taiwan Island, where waters are affected by the northern branch of the Kuroshio intrusion current (KIC) and runoff from Taiwan rivers. The surface sediments with the highest pH (⩾7.5, and up to 8.3) were located in a fourth area, which corresponded to the western branch of the KIC where sediments have been intensively eroded by bottom currents. The pH of surface-sediment porewater was significantly linearly related to water depth, bottom-water temperature, and CaCO3 concentration (p < 0.05 for the whole sampling area). This study shows that the pH of surface-sediment porewater can be sensitive to characteristics of the overlying water column, and suggests that it will respond to global warming as changes in surface-ocean temperature and pH progressively reach deeper waters.

  12. Downhole fluid sampling and noble gas analysis of saline waters from the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersberg, Thomas; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Ahonen, Lasse; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    The 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole is situated at the NW-SE trending boundary between the Archaean and Proterozoic domains of the eastern Fennoscandian Shield (Finland). In August 2011, eight fluid samples were collected with a Leutert positive displacement sampler (PDS) from 500 m to 2480 m depth in the open bore hole. The PDS allows sampling at in situ pressures, thus minimising fractionation from degassing during sampling. At the surface, the samples were transferred into an evacuated sampling line connected with a Cu-tube and a glass bulb for gas sampling, a pressure gauge, and a thermometer. Gas was liberated with a heated ultrasonic bath and then admitted to the sampling devices. Gas/water ratios were already determined in the field during gas extraction. Saline groundwaters rich in methane, nitrogen, hydrogen and helium and with water stable isotope composition distinctive from meteoric and sea water have been found to host isolated ecosystems within the Precambrian crystalline bedrock of Outokumpu (Kietäväinen et al., 2013). In order to characterise the geochemical and microbiological evolution of the deep subsurface of the area, noble gas residence times have been calculated based on radiogenic (4He, 40Ar), nucleogenic (21Ne) and fissiogenic (134Xe, 136Xe) noble gas nuclides. Geochemical and microbiological variations together with hydrogeological and geophysical data indicate negligible vertical fluid flow in the bedrock. Moreover, noble gas diffusion models show that diffusion is not likely to affect noble gas concentrations of groundwater at or below 500 m depth in Outokumpu. Therefore in situ accumulation was assumed as a basis for the age determination. In general, residence times between 10 and 50 Ma were indicated by 4He and21Ne, while somewhat younger ages were obtained by 40Ar, using average values for porosity, density and concentration of radioactive elements in the bedrock of Outokumpu. Kietäväinen R., Ahonen L., Kukkonen I

  13. The impact of deep overshooting convection on the water vapour and trace gas distribution in the TTL and lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P. M.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    Overshooting convection penetrating the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and the lower stratosphere has a significant impact on the redistribution of water vapour and further trace gases. This is of importance for the stratospheric water vapour budget, which plays a central role in radiative and chemical processes. Modelling studies and in situ measurements show the hydration potential of convective overshooting partly by direct injection of ice particles into the stratosphere and subsequent sublimation. However, processes leading to dehydration of the TTL may also impact the stratospheric humidity by limiting the amount of water vapour carried aloft. While the large scale drives some of the dehydrating processes, others are of convective origin, for example gravity waves and cooling associated with overshooting turrets. Furthermore, downdrafts may transport dry and ozone rich air masses from the stratosphere into the TTL. Improving our understanding of overshooting convection and its influence on TTL water vapour will ultimately place better constraints on the budget of water vapour in the stratosphere.In this study we use three-dimensional cloud resolving (WRF-ARW) simulations of a deep convective thunderstorm (Hector) to study the redistribution of water vapour and trace gases in the upper TTL/lower stratosphere. Passive tracers are initialised to investigate the transport of air masses. The simulations focus on an Hector event that has been probed by aircraft during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Observations were performed in and around overshoots that even penetrated the stratosphere. These observations as well as the model simulations show downward transport and mixing of air masses from the stratosphere, though less strong and more localised in the simulation. Furthermore, the simulations shows a layering of hydrated and dehydrated air masses post-convection in the upper TTL and lower stratosphere. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the

  14. Intrusion dynamics of particle plumes in stratified water with weak crossflow: Application to deep ocean blowouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayang; Adams, E. Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present an experimental study of particle plumes in ambient stratification and a mild current. In an inverted framework, the results describe the fate of oil droplets released from a deep ocean blowout. A continuous stream of dense glass beads was released from a carriage towed in a salt-stratified tank. Nondimensional particle slip velocity UN ranged from 0.1 to 1.9, and particles with UN ≤ 0.5 were observed to enter the intrusion layer. The spatial distributions of beads, collected on a bottom sled towed with the source, present a Gaussian distribution in the transverse direction and a skewed distribution in the along-current direction. Dimensions of the distributions increase with decreasing UN. The spreading relations can be used as input to far-field models describing subsequent transport of particles or, in an inverted framework, oil droplets. The average particle settling velocity, Uave, was found to exceed the individual particle slip velocity, Us, which is attributed to the initial plume velocity near the point of release. Additionally, smaller particles exhibit a "group" or "secondary plume" effect as they exit the intrusion as a swarm. The secondary effect becomes more prominent as UN decreases, and might help explain observations from the 2000 Deep Spill field experiment where oil was found to surface more rapidly than predicted based on Us. An analytical model predicting the particle deposition patterns was validated against experimental measurements, and used to estimate near-field oil transport under the Deepwater Horizon spill conditions, with/without chemical dispersants.

  15. Growth of a deep-water, predatory fish is influenced by the productivity of a boundary current system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Rountrey, Adam N; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Coulson, Peter G; Feng, Ming; Newman, Stephen J; Waite, Anya M; Wakefield, Corey B; Meekan, Mark G

    2015-03-12

    The effects of climate change on predatory fishes in deep shelf areas are difficult to predict because complex processes may govern food availability and temperature at depth. We characterised the net impact of recent environmental changes on hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios), an apex predator found in continental slope habitats (>200 m depth) by using dendrochronology techniques to develop a multi-decadal record of growth from otoliths. Fish were sampled off temperate south-western Australia, a region strongly influenced by the Leeuwin Current, a poleward-flowing, eastern boundary current. The common variance among individual growth records was relatively low (3.4%), but the otolith chronology was positively correlated (r = 0.61, p < 0.02) with sea level at Fremantle, a proxy for the strength of the Leeuwin Current. The Leeuwin Current influences the primary productivity of shelf ecosystems, with a strong current favouring growth in hapuku. Leeuwin Current strength is predicted to decline under climate change models and this study provides evidence that associated productivity changes may flow through to higher trophic levels even in deep water habitats.

  16. Deep-water Thyasiridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the Oman Margin, Arabian Sea, new species and examples of endemism and cosmopolitanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, P Graham

    2015-08-05

    Seven species of Thyasiridae are reported from the Oman Margin of the Arabian Sea at depths between 688 m and 3356 m. Hypoxic conditions exist at depths between 400 and 1200 m and three species are restricted to this zone and to the Arabian Sea. Leptaxinus indusarium has also been recorded from the Indus Fan and Channelaxinus investigatoris from off Sri Lanka. A new species Thyasira anassa sp. nov. is described from the hypoxic zone. Another four species are recorded from the abyssal zone where oxygen levels are typical for the deep ocean. Here another new species is described, Parathyasira bamberi sp. nov. but the other species could not be conclusively identified because of close affinity with populations from other oceans.  Deep water Atlantic species Axinulus croulinensis and Mendicula ferruginosa are apparently present in the abyssal Indian Ocean while another thyasirid shell is very close to Channelaxinus excavatus from the Eastern Pacific and C. perplicata from the Atlantic. Accompanying these abyssal thyasirids were other bivalve species, Deminucula atacellana, Limopsis pelagica and Bentharca asperula that cannot be distinguished by morphology from their Atlantic populations. It is concluded that using morphology alone that the abyssal species may well be cosmopolitan in distribution.

  17. Occurrence of deep-water corals on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge based on MAR-ECO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, P. B.; Buhl-Mortensen, L.; Gebruk, A. V.; Krylova, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence of deep-water corals on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between the southern part of the Reykjanes Ridge and the Azores has been examined based on video surveys using remotely operated vehicles (ROV) and bycatch from longline and bottom trawl. Eight sites were surveyed with ROVs, and the bycatch material came from 16 trawl hauls and nine longline sets. Corals were observed at all sites surveyed with ROVs at depths between 800 and 2400 m, but most commonly shallower than 1400 m. The species richness of corals was high, with a total of 40 taxa recorded. Octocorals dominated the coral fauna with 27 taxa. Lophelia pertusa was one of the most frequently observed corals, present at five of the eight surveyed sites. It occurred on basaltic outcrops on the seamounts but always as relatively small colonies (reef structures were not observed. The deepest record of Lophelia was at 1340 m, south of the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone. Accumulations of dead debris of coral skeletons could indicate a presence of former large Lophelia reefs at several locations. The number of megafaunal taxa was 1.6 times higher in areas where corals were present compared to areas without corals. Typical taxa that co-occurred with Lophelia were crinoids, certain sponges, the bivalve Acesta excavata, and squat lobsters. Signs of destructive fishing and lost gillnets were observed at several locations. The impact of fishing on deep-sea corals is discussed.

  18. Novel techniques and insights into the deployment of pop-up satellite archival tags on a small-bodied deep-water chondrichthyan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Oliver N.; Howey, Lucy A.; Tolentino, Emily R.; Jordan, Lance K. B.; Brooks, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring movement data for small-bodied, deep-water chondrichthyans is challenged by extreme effects of capture and handling stress, and post-release predation, however, it is urgently required to examine important fisheries interactions and assess the ecological role of these species within deep-water food webs. Here we suggest a novel release-cage mechanism to deploy pop-up satellite archival tags, as well as present vertical habitat data for a data-deficient, small-bodied, deep-water bycatch species, the Cuban dogfish (Squalus cubensis). Data were gathered from seven of eight High Rate X-Tags deployed on mature Cuban dogfish in the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas. Recovery periods appeared variable between individuals and are likely driven by capture-and-handling stress and tag burden. Application of the cross-correlation function to time-series depth and temperature data indicated three of the seven individuals suffered mortality through predation, which occurred during daytime, and suggests Cuban dogfish may constitute a proportion of deep-water apex predator diet in the Exuma Sound. Two animals were successfully released via a novel release-cage mechanism and displayed either no, or rapid (deep-water taxa, and exhibit a relatively broad temperature and depth range, which may be driven by preference for specific bathymetric structures. These techniques provide an important first step into acquiring and presenting vertical habitat data for small-bodied, deep-water chondrichthyans, which can be directly applied to fisheries and ecosystem-based management approaches.

  19. Estimating the Effects of Conversion of Agricultural Land to Urban Land on Deep Percolation of Irrigation Water in the Grand Valley, Western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The conversion of agricultural land to urban residential land is associated with rapid population growth in the Grand Valley of western Colorado. Information regarding the effects of this land-use conversion on deep percolation, irrigation-water application, and associated salt loading to the Colorado River is needed to support water-resource planning and conservation efforts. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) assessed deep percolation and estimated salt loading derived from irrigated agricultural lands in the Grand Valley in a 1985 to 2002 monitoring and evaluation study (NRCS M&E). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Salinity Control Forum and the Mesa Conservation District, quantified the current (2005-2006) deep percolation and irrigation-water application characteristics of 1/4-acre residential lots and 5-acre estates, urban parks, and urban orchard grass fields in the Grand Valley, and compared the results to NRCS M&E results from alfalfa-crop sites. In addition, pond seepage from three irrigation-water holding ponds was estimated. Salt loading was estimated for the urban study results and the NRCS M&E results by using standard salt-loading factors. A daily soil-moisture balance calculation technique was used at all urban study irrigated sites. Deep percolation was defined as any water infiltrating below the top 12 inches of soil. Deep percolation occurred when the soil-moisture balance in the first 12 inches of soil exceeded the field capacity for the soil type at each site. Results were reported separately for urban study bluegrass-only sites and for all-vegetation type (bluegrass, native plants, and orchard grass) sites. Deep percolation and irrigation-water application also were estimated for a complete irrigation season at three subdivisions by using mean site data from each subdivision. It was estimated that for the three subdivisions, 37 percent of the developed acreage was irrigated (the balance

  20. Optimum design and global analysis of flexible jumper for an innovative subsurface production system in ultra-deep water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Zhen, Xing-wei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Wen-hua

    2014-04-01

    The study focuses on the flexible jumper issue of Subsurface Tension Leg Production (STLP) system concept, which is considered as a competing alternative system to support well completion devices and rigid risers in ultra-deep water for offshore petroleum production. The paper presents analytical and numerical approaches for the optimum design and global analysis of the flexible jumper. Criteria using catenary concept are developed to define the critical length for optimum design. Based on the criteria, detailed hydrodynamic analyses including quasi-static analysis, modal analysis, and dynamic analysis are performed. Modal analysis with respect to the quasi-static analysis shows that the existence of resonant modes requires special consideration. The results of dynamic analysis confirm the effectiveness of the de-coupled effect from the jumper on STLP system. The approaches developed in the study also have wide application prospect in reference to the optimum design and analysis of any Hybrid Riser (HR) concept.

  1. A new genus and species of Thyasiridae (Mollusca, Bivalvia from deep-water, Beaufort Sea, northern Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Valentich-Scott

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve mollusk shells were collected in 2350 m depth in the Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean off northern Alaska. Initial identification suggested the specimens were a member of the bivalve family Thyasiridae, but no known eastern Pacific or Arctic living or fossil thyasirid resembled these deep-water specimens. Comparisons were made with the type of the genera Maorithyas Fleming, 1950, Spinaxinus Oliver & Holmes, 2006, Axinus Sowerby, 1821, and Parathyasira Iredale, 1930. We determined the Beaufort Sea species represents a new genus, herein described as Wallerconcha. These specimens also represent a new species, herein named Wallerconcha sarae. These new taxa are compared with known modern and fossil genera and species of thyasirds.

  2. Study of the sealing performance of tubing adapters in gas-tight deep-sea water sampler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haocai Huang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubing adapter is a key connection device in Gas-Tight Deep-Sea Water Sampler (GTWS. The sealing performance of the tubing adapter directly affects the GTWS's overall gas tightness. Tubing adapters with good sealing performance can ensure the transmission of seawater samples without gas leakage and can be repeatedly used. However, the sealing performance of tubing adapters made of different materials was not studied sufficiently. With the research discussed in this paper, the materials match schemes of the tubing adapters were proposed. With non-linear finite element contact analysis and sea trials in the South China Sea, it is expected that the recommended materials match schemes not only meet the requirements of tubing adapters’ sealing performance but also provide the feasible options for the following research on tubing adapters in GTWS.

  3. An unusual new species of paguroid (Crustacea, Anomura, Paguridae from deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Lemaitre

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new hermit crab species of the family Paguridae, Tomopaguropsis ahkinpechensis sp. n., is described from deep waters (780–827 m of the Gulf of Mexico. This is the second species of Tomopaguropsis known from the western Atlantic, and the fifth worldwide. The new species is morphologically most similar to a species from Indonesia, T. crinita McLaughlin, 1997, the two having ocular peduncles that diminish in width distally, reduced corneas, dense cheliped setation, and males lacking paired pleopods 1. The calcified figs on the branchiostegite and anterodorsally on the posterior carapace, and the calcified first pleonal somite that is not fused to the last thoracic somite, are unusual paguroid characters. A discussion of the affinities and characters that define this new species is included, along with a key to all five species of Tomopaguropsis.

  4. An unusual new species of paguroid (Crustacea, Anomura, Paguridae) from deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Rafael; Vázquez-Bader, Ana Rosa; Gracia, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new hermit crab species of the family Paguridae, Tomopaguropsis ahkinpechensis sp. n., is described from deep waters (780–827 m) of the Gulf of Mexico. This is the second species of Tomopaguropsis known from the western Atlantic, and the fifth worldwide. The new species is morphologically most similar to a species from Indonesia, Tomopaguropsis crinita McLaughlin, 1997, the two having ocular peduncles that diminish in width distally, reduced corneas, dense cheliped setation, and males lacking paired pleopods 1. The calcified figs on the branchiostegite and anterodorsally on the posterior carapace, and the calcified first pleonal somite that is not fused to the last thoracic somite, are unusual paguroid characters. A discussion of the affinities and characters that define this new species is included, along with a key to all five species of Tomopaguropsis. PMID:25408613

  5. Scaling oxygen microprofiles at the sediment interface of deep stratified waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, Robert; Hondzo, Miki; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen microprofiles at the sediment-water interface of Lake Geneva were measured concurrently with velocities 0.25 to 2 m above the sediment. The measurements and scaling analyses indicate dissolved oxygen fluctuations and turbulent fluxes in exceedance of molecular diffusion in the proximity of the sediment-water interface. The measurements allowed the parameterization of the turbulent diffusion as a function of the dimensionless height above the sediment and the turbulence above the sediment-water interface. Turbulent diffusion depended strongly on the friction velocity and differed from formulations reported in the literature that are based on concepts of turbulent and developed wall-bounded flows. The dissolved oxygen microprofiles and proposed parameterization of turbulent diffusion enable a foundation for the similarity scaling of oxygen microprofiles in proximity to the sediment. The proposed scaling allows the estimation of diffusive boundary layer thickness, oxygen flux, and oxygen microprofile distribution in the near-sediment boundary layer.

  6. Low salinity hydrocarbon water disposal through deep subsurface drip irrigation: leaching of native selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Engle, Mark A.; Boehlke, Adam R.; Zupancic, John W.; Brown, Adrian; Figueroa, Linda; Wolkersdorfer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    A subsurface drip irrigation system is being used in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin that treats high sodium, low salinity, coal bed methane (CBM) produced water with sulfuric acid and injects it into cropped fields at a depth of 0.92 m. Dissolution of native gypsum releases calcium that combats soil degradation that would otherwise result from high sodium water. Native selenium is leached from soil by application of the CBM water and traces native salt mobilization to groundwater. Resulting selenium concentrations in groundwater at this alluvial site were generally low (0.5–23 μg/L) compared to Wyoming’s agricultural use suitability standard (20 μg/L).

  7. SPATIAL AND MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN THE SURFACE WATER AND DEEP SEDIMENTS OF FRESH WATER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantha Deivi Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the levels of various trace metals present in water and sediment of fresh water aquatic ecosystem during the post monsoon season. The study was extended to identify the trace metal contamination in the water and sediment samples collected along the shores of Lambapur and Peddagattu the tribal villages in India using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICPMS. The trace metal contents in water samples were copper- 24.2 to 47.5, chromium- 4.4 to 8.2, cadmium- 0.1 to 0.3, lead- 2.1 to 3.8, Nickel- 5.9 to 9.7, Zinc- 4.6 to 9.7, Manganese- 10.8 to 13.2, Iron- 52.9 to 157.2 (µg L-1 cobalt and arsenic were in BDL and the values were within the limits of Indian drinking water standards (BIS 10500: 1991. The trace metals concentration in the sediment samples ranged from (mg kg-1: Copper- 61.5 to 113.7, chromium- 138.4 to 177.5, cobalt- 33.2 to 42.7, cadmium- 1.0 to 2.1, lead- 57.9 to 103.4, Nickel- 36.1 to 56.6, Zinc- 51.2 to 102.1, Manganese- 610.8 to 1301.7 and Iron- 2.5 to 2.9%. In our study, four reliable indices such as Enrichment factor, Contamination factor, Geoaccumulation Index and Pollution Load Index were applied to estimate metal pollution and the results comparison are discussed below. The data generated were used to determine the quality of the sediments based on the enrichment factor, contamination factor and degree of contamination, geochemical index and Pollution Load Index (PLI.

  8. Orbital and suborbital variability in North Atlantic bottom water temperature obtained from deep-sea ostracod Mg/Ca ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; DeMartino, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) ratios were measured in the deep-sea ostracod (Crustacea) genus Krithe from Chain core 82-24-4PC from the western mid-Atlantic Ridge (3427 m) in order to estimate ocean circulation and bottom water temperature (BWT) variability over the past 200,000 years. Mg/Ca ratios have been used as a paleothermometer because the ratios are controlled primarily by ambient water temperatures at the time the organism secretes its adult carapace. Over the past two glacial-interglacial cycles, Mg/Ca values oscillated between about 7 mmol/mol and 12 mmol/mol, equivalent to a BWT range of 0 to > 3.5??C. The lowest values were obtained on specimens from glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 2, 4 and 6; the highest values were obtained from specimens from the early part of the Holocene interglacial (MIS 1), and also from MISs 5 and 7. These trends suggest that BWTs in the North Atlantic Ocean fluctuate over orbital time scales. Suborbital variability in Mg/Ca ratios and BWT was also observed for the past 100,000 years. Ratios rose from ~8 mmol/mol to ~10 mmol/mol (implying a BWT increase of ~1 to 3??C) during 14 Mg/Ca excursions. The highest ratios were found in Krithe dated at approximately 32, 36-38, 43, 48, 73, 85 and 93 ka. Although the age model for the Chain 82-24-4PC and temporal resolution do not allow precise correlation, some of these deep-sea bottom temperature excursions appear to correspond to Heinrich events recorded in other regions of the North Atlantic and perhaps Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadial events recorded in Greenland ice cores. If confirmed, this would support the hypothesis that millennial-scale oscillations of climate in the North Atlantic are capable of affecting global climate via thermohaline circulation changes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Countermeasures to Microbiofouling in Simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers with Surface and Deep Ocean Waters in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Leslie Ralph; Berger, Joyce A.

    1986-01-01

    Countermeasures to biofouling in simulated ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers have been studied in single-pass flow systems, using cold deep and warm surface ocean waters off the island of Hawaii. Manual brushing of the loops after free fouling periods removed most of the biofouling material. However, over a 2-year period a tenacious film formed. Daily free passage of sponge rubber balls through the tubing only removed the loose surface biofouling layer and was inadequate as a countermeasure in both titanium and aluminum alloy tubes. Chlorination at 0.05, 0.07, and 0.10 mg liter-1 for 1 h day-1 lowered biofouling rates. Only at 0.10 mg liter-1 was chlorine adequate over a 1-year period to keep film formation and heat transfer resistance from rising above the maximum tolerated values. Lower chlorination regimens led to the buildup of uneven or patchy films which produced increased flow turbulence. The result was lower heat transfer resistance values which did not correlate with the amount of biofouling. Surfaces which were let foul and then treated with intermittent or continuous chlorination at 0.10 mg of chlorine or less per liter were only partially or unevenly cleaned, although heat transfer measurements did not indicate that fact. It took continuous chlorination at 0.25 mg liter-1 to bring the heat transfer resistance to zero and eliminate the fouling layer. Biofouling in deep cold seawater was much slower than in the warm surface waters. Tubing in one stainless-steel loop had a barely detectable fouling layer after 1 year in flow. With aluminum alloys sufficient corrosion and biofouling material accumulated to require that some fouling coutermeasure be used in long-term operation of an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. Images PMID:16347076

  10. Water resource management under deep uncertainty: The concept and application of vulnerability maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, A.; Wheater, H. S.

    2013-12-01

    Assessments of potential impacts of climate change on water resources are generally based on the use of downscaled climate scenarios to force hydrological models and hence estimate the changes in natural water availability in comparison to baseline conditions. This framework, however, suffers from various sources of uncertainty. First, climate models have large uncertainty associated with key climate variables such as precipitation. Second, downscaling approaches are based on several assumptions, which degrade their prediction capability for future conditions. Third, hydrological models are associated with a set of limitations due to lack of process understanding and data support as well as structural and parametric identifiability. As a result, given a particular water resource system and a certain scenario of climate change, different combinations of climate/downscaling/hydrological models may result in very different estimates of future water availability. Moreover, using the 'cascade of models approach', limited insights into the water resource system response to potential hydrological changes in the flow regime are obtained. We argue that there is merit in an alternative approach in which the vulnerability in water resource system response to a feasible range of future inflows is evaluated. We develop a stochastic reconstruction framework that generates a large ensemble of perturbed flow series at the local scale to represent a range of potential flow responses to climate change. This approach is generic and can provide insight into critical thresholds beyond which changes in the natural streamflow regime can initiate stress in the system. It can also provide the basis for assessment of specific realizations of future scenarios, which can be located on a vulnerability map. The methodology is applied to the existing water resource system of the South Saskatchewan river in southern Alberta, Canada, to explore the system's vulnerability to potential changes in

  11. Growth response of a deep-water ferromanganese crust to evolution of the Neogene Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.

    in the vertical distance between the seafloor depth and the CCD during the early Miocene in addition to the influx of oxygenated bottom-water likely initiated Fe–Mn crust formation. Pillar structure characterises the younger zone, which extends from 40 mm... with low detritus. Therefore, the younger crust started to accrete in response to a shift in bottom-water circulation towards the contemporary pattern, which produced a uniform growth rate and pillar structure up to the present. q 2000 Published by Elsevier...

  12. Generic models of deep formation water calculated with PHREEQC using the "gebo"-database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozau, E.; van Berk, W.

    2012-04-01

    To identify processes during the use of formation waters for geothermal energy production an extended hydrogeochemical thermodynamic database (named "gebo"-database) for the well known and commonly used software PHREEQC has been developed by collecting and inserting data from literature. The following solution master species: Fe(+2), Fe(+3), S(-2), C(-4), Si, Zn, Pb, and Al are added to the database "pitzer.dat" which is provided with the code PHREEQC. According to the solution master species the necessary solution species and phases (solid phases and gases) are implemented. Furthermore, temperature and pressure adaptations of the mass action law constants, Pitzer parameters for the calculation of activity coefficients in waters of high ionic strength and solubility equilibria among gaseous and aqueous species of CO2, methane, and hydrogen sulphide are implemented into the "gebo"-database. Combined with the "gebo"-database the code PHREEQC can be used to test the behaviour of highly concentrated solutions (e.g. formation waters, brines). Chemical changes caused by temperature and pressure gradients as well as the exposure of the water to the atmosphere and technical equipments can be modelled. To check the plausibility of additional and adapted data/parameters experimental solubility data from literature (e.g. sulfate and carbonate minerals) are compared to modelled mineral solubilities at elevated levels of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), temperature, and pressure. First results show good matches between modelled and experimental mineral solubility for barite, celestite, anhydrite, and calcite in high TDS waters indicating the plausibility of additional and adapted data and parameters. Furthermore, chemical parameters of geothermal wells in the North German Basin are used to test the "gebo"-database. The analysed water composition (starting with the main cations and anions) is calculated by thermodynamic equilibrium reactions of pure water with the minerals found in

  13. New evidence and modeling studies of cross-tropopause transport of water substance by deep convective storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Water vapor in the stratosphere can intercept substantial amount of terrestrial infrared radiation, thus causing exasperation of global warming at the surface due to increasing CO2. It also serves as the source material for making stratospheric odd hydrogen species that may cause ozone depletion through certain catalytic cycles. It is therefore very important to identify the process via which water vapor is transported across the tropopause into the stratosphere. Transport of water substance into the stratosphere by deep convective storms have been investigated by the author since around 2000, and in 2003 he proposed that it is the internal gravity wave breaking at the storm top that causes the water substance to penetrate through the tropopause and enter the stratosphere. Since then increasing evidence, including the observation of above-anvil cirrus plumes, jumping cirrus at the storm top, and the so-called pancake clouds, have been suggested as the manifestation of this wave breaking phenomenon. Cloud-resolving model studies did show the clear connection between these phenomena and wave breaking. Still there are several unresolved questions such as whether or not the jumping cirrus eventually evolves into plumes and whether the pancake clouds really exist. In this paper, I will show new aircraft and satellite observational evidence that confirm the above questions. These evidence demonstrate that the jumping cirrus can indeed evolve into plumes as observed by satellite storm images and that new rapid scan satellite storm images reveal the existence of the pancake clouds. New high resolution model simulations show cloud top features that match the observation very well and thus vindicating the role of gravity wave breaking in this process. Model results also give an estimate of the cross-tropopause transport of water substance that is much larger than previously thought.

  14. Geochemical inputs for hydrological models of deep-lying sedimentary units: Loss of mineral hydration water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, D. L.; Anderson, D. E.

    1981-12-01

    Hydrological models that treat phenomena occurring deep in sedimentary piles, such as petroleum maturation and retention of chemical and radioactive waste, may require time spans of at least several million years. Many input quantities classically treated as constants will be variables on this time scale. Models sophisticated enough to include transport contributions from such processes as chemical diffusion, mineral dehydration and shale membrane behavior require considerable knowledge about regional geological history as well as the pertinent mineralogical and geochemical relationships. Simple dehydrations such as those of gypsum and halloysite occur at sharply-defined temperatures but, as with all mineral dehydration reactions, the equilibrium temperature is strongly dependent on the pore-fluid salinity and degree of overpressuring encountered in the subsurface. The dehydrations of analcime and smectite proceed by reactions involving other sedimentary minerals. The smectite reaction is crystallographically complex, yielding a succession of mixed-layered illite/smectites, and on the U.S.A. Gulf of Mexico coast continues over several million years at a particular stratigraphic interval.

  15. Quantifying Deep Vadose Zone Soil Water Potential Changes At A Waste Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel M. Hubbell; Deborah L. McElroy

    2007-10-01

    Recent advances in moisture monitoring using tensiometers has allowed long-duration, high quality data sets from within the deep vadose zone. A network of about 30 advanced tensiometers in 18 wells provided field-scale data to monitor moisture conditions and movement in the subsurface in and around a mixed waste disposal site at depths ranging from 6 to over 67 m below land surface (bls). Sensors are located in both sediments and fractured rock within the geologic profile and some have been in operation for over 10 years. The moisture monitoring was able to detect long term declines in moisture content presumably in response to lower than normal precipitation and resultant infiltration over the time period from 2000 to 2004. This trend was reversed in 2005 and 2006 in more than half of the monitoring sites over the 6 to 33 m depth interval and in several monitoring sites from 33 to 67 m, in response to normal to above normal precipitation. This tensiometer data can be used to evaluate the appropriateness of the current conceptual model of flow at this site. It also shows that a moisture monitoring system should be effective to rapidly validate that a proposed remedial action (such as placement of an ET cover) would be effective in reducing the moisture movement to levels similar to those in undisturbed sites outside of the disposal area. This paper will describe the instrument design, how the instruments were installed, and the resultant data from this monitoring system.

  16. Adaptation and evolution of deep-sea scale worms (Annelida: Polynoidae): insights from transcriptome comparison with a shallow-water species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjie; Sun, Jin; Chen, Chong; Watanabe, Hiromi K.; Feng, Dong; Zhang, Yu; Chiu, Jill M. Y.; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2017-04-01

    Polynoid scale worms (Polynoidae, Annelida) invaded deep-sea chemosynthesis-based ecosystems approximately 60 million years ago, but little is known about their genetic adaptation to the extreme deep-sea environment. In this study, we reported the first two transcriptomes of deep-sea polynoids (Branchipolynoe pettiboneae, Lepidonotopodium sp.) and compared them with the transcriptome of a shallow-water polynoid (Harmothoe imbricata). We determined codon and amino acid usage, positive selected genes, highly expressed genes and putative duplicated genes. Transcriptome assembly produced 98,806 to 225,709 contigs in the three species. There were more positively charged amino acids (i.e., histidine and arginine) and less negatively charged amino acids (i.e., aspartic acid and glutamic acid) in the deep-sea species. There were 120 genes showing clear evidence of positive selection. Among the 10% most highly expressed genes, there were more hemoglobin genes with high expression levels in both deep-sea species. The duplicated genes related to DNA recombination and metabolism, and gene expression were only enriched in deep-sea species. Deep-sea scale worms adopted two strategies of adaptation to hypoxia in the chemosynthesis-based habitats (i.e., rapid evolution of tetra-domain hemoglobin in Branchipolynoe or high expression of single-domain hemoglobin in Lepidonotopodium sp.).

  17. New down-hole TDR method for deep profile soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive irrigation and salinity management both require accurate knowledge of field soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity to depths greater than the root zone depth in agricultural fields. Scientists at the USDA-ARS Conservation & Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas, ...

  18. Bacterial Versus Archaeal Origin of Extracellular Enzymatic Activity in the Northeast Atlantic Deep Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltar, F.; Arístegui, J.; Gasol, J.M.; Yokokawa, T.; Herndl, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the total and dissolved extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) of alpha-glucosidase and beta-glucosidase (AGase and BGase), alkaline phosphatase (APase) and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) activities in the epi-, meso- and bathypelagic waters of the subtropical Northeast Atlantic. EEA

  19. Viscous-flow calculations for KVLCC2 in deep and shallow water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toxopeus, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the SIMMAN 2008 workshop, the capability of CFD tools to predict the flow around manoeuvring ships has been investigated. It was decided to continue this effort but to extend the work to the flow around ships in shallow water. In this paper, CFD calculations for the KLVCC2 are presented. The aim

  20. Viscous-flow calculations for KVLCC2 in deep and shallow water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toxopeus, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the SIMMAN 2008 workshop, the capability of CFD tools to predict the flow around manoeuvring ships has been investigated. It was decided to continue this effort but to extend the work to the flow around ships in shallow water. In this paper, CFD calculations for the KLVCC2 are presented. The aim

  1. Development and deployment of a deep-sea Raman probe for measurement of pore water geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Walz, Peter M.; Kirkwood, William J.; Hester, Keith C.; Ussler, William; Peltzer, Edward T.; Brewer, Peter G.

    2010-02-01

    We have developed, deployed, and tested a novel probe for study of the geochemistry of sediment pore waters based upon Raman spectroscopy. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for in situ measurements of targets of scientific interest including gas and hydrothermal vents and complex gas hydrates, but sediment geochemistry has so far been an intractable problem since the sediments themselves are strongly fluorescent and typically only very small sample volumes are obtainable. The 35 cm long probe extracts pore fluids through a 10 μm sintered metallic frit and draws the sample through a 2 mm diameter channel into a sapphire windowed optical cell within which the laser beam is focused and the spectrum recorded. The dead volume of the system is ˜1 ml and the instrument is ROV deployable with activation of probe insertion and sample withdrawal under direct operator control. The unique features of this mode of detection include observation of the sulfate gradient in marine pore waters as an indicator of diagenesis, direct measurement of the dissolved sulfide species H 2S and HS -, and measurement of dissolved methane; all of which are of primary geochemical interest. Quantitative analysis is achieved by area ratio to known water peaks and from standard calibration curves with a precision of ±5%. We find only very small fluorescence from pore waters measured in situ, but observe rapid increases in fluorescence from cores returned to the surface and exposed to oxygen.

  2. Deep and bottom water characteristics in the Owen Fracture Zone, Western Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Kureishy, T.W.

    Hydro chemical studies at a station (10 degrees 34.l'N,56 degrees 31,7'E) in the Owen Fracture zone reveal an active movement of bottom water as approx 75 m thick, cold, low-salinity layer. Silicate profile exhibits a broad maximum coinciding with a...

  3. Influence of runoff, high frequency atmospheric forcing and model resolution on deep water mass formation regions and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, from a numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Quintana, Yarisbel; Courtois, Peggy; Hu, Xianmin; Pennelly, Clark; Myers, Paul G.

    2016-04-01

    Water mass formation regions act as windows to the deep ocean where surface waters are transformed to intermediate and deep waters. Within the North Atlantic, Labrador Sea Water (LSW) is convectively produced in the Labrador Sea while in the Nordic Seas the source waters for Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW) and Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (NEADW) are formed. They are the main components of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) which forms the lower limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). We explore the changes of the LSW formation rates and in AMOC strength as consequence of runoff glacial melt, high frequency atmospheric forcing influence and variations in model's resolution. We use 1/4° resolution Arctic and Northern Hemisphere Atlantic (ANHA4) configuration from the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model. A nest using ANHA4 and the Adaptive Grid Refinement in FORTRAN (AGRIF) package was used to increase the resolution to 1/12° in the sub-polar gyre. The formation rate is calculated based upon a kinematic subduction approach where the exchange through the dynamic mixed layer base is calculated based on shallowing and deepening in the mixed layer, and convergence of horizontal transport into or out of the mixed layer. Lastly we use a Lagrangian tool (Ariane) to track the path of the DSOW and the NEADW from their formation source.

  4. Application of water inrush coefficients in deep mining%突水系数法在煤矿深部开采中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李本军; 刘海新; 刘晓威

    2011-01-01

    The development tendency of formula of the method of water inrush coefficients was pointed out by combining with the current practice of mining. Taking well field of CLXI for example, the limitation of water inrush coefficients for evaluating risk of floor water inrush in deep mining was proved. Other methods can be a supplement for evaluating water inrush coefficients for evaluating risk of floor water inrush in deep mining. The achieved results can be provided for evaluating water inrush risk of floor in deep mining of some mining areas, in which the water - enriched properties of aquifer are not obvious but water inrush coefficient is larger.%结合目前的采煤实践,设想了突水系数公式的发展趋势.通过磁西一号井田实例,证实了突水系数法在预测开采深部煤层突水危险性评价中的局限性.表明在深部煤层突水危险性评价应用时,其它方法作为突水系数法的补充,可为含水层富水性较弱而突水系数较大的深部开采底板突水安全评价提供参考依据.

  5. Dynamics of a deep-water seagrass population on the Great Barrier Reef: annual occurrence and response to a major dredging program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Paul H; Carter, Alex B; Chartrand, Kathryn; Sankey, Tonia; Wells, Linda; Rasheed, Michael A

    2015-08-17

    Global seagrass research efforts have focused on shallow coastal and estuarine seagrass populations where alarming declines have been recorded. Comparatively little is known about the dynamics of deep-water seagrasses despite evidence that they form extensive meadows in some parts of the world. Deep-water seagrasses are subject to similar anthropogenic threats as shallow meadows, particularly along the Great Barrier Reef lagoon where they occur close to major population centres. We examine the dynamics of a deep-water seagrass population in the GBR over an 8 year period during which time a major capital dredging project occurred. Seasonal and inter-annual changes in seagrasses were assessed as well as the impact of dredging. The seagrass population was found to occur annually, generally present between July and December each year. Extensive and persistent turbid plumes from a large dredging program over an 8 month period resulted in a failure of the seagrasses to establish in 2006, however recruitment occurred the following year and the regular annual cycle was re-established. Results show that despite considerable inter annual variability, deep-water seagrasses had a regular annual pattern of occurrence, low resistance to reduced water quality but a capacity for rapid recolonisation on the cessation of impacts.

  6. Water use, root activity and deep drainage within a perennial legume-grass pasture: A case study in southern inland Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nahuel A. Pachas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water use and depth of water extraction of leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala and Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana pasture, irrigated with desalinated coal seam water (a by-product of the coal seam gas industry, were monitored to provide background information on root activity, spatial and temporal water use and deep drainage over a 757-day period from August 2011 to August 2013. Methodology comprised measurement of soil water from surface to 4 m depth using 8 EnviroSCAN probes connected to dataloggers positioned within leucaena twin rows and within the Rhodes grass inter-row. Just over 581,000 individual moisture measurements were collated and are reported here. Water extraction (and by inference root activity of leucaena and Rhodes grass showed marked seasonal fluctuation with deepest and highest water extraction occurring during the first growing season; water extraction was greatly diminished during the following drier and cooler seasons due to the negative influences of lower soil moisture contents, lower temperatures and increased defoliation on pasture growth. The highest values of deep drainage below 4 m depth occurred when high rainfall events corresponded with high soil water storage in the entire profile (0–4 m depth. Given that water usage by both leucaena and Rhodes grass was greatest in the upper layers of soil (<1.5 m, future research should focus on how the level of competitive interaction might be managed by choice of row spacing and frequency of irrigation. Further studies are needed, including: (a physical sampling to determine the depth of active roots; (b how defoliation affects rooting behaviours and water use of leucaena; and (c modelling of the water and salt balances of leucaena and grass inter-row systems using data from this study, with various levels of irrigation, to investigate the risks of deep drainage over an extended climate sequence.Keywords: Active rooting depth, agroforestry, Chloris gayana, Leucaena leucocephala

  7. Improving predictive mapping of deep-water habitats: Considering multiple model outputs and ensemble techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Katleen; Jones, Daniel O. B.; Roberts, J. Murray; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.

    2016-07-01

    In the deep sea, biological data are often sparse; hence models capturing relationships between observed fauna and environmental variables (acquired via acoustic mapping techniques) are often used to produce full coverage species assemblage maps. Many statistical modelling techniques are being developed, but there remains a need to determine the most appropriate mapping techniques. Predictive habitat modelling approaches (redundancy analysis, maximum entropy and random forest) were applied to a heterogeneous section of seabed on Rockall Bank, NE Atlantic, for which landscape indices describing the spatial arrangement of habitat patches were calculated. The predictive maps were based on remotely operated vehicle (ROV) imagery transects high-resolution autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) sidescan backscatter maps. Area under the curve (AUC) and accuracy indicated similar performances for the three models tested, but performance varied by species assemblage, with the transitional species assemblage showing the weakest predictive performances. Spatial predictions of habitat suitability differed between statistical approaches, but niche similarity metrics showed redundancy analysis and random forest predictions to be most similar. As one statistical technique could not be found to outperform the others when all assemblages were considered, ensemble mapping techniques, where the outputs of many models are combined, were applied. They showed higher accuracy than any single model. Different statistical approaches for predictive habitat modelling possess varied strengths and weaknesses and by examining the outputs of a range of modelling techniques and their differences, more robust predictions, with better described variation and areas of uncertainties, can be achieved. As improvements to prediction outputs can be achieved without additional costly data collection, ensemble mapping approaches have clear value for spatial management.

  8. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Chan, K.M.; Sayles, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    Leg 5 samples fall into two categories with respect to interstitial water composition: 1) rapidly deposited terrigenous or appreciably terrigenous deposits, such as in Hole 35 (western Escanaba trough, off Cape Mendocino, California); and, 2) slowly deposited pelagic clays and biogenic muds and oozes. Interstitial waters in the former show modest to slight variations in chloride and sodium, but drastic changes in non-conservative ions such as magnesium and sulfate. The pelagic deposits show only relatively minor changes in both conservative and non-conservative pore fluid constituents. As was pointed out in earlier Leg Reports, it is believed that much of the variation in chloride in pore fluids within individual holes is attributable to the manipulation of samples on board ship and in the laboratory. On the other hand, the scatter in sodium is due in part to analytical error (on the order of 2 to 3 per cent, in terms of a standard deviation), and it probably accounts for most of the discrepancies in total anion and cation balance. All constituents reported here, with the exception of bulk water content, were analyzed on water samples which were sealed in plastic tubes aboard ship and were subsequently opened and divided into weighed aliquots in the laboratory. Analytical methods follow the atomic absorption, wet chemical and emission spectrochemical techniques briefly summarized in previous reports, e.g. Manheim et al., 1969, and Chan and Manheim, 1970. The authors acknowledge assistance from W. Sunda, D. Kerr, C. Lawson and H. Richards, and thank D. Spencer, P. Brewer and E. Degens for allowing the use of equipment and laboratory facilities.

  9. Contrasting cesium dynamics in neighboring deep and shallow warm-water reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, John E. [Department of Biology, Texas Christian University, Ft. Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Hinton, T.G., E-mail: thomas.hinton@irsn.f [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Cadarache, 13115 France (France); Whicker, F.W. [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1618 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To measure the long term retention and seasonal dynamics of an initial 4 kg addition of {sup 133}Cs into an 11.4-ha, 157,000 m{sup 3} reservoir (Pond 4, near Aiken, South Carolina, USA), the concentrations and inventories of {sup 133}Cs in the water column were measured at periodical intervals for 522 days following the 1 August, 1999 release. After rapid declines in concentrations and inventories during the first 90 days, the {sup 133}Cs concentrations in the water column declined at an average proportional rate of 0.004 d{sup -1}. However, there were periods of less rapid and more rapid rates of declines, and these were correlated with periods of increasing and decreasing K concentrations in the water column. The decline rates were less and the K concentrations greater in the winter than in the summer. In the deeper, neighboring monomictic reservoirs of Par Pond and Pond B, a yearly cycle of increasing and decreasing {sup 137}Cs concentrations in the water column is driven by anoxic remobilization of Cs from the sediments into a persistent summer hypolimnion. In Pond 4, whose mean depth of 1.6 m is too shallow to support a persistent anoxic hypolimnion, the pattern of yearly dynamics for K and Cs appear to be related to the accumulation and release of these elements from the extensive, seasonal macrophyte communities. The contrasting results between Pond 4 and Pond B suggest that a full appreciation of the relative importance of 1) anoxic remobilization and 2) accumulation and release by macrophytes in these systems remains to be established.

  10. Contrasting cesium dynamics in neighboring deep and shallow warm-water reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, John E; Hinton, T G; Whicker, F W

    2010-09-01

    To measure the long term retention and seasonal dynamics of an initial 4 kg addition of (133)Cs into an 11.4-ha, 157,000 m(3) reservoir (Pond 4, near Aiken, South Carolina, USA), the concentrations and inventories of (133)Cs in the water column were measured at periodical intervals for 522 days following the 1 August, 1999 release. After rapid declines in concentrations and inventories during the first 90 days, the (133)Cs concentrations in the water column declined at an average proportional rate of 0.004 d(-1). However, there were periods of less rapid and more rapid rates of declines, and these were correlated with periods of increasing and decreasing K concentrations in the water column. The decline rates were less and the K concentrations greater in the winter than in the summer. In the deeper, neighboring monomictic reservoirs of Par Pond and Pond B, a yearly cycle of increasing and decreasing (137)Cs concentrations in the water column is driven by anoxic remobilization of Cs from the sediments into a persistent summer hypolimnion. In Pond 4, whose mean depth of 1.6 m is too shallow to support a persistent anoxic hypolimnion, the pattern of yearly dynamics for K and Cs appear to be related to the accumulation and release of these elements from the extensive, seasonal macrophyte communities. The contrasting results between Pond 4 and Pond B suggest that a full appreciation of the relative importance of 1) anoxic remobilization and 2) accumulation and release by macrophytes in these systems remains to be established.

  11. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    acoustic predictions and for understanding the local ocean dynamics, (iii) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves ...the scattering of the acoustic signals by ocean internal waves and/or spice (Dzieciuch, 2014). The procedure consisted of pulse compression of the...ambient noise field, and (v) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor for both

  12. Water mass characteristics in the deep layers of the western Ionian Basin observed during May 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainbucher, D.; Rubino, A.; Klein, B.

    2006-03-01

    CTD measurements carried out in the southern Adriatic Sea and in the western Ionian basin (Eurafrican Mediterranean Sea) during May 2003 by the German research vessel Poseidon (Poseidon cruise 298) and numerical simulations are used to elucidate aspects of the abyssal circulation of this oceanic region. The observations reveal that dense waters of Adriatic origin were strongly diluted along their way on the Italian continental slope, whilst their characteristics remained better preserved in a region located further east. Numerical simulations carried out by means of a nonlinear, reduced-gravity plume model confirm the observations and contribute to explain their cause: The very steep topographic slope along the Italian shelf in the region of the Gulf of Taranto induces strong entrainment of intermediate waters in the bottom layers. Instead, the bottom waters of Adriatic origin which, along their path further east, encounter gentler topographic variations, are weakly diluted by turbulent mixing and, therefore, better preserve their original characteristics. The remarkable differences in the simulated turbulent mixing along these two different paths are accentuated by the presence of a noticeable zonal gradient of potential density existing in the near-bottom layers of the northern Ionian basin.

  13. Sediment pollution characteristics and in situ control in a deep drinking water reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zizhen; Huang, Tinglin; Li, Yang; Ma, Weixing; Zhou, Shilei; Long, Shenghai

    2017-02-01

    Sediment pollution characteristics, in situ sediment release potential, and in situ inhibition of sediment release were investigated in a drinking water reservoir. Results showed that organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) in sediments increased from the reservoir mouth to the main reservoir. Fraction analysis indicated that nitrogen in ion exchangeable form and NaOH-extractable P (Fe/Al-P) accounted for 43% and 26% of TN and TP in sediments of the main reservoir. The Risk Assessment Code for metal elements showed that Fe and Mn posed high to very high risk. The results of the in situ reactor experiment in the main reservoir showed the same trends as those observed in the natural state of the reservoir in 2011 and 2012; the maximum concentrations of total OC, TN, TP, Fe, and Mn reached 4.42mg/L, 3.33mg/L, 0.22mg/L, 2.56mg/L, and 0.61mg/L, respectively. An in situ sediment release inhibition technology, the water-lifting aerator, was utilized in the reservoir. The results of operating the water-lifting aerator indicated that sediment release was successfully inhibited and that OC, TN, TP, Fe, and Mn in surface sediment could be reduced by 13.25%, 15.23%, 14.10%, 5.32%, and 3.94%, respectively.

  14. Flume Experiments for Optimizing the Hydraulic Performance of a Deep-Water Wetland Utilizing Emergent Vegetation and Obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Shu Shih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Constructed ponds and wetlands are widely used in urban areas for stormwater management, ecological conservation, and pollution treatment. The treatment efficiency of these systems is strongly related to the hydrodynamics and hydraulic residence time. In this study, we developed a physical model and used rhodamine-WT as a tracer to conduct flume experiments. An equivalent Reynolds number was assumed, and the flume was a 1/25-scale model. Emergent obstructions (EOs, submerged obstructions (SOs, and high- and low-density emergent vegetation were placed along the sides of the flume, and 49 tracer tests were performed. We altered the density, spatial extent, aspect ratio, and configurations of the obstructions and emergent vegetation to observe changes in the hydraulic efficiency of a deep-water wetland. In the cases of low-aspect-ratio obstructions, the effects of the EOs on the hydraulic efficiency were significantly stronger than those of the SOs. In contrast, in the cases of high-aspect-ratio obstructions, the improvement effects of the EOs were weaker than those of the SOs. The high-aspect-ratio EOs altered the flow direction and constrained the water conveyance area, which apparently caused a short-circuited flow phenomenon, resulting in a decrease in hydraulic efficiency. Most cases revealed that the emergent vegetation improved the hydraulic efficiency more than the EOs. The high-density emergent vegetation (HEV improved the hydraulic efficiency more than the low-density emergent vegetation (LEV. Three cases involving HEV, two cases involving LEV, and one case involving EOs attained a good hydraulic efficiency (λ > 0.75. To achieve greater water purification, aquatic planting in constructed wetlands should not be overly dense. The HEV configuration in case 3-1 achieved optimum hydraulic performance for compliance with applicable water treatment standards.

  15. Probing Microbial Activity in a Perched Water Body Located in a Deep Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Y.; Taylor, J. L.; Henriksen, J. R.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Hubbard, S. S.; Spycher, N.; Weathers, T. S.; Ginn, T. R.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Smith, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    Waste releases to the vadose zone are a legacy of past activities at a number of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), 90Sr has been detected in perched water bodies underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) facility. Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) using urea-hydrolyzing microbes is one proposed approach for immobilization of 90Sr in the subsurface. The sequestration mechanism is co-precipitation in calcite, promoted by the production of carbonate alkalinity from ureolysis. In order to assess the potential efficacy of MICP at INTEC a field study was conducted at the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP). The VZRP is located approximately 3 km from INTEC and shares many of the same hydrologic and lithologic features but in a non-contaminated setting. We conducted experiments over two field seasons in a perched water body located approximately 15 meters below land surface, using a 5-spot wellfield design. During the first season amendments (molasses and urea) were injected into the central well and water was extracted from two wells on either side, located along a diagonal. Water samples were characterized for microbial abundance, ureolytic activity and ureC gene numbers, along with solution composition. Before, during and after the injections cross-borehole geophysical imaging was performed, using various combinations of the available wells. During the second field season in situ static experiments were conducted to specifically characterize attached and unattached microbial communities, using surrogate substrates colonized during a 12 week incubation. Based on the field data a first order in situ urea hydrolysis rate constant of 0.034 d-1 was estimated. This was more than an order of magnitude higher than rate constants estimated above-ground using water samples, suggesting that attached microorganisms were responsible for >90% of the observed urea hydrolysis activity. The

  16. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is without a doubt on of the greatest threats to the human species and has all the potential to destabilise world peace. Falling water tables are a new phenomenon. Up until the development of steam and electric motors, deep groudwater...

  17. Nocturnal Foraging by Red-Legged Kittiwakes, a Surface Feeding Seabird That Relies on Deep Water Prey During Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubun, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kikuchi, Dale M; Kitaysky, Alexander; Takahashi, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Narrow foraging speciali