WorldWideScience

Sample records for deep cortex cells

  1. Deep prepiriform cortex kindling and amygdala interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D Y; Moshé, S L

    1987-03-01

    The deep prepiriform cortex (DPC) has been recently suggested to be a crucial epileptogenic site in the rat brain. We investigated the susceptibility of the DPC to the development of electrical kindling as compared to that of the superficial prepiriform cortex (SPC) and amygdala as well as the transfer interactions between the two prepiriform sites and amygdala. Adult rats with electrodes implanted in the right prepiriform cortex (DPC or SPC) and left amygdala were divided into a DPC-amygdala and SPC-amygdala group while a third group consisted of rats with electrodes implanted in the ipsilateral DPC and amygdala. Within each group the rats were initially kindled from one site selected randomly and then rekindled from the other site. Both DPC and SPC were as sensitive to the development of kindling as the amygdala. The behavioral seizures elicited with DPC or SPC primary kindling were identical to those induced by amygdala kindling. Initial DPC kindling facilitated the development of kindling from either ipsilateral or contralateral amygdala with the ipsilateral transfer being significantly more potent than the contralateral. SPC kindling also facilitated the development of contralateral amygdala kindling but was less effective than DPC kindling. On the other hand, amygdala kindling did not facilitate contralateral SPC or DPC kindling although it transferred to the ipsilateral DPC. These results indicate that the prepiriform cortex can be readily kindled but not faster than the amygdala and that there are unequal kindling transfer interactions between prepiriform cortex and amygdala.

  2. Acetogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria inhabiting the rhizoplane and deep cortex cells of the sea grass Halodule wrightii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, K; Pinkart, H C; Drake, H L; Devereux, R

    1999-11-01

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed (33)P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment.

  3. Acetogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Inhabiting the Rhizoplane and Deep Cortex Cells of the Sea Grass Halodule wrightii†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, Kirsten; Pinkart, Holly C.; Drake, Harold L.; Devereux, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizospheres that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacteria and clostridia were enriched in sediments colonized by the sea grasses Halodule wrightii and Thalassia testudinum compared to an adjacent unvegetated sediment. Most-probable-number analyses found that in contrast to butyrate-producing clostridia, acetogens and acetate-utilizing sulfate reducers were enriched by an order of magnitude in rhizosphere sediments. Although sea grass roots are oxygenated in the daytime, colorimetric root incubation studies demonstrated that acetogenic O-demethylation and sulfidogenic iron precipitation activities were tightly associated with washed, sediment-free H. wrightii roots. This suggests that the associated anaerobes are able to tolerate exposure to oxygen. To localize and quantify the anaerobic microbial colonization, root thin sections were hybridized with newly developed 33P-labeled probes that targeted (i) low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria, (ii) cluster I species of clostridia, (iii) species of Acetobacterium, and (iv) species of Desulfovibrio. Microautoradiography revealed intercellular colonization of the roots by Acetobacterium and Desulfovibrio species. Acetogenic bacteria occurred mostly in the rhizoplane and outermost cortex cell layers, and high numbers of sulfate reducers were detected on all epidermal cells and inward, colonizing some 60% of the deepest cortex cells. Approximately 30% of epidermal cells were colonized by bacteria that hybridized with an archaeal probe, strongly suggesting the presence of methanogens. Obligate anaerobes within the roots might contribute to the vitality of sea grasses and other aquatic plants and to the biogeochemistry of the surrounding sediment. PMID:10543830

  4. Deep Hierarchies in the Primate Visual Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Norbert; Jannsen, Per; Kalkan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling of the primate visual system yields insights of potential relevance to some of the challenges that computer vision is facing, such as object recognition and categorization, motion detection and activity recognition or vision-based navigation and manipulation. This article...... reviews some functional principles and structures that are generally thought to underlie the primate visual cortex, and attempts to extract biological principles that could further advance computer vision research. Organized for a computer vision audience, we present functional principles...... of the processing hierarchies present in the primate visual system considering recent discoveries in neurophysiology. The hierarchal processing in the primate visual system is characterized by a sequence of different levels of processing (in the order of ten) that constitute a deep hierarchy in contrast to the flat...

  5. Molecularly Defined Circuitry Reveals Input-Output Segregation in Deep Layers of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürmeli, Gülşen; Marcu, Daniel Cosmin; McClure, Christina; Garden, Derek L F; Pastoll, Hugh; Nolan, Matthew F

    2015-12-01

    Deep layers of the medial entorhinal cortex are considered to relay signals from the hippocampus to other brain structures, but pathways for routing of signals to and from the deep layers are not well established. Delineating these pathways is important for a circuit level understanding of spatial cognition and memory. We find that neurons in layers 5a and 5b have distinct molecular identities, defined by the transcription factors Etv1 and Ctip2, and divergent targets, with extensive intratelencephalic projections originating in layer 5a, but not 5b. This segregation of outputs is mirrored by the organization of glutamatergic input from stellate cells in layer 2 and from the hippocampus, with both preferentially targeting layer 5b over 5a. Our results suggest a molecular and anatomical organization of input-output computations in deep layers of the MEC, reveal precise translaminar microcircuitry, and identify molecularly defined pathways for spatial signals to influence computation in deep layers.

  6. Determining physical properties of the cell cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, A; Behrndt, M; Heisenberg, C -P; Jülicher, F; Grill, S W

    2015-01-01

    Actin and myosin assemble into a thin layer of a highly dynamic network underneath the membrane of eukaryotic cells. This network generates the forces that drive cell and tissue-scale morphogenetic processes. The effective material properties of this active network determine large-scale deformations and other morphogenetic events. For example,the characteristic time of stress relaxation (the Maxwell time)in the actomyosin sets the time scale of large-scale deformation of the cortex. Similarly, the characteristic length of stress propagation (the hydrodynamic length) sets the length scale of slow deformations, and a large hydrodynamic length is a prerequisite for long-ranged cortical flows. Here we introduce a method to determine physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer (in vivo). For this we investigate the relaxation dynamics of the cortex in response to laser ablation in the one-cell-stage {\\it C. elegans} embryo and in the gastrulating zebrafish embryo. These responses can be interpreted using ...

  7. Development of epileptiform excitability in the deep entorhinal cortex after status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E.; Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Peterson, Steven; Connor, John A.; Müller, Wolfgang S.

    2009-01-01

    Epileptiform neuronal activity during seizures is observed in many brain areas, but its origins following status epilepticus (SE) are unclear. We have used the Li-low dose pilocarpine rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to examine early development of epileptiform activity in the deep entorhinal cortex (EC). We show that during the 3 week latent period that follows SE, an increasing percentage of neurons in EC layer 5 respond to a single synaptic stimulus with polysynaptic burst depolarizations. This change is paralleled by a progressive depolarizing shift of the IPSP reversal potential in layer 5 neurons, apparently caused by upregulation of the Cl- inward transporter NKCC1 and concurrent downregulation of the Cl- outward transporter KCC2, both changes favoring intracellular Cl- accumulation. Inhibiting Cl- uptake in the latent period restored more negative GABAergic reversal potentials and eliminated polysynaptic bursts. The changes in the Cl- transporters were highly specific to the deep entorhinal cortex. They did not occur in layers 1-3, perirhinal cortex, subiculum or dentate gyrus during this period. We propose that the changes in Cl- homeostasis facilitate hyperexcitability in the deep entorhinal cortex leading to epileptiform discharge there, which subsequently affects downstream cortical regions. PMID:19674083

  8. Determining Physical Properties of the Cell Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Arnab; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Behrndt, Martin; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Jülicher, Frank; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-03-01

    Actin and myosin assemble into a thin layer of a highly dynamic network underneath the membrane of eukaryotic cells. This network generates the forces that drive cell and tissue-scale morphogenetic processes. The effective material properties of this active network determine large-scale deformations and other morphogenetic events. For example,the characteristic time of stress relaxation (the Maxwell time)in the actomyosin sets the time scale of large-scale deformation of the cortex. Similarly, the characteristic length of stress propagation (the hydrodynamic length) sets the length scale of slow deformations, and a large hydrodynamic length is a prerequisite for long-ranged cortical flows. Here we introduce a method to determine physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer (in vivo). For this we investigate the relaxation dynamics of the cortex in response to laser ablation in the one-cell-stage {\\it C. elegans} embryo and in the gastrulating zebrafish embryo. These responses can be interpreted using a coarse grained physical description of the cortex in terms of a two dimensional thin film of an active viscoelastic gel. To determine the Maxwell time, the hydrodynamic length and the ratio of active stress and per-area friction, we evaluated the response to laser ablation in two different ways: by quantifying flow and density fields as a function of space and time, and by determining the time evolution of the shape of the ablated region. Importantly, both methods provide best fit physical parameters that are in close agreement with each other and that are similar to previous estimates in the two systems. We provide an accurate and robust means for measuring physical parameters of the actomyosin cortical layer.It can be useful for investigations of actomyosin mechanics at the cellular-scale, but also for providing insights in the active mechanics processes that govern tissue-scale morphogenesis.

  9. Deep brain stimulation reveals emotional impact processing in ventromedial prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Geday, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that modulation of monoaminergic tone with deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of subthalamic nucleus would reveal a site of reactivity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex that we previously identified by modulating serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms by blocking serotonin......-noradrenaline reuptake sites. We tested the hypothesis in patients with Parkinson's disease in whom we had measured the changes of blood flow everywhere in the brain associated with the deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We determined the emotional reactivity of the patients as the average impact...... of emotive images rated by the patients off the DBS. We then searched for sites in the brain that had significant correlation of the changes of blood flow with the emotional impact rated by the patients. The results indicate a significant link between the emotional impact when patients are not stimulated...

  10. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Costagli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1 in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM. Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagli, M; Donatelli, G; Biagi, L; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Siciliano, G; Tosetti, M; Cosottini, M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN) impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR) T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  12. Cellular resolution optical access to brain regions in fissures: imaging medial prefrontal cortex and grid cells in entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ryan J; Gu, Yi; Tank, David W

    2014-12-30

    In vivo two-photon microscopy provides the foundation for an array of powerful techniques for optically measuring and perturbing neural circuits. However, challenging tissue properties and geometry have prevented high-resolution optical access to regions situated within deep fissures. These regions include the medial prefrontal and medial entorhinal cortex (mPFC and MEC), which are of broad scientific and clinical interest. Here, we present a method for in vivo, subcellular resolution optical access to the mPFC and MEC using microprisms inserted into the fissures. We chronically imaged the mPFC and MEC in mice running on a spherical treadmill, using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy and genetically encoded calcium indicators to measure network activity. In the MEC, we imaged grid cells, a widely studied cell type essential to memory and spatial information processing. These cells exhibited spatially modulated activity during navigation in a virtual reality environment. This method should be extendable to other brain regions situated within deep fissures, and opens up these regions for study at cellular resolution in behaving animals using a rapidly expanding palette of optical tools for perturbing and measuring network structure and function.

  13. Neural discriminability in rat lateral extrastriate cortex and deep but not superficial primary visual cortex correlates with shape discriminability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaercke, Ben; Van den Bergh, Gert; Gerich, Florian; Op de Beeck, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a surprising degree of functional specialization in rodent visual cortex. It is unknown to what degree this functional organization is related to the well-known hierarchical organization of the visual system in primates. We designed a study in rats that targets one of the hallmarks of the hierarchical object vision pathway in primates: selectivity for behaviorally relevant dimensions. We compared behavioral performance in a visual water maze with neural discriminability in five visual cortical areas. We tested behavioral discrimination in two independent batches of six rats using six pairs of shapes used previously to probe shape selectivity in monkey cortex (Lehky and Sereno, 2007). The relative difficulty (error rate) of shape pairs was strongly correlated between the two batches, indicating that some shape pairs were more difficult to discriminate than others. Then, we recorded in naive rats from five visual areas from primary visual cortex (V1) over areas LM, LI, LL, up to lateral occipito-temporal cortex (TO). Shape selectivity in the upper layers of V1, where the information enters cortex, correlated mostly with physical stimulus dissimilarity and not with behavioral performance. In contrast, neural discriminability in lower layers of all areas was strongly correlated with behavioral performance. These findings, in combination with the results from Vermaercke et al. (2014b), suggest that the functional specialization in rodent lateral visual cortex reflects a processing hierarchy resulting in the emergence of complex selectivity that is related to behaviorally relevant stimulus differences.

  14. Deep hierarchies in the primate visual cortex: what can we learn for computer vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Norbert; Janssen, Peter; Kalkan, Sinan; Lappe, Markus; Leonardis, Ales; Piater, Justus; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Antonio J; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2013-08-01

    Computational modeling of the primate visual system yields insights of potential relevance to some of the challenges that computer vision is facing, such as object recognition and categorization, motion detection and activity recognition, or vision-based navigation and manipulation. This paper reviews some functional principles and structures that are generally thought to underlie the primate visual cortex, and attempts to extract biological principles that could further advance computer vision research. Organized for a computer vision audience, we present functional principles of the processing hierarchies present in the primate visual system considering recent discoveries in neurophysiology. The hierarchical processing in the primate visual system is characterized by a sequence of different levels of processing (on the order of 10) that constitute a deep hierarchy in contrast to the flat vision architectures predominantly used in today's mainstream computer vision. We hope that the functional description of the deep hierarchies realized in the primate visual system provides valuable insights for the design of computer vision algorithms, fostering increasingly productive interaction between biological and computer vision research.

  15. Deep neural networks rival the representation of primate IT cortex for core visual object recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Cadieu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The primate visual system achieves remarkable visual object recognition performance even in brief presentations, and under changes to object exemplar, geometric transformations, and background variation (a.k.a. core visual object recognition. This remarkable performance is mediated by the representation formed in inferior temporal (IT cortex. In parallel, recent advances in machine learning have led to ever higher performing models of object recognition using artificial deep neural networks (DNNs. It remains unclear, however, whether the representational performance of DNNs rivals that of the brain. To accurately produce such a comparison, a major difficulty has been a unifying metric that accounts for experimental limitations, such as the amount of noise, the number of neural recording sites, and the number of trials, and computational limitations, such as the complexity of the decoding classifier and the number of classifier training examples. In this work, we perform a direct comparison that corrects for these experimental limitations and computational considerations. As part of our methodology, we propose an extension of "kernel analysis" that measures the generalization accuracy as a function of representational complexity. Our evaluations show that, unlike previous bio-inspired models, the latest DNNs rival the representational performance of IT cortex on this visual object recognition task. Furthermore, we show that models that perform well on measures of representational performance also perform well on measures of representational similarity to IT, and on measures of predicting individual IT multi-unit responses. Whether these DNNs rely on computational mechanisms similar to the primate visual system is yet to be determined, but, unlike all previous bio-inspired models, that possibility cannot be ruled out merely on representational performance grounds.

  16. Common mechanisms regulating cell cortex properties during cell division and cell migration.

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    Roubinet, Chantal; Tran, Phong T; Piel, Matthieu

    2012-11-01

    Single cell morphogenesis results from a balance of forces involving internal pressure (also called turgor pressure in plants and fungi) and the plastic and dynamic outer shell of the cell. Dominated by the cell wall in plants and fungi, mechanical properties of the outer shell of animal cells arise from the cell cortex, which is mostly composed of the plasma membrane (and membrane proteins) and the underlying meshwork of actin filaments and myosin motors (and associated proteins). In this review, following Bray and White [1988; Science 239:883-889], we draw a parallel between the regulation of the cell cortex during cell division and cell migration in animal cells. Starting from the similarities in shape changes and underlying mechanical properties, we further propose that the analogy between cell division and cell migration might run deeper, down to the basic molecular mechanisms driving cell cortex remodeling. We focus our attention on how an heterogeneous and dynamic cortex can be generated to allow cell shape changes while preserving cell integrity.

  17. Optogenetic Mapping of Intracortical Circuits Originating from Semilunar Cells in the Piriform Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Julian M C; Suzuki, Norimitsu; Shima, Yasuyuki; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Nelson, Sacha B; Bekkers, John M

    2015-10-26

    Despite its comparatively simple trilaminar architecture, the primary olfactory (piriform) cortex of mammals is capable of performing sophisticated sensory processing, an ability that is thought to depend critically on its extensive associational (intracortical) excitatory circuits. Here, we used a novel transgenic mouse model and optogenetics to measure the connectivity of associational circuits that originate in semilunar (SL) cells in layer 2a of the anterior piriform cortex (aPC). We generated a mouse line (48L) in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR) could be selectively expressed in a subset of SL cells. Light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) could be evoked in superficial pyramidal cells (17.4% of n = 86 neurons) and deep pyramidal cells (33.3%, n = 9) in the aPC, but never in ChR(-) SL cells (0%, n = 34). Thus, SL cells monosynaptically excite pyramidal cells, but not other SL cells. Light-evoked EPSCs were also selectively elicited in 3 classes of GABAergic interneurons in layer 3 of the aPC. Our results show that SL cells are specialized for providing feedforward excitation of specific classes of neurons in the aPC, confirming that SL cells comprise a functionally distinctive input layer.

  18. Deep brain stimulation in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex impairs spatial reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanker, Marianne; Post, Ger; Joosten, Ruud; Feenstra, Matthijs; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-05-15

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a successful novel treatment for treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder and is currently under investigation for addiction and eating disorders. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown functional changes in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) following DBS in the ventral capsule/ventral striatum. These findings suggest that DBS can affect neural activity in distant regions that are connected to the site of electrode implantation. However, the behavioral consequences of direct OFC stimulation are not known. Here, we studied the effects of direct stimulation in the lateral OFC on spatial discrimination and reversal learning in rats. Rats were implanted with stimulating electrodes and were trained on a spatial discrimination and reversal learning task. DBS in the OFC did not affect acquisition of a spatial discrimination. Stimulated animals made more incorrect responses during the first reversal. Acquisition of the second reversal was not affected. These results suggest that DBS may inhibit activity in the OFC, or may disrupt output of the OFC to other cortical or subcortical areas, resulting in perseverative behavior or an inability to adapt behavior to altered response-reward contingencies.

  19. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  20. Rheology of the Active Cell Cortex in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Toyoda, Yusuke; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-08-09

    The cell cortex is a key structure for the regulation of cell shape and tissue organization. To reach a better understanding of the mechanics and dynamics of the cortex, we study here HeLa cells in mitosis as a simple model system. In our assay, single rounded cells are dynamically compressed between two parallel plates. Our measurements indicate that the cortical layer is the dominant mechanical element in mitosis as opposed to the cytoplasmic interior. To characterize the time-dependent rheological response, we extract a complex elastic modulus that characterizes the resistance of the cortex against area dilation. In this way, we present a rheological characterization of the cortical actomyosin network in the linear regime. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of actin cross linkers and the impact of active prestress on rheological behavior. Notably, we find that cell mechanics values in mitosis are captured by a simple rheological model characterized by a single timescale on the order of 10 s, which marks the onset of fluidity in the system. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Seizure-like thalamocortical rhythms initiate in the deep layers of the cortex in a co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brendan E L; Kyi, Mervyn; Reid, Christopher A; Myers, Damian E; Xu, Shenghong; Williams, David A; O'Brien, Terence J

    2011-01-01

    The oscillatory rhythms underlying many physiological and pathological states, including absence seizures, require both the thalamus and cortices for full expression. A co-culture preparation combining cortical and thalamic explants provides a unique model for investigating how such oscillations initiate and spread. Here we investigated the dynamics of synchronized thalamocortical activity by simultaneous measurement of field-potential recordings and rapid imaging of Ca(2+) transients by fluorescence methods. Spontaneous sustained hypersynchronized "seizure-like" oscillations required reciprocal cortico-thalamocortical connections. Isolated cortical explants can independently develop brief discharges, while thalamic explants alone were unable to do so. Rapid imaging of Ca(2+) transients demonstrated deep-layer cortical initiation of oscillatory network activity in both connected and isolated explants. Further, cortical explants derived from a rat model of genetic absence epilepsy showed increased bursting duration consistent with an excitable cortex. We propose that thalamocortical oscillatory network activity initiates in deep layers of the cortex with reciprocal thalamic interconnections enabling sustained hyper-synchronization.

  2. Deep sleep and parietal cortex gene expression changes are related to cognitive deficits with age.

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    Heather M Buechel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related cognitive deficits negatively affect quality of life and can presage serious neurodegenerative disorders. Despite sleep disruption's well-recognized negative influence on cognition, and its prevalence with age, surprisingly few studies have tested sleep's relationship to cognitive aging. METHODOLOGY: We measured sleep stages in young adult and aged F344 rats during inactive (enhanced sleep and active (enhanced wake periods. Animals were behaviorally characterized on the Morris water maze and gene expression profiles of their parietal cortices were taken. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Water maze performance was impaired, and inactive period deep sleep was decreased with age. However, increased deep sleep during the active period was most strongly correlated to maze performance. Transcriptional profiles were strongly associated with behavior and age, and were validated against prior studies. Bioinformatic analysis revealed increased translation and decreased myelin/neuronal pathways. CONCLUSIONS: The F344 rat appears to serve as a reasonable model for some common sleep architecture and cognitive changes seen with age in humans, including the cognitively disrupting influence of active period deep sleep. Microarray analysis suggests that the processes engaged by this sleep are consistent with its function. Thus, active period deep sleep appears temporally misaligned but mechanistically intact, leading to the following: first, aged brain tissue appears capable of generating the slow waves necessary for deep sleep, albeit at a weaker intensity than in young. Second, this activity, presented during the active period, seems disruptive rather than beneficial to cognition. Third, this active period deep sleep may be a cognitively pathologic attempt to recover age-related loss of inactive period deep sleep. Finally, therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing active period deep sleep (e.g., by promoting active period wakefulness and/or inactive

  3. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

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    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the amount of variation in the length of the cell cycle for cells in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) of the developing cortex of mice on embryonic day 14. Our measurements were made in three cortical regions (i.e., the neocortex, archicortex, and periarchicortex) using three different methods: the cumulative labeling method (CLM), the percent labeled mitoses (PLM) method, and a comparison of the time needed for the PLM to ascend from 0 to 100% with the time needed for the PLM to descend from 100 to 0%. These 3 different techniques provide different perspectives on the cytokinetic parameters. Theoretically, CLM gives an estimate for a maximum value of the total length of the cell cycle (TC), whereas PLM gives an estimate of a minimum value of TC. The difference between these two estimates indicates that the range for TC is +/-1% of the mean TC for periarchicortex, +/-7% for neocortex, and +/-8% for archicortex. This was confirmed by a lengthening of the PLM descent time in comparison with its ascent time. The sharpness of the transitions and the flatness of the plateau of the PLM curves indicate that 99% of the proliferating cells are within this narrow estimated range for TC; hence, only approximately 1% deviate outside of a relatively restricted range from the average TC of the population. In the context of the possible existence within the cortical PVE of two populations with markedly dissimilar cell cycle kinetics from the mean, one such population must comprise approximately 99% of the total population, and the other, if it exists, is only approximately 1% of the total. This seems to be true for all three cortical regions. The narrow range of TC indicates a homogeneity in the cell cycle length for proliferating cells in three different cortical regions, despite the fact that progenitor cells of different lineages may be present. It further predicts the existence of almost synchronous interkinetic nuclear movements of the

  4. Functional integration of human neural precursor cells in mouse cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Wen Zhou

    Full Text Available This study investigates the electrophysiological properties and functional integration of different phenotypes of transplanted human neural precursor cells (hNPCs in immunodeficient NSG mice. Postnatal day 2 mice received unilateral injections of 100,000 GFP+ hNPCs into the right parietal cortex. Eight weeks after transplantation, 1.21% of transplanted hNPCs survived. In these hNPCs, parvalbumin (PV-, calretinin (CR-, somatostatin (SS-positive inhibitory interneurons and excitatory pyramidal neurons were confirmed electrophysiologically and histologically. All GFP+ hNPCs were immunoreactive with anti-human specific nuclear protein. The proportions of PV-, CR-, and SS-positive cells among GFP+ cells were 35.5%, 15.7%, and 17.1%, respectively; around 15% of GFP+ cells were identified as pyramidal neurons. Those electrophysiologically and histological identified GFP+ hNPCs were shown to fire action potentials with the appropriate firing patterns for different classes of neurons and to display spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs. The amplitude, frequency and kinetic properties of sEPSCs and sIPSCs in different types of hNPCs were comparable to host cells of the same type. In conclusion, GFP+ hNPCs produce neurons that are competent to integrate functionally into host neocortical neuronal networks. This provides promising data on the potential for hNPCs to serve as therapeutic agents in neurological diseases with abnormal neuronal circuitry such as epilepsy.

  5. Deep brain stimulation versus motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic pain: A minireview of the literature and proposal for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, C Michael; Tronnier, Volker M; Honey, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of neuropathic pain remains a public health concern. A growing cohort of patients is plagued by medically refractory, unrelenting severe neuropathic pain that ruins their quality of life and productivity. For this group, neurosurgery can offer two different kinds of neuromodulation that may help: deep brain simulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Unfortunately, there is no consensus on how to perform these procedures, which stimulation parameters to select, how to measure success, and which patients may benefit. This brief review highlights the literature supporting each technique and attempts to provide some comparisons and contrasts between DBS and MCS for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Finally, we highlight the current unanswered questions in the field and suggest future research strategies that may advance the care of our patients with neuropathic pain.

  6. Properties and fate of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the corpus callosum, motor cortex, and piriform cortex of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura E; Young, Kaylene M; Hamilton, Nicola B; Li, Huiliang; Richardson, William D; Attwell, David

    2012-06-13

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in the postnatal mouse corpus callosum (CC) and motor cortex (Ctx) reportedly generate only oligodendrocytes (OLs), whereas those in the piriform cortex may also generate neurons. OPCs have also been subdivided based on their expression of voltage-gated ion channels, ability to respond to neuronal activity, and proliferative state. To determine whether OPCs in the piriform cortex have inherently different physiological properties from those in the CC and Ctx, we studied acute brain slices from postnatal transgenic mice in which GFP expression identifies OL lineage cells. We whole-cell patch clamped GFP-expressing (GFP(+)) cells within the CC, Ctx, and anterior piriform cortex (aPC) and used prelabeling with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to assess cell proliferation. After recording, slices were immunolabeled and OPCs were defined by strong expression of NG2. NG2(+) OPCs in the white and gray matter proliferated and coexpressed PDGFRα and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (I(Na)). Approximately 70% of OPCs were capable of generating regenerative depolarizations. In addition to OLIG2(+) NG2(+) I(Na)(+) OPCs and OLIG2(+) NG2(neg) I(Na)(neg) OLs, we identified cells with low levels of NG2 limited to the soma or the base of some processes. These cells had a significantly reduced I(Na) and a reduced ability to incorporate EdU when compared with OPCs and probably correspond to early differentiating OLs. By combining EdU labeling and lineage tracing using Pdgfrα-CreER(T2) : R26R-YFP transgenic mice, we double labeled OPCs and traced their fate in the postnatal brain. These OPCs generated OLs but did not generate neurons in the aPC or elsewhere at any time that we examined.

  7. Electrophysiology of regular firing cells in the rat perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antuono, M; Biagini, G; Tancredi, V; Avoli, M

    2001-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of neurons in the rat perirhinal cortex were analyzed with intracellular recordings in an in vitro slice preparation. Cells included in this study (n = 59) had resting membrane potential (RMP) = -73.9 +/- 8.5 mV (mean +/- SD), action potential amplitude = 95.5 +/- 10.4 mV, input resistance = 36.1 +/- v 15.7 M omega, and time constant = 13.9 +/- 3.4 ms. When filled with neurobiotin (n = 27) they displayed a pyramidal shape with an apical dendrite and extensive basal dendritic tree. Injection of intracellular current pulses revealed: 1) a tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 microM)-sensitive, inward rectification in the depolarizing direction (n = 6), and 2) a time- and voltage-dependent hyperpolarizing sag that was blocked by extracellular Cs+ (3 mM, n = 5) application. Prolonged (up to 3 s) depolarizing pulses made perirhinal cells discharge regular firing of fast action potentials that diminished over time in frequency and reached a steady level (i.e., adapted). Repetitive firing was followed by an afterhyperpolarization that was decreased, along with firing adaptation, by the Ca(2+)-channel blocker Co2+ (2 mM, n = 6). Action potential broadening became evident during repetitive firing. This behavior, which was more pronounced when larger pulses of depolarizing current were injected (and thus when repetitive firing attained higher rates), was markedly decreased by Co2+ application. Subthreshold membrane oscillations at 5-12 Hz became apparent when cells were depolarized by 10-20 mV from RMP, and action potential clusters appeared with further depolarization. Application of glutamatergic and GABAA receptor antagonists (n = 4), CO2+ (n = 6), or Cs+ (n = 5) did not prevent the occurrence of these oscillations that were abolished by TTX (n = 6). Our results show that pyramidal-like neurons in the perirhinal cortex are regular firing cells with electrophysiological features resembling those of other cortical pyramidal elements. The ability to

  8. Deep sleep divides the cortex into opposite modes of anatomical-functional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Crossley, Nicolas; Bullmore, Edward T; Laufs, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    The coupling of anatomical and functional connectivity at rest suggests that anatomy is essential for wake-typical activity patterns. Here, we study the development of this coupling from wakefulness to deep sleep. Globally, similarity between whole-brain anatomical and functional connectivity networks increased during deep sleep. Regionally, we found differential coupling: during sleep, functional connectivity of primary cortices resembled more the underlying anatomical connectivity, while we observed the opposite in associative cortices. Increased anatomical-functional similarity in sensory areas is consistent with their stereotypical, cross-modal response to the environment during sleep. In distinction, looser coupling-relative to wakeful rest-in higher order integrative cortices suggests that sleep actively disrupts default patterns of functional connectivity in regions essential for the conscious access of information and that anatomical connectivity acts as an anchor for the restoration of their functionality upon awakening.

  9. Dissecting the actin cortex density and membrane-cortex distance in living cells by super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M. P.; Colin-York, H.; Schneider, F.; Eggeling, C.; Fritzsche, M.

    2017-02-01

    Nanoscale spacing between the plasma membrane and the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton profoundly modulates cellular morphology, mechanics, and function. Measuring this distance has been a key challenge in cell biology. Current methods for dissecting the nanoscale spacing either limit themselves to complex survey design using fixed samples or rely on diffraction-limited fluorescence imaging whose spatial resolution is insufficient to quantify distances on the nanoscale. Using dual-color super-resolution STED (stimulated-emission-depletion) microscopy, we here overcome this challenge and accurately measure the density distribution of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and the distance between the actin cortex and the membrane in live Jurkat T-cells. We found an asymmetric cortical actin density distribution with a mean width of 230 (+105/-125) nm. The spatial distances measured between the maximum density peaks of the cortex and the membrane were bi-modally distributed with mean values of 50  ±  15 nm and 120  ±  40 nm, respectively. Taken together with the finite width of the cortex, our results suggest that in some regions the cortical actin is closer than 10 nm to the membrane and a maximum of 20 nm in others.

  10. The embryonic septum and ventral pallium, new sources of olfactory cortex cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Ceci

    Full Text Available The mammalian olfactory cortex is a complex structure located along the rostro-caudal extension of the ventrolateral prosencephalon, which is divided into several anatomically and functionally distinct areas: the anterior olfactory nucleus, piriform cortex, olfactory tubercle, amygdaloid olfactory nuclei, and the more caudal entorhinal cortex. Multiple forebrain progenitor domains contribute to the cellular diversity of the olfactory cortex, which is invaded simultaneously by cells originating in distinct germinal areas in the dorsal and ventral forebrain. Using a combination of dye labeling techniques, we identified two novel areas that contribute cells to the developing olfactory cortices, the septum and the ventral pallium, from which cells migrate along a radial and then a tangential path. We characterized these cell populations by comparing their expression of calretinin, calbindin, reelin and Tbr1 with that of other olfactory cell populations.

  11. Mimicking the mechanical properties of the cell cortex by the self-assembly of an actin cortex in vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tianzhi; Srivastava, Vasudha; Ren, Yixin; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2014-04-01

    The composite of the actin cytoskeleton and plasma membrane plays important roles in many biological events. Here, we employed the emulsion method to synthesize artificial cells with biomimetic actin cortex in vesicles and characterized their mechanical properties. We demonstrated that the emulsion method provides the flexibility to adjust the lipid composition and protein concentrations in artificial cells to achieve the desired size distribution, internal microstructure, and mechanical properties. Moreover, comparison of the cortical elasticity measured for reconstituted artificial cells to that of real cells, including those manipulated using genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition, strongly supports that actin cytoskeletal proteins are dominant over lipid molecules in cortical mechanics. Our study indicates that the assembly of biological systems in artificial cells with purified cellular components provides a powerful way to answer biological questions.

  12. Endothelial cell density after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (Melles technique)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dooren, BTH; Mulder, PGH; Nieuwendaal, CP; Beekhuis, WH; Melles, GRJ

    PURPOSE: To measure the recipient endothelial cell loss after the Melles technique for deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty. METHODS: In 21 eyes of 21 patients, a deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty procedure was performed. Before surgery and at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, specular microscopy

  13. Emerging roles of neural stem cells in cerebral cortex development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Víctor; Reillo, Isabel

    2012-07-01

    Expansion and folding of the cerebral cortex are landmark features of mammalian brain evolution, which are recapitulated during embryonic development. Neural stem cells and their derived germinal cells are coordinated during cerebral cortex development to produce the appropriate amounts and types of neurons. This process is further complicated in gyrencephalic species, where newborn neurons must disperse in the tangential axis to expand the cerebral cortex in surface area. Here, we review advances that have been made over the last decade in understanding the nature and diversity of telencephalic neural stem cells and their roles in cortical development, and we discuss recent progress on how newly identified types of cortical progenitor cell populations may have evolved to drive the expansion and folding of the mammalian cerebral cortex.

  14. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification...

  15. Computational Image Analysis Reveals Intrinsic Multigenerational Differences between Anterior and Posterior Cerebral Cortex Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Winter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Time-lapse microscopy can capture patterns of development through multiple divisions for an entire clone of proliferating cells. Images are taken every few minutes over many days, generating data too vast to process completely by hand. Computational analysis of this data can benefit from occasional human guidance. Here we combine improved automated algorithms with minimized human validation to produce fully corrected segmentation, tracking, and lineaging results with dramatic reduction in effort. A web-based viewer provides access to data and results. The improved approach allows efficient analysis of large numbers of clones. Using this method, we studied populations of progenitor cells derived from the anterior and posterior embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, each growing in a standardized culture environment. Progenitors from the anterior cortex were smaller, less motile, and produced smaller clones compared to those from the posterior cortex, demonstrating cell-intrinsic differences that may contribute to the areal organization of the cerebral cortex.

  16. Comparative density of CCK- and PV-GABA cells within the cortex and hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul David Whissell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK- and parvalbumin (PV-expressing neurons constitute the two major populations of perisomatic GABAergic neurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. As CCK- and PV-GABA neurons differ in an array of morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological features, it has been proposed that they form distinct inhibitory ensembles which differentially contribute to network oscillations and behaviour. However, the relationship and balance between CCK- and PV-GABA neurons in the inhibitory networks of the brain is currently unclear as the distribution of these cells has never been compared on a large scale. Here, we systemically investigated the distribution of CCK- and PV-GABA cells across a wide number of discrete forebrain regions using an intersectional genetic approach. Our analysis revealed several novel trends in the distribution of these cells. While PV-GABA cells were more abundant overall, CCK-GABA cells outnumbered PV-GABA cells in several subregions of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral temporal cortex. Interestingly, CCK-GABA cells were relatively more abundant in secondary/association areas of the cortex (V2, S2, M2, and AudD/AudV than they were in corresponding primary areas (V1, S1, M1 and Aud1. The reverse trend was observed for PV-GABA cells. Our findings suggest that the balance between CCK- and PV-GABA cells in a given cortical region is related to the type of processing that area performs; inhibitory networks in the secondary cortex tend to favour the inclusion of CCK-GABA cells more than networks in the primary cortex. The intersectional genetic labelling approach employed in the current study expands upon the ability to study molecularly defined subsets of GABAergic neurons. This technique can be applied to the investigation of neuropathologies which involve disruptions to the GABAergic system, including schizophrenia, stress, maternal immune activation and autism.

  17. Doublecortin-expressing cells persist in the associative cerebral cortex and amygdala in aged nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-mei Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel population of cells that express typical immature neuronal markers including doublecortin (DCX+ has been recently identified throughout the adult cerebral cortex of relatively large mammals (guinea pig, rabbit, cat, monkey and human. These cells are more common in the associative relative to primary cortical areas and appear to develop into interneurons including type II nitrinergic neurons. Here we further describe these cells in the cerebral cortex and amygdala, in comparison with DCX+ cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, in 3 age groups of rhesus monkeys: young adult (12.3±0.2 yrs, n=3, mid-age (21.2±1.9 yrs, n=3 and aged (31.3±1.8 yrs, n=4. DCX+ cells with a heterogeneous morphology persisted in layers II/III primarily over the associative cortex and amygdala in all groups (including in two old animals with cerebral amyloid pathology, showing a parallel decline in cell density with age across regions. In contrast to the cortex and amygdala, DCX+ cells in the subgranular zone diminished in the mid-age and aged groups. DCX+ cortical cells might arrange as long tangential migratory chains in the mid-age and aged animals, with apparently distorted cell clusters seen in the aged group. Cortical DCX+ cells colocalized commonly with polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM and partially with neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, suggesting a potential differentiation of these cells into interneuron phenotype. These data suggest a life-long role for immature interneuron-like cells in the associative cerebral cortex and amygdala in nonhuman primates.

  18. Dynamic distribution and stem cell characteristics of Sox1-expressing cells in the cerebellar cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joelle Alcock; Virginie Sottile

    2009-01-01

    Bergmann glia cells are a discrete radial glia population surrounding Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex. Al-though Bergmann glia are essential for the development and correct arborization of Purkinje cells, little is known about the regulation of this cell population after the developmental phase. In an effort to characterize this population at the molecular level, we have analyzed marker expression and established that adult Bergmann glia express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a feature otherwise associated with neural stem cells (NSCs). In the present study, we have further analyzed the developmental pattern of Soxl-expressing cells in the developing cerebellum. We report that before be-coming restricted to the Purkinje cell layer, Soxl-positive cells are present throughout the immature tissue, and that these cells show characteristics of Bergmann glia progenitors. Our study shows that these progenitors express Soxl, Sox2 and Sox9, a signature maintained throughout cerebellar maturation into adulthood. When isolated in culture, the Soxl-expressing cerebellar population exhibited neurosphere-forming ability, NSC-marker characteristics, and demonstrated multipotency at the clonal level. Our results show that the Bergmann glia population expresses Soxl during cerebellar development, and that these cells can be isolated and show stem cell characteristics in vitro, sug-gesting that they could hold a broader potential than previously thought.

  19. Cell biology: More than skin deep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    In studying how stem cells make and maintain tissues, nearly every chapter of a cell biology textbook is of interest. The field even allows us to venture where no chapters have yet been written. In studying this basic problem, we are continually bombarded by nature’s surprises and challenges. PMID:26056136

  20. Culture and Identification of Monoclonal Neural Stem Cells Derived from Cerebral Cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Kaixiong; CHEN Jingbo; WANG Guobin; SHU Xiaogang

    2006-01-01

    To isolate and culture the purified monoclonal neural stem cells from the cerebral cortex of new born mice, new-born mice cerebral cortex was isolated and dissociated to single-cell suspension by mechanical trituration. The dissociated single cells were cultured in serum-free medium. After the formation of neurospheres, single-cell clone culture was performed by limiting dilution and the proliferated single-cell clones were harvested for subculture. Immunocytochemistry was used to detect the specific marker of neuroepithelial stem cells (Nestin) of the primary and monoclonal neurospheres. In the differentiated cells we detected the specific antigen of NF-200 and GFAP. Our results showed that the primary neurospheres expressed Nestin antigen positively. By limiting dilution, we cultured the cell lines from single-cell clone and the monoclonal neurospheres expressed Nestin and had capabilities of self-renewal, proliferation and the potentiality of differentiation into neurons and glial cells. It is concluded that monoclonal neural stem cells which have the ability of proliferation and multi-directional differentiation can be isolated and cultured from the cerebral cortex of new-born mice by limiting dilution.

  1. Molecular networks linked by Moesin drive remodeling of the cell cortex during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Decelle, Barbara; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Dorn, Jonas F.; Payrastre, Bernard; Payre, François; Carreno, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The cortical mechanisms that drive the series of mitotic cell shape transformations remain elusive. In this paper, we identify two novel networks that collectively control the dynamic reorganization of the mitotic cortex. We demonstrate that Moesin, an actin/membrane linker, integrates these two networks to synergize the cortical forces that drive mitotic cell shape transformations. We find that the Pp1-87B phosphatase restricts high Moesin activity to early mitosis and down-regulates Moesin at the polar cortex, after anaphase onset. Overactivation of Moesin at the polar cortex impairs cell elongation and thus cytokinesis, whereas a transient recruitment of Moesin is required to retract polar blebs that allow cortical relaxation and dissipation of intracellular pressure. This fine balance of Moesin activity is further adjusted by Skittles and Pten, two enzymes that locally produce phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and thereby, regulate Moesin cortical association. These complementary pathways provide a spatiotemporal framework to explain how the cell cortex is remodeled throughout cell division. PMID:21969469

  2. Collective dynamics of actomyosin cortex endow cells with intrinsic mechanosensing properties

    CERN Document Server

    Étienne, Jocelyn; Fouchard, Jonathan; Bufi, Nathalie; Durand-Smet, Pauline; Asnacios, Atef

    2014-01-01

    Living cells adapt and respond actively to the mechanical properties of their environment. In addition to biochemical mechanotransduction, evidence exists for a myosin-dependent, purely mechanical sensitivity to the stiffness of the surroundings at the scale of the whole cell. Using a minimal model of the dynamics of actomyosin cortex, we show that the interplay of myosin power strokes with the rapidly remodelling actin network results in a regulation of force and cell shape that adapts to the stiffness of the environment. Instantaneous changes of the environment stiffness are found to trigger an intrinsic mechanical response of the actomyosin cortex. Cortical retrograde flow resulting from actin polymerisation at the edges is shown to be modulated by the stress resulting from myosin contractility, which in turn regulates the cell size in a force-dependent manner. The model describes the maximum force that cells can exert and the maximum speed at which they can contract, which are measured experimentally. The...

  3. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX)-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempin, Friederike; Kronenberg, Golo; Cheung, Giselle; Kettenmann, Helmut; Kempermann, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex) sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise), also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  4. Cell types, circuits, and receptive fields in the mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niell, Cristopher M

    2015-07-08

    Over the past decade, the mouse has emerged as an important model system for studying cortical function, owing to the advent of powerful tools that can record and manipulate neural activity in intact neural circuits. This advance has been particularly prominent in the visual cortex, where studies in the mouse have begun to bridge the gap between cortical structure and function, allowing investigators to determine the circuits that underlie specific visual computations. This review describes the advances in our understanding of the mouse visual cortex, including neural coding, the role of different cell types, and links between vision and behavior, and discusses how recent findings and new approaches can guide future studies.

  5. Intrinsic electrophysiological properties of entorhinal cortex stellate cells and their contribution to grid cell firing fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh ePastoll

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC is an increasingly important focus for investigation of mechanisms for spatial representation. Grid cells found in layer II of the MEC are likely to be stellate cells, which form a major projection to the dentate gyrus. Entorhinal stellate cells are distinguished by distinct intrinsic electrophysiological properties, but how these properties contribute to representation of space is not yet clear. Here, we review the ionic conductances, synaptic and excitable properties of stellate cells, and examine their implications for models of grid firing fields. We discuss why existing data are inconsistent with models of grid fields that require stellate cells to generate periodic oscillations. An alternative possibility is that the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of stellate cells are tuned specifically to control integration of synaptic input. We highlight recent evidence that the dorsal-ventral organization of synaptic integration by stellate cells, through differences in currents mediated by HCN and leak potassium channels, influences the corresponding organization of grid fields. Because accurate cellular data will be important for distinguishing mechanisms for generation of grid fields, we introduce new data comparing properties measured with whole-cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings. We find that clustered patterns of action potential firing and the action potential after-hyperpolarization are particularly sensitive to recording condition. Nevertheless, with both methods, these properties, resting membrane properties and resonance follow a dorsal ventral organization. Further investigation of the molecular basis for synaptic integration by stellate cells will be important for understanding mechanisms for generation of grid fields.

  6. Mouse embryos and chimera cloned from neural cells in the postnatal cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Hatsune; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Hamada, Shun; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Osada, Tomoharu; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Cloning of mice has been achieved by transferring nuclei of various types of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. However, all attempts to produce live cloned offspring using the nuclei of neurons from adult cerebral cortex have failed. Previously we obtained cloned mice using the nuclei of neural cells collected from fetal cerebral cortex. Here, we attempted to generate cloned mice using differentiated neurons from the cerebral cortex of postnatal (day 0-4) mice. Although we were unable to obtain live cloned pups, many fetuses reached day 10.5 days of development. These fetuses showed various abnormalities such as spherical omission of the neuroepithelium, collapsed lumen of neural tube, and aberrant expressions of marker proteins of neurons. We produced chimeric mice in which some hair cells and kidney cells were originated from differentiated neurons. In chimeric fetuses, LacZ-positive donor cells were in all three germ cell layers. However, chimeras with large contribution of donor-derived cells were not obtained. These results indicate that nuclei of differentiated neurons have lost their developmental totipotency. In other words, the conventional nuclear transfer technique does not allow nuclei of differentiated neurons to undergo complete genomic reprogramming required for normal embryonic development.

  7. Localization of Sonic hedgehog secreting and receiving cells in the developing and adult rat adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasti, Leonardo; Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed; King, Peter

    2011-04-10

    Sonic hedgehog signaling was recently demonstrated to play an important role in murine adrenal cortex development. The organization of the rat adrenal differs from that of the mouse, with the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata separated by an undifferentiated zone in the rat, but not in the mouse. In the present study we aimed to determine the mRNA expression patterns of Sonic hedgehog and the hedgehog signaling pathway components Patched-1 and Gli1 in the developing and adult rat adrenal. Sonic hedgehog expression was detected at the periphery of the cortex in cells lacking CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 expression, while signal-receiving cells were localized in the overlying capsule mesenchyme. Using combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that the cells expressing Sonic hedgehog lie between the CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 layers, and thus Sonic hedgehog expression defines one cell population of the undifferentiated zone.

  8. Identification and characterization of inward K ~+-channels in plasma membranes of Arabidopsis root cortex cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于川江; 武维华

    1999-01-01

    Patch clamping whole-cell reeording techniques were apphed to study the inward K+ channels in Arabidopsis root cortex cells. The inward K+-channels in the plasma membranes of the root cortex cell protoplasts were activated by hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The channels were highly selective tor K+ ions over Na+ ions. The channel activity was significantly inbibited by the external TEA(?) or Ba(?) The changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations did not affect the whole-cell inward K+-currents. The possible asso(?)ation betw(?)en the channel selectivity to K+ and Na(?) ions and plant salt-tolerance was also discussed.

  9. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  10. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  11. Medial Entorhinal Cortex Lesions Only Partially Disrupt Hippocampal Place Cells and Hippocampus-Dependent Place Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jena B. Hales

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex provides the primary cortical projections to the hippocampus, a brain structure critical for memory. However, it remains unclear how the precise firing patterns of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC cells influence hippocampal physiology and hippocampus-dependent behavior. We found that complete bilateral lesions of the MEC resulted in a lower proportion of active hippocampal cells. The remaining active cells had place fields, but with decreased spatial precision and decreased long-term spatial stability. In addition, MEC rats were as impaired in the water maze as hippocampus rats, while rats with combined MEC and hippocampal lesions had an even greater deficit. However, MEC rats were not impaired on other hippocampus-dependent tasks, including those in which an object location or context was remembered. Thus, the MEC is not necessary for all types of spatial coding or for all types of hippocampus-dependent memory, but it is necessary for the normal acquisition of place memory.

  12. Diversity and complexity of roles of granule cells in the cerebellar cortex. Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2012-03-01

    The cerebellar granule cell, the most numerous neurons in the brain, forms the main excitatory neuron of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. Granule cells are synaptically connected with both mossy fibers and Golgi cells inside specialized structures called glomeruli, and thereby, they are subject to both feed-forward and feed-back inhibition. Their unique architecture with about four dendrites and a single axon ascending in the cerebellar cortex to bifurcate into two parallel fibers making synapses with Purkinje neurons has attracted numerous scientists. Recent advances show that they are much more than just relays of mossy fibers. They perform diverse and complex transformations in the spatiotemporal domain. This special issue highlights novel avenues in our understanding of the roles of this key neuronal population of the cerebellar cortex, ranging from developmental up to physiological and pathological points of view.

  13. Analogues of simple and complex cells in rhesus monkey auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Biao; Kuśmierek, Paweł; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2013-05-01

    Receptive fields (RFs) of neurons in primary visual cortex have traditionally been subdivided into two major classes: "simple" and "complex" cells. Simple cells were originally defined by the existence of segregated subregions within their RF that respond to either the on- or offset of a light bar and by spatial summation within each of these regions, whereas complex cells had ON and OFF regions that were coextensive in space [Hubel DH, et al. (1962) J Physiol 160:106-154]. Although other definitions based on the linearity of response modulation have been proposed later [Movshon JA, et al. (1978) J Physiol 283:53-77; Skottun BC, et al. (1991) Vision Res 31(7-8):1079-1086], the segregation of ON and OFF subregions has remained an important criterion for the distinction between simple and complex cells. Here we report that response profiles of neurons in primary auditory cortex of monkeys show a similar distinction: one group of cells has segregated ON and OFF subregions in frequency space; and another group shows ON and OFF responses within largely overlapping response profiles. This observation is intriguing for two reasons: (i) spectrotemporal dissociation in the auditory domain provides a basic neural mechanism for the segregation of sounds, a fundamental prerequisite for auditory figure-ground discrimination; and (ii) the existence of similar types of RF organization in visual and auditory cortex would support the existence of a common canonical processing algorithm within cortical columns.

  14. Control of directed cell migration in vivo by membrane-to-cortex attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Diz-Muñoz

    Full Text Available Cell shape and motility are primarily controlled by cellular mechanics. The attachment of the plasma membrane to the underlying actomyosin cortex has been proposed to be important for cellular processes involving membrane deformation. However, little is known about the actual function of membrane-to-cortex attachment (MCA in cell protrusion formation and migration, in particular in the context of the developing embryo. Here, we use a multidisciplinary approach to study MCA in zebrafish mesoderm and endoderm (mesendoderm germ layer progenitor cells, which migrate using a combination of different protrusion types, namely, lamellipodia, filopodia, and blebs, during zebrafish gastrulation. By interfering with the activity of molecules linking the cortex to the membrane and measuring resulting changes in MCA by atomic force microscopy, we show that reducing MCA in mesendoderm progenitors increases the proportion of cellular blebs and reduces the directionality of cell migration. We propose that MCA is a key parameter controlling the relative proportions of different cell protrusion types in mesendoderm progenitors, and thus is key in controlling directed migration during gastrulation.

  15. Control of directed cell migration in vivo by membrane-to-cortex attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Krieg, Michael; Bergert, Martin; Ibarlucea-Benitez, Itziar; Muller, Daniel J; Paluch, Ewa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-11-30

    Cell shape and motility are primarily controlled by cellular mechanics. The attachment of the plasma membrane to the underlying actomyosin cortex has been proposed to be important for cellular processes involving membrane deformation. However, little is known about the actual function of membrane-to-cortex attachment (MCA) in cell protrusion formation and migration, in particular in the context of the developing embryo. Here, we use a multidisciplinary approach to study MCA in zebrafish mesoderm and endoderm (mesendoderm) germ layer progenitor cells, which migrate using a combination of different protrusion types, namely, lamellipodia, filopodia, and blebs, during zebrafish gastrulation. By interfering with the activity of molecules linking the cortex to the membrane and measuring resulting changes in MCA by atomic force microscopy, we show that reducing MCA in mesendoderm progenitors increases the proportion of cellular blebs and reduces the directionality of cell migration. We propose that MCA is a key parameter controlling the relative proportions of different cell protrusion types in mesendoderm progenitors, and thus is key in controlling directed migration during gastrulation.

  16. Severe cell reduction in the future brain cortex in human growth-restricted fetuses and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Grethe B; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bogdanović, Nenad;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that the total number of cells in the cortical part of the cerebral wall is the same in intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) fetuses, compared with normally grown fetuses. STUDY DESIGN: The total cell number in the cerebral wall...... with controls. The daily increase in brain cells in the future cortex was only half of that of the controls. In the 3 other developmental zones, no significant differences in cell numbers could be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: IUGR in humans is associated with a severe reduction in cortical growth...

  17. Spatial phase sensitivity of complex cells in primary visual cortex depends on stimulus contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffin, H; Hietanen, M A; Cloherty, S L; Ibbotson, M R

    2015-12-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex are classified as simple, which are phase sensitive, or complex, which are significantly less phase sensitive. Previously, we have used drifting gratings to show that the phase sensitivity of complex cells increases at low contrast and after contrast adaptation while that of simple cells remains the same at all contrasts (Cloherty SL, Ibbotson MR. J Neurophysiol 113: 434-444, 2015; Crowder NA, van Kleef J, Dreher B, Ibbotson MR. J Neurophysiol 98: 1155-1166, 2007; van Kleef JP, Cloherty SL, Ibbotson MR. J Physiol 588: 3457-3470, 2010). However, drifting gratings confound the influence of spatial and temporal summation, so here we have stimulated complex cells with gratings that are spatially stationary but continuously reverse the polarity of the contrast over time (contrast-reversing gratings). By varying the spatial phase and contrast of the gratings we aimed to establish whether the contrast-dependent phase sensitivity of complex cells results from changes in spatial or temporal processing or both. We found that most of the increase in phase sensitivity at low contrasts could be attributed to changes in the spatial phase sensitivities of complex cells. However, at low contrasts the complex cells did not develop the spatiotemporal response characteristics of simple cells, in which paired response peaks occur 180° out of phase in time and space. Complex cells that increased their spatial phase sensitivity at low contrasts were significantly overrepresented in the supragranular layers of cortex. We conclude that complex cells in supragranular layers of cat cortex have dynamic spatial summation properties and that the mechanisms underlying complex cell receptive fields differ between cortical layers.

  18. Stage-specific requirement for cyclin D1 in glial progenitor cells of the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobs, Lionel; Baranek, Constanze; Nestel, Sigrun; Kulik, Akos; Kapfhammer, Josef; Nitsch, Cordula; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2014-05-01

    Despite the vast abundance of glial progenitor cells in the mouse brain parenchyma, little is known about the molecular mechanisms driving their proliferation in the adult. Here we unravel a critical role of the G1 cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in controlling cell division of glial cells in the cortical grey matter. We detect cyclin D1 expression in Olig2-immunopositive (Olig2+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, as well as in Iba1+ microglia and S100β+ astrocytes in cortices of 3-month-old mice. Analysis of cyclin D1-deficient mice reveals a cell and stage-specific molecular control of cell cycle progression in the various glial lineages. While proliferation of fast dividing Olig2+ cells at early postnatal stages becomes gradually dependent on cyclin D1, this particular G1 regulator is strictly required for the slow divisions of Olig2+/NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors in the adult cerebral cortex. Further, we find that the population of mature oligodendrocytes is markedly reduced in the absence of cyclin D1, leading to a significant decrease in the number of myelinated axons in both the prefrontal cortex and the corpus callosum of 8-month-old mutant mice. In contrast, the pool of Iba1+ cells is diminished already at postnatal day 3 in the absence of cyclin D1, while the number of S100β+ astrocytes remains unchanged in the mutant.

  19. Single-Cell Phenotype Classification Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Oliver; Sick, Beate

    2016-10-01

    Deep learning methods are currently outperforming traditional state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms in diverse applications and recently even surpassed human performance in object recognition. Here we demonstrate the potential of deep learning methods to high-content screening-based phenotype classification. We trained a deep learning classifier in the form of convolutional neural networks with approximately 40,000 publicly available single-cell images from samples treated with compounds from four classes known to lead to different phenotypes. The input data consisted of multichannel images. The construction of appropriate feature definitions was part of the training and carried out by the convolutional network, without the need for expert knowledge or handcrafted features. We compare our results against the recent state-of-the-art pipeline in which predefined features are extracted from each cell using specialized software and then fed into various machine learning algorithms (support vector machine, Fisher linear discriminant, random forest) for classification. The performance of all classification approaches is evaluated on an untouched test image set with known phenotype classes. Compared to the best reference machine learning algorithm, the misclassification rate is reduced from 8.9% to 6.6%.

  20. Neurochemical phenotype of Reelin immunoreactive cells in the Piriform cortex layer II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector eCarceller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTReelin, a glycoprotein expressed by Cajal-Retzius neurons throughout the marginal layer of developing neocortex, has been extensively shown to play an important role during brain development, guiding neuronal migration and detachment from radial glia. During the adult life, however, many studies have associated Reelin expression to enhanced neuronal plasticity. Although its mechanism of action in the adult brain remains mostly unknown, Reelin is expressed mainly by a subset of mature interneurons. Here, we confirm the described phenotype of this subpopulation in the adult neocortex. We show that these mature interneurons, although being in close proximity, lack PSA-NCAM expression, a molecule expressed by a subpopulation of mature interneurons, related to brain development and involved in neuronal plasticity of the adult brain as well. However, in the layer II of Piriform cortex there is a high density of cells expressing Reelin whose neurochemical phenotype and connectivity has not been described before. Interestingly, in close proximity to these Reelin expressing cells there is a numerous subpopulation of immature neurons expressing PSA-NCAM and DCX in this layer of the Piriform cortex. Here we show that Reelin cells express the neuronal marker NeuN, but however the majority of neurons lack markers of mature excitatory or inhibitory neurons. A detail analysis of its morphology indicates these that some of these cells might correspond to semilunar neurons. Interestingly, we found that the majority of these cells express TBR-1 a transcription factor found not only in post-mitotic neurons that differentiate to glutamatergic excitatory neurons but also in Cajal-Retzius cells. We suggest that the function of these Reelin expressing cells might be similar to that of the Cajal-Retzius cells during development, having a role in the maintenance of the immature phenotype of the PSA-NCAM/DCX neurons through its receptors ApoER2 and VLDL in the

  1. The abrupt development of adult-like grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Thomas J; Barry, Caswell; Cacucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the development of the neural circuits subserving specific cognitive functions such as navigation remains a central problem in neuroscience. Here, we characterize the development of grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex, which, by nature of their regularly spaced firing fields, are thought to provide a distance metric to the hippocampal neural representation of space. Grid cells emerge at the time of weaning in the rat, at around 3 weeks of age. We investigated whether grid cells in young rats are functionally equivalent to those observed in the adult as soon as they appear, or if instead they follow a gradual developmental trajectory. We find that, from the very youngest ages at which reproducible grid firing is observed (postnatal day 19): grid cells display adult-like firing fields that tessellate to form a coherent map of the local environment; that this map is universal, maintaining its internal structure across different environments; and that grid cells in young rats, as in adults, also encode a representation of direction and speed. To further investigate the developmental processes leading up to the appearance of grid cells, we present data from individual medial entorhinal cortex cells recorded across more than 1 day, spanning the period before and after the grid firing pattern emerged. We find that increasing spatial stability of firing was correlated with increasing gridness.

  2. Investigating the function of deep cortical and subcortical structures using stereotactic electroencephalography: lessons from the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Robert A; Ratneswaren, Tarini; Smith, Elliot H; Russo, Jennifer F; Jongeling, Amy C; Bateman, Lisa M; Schevon, Catherine A; Feldstein, Neil A; McKhann, Guy M; Sheth, Sameer

    2015-04-15

    Stereotactic Electroencephalography (SEEG) is a technique used to localize seizure foci in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. This procedure involves the chronic placement of multiple depth electrodes into regions of the brain typically inaccessible via subdural grid electrode placement. SEEG thus provides a unique opportunity to investigate brain function. In this paper we demonstrate how SEEG can be used to investigate the role of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in cognitive control. We include a description of the SEEG procedure, demonstrating the surgical placement of the electrodes. We describe the components and process required to record local field potential (LFP) data from consenting subjects while they are engaged in a behavioral task. In the example provided, subjects play a cognitive interference task, and we demonstrate how signals are recorded and analyzed from electrodes in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, an area intimately involved in decision-making. We conclude with further suggestions of ways in which this method can be used for investigating human cognitive processes.

  3. Pyramidal Cells in Prefrontal Cortex of Primates: Marked Differences in Neuronal Structure Among Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; Manger, Paul R.; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The most ubiquitous neuron in the cerebral cortex, the pyramidal cell, is characterized by markedly different dendritic structure among different cortical areas. The complex pyramidal cell phenotype in granular prefrontal cortex (gPFC) of higher primates endows specific biophysical properties and patterns of connectivity, which differ from those in other cortical regions. However, within the gPFC, data have been sampled from only a select few cortical areas. The gPFC of species such as human and macaque monkey includes more than 10 cortical areas. It remains unknown as to what degree pyramidal cell structure may vary among these cortical areas. Here we undertook a survey of pyramidal cells in the dorsolateral, medial, and orbital gPFC of cercopithecid primates. We found marked heterogeneity in pyramidal cell structure within and between these regions. Moreover, trends for gradients in neuronal complexity varied among species. As the structure of neurons determines their computational abilities, memory storage capacity and connectivity, we propose that these specializations in the pyramidal cell phenotype are an important determinant of species-specific executive cortical functions in primates. PMID:21347276

  4. Does cell lineage in the developing cerebral cortex contribute to its columnar organization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos R Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneer work of Lorente de Nó, Ramón y Cajal, Brodmann, Mountcastle, Hubel and Wiesel and others, the cerebral cortex has been seen as a jigsaw of anatomic and functional modules involved in the processing of different sets of information. In fact, a columnar distribution of neurons displaying similar functional properties throughout the cerebral cortex has been observed by many researchers. Although it has been suggested that much of the anatomical substrate for such organization would be already specified at early developmental stages, before activity-dependent mechanisms could take place, it is still unclear whether gene expression in the ventricular zone could play a role in the development of discrete functional units, such as minicolumns or columns. Cell lineage experiments using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have shown that the progeny of a single neuroepithelial/radial glial cell in the dorsal telencephalon is organized into discrete radial clusters of sibling excitatory neurons, which have a higher propensity for developing chemical synapses with each other rather than with neighbouring non-siblings. Here, we will discuss the possibility that the cell lineage of single neuroepithelial/radial glia cells could contribute for the columnar organization of the neocortex by generating radial columns of sibling, interconnected neurons. Borrowing some concepts from the studies on cell-cell recognition and transcription factor networks, we will also touch upon the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment of sibling-neuron circuits.

  5. Neural progenitor cells orchestrate microglia migration and positioning into the developing cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnò, Benedetta; Grassivaro, Francesca; Rossi, Chiara; Bergamaschi, Andrea; Castiglioni, Valentina; Furlan, Roberto; Greter, Melanie; Favaro, Rebecca; Comi, Giancarlo; Becher, Burkhard; Martino, Gianvito; Muzio, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are observed in the early developing forebrain and contribute to the regulation of neurogenesis through still unravelled mechanisms. In the developing cerebral cortex, microglia cluster in the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ), a region containing Cxcl12-expressing basal progenitors (BPs). Here we show that the ablation of BP as well as genetic loss of Cxcl12 affect microglia recruitment into the SVZ. Ectopic Cxcl12 expression or pharmacological blockage of CxcR4 further supports that Cxcl12/CxcR4 signalling is involved in microglial recruitment during cortical development. Furthermore, we found that cell death in the developing forebrain triggers microglial proliferation and that this is mediated by the release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Finally, we show that the depletion of microglia in mice lacking receptor for colony-stimulating factor-1 (Csf-1R) reduces BPs into the cerebral cortex.

  6. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  7. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Klempin

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise, also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  8. Does Cell Lineage in the Developing Cerebral Cortex Contribute to its Columnar Organization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcos R.; Hedin-Pereira, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneer work of Lorente de Nó, Ramón y Cajal, Brodmann, Mountcastle, Hubel and Wiesel and others, the cerebral cortex has been seen as a jigsaw of anatomic and functional modules involved in the processing of different sets of information. In fact, a columnar distribution of neurons displaying similar functional properties throughout the cerebral cortex has been observed by many researchers. Although it has been suggested that much of the anatomical substrate for such organization would be already specified at early developmental stages, before activity-dependent mechanisms could take place, it is still unclear whether gene expression in the ventricular zone (VZ) could play a role in the development of discrete functional units, such as minicolumns or columns. Cell lineage experiments using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have shown that the progeny of a single neuroepithelial/radial glial cell in the dorsal telencephalon is organized into discrete radial clusters of sibling excitatory neurons, which have a higher propensity for developing chemical synapses with each other rather than with neighboring non-siblings. Here, we will discuss the possibility that the cell lineage of single neuroepithelial/radial glia cells could contribute for the columnar organization of the neocortex by generating radial columns of sibling, interconnected neurons. Borrowing some concepts from the studies on cell–cell recognition and transcription factor networks, we will also touch upon the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment of sibling-neuron circuits. PMID:20676384

  9. Effect of Deep Space Radiation on Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Bennett, Paula; Swider, Cezary R.; Sutherland, Betsy M.; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    Astronaut flight crews on long-term missions in deep space will be exposed to a unique radiation environment as a result of exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). This environment consists predominantly of high energy protons, helium and high charge, high energy (HZE) atomic nuclei from iron predominantly, but all other elements as well. The effect of such particles, alone, or in combination, on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) has not been well studied but is clearly of interest since blood forming cells are known to be sensitive to radiation, and irreversible damage to these cells could quickly compromise a mission due to loss of marrow function. To better understand the effects of GCR and SPE on human stem/progenitor cell function, we have exposed partially purified CD34+ normal human marrow cells to protons, radioactive Fe, and Ti, alone, and in combination at varying doses up to 70cGy, and down to 1, 2, and 4 particle hits per nucleus. We then examined the effects of these radiations on HSPC function, as assessed by the ability to form CFU-GEMM, and LTCIC colonies in semi-solid culture medium. At the highest doses (50 and 70cGy), all radiation types tested significantly diminished the ability of CD34+ cells to form such colonies. The number of CFU-GEMM in irradiated samples was 70-90

  10. Development and function of human cerebral cortex neural networks from pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Peter; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Peter, Manuel; Momoh, Ayiba; Arambepola, Devika; Robinson, Hugh P C; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-09-15

    A key aspect of nervous system development, including that of the cerebral cortex, is the formation of higher-order neural networks. Developing neural networks undergo several phases with distinct activity patterns in vivo, which are thought to prune and fine-tune network connectivity. We report here that human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cerebral cortex neurons form large-scale networks that reflect those found in the developing cerebral cortex in vivo. Synchronised oscillatory networks develop in a highly stereotyped pattern over several weeks in culture. An initial phase of increasing frequency of oscillations is followed by a phase of decreasing frequency, before giving rise to non-synchronous, ordered activity patterns. hPSC-derived cortical neural networks are excitatory, driven by activation of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, and can undergo NMDA-receptor-mediated plasticity. Investigating single neuron connectivity within PSC-derived cultures, using rabies-based trans-synaptic tracing, we found two broad classes of neuronal connectivity: most neurons have small numbers (40). These data demonstrate that the formation of hPSC-derived cortical networks mimics in vivo cortical network development and function, demonstrating the utility of in vitro systems for mechanistic studies of human forebrain neural network biology. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Neurochemical Phenotype of Reelin Immunoreactive Cells in the Piriform Cortex Layer II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller, Hector; Rovira-Esteban, Laura; Nacher, Juan; Castrén, Eero; Guirado, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Reelin, a glycoprotein expressed by Cajal-Retzius neurons throughout the marginal layer of developing neocortex, has been extensively shown to play an important role during brain development, guiding neuronal migration and detachment from radial glia. During the adult life, however, many studies have associated Reelin expression to enhanced neuronal plasticity. Although its mechanism of action in the adult brain remains mostly unknown, Reelin is expressed mainly by a subset of mature interneurons. Here, we confirm the described phenotype of this subpopulation in the adult neocortex. We show that these mature interneurons, although being in close proximity, lack polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) expression, a molecule expressed by a subpopulation of mature interneurons, related to brain development and involved in neuronal plasticity of the adult brain as well. However, in the layer II of Piriform cortex there is a high density of cells expressing Reelin whose neurochemical phenotype and connectivity has not been described before. Interestingly, in close proximity to these Reelin expressing cells there is a numerous subpopulation of immature neurons expressing PSA-NCAM and doublecortin (DCX) in this layer of the Piriform cortex. Here, we show that Reelin cells express the neuronal marker Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN), but however the majority of neurons lack markers of mature excitatory or inhibitory neurons. A detail analysis of its morphology indicates these that some of these cells might correspond to semilunar neurons. Interestingly, we found that the majority of these cells express T-box brain 1 (TBR-1) a transcription factor found not only in post-mitotic neurons that differentiate to glutamatergic excitatory neurons but also in Cajal-Retzius cells. We suggest that the function of these Reelin expressing cells might be similar to that of the Cajal-Retzius cells during development, having a role in the maintenance of the immature phenotype of the

  12. Effect of Contrast on Visual Spatial Summation in Different Cell Categories in Cat Primary Visual Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Chen

    Full Text Available Multiple cell classes have been found in the primary visual cortex, but the relationship between cell types and spatial summation has seldom been studied. Parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons can be distinguished from pyramidal neurons based on their briefer action potential durations. In this study, we classified V1 cells into fast-spiking units (FSUs and regular-spiking units (RSUs and then examined spatial summation at high and low contrast. Our results revealed that the excitatory classical receptive field and the suppressive non-classical receptive field expanded at low contrast for both FSUs and RSUs, but the expansion was more marked for the RSUs than for the FSUs. For most V1 neurons, surround suppression varied as the contrast changed from high to low. However, FSUs exhibited no significant difference in the strength of suppression between high and low contrast, although the overall suppression decreased significantly at low contrast for the RSUs. Our results suggest that the modulation of spatial summation by stimulus contrast differs across populations of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex.

  13. Parenchymatous cell division characterizes the fungal cortex of some common foliose lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, William B; de Los Ríos, Asunción

    2017-02-01

    Lichen-forming fungi produce diverse vegetative tissues, some closely resembling those of plants. Yet it has been repeatedly affirmed that none is a true parenchyma, in which cellular compartments are subdivided from all adjacent neighbors by cross walls adjoining older cross walls. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we tested this assumption by examining patterns of septum formation in the parenchyma-like cortex of three lichens of different phylogenetic affinities: Sticta canariensis, Leptogium cyanescens, and Endocarpon pusillum. In the cortex of all three lichens, new septa adjoined perpendicularly or obliquely to previous septa. Septal walls possessed an electron-transparent core (median) layer covered on both sides by layers of intermediate electron density. At septal junctures, the core layer of the newer septum was not continuous with that of the older septum. Amorphous, electron-dense material often became deposited in the core region of older septal walls, and the septum gradually delaminated along its median into what could then be recognized as the distinct walls of neighboring cells. However, cells maintained continuity at pores, where adjacent remnants of the electron-transparent core layer suggested septal partition rather than secondary establishment of a lateral wall connection via anastomosis. Although fungal tissues first arise by the coalescence of filaments early in lichen ontogeny, the mature cortical tissues of some lichens are comparable to true parenchyma in the unrestricted orientation of their septal cross walls and the resulting ontogenetic relationship among neighboring cell compartments. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  14. Decellularized Human Kidney Cortex Hydrogels Enhance Kidney Microvascular Endothelial Cell Maturation and Quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Ryan J; Xu, Jin; Luo, Ping; Xue, Jun; Wang, Yi; Kotha, Surya; Zeng, Wen; Fu, Xiaoyun; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Zheng, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The kidney peritubular microvasculature is highly susceptible to injury from drugs and toxins, often resulting in acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease. Little is known about the process of injury and regeneration of human kidney microvasculature, resulting from the lack of appropriate kidney microvascular models that can incorporate the proper cells, extracellular matrices (ECMs), and architectures needed to understand the response and contribution of individual vascular components in these processes. In this study, we present methods to recreate the human kidney ECM (kECM) microenvironment by fabricating kECM hydrogels derived from decellularized human kidney cortex. The majority of native matrix proteins, such as collagen-IV, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and their isoforms were preserved in similar proportions as found in normal kidneys. Human kidney peritubular microvascular endothelial cells (HKMECs) became more quiescent when cultured on this kECM gel compared with culture on collagen-I-assessed using phenotypic, genotypic, and functional assays; whereas human umbilical vein endothelial cells became stimulated on kECM gels. We demonstrate for the first time that human kidney cortex can form a hydrogel suitable for use in flow-directed microphysiological systems. Our findings strongly suggest that selecting the proper ECM is a critical consideration in the development of vascularized organs on a chip and carries important implications for tissue engineering of all vascularized organs.

  15. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, David A; Kudo, Takamasa; Lane, Keara M; Macklin, Derek N; Quach, Nicolas T; DeFelice, Mialy M; Maayan, Inbal; Tanouchi, Yu; Ashley, Euan A; Covert, Markus W

    2016-11-01

    Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  16. Parvalbumin interneurons provide grid cell-driven recurrent inhibition in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetfering, Christina; Allen, Kevin; Monyer, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) generate metric spatial representations. Recent attractor-network models suggest an essential role for GABAergic interneurons in the emergence of the grid-cell firing pattern through recurrent inhibition dependent on grid-cell phase. To test this hypothesis, we studied identified parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+)) interneurons that are the most likely candidate for providing this recurrent inhibition onto grid cells. Using optogenetics and tetrode recordings in mice, we found that PV(+) interneurons exhibited high firing rates, low spatial sparsity and no spatial periodicity. PV(+) interneurons inhibited all functionally defined cell types in the MEC and were in turn recruited preferentially by grid cells. To our surprise, we found that individual PV(+) interneurons received input from grid cells with various phases, which most likely accounts for the broadly tuned spatial firing activity of PV(+) interneurons. Our data argue against the notion that PV(+) interneurons provide phase-dependent recurrent inhibition and challenge recent attractor-network models of grid cells.

  17. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates mode of cell division of early cerebral cortex progenitors and increases astrogliogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geissy LL Araújo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH plays a critical role in the development of different tissues. In the central nervous system, SHH is well known to contribute to the patterning of the spinal cord and separation of the brain hemispheres. In addition, it has recently been shown that SHH signaling also contributes to the patterning of the telencephalon and establishment of adult neurogenic niches. In this work, we investigated whether SHH signaling influences the behavior of neural progenitors isolated from the dorsal telencephalon, which generate excitatory neurons and macroglial cells in vitro. We observed that SHH increases proliferation of cortical progenitors and generation of astrocytes, whereas blocking SHH signaling with cyclopamine has opposite effects. In both cases, generation of neurons did not seem to be affected. However, cell survival was broadly affected by blockade of SHH signaling. SHH effects were related to three different cell phenomena: mode of cell division, cell cycle length and cell growth. Together, our data in vitro demonstrate that SHH signaling controls cell behaviors that are important for proliferation of cerebral cortex progenitors, as well as differentiation and survival of neurons and astroglial cells.

  18. Mother and child T cell receptor repertoires: deep profiling study

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    Ekaterina V Putintseva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between maternal and child immunity has been actively studied in the context of complications during pregnancy, autoimmune diseases, and haploidentical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and solid organs. Here, we have for the first time used high-throughput Illumina HiSeq sequencing to perform deep quantitative profiling of T-cell receptor (TCR repertoires for peripheral blood samples of three mothers and their six children. Advanced technology allowed accurate identification of 5х105–2х106 TCR beta clonotypes per individual. We performed comparative analysis of these TCR repertoires with the aim of revealing characteristic features that distinguish related mother-child pairs, such as relative TRBV segment usage frequency and relative overlap of TCR beta CDR3 repertoires. We show that thymic selection essentially and similarly shapes the initial output of the TCR recombination machinery in both related and unrelated pairs, with minor effect from inherited differences. The achieved depth of TCR profiling also allowed us to test the hypothesis that mature T cells transferred across the placenta during pregnancy can expand and persist as functional microchimeric clones in their new host, using characteristic TCR beta CDR3 variants as clonal identifiers.

  19. Visual response properties of cells in the ventral and dorsal parts of the macaque inferotemporal cortex.

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    Tamura, H; Tanaka, K

    2001-05-01

    We recorded from cells in the anterio-ventral (TEav) and anterio- dorsal (TEad) parts of area TE of the inferotemporal cortex and examined their responses to a set of 100 visual stimuli in awake, fixating monkeys. In both TEav and TEad we found that, depending on the stimulus, the time course of responses varied considerably within individual cells and that there were three main factors in the variation. One factor is variance in the balance between the initial transient part of responses around 130 ms after stimulus onset and the later part after 240 ms from stimulus onset. The later parts of responses were more stimulus selective. The second factor is variance in the latency of response onset and peak and the third is variance in the speed of decay from the peak within the initial part of the responses. Stronger responses had shorter onset and peak latencies and longer decay times. The results suggest that stimulus images can be discriminated very rapidly in TEav and TEad by detecting differences in response onset. TEav cells differed from TEad cells in that they were more difficult to activate than TEad cells: the proportion of responsive TEav cells was smaller, the maximal responses of individual cells were smaller than in TEad and the number of stimuli that evoked significant responses in individual responsive cells was also smaller than in TEad. Moreover, TEav cells, overall, responded more strongly to more colorful object images than less colorful ones, while TEad cells did not show such a tendency. However, the minimum onset latency of individual cells and the sharpness of stimulus selectivity did not differ significantly between TEav and TEad. Responses of TEav cells are as selective as those of TEad cells, although there remains a possibility that the domain of selectivity differs between the two areas. These results support an earlier anatomical finding that TEav and TEad are located at the same hierarchical level of separate serial pathways rather than

  20. Patterns of cell division, cell differentiation and cell elongation in epidermis and cortex of Arabidopsis pedicels in the wild type and in erecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Mark G R; Thompson, Olivia A; Sieger, Matthew T; Shpak, Elena D

    2012-01-01

    Plant organ shape and size are established during growth by a predictable, controlled sequence of cell proliferation, differentiation, and elongation. To understand the regulation and coordination of these processes, we studied the temporal behavior of epidermal and cortex cells in Arabidopsis pedicels and used computational modeling to analyze cell behavior in tissues. Pedicels offer multiple advantages for such a study, as their growth is determinate, mostly one dimensional, and epidermis differentiation is uniform along the proximodistal axis. Three developmental stages were distinguished during pedicel growth: a proliferative stage, a stomata differentiation stage, and a cell elongation stage. Throughout the first two stages pedicel growth is exponential, while during the final stage growth becomes linear and depends on flower fertilization. During the first stage, the average cell cycle duration in the cortex and during symmetric divisions of epidermal cells was constant and cells divided at a fairly specific size. We also examined the mutant of ERECTA, a gene with strong influence on pedicel growth. We demonstrate that during the first two stages of pedicel development ERECTA is important for the rate of cell growth along the proximodistal axis and for cell cycle duration in epidermis and cortex. The second function of ERECTA is to prolong the proliferative phase and inhibit premature cell differentiation in the epidermis. Comparison of epidermis development in the wild type and erecta suggests that differentiation is a synchronized event in which the stomata differentiation and the transition of pavement cells from proliferation to expansion are intimately connected.

  1. Adult Neural Stem Cells from the Subventricular Zone Give Rise to Reactive Astrocytes in the Cortex after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Maryam; Sachewsky, Nadia; Gascón, Sergio; Bang, K W Annie; Morshead, Cindi M; Nagy, Andras

    2015-11-05

    Reactive astrocytes (RAs) have been reported to convert to multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) capable of neurosphere (NS) formation and multilineage differentiation in vitro. Using genetic tagging, we determined that subventricular zone (SVZ) NSCs give rise to NSs derived from the stroke-injured cortex. We demonstrate that these cells can be isolated from the cortex in two different models of stroke and from different stroke-lesioned cortical regions. Interestingly, SVZ NSCs give rise to a subpopulation of RAs in the cortex that contribute to astrogliosis and scar formation. Last, we show that these SVZ derived RAs can be converted to neurons in vivo by forced expression of Ascl1. Identifying the contribution of cells originating from the SVZ to injury repair has implications for neural regeneration strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Noise-induced cell death in the mouse medial geniculate body and primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Dietmar; Tzschentke, Barbara; Ernst, Arne

    Noise-induced effects within the inner ear have been well investigated for several years. However, this peripheral damage cannot fully explain the audiological symptoms in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), e.g. tinnitus, recruitment, reduced speech intelligibility, hyperacusis. There are few reports on central noise effects. Noise can induce an apoptosis of neuronal tissue within the lower auditory pathway. Higher auditory structures (e.g. medial geniculate body, auditory cortex) are characterized by metabolic changes after noise exposure. However, little is known about the microstructural changes of the higher auditory pathway after noise exposure. The present paper was therefore aimed at investigating the cell density in the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the primary auditory cortex (AI) after noise exposure. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun, 10:1). After 1 week, auditory brainstem response recordings (ABR) were performed in noise exposed and normal hearing animals. After fixation, the brain was microdissected and stained (Kluever-Barrera). The cell density in the MGB subdivisions and the AI were determined by counting the cells within a grid. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift over the whole frequency range. Cell density was significantly reduced in all subdivisions of the MGB and in layers IV-VI of AI. The present findings demonstrate a significant noise-induced change of the neuronal cytoarchitecture in central key areas of auditory processing. These changes could contribute to the complex psychoacoustic symptoms after NIHL.

  3. Three counting methods agree on cell and neuron number in chimpanzee primary visual cortex

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    Daniel James Miller

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the cellular composition of specific brain regions is crucial to our understanding of the function of neurobiological systems. It is therefore useful to identify the extent to which different methods agree when estimating the same properties of brain circuitry. In this study, we estimated the number of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the primary visual cortex (area 17 or V1 of both hemispheres from a single chimpanzee. Specifically, we processed samples distributed across V1 of the right hemisphere after cortex was flattened into a sheet using two variations of the isotropic fractionator cell and neuron counting method. We processed the left hemisphere as serial brain slices for stereological investigation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the agreement between these methods in the most direct manner possible by comparing estimates of cell density across one brain region of interest in a single individual. In our hands, these methods produced similar estimates of the total cellular population (approximately 1 billion as well as the number of neurons (approximately 675 million in chimpanzee V1, providing evidence that both techniques estimate the same parameters of interest. In addition, our results indicate the strengths of each distinct tissue preparation procedure, highlighting the importance of attention to anatomical detail. In summary, we found that the isotropic fractionator and the stereological optical fractionator produced concordant estimates of the cellular composition of V1, and that this result supports the conclusion that chimpanzees conform to the primate pattern of exceptionally high packing density in V1. Ultimately, our data suggest that investigators can optimize their experimental approach by using any of these counting methods to obtain reliable cell and neuron counts.

  4. The Neural Mechanism Exploration of Adaptive Motor Control: Dynamical Economic Cell Allocation in the Primary Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Guo, Yangyang; Fan, Jing; Ma, Chaolin; Ma, Xuan; Chen, Xi; He, Jiping

    2017-05-01

    Adaptive flexibility is of significance for the smooth and efficient movements in goal attainment. However, the underlying work mechanism of the cerebral cortex in adaptive motor control still remains unclear. How does the cerebral cortex organize and coordinate the activity of a large population of cells in the implementation of various motor strategies? To explore this issue, single-unit activities from the M1 region and kinematic data were recorded simultaneously in monkeys performing 3D reach-to-grasp tasks with different perturbations. Varying motor control strategies were employed and achieved in different perturbed tasks, via the dynamic allocation of cells to modulate specific movement parameters. An economic principle was proposed for the first time to describe a basic rule for cell allocation in the primary motor cortex. This principle, defined as the Dynamic Economic Cell Allocation Mechanism (DECAM), guarantees benefit maximization in cell allocation under limited neuronal resources, and avoids committing resources to uneconomic investments for unreliable factors with no or little revenue. That is to say, the cells recruited are always preferentially allocated to those factors with reliable return; otherwise, the cells are dispatched to respond to other factors about task. The findings of this study might partially reveal the working mechanisms underlying the role of the cerebral cortex in adaptive motor control, wherein is also of significance for the design of future intelligent brain-machine interfaces and rehabilitation device.

  5. Reduced pCREB in Alzheimer's disease prefrontal cortex is reflected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotti, N; Bennett, D A; Lazarov, O

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has a critical role in the formation of memories. CREB signaling is dysfunctional in the brains of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and evidence suggests that CREB signaling may be disrupted in human AD brains as well. Here, we show that both CREB and its activated form pCREB-Ser133 (pCREB) are reduced in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients. Similarly, the transcription cofactors CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are reduced in the prefrontal cortex of AD patients, indicating additional dysfunction of CREB signaling in AD. Importantly, we show that pCREB expression is reduced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of AD subjects. In addition, pCREB levels in PBMC positively correlated with pCREB expression in the postmortem brain of persons with AD. These results suggest that pCREB expression in PBMC may be indicative of its expression in the brain, and thus offers the intriguing possibility of pCREB as a biomarker of cognitive function and disease progression in AD. PMID:27480489

  6. Turtle Dorsal Cortex Pyramidal Neurons Comprise Two Distinct Cell Types with Indistinguishable Visual Responses.

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    Thomas Crockett

    Full Text Available A detailed inventory of the constituent pieces in cerebral cortex is considered essential to understand the principles underlying cortical signal processing. Specifically, the search for pyramidal neuron subtypes is partly motivated by the hypothesis that a subtype-specific division of labor could create a rich substrate for computation. On the other hand, the extreme integration of individual neurons into the collective cortical circuit promotes the hypothesis that cellular individuality represents a smaller computational role within the context of the larger network. These competing hypotheses raise the important question to what extent the computational function of a neuron is determined by its individual type or by its circuit connections. We created electrophysiological profiles from pyramidal neurons within the sole cellular layer of turtle visual cortex by measuring responses to current injection using whole-cell recordings. A blind clustering algorithm applied to these data revealed the presence of two principle types of pyramidal neurons. Brief diffuse light flashes triggered membrane potential fluctuations in those same cortical neurons. The apparently network driven variability of the visual responses concealed the existence of subtypes. In conclusion, our results support the notion that the importance of diverse intrinsic physiological properties is minimized when neurons are embedded in a synaptic recurrent network.

  7. Pine pollen inhibits cell apoptosis-related protein expression in the cerebral cortex of mice with arsenic poisoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong Luo; Yaodong Wei; Taizhong Wang; Dongzhu Chen; Tiansheng Lu; Ruibo Wu; Keke Si

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that pine pollen can inhibit cerebral cortical cell apoptosis in mice with arsenic poisoning. The present study sought to detect the influence of pine pollen on apoptosis-related proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assays were used to measure the levels of apoptosis-related proteins in the cerebral cortex of mice with arsenic poisoning. Results indicated that pine pollen suppressed cell apoptosis in the cerebral cortex of arsenic-poisoned mice by reducing Bax, Bcl-2 protein expression and increasing p53 protein expression.

  8. Pyramidal cells make specific connections onto smooth (GABAergic neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Bopp

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of neocortical circuits is the predominance of recurrent excitation between pyramidal neurons, which is balanced by recurrent inhibition from smooth GABAergic neurons. It has been previously described that in layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex (V1 of cat and monkey, pyramidal cells filled with horseradish peroxidase connect approximately in proportion to the spiny (excitatory, 95% and 81%, respectively and smooth (GABAergic, 5% and 19%, respectively dendrites found in the neuropil. By contrast, a recent ultrastructural study of V1 in a single mouse found that smooth neurons formed 51% of the targets of the superficial layer pyramidal cells. This suggests that either the neuropil of this particular mouse V1 had a dramatically different composition to that of V1 in cat and monkey, or that smooth neurons were specifically targeted by the pyramidal cells in that mouse. We tested these hypotheses by examining similar cells filled with biocytin in a sample of five mice. We found that the average composition of the neuropil in V1 of these mice was similar to that described for cat and monkey V1, but that the superficial layer pyramidal cells do form proportionately more synapses with smooth dendrites than the equivalent neurons in cat or monkey. These distributions may underlie the distinct differences in functional architecture of V1 between rodent and higher mammals.

  9. Single-cell methylomes identify neuronal subtypes and regulatory elements in mammalian cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chongyuan; Keown, Christopher L; Kurihara, Laurie; Zhou, Jingtian; He, Yupeng; Li, Junhao; Castanon, Rosa; Lucero, Jacinta; Nery, Joseph R; Sandoval, Justin P; Bui, Brian; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Harkins, Timothy T; Mukamel, Eran A; Behrens, M Margarita; Ecker, Joseph R

    2017-08-11

    The mammalian brain contains diverse neuronal types, yet we lack single-cell epigenomic assays that are able to identify and characterize them. DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic mark that distinguishes cell types and marks regulatory elements. We generated >6000 methylomes from single neuronal nuclei and used them to identify 16 mouse and 21 human neuronal subpopulations in the frontal cortex. CG and non-CG methylation exhibited cell type-specific distributions, and we identified regulatory elements with differential methylation across neuron types. Methylation signatures identified a layer 6 excitatory neuron subtype and a unique human parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neuron subtype. We observed stronger cross-species conservation of regulatory elements in inhibitory neurons than in excitatory neurons. Single-nucleus methylomes expand the atlas of brain cell types and identify regulatory elements that drive conserved brain cell diversity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Toluene decreases Purkinje cell output by enhancing inhibitory synaptic transmission in the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmaz, Jimmie M; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-02-07

    Toluene belongs to a class of psychoactive drugs known as inhalants. Found in common household products such as adhesives, paint products, and aerosols, toluene is inhaled for its intoxicating and euphoric properties. Additionally, exposure to toluene disrupts motor behaviors in a manner consistent with impairments to cerebellar function. Previous work has suggested a role of GABA in mediating toluene's neurobehavioral effects, but how this manifests in the cerebellar cortex is not yet understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of toluene on cerebellar Purkinje cell action potential output and inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells using patch clamp electrophysiology in acute rat cerebellar slices. Toluene (1mM) reduced the frequency of Purkinje cell action potential output without affecting input resistance. Furthermore, toluene dose-dependently enhanced inhibitory synaptic transmission onto Purkinje cells, increasing the amplitude and frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents; no change in the frequency of action potentials from molecular layer interneurons was noted. The observed decreases in Purkinje cell action potential output could contribute to toluene-evoked impairments in cerebellar and motor functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Time‐invariant feed‐forward inhibition of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Antonin; de Solages, Camille; Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, German; Hakim, Vincent; Léna, Clément

    2016-01-01

    Key points We performed extracellular recording of pairs of interneuron–Purkinje cells in vivo.A single interneuron produces a substantial, short‐lasting, inhibition of Purkinje cells.Feed‐forward inhibition is associated with characteristic asymmetric cross‐correlograms. In vivo, Purkinje cell spikes only depend on the most recent synaptic activity. Abstract Cerebellar molecular layer interneurons are considered to control the firing rate and spike timing of Purkinje cells. However, interactions between these cell types are largely unexplored in vivo. Using tetrodes, we performed simultaneous extracellular recordings of neighbouring Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons, presumably basket cells, in adult rats in vivo. The high levels of afferent synaptic activity encountered in vivo yield irregular spiking and reveal discharge patterns characteristic of feed‐forward inhibition, thus suggesting an overlap of the afferent excitatory inputs between Purkinje cells and basket cells. Under conditions of intense background synaptic inputs, interneuron spikes exert a short‐lasting inhibitory effect, delaying the following Purkinje cell spike by an amount remarkably independent of the Purkinje cell firing cycle. This effect can be explained by the short memory time of the Purkinje cell potential as a result of the intense incoming synaptic activity. Finally, we found little evidence for any involvement of the interneurons that we recorded with the cerebellar high‐frequency oscillations promoting Purkinje cell synchrony. The rapid interactions between interneurons and Purkinje cells might be of particular importance in fine motor control because the inhibitory action of interneurons on Purkinje cells leads to deep cerebellar nuclear disinhibition and hence increased cerebellar output. PMID:26918702

  12. Deep Learning Automates the Quantitative Analysis of Individual Cells in Live-Cell Imaging Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Van Valen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Live-cell imaging has opened an exciting window into the role cellular heterogeneity plays in dynamic, living systems. A major critical challenge for this class of experiments is the problem of image segmentation, or determining which parts of a microscope image correspond to which individual cells. Current approaches require many hours of manual curation and depend on approaches that are difficult to share between labs. They are also unable to robustly segment the cytoplasms of mammalian cells. Here, we show that deep convolutional neural networks, a supervised machine learning method, can solve this challenge for multiple cell types across the domains of life. We demonstrate that this approach can robustly segment fluorescent images of cell nuclei as well as phase images of the cytoplasms of individual bacterial and mammalian cells from phase contrast images without the need for a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker. These networks also enable the simultaneous segmentation and identification of different mammalian cell types grown in co-culture. A quantitative comparison with prior methods demonstrates that convolutional neural networks have improved accuracy and lead to a significant reduction in curation time. We relay our experience in designing and optimizing deep convolutional neural networks for this task and outline several design rules that we found led to robust performance. We conclude that deep convolutional neural networks are an accurate method that require less curation time, are generalizable to a multiplicity of cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, and expand live-cell imaging capabilities to include multi-cell type systems.

  13. Short-term environmental enrichment exposure induces proliferation and maturation of doublecortin-positive cells in the prefrontal cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Fan; Mengqi Zhang; Lei Shang; Ngobe Akume Cynthia; Zhi Li; Zhenyu Yang; Dan Chen; Jufang Huang; Kun Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that doublecortin-positive immature neurons exist pre-dominantly in the superficial layer of the cerebral cortex of adult mammals such as guinea pigs, and these neurons exhibit very weak properties of self-proliferation during adulthood under physiological conditions. To verify whether environmental enrichment has an impact on the proliferation and maturation of these immature neurons in the prefrontal cortex of adult guinea pigs, healthy adult guinea pigs were subjected to short-term environmental enrichment. Animals were allowed to play with various cognitive and physical stimulating objects over a period of 2 weeks, twice per day, for 60 minutes each. Immunolfuorescence staining results indicated that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in layer II of the prefrontal cortex was signiifcantly increased after short-term environmental enrichment exposure. In addition, these doublecortin-positive cells co-expressed 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (a marker of cell prolifera-tion), c-Fos (a marker of cell viability) and NeuN (a marker of mature neurons). Experimental ifndings showed that short-term environmental enrichment can induce proliferation, activation and maturation of doublecortin-positive cells in layer II of the prefrontal cortex of adult guinea pigs.

  14. Human umbilical cord blood cells restore brain damage induced changes in rat somatosensory cortex.

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    Maren Geissler

    Full Text Available Intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells has been shown to reduce sensorimotor deficits after hypoxic ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats. However, the neuronal correlate of the functional recovery and how such a treatment enforces plastic remodelling at the level of neural processing remains elusive. Here we show by in-vivo recordings that hUCB cells have the capability of ameliorating the injury-related impairment of neural processing in primary somatosensory cortex. Intact cortical processing depends on a delicate balance of inhibitory and excitatory transmission, which is disturbed after injury. We found that the dimensions of cortical maps and receptive fields, which are significantly altered after injury, were largely restored. Additionally, the lesion induced hyperexcitability was no longer observed in hUCB treated animals as indicated by a paired-pulse behaviour resembling that observed in control animals. The beneficial effects on cortical processing were reflected in an almost complete recovery of sensorimotor behaviour. Our results demonstrate that hUCB cells reinstall the way central neurons process information by normalizing inhibitory and excitatory processes. We propose that the intermediate level of cortical processing will become relevant as a new stage to investigate efficacy and mechanisms of cell therapy in the treatment of brain injury.

  15. Cellular mechanisms for response heterogeneity among L2/3 pyramidal cells in whisker somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstrott, Justin; Clancy, Kelly B; Jafri, Haani; Akimenko, Igor; Feldman, Daniel E

    2014-07-15

    Whisker deflection evokes sparse, low-probability spiking among L2/3 pyramidal cells in rodent somatosensory cortex (S1), with spiking distributed nonuniformly between more and less responsive cells. The cellular and local circuit factors that determine whisker responsiveness across neurons are unclear. To identify these factors, we used two-photon calcium imaging and loose-seal recording to identify more and less responsive L2/3 neurons in S1 slices in vitro, during feedforward recruitment of the L2/3 network by L4 stimulation. We observed a broad gradient of spike recruitment thresholds within local L2/3 populations, with low- and high-threshold cells intermixed. This recruitment gradient was significantly correlated across different L4 stimulation sites, and between L4-evoked and whisker-evoked responses in vivo, indicating that a substantial component of responsiveness is independent of tuning to specific feedforward inputs. Low- and high-threshold L2/3 pyramidal cells differed in L4-evoked excitatory synaptic conductance and intrinsic excitability, including spike threshold and the likelihood of doublet spike bursts. A gradient of intrinsic excitability was observed across neurons. Cells that spiked most readily to L4 stimulation received the most synaptic excitation but had the lowest intrinsic excitability. Low- and high-threshold cells did not differ in dendritic morphology, passive membrane properties, or L4-evoked inhibitory conductance. Thus multiple gradients of physiological properties exist across L2/3 pyramidal cells, with excitatory synaptic input strength best predicting overall spiking responsiveness during network recruitment. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Cell-Type-Specific Activity in Prefrontal Cortex during Goal-Directed Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Lucas; Dan, Yang

    2015-07-15

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a key role in controlling goal-directed behavior. Although a variety of task-related signals have been observed in the PFC, whether they are differentially encoded by various cell types remains unclear. Here we performed cellular-resolution microendoscopic Ca(2+) imaging from genetically defined cell types in the dorsomedial PFC of mice performing a PFC-dependent sensory discrimination task. We found that inhibitory interneurons of the same subtype were similar to each other, but different subtypes preferentially signaled different task-related events: somatostatin-positive neurons primarily signaled motor action (licking), vasoactive intestinal peptide-positive neurons responded strongly to action outcomes, whereas parvalbumin-positive neurons were less selective, responding to sensory cues, motor action, and trial outcomes. Compared to each interneuron subtype, pyramidal neurons showed much greater functional heterogeneity, and their responses varied across cortical layers. Such cell-type and laminar differences in neuronal functional properties may be crucial for local computation within the PFC microcircuit.

  17. The planar cell polarity effector protein Wdpcp (Fritz) controls epithelial cell cortex dynamics via septins and actomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Joo; Kim, Su Kyoung; Wallingford, John B

    2015-01-09

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling controls polarized behaviors in diverse tissues, including the collective cell movements of gastrulation and the planar polarized beating of motile cilia. A major question in PCP signaling concerns the mechanisms linking this signaling cascade with more general cytoskeletal elements to drive polarized behavior. Previously, we reported that the PCP effector protein Wdpcp (formerly known as Fritz) interacts with septins and is critical for collective cell migration and cilia formation. Here, we report that Wdpcp is broadly involved in maintaining cortical tension in epithelial cells. In vivo 3D time-lapse imaging revealed that Wdpcp is necessary for basolateral plasma membrane stability in epithelial tissues, and we further show that Wdpcp controls cortical septin localization to maintain cortical rigidity in mucociliary epithelial cells. Finally, we show that Wdpcp acts via actomyosin to maintain balanced cortical tension in the epithelium. These data suggest that, in addition to its role in controlling plasma membrane dynamics in collective mesenchymal cell movements, Wdpcp is also essential for normal cell cortex stability during epithelial homeostasis.

  18. Cell type-specific thalamic innervation in a column of rat vibrissal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hanno S; Wimmer, Verena C; Hemberger, Mike; Bruno, Randy M; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Frick, Andreas; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2010-10-01

    This is the concluding article in a series of 3 studies that investigate the anatomical determinants of thalamocortical (TC) input to excitatory neurons in a cortical column of rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1). We used viral synaptophysin-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in thalamic neurons and reconstructions of biocytin-labeled cortical neurons in TC slices to quantify the number and distribution of boutons from the ventral posterior medial (VPM) and posteromedial (POm) nuclei potentially innervating dendritic arbors of excitatory neurons located in layers (L)2-6 of a cortical column in rat somatosensory cortex. We found that 1) all types of excitatory neurons potentially receive substantial TC input (90-580 boutons per neuron); 2) pyramidal neurons in L3-L6 receive dual TC input from both VPM and POm that is potentially of equal magnitude for thick-tufted L5 pyramidal neurons (ca. 300 boutons each from VPM and POm); 3) L3, L4, and L5 pyramidal neurons have multiple (2-4) subcellular TC innervation domains that match the dendritic compartments of pyramidal cells; and 4) a subtype of thick-tufted L5 pyramidal neurons has an additional VPM innervation domain in L4. The multiple subcellular TC innervation domains of L5 pyramidal neurons may partly explain their specific action potential patterns observed in vivo. We conclude that the substantial potential TC innervation of all excitatory neuron types in a cortical column constitutes an anatomical basis for the initial near-simultaneous representation of a sensory stimulus in different neuron types.

  19. The contribution of CXCL12-expressing radial glia cells to neuro-vascular patterning during human cerebral cortex development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella eErrede

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted on human developing brain by laser confocal and transmission electron microscopy to make a detailed analysis of important features of blood-brain barrier microvessels and possible control mechanisms of vessel growth and differentiation during cerebral cortex vascularization. The blood-brain barrier status of cortex microvessels was examined at a defined stage of cortex development, at the end of neuroblast waves of migration and before cortex lamination, with blood-brain barrier-endothelial cell markers, namely tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-5 and influx and efflux transporters (Glut-1 and P-glycoprotein, the latter supporting evidence for functional effectiveness of the fetal blood-brain barrier. According to the well-known roles of astroglia cells on microvessel growth and differentiation, the early composition of astroglia/endothelial cell relationships was analysed by detecting the appropriate astroglia, endothelial, and pericyte markers. GFAP, chemokine CXCL12, and connexin 43 (Cx43 were utilized as markers of radial glia cells, CD105 (endoglin as a marker of angiogenically activated endothelial cells, and proteoglycan NG2 as a marker of immature pericytes. Immunolabeling for CXCL12 showed the highest level of the ligand in radial glial fibres in contact with the growing cortex microvessels. These specialized contacts, recognizable on both perforating radial vessels and growing collaterals, appeared as CXCL12-reactive en passant, symmetrical and asymmetrical vessel-specific RG fibre swellings. At the highest confocal resolution, these RG varicosities showed a CXCL12-reactive dot-like content whose microvesicular nature was confirmed by ultrastructural observations. A further analysis of radial glial varicosities reveals colocalization of CXCL12 with connexin Cx43, which is possibly implicated in vessel-specific chemokine signalling.

  20. Activator-inhibitor coupling between Rho signaling and actin assembly make the cell cortex an excitable medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, William M.; Leda, Marcin; Moe, Alison M.; Kita, Angela M.; Larson, Matthew E.; Golding, Adriana E.; Pfeuti, Courtney; Su, Kuan-Chung; Miller, Ann L.; Goryachev, Andrew B.; von Dassow, George

    2016-01-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis results from patterned activation of the small GTPase Rho, which directs assembly of actomyosin in the equatorial cortex. Cytokinesis is restricted to a portion of the cell cycle following anaphase onset in which the cortex is responsive to signals from the spindle. We show that shortly after anaphase onset oocytes and embryonic cells of frogs and echinoderms exhibit cortical waves of Rho activity and F-actin polymerization. The waves are modulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity and require the Rho GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor), Ect2. Surprisingly, during wave propagation, while Rho activity elicits F-actin assembly, F-actin subsequently inactivates Rho. Experimental and modeling results show that waves represent excitable dynamics of a reaction diffusion system with Rho as the activator and F-actin the inhibitor. We propose that cortical excitability explains fundamental features of cytokinesis including its cell cycle regulation. PMID:26479320

  1. Wave Patterns in Cell Membrane and Actin Cortex Uncoupled from Chemotactic Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerisch, Günther; Ecke, Mary

    2016-01-01

    When cells of Dictyostelium discoideum orientate in a gradient of chemoattractant, they are polarized into a protruding front pointing toward the source of attractant, and into a retracting tail. Under the control of chemotactic signal inputs, Ras is activated and PIP3 is synthesized at the front, while the PIP3-degrading phosphatase PTEN decorates the tail region. As a result of signal transduction, actin filaments assemble at the front into dendritic structures associated with the Arp2/3 complex, in contrast to the tail region where a loose actin meshwork is associated with myosin-II and cortexillin, an antiparallel actin-bundling protein. In axenically growing strains of D. discoideum, wave patterns built by the same components evolve in the absence of any external signal input. Since these autonomously generated patterns are constrained to the plane of the substrate-attached cell surface, they are optimally suited to the optical analysis of state transitions between front-like and tail-like states of the membrane and the actin cortex. Here, we describe imaging techniques using fluorescent proteins to probe for the state of the membrane, the reorganization of the actin network, and the dynamics of wave patterns.

  2. Behavioral Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Nucleus of Thalamus, Entorhinal Cortex and Fornix in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhang; Wen-Han Hu; De-Long Wu; Kai Zhang; Jian-Guo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Recent clinical and preclinical studies have suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can be used as a tool to enhance cognitive functions.The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of DBS at three separate targets in the Papez circuit,including the anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT),the entorhinal cortex (EC),and the fornix (FX),on cognitive behaviors in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model.Methods:Forty-eight rats were subjected to an intrahippocampal injection ofamyloid peptides 1-42 to induce an AD model.Rats were divided into six groups:DBS and sham DBS groups of ANT,EC,and FX.Spatial learning and memory were assessed by the Morris water maze (MWM).Recognition memory was investigated by the novel object recognition memory test (NORM).Locomotor and anxiety-related behaviors were detected by the open field test (OF).By using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA),behavior differences between the six groups were analyzed.Results:In the MWM,the ANT,EC,and FX DBS groups performed differently in terms of the time spent in the platform zone (F(2.23) =6.04,P < 0.01),the frequency of platform crossing (F(2,23) =11.53,P < 0.001),and the percent time spent within the platform quadrant (F(2,23) =6.29,P < 0.01).In the NORM,the EC and FX DBS groups spent more time with the novel object,although the ANT DBS group did not (F(2,23) =10.03,P < 0.001).In the OF,all of the groups showed a similar total distance moved (F(1.42) =1.14,P =0.29)and relative time spent in the center (F(2,42) =0.56,P =0.58).Conclusions:Our results demonstrated that DBS of the EC and FX facilitated hippocampus-dependent spatial memory more prominently thanANT DBS.In addition,hippocampus-independent recognition memory was enhanced by EC and FX DBS.None of the targets showed side-effects of anxiety or locomotor behaviors.

  3. Stem/progenitor cells in the cerebral cortex of the human preterm: a resource for an endogenous regenerative neuronal medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vinci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of the central nervous system represents a very delicate period of embryogenesis. Premature interruption of neurogenesis in human preterm newborns can lead to motor deficits, including cerebral palsy, and significant cognitive, behavioral or sensory deficits in childhood. Preterm infants also have a higher risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases later in life. In the last decade, great importance has been given to stem/progenitor cells and their possible role in the development and treatment of several neurological disorders. Several studies, mainly carried out on experimental models, evidenced that immunohistochemistry may allow the identification of different neural and glial precursors inside the developing cerebral cortex. However, only a few studies have been performed on markers of human stem cells in the embryonic period.This review aims at illustrating the importance of stem/progenitor cells in cerebral cortex during pre- and post-natal life. Defining the immunohistochemical markers of stem/progenitor cells in the human cerebral cortex during development may be important to develop an “endogenous” target therapy in the perinatal period. Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  4. The postrhinal cortex is not necessary for landmark control in rat head direction cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, James R; Taube, Jeffery S

    2017-02-01

    The rodent postrhinal cortex (POR), homologous to primate areas TH/TF and the human 'parahippocampal place area', has been implicated in processing visual landmark and contextual information about the environment. Head direction (HD) cells are neurons that encode allocentric head direction, independent of the animal's location or behavior, and are influenced by manipulations of visual landmarks. The present study determined whether the POR plays a role in processing environmental information within the HD circuit. Experiment 1 tested the role of the POR in processing visual landmark cues in the HD system during manipulation of a visual cue. HD cells from POR lesioned animals had similar firing properties, shifted their preferred firing direction following rotation of a salient visual cue, and in darkness had preferred firing directions that drifted at the same rate as controls. Experiment 2 tested the PORs involvement in contextual fear conditioning, where the animal learns to associate a shock with both a tone and a context in which the shock was given. In agreement with previous studies, POR lesioned animals were able to learn the tone-shock pairing, but displayed less freezing relative to controls when reintroduced into the environment previously paired with a shock. Therefore, HD cells from POR lesioned animals, with demonstrated impairments in contextual fear conditioning, were able to use a visual landmark to control their preferred direction. Thus, despite its importance in processing visual landmark information in primates, the POR in rats does not appear to play a pivotal role in controlling visual landmark information in the HD system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Reg4+ deep crypt secretory cells function as epithelial niche for Lgr5+ stem cells in colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasaki, Nobuo; Sachs, Norman; Wiebrands, Kay; Ellenbroek, Saskia I J; Fumagalli, Arianna; Lyubimova, Anna; Begthel, Harry; van den Born, Maaike; van Es, Johan H; Karthaus, Wouter R; Li, Vivian S W; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peters, Peter J; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5(+)) stem cells reside at crypt bottoms of the small and large intestine. Small intestinal Paneth cells supply Wnt3, EGF, and Notch signals to neighboring Lgr5(+) stem cells. Whereas the colon lacks Paneth cells, deep crypt

  6. Olfactory Bulb Deep Short-Axon Cells Mediate Widespread Inhibition of Tufted Cell Apical Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Shawn D; LaRocca, Greg; Liu, Annie; Cheetham, Claire E J; Urban, Nathaniel N

    2017-02-01

    In the main olfactory bulb (MOB), the first station of sensory processing in the olfactory system, GABAergic interneuron signaling shapes principal neuron activity to regulate olfaction. However, a lack of known selective markers for MOB interneurons has strongly impeded cell-type-selective investigation of interneuron function. Here, we identify the first selective marker of glomerular layer-projecting deep short-axon cells (GL-dSACs) and investigate systematically the structure, abundance, intrinsic physiology, feedforward sensory input, neuromodulation, synaptic output, and functional role of GL-dSACs in the mouse MOB circuit. GL-dSACs are located in the internal plexiform layer, where they integrate centrifugal cholinergic input with highly convergent feedforward sensory input. GL-dSAC axons arborize extensively across the glomerular layer to provide highly divergent yet selective output onto interneurons and principal tufted cells. GL-dSACs are thus capable of shifting the balance of principal tufted versus mitral cell activity across large expanses of the MOB in response to diverse sensory and top-down neuromodulatory input. The identification of cell-type-selective molecular markers has fostered tremendous insight into how distinct interneurons shape sensory processing and behavior. In the main olfactory bulb (MOB), inhibitory circuits regulate the activity of principal cells precisely to drive olfactory-guided behavior. However, selective markers for MOB interneurons remain largely unknown, limiting mechanistic understanding of olfaction. Here, we identify the first selective marker of a novel population of deep short-axon cell interneurons with superficial axonal projections to the sensory input layer of the MOB. Using this marker, together with immunohistochemistry, acute slice electrophysiology, and optogenetic circuit mapping, we reveal that this novel interneuron population integrates centrifugal cholinergic input with broadly tuned feedforward sensory

  7. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons integrate in stroke-injured cortex and improve functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Daniel; Wattananit, Somsak; Grønning Madsen, Marita; Koch, Philipp; Wood, James; Tatarishvili, Jemal; Mine, Yutaka; Ge, Ruimin; Monni, Emanuela; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Hevner, Robert F; Brüstle, Oliver; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2013-12-01

    Stem cell-based approaches to restore function after stroke through replacement of dead neurons require the generation of specific neuronal subtypes. Loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex is a major cause of stroke-induced neurological deficits in adult humans. Reprogramming of adult human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells is a novel approach to produce patient-specific cells for autologous transplantation. Whether such cells can be converted to functional cortical neurons that survive and give rise to behavioural recovery after transplantation in the stroke-injured cerebral cortex is not known. We have generated progenitors in vitro, expressing specific cortical markers and giving rise to functional neurons, from long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial-like stem cells, produced from adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. At 2 months after transplantation into the stroke-damaged rat cortex, the cortically fated cells showed less proliferation and more efficient conversion to mature neurons with morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a cortical phenotype and higher axonal projection density as compared with non-fated cells. Pyramidal morphology and localization of the cells expressing the cortex-specific marker TBR1 in a certain layered pattern provided further evidence supporting the cortical phenotype of the fated, grafted cells, and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated their functionality. Both fated and non-fated cell-transplanted groups showed bilateral recovery of the impaired function in the stepping test compared with vehicle-injected animals. The behavioural improvement at this early time point was most likely not due to neuronal replacement and reconstruction of circuitry. At 5 months after stroke in immunocompromised rats, there was no tumour formation and the grafted cells exhibited electrophysiological properties of mature neurons with evidence of integration in host circuitry. Our

  8. Distinction of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the cerebral cortex: an algorithm based on cytological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel García-Cabezas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the number or density of neurons and types of glial cells and their relative proportions in different brain areas are at the core of rigorous quantitative neuroanatomical studies. Unfortunately, the lack of detailed, updated, systematic, and well-illustrated descriptions of the cytology of neurons and glial cell types, especially in the primate brain, makes such studies especially demanding, often limiting their scope and broad use. Here, following extensive analysis of histological materials and the review of current and classical literature, we compile a list of precise morphological criteria that can facilitate and standardize identification of cells in stained sections examined under the microscope. We describe systematically and in detail the cytological features of neurons and glial cell types in the cerebral cortex of the macaque monkey and the human using semithin and thick sections stained for Nissl. We used this classical staining technique because it labels all cells in the brain in distinct ways. In addition, we corroborate key distinguishing characteristics of different cell types in sections immunolabeled for specific markers counterstained for Nissl and in ultrathin sections processed for electron microscopy. Finally, we summarize the core features that distinguish each cell type in easy-to-use tables and sketches, and structure these key features in an algorithm that can be used to systematically distinguish cellular types in the cerebral cortex. Moreover, we report high inter-observer algorithm reliability, which is a crucial test for obtaining consistent and reproducible cell counts in unbiased stereological studies. This protocol establishes a consistent framework that can be used to reliably identify and quantify cells in the cerebral cortex of primates as well as other mammalian species in health and disease.

  9. Diverse action of repeated corticosterone treatment on synaptic transmission, neuronal plasticity, and morphology in superficial and deep layers of the rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Joanna; Gugula, Anna; Blasiak, Anna; Bobula, Bartosz; Danielewicz, Joanna; Kania, Alan; Tylko, Grzegorz; Hess, Grzegorz

    2017-07-27

    One of the adverse effects of prolonged stress in rats is impaired performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks. The mechanisms that lead to these abnormalities are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared the effects of twice daily repeated corticosterone injections for 7 days on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as on synaptic plasticity and morphology of layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1) of male Wistar rats. Corticosterone treatment resulted in increased frequency, but not amplitude, of mEPSCs in layer II/III neurons accompanied by increased complexity of the apical part of their dendritic tree, with no changes in the density of dendritic spines. The frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs as well as the parameters characterizing the complexity of the dendritic tree were not changed in layer V cells; however, their dendritic spine density was increased. While corticosterone treatment resulted in an increase in the amplitude of field potentials evoked in intralaminar connections within layer II/III, it did not influence field responses in layer V intralaminar connections, as well as the extent of chemically induced layer V long-term potentiation (chemLTP) by the application of tetraethylammonium (TEA, 25 mM). However, chemLTP induction in layer II/III was impaired in slices prepared from corticosterone-treated animals. These data indicate that repeated 7-day administration of exogenous corticosterone induces structural and functional plasticity in the M1, which occurs mainly in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These findings shed light on potential sites of action and mechanisms underlying stress-induced impairment of motor functions.

  10. The abrupt emergence of adult-like grid cell firing during the development of the medial entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Joseph Wills

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural circuits underlying spatial cognition are created during the development of the brain, and understanding how networks subserving specific cognitive functions are assembled remains a challenge for neuroscience. Here, we characterise the development of grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex, which, by nature of their regularly spaced firing fields, are thought to provide a distance metric to the hippocampal neural representation of space. Grid cells emerge at the time of weaning in the rat, at around three weeks of age. We investigated whether grid cells in young rats are functionally equivalent to those observed in the adult as soon as they appear, or if instead they follow a gradual developmental trajectory. We find that, from the very youngest ages at which reproducible grid firing is observed (postnatal day 19: grid cells display adult-like firing fields that tessellate to form a coherent map of the local environment; that this map is universal, maintaining its internal structure across different environments; and that grid cells in young rats, as in adults, also encode a representation of direction and speed. To further investigate the developmental processes leading up to the appearance of grid cells, we present data from individual medial entorhinal cortex cells recorded across more than one day, spanning the period before and after the grid firing pattern emerged. We find that different cells show different patterns of development, but that increasing spatial stability may be a common theme.

  11. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice.

  12. Postnatal development of calcium-binding proteins immunoreactivity (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin) in the human entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grateron, L; Cebada-Sanchez, S; Marcos, P; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Insausti, A M; Muñoz, M; Arroyo-Jimenez, M M; Martinez-Marcos, A; Artacho-Perula, E; Blaizot, X; Insausti, R

    2003-12-01

    The entorhinal cortex is an essential component in the organization of the human hippocampal formation related to cortical activity. It transfers, neocortical information (ultimately distributed to the dentate gyrus and hippocampus) and receives most of the hippocampal output directed to neocortex. At birth, the human entorhinal cortex presents similar layer organization as in adults, although layer II (cell islands) and upper layer III have a protracted maturation. The presence of interneurons expressing calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin-D28K (calbindin) and calretinin) is well documented in the adult human entorhinal cortex. In many of them the calcium binding is co-localized with GABA. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers were virtually absent at birth, their presence increasing gradually in deep layer III, mostly in the lateral and caudal portions of the entorhinal cortex from the 5th month onwards. Calbindin immunoreactive cells and fibers were present at birth, mainly in layers II and upper III; mostly at rostral and lateral portions of the entorhinal cortex, increasing in number and extending to deep layers from the 5th month onwards. Calretinin immunoreactivity was present at birth, homogeneously distributed over layers I, II and upper V, throughout the entorhinal cortex. A substantial increase in the number of calretinin neurons in layer V was observed at the 5th month. The postnatal development of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin may have an important role in the functional maturation of the entorhinal cortex through the control of hippocampal, cortical and subcortical information.

  13. Deep level transient spectroscopy investigation of deep levels in CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with Te:Cu back contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Li, Bing; Zheng, Xu; Xie, Jing; Huang, Zheng; Liu, Cai; Feng, Liang-Huan; Zheng, Jia-Gui

    2010-02-01

    Deep levels in Cds/CdTe thin film solar cells have a potent influence on the electrical property of these devices. As an essential layer in the solar cell device structure, back contact is believed to induce some deep defects in the CdTe thin film. With the help of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), we study the deep levels in CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with Te:Cu back contact. One hole trap and one electron trap are observed. The hole trap H1, localized at Ev + 0.128 eV, originates from the vacancy of Cd (VCd). The electron trap E1, found at Ec -0.178 eV, is considered to be correlated with the interstitial Cuj+ in CdTe.

  14. Progesterone Induces the Growth and Infiltration of Human Astrocytoma Cells Implanted in the Cerebral Cortex of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Germán-Castelán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone (P4 promotes cell proliferation in several types of cancer, including brain tumors such as astrocytomas, the most common and aggressive primary intracerebral neoplasm in humans. In this work, we studied the effects of P4 and its intracellular receptor antagonist, RU486, on growth and infiltration of U373 cells derived from a human astrocytoma grade III, implanted in the motor cortex of adult male rats, using two treatment schemes. In the first one, fifteen days after cells implantation, rats were daily subcutaneously treated with vehicle (propylene glycol, 160 μL, P4 (1 mg, RU486 (5 mg, or P4 + RU486 (1 mg and 5 mg, resp. for 21 days. In the second one, treatments started 8 weeks after cells implantation and lasted for 14 days. In both schemes we found that P4 significantly increased the tumor area as compared with the rest of the treatments, whereas RU486 blocked P4 effects. All rats treated with P4 showed tumor infiltration, while 28.6% and 42.9% of the animals treated with RU486 and P4 + RU486, respectively, presented it. Our data suggest that P4 promotes growth and migration of human astrocytoma cells implanted in the motor cortex of the rat through the interaction with its intracellular receptor.

  15. Modular organization of directionally tuned cells in the motor cortex: Is there a short-range order?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirikian, Bagrat; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated the presence of short-range order (<600 μm) in the directional properties of neurons in the motor cortex of the monkey. For that purpose, we developed a quantitative method for the detection of functional cortical modules and used it to examine such potential modules formed by directionally tuned cells. In the functional domain, we labeled each cell by its preferred direction (PD) vector in 3D movement space; in the spatial domain, we used the position of the tip of the recording microelectrode as the cell's coordinate. The images produced by this method represented two orthogonal dimensions in the cortex; one was parallel ("horizontal") and the other perpendicular ("vertical") to the cortical layers. The distribution of directionally tuned cells in these dimensions was nonuniform and highly structured. Specifically, cells with similar PDs tended to segregate into vertically oriented minicolumns 50-100 μm wide and at least 500 μm high. Such minicolumns aggregated across the horizontal dimension in a secondary structure of higher order. In this structure, minicolumns with similar PDs were 200 μm apart and were interleaved with minicolumns representing nearly orthogonal PDs; in addition, nonoverlapping columns representing nearly opposite PDs were 350 μm apart.

  16. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    a continuous basal lamina, caveolae, intermediate filaments, dense bodies, dense bands, and a well-developed subsurface smooth endoplasmic reticulum), but the arrangement of organelles was clearly different, and cisternae of granular endoplasmic reticulum were abundant. Interstitial cells of Cajal were......Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... for identification and further physiological or pathological studies. The deep muscular plexus was sandwiched between a thin inner layer of smooth muscle (one to five cells thick) and the bulk of the circular muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal in this region very much resembled smooth muscle cells (with...

  17. Deep characterization of blood cell miRNomes by NGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eva C; Backes, Christina; Knörck, Arne; Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Hoxha, Cora; Schwär, Gertrud; Grossmann, Thomas; Müller, Sabine C; Hart, Martin; Haas, Jan; Galata, Valentina; Müller, Isabelle; Fehlmann, Tobias; Eichler, Hermann; Franke, Andre; Meder, Benjamin; Meese, Eckart; Hoth, Markus; Keller, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    A systematic understanding of different factors influencing cell type specific microRNA profiles is essential for state-of-the art biomarker research. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the biological variability and changes in cell type pattern over time for different cell types and different isolation approaches in technical replicates. All combinations of the parameters mentioned above have been measured, resulting in 108 miRNA profiles that were evaluated by next-generation-sequencing. The largest miRNA variability was due to inter-individual differences (34 %), followed by the cell types (23.4 %) and the isolation technique (17.2 %). The change over time in cell miRNA composition was moderate (web resource.

  18. Expression of TGF-β2 mRNA and PCNA, FN Protein in Lens Epithelial Cells in Age-related Nuclear and Cortex Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, the expressions of transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) mRNA, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and fibronection (FN) protein in lens epithelial cells (LECs) of age-related nuclear and cortex cataract were detected and compared. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the expression of TGF-β2 mRNA was higher in cortex cataract than in nuclear cataract. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expression of PCNA protein was lower and the expression of FN protein was higher in cortex cataract than in nuclear cataract. It was suggested that TGF-β2, PCNA and FN might take important parts in the process of age-related cataract. Cortex cataract was related to the transdifferentiation of LECs, and nuclear cataract to the proliferation of LECs.

  19. Ultrastructural changes in aster yellows phytoplasma affected Limonium sinuatum Mill. plants II. Pathology of cortex parenchyma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Limonium sinuatum Mill, plants with severe symptoms of aster yellows infection phytoplasmas were present not only in the phloem but also in some cortex parenchymas cells. These parenchyma cells were situated at some distance from the conducting bundles. The phytoplasmas were observed directly in parenchyma cells cytoplasm. The number of phytoplasmas present in each selected cell varies. The cells with a small number of phytoplasmas show little pathological changes compared with the unaffected cells of the same zone of the stem as well with the cells of healthy plants. The cells filled with a number of phytoplasmas had their protoplast very much changed. The vacuole was reduced and in the cytoplasm a reduction of the number of ribosomes was noted and regions of homogenous structure appeared. Mitochondria were moved in the direction of the tonoplast and plasma membrane. Compared to the cells unaffected by phytoplasma, the mitochondria were smaller and had an enlarged cristae internal space. The chloroplasts from affected cells had a very significant reduction in size and the tylacoids system had disappeared. The role of these changes for creating phytoplasma friendly enviroment is discused.

  20. Extracellular matrix plasticity and GABAergic inhibition of prefrontal cortex pyramidal cells facilitates relapse to heroin seeking

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Successful treatment of drug addiction is hampered by high relapse rates during periods of abstinence. Neuroadaptation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is thought to play a crucial role in vulnerability to relapse to drug seeking, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To identify protein changes that contribute to relapse susceptibility, we investigated synaptic membrane fractions from the mPFC of rats that underwent 21 days of forced abst...

  1. Novel light trapping scheme for thin crystalline cells utilizing deep structures on both wafer sides [solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Michael; Clausen, Thomas; Leistiko, Otto

    1998-01-01

    62 times the average thickness. The structure consists of deep (-200 μm) inverted pyramids on the front side and deep (-200 μm) truncated pyramids with eight sides on the back. The structure is realized in crystalline silicon by wet chemical etching using potassium hydroxide (KOH) and isopropanol...... (IPA). A process for creating thin solar cells with this light trapping scheme is described. The process includes only two main photolithographic steps and features a self-aligned front metallization. The process uses 250 μm wafers to create cells that on average are about 70 μm thick...

  2. Application of isothermal current deep level transient spectroscopy to solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancour, D. P.; Pierret, R. F.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Melloch, M. R.

    1989-03-01

    The utility of isothermal current deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) techniques in directly probing solar cells is described and illustrated. A modified approach to processing the isothermal DLTS data is also presented. Specifically, it is pointed out that properly normalized isothermal data, whether derived from a current or capacitance transient, should conform to a single, temperature-independent curve.

  3. High virus-to-cell ratios indicate ongoing production of viruses in deep subsurface sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Tim; Kallmeyer, Jens; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2014-07-01

    Marine sediments cover two-thirds of our planet and harbor huge numbers of living prokaryotes. Long-term survival of indigenous microorganisms within the deep subsurface is still enigmatic, as sources of organic carbon are vanishingly small. To better understand controlling factors of microbial life, we have analyzed viral abundance within a comprehensive set of globally distributed subsurface sediments. Phages were detected by electron microscopy in deep (320 m below seafloor), ancient (∼14 Ma old) and the most oligotrophic subsurface sediments of the world's oceans (South Pacific Gyre (SPG)). The numbers of viruses (10(4)-10(9) cm(-3), counted by epifluorescence microscopy) generally decreased with sediment depth, but always exceeded the total cell counts. The enormous numbers of viruses indicate their impact as a controlling factor for prokaryotic mortality in the marine deep biosphere. The virus-to-cell ratios increased in deeper and more oligotrophic layers, exhibiting values of up to 225 in the deep subsurface of the SPG. High numbers of phages might be due to absorption onto the sediment matrix and a diminished degradation by exoenzymes. However, even in the oldest sediments, microbial communities are capable of maintaining viral populations, indicating an ongoing viral production and thus, viruses provide an independent indicator for microbial life in the marine deep biosphere.

  4. Cell segmentation in histopathological images with deep learning algorithms by utilizing spatial relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Nuh; Bilgin, Gokhan

    2017-02-28

    In many computerized methods for cell detection, segmentation, and classification in digital histopathology that have recently emerged, the task of cell segmentation remains a chief problem for image processing in designing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. In research and diagnostic studies on cancer, pathologists can use CAD systems as second readers to analyze high-resolution histopathological images. Since cell detection and segmentation are critical for cancer grade assessments, cellular and extracellular structures should primarily be extracted from histopathological images. In response, we sought to identify a useful cell segmentation approach with histopathological images that uses not only prominent deep learning algorithms (i.e., convolutional neural networks, stacked autoencoders, and deep belief networks), but also spatial relationships, information of which is critical for achieving better cell segmentation results. To that end, we collected cellular and extracellular samples from histopathological images by windowing in small patches with various sizes. In experiments, the segmentation accuracies of the methods used improved as the window sizes increased due to the addition of local spatial and contextual information. Once we compared the effects of training sample size and influence of window size, results revealed that the deep learning algorithms, especially convolutional neural networks and partly stacked autoencoders, performed better than conventional methods in cell segmentation.

  5. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eLabonté

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a three km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32 % of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment.

  6. Intra-areal and corticocortical circuits arising in the dysgranular zone of rat primary somatosensory cortex that processes deep somatic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Uhnoh; Lee, Taehee

    2013-08-01

    Somesthesis-guided exploration of the external world requires cortical processing of both cutaneous and proprioceptive information and their integration into motor commands to guide further haptic movement. In the past, attention has been given mostly to the cortical circuits processing cutaneous information for somatic motor integration. By comparison, little has been examined about how cortical circuits are organized for higher order proprioceptive processing. Using the rat cortex as a model, we characterized the intrinsic and corticocortical circuits arising in the major proprioceptive region of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) that is conventionally referred to as the dysgranular zone (DSZ). We made small injections of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) as an anterograde tracer in various parts of the DSZ, revealing three distinct principles of its cortical circuit organization. First, its intrinsic circuits extend mainly along the major axis of DSZ to organize multiple patches of interconnections. Second, the central and peripheral regions of DSZ produce differential patterns of intra-areal and corticocortical circuits. Third, the projection fields of DSZ encompass only selective regions of the second somatic (SII), posterior parietal (PPC), and primary motor (MI) cortices. These projection fields are at least partially separated from those of SI cutaneous areas. We hypothesize, based on these observations, that the cortical circuits of DSZ facilitate a modular integration of proprioceptive information along its major axis and disseminate this information to only selective parts of higher order somatic and MI cortices in parallel with cutaneous information.

  7. Increased number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the ventral tegmental area after deep brain stimulation of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, J A D; Hescham, S; Adriaanse, B; Campos, F L; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F; Temel, Y; Jahanshahi, A

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) has been long implicated with the processes of memory. In long-term memory, the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area (VTA) use DA to enhance long-term potentiation, while prefrontal DA D1 receptors are involved in working memory. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of specific brain areas have been shown to affect memory impairments in animal models. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DBS could reverse memory impairments by increasing the number of dopaminergic cells in the VTA. Rats received DBS at the level of the mammillothalamic tract, the anterior nucleus of the thalamus, and entorhinal cortex before euthanasia. These regions are part of the so-called memory circuit. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunocytochemistry in the VTA and the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). c-Fos, TH and c-Fos/TH immunoreactive cells were analyzed by means of stereology and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that DBS of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus induced substantial higher numbers of TH-immunoreactive cells in the VTA, while there were no significant differences between the experimental groups in the number of TH immunoreactive cells in the SNc, c-Fos immunoreactive cells and c-Fos/TH double-labeled cells in both the SNc and VTA. Our findings suggest a phenotypic switch, or neurotransmitter respecification, of DAergic cells specifically in the VTA which may be induced by DBS in the anterior nucleus of the thalamus.

  8. Cell type specificity of tissue plasminogen activator in the mouse barrel cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Chu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We provide data in this article related to (C.C. Chen et al.,. Neurosci. Lett., 599 (2015 152–157. [1] where the expression of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is expressed by the whisker representation in the somatosensory cortex. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data indicating that tPA is expressed by putative excitatory neurons as well as parvalbumin+ interneurons but not by somatostatin+ inhibitory interneurons. We also provide data showing that microglia do not normally express high levels of tPA, but upregulate their levels following cortical penetration with a recording electrode.

  9. [Persistence of orientation-selective cells of the primary visual cortex in kittens enucleated unilaterally at birth and reared in darkness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregnac, Y; Buisseret, P; Bienenstock, E; Gary-Bobo, E; Imbert, M

    1978-07-17

    In kittens dark reared (6 weeks old) orientation selective cells are no longer recorded in the primary visual cortex, while in kittens of same age, enucleated at birth unilaterally and reared in identical conditions, 30% of visual cortical cells are shown to be orientation selective and in addition respond preferentially to horizontal and vertical orientations.

  10. Micropatterned bioimplant with guided neuronal cells to promote tissue reconstruction and improve functional recovery after primary motor cortex insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaysse, L; Beduer, A; Sol, J C; Vieu, C; Loubinoux, I

    2015-07-01

    With the ever increasing incidence of brain injury, developing new tissue engineering strategies to promote neural tissue regeneration is an enormous challenge. The goal of this study was to design and evaluate an implantable scaffold capable of directing neurite and axonal growth for neuronal brain tissue regeneration. We have previously shown in cell culture conditions that engineered micropatterned PDMS surface with straight microchannels allow directed neurite growth without perturbing cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth. In this study, the micropatterned PDMS device pre-seeded with hNT2 neuronal cells were implanted in rat model of primary motor cortex lesion which induced a strong motor deficit. Functional recovery was assessed by the forelimb grip strength test during 3 months post implantation. Results show a more rapid and efficient motor recovery with the hNT2 neuroimplants associated with an increase of neuronal tissue reconstruction and cell survival. This improvement is also hastened when compared to a direct cell graft of ten times more cells. Histological analyses showed that the implant remained structurally intact and we did not see any evidence of inflammatory reaction. In conclusion, PDMS bioimplants with guided neuronal cells seem to be a promising approach for supporting neural tissue reconstruction after central brain injury.

  11. Origin, migration and fate of newly generated neurons in the adult rodent piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lee A; Ng, Kwan L; Kinyamu, Richard; Whitaker-Azmitia, Patricia; Geisert, Eldon E; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Ribak, Charles E

    2007-09-01

    Newly generated neurons are continuously added to the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulbs of adult mammals. Studies also report newly generated neurons in the piriform cortex, the primary cortical projection site of the olfactory bulbs. The current study used BrdU-injection paradigms, and in vivo and in vitro DiI tracing methods to address three fundamental issues of these cells: their origin, migratory route and fate. The results show that 1 day after a BrdU-injection, BrdU/DCX double-labeled cells appear deep to the ventricular subependyma, within the white matter. Such cells appear further ventral and caudal in the ensuing days, first appearing in the rostral piriform cortex of mice at 2 days after the BrdU-injection, and at 4 days in the rat. In the caudal piriform cortex, BrdU/DCX labeled cells first appear at 4 days after the injection in mice and 7 days in rats. The time it takes for these cells to appear in the piriform cortex and the temporal distribution pattern suggest that they migrate from outside this region. DiI tracing methods confirmed a migratory route to the piriform cortex from the ventricular subependyma. The presence of BrdU/NeuN labeled cells as early as 7 days after a BrdU injection in mice and 10 days in the rat and lasting as long as 41 days indicates that some of these cells have extended survival durations in the adult piriform cortex.

  12. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten;

    2016-01-01

    determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density...... centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS......-specific carbon content was 19–31 fg C cell−1, which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm−3, suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow...

  13. Germinal zones in the developing cerebral cortex of ferret: ontogeny, cell cycle kinetics, and diversity of progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reillo, Isabel; Borrell, Víctor

    2012-09-01

    Expansion and folding of the cerebral cortex are landmark features of mammalian brain evolution. This is recapitulated during embryonic development, and specialized progenitor cell populations known as intermediate radial glia cells (IRGCs) are believed to play central roles. Because developmental mechanisms involved in cortical expansion and folding are likely conserved across phylogeny, it is crucial to identify features specific for gyrencephaly from those unique to primate brain development. Here, we studied multiple features of cortical development in ferret, a gyrencephalic carnivore, in comparison with primates. Analyzing the combinatorial expression of transcription factors, cytoskeletal proteins, and cell cycle parameters, we identified a combination of traits that distinguish in ferret similar germinal layers as in primates. Transcription factor analysis indicated that inner subventricular zone (ISVZ) and outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) may contain an identical mixture of progenitor cell subpopulations in ferret. However, we found that these layers emerge at different time points, differ in IRGC abundance, and progenitors have different cell cycle kinetics and self-renewal dynamics. Thus, ISVZ and OSVZ are likely distinguished by genetic differences regulating progenitor cell behavior and dynamics. Our findings demonstrate that some, but not all, features of primate cortical development are shared by the ferret, suggesting a conserved role in the evolutionary emergence of gyrencephaly.

  14. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kathleen Bourne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions. Abnormal activity in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC circuits including the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and mediodorsal thalamus has been implicated in OCD. To this end a number of DBS targets including the anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral capsule/ventral striatum, ventral caudate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and the inferior thalamic peduncle have been investigated for the treatment of OCD. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in movement disorders, the mechanism of DBS is not fully understood, especially as it relates to psychiatric disorders. While initially thought to create a functional lesion akin to ablative procedures, it is increasingly clear that DBS may induce clinical benefit through activation of axonal fibers spanning the CSTC circuits, alteration of oscillatory activity within this network, and/or release of critical neurotransmitters. In this article we review how the use of DBS for OCD informs our understanding of both the mechanisms of DBS and the circuitry of OCD. We review the literature on DBS for OCD and discuss potential mechanisms of action at the neuronal level as well as the broader circuit level.

  15. Differential cell proliferation in the cortex of the APPswePS1dE9 Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Orre, Marie; Kooijman, Lieneke; Dahmen, Maurice; Hol, Elly M

    2012-04-01

    Plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to decrease proliferation in neurogenic niches in AD mouse models, but the effects on cell proliferation and differentiation in other brain areas have not been studied in detail. We analyzed cell proliferation in the cortex of wild type (WT) and APPswePS1dE9 transgenic (AD) mice at different ages. Mice were studied shortly after the last BrdU injection (BrdU[ST]). In AD mice, the number of proliferating cells increased fourfold, coinciding with plaque appearance and its associated reactive gliosis and activation of microglia. An increase in the number of BrdU[ST]-cells expressing markers for activated microglia is underlying the enhanced proliferation. Cortical reactive astrocytes did not become proliferative since BrdU[ST]-cells were negative for different astrocyte-specific markers. The number of Olig2-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells was unchanged. Four weeks after the last BrdU application, the number of BrdU[LT]-cells with an activated microglia signature was still enhanced in AD mice. None of the newborn cells had differentiated into oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, or neurons. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that amyloid plaque deposition increases proliferation of microglia around plaques but does not affect the proliferation of cortical oligodendrocyte precursor cells. No evidence was found for damage-induced proliferation of reactive astrocytes or for a redirected neurogenesis from the subventricular zone. The proliferation of microglia contributes to the rapid accumulation of microglia around plaques and may play a role in limitating plaque expansion. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Deep trap levels in CdS solar cells observed by capacitance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmurcik, L.; Ketelsen, L.; Serway, R. A.

    1982-05-01

    Capacitance measurements have been carried out as a function of reverse bias voltage and signal frequency on thin-film and single-crystal CdS solar cells. It is shown that such measurements can reveal abrupt changes in C-V plots which are attributed to the presence of deep trapping states. The anomalous change in capacitance occurs when the bias voltage raises a trapping state above the Fermi level; the strength of the anomalies depends on several factors including temperature, signal frequency, and junction properties. Measurements taken on the CdS cells indicate that at least two deep trapping states are present in the partially formed i layer of CdS, which is consistent with results reported by other workers.

  17. Cell-Targeted Optogenetics and Electrical Microstimulation Reveal the Primate Koniocellular Projection to Supra-granular Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Carsten; Evrard, Henry C; Shapcott, Katharine A; Haverkamp, Silke; Logothetis, Nikos K; Schmid, Michael C

    2016-04-01

    Electrical microstimulation and more recently optogenetics are widely used to map large-scale brain circuits. However, the neuronal specificity achieved with both methods is not well understood. Here we compare cell-targeted optogenetics and electrical microstimulation in the macaque monkey brain to functionally map the koniocellular lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) projection to primary visual cortex (V1). Selective activation of the LGN konio neurons with CamK-specific optogenetics caused selective electrical current inflow in the supra-granular layers of V1. Electrical microstimulation targeted at LGN konio layers revealed the same supra-granular V1 activation pattern as the one elicited by optogenetics. Taken together, these findings establish a selective koniocellular LGN influence on V1 supra-granular layers, and they indicate comparable capacities of both stimulation methods to isolate thalamo-cortical circuits in the primate brain.

  18. Environmental enrichment and working memory tasks decrease hippocampal cell proliferation after wheel running--A role for the prefrontal cortex in hippocampal plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefers, Andrea T U

    2015-10-22

    Despite an increasing amount of evidence about the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis on the local level, less attention has been paid to its systemic embedding in wider brain circuits. The aim of the present study was to obtain evidence for a potential role of the prefrontal cortex in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We hypothesised that activation of the prefrontal cortex by environmental enrichment or a working-memory task would decrease previously enhanced cell proliferation rates. Wheel running was applied as a common stimulator of cell proliferation in CD1 mice reared under deprivation of natural environmental stimulation. Next, the animals were assigned to four groups for different treatments in the following three days: housing under continued deprivation, environmental enrichment, a spatial-delayed alternation task in an automated T-maze that activates the prefrontal cortex by working-memory requirements or a control task in the automated T-maze differing only in the single parameter working-memory-associated delay. Both the environmental enrichment and spatial-delayed alternation tasks decreased cell proliferation rates in the dentate gyrus compared to deprived housing and the control task in the T-maze. As the control animals underwent the same procedures and stressors and differed only in the single parameter working-memory-associated delay, the working-memory requirement seems to be the crucial factor for decreasing cell proliferation rates. Taken together, these results suggest that the prefrontal cortex may play a role in the regulation of hippocampal cell proliferation.

  19. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex pyramidal cells have a temporal dynamic role in recall and extinction of cocaine-associated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Oever, Michel C; Rotaru, Diana C; Heinsbroek, Jasper A; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B

    2013-11-13

    In addicts, associative memories related to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse can evoke powerful craving and drug seeking urges, but effective treatment to suppress these memories is not available. Detailed insight into the neural circuitry that mediates expression of drug-associated memory is therefore of crucial importance. Substantial evidence from rodent models of addictive behavior points to the involvement of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in conditioned drug seeking, but specific knowledge of the temporal role of vmPFC pyramidal cells is lacking. To this end, we used an optogenetics approach to probe the involvement of vmPFC pyramidal cells in expression of a recent and remote conditioned cocaine memory. In mice, we expressed Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or Halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0) in pyramidal cells of the vmPFC and studied the effect of activation or inhibition of these cells during expression of a cocaine-contextual memory on days 1-2 (recent) and ∼3 weeks (remote) after conditioning. Whereas optical activation of pyramidal cells facilitated extinction of remote memory, without affecting recent memory, inhibition of pyramidal cells acutely impaired recall of recent cocaine memory, without affecting recall of remote memory. In addition, we found that silencing pyramidal cells blocked extinction learning at the remote memory time-point. We provide causal evidence of a critical time-dependent switch in the contribution of vmPFC pyramidal cells to recall and extinction of cocaine-associated memory, indicating that the circuitry that controls expression of cocaine memories reorganizes over time.

  20. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  1. Protocol to isolate a large amount of functional oligodendrocyte precursor cells from the cerebral cortex of adult mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva María Medina-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available During development, oligodendrocytes are generated from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs, a cell type that is a significant proportion of the total cells (3-8% in the adult central nervous system (CNS of both rodents and humans. Adult OPCs are responsible for the spontaneous remyelination that occurs in demyelinating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS and they constitute an interesting source of cells for regenerative therapy in such conditions. However, there is little data regarding the neurobiology of adult OPCs isolated from mice since an efficient method to isolate them has yet to be established. We have designed a protocol to obtain viable adult OPCs from the cerebral cortex of different mouse strains and we have compared its efficiency with other well-known methods. In addition, we show that this protocol is also useful to isolate functional OPCs from human brain biopsies. Using this method we can isolate primary cortical OPCs in sufficient quantities so as to be able to study their survival, maturation and function, and to facilitate an evaluation of their utility in myelin repair.

  2. Background synaptic activity in rat entorhinal cortex shows a progressively greater dominance of inhibition over excitation from deep to superficial layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart David Greenhill

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC controls hippocampal input and output, playing major roles in memory and spatial navigation. Different layers of the EC subserve different functions and a number of studies have compared properties of neurones across layers. We have studied synaptic inhibition and excitation in EC neurones, and we have previously compared spontaneous synaptic release of glutamate and GABA using patch clamp recordings of synaptic currents in principal neurones of layers II (L2 and V (L5. Here, we add comparative studies in layer III (L3. Such studies essentially look at neuronal activity from a presynaptic viewpoint. To correlate this with the postsynaptic consequences of spontaneous transmitter release, we have determined global postsynaptic conductances mediated by the two transmitters, using a method to estimate conductances from membrane potential fluctuations. We have previously presented some of this data for L3 and now extend to L2 and L5. Inhibition dominates excitation in all layers but the ratio follows a clear rank order (highest to lowest of L2>L3>L5. The variance of the background conductances was markedly higher for excitation and inhibition in L2 compared to L3 or L5. We also show that induction of synchronized network epileptiform activity by blockade of GABA inhibition reveals a relative reluctance of L2 to participate in such activity. This was associated with maintenance of a dominant background inhibition in L2, whereas in L3 and L5 the absolute level of inhibition fell below that of excitation, coincident with the appearance of synchronized discharges. Further experiments identified potential roles for competition for bicuculline by ambient GABA at the GABAA receptor, and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in residual inhibition in L2. We discuss our results in terms of control of excitability in neuronal subpopulations of EC neurones and what these may suggest for their functional roles.

  3. ARM-Cortex M3-Based Two-Wheel Robot for Assessing Grid Cell Model of Medial Entorhinal Cortex: Progress towards Building Robots with Biologically Inspired Navigation-Cognitive Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cuneo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the implementation and use of a two-wheel autonomous robot and its effectiveness as a tool for studying the recently discovered use of grid cells as part of mammalian’s brains space-mapping circuitry (specifically the medial entorhinal cortex. A proposed discrete-time algorithm that emulates the medial entorhinal cortex is programed into the robot. The robot freely explores a limited laboratory area in the manner of a rat or mouse and reports information to a PC, thus enabling research without the use of live individuals. Position coordinate neural maps are achieved as mathematically predicted although for a reduced number of implemented neurons (i.e., 200 neurons. However, this type of computational embedded system (robot’s microcontroller is found to be insufficient for simulating huge numbers of neurons in real time (as in the medial entorhinal cortex. It is considered that the results of this work provide an insight into achieving an enhanced embedded systems design for emulating and understanding mathematical neural network models to be used as biologically inspired navigation system for robots.

  4. Brain cells in the avian 'prefrontal cortex' code for features of slot-machine-like gambling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Scarf

    Full Text Available Slot machines are the most common and addictive form of gambling. In the current study, we recorded from single neurons in the 'prefrontal cortex' of pigeons while they played a slot-machine-like task. We identified four categories of neurons that coded for different aspects of our slot-machine-like task. Reward-Proximity neurons showed a linear increase in activity as the opportunity for a reward drew near. I-Won neurons fired only when the fourth stimulus of a winning (four-of-a-kind combination was displayed. I-Lost neurons changed their firing rate at the presentation of the first nonidentical stimulus, that is, when it was apparent that no reward was forthcoming. Finally, Near-Miss neurons also changed their activity the moment it was recognized that a reward was no longer available, but more importantly, the activity level was related to whether the trial contained one, two, or three identical stimuli prior to the display of the nonidentical stimulus. These findings not only add to recent neurophysiological research employing simulated gambling paradigms, but also add to research addressing the functional correspondence between the avian NCL and primate PFC.

  5. Robust Individual-Cell/Object Tracking via PCANet Deep Network in Biomedicine and Computer Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineng Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracking individual-cell/object over time is important in understanding drug treatment effects on cancer cells and video surveillance. A fundamental problem of individual-cell/object tracking is to simultaneously address the cell/object appearance variations caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In this paper, inspired by the architecture of deep learning, we propose a robust feature learning method for constructing discriminative appearance models without large-scale pretraining. Specifically, in the initial frames, an unsupervised method is firstly used to learn the abstract feature of a target by exploiting both classic principal component analysis (PCA algorithms with recent deep learning representation architectures. We use learned PCA eigenvectors as filters and develop a novel algorithm to represent a target by composing of a PCA-based filter bank layer, a nonlinear layer, and a patch-based pooling layer, respectively. Then, based on the feature representation, a neural network with one hidden layer is trained in a supervised mode to construct a discriminative appearance model. Finally, to alleviate the tracker drifting problem, a sample update scheme is carefully designed to keep track of the most representative and diverse samples during tracking. We test the proposed tracking method on two standard individual cell/object tracking benchmarks to show our tracker's state-of-the-art performance.

  6. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi from deep sea sediments of Peruvian Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spormann, A.; Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. These strictly anaerobic microbes depend on a supporting microbial community to mitigate electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environments.

  7. Single cell genomic study of dehalogenating Chloroflexi in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Biddle, J.; Spormann, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites (Dhc), are members of the rare biosphere of deep sea sediments but were originally discovered as the key microbes mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene to ethene. Dhc are slow growing, highly niche adapted microbes that are specialized to organohalide respiration as the sole mode of energy conservation. They are strictly anaerobic microbes that depend on a supporting microbial community for electron donor and cofactor requirements among other factors. Molecular and genomic studies on the key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases, have provided evidence for rapid adaptive evolution in terrestrial environments. However, the metabolic life style of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants, such as in pristine deep sea sediments, is still unknown. In order to provide fundamental insights into life style, genomic population structure and evolution of Dhc, we analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site collected 6 mbsf by a metagenomic and single cell genomic approach. We present for the first time single cell genomic data on dehalogenating Chloroflexi, a significant microbial population in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  8. Structural brain mutant of Drosophila melanogaster with reduced cell number in the medulla cortex and with normal optomotor yaw response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, K. F.; Heisenberg, M.

    1981-01-01

    KS58, one out of six known alleles of the small optic lobes (sol) gene in Drosophila melanogaster, reduces the cell number in the medulla cortex by degeneration of ganglion cells in the pupae to about 50%. Also, about half the volume of the medulla and lobula complex neuropils is missing. Many Golgistained cells in the mutant optic lobes resemble their homologues in wild type. However, special classes of transmedullary columnar neurons projecting to the lobula or to both lobula and lobula plate are not seen in the mutant. Some neurons linking the lobula complex to the central brain send branches to the medulla (the branches do not exist in wild type); some other types seem to be missing. The fate mapping of the KS58 focus reveals a location ventral to the head bristles and in sine oculis (so) flies the mutation further reduces the rudiments of the optic lobes normally seen. Therefore the sol phenotype is not induced by mutant eyes and the primary gene action seems to be on nervous tissue. The structural alterations of the small optic lobes are reflected in visual orientation behavior. The optomotor yaw response, however, is almost quantitatively preserved. The respective neural network should still be present in the mutant optic lobes. Images PMID:16592962

  9. Gallium nitride induces neuronal differentiation markers in neural stem/precursor cells derived from rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Ruei; Li, Yi-Chen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2009-09-01

    In the present study, gallium nitride (GaN) was used as a substrate to culture neural stem/precursor cells (NSPCs), isolated from embryonic rat cerebral cortex, to examine the effect of GaN on the behavior of NSPCs in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in serum-free medium. Morphological studies showed that neurospheres maintained their initial shape and formed many long and thick processes with the fasciculate feature on GaN. Immunocytochemical characterization showed that GaN could induce the differentiation of NSPCs into neurons and astrocytes. Compared to poly-d-lysine (PDL), the most common substrate used for culturing neurons, there was considerable expression of synapsin I for differentiated neurons on GaN, suggesting GaN could induce the differentiation of NSPCs towards the mature differentiated neurons. Western blot analysis showed that the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) activity was one of the effects of GaN-promoted NSPC differentiation into neurons. Finally, compared to PDL, GaN could significantly improve cell survival to reduce cell death after long-term culture. These results suggest that GaN potentially has a combination of electric characteristics suitable for developing neuron and/or NSPC chip systems.

  10. Differential effects of stress on microglial cell activation in male and female medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Justin L; Bergeon Burns, Christine M; Wellman, Cara L

    2016-02-01

    Susceptibility to stress-linked psychological disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, differs between men and women. Dysfunction of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in many of these disorders. Chronic stress affects mPFC in a sex-dependent manner, differentially remodeling dendritic morphology and disrupting prefrontally mediated behaviors in males and females. Chronic restraint stress induces microglial activation, reflected in altered microglial morphology and immune factor expression, in mPFC in male rats. Unstressed females exhibit increased microglial ramification in several brain regions compared to males, suggesting both heightened basal activation and a potential for sex-dependent effects of stress on microglial activation. Therefore, we assessed microglial density and ramification in the prelimbic region of mPFC, and immune-associated genes in dorsal mPFC in male and female rats following acute or chronic restraint stress. Control rats were left unstressed. On the final day of restraint, brains were collected for either qPCR or visualization of microglia using Iba-1 immunohistochemistry. Microglia in mPFC were classified as ramified, primed, reactive, or amoeboid, and counted stereologically. Expression of microglia-associated genes (MHCII, CD40, IL6, CX3CL1, and CX3CR1) was also assessed using qPCR. Unstressed females showed a greater proportion of primed to ramified microglia relative to males, alongside heightened CX3CL1-CX3CR1 expression. Acute and chronic restraint stress reduced the proportion of primed to ramified microglia and microglial CD40 expression in females, but did not significantly alter microglial activation in males. This sex difference in microglial activation could contribute to the differential effects of stress on mPFC structure and function in males versus females.

  11. Deep hypothermia-enhanced autophagy protects PC12 cells against oxygen glucose deprivation via a mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dang; Wang, Cheng; Gao, Yongjun; Pu, Jun; Long, Jiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-10-06

    Deep hypothermia is known for its organ-preservation properties, which is introduced into surgical operations on the brain and heart, providing both safety in stopping circulation as well as an attractive bloodless operative field. However, the molecular mechanisms have not been clearly identified. This study was undertaken to determine the influence of deep hypothermia on neural apoptosis and the potential mechanism of these effects in PC12 cells following oxygen-glucose deprivation. Deep hypothermia (18°C) was given to PC12 cells while the model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induction for 1h. After 24h of reperfusion, the results showed that deep hypothermia decreased the neural apoptosis, and significantly suppressed overexpression of Bax, CytC, Caspase 3, Caspase 9 and cleaved PARP-1, and inhibited the reduction of Bcl-2 expression. While deep hypothermia increased the LC3II/LC3I and Beclin 1, an autophagy marker, which can be inhibited by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), indicating that deep hypothermia-enhanced autophagy ameliorated apoptotic cell death in PC12 cells subjected to OGD. Based on these findings we propose that deep hypothermia protects against neural apoptosis after the induction of OGD by attenuating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, moreover, the mechanism of these antiapoptosis effects is related to the enhancement of autophagy, which autophagy might provide a means of neuroprotection against OGD.

  12. What Does the Anatomical Organization of the Entorhinal Cortex Tell Us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin B. Canto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex is commonly perceived as a major input and output structure of the hippocampal formation, entertaining the role of the nodal point of cortico-hippocampal circuits. Superficial layers receive convergent cortical information, which is relayed to structures in the hippocampus, and hippocampal output reaches deep layers of entorhinal cortex, that project back to the cortex. The finding of the grid cells in all layers and reports on interactions between deep and superficial layers indicate that this rather simplistic perception may be at fault. Therefore, an integrative approach on the entorhinal cortex, that takes into account recent additions to our knowledge database on entorhinal connectivity, is timely. We argue that layers in entorhinal cortex show different functional characteristics most likely not on the basis of strikingly different inputs or outputs, but much more likely on the basis of differences in intrinsic organization, combined with very specific sets of inputs. Here, we aim to summarize recent anatomical data supporting the notion that the traditional description of the entorhinal cortex as a layered input-output structure for the hippocampal formation does not give the deserved credit to what this structure might be contributing to the overall functions of cortico-hippocampal networks.

  13. A neural network model on self-organizing emergence of simple-cell receptive field with orientation selectivity in visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨谦; 齐翔林; 汪云九

    2001-01-01

    In order to probe into the self-organizing emergence of simple cell orientation selectivity,we tried to construct a neural network model that consists of LGN neurons and simple cells in visual cortex and obeys the Hebbian learning rule. We investigated the neural coding and representation of simple cells to a natural image by means of this model. The results show that the structures of their receptive fields are determined by the preferred orientation selectivity of simple cells.However, they are also decided by the emergence of self-organization in the unsupervision learning process. This kind of orientation selectivity results from dynamic self-organization based on the interactions between LGN and cortex.

  14. ACETOGENIC AND SULPHATE-REDUCING BACTERIA INHABITING THE RHIZOPLANE AND DEEP CORTEX CELLS OF THE SEAGRASS HALODULE WRIGHTII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizosphere that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacter...

  15. High-Content Analysis of Breast Cancer Using Single-Cell Deep Transfer Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Chetak; Silva, Luís M; Alexandre, Luís A; Santos, Jorge M

    2016-03-01

    High-content analysis has revolutionized cancer drug discovery by identifying substances that alter the phenotype of a cell, which prevents tumor growth and metastasis. The high-resolution biofluorescence images from assays allow precise quantitative measures enabling the distinction of small molecules of a host cell from a tumor. In this work, we are particularly interested in the application of deep neural networks (DNNs), a cutting-edge machine learning method, to the classification of compounds in chemical mechanisms of action (MOAs). Compound classification has been performed using image-based profiling methods sometimes combined with feature reduction methods such as principal component analysis or factor analysis. In this article, we map the input features of each cell to a particular MOA class without using any treatment-level profiles or feature reduction methods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of DNN in this domain, leveraging single-cell information. Furthermore, we use deep transfer learning (DTL) to alleviate the intensive and computational demanding effort of searching the huge parameter's space of a DNN. Results show that using this approach, we obtain a 30% speedup and a 2% accuracy improvement.

  16. Alcohol dependence-related increase of glial cell density in the anterior cingulate cortex of suicide completers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercher, Christa; Parent, Martin; Flores, Cecilia; Canetti, Lilian; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2009-07-01

    Suicide is the most serious consequence of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; Brodmann area [BA] 24) has been increasingly investigated for its role in the etiology of MDD, there is surprisingly very little information about the possible implication of this brain region in suicide. We hypothesized that changes in BA24 cell densities occur in depressed individuals who commit suicide, possibly reflecting an altered state of cortical plasticity that is thought to occur in depression. We investigated cell densities and sizes in BA24 among suicide completers and matched sudden-death controls. We examined a 1-cm(3) tissue block from BA24a of the supracallosal ACC in 26 human postmortem brain specimens (13 depressed individuals who committed suicide and 13 controls). We assessed neuronal and glial cell densities as well as neuronal soma sizes in the upper and lower cortical layers using optical fractionator and nucleator 3-dimensional stereological probes. Glial densities, neuronal densities and soma sizes measured in BA24a did not differ significantly between controls and suicide completers. Secondary analyses showed a significant and robust increase in glial cell densities in BA24a of alcohol-dependent depressed suicide completers compared with depressed suicide completers who were not alcohol-dependent (38%) and, to a lesser extent, controls (30%). Our study, conducted with tissue samples from men only, made use of a nonspecific stain that does not distinguish between neuronal or glial cell subtypes. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis concerned upper and lower cortical contours rather than individual cortical layers. Our results indicate that in BA24, glial density, neuronal density and soma size are not affected in MDD and suicide. They also suggest that alcohol dependence has an important influence on glial densities in this key limbic structure.

  17. Alcohol dependence–related increase of glial cell density in the anterior cingulate cortex of suicide completers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercher, Christa; Parent, Martin; Flores, Cecilia; Canetti, Lilian; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicide is the most serious consequence of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; Brodmann area [BA] 24) has been increasingly investigated for its role in the etiology of MDD, there is surprisingly very little information about the possible implication of this brain region in suicide. We hypothesized that changes in BA24 cell densities occur in depressed individuals who commit suicide, possibly reflecting an altered state of cortical plasticity that is thought to occur in depression. Methods We investigated cell densities and sizes in BA24 among suicide completers and matched sudden-death controls. We examined a 1-cm3 tissue block from BA24a of the supracallosal ACC in 26 human postmortem brain specimens (13 depressed individuals who committed suicide and 13 controls). We assessed neuronal and glial cell densities as well as neuronal soma sizes in the upper and lower cortical layers using optical fractionator and nucleator 3-dimensional stereological probes. Results Glial densities, neuronal densities and soma sizes measured in BA24a did not differ significantly between controls and suicide completers. Secondary analyses showed a significant and robust increase in glial cell densities in BA24a of alcohol-dependent depressed suicide completers compared with depressed suicide completers who were not alcohol-dependent (38%) and, to a lesser extent, controls (30%). Limitations Our study, conducted with tissue samples from men only, made use of a nonspecific stain that does not distinguish between neuronal or glial cell subtypes. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis concerned upper and lower cortical contours rather than individual cortical layers. Conclusion Our results indicate that in BA24, glial density, neuronal density and soma size are not affected in MDD and suicide. They also suggest that alcohol dependence has an important influence on glial densities in this key limbic structure. PMID:19568479

  18. Study of deep level defects of n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharangarh, Poonam Rani

    Among various photovoltaic materials, polycrystalline cadmium telluride thin film is now the most promising material, due to its low production cost excellent stability and reliability. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements of CdTe photovoltaic devices at different temperatures can provide valuable information about non-idealities in the n-p semiconductor junction. There are certain limitations which limit the efficiency of CdTe solar cells. There is no real distinction between defects and impurities in CdTe solar cells as both act as beneficial dopants or detrimental traps unlike Si where intentional shallow dopants and traps are distinctly different. Therefore, the role of defect states on CdTe solar cell performance, the effect of processing on defect states, and simple and effective characterization techniques must be investigated and identified. In this research the thin film n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells made with evaporated Cu as a primary back contact, are characterized by using the temperature dependence of the reverse bias diode current (J-V-T) to determine the energy levels of deep defects. The results of the J-V-T measurements on solar cells made at NJIT show that while modest amounts of Cu enhance cell performance, an excessive high temperature annealing step degrades device quality and reduces efficiency. This work addresses the error that can be introduced during defect energy level estimation if the temperature dependence of the carrier capture cross-section is neglected. Therefore, the location of traps is derived using a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination model with modified assumptions. A Cu-related deep level defect with activation energy of 0.57eV is observed for Cu evaporated back contact cells and an intrinsic defect with activation energy 0.89eV is found. Frequency dispersion in Capacitance-Voltage measurements confirms the presence of Cu-related deep level traps for cells with a Cu evaporated back contact, whereas no such defects

  19. Touching Textured Surfaces: Cells in Somatosensory Cortex Respond Both to Finger Movement and to Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darian-Smith, Ian; Sugitani, Michio; Heywood, John; Karita, Keishiro; Goodwin, Antony

    1982-11-01

    Single neurons in Brodmann's areas 3b and 1 of the macaque postcentral gyrus discharge when the monkey rubs the contralateral finger pads across a textured surface. Both the finger movement and the spatial pattern of the surface determine this discharge in each cell. The spatial features of the surface are represented unambiguously only in the responses of populations of these neurons, and not in the responses of the constituent cells.

  20. Spinogenesis and pruning in the anterior ventral inferotemporal cortex of the macaque monkey: an intracellular injection study of layer III pyramidal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy N. Elston

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cortical pyramidal cells grow and mature at different rates in visual, auditory and prefrontal cortex of the macaque monkey. In particular, differences across the areas have been reported in both the timing and magnitude of growth, branching, spinogenesis and pruning in the basal dendritic trees of cells in layer III. Presently available data suggest that these different growth profiles reflect the type of functions performed by these cells in the adult brain. However, to date, studies have focussed on only a relatively few cortical areas. In the present investigation we quantified the growth of the dendritic trees of layer III pyramidal cells in the anterior ventral portion of cytoarchitectonic area TE (TEav to better comprehend developmental trends in the cerebral cortex. We quantified the growth and branching of the dendrities, and spinogenesis and pruning of spines, from post-natal day 2 (PND2 to four and a half years of age. We found that the dendritic trees increase in size from PND2 to 7 months of age and thereafter become smaller. The dendritic trees became increasingly more branched from PND2 into adulthood. There was a 2-fold increase in the number of spines in the basal dendritic trees of pyramidal cells from PND2 to 3½ months of age and then a 10% net decrease in spine number into adulthood. Thus, the growth profile of layer III pyramidal cells in the anterior ventral portion of the inferotemporal cortex differs to that in other cortical areas associated with visual processing.

  1. Retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in deep-sea lanternfishes (Myctophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Marshall, N Justin; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Retinal Ganglion Cell Distribution and Spatial Resolving Power in Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    De Busserolles, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history.

  3. Cortex cinnamomi extract prevents streptozotocin- and cytokine-induced β-cell damage by inhibiting NF-κB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kang-Beom Kwon; Eun-Kyung Kim; Eun-Sil Jeong; Young-Hoon Lee; Young-Rae Lee; Jin-Woo Park; Do-Gon Ryu; Byung-Hyun Park

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the mechanism underlying the antidiabetic activities of cortex cinnamomi extract (CCE).METHODS: To induce in vivo diabetes, mice were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) via a tail vein (100 mg STZ/kg body weight). To determine the effects of CCE,mice were administered CCE twice daily for 7 d by oral gavage starting 1 wk before the STZ injection. Blood glucose and plasma insulin concentration were measured as an index of diabetes. Also, to induce cytotoxicity of RINm5F cells, we treated with cytokines (IL-1β (2.0 ng/mL) and IFN-γ (100 U/mL)). Cell viability and nitric oxide production were measured colorimetrically.Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activation of NF-KB was assayed by using gel mobility shift assays of nuclear extracts.RESULTS: Treatment of mice with STZ resulted in hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, which was further evidenced by immunohistochemical staining of islets. However, the diabetogenic effects of STZ were completely prevented when mice were pretreated with CCE. The inhibitory effect of CCE on STZ-induced hyperglycemia was mediated through the suppression of iNOS expression. In rat insulinoma RINm5F cells,CCE completely protected against interleukin-1β and interferon-y-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, RINm5F cells incubated with CCE showed significant reductions in interleukin-1β and interferon-y-induced nitric oxide production and in iNOS mRNA and protein expression,and these findings correlated well with in vivo observations.CONCLUSION: The molecular mechanism by which CCE inhibits iNOS gene expression appears to involve the inhibition of NF-κB activation. These results reveal the possible therapeutic value of CCE for the prevention of diabetes mellitus progression.

  4. Light-Emitting Diode (LED) therapy improves occipital cortex damage by decreasing apoptosis and increasing BDNF-expressing cells in methanol-induced toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Amir; Ghareghani, Majid; Zibara, Kazem; Delaviz, Hamdallah; Ebadi, Elham; Jahantab, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-05-01

    Methanol-induced retinal toxicity, frequently associated with elevated free radicals and cell edema, is characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death and vision loss. Previous studies investigated the effect of photomodulation on RGCs, but not the visual cortex. In this study, the effect of 670nm Light-Emitting Diode (LED) therapy on RGCs and visual cortex recovery was investigated in a seven-day methanol-induced retinal toxicity protocol in rats. Methanol administration showed a reduction in the number of RGCs, loss of neurons (neuronal nuclear antigen, NeuN+), activation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP+) expressing cells, suppression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF+) positive cells, increase in apoptosis (caspase 3+) and enhancement of nitric oxide (NO) release in serum and brain. On the other hand, LED therapy significantly reduced RGC death, in comparison to the methanol group. In addition, the number of BDNF positive cells was significantly higher in the visual cortex of LED-treated group, in comparison to methanol-intoxicated and control groups. Moreover, LED therapy caused a significant decrease in cell death (caspase 3+ cells) and a significant reduction in the NO levels, both in serum and brain tissue, in comparison to methanol-intoxicated rats. Overall, LED therapy demonstrated a number of beneficial effects in decreasing oxidative stress and in functional recovery of RGCs and visual cortex. Our data suggest that LED therapy could be a potential condidate as a non-invasive approach for treatment of retinal damage, which needs further clinicl studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep trap levels in CdS solar cells observed by capacitance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hmurcik, L.; Ketelsen, L.; Serway, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    This paper is concerned with ac capacitance measurements taken as a function of reverse bias voltage and signal frequency on four thin-film CdS/Cu/sub x/S solar cells and one single-crystal cell. Our results suggest the presence of at least two trapping states in the i layer formed by the presence of Cu impurities in CdS. The deep traps produce anomalies in the normally linear 1/C/sup 2/ vs V plots. The energies of the states were found by measuring the particular bias voltages at which anomalies were observed. Other results concerning the anomalous behavior in CdS cells and their relation to the work of Roberts and Crowell are also discussed. These include variations of capacitance with frequency and temperature, and changes in shunt conductance with frequency.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy as a Counter-Measure for Human Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.; Roach, A.-N.; Ramsahai, S.; Kim, B. C.; Fitzgerald, W.; Riley, D. A.; Gonda, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exploration of deep space depends, in part, on our ability to counter severe/invasive disorders that astronauts experience in space environments. The known symptoms include hematological/cardiac abnormalities,bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, we have advanced a hypothesis that ome of the space-caused disorders maybe amenable to hematopoietis stem cell therapy(HSCT) so as to maintain promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia beta-thaiassemia) as well as spaceflight (hindlimb unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, in the case of HSCT for muscle loss, the beta-galactosidese marked HSCs were detected in the hindlimbs of unloaded mouse following transplantation by -X-gal wholemaunt staining procedure. Histochemicaland physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. HSCT for immunodeficiency was investigated ising beta-galactosidese gene-tagged Escherichia coli as the infectious agent. Results of the X-gal staining procedure indicated the rapeutic role of the HSCT. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  7. Stereological estimation of total cell numbers in the human cerebral and cerebellar cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walløe, Solveig; Pakkenberg, Bente; Fabricius, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the relationship between brain structure and cognitive function is still limited. Human brains and individual cortical areas vary considerably in size and shape. Studies of brain cell numbers have historically been based on biased methods, which did not always result in correct e...

  8. Subplate cells: amplifiers of neuronal activity in the developing cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko J Luhmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique structural and functional properties, subplate cells are ideally suited to function as important amplifying units within the developing neocortical circuit. Subplate neurons have extensive dendritic and axonal ramifications and relatively mature functional properties, i.e. their action potential firing can exceed frequencies of 40 Hz. At earliest stages of corticogenesis subplate cells receive functional synaptic inputs from the thalamus and from other cortical and non-cortical sources. Glutamatergic and depolarizing GABAergic inputs arise from cortical neurons and neuromodulatory inputs arise from the basal forebrain and other sources. Activation of postsynaptic metabotropic receptors, i.e. muscarinic receptors, elicits in subplate neurons oscillatory burst discharges which are transmitted via electrical and chemical synapses to neighbouring subplate cells and to immature neurons in the cortical plate. The tonic nonsynaptic release of GABA from GABAergic subplate cells facilitates the generation of burst discharges. These cellular bursts are amplified by prominent gap junction coupling in the subplate and cortical plate, thereby eliciting 10 to 20 Hz oscillations in a local columnar network. Thus, we propose that neuronal networks are organized at earliest stages in a gap junction coupled columnar syncytium. We postulate that the subplate does not only serve as a transient relay station for afferent inputs, but rather as an active element amplifying the afferent and intracortical activity.

  9. Layer- and cell-type-specific subthreshold and suprathreshold effects of long-term monocular deprivation in rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medini, Paolo

    2011-11-23

    Connectivity and dendritic properties are determinants of plasticity that are layer and cell-type specific in the neocortex. However, the impact of experience-dependent plasticity at the level of synaptic inputs and spike outputs remains unclear along vertical cortical microcircuits. Here I compared subthreshold and suprathreshold sensitivity to prolonged monocular deprivation (MD) in rat binocular visual cortex in layer 4 and layer 2/3 pyramids (4Ps and 2/3Ps) and in thick-tufted and nontufted layer 5 pyramids (5TPs and 5NPs), which innervate different extracortical targets. In normal rats, 5TPs and 2/3Ps are the most binocular in terms of synaptic inputs, and 5NPs are the least. Spike responses of all 5TPs were highly binocular, whereas those of 2/3Ps were dominated by either the contralateral or ipsilateral eye. MD dramatically shifted the ocular preference of 2/3Ps and 4Ps, mostly by depressing deprived-eye inputs. Plasticity was profoundly different in layer 5. The subthreshold ocular preference shift was sevenfold smaller in 5TPs because of smaller depression of deprived inputs combined with a generalized loss of responsiveness, and was undetectable in 5NPs. Despite their modest ocular dominance change, spike responses of 5TPs consistently lost their typically high binocularity during MD. The comparison of MD effects on 2/3Ps and 5TPs, the main affected output cells of vertical microcircuits, indicated that subthreshold plasticity is not uniquely determined by the initial degree of input binocularity. The data raise the question of whether 5TPs are driven solely by 2/3Ps during MD. The different suprathreshold plasticity of the two cell populations could underlie distinct functional deficits in amblyopia.

  10. Stereological estimation of total cell numbers in the human cerebral and cerebellar cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Walløe, Solveig; Pakkenberg, Bente; Fabricius, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the relationship between brain structure and cognitive function is still limited. Human brains and individual cortical areas vary considerably in size and shape. Studies of brain cell numbers have historically been based on biased methods, which did not always result in correct estimates and were often very time-consuming. Within the last 20–30 years, it has become possible to rely on more advanced and unbiased methods. These methods have provided us with information about fe...

  11. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew J S; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367-16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.218 to 0.465). 3-93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches.

  12. Strong inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis in the developing rat cerebral cortex and glioma cells by roscovitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakisich, Juan Sebastian; Vita, Marina Fernanda; Siden, Ake; Tasat, Deborah Ruth; Cruz, Mabel

    2010-06-01

    The effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors roscovitine and olomoucine on DNA synthesis rate during normal rat brain development were studied by using short time (90 min) incubation. Both purine analogues at 100 microM concentration decreased the DNA synthesis of rat cerebral cortex in an age-dependent manner. The maximum inhibitory effect (approximately 90% for roscovitine, approximately 60% for olomoucine) occurred in rats of 2-13 days postnatal age. In adult rats (> 60 days postnatal age), the effect of both purine analogues was low. Roscovitine even at 200 microM concentration did not inhibit the fraction of DNA synthesis insensitive to hydroxyurea (unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS)). In addition, in the RG2 rat glioma model, roscovitine produced a strong inhibition of DNA synthesis in glioma cells when compared to adult normal tissue. Since in adult rat brain more than 60% of DNA synthesis is related to DNA repair, usually measured as UDS, our results indicate that roscovitine strongly blocks ongoing DNA synthesis connected with replicative processes.

  13. Ultra-deep sequencing reveals the subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... complex subclonal architectures comprising distinct subclones only found in geographically distinct regions of the tumors. The metastatic potential of the tumor is acquired early in the tumor evolution, as indicated by the lymph node sharing the majority of the mutations with the tumor biopsies, while...

  14. Postnatal Dendritic Growth and Spinogenesis of Layer-V Pyramidal Cells Differ between Visual, Inferotemporal, and Prefrontal Cortex of the Macaque Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oga, Tomofumi; Elston, Guy N.; Fujita, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex, particularly those in layer III, exhibit regional variation in both the time course and magnitude of postnatal growth and pruning of dendrites and spines. Less is known about the development of pyramidal cell dendrites and spines in other cortical layers. Here we studied dendritic morphology of layer-V pyramidal cells in primary visual cortex (V1, sensory), cytoarchitectonic area TE in the inferotemporal cortex (sensory association), and granular prefrontal cortex (Walker's area 12, executive) of macaque monkeys at the ages of 2 days, 3 weeks, 3.5 months, and 4.5 years. We found that changes in the basal dendritic field area of pyramidal cells were different across the three areas. In V1, field size became smaller over time (largest at 2 days, half that size at 4.5 years), in TE it did not change, and in area 12 it became larger over time (smallest at 2 days, 1.5 times greater at 4.5 years). In V1 and TE, the total number of branch points in the basal dendritic trees was similar between 2 days and 4.5 years, while in area 12 the number was greater in the adult monkeys than in the younger ones. Spine density peaked at 3 weeks and declined in all areas by adulthood, with V1 exhibiting a faster decline than area TE or area 12. Estimates of the total number of spines in the dendritic trees revealed that following the onset of visual experience, pyramidal cells in V1 lose more spines than they grow, whereas those in TE and area 12 grow more spines than they lose during the same period. These data provide further evidence that the process of synaptic refinement in cortical pyramidal cells differs not only according to time, but also location within the cortex. Furthermore, given the previous finding that layer-III pyramidal cells in all these areas exhibit the highest density and total number of spines at 3.5 months, the current results indicate that pyramidal cells in layers III and V develop spines at different rates.

  15. Short-term effects of ACTH on protein synthesis in adrenal cortex cells of young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, M C; Magalhães, M M; Cimbra, A

    1975-11-19

    Two units of ACTH were administered intraperitoneally to young 20 gm-rats which received an intravenous injection of L-leucine-3H thirteen min later. ACTH-injected rats, and control rats which received the isotope alone, were killed at 2-, 10-, 30- and 60-min intervals. Electron microscope autoradiographs in control animals showed strong amino-acid uptake at pulse time (2-min) in the cytoplasm of adrenal zona fasciculata cells. Label was shared between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, and a lower but still considerable uptake was seen in nucleoli. At first chase time interval (10-min) cytoplasmic labelling declined, while nuclear and nucleolar labelling increased, both changing little thereafter, and there was a 10-30 min Golgi peak. ACTH administration provoked an overall increase in amino-acid incorporation into cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus at pulse time, with no changes in the distribution of the reactions among organelles. Intensification of labelling was most evident over nucleoli, the grain density of which was four-times as high as in controls. The short-term increase in ER and mitochondrial protein synthesis observed after ACTH injections was considered to be consistent with the hypothesis that most newly-formed proteins in these cells may be involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis. The marked increase in nucleolar labelling suggested the presence of proteins involved in RNA synthesis.

  16. The Abused Inhalant Toluene Differentially Modulates Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Deep-Layer Neurons of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Jacob T; Woodward, John J

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene are voluntarily inhaled for their intoxicating effects. Solvent use is especially prevalent among adolescents, and is associated with deficits in a wide range of cognitive tasks including attention, behavioral control, and risk assessment. Despite these findings, little is known about the effects of toluene on brain areas mediating these behaviors. In this study, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to determine the effect toluene on neurons within the medial PFC, a region critically involved in cognitive function. Toluene had no effect on measures of intrinsic excitability, but enhanced stimulus-evoked γ-amino butyric acid A-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) to block action potentials, toluene increased the frequency and amplitude of miniature IPSCs. In contrast, toluene induced a delayed but persistent decrease in evoked or spontaneous AMPA-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This effect was prevented by an intracellular calcium chelator or by the ryanodine receptor and SERCA inhibitors, dantrolene or thapsigargin, respectively, suggesting that toluene may mobilize intracellular calcium pools. The toluene-induced reduction in AMPA EPSCs was also prevented by a cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist, and was occluded by the CB1 agonist WIN 55,212-2 that itself induced a profound decrease in AMPA-mediated EPSCs. Toluene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of miniature EPSCs recorded in the presence of TTX. Finally, toluene dose-dependently inhibited N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA)-mediated EPSCs and the magnitude and reversibility of this effect was CB1R sensitive indicating both direct and indirect actions of toluene on NMDA-mediated responses. Together, these results suggest that the effect of toluene on cognitive behaviors may result from its action on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission of PFC neurons. PMID:21430649

  17. Synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimuli in Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory stimuli evoke responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway. However, the properties of synaptic responses evoked by tactile stimulation in cerebellar PCs are unknown. The present study investigated the synaptic responses of PCs in response to an air-puff stimulation on the ipsilateral whisker pad in urethane-anesthetized mice. METHODS AND MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-three PCs were recorded from 48 urethane-anesthetized adult (6-8-week-old HA/ICR mice by somatic or dendritic patch-clamp recording and pharmacological methods. Tactile stimulation to the ipsilateral whisker pad was delivered by an air-puff through a 12-gauge stainless steel tube connected with a pressurized injection system. Under current-clamp conditions (I = 0, the air-puff stimulation evoked strong inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs in the somata of PCs. Application of SR95531, a specific GABA(A receptor antagonist, blocked IPSPs and revealed stimulation-evoked simple spike firing. Under voltage-clamp conditions, tactile stimulation evoked a sequence of transient inward currents followed by strong outward currents in the somata and dendrites in PCs. Application of SR95531 blocked outward currents and revealed excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs in somata and a temporal summation of parallel fiber EPSCs in PC dendrites. We also demonstrated that PCs respond to both the onset and offset of the air-puff stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that tactile stimulation induced asynchronous parallel fiber excitatory inputs onto the dendrites of PCs, and failed to evoke strong EPSCs and spike firing in PCs, but induced the rapid activation of strong GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the somata and dendrites of PCs in the cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized mice.

  18. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Brian E; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, it is unclear whether subtypes of principal neurons within a brain region are affected uniformly. We tested for alterations to ion channels critical in regulating neural excitability in two subtypes of prefrontal L5 pyramidal neurons. Using somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we provide evidence that the functional expression of h-channels (Ih) is down-regulated, whereas A-type K(+) channel function is up-regulated in pyramidal tract-projecting (PT) neurons in the fmr1-/y mouse PFC. This is the opposite pattern of results from published findings from hippocampus where Ih is up-regulated and A-type K(+) channel function is down-regulated. Additionally, we find that somatic Kv1-mediated current is down-regulated, resulting in increased excitability of fmr1-/y PT neurons. Importantly, these h- and K(+) channel differences do not extend to neighboring intratelencephalic-projecting neurons. Thus, the absence of FMRP has divergent effects on the function of individual types of ion channels not only between brain regions, but also variable effects across cell types within the same brain region. Given the importance of ion channels in regulating neural circuits, these results suggest cell-type-specific phenotypes for the disease.

  19. Medial Forebrain Bundle Deep Brain Stimulation has Symptom-specific Anti-depressant Effects in Rats and as Opposed to Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Stimulation Interacts With the Reward System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Voget, Mareike; Empl, Laura; Vogel, Martin; Wieske, Franziska; Rummel, Julia; Heinz, Andreas; Mathé, Aleksander A; Hadar, Ravit; Winter, Christine

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients suffering from treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Several stimulation targets have successfully been tested in clinical settings, including the subgenual cingulum (Cg25) and the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). MFB-DBS has led to remarkable results, surpassing the effect of previous targets in terms of response latency and number of responders. However, the question remains as to which mechanisms underlie this difference. The aim of the present study was to thoroughly study the anti-depressant effect of MFB-DBS in the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rat model of depression as well as to investigate whether MFB-DBS and Cg25-DBS operate through the same neurobiological circuits. FSL and control rats received bilateral high-frequency stimulation to the MFB at the level of the lateral hypothalamus, while being subjected to a variety of depression- and anxiety-related behavioral paradigms. To further compare the effects of MFB-DBS and Cg25-DBS on reward-related behavior, animals were stimulated in either the MFB or ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, rodent analog to Cg25), while being tested in the intra-cranial self-stimulation paradigm. A marked symptom-specific anti-depressant effect of MFB-DBS was demonstrated. The ICSS-paradigm revealed that MFB-DBS, as opposed to vmPFC-DBS interacts with the reward system. Our data suggest that MFB-DBS and Cg25-DBS do not operate via the same neurobiological circuits. This differentiation might be of interest when selecting patients for either Cg25- or MFB-DBS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anti-anhedonic effect of deep brain stimulation of the prefrontal cortex and the dopaminergic reward system in a genetic rat model of depression: an intracranial self-stimulation paradigm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Ellis; Rummel, Julia; Schmidt, Timo T; Hadar, Ravit; Heinz, Andreas; Mathé, Aleksander A; Winter, Christine

    2014-01-01

    One of the two core symptoms of major depression (MD), whether uni- or bipolar, is the inability to experience pleasure, suggested to be triggered by dysregulation within the brain reward system. In recent years, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has evolved as a potential tool to modulate pathological neural activity; stimulation of the subgenual cingulate (Cg25) has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms, including anhedonia. In rodents, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is likely to represent the correlate of Cg25 and accordingly, stimulation of vmPFC reduces anhedonia-like behavior in rats. The present study addresses the question of whether the anti-anhedonic effect of vmPFC-DBS is mediated by the brain reward system. Rats of the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), a validated genetic animal model of depression, and its controls, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL), were stimulated in the vmPFC and tested in the forced swim test (FST), sucrose consumption test (SCT) and the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. The curve-shift paradigm of ICSS was used in combination with vmPFC-DBS, d-amphetamine and fluoxetine to quantify reward-facilitating or -attenuating treatment effects. Our findings support anti-depressive efficacy of vmPFC-DBS with respect to despair- and anhedonia-like behavior, as shown in the FST and SCT, respectively. However, DBS did not elicit reward-facilitating or reward-attenuating effects on ICSS behavior. These data suggest that it is unlikely that the anti-anhedonic effect of vmPFC-DBS depends on the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Embryonic mosaic deletion of APP results in displaced Reelin-expressing cells in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, D G; Taylor, W M; Tilearcio, M; Cavanaugh, T; Selkoe, D J; Young-Pearse, T L

    2017-03-08

    It is widely accepted that amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, APP has been proposed to have functions in numerous biological processes including neuronal proliferation, differentiation, migration, axon guidance, and neurite outgrowth, as well as in synapse formation and function. However, germline knockout of APP yields relatively subtle phenotypes, and brain development appears grossly normal. This is thought to be due in part to functional compensation by APP family members and other type I transmembrane proteins. Here, we have generated a conditional mouse knockout for APP that is controlled temporally using Cre(ER) and tamoxifen administration. We show that total cortical expression of APP is reduced following tamoxifen administration during embryonic time points critical for cortical lamination, and that this results in displacement of Reelin-positive cells below the cortical plate with a concurrent elevation in Reelin protein levels. These results support a role for APP in cortical lamination and demonstrate the utility of a conditional knockout approach in which APP can be deleted with temporal control in vivo. This new tool should be useful for many different applications in the study of APP function across the mammalian life span.

  2. Comparative Single-Cell Genomics of Chloroflexi from the Okinawa Trough Deep-Subsurface Biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Heather; Moyer, Craig L

    2016-05-15

    Chloroflexi small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences are frequently recovered from subseafloor environments, but the metabolic potential of the phylum is poorly understood. The phylum Chloroflexi is represented by isolates with diverse metabolic strategies, including anoxic phototrophy, fermentation, and reductive dehalogenation; therefore, function cannot be attributed to these organisms based solely on phylogeny. Single-cell genomics can provide metabolic insights into uncultured organisms, like the deep-subsurface Chloroflexi Nine SSU rRNA gene sequences were identified from single-cell sorts of whole-round core material collected from the Okinawa Trough at Iheya North hydrothermal field as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 331 (Deep Hot Biosphere). Previous studies of subsurface Chloroflexi single amplified genomes (SAGs) suggested heterotrophic or lithotrophic metabolisms and provided no evidence for growth by reductive dehalogenation. Our nine Chloroflexi SAGs (seven of which are from the order Anaerolineales) indicate that, in addition to genes for the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, exogenous carbon sources can be actively transported into cells. At least one subunit for pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase was found in four of the Chloroflexi SAGs. This protein can provide a link between the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and other carbon anabolic pathways. Finally, one of the seven Anaerolineales SAGs contains a distinct reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdhA) gene. Through the use of single amplified genomes (SAGs), we have extended the metabolic potential of an understudied group of subsurface microbes, the Chloroflexi These microbes are frequently detected in the subsurface biosphere, though their metabolic capabilities have remained elusive. In contrast to previously examined Chloroflexi SAGs, our genomes (several are from the order Anaerolineales) were recovered from a hydrothermally driven system and therefore provide a unique window into

  3. Evolutionary strategies of cells and viruses in deep-sea hydrothermal systems revealed through comparative metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.; Sogin, M. L.; Baross, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent habitat hosts a diverse community of archaea and bacteria that withstand extreme fluctuations in environmental conditions. Abundant viruses in these systems must also withstand these environmental extremes, and a high proportion of viruses in these systems are lysogenic. Comparative analysis of a cellular and viral metagenome from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent has provided insights into the evolutionary strategies of both cells and viruses in hydrothermal systems. We detected numerous mobile elements in the viral and cellular gene pools as well as a large number of prophage in the cellular fraction. We show that the hydrothermal vent viral gene pool is relatively enriched in genes related to energy metabolism, a feature that is unique to the hydrothermal vent viral gene pool compared to viral gene pools from other environments, indicating a potential for integrated prophage to enhance host metabolic flexibility. We also detected stronger purifying selection in the viral versus cellular gene pool, indicating selection pressures that promote prolonged viral integration in the host. Our results support the hypothesis that viruses enhance host genomic plasticity and adaptability in this extreme and dynamic environment. Finally, we will discuss general implications of this work for understanding the viral impact on biogeochemical cycles and evolutionary trajectories of microbial populations in the deep subsurface biosphere.

  4. Dysregulation of B Cell Repertoire Formation in Myasthenia Gravis Patients Revealed through Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Heiden, Jason A; Stathopoulos, Panos; Zhou, Julian Q; Chen, Luan; Gilbert, Tamara J; Bolen, Christopher R; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Ciafaloni, Emma; Broering, Teresa J; Vigneault, Francois; Nowak, Richard J; Kleinstein, Steven H; O'Connor, Kevin C

    2017-02-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a prototypical B cell-mediated autoimmune disease affecting 20-50 people per 100,000. The majority of patients fall into two clinically distinguishable types based on whether they produce autoantibodies targeting the acetylcholine receptor (AChR-MG) or muscle specific kinase (MuSK-MG). The autoantibodies are pathogenic, but whether their generation is associated with broader defects in the B cell repertoire is unknown. To address this question, we performed deep sequencing of the BCR repertoire of AChR-MG, MuSK-MG, and healthy subjects to generate ∼518,000 unique VH and VL sequences from sorted naive and memory B cell populations. AChR-MG and MuSK-MG subjects displayed distinct gene segment usage biases in both VH and VL sequences within the naive and memory compartments. The memory compartment of AChR-MG was further characterized by reduced positive selection of somatic mutations in the VH CDR and altered VH CDR3 physicochemical properties. The VL repertoire of MuSK-MG was specifically characterized by reduced V-J segment distance in recombined sequences, suggesting diminished VL receptor editing during B cell development. Our results identify large-scale abnormalities in both the naive and memory B cell repertoires. Particular abnormalities were unique to either AChR-MG or MuSK-MG, indicating that the repertoires reflect the distinct properties of the subtypes. These repertoire abnormalities are consistent with previously observed defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in MG, thereby offering additional insight regarding the impact of tolerance defects on peripheral autoimmune repertoires. These collective findings point toward a deformed B cell repertoire as a fundamental component of MG.

  5. Expression of Kv3.1b potassium channel is widespread in macaque motor cortex pyramidal cells: A histological comparison between rat and macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, David; Goldrick, Isabelle; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander; Greensmith, Linda; Kalmar, Bernadett

    2017-02-18

    There are substantial differences across species in the organisation and function of the motor pathways. These differences extend to basic electrophysiological properties. Thus, in rat motor cortex, pyramidal cells have long duration action potentials, while in the macaque, some pyramidal neurons exhibit short duration 'thin' spikes. These differences may be related to the expression of the fast potassium channel Kv3.1b, which in rat interneurons is associated with generation of thin spikes. Rat pyramidal cells typically lack these channels, while there are reports that they are present in macaque pyramids. Here we made a systematic, quantitative comparison of the expression of Kv3.1b in sections from macaque and rat motor cortex, using two different antibodies (NeuroMab, Millipore). As our standard reference, we examined, in the same sections, Kv3.1b staining in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, which show strong Kv3.1b immunoreactivity. In macaque motor cortex, a large sample of pyramidal neurons were nearly all found to express Kv3.1b in their soma membranes. These labelled neurons were identified as pyramidal based either by expression of SMI32 (a pyramidal marker), or by their shape and size, lack of expression of parvalbumin (a marker for some classes of interneuron). Large (Betz cells), medium and small pyramidal neurons all expressed Kv3.1b. In rat motor cortex, SMI32-postive pyramidal neurons expressing Kv3.1b were very rare and weakly stained. Thus, there is a marked species difference in the immunoreactivity of Kv3.1b in pyramidal neurons, and this may be one of the factors explaining the pronounced electrophysiological differences between rat and macaque pyramidal neurons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Different mechanisms underlying the repolarization of narrow and wide action potentials in pyramidal cells and interneurons of cat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Zhang, J J; Hu, G Y; Wu, C P

    1996-07-01

    Two different types of action potentials were observed among the pyramidal cells and interneurons in cat motor cortex: the narrow action potentials and the wide action potentials. These two types of action potentials had similar rising phases (528.8 +/- 77.0 vs 553.1 +/- 71.8 mV/ms for the maximal rising rate), but differed in spike duration (0.44 +/- 0.09 vs 1.40 +/- 0.39 ms) and amplitude (57.31 +/- 8.22 vs 72.52 +/- 8.31 mV), implying that the ionic currents contributing to repolarization of these action potentials are different. Here we address this issue by pharmacological manipulation and using voltage-clamp technique in slices of cat motor cortex. Raising extracellular K+ concentration (from 3 mM to 10 mM), applying a low dose of 4-aminopyridine (2-200 microM) or administering a low concentration of tetraethylammonium (0.2-1.0 mM) each not only broadened the narrow action potentials, but also increased their amplitudes. In contrast, high K+ medium or low dose of tetraethylammonium only broadened the wide action potentials, leaving their amplitudes unaffected, and 4-aminopyridine had only a slight broadening effect on the wide spikes. These results implied that K+ currents were involved in the repolarization of both types of action potentials, and that the K+ currents in the narrow action potentials seemed to activate much earlier than those in the wide spikes. This early activated K+ current may counteract the rapid sodium current, yielding the extremely brief duration and small amplitude of the narrow spikes. The sensitivity of the narrow spikes to 4-aminopyridine may not be mainly attributed to blockade of the classical A current (IA), because depolarizing the membrane potential to inactivate IA did not reproduce the effects of 4-aminopyridine. Blockade of Ca2+ influx slowed the last two-thirds repolarization of the wide action potentials. On the contrary, the narrow action potentials were not affected by Ca(2+)-current blockers, but if they were first

  7. Properties of fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from the cortex and nucleus of the porcine eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2012-04-01

    The organization and physical properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from the eye lenses of two-year-old pigs were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, and the oxygen transport parameter (OTP) were assessed from the EPR spectra of precisely positioned spin labels. Intact cortical and nuclear membranes, which include membrane proteins, were found to contain three distinct lipid environments. These lipid environments were termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain (lipids in protein aggregates). The amount of boundary and trapped lipids was greater in intact nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. The properties of intact membranes were compared with the organization and properties of lens lipid membranes made of the total lipid extracts from the lens cortex or nucleus. In cortical lens lipid membranes, only one homogenous environment was detected, which was designated as a bulk lipid domain (phospholipid bilayer saturated with cholesterol). Lens lipid membranes prepared from the lens nucleus possessed two domains, assigned as a bulk lipid domain and a cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD). In intact nuclear membranes, it was difficult to discriminate the CBD, which was clearly detected in nuclear lens lipid membranes, because the OTP measured in the CBD is the same as in the domain formed by trapped lipids. The two domains unique to intact membranes-namely, the domain formed by boundary lipids and the domain formed by trapped lipids-were most likely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins. It is concluded that formation of rigid and practically impermeable domains is enhanced in the lens nucleus, indicating changes in membrane composition that may help to maintain low oxygen concentration in this lens region.

  8. Effects of the angiotensin-(1-7) receptor Mas on cell proliferation and on the population of doublecortin positive cells within the dentate gyrus and the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, M; Walther, T; von Bohlen Und Halbach, O

    2014-02-01

    Aside from the well-known biologically active angiotensin II, other biologically active angiotensins have been discovered, including angiotensin IV and angiotensin-(1-7). Some years ago, we and others discovered that the Mas proto-oncogene encodes a G protein-coupled receptor being essential for angiotensin-(1-7) signaling. Mas is not only expressed in the periphery but also within the brain, e.g. in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the piriform cortex (PC). Since the DG is capable of adult neurogenesis, we examined the impact of a deletion of Mas upon adult neurogenesis. Deletion of Mas did not alter cell proliferation in the adult DG (as monitored with phosphohistone H3) and did not alter cell death (as monitored with activated Caspase 3). However, Mas deficiency resulted in an increase in the number of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells, indicating that lack of Mas increases the number of this cell population. Concerning the PC, it is discussed whether adult neurogenesis occurs under physiological conditions in this area. We could demonstrate that Mas deficiency has an impact on cell division and on the population of DCX-positive cells within the PC. Since Mas is not expressed before birth within the brain, our data may suggest that adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neurogenesis occurring during prenatal development share several common mechanisms, but are, at least in part, differentially regulated. Moreover, since deficiency for Mas increases the numbers of DCX-positive young neurons, blockage of Mas might be beneficial in stimulating neurogenesis in adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa De Rose; Giusy Guzzi; Domenico Bosco; Mary Romano; Serena Marianna Lavano; Massimiliano Plastino; Giorgio Volpentesta; Rosa Marotta; Angelo Lavano

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment...

  10. Bistable character of a deep level in polycrystalline Si substrate for solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y., E-mail: yamasita@elec.okayama-u.ac.j [Division of Industrial Innovation Sciences, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Ochi, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Kamiura, Y.; Ishiyama, T. [Division of Industrial Innovation Sciences, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Electronic levels in polycrystalline Si (pc-Si) substrates for solar cells were studied by means of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). A broad peak was observed at around 250 K when samples with grain boundaries (GBs) were thermally treated. The origin of this peak was investigated and we conclude that it is attributed to Cu contaminants gathered around GBs. We found interesting character of this peak. The peak intensity became small by annealing with reverse-biased voltage on the Schottky junction and it was recovered after keeping the sample at room temperature for several days. We explained this character as bistability of the center depending on its charge state. From the application viewpoint, we tried remote hydrogen-plasma treatment and could annihilate the peak.

  11. Advanced Solar Cell and Array Technology for NASA Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael; Benson, Scott; Scheiman, David; Finacannon, Homer; Oleson, Steve; Landis, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by the NASA Glenn Research Center assessed the feasibility of using photovoltaics (PV) to power spacecraft for outer planetary, deep space missions. While the majority of spacecraft have relied on photovoltaics for primary power, the drastic reduction in solar intensity as the spacecraft moves farther from the sun has either limited the power available (severely curtailing scientific operations) or necessitated the use of nuclear systems. A desire by NASA and the scientific community to explore various bodies in the outer solar system and conduct "long-term" operations using using smaller, "lower-cost" spacecraft has renewed interest in exploring the feasibility of using photovoltaics for to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond. With recent advances in solar cell performance and continuing development in lightweight, high power solar array technology, the study determined that photovoltaics is indeed a viable option for many of these missions.

  12. Gallic Acid Is the Major Active Component of Cortex Moutan in Inhibiting Immune Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ben Chung Lap; Li, Long Fei; Hu, Shui Qing; Wat, Elaine; Wong, Eric Chun Wai; Zhang, Vanilla Xin; Lau, Clara Bik San; Wong, Chun Kwok; Hon, Kam Lun Ellis; Hui, Patrick Chi Leung; Leung, Ping Chung

    2015-09-10

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a widely prevalent and chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Penta Herbs Formula (PHF) is efficacious in improving the quality of life and reducing topical corticosteroid used in children with AD and one of the active herbs it contains is Cortex Moutan. Recent studies showed that altered functions of dendritic cells (DC) were observed in atopic individuals, suggesting that DC might play a major role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation by their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hence, the aims of the present study were to identify the major active component(s) of Cortex Moutan, which might inhibit DC functions and to investigate their possible interactions with conventional corticosteroid on inhibiting the development of DC from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) culture model coupled with the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC), high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) analyses were used. Gallic acid was the major active component from Cortex Moutan which could dose dependently inhibit interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and the functional cluster of differentiation (CD) surface markers CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression from cytokine cocktail-activated moDC. Gallic acid could also lower the concentration of hydrocortisone required to inhibit the activation of DC.

  13. Gallic Acid Is the Major Active Component of Cortex Moutan in Inhibiting Immune Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Chung Lap Chan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a widely prevalent and chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease. Penta Herbs Formula (PHF is efficacious in improving the quality of life and reducing topical corticosteroid used in children with AD and one of the active herbs it contains is Cortex Moutan. Recent studies showed that altered functions of dendritic cells (DC were observed in atopic individuals, suggesting that DC might play a major role in the generation and maintenance of inflammation by their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hence, the aims of the present study were to identify the major active component(s of Cortex Moutan, which might inhibit DC functions and to investigate their possible interactions with conventional corticosteroid on inhibiting the development of DC from monocytes. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC culture model coupled with the high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LCMS analyses were used. Gallic acid was the major active component from Cortex Moutan which could dose dependently inhibit interleukin (IL-12 p40 and the functional cluster of differentiation (CD surface markers CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression from cytokine cocktail-activated moDC. Gallic acid could also lower the concentration of hydrocortisone required to inhibit the activation of DC.

  14. Cerebral cortex modulation of pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-feng XIE; Fu-quan HUO; Jing-shi TANG

    2009-01-01

    Pain is a complex experience encompassing sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational and cognitiv e-emotional com-ponents mediated by different mechanisms. Contrary to the traditional view that the cerebral cortex is not involved in pain perception, an extensive cortical network associated with pain processing has been revealed using multiple methods over the past decades. This network consistently includes, at least, the anterior cingulate cortex, the agranular insular cortex, the primary (SⅠ) and secondary somatosensory (SⅡ) cortices, the ventrolateral orbital cortex and the motor cortex. These corti-cal structures constitute the medial and lateral pain systems, the nucleus submedius-ventrolateral orbital cortex-periaque-ductal gray system and motor cortex system, respectively. Multiple neurotransmitters, including opioid, glutamate, GABA and dopamine, are involved in the modulation of pain by these cortical structures. In addition, glial cells may also be in-volved in cortical modulation of pain and serve as one target for pain management research. This review discusses recent studies of pain modulation by these cerebral cortical structures in animals and human.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha affect hydrocortisone expression in mice adrenal cortex cells mainly through tumor necrosis factor alpha-receptor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Hai-ming; FANG Yuan; HUANG Pei-lin

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is important in promoting relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).We identified the TNF-α receptor involved in the inhibition of adrenal corticotrophin (ACTH)-stimulated hydrocortisone release by studying the expression of TNF-α receptors in adrenal cortex Y1 cells and the effect of downregulating TNF receptors on ACTH-stimulated hydrocortisone release.Methods We used real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry to evaluate the expression of TNF receptors on Y1 cells.TNF-receptor 1 (TNF-R1) DNA fragments corresponding to the short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-sequences were synthesized and cloned into pcDNATM 6.2-GW/EmGFP expression vector.Knockdown efficiency of TNF-R1 expression was evaluated in miRNA transfected and mock-miRNA transfected Y1 cells by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR).Hydrocortisone expression levels were determined in TNF-R1-knockdown and control Y1 cells treated with TNF-α and ACTH.Results Mouse adrenal cortex Y1 cells were positive for type I TNF-R1,but not type Ⅱ TNF-receptor (TNF-R2).Blocking TNF-R1 expression resulted in loss of TNF-α-mediated inhibition of ACTH-stimulated hydrocortisone expression,suggesting a role for the TNF-R1 related signaling pathway in ACTH-stimulated hydrocortisone synthesis.Conclusion The inhibitory effect of TNF-α on ACTH-stimulated hydrocortisone synthesis was mediated via TNF-R1 in adrenal cortex.

  16. Electronic properties and deep level transient spectroscopy of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Feng, Liang-Huan; Wang, Zhao; Zheng, Xu; Zheng, Jia-Gui; Cai, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Quan; Li, Wei; Wu, Li-Li; Lei, Zhi; Zeng, Guang-Gen

    2011-03-01

    It is well known that preparing temperatures and defects are highly related to deep-level impurities. In our studies, the CdTe polycrystalline films have been prepared at various temperatures by close spaced sublimation (CSS). The different preparing temperature effects on CdS/CdTe solar cells and deep-level impurities have been investigated by I—V and C—V measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). By comparison, less dark saturated current density, higher carrier concentration, and better photovoltaic performance are demonstrated in a 580°C sample. Also there is less deep-level impurity recombination, because the lower hole trap concentration is present in this sample. In addition, three deep levels, Ev + 0.341 eV(H4), Ev + 0.226 eV(H5) and EC - 0.147 eV(E3), are found in the 580°C sample, and the possible source of deep levels is analysed and discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 60506004), and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2003AA513010).

  17. Electronic properties and deep level transient spectroscopy of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bing; Lei Zhi; Zeng Guang-Gen; Eeng Liang-Huan; Wang Zhao; Zheng Xu; Zheng Jia-Gui; Cai Ya-Ping; Zhang Jing-Quan; Li Wei; Wu Li-Li

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that preparing temperatures and defects are highly related to deep-level impurities. In our studies, the CdTe polycrystalline films have been prepared at various temperatures by close spaced sublimation (CSS). The different preparing temperature effects on CdS/CdTe solar cells and deep-level impurities have been investigated by I-V and C-V measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). By comparison, less dark saturated current density, higher carrier concentration, and better photovoltaic performance are demonstrated in a 580℃ sample. Also there is less deep-level impurity recombination, because the lower hole trap concentration is present in this sample. In addition, three deep levels, Ev + 0.341 eV(H4), Ev + 0.226 eV(H5) and EC -0.147 eV(E3), are found in the 580℃ sample, and the possible source of deep levels is analysed and discussed.

  18. Enhanced sensitivity of A549 cells to the cytotoxic action of anticancer drugs via suppression of Nrf2 by procyanidins from Cinnamomi Cortex extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Itoi, Ayano; Kawana, Ayako; Nishiyama, Takahito; Ogura, Kenichiro [Department of Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Akira, E-mail: hiratuka@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} We found a novel inhibitor of Nrf2 known as a chemoresistance factor. {yields} Overexpressed Nrf2 in lung cancer cells was suppressed by Cinnamomi Cortex extract. {yields} Cytotoxic action of anticancer drugs in cells treated with the extract was enhanced. {yields} Procyanidin tetramers and pentamers were active components in suppressing Nrf2. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an important cytoprotective transcription factor because Nrf2-regulated enzymes play a key role in antioxidant and detoxification processes. Recent studies have reported that lung cancer cells overexpressing Nrf2 exhibit increased resistance to chemotherapy. Suppression of overexpressed Nrf2 is needed for a new therapeutic approach against lung cancers. In the present study, we found that Cinnamomi Cortex extract (CCE) has an ability to suppress Nrf2-regulated enzyme activity and Nrf2 expression in human lung cancer A549 cells with high Nrf2 activity. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCE significantly enhances sensitivity of A549 cells to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin and etoposide as well as increasing the intracellular accumulation of both drugs. These results suggest that CCE might be an effective concomitant agent to reduce anticancer drug resistance derived from Nrf2 overexpression. Bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed that procyanidin tetramers and pentamers contained in CCE were active components in suppressing Nrf2.

  19. Response of the sensorimotor cortex of cerebral palsy rats receiving transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor 165-transfected neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jielu Tan; Xiangrong Zheng; Shanshan Zhang; Yujia Yang; Xia Wang; Xiaohe Yu; Le Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells are characterized by the ability to differentiate and stably express exogenous ge-nes. Vascular endothelial growth factor plays a role in protecting local blood vessels and neurons of newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected neural stem cells may be neuroprotective in rats with cerebral palsy. In this study, 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into ifve groups: (1) sham operation (control), (2) cerebral palsy model alone or with (3) phosphate-buffered saline, (4) vascular en-dothelial growth factor 165 + neural stem cells, or (5) neural stem cells alone. hTe cerebral palsy model was established by ligating the letf common carotid artery followed by exposure to hypox-ia. Phosphate-buffered saline, vascular endothelial growth factor + neural stem cells, and neural stem cells alone were administered into the sensorimotor cortex using the stereotaxic instrument and microsyringe. Atfer transplantation, the radial-arm water maze test and holding test were performed. Immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor and histology using hematoxylin-eosin were performed on cerebral cortex. Results revealed that the number of vas-cular endothelial growth factor-positive cells in cerebral palsy rats transplanted with vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected neural stem cells was increased, the time for ifnding water and the ifnding repetitions were reduced, the holding time was prolonged, and the degree of cell degeneration or necrosis was reduced. hTese ifndings indicate that the transplantation of vascu-lar endothelial growth factor-transfected neural stem cells alleviates brain damage and cognitive deifcits, and is neuroprotective in neonatal rats with hypoxia ischemic-mediated cerebral palsy.

  20. Response of the sensorimotor cortex of cerebral palsy rats receiving transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor 165-transfected neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jielu; Zheng, Xiangrong; Zhang, Shanshan; Yang, Yujia; Wang, Xia; Yu, Xiaohe; Zhong, Le

    2014-10-01

    Neural stem cells are characterized by the ability to differentiate and stably express exogenous ge-nes. Vascular endothelial growth factor plays a role in protecting local blood vessels and neurons of newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected neural stem cells may be neuroprotective in rats with cerebral palsy. In this study, 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: (1) sham operation (control), (2) cerebral palsy model alone or with (3) phosphate-buffered saline, (4) vascular endothelial growth factor 165 + neural stem cells, or (5) neural stem cells alone. The cerebral palsy model was established by ligating the left common carotid artery followed by exposure to hypoxia. Phosphate-buffered saline, vascular endothelial growth factor + neural stem cells, and neural stem cells alone were administered into the sensorimotor cortex using the stereotaxic instrument and microsyringe. After transplantation, the radial-arm water maze test and holding test were performed. Immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor and histology using hematoxylin-eosin were performed on cerebral cortex. Results revealed that the number of vascular endothelial growth factor-positive cells in cerebral palsy rats transplanted with vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected neural stem cells was increased, the time for finding water and the finding repetitions were reduced, the holding time was prolonged, and the degree of cell degeneration or necrosis was reduced. These findings indicate that the transplantation of vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected neural stem cells alleviates brain damage and cognitive deficits, and is neuroprotective in neonatal rats with hypoxia ischemic-mediated cerebral palsy.

  1. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...

  2. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.J. de Kock (Christiaan); B. Sakmann (Bert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats th

  3. Spiking in primary somatosensory cortex during natural whisking in awake head-restrained rats is cell-type specific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.J. de Kock (Christiaan); B. Sakmann (Bert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSensation involves active movement of sensory organs, but it remains unknown how position or movement of sensory organs is encoded in cortex. In the rat whisker system, each whisker is represented by an individual cortical (barrel) column. Here, we quantified in awake, head-fixed rats th

  4. The cell spar for development of deep water fields offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, Jim; Finn, Lyle [Technip/Floater Product Line, Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The Cell Spar is the third generation of the highly successful spar technology and has many of the characteristics of its predecessors, the Classic and Truss Spars, including similar in-place performance. Unlike the two preceding generations, which were suited to larger developments, the Cell Spar is designed to be competitive in the smaller range of floating production systems and is best suited for small deck weights and well counts. What distinguishes the Cell Spar from the other Spars is the fabrication method. The design utilizes a familiar rolling procedure and high speed welding process, to promote competitive fabrication costs and cycle times. A shorter cycle time from discovery to first production, coupled with a lower cost structure improves development economics, making the concept suitable for consideration for smaller (less than 75 MMBE) deep water field developments. The fabrication method employs tubular rolling and welding techniques that have been used successfully for years to fabricate conventional steel jacket structures. This tubular rolling and welding capability is available at many locations around the world and this capability could be established for a modest cost at other locations. As a result, it is feasible to fabricate the structure at many locations around the world, including Brazil, and thus increase the local content for the field development, as well as reduce transportation risks and expense of the final hull form. The first Cell Spar has already been delivered earlier this year. Based on the experience on this initial design, a number of product improvements have been implemented. Most of these product improvements have focused on reducing the number of required details, standardizing components, and enabling more outfitting work to be done early in the process. The first application has been classified as an ABS A1 Floating Offshore Installation (FOI). The product improvements that have been recently implemented have received

  5. The Effect of the Oral Administration of Salvia Rhytidia Extract on Neural Cell Numbers of Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus Following Ischemia-Reperfusion in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Haghjoo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds & aim: Forebrain ischemia induces complete interruption of brain blood flow and neuronal injury. In the present study the effect of Salvia rhytidia extract on cell numbers of the cerebral cortex and different hippocampal regions following ischemia-reperfusion (IR was evaluated. Methods: In the present experimental study, Thirty-five adult male rats were divided into 7 groups of 5 rats. Control group (1, sham group (3, and 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 as ischemic groups. (2, 4, 5, 6, 7. Left common carotid and left vertebral arteries were occluded by tourniquet for 10 min. Group 2 received no drug .sham group (3 received normal saline without ischemia. Group 4 received Salvia (3.2mg/kg and group 5 received silymarin (50 mg/kg, 2 h after ischemia. Group 6 received the same dose of Salvia and group 7 received the same dose of silymarin 0, 24, 48, and 72 hrs before ischemia. After 24 h reperfusion, the brains of rats were prepared for histological studies. The cells were counted and cerebral and hippocampal tissue sections stained by hematoxylin and eosin. The data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Duncan as posthoc test. Results: Significant decrease was observed in the neural cell numbers of cerebral cortex and pyramidal layer of CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus in groups 2, 4 and 5 compared to control group (p=00000. No significant decrease was observed in neural cell numbers of cerebral cortex and all hippocampal regions in groups 3, 6, 7. Pyramidal layer of CA3 and granular layer of dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus in groups 2, 4 and 5 compared to control. Conclusion: Saliva extract with aintoxidan effect similar to silymarin protects the forebrain from ischemia injuries and reperfusion.

  6. Single cell genomic study of Dehalococcoidites in deep sea sediments of Peru Margin 1230

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, A.; Meyer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dehalogenating Chloroflexi, such as Dehalococcoidites Dhc were originally discovered as the key microorganisms mediating reductive dehalogenation of the prevalent groundwater contaminants tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene. Molecular and genomic studies on their key enzymes for energy conservation, reductive dehalogenases rdh, have provided evidence for ubiquitous horizontal gene transfer. A pioneering study by Futagami et al. discovered novel putative rdh phylotypes in sediments from the Pacific, revealing an unknown and surprising abundance of rdh genes in pristine habitats. The frequent detection of Dhc-related 16S rRNA genes from these environments implied the occurrence of dissimilatory dehalorespiration in marine subsurface sediments, however, pristine Dhc could never be linked to this activity. Despite being ubiquitous in those environments, metabolic life style or ecological function of Dhc in the absence of anthropogenic contaminants is still completely unknown. We therefore analyzed a non-contaminated deep sea sediment sample of the Peru Margin 1230 site by a single cell genomic (SGC) approach. We present for the first time data on three single Dhc cells, helping to elucidate their role in the poorly understood oligotrophic marine sub-surface environment.

  7. Deep sequencing of Trichomonas vaginalis during the early infection of vaginal epithelial cells and amoeboid transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Sven B; Woehle, Christian; Kusdian, Gary; Landan, Giddy; Tachezy, Jan; Zimorski, Verena; Martin, William F

    2013-08-01

    The human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis has the largest protozoan genome known, potentially encoding approximately 60,000 proteins. To what degree these genes are expressed is not well known and only a few key transcription factors and promoter domains have been identified. To shed light on the expression capacity of the parasite and transcriptional regulation during phase transitions, we deep sequenced the transcriptomes of the protozoan during two environmental stimuli of the early infection process: exposure to oxygen and contact with vaginal epithelial cells. Eleven 3' fragment libraries from different time points after exposure to oxygen only and in combination with human tissue were sequenced, generating more than 150 million reads which mapped onto 33,157 protein coding genes in total and a core set of more than 20,000 genes represented within all libraries. The data uncover gene family expression regulation in this parasite and give evidence for a concentrated response to the individual stimuli. Oxygen stress primarily reveals the parasite's strategies to deal with oxygen radicals. The exposure of oxygen-adapted parasites to human epithelial cells primarily induces cytoskeletal rearrangement and proliferation, reflecting the rapid morphological transition from spindle shaped flagellates to tissue-feeding and actively dividing amoeboids.

  8. Coordinated cell type-specific epigenetic remodeling in prefrontal cortex begins before birth and continues into early adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennady P Shulha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of prefrontal and other higher-order association cortices is associated with widespread changes in the cortical transcriptome, particularly during the transitions from prenatal to postnatal development, and from early infancy to later stages of childhood and early adulthood. However, the timing and longitudinal trajectories of neuronal gene expression programs during these periods remain unclear in part because of confounding effects of concomitantly occurring shifts in neuron-to-glia ratios. Here, we used cell type-specific chromatin sorting techniques for genome-wide profiling of a histone mark associated with transcriptional regulation--H3 with trimethylated lysine 4 (H3K4me3--in neuronal chromatin from 31 subjects from the late gestational period to 80 years of age. H3K4me3 landscapes of prefrontal neurons were developmentally regulated at 1,157 loci, including 768 loci that were proximal to transcription start sites. Multiple algorithms consistently revealed that the overwhelming majority and perhaps all of developmentally regulated H3K4me3 peaks were on a unidirectional trajectory defined by either rapid gain or loss of histone methylation during the late prenatal period and the first year after birth, followed by similar changes but with progressively slower kinetics during early and later childhood and only minimal changes later in life. Developmentally downregulated H3K4me3 peaks in prefrontal neurons were enriched for Paired box (Pax and multiple Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT motifs, which are known to promote glial differentiation. In contrast, H3K4me3 peaks subject to a progressive increase in maturing prefrontal neurons were enriched for activating protein-1 (AP-1 recognition elements that are commonly associated with activity-dependent regulation of neuronal gene expression. We uncovered a developmental program governing the remodeling of neuronal histone methylation landscapes in the prefrontal

  9. Maternal Exercise during Pregnancy Increases BDNF Levels and Cell Numbers in the Hippocampal Formation but Not in the Cerebral Cortex of Adult Rat Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gomes da Silva

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence has shown that physical exercise during pregnancy may alter brain development and improve cognitive function of offspring. However, the mechanisms through which maternal exercise might promote such effects are not well understood. The present study examined levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and absolute cell numbers in the hippocampal formation and cerebral cortex of rat pups born from mothers exercised during pregnancy. Additionally, we evaluated the cognitive abilities of adult offspring in different behavioral paradigms (exploratory activity and habituation in open field tests, spatial memory in a water maze test, and aversive memory in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Results showed that maternal exercise during pregnancy increased BDNF levels and absolute numbers of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the hippocampal formation of offspring. No differences in BDNF levels or cell numbers were detected in the cerebral cortex. It was also observed that offspring from exercised mothers exhibited better cognitive performance in nonassociative (habituation and associative (spatial learning mnemonic tasks than did offspring from sedentary mothers. Our findings indicate that maternal exercise during pregnancy enhances offspring cognitive function (habituation behavior and spatial learning and increases BDNF levels and cell numbers in the hippocampal formation of offspring.

  10. Deep tissue single cell MSC ablation using a fiber laser source to evaluate therapeutic potential in osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan F.; Pendleton, Emily G.; Lin, Charles P.; Mortensen, Luke J.

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a currently uncurable disease where a mutation in collagen type I yields brittle bones. One potential therapy is transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but controlling and enhancing transplanted cell survival has proven challenging. Therefore, we use a 2- photon imaging system to study individual transplanted cells in the living bone marrow. We ablated cells deep in the bone marrow and observed minimal collateral damage to surrounding tissue. Future work will evaluate the local impact of transplanted MSCs on bone deposition in vivo.

  11. Deep sequencing reveals low incidence of endogenous LINE-1 retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Arokium

    Full Text Available Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1 retrotransposition induces insertional mutations that can result in diseases. It was recently shown that the copy number of L1 and other retroelements is stable in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. However, by using an engineered reporter construct over-expressing L1, another study suggests that reprogramming activates L1 mobility in iPSCs. Given the potential of human iPSCs in therapeutic applications, it is important to clarify whether these cells harbor somatic insertions resulting from endogenous L1 retrotransposition. Here, we verified L1 expression during and after reprogramming as well as potential somatic insertions driven by the most active human endogenous L1 subfamily (L1Hs. Our results indicate that L1 over-expression is initiated during the reprogramming process and is subsequently sustained in isolated clones. To detect potential somatic insertions in iPSCs caused by L1Hs retotransposition, we used a novel sequencing strategy. As opposed to conventional sequencing direction, we sequenced from the 3' end of L1Hs to the genomic DNA, thus enabling the direct detection of the polyA tail signature of retrotransposition for verification of true insertions. Deep coverage sequencing thus allowed us to detect seven potential somatic insertions with low read counts from two iPSC clones. Negative PCR amplification in parental cells, presence of a polyA tail and absence from seven L1 germline insertion databases highly suggested true somatic insertions in iPSCs. Furthermore, these insertions could not be detected in iPSCs by PCR, likely due to low abundance. We conclude that L1Hs retrotransposes at low levels in iPSCs and therefore warrants careful analyses for genotoxic effects.

  12. Deep sequencing reveals low incidence of endogenous LINE-1 retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokium, Hubert; Kamata, Masakazu; Kim, Sanggu; Kim, Namshin; Liang, Min; Presson, Angela P; Chen, Irvin S

    2014-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition induces insertional mutations that can result in diseases. It was recently shown that the copy number of L1 and other retroelements is stable in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, by using an engineered reporter construct over-expressing L1, another study suggests that reprogramming activates L1 mobility in iPSCs. Given the potential of human iPSCs in therapeutic applications, it is important to clarify whether these cells harbor somatic insertions resulting from endogenous L1 retrotransposition. Here, we verified L1 expression during and after reprogramming as well as potential somatic insertions driven by the most active human endogenous L1 subfamily (L1Hs). Our results indicate that L1 over-expression is initiated during the reprogramming process and is subsequently sustained in isolated clones. To detect potential somatic insertions in iPSCs caused by L1Hs retotransposition, we used a novel sequencing strategy. As opposed to conventional sequencing direction, we sequenced from the 3' end of L1Hs to the genomic DNA, thus enabling the direct detection of the polyA tail signature of retrotransposition for verification of true insertions. Deep coverage sequencing thus allowed us to detect seven potential somatic insertions with low read counts from two iPSC clones. Negative PCR amplification in parental cells, presence of a polyA tail and absence from seven L1 germline insertion databases highly suggested true somatic insertions in iPSCs. Furthermore, these insertions could not be detected in iPSCs by PCR, likely due to low abundance. We conclude that L1Hs retrotransposes at low levels in iPSCs and therefore warrants careful analyses for genotoxic effects.

  13. Deep sequencing of mRNA in CD24− and CD24+ mammary carcinoma Mvt1 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Rostoker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available CD24 is an anchored cell surface marker that is highly expressed in cancer cells (Lee et al., 2009 and its expression is associated with poorer outcome of cancer patients (Kristiansen et al., 2003. Phenotype comparison between two subpopulations derived from the Mvt1 cell line, CD24− cells (with no CD24 cell surface expression and the CD24+ cells, identified high tumorigenic capacity for the CD24+ cells. In order to reveal the transcripts that support the CD24+ aggressive and invasive phenotype we compared the gene profiles of these two subpopulations. mRNA profiles of CD24− and CD24+ cells were generated by deep sequencing, in triplicate, using an Illumina HiSeq 2500. Here we provide a detailed description of the mRNA-seq analysis from our recent study (Rostoker et al., 2015. The mRNA-seq data have been deposited in the NCBI GEO database (accession number GSE68746.

  14. A neural network model on self-organizing emergence of simple-cell receptive field with orientation selectivity in visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Qian(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Hubel, D. H.. Wiesel. T. N., Receptive fields of single neuron in the cat striate cortex, Journal of Physiology, 1959, 148:574-591.[2]Hubel. D. H.. Wiesel, T. N., Functional architecture macaque monkey visual cortexm, Proc. Roy. Soc. B, 1977, 198: 1-59.[3]Shou. T. D., Brain Mechanisms of Visual Information Processing (in Chinese), Shanghai: Shanghai Science-Technology and Education Press, 1997, 188-197.[4]Ferster, D., Chung, S., Wheat, H., Orientation selectivity of thalamic input to simple cells of cat visual cortex, Nature,1996, 380: 249-252.[5]Vidyasagar. T. R., Pei, X., Volgushev, M., Multiple mechanisms underlying the orientation selectivity of visual cortical neurons. TINS, 1996, 19: 272-277.[6]Artun, O. B., Shouval, H. Z., Cooper, L. N., The effect of dynamic synapses on spatiotemporal receptive fields in visual cortex, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1998, 95:11999-12003.[7]Rolls, E. T.. Tovee, M. J., Sparseness of the neuronal representation of stimuli in the primate temporal visual cortex, J.Neurophysiology, 1995,73: 713-726.[8]Olshausen. B. A.. Field, D. J., Sparse coding with an overcomplete basis set: A strategy employed by V 1 ? Vision Research,1997.37: 3311-3325.[9]Bell. A. J., Sejnoswski, T. J., The "Independent components" of natural scenes are edge filters, Vision Research, 1997, 37:3327-3338.[10]Dan, Y., Atick, J. J., Reid, R. C., Efficient coding of natural scenes in the lateral geniculate nucleus: experimental test of a computational theory, Journal of Neuroscience, 1996, 16:3351-3362.[11]Field. D. J., Relations between the statistics of natural images and the response properties of cortical cells, Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 1987, 4: 2379-2394.[12]DeAngelis, G. C., Ohzawa, I., Freeman, R. D., Receptive filed dynamics in the central visual pathway, TINS, 1995,18:451-458.[13]Wang, Y. J., Qi, X. L., Chen, Y. Z., Simulations of receptive fields dynamics, TINS, 1996, 19: 385-386.

  15. Comparative in vitro study of cholinium-based ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents toward fish cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radošević, Kristina; Železnjak, Jelena; Cvjetko Bubalo, Marina; Radojčić Redovniković, Ivana; Slivac, Igor; Gaurina Srček, Višnja

    2016-09-01

    With the advent of ionic liquids, much was expected concerning their applicability as an alternative to organic solvents in the chemical technology and biotechnology fields. However, the most studied and commonly used ionic liquids based on imidazolium and pyridinium were found not to be as environmentally friendly as it was first expected. Therefore, a new generation of alternative solvents named natural ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents, composed of natural and/or renewable compounds, have come into focus in recent years. Since the number of newly synthesized chemicals increases yearly, simple and reliable methods for their ecotoxicological assessment are necessary. Permanent fish cell lines can serve as a test system for the evaluation of a chemical's cytotoxicity. This paper presents research results on the cytotoxic effects on Channel Catfish Ovary (CCO) cell line induced by fifteen cholinium-based ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents. Based on the decrease in cell viability, the most obvious toxic effect on CCO cells was caused by ionic liquid choline oxalate, while other solvents tested exhibited low cytotoxicity. Therefore, we can conclude that cholinium-based ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents are comparatively less toxic to CCO cells than conventional ionic liquids.

  16. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell.

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    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris; Mortensen, Peter; Mann, Matthias; Thomas, Alan W

    2008-07-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much research has therefore focused on RBC and cardiovascular disorders of mouse and humans. RBCs also host malaria parasites. Recently we presented an in-depth proteome for the human RBC. Here we present directly comparable data for the mouse RBC as membrane-only, soluble-only, and combined membrane-bound/soluble proteomes (comprising, respectively, 247, 232, and 165 proteins). All proteins were identified, validated, and categorized in terms of subcellular localization, protein family, and function, and in comparison with the human RBC, were classified as orthologs, family-related, or unique. Splice isoforms were identified, and polypeptides migrating with anomalous apparent molecular weights were grouped into putatively ubiquitinated or partially degraded complexes. Overall there was close concordance between mouse and human proteomes, confirming the unexpected RBC complexity. Several novel findings in the human proteome have been confirmed here. This comparison sheds light on several open issues in RBC biology and provides a departure point for more comprehensive understanding of RBC function.

  17. Differences in Visual-Spatial Input May Underlie Different Compression Properties of Firing Fields for Grid Cell Modules in Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    Firing fields of grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex show compression or expansion after manipulations of the location of environmental barriers. This compression or expansion could be selective for individual grid cell modules with particular properties of spatial scaling. We present a model for differences in the response of modules to barrier location that arise from different mechanisms for the influence of visual features on the computation of location that drives grid cell firing patterns. These differences could arise from differences in the position of visual features within the visual field. When location was computed from the movement of visual features on the ground plane (optic flow) in the ventral visual field, this resulted in grid cell spatial firing that was not sensitive to barrier location in modules modeled with small spacing between grid cell firing fields. In contrast, when location was computed from static visual features on walls of barriers, i.e. in the more dorsal visual field, this resulted in grid cell spatial firing that compressed or expanded based on the barrier locations in modules modeled with large spacing between grid cell firing fields. This indicates that different grid cell modules might have differential properties for computing location based on visual cues, or the spatial radius of sensitivity to visual cues might differ between modules.

  18. Rho kinase's role in myosin recruitment to the equatorial cortex of mitotic Drosophila S2 cells is for myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation.

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    Sara O Dean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin II recruitment to the equatorial cortex is one of the earliest events in establishment of the cytokinetic contractile ring. In Drosophila S2 cells, we previously showed that myosin II is recruited to the furrow independently of F-actin, and that Rho1 and Rok are essential for this recruitment [1]. Rok phosphorylates several cellular proteins, including the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we express phosphorylation state mimic constructs of the RLC in S2 cells to examine the role of RLC phosphorylation involving Rok in the localization of myosin. Phosphorylation of the RLC is required for myosin localization to the equatorial cortex during mitosis, and the essential role of Rok in this localization and for cytokinesis is to maintain phosphorylation of the RLC. The ability to regulate the RLC phosphorylation state spatio-temporally is not essential for the myosin localization. Furthermore, the essential role of Citron in cytokinesis is not phosphorylation of the RLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the Rho1 pathway leading to myosin localization to the future cytokinetic furrow is relatively straightforward, where only Rok is needed, and it is only needed to maintain phosphorylation of the myosin RLC.

  19. Effects of Biowastes Released by Mechanically Damaged Muscle Cells on the Propagation of Deep Tissue Injury: A Multiphysics Study.

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    Yao, Yifei; Da Ong, Lucas Xian; Li, Xiaotong; Wan, Kinlun; Mak, Arthur F T

    2017-03-01

    Deep tissue injuries occur in muscle tissues around bony prominences under mechanical loading leading to severe pressure ulcers. Tissue compression can potentially compromise lymphatic transport and cause accumulation of metabolic biowastes, which may cause further cell damage under continuous mechanical loading. In this study, we hypothesized that biowastes released by mechanically damaged muscle cells could be toxic to the surrounding muscle cells and could compromise the capability of the surrounding muscle cells to withstand further mechanical loadings. In vitro, we applied prolonged low compressive stress (PLCS) and short-term high compressive stress to myoblasts to cause cell damage and collected the biowastes released by the damaged cells under the respective loading scenarios. In silico, we used COMSOL to simulate the compressive stress distribution and the diffusion of biowastes in a semi-3D buttock finite element model. In vitro results showed that biowastes collected from cells damaged under PLCS were more toxic and could compromise the capability of normal myoblasts to resist compressive damage. In silico results showed that higher biowastes diffusion coefficient, higher biowastes release rate, lower biowastes tolerance threshold and earlier timeline of releasing biowastes would cause faster propagation of tissue damage. This study highlighted the importance of biowastes in the development of deep tissue injury to clinical pressure ulcers under prolonged skeletal compression.

  20. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  1. β-Adrenoceptor activation enhances L-type calcium channel currents in anterior piriform cortex pyramidal cells of neonatal mice: implication for odor learning.

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    Ghosh, Abhinaba; Mukherjee, Bandhan; Chen, Xihua; Yuan, Qi

    2017-03-01

    Early odor preference learning occurs in one-week-old rodents when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation mimicking maternal care. β-Adrenoceptors and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) are critically involved in this learning. However, whether β-adrenoceptors interact directly with LTCCs in aPC pyramidal cells is unknown. Here we show that pyramidal cells expressed significant LTCC currents that declined with age. β-Adrenoceptor activation via isoproterenol age-dependently enhanced LTCC currents. Nifedipine-sensitive, isoproterenol enhancement of calcium currents was only observed in post-natal day 7-10 mice. APC β-adrenoceptor activation induced early odor preference learning was blocked by nifedipine coinfusion.

  2. Intermittent hypoxia stimulates formation of binuclear neurons in brain cortex- a role of cell fusion in neuroprotection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltsyn, Alexander A; Manukhina, Eugenia B; Goryacheva, Anna V; Downey, H Fred; Dubrovin, Ivan P; Komissarova, Svetlana V; Kubatiev, Aslan A

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte fusion with neurons in the brain cortex is a part of normal ontogenesis and is a possible means of neuroregeneration. Following such fusion, the oligodendrocyte nucleus undergoes neuron-specific reprogramming, resulting in the formation of binuclear neurons, which doubles the functional capability of the neuron. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the formation of binuclear neurons is involved in long-term adaptation of the brain to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia, which is known to be neuroprotective. Rats were adapted to hypoxia in an altitude chamber at a simulated altitude of 4000 m above sea level for 14 days (30 min increasing to 4 h, daily). One micrometer sections of the left motor cortex were analyzed by light microscopy. Phases of the fusion and reprogramming process were recorded, and the number of binuclear neurons was counted for all section areas containing pyramidal neurons of layers III-V. For the control group subjected to sham hypoxia, the density of binuclear neurons was 4.49 ± 0.32 mm(2). In the hypoxia-adapted group, this density increased to 5.71 ± 0.39 mm(2) (P neurons did not differ from the number observed in the control group. We suggest that the increased content of binuclear neurons may serve as a structural basis for the neuroprotective effects of the adaptation to hypoxia.

  3. Curcumin and sertraline prevent the reduction of the number of neurons and glial cells and the volume of rats' medial prefrontal cortex induced by stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorafshan, Ali; Abdollahifar, Mohammad-Amin; Asadi-Golshan, Reza; Rashidian-Rashidabadi, Ali; Karbalay-Doust, Saied

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces morphological changes in the neurons of several brain regions, including medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). This region is involved in variety of behavioral tasks, including learning and memory. Our previous work showed that stress impaired function. The present work extends the earlier work to study mPFC in stressed and non-stressed rats with or without sertraline or curcumin treatments using stereological methods. Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and curcumin is the main ingredient of turmeric with neuroprotective effects. In this study, 42 male rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: stress + distilled water, stress + olive oil, stress + curcumin (100 mg/kg/day), stress + sertraline (10 mg/kg/day), curcumin, sertraline, and control groups. After 56 days, the right mPFC was removed. The volume of mPFC and its subdivisions and the total number of neurons and glia were estimated. The results showed ~8%, ~8%, and 24% decrease in the volume of the mPFC and its prelimbic and infralimbic subdivisions, respectively. However, the anterior cingulated cortex remained unchanged. Also, the total number of the neurons and glial cells was significantly reduced (11% and 5%, respectively) in stress (+distilled water or olive oil) group in comparison to the non-stressed rats (Psertraline and stress + curcumin groups in comparison to the non-treated stressed rats (Psertraline could prevent the stress-induced changes in mPFC.

  4. MRI displays involvement of the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in patients with giant cell arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Bley, Thorsten A. [University Medical Center Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klink, Thorsten [Inselspital - University Medical Center Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Geiger, Julia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); University Children' s Hospital Zuerich, Division of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Vaith, Peter; Glaser, Cornelia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Freiburg (Germany); Ness, Thomas [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Ophthalmology, Freiburg (Germany); Duwendag, Dirk [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Ophthalmology, Kiel (Germany); Both, Marcus [University Medical Center Kiel, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    To assess deep temporal artery and temporalis muscle involvement in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Ninety-nine patients who received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and superficial temporal artery biopsy (TAB) were included in this study. Patients with positive TAB (n = 61) were defined as GCA patients, those with negative TAB (n = 38) as the GCA-negative reference group. Contrast-enhanced T1w-images were acquired utilizing 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Two radiologists assessed the images. Mural contrast-hyperenhancement and wall thickening of the deep temporal artery and hyperenhancement of the muscle were defined as inflammation. MRI results were correlated with jaw claudication in 70 patients. The two observers found temporalis muscle involvement in 19.7 % (n = 12) and 21.3 % (n = 13) of GCA patients. It occurred bilaterally in 100 %. Specificities were 92/97 % and sensitivities were 20/21 %. Deep temporal artery involvement was found in 34.4 % (n = 21) and 49.2 % (n = 30) and occurred bilaterally in 80/90.5 %. Specificities were 84/95 % and sensitivities were 34/49 %. Both structures were affected simultaneously in 18/21.3 %. Jaw claudication correlated moderately with inflammation of the temporalis muscle (r = 0.31; p < 0.05) and the deep temporal artery (r = 0.38; p = 0.01). MRI visualizes changes in the temporalis muscle and the deep temporal artery in GCA. Moderate correlation of clinical symptoms with MRI results was observed. circle Approximately 20 % of GCA patients presented with temporalis muscle inflammation. (orig.)

  5. An improved system for the surface immobilisation of proteins on Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative cells and spores through a new spore cortex-lytic enzyme anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiaohu; Ni, Hong; Lu, Ting; Jiang, Mengtian; Li, Hua; Huang, Xinfeng; Li, Lin

    2012-02-15

    An improved surface-immobilisation system was engineered to target heterologous proteins onto vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid-free recipient strain BMB171. The sporulation-dependent spore cortex-lytic enzyme from B. thuringiensis YBT-1520, SceA, was expressed in vegetative cells and used as the surface anchoring motif. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a Bacillus endo-β-1,3-1,4-glucanase (BglS) were used as the fusion partners to test the binding efficiency and the functional activities of immobilised surface proteins. The surface localisation of the SceA-GFP fusion protein on vegetative cells and spores was confirmed by Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The GFP fluorescence intensity from both vegetative cells and spores was measured and compared to a previously characterised surface display system using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor (Mbg). Results demonstrated comparable efficiency of SceA- and Mbg-mediated immobilisation on vegetative cells but a more efficient immobilisation on spores using the SceA anchor, suggesting SceA has greater potential for spore-based applications. The SceA protein was then applied to target BglS onto vegetative cells and spores, and the surface immobilisation was verified by the substantial whole-cell enzymatic activity and enhanced whole-spore enzymatic activity compared to vegetative cells. A dually active B. thuringiensis vegetative cell and spore display system could prove especially valuable for the development of regenerable and heat-stable biocatalysts that function under adverse environmental conditions, for example, an effective feed additive for improved digestion and nutrient absorption by livestock.

  6. The Effect of Salvia Rhytidea Extract on the Number of Cells of Different Layers of Cerebellar Cortex Following Ischemia Reperfusion in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Farahmand

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Salvia has anti-oxidant oxygen free radicals which are generated during the interruption and reestablishment of ischemia reperfusion.  The aim of study was to investigate the effect of Salvia Rhytidea extract on the number of cells of different layers of cerebellar cortex following ischemia reperfusion in rats. Methods: In the present experimental study, 35 adult male rats were randomly divided into 7 groups of 5: Group 1 (control-: Sampling without ischemia. Group 2 (control +: Cerebellar ischemia with administration of normal saline. Group 3(sham: Manipulation without ischemia with normal saline administration. Group 4   received (3.2 mg/kg aqueous and alcoholic Salvia extract 2 hours after ischemia. Group 5 received 50 mg/kg silymarin drug, 2 hours after ischemia. Group 6 received 3.2 mg/kg aqueous and alcoholic Salvia extract 72, 48, 24 and 0 h before ischemia and group 7 received silymarin drug (50 mg/kg, 0, 24, 48, and 72, hrs. before ischemia. 24 hrs. following reperfusion, the rats were euthanized and samples of the cerebellum were obtained. By using routine histological technique, the sections were stained by H&E. The measurement of cell count in cerebellar cortex were accomplished. Data were evaluated with One-Way ANOVA and Tukey diagnostic tests. Results: A significant decrease was observed in the number of neural cells in granular layer in the non-treated ischemia group and in the groups which received Salvia extract and silymarin, two hours after the ischemia (p< 0.05. No significant decrease was observed in the number of cells of this layer in the groups which received salvia extract before ischemia. But regarding the cell number of molecular and purkinje layers in above groups, no significant difference was observed compared to the control group (P˃0.05. However, no significant differences was seen in the number of cells layers compared to the control group (P˃0.05. Conclusion: Finally, administration of

  7. A hypothesis for the evolution of the upper layers of the neocortex through co-option of the olfactory cortex developmental program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico eLuzzati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The neocortex is unique to mammals and its evolutionary origin is still highly debated. The neocortex is generated by the dorsal pallium ventricular zone, a germinative domain that in reptiles give rise to the dorsal cortex. Whether this latter allocortical structure contains homologues of all neocortical cell types it is unclear. Recently we described a population of DCX+/Tbr1+ cells that is specifically associated with the layer II of higher order areas of both the neocortex and of the more evolutionary conserved piriform cortex. In a reptile similar cells are present in the layer II of the olfactory cortex and the DVR but not in the dorsal cortex. These data are consistent with the proposal that the reptilian dorsal cortex is homologous only to the deep layers of the neocortex while the upper layers are a mammalian innovation. Based on our observations we extended these ideas by hypothesizing that this innovation was obtained by co-opting a lateral and/or ventral pallium developmental program. Interestingly, an analysis in the Allen brain atlas revealed a striking similarity in gene expression between neocortical layers II/III and piriform cortex. We thus propose a model in which the early neocortical column originated by the superposition of the lateral olfactory and dorsal cortex. This idea is consistent with previous hypotheses that the peri-allocortex (i.e insular and perirhinal cortex may represent the more ancient neocortical part. Our model may have also interesting implications in the study of sensory processing in both neocortex and piriform cortex. The great advances in deciphering the molecular logic of the amniote pallium developmental programs will hopefully enable to directly test our hypotheses in the next future.

  8. Behavior of deep level defects on voltage-induced stress of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Cho, S.E. [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Solar Cell Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of deep level defects by a voltage-induced stress for CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been investigated. CIGS solar cells were used with standard structures which are Al-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGSe{sub 2}/Mo on soda lime glass, and that resulted in conversion efficiencies as high as 16%. The samples with the same structure were isothermally stressed at 100 °C under the reverse voltages. The voltage-induced stressing in CIGS samples causes a decrease in the carrier density and conversion efficiency. To investigate the behavior of deep level defects in the stressed CIGS cells, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy was utilized, and normally 3 deep level defects (including 2 hole traps and 1 electron trap) were found to be located at 0.18 eV and 0.29 eV above the valence band maximum (and 0.36 eV below the conduction band). In voltage-induced cells, especially, it was found that the decrease of the hole carrier density could be responsible for the increase of the 0.29 eV defect, which is known to be observed in less efficient CIGS solar cells. And the carrier density and the defects are reversible at least to a large extent by resting at room-temperature without the bias voltage. From optical capture kinetics in photo-induced current transient spectroscopy measurement, the types of defects could be distinguished into the isolated point defect and the extended defect. In this work, it is suggested that the increase of the 0.29 eV defect by voltage-induced stress could be due to electrical activation accompanied by a loss of positive ion species and the activated defect gives rise to reduction of the carrier density. - Highlights: • We investigated behavior of deep level defects by voltage-induced stress. • Defect generation could affect the decrease of the conversion efficiency of cells. • Defect generation could be electrically activated by a loss of positive ion species. • Type of defects could be studied with models of point defects

  9. Cell-type and state-dependent synchronization among rodent areas S1BF, V1, perirhinal cortex and hippocampus CA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eVinck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta and gamma rhythms have been hypothesized to be involved in global and local coordination of neuronal activity, respectively. Here, we investigated how cells in rodent area S1BF are entrained by rhythmic fluctuations at various frequencies within the local area and in connected areas, and how this depends on behavioral state and cell type. We performed simultaneous extracellular field and unit recordings in four connected areas of the freely moving rat (S1BF, V1M, perirhinal cortex, CA1. S1BF spiking activity was strongly entrained by both beta and gamma S1BF oscillations, which were associated with deactivations and activations, respectively. We identified multiple classes of fast spiking and excitatory cells in S1BF, which showed prominent differences in rhythmic entrainment and in the extent to which phase locking was modulated by behavioral state. Using an additional dataset acquired by whole-cell recordings in head-fixed mice, these cell classes could be compared with identified phenotypes showing gamma rhythmicity in their membrane potential. We next examined how S1BF cells were entrained by rhythmic fluctuations in connected brain areas. Gamma-synchronization was detected in all four areas, however we did not detect significant gamma coherence among these areas. Instead, we only found long-range coherence in the theta-beta range among these areas. In contrast to local S1BF synchronization, we found long-range S1BF-spike to CA1-LFP synchronization to be homogeneous across inhibitory and excitatory cell types. These findings suggest distinct, cell-type contributions of low and high-frequency synchronization to intra- and inter-areal neuronal interactions.

  10. Determining auditory-evoked activities from multiple cells in layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus of mice by in vivo calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Hirose, Junichi; Murase, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-24

    Layer 1 of the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC) is distinguished from other layers by its cytoarchitecture and fiber connections. However, the information of the sound types represented in layer 1 of the DCIC remains unclear because placing electrodes on such thin structures is challenging. In this study, we utilized in vivo calcium imaging to assess auditory-evoked activities in multiple cells in layer 1 of DCIC and to characterize sound stimuli producing strong activity. Most cells examined showed strong responses to broad-band noise and low-frequency tone bursts of high sound intensity. In some cases, we successfully obtained frequency response areas, which are receptive fields to tone frequencies and intensities, and ~30% of these showed V-shape tunings. This is the first systematic study to record auditory responses of cells in layer 1 of DCIC. These results indicate that cells in this area are selective to tones with low frequency, implying the importance of such auditory information in the neural circuitry of layer 1 of DCIC.

  11. The Role of Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase Deficiency Type II on Proliferation of Neuronal Progenitor Cells and Layering of the Cerebral Cortex in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heepeel Chang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase Deficiency Type II, characterized by the absence of CPT II enzyme, is one of the lethal disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. CPT II regulates the conversion of long chain fatty acids, so that its product, acyl-CoA esters, can enter the Krebs cycle and generate energy. Neonatal mutations of CPT II lead to severe disruption of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acids and result in dysmorphic features, cystic renal dysplasia, and neuronal migration defects. Examination of the brain from an approximately 15-week gestation human fetus with CPT II deficiency revealed premature formation of cerebral cortical gyri and sulci and significantly lower levels of neuronal cell proliferation in the ventricular and subventricular zones as compared to the reference cases. We used immunohistochemical markers to further characterize the effect of CPT II deficiency on progenitor cell proliferation and layering of neurons. These studies demonstrated a premature generation of layer 5 cortical neurons. In addition, both the total number and percentage of progenitor cells proliferating in the ventricular zone were markedly reduced in the CPT II case in comparison to a reference case. Our results indicate that CPT II deficiency alters the normal program of cellular proliferation and differentiation in the cortex, with early differentiation of progenitor cells associated with premature cortical maturation.

  12. The application of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells in the management of deep partial thickness burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefta Moenadjat

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound healing in burn is a complex process and early complete wound closure still enfaces many problems. Application of stem cells is found to be the future method of wound healing. Among the available sources of allogenic stem cells, umbilical cord blood is quite easy to be obtained, has less ethical issue, and contain multipotent stem cells, which are characterized by low immunogenicity. The study aims to evaluate the potential of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (hUCBMNCs treatment in the management of deep partial thickness burns. Methods: Twenty patients with deep partial thickness burns were treated with topical application of 2 x 107 hUCBMNCs and silver sulfadiazine (SSD cream on the comparable wound size in the other sites. The treatments were applied for six times in every two consecutive days. Wound surface area was measured with Visitrak® on day 0, 7, and 11. Pain intensity was evaluated using Wong Baker’s faces scale on each wound dressing change. Histology examination was performed in some samples of collected skin biopsy of the newly re-epithelialized area of hUCBMNCs and SSD-treated wound at the end of treatment. HLA typing is used to evaluate the issue of safety. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the rate of wound healing. Results: Sixteen patients of hUCBMNCs-treated showed a significant wound closure in faster than SSD-treated; measured on day 7 (p = 0.041 and day 11 (p = 0.021. Number of patients with reduced pain intensity, from approximately scale 3 to 1/0 on day 7 and 11, were higher in hUCBMNCs-treated compared to SSD-treated wound. In spite of the HLA-mismatch, no allergic reaction, rejection, and infection found on hUCBMNCs-treated wound suggested the safety of this therapy. Histology examination found the formation of dermal-epidermal junction and rete ridges equal to the normal skin on hUCBMNCs-treated wounds. Conclusion: hUCBMNCs are effective and safe to promote re

  13. [The postnatal development of the lamina V pyramidal cells in the temporal cortex of the albino rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, B

    1981-01-01

    1. The development of layer V pyramidal neurons is analysed quantitatively in albino rat temporal ("auditory") cortex from the 1st to the 90th postnatal days (12 stages). The length of apical dendrites, the number of primary dendrites and the total amount of apical dendrite spines are registered in Golgi-Cox preparations (55 animals). The diameters of the nucleus, length and width of the perikaryon and the relation between nucleus and perikaryon are measured in Nissl-series (45 animals). 2. Two types of development can be recognised by the examined parameters: --Length of apical dendrites, number of primary dendrites and of apical dendrite spines aspire more or less continuously to a maximum value. --Sizes of nucleus and perikaryon show intermediately a higher value than the terminal one ("overshooting growth"). 3. The postnatal development of the parameters suggests that the dendritic growth (also after initiated phase) starts from the perikaryon and relates with dendritic neuroplasmic flow. 4. In order to give general statements about the evolution of layer V pyramidal neuron's rates of growth are counted and their degree of maturity is determined. The biggest rates of growth are reached up to the 12th day post partum. At this time the pyramidal neurons have a relatively high degree of maturity. 5. There are two periods with especially marked alterations of structure of the layer V pyramidal neurons. These alterations are regarded as morphokineses according to Scharf. I. The morphological changes between the 8th and the 12th day are regarded as "morphokinesis as a reaction to planned crises" (2.2., according to Scharf 1970). In this case the critical situation is the beginning of hearing of the young rats, which is to be prepared. II. The morphological changes between the 24th and 36th day take place in the critical period of primary socialization (Scott et al. 1974). This could be understood as "morphokinesis as a reaction to environmental influences" (2

  14. The anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex of the echidna and platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Phillips, Jennifer M

    2006-01-01

    The cyto- and chemoarchitecture of the anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex of the short-beaked echidna and platypus were studied to determine: (1) if these areas contain chemically distinct subdivisions, and (2) if the chemoarchitecture of those cortical olfactory regions differs from therians. Nissl and myelin staining were applied in conjunction with enzyme reactivity for NADPH diaphorase and acetylcholinesterase, and immunoreactivity for calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin) and tyrosine hydroxylase. Golgi impregnations were also available for the echidna. In the echidna, the anterior olfactory nucleus is negligible in extent and merges at very rostral levels with a four-layered piriform cortex. Several rostrocaudally running subregions of the echidna piriform lobe could be identified on the basis of Nissl staining and calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity. Laminar-specific differences in calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity and NADPH-d-reactive neuron distribution were also noted. Neuron types identified in echidna piriform cortex included pyramidal neurons predominating in layers II and III and non-pyramidal neurons (e.g., multipolar profusely spiny and neurogliaform cells) in deeper layers. Horizontal cells were identified in both superficial and deep layers. By contrast, the platypus had a distinct anterior olfactory nucleus and a three-layered piriform cortex with no evidence of chemically distinct subregions within the piriform cortex. Volume of the paleocortex of the echidna was comparable to prosimians of similar body weight and, in absolute volume, exceeded that for eutherian insectivores such as T. ecaudatus and E. europaeus. The piriform cortex of the echidna shows evidence of regional differentiation, which in turn suggests highly specialized olfactory function.

  15. Up-regulation of the ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1) gene, a downstream target of the beta-catenin/T-cell factor complex, in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Furukawa, Y; Tsunoda, T; Tanaka, T; Ogawa, M; Nakamura, Y

    2001-11-01

    To clarify the molecular mechanisms of human carcinogenesis associated with abnormal Wnt/wingless signaling, we searched for genes the expression of which was significantly altered by introduction of wild-type AXIN1 into LoVo colon cancer cells. By means of a cDNA microarray, we compared expression profiles of LoVo cells infected with either adenoviruses expressing wild-type AXIN1 (Ad-Axin) or those expressing a control gene (Ad-LacZ). Among the genes showing altered expression, the ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1) gene was down-regulated in response to Ad-Axin. The promoter activity of ENC1 was elevated approximately 3-fold by transfection of an activated form of beta-catenin together with wild-type T-cell factor (Tcf)4 in HeLa cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that expression of ENC1 was increased in more than two-thirds of 24 primary colon cancer tissues that we examined compared with corresponding noncancerous mucosae. Introduction of exogenous ENC1 increased the growth rate of HCT116 colon cancer cells in serum-depleted medium. In other experiments, overexpression of ENC1 in HT-29 colon cancer cells suppressed the usual increase of two differentiation markers, in response to treatment with sodium butyrate, a differentiation-inducible agent. These data suggest that ENC1 is regulated by the beta-catenin/Tcf pathway and that its altered expression may contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis by suppressing differentiation of colonic cells.

  16. Human development VIII: a theory of "deep" quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organisms consciousness and complex behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-11-14

    Deep quantum chemistry is a theory of deeply structured quantum fields carrying the biological information of the cell, making it able to remember, intend, represent the inner and outer world for comparison, understand what it "sees", and make choices on its structure, form, behavior and division. We suggest that deep quantum chemistry gives the cell consciousness and all the qualities and abilities related to consciousness. We use geometric symbolism, which is a pre-mathematical and philosophical approach to problems that cannot yet be handled mathematically. Using Occam's razor we have started with the simplest model that works; we presume this to be a many-dimensional, spiral fractal. We suggest that all the electrons of the large biological molecules' orbitals make one huge "cell-orbital", which is structured according to the spiral fractal nature of quantum fields. Consciousness of single cells, multi cellular structures as e.g. organs, multi-cellular organisms and multi-individual colonies (like ants) and human societies can thus be explained by deep quantum chemistry. When biochemical activity is strictly controlled by the quantum-mechanical super-orbital of the cell, this orbital can deliver energetic quanta as biological information, distributed through many fractal levels of the cell to guide form and behavior of an individual single or a multi-cellular organism. The top level of information is the consciousness of the cell or organism, which controls all the biochemical processes. By this speculative work inspired by Penrose and Hameroff we hope to inspire other researchers to formulate more strict and mathematically correct hypothesis on the complex and coherence nature of matter, life and consciousness.

  17. Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Jugular-Subclavian Deep Vein Thrombosis as the First Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ali Eltawansy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jugular venous thrombosis infrequently could be secondary to malignancy and has seldom been reported secondary to mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas. The postulated mechanisms are mechanical compression that leads to stagnation of blood in the venous system of the neck and/or an increase in the circulating thrombogenic elements that could cause venous thromboembolism as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. We report the case of a middle aged male presenting with right sided neck pain and arm swelling secondary to ipsilateral jugular-subclavian deep vein thrombosis. Investigations revealed it to be secondary to a mediastinal mass shown on CT scan of the chest.

  18. DeepSNVMiner: a sequence analysis tool to detect emergent, rare mutations in subsets of cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Daniel Andrews

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Massively parallel sequencing technology is being used to sequence highly diverse populations of DNA such as that derived from heterogeneous cell mixtures containing both wild-type and disease-related states. At the core of such molecule tagging techniques is the tagging and identification of sequence reads derived from individual input DNA molecules, which must be first computationally disambiguated to generate read groups sharing common sequence tags, with each read group representing a single input DNA molecule. This disambiguation typically generates huge numbers of reads groups, each of which requires additional variant detection analysis steps to be run specific to each read group, thus representing a significant computational challenge. While sequencing technologies for producing these data are approaching maturity, the lack of available computational tools for analysing such heterogeneous sequence data represents an obstacle to the widespread adoption of this technology. Results. Using synthetic data we successfully detect unique variants at dilution levels of 1 in a 1,000,000 molecules, and find DeeepSNVMiner obtains significantly lower false positive and false negative rates compared to popular variant callers GATK, SAMTools, FreeBayes and LoFreq, particularly as the variant concentration levels decrease. In a dilution series with genomic DNA from two cells lines, we find DeepSNVMiner identifies a known somatic variant when present at concentrations of only 1 in 1,000 molecules in the input material, the lowest concentration amongst all variant callers tested. Conclusions. Here we present DeepSNVMiner; a tool to disambiguate tagged sequence groups and robustly identify sequence variants specific to subsets of starting DNA molecules that may indicate the presence of a disease. DeepSNVMiner is an automated workflow of custom sequence analysis utilities and open source tools able to differentiate somatic DNA variants from

  19. Characterization of CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells by admittance spectroscopy and deep-level transient spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isett, L. C.

    1984-12-01

    Mitchell (1982) and Tyan (1980) have described several thin-film CdTe solar-cell configurations. Power conversion efficiencies greater than 8 percent were demonstrated. It is pointed out that for a clearer understanding of the solar cell, a determination of the electronic character of semiconductor imperfection states is required in addition to measurement of solar-cell parameters (efficiency, short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage). The present investigation is concerned with the analysis of CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells prepared by close-spaced sublimation (CSS), taking into account the employment of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and admittance spectroscopy. The analysis provides information on both the structure of the CdS/CdTe solar cell and the deep-level impurities in CdTe. Deep-level impurities in the p-CdTe layer are discussed.

  20. Coordinated gene expression of neuroinflammatory and cell signaling markers in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during human brain development and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T Primiani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age changes in expression of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes are not well characterized during human brain development and senescence. Knowing these changes may elucidate structural, metabolic, and functional brain processes over the lifespan, as well vulnerability to neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative diseases. HYPOTHESIS: Expression levels of inflammatory, synaptic, and neurotrophic genes in the human brain are coordinated over the lifespan and underlie changes in phenotypic networks or cascades. METHODS: We used a large-scale microarray dataset from human prefrontal cortex, BrainCloud, to quantify age changes over the lifespan, divided into Development (0 to 21 years, 87 brains and Aging (22 to 78 years, 144 brains intervals, in transcription levels of 39 genes. RESULTS: Gene expression levels followed different trajectories over the lifespan. Many changes were intercorrelated within three similar groups or clusters of genes during both Development and Aging, despite different roles of the gene products in the two intervals. During Development, changes were related to reported neuronal loss, dendritic growth and pruning, and microglial events; TLR4, IL1R1, NFKB1, MOBP, PLA2G4A, and PTGS2 expression increased in the first years of life, while expression of synaptic genes GAP43 and DBN1 decreased, before reaching plateaus. During Aging, expression was upregulated for potentially pro-inflammatory genes such as NFKB1, TRAF6, TLR4, IL1R1, TSPO, and GFAP, but downregulated for neurotrophic and synaptic integrity genes such as BDNF, NGF, PDGFA, SYN, and DBN1. CONCLUSIONS: Coordinated changes in gene transcription cascades underlie changes in synaptic, neurotrophic, and inflammatory phenotypic networks during brain Development and Aging. Early postnatal expression changes relate to neuronal, glial, and myelin growth and synaptic pruning events, while late Aging is associated with pro-inflammatory and synaptic loss

  1. Structural changes in pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses in the unaffected side of the sensorimotor cortex following transcranial magnetic stimulation and rehabilitation training in a rat model of focal cerebral infarct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanyu Liu; Surong Zhou; Xuwen Sun; Zhuli Liu; Hongliang Wu; Yuanwu Mei

    2011-01-01

    Very little is known about the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation and rehabilitation training on pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses of the contralateral, unaffected sensorimotor cortex in a rat model of focal cerebral infarct. The present study was designed to explore the mechanisms underlying improved motor function via transcranial magnetic stimulation and rehabilitation training following cerebral infarction. Results showed that rehabilitation training or transcranial magnetic stimulation alone reduced neurological impairment in rats following cerebral infarction, as well as significantly increased synaptic curvatures and post-synaptic density in the non-injured cerebral hemisphere sensorimotor cortex and narrowed the synapse cleft width. In addition, the percentage of perforated synapses increased. The combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation and rehabilitation resulted in significantly increased total dendritic length, dendritic branching points, and dendritic density in layer V pyramidal cells of the non-injured cerebral hemisphere motor cortex.These results demonstrated that transcranial magnetic stimulation and rehabilitation training altered structural parameters of pyramidal cell dendrites and synapses in the non-injured cerebral hemisphere sensorimotor cortex, thereby improving the ability to compensate for neurological functions in rats following cerebral infarction.

  2. A phosphatidylinositol lipids system, lamellipodin, and Ena/VASP regulate dynamic morphology of multipolar migrating cells in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sasaki, Shinji; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Ogawa, Yukino; Yasui, Masato; Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-08-22

    In the developing mammalian cerebral cortex, excitatory neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone; these neurons migrate toward the pial surface. The neurons generated in the VZ assume a multipolar morphology and remain in a narrow region called the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) for ∼24 h, in which they extend and retract multiple processes dynamically. They eventually extend an axon tangentially and begin radial migration using a migratory mode called locomotion. Despite the potential biological importance of the process movement of multipolar cells, the molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we observed that the processes of mouse multipolar cells were actin rich and morphologically resembled the filopodia and lamellipodia in growth cones; thus, we focused on the actin-remodeling proteins Lamellipodin (Lpd) and Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Lpd binds to phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P₂] and recruits Ena/VASP, which promotes the assembly of actin filaments, to the plasma membranes. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that Lpd is expressed in multipolar cells in the MAZ. The functional silencing of either Lpd or Ena/VASP decreased the number of primary processes. Immunostaining and a Förster resonance energy transfer analysis revealed the subcellular localization of PI(3,4)P₂ at the tips of the processes. A knockdown experiment and treatment with an inhibitor for Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-2, a 5-phosphatase that produces PI(3,4)P₂ from phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, decreased the number of primary processes. Our observations suggest that PI(3,4)P₂, Lpd, and Ena/VASP are involved in the process movement of multipolar migrating cells.

  3. An angiotensin-(1-7) peptidase in the kidney cortex, proximal tubules, and human HK-2 epithelial cells that is distinct from insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bryan A; Cruz-Diaz, Nildris; Marshall, Allyson C; Pirro, Nancy T; Su, Yixin; Gwathmey, TanYa M; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C

    2015-03-15

    Angiotensin 1-7 [ANG-(1-7)] is expressed within the kidney and exhibits renoprotective actions that antagonize the inflammatory, fibrotic, and pro-oxidant effects of ANG II. We previously identified an peptidase that preferentially metabolized ANG-(1-7) to ANG-(1-4) in the brain medulla and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sheep (Marshall AC, Pirro NT, Rose JC, Diz DI, Chappell MC. J Neurochem 130: 313-323, 2014); thus the present study established the expression of the peptidase in the kidney. Utilizing a sensitive HPLC-based approach, we demonstrate a peptidase activity that hydrolyzed ANG-(1-7) to ANG-(1-4) in the sheep cortex, isolated tubules, and human HK-2 renal epithelial cells. The peptidase was markedly sensitive to the metallopeptidase inhibitor JMV-390; human HK-2 cells expressed subnanomolar sensitivity (IC50 = 0.5 nM) and the highest specific activity (123 ± 5 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)) compared with the tubules (96 ± 12 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)) and cortex (107 ± 9 fmol·min(-1)·mg(-1)). The peptidase was purified 41-fold from HK-2 cells; the activity was sensitive to JMV-390, the chelator o-phenanthroline, and the mercury-containing compound p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB), but not to selective inhibitors against neprilysin, neurolysin and thimet oligopeptidase. Both ANG-(1-7) and its endogenous analog [Ala(1)]-ANG-(1-7) (alamandine) were preferentially hydrolyzed by the peptidase compared with ANG II, [Asp(1)]-ANG II, ANG I, and ANG-(1-12). Although the ANG-(1-7) peptidase and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) share similar inhibitor characteristics of a metallothiolendopeptidase, we demonstrate marked differences in substrate specificity, which suggest these peptidases are distinct. We conclude that an ANG-(1-7) peptidase is expressed within the renal proximal tubule and may play a potential role in the renal renin-angiotensin system to regulate ANG-(1-7) tone.

  4. Investigation of defect properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 solar cells by deep-level transient spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, L. L.; Li, Sheng S.; Johnston, S. W.; Anderson, T. J.; Crisalle, O. D.; Kim, W. K.; Abushama, J.; Noufi, R. N.

    2004-09-01

    The performance of the chalcopyrite material Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. The deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique is used in this work to characterize the defect properties, yielding relevant information about the defect types, their capture cross-sections, and energy levels and densities in the CIGS cells. Three solar cells developed using different absorber growth technologies were analyzed using DLTS, capacitance-voltage ( C- V), and capacitance-temperature ( C- T) techniques. It was found that CIS cells grown at the University of Florida exhibits a middle-gap defect level that may relate to the cell's low fill factor and open-circuit voltage values observed. A high efficiency ( ηc>18%) CIGS cell produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was found to contain three minority-carrier (electron) traps and a 13% CIGS cell produced by the Energy Photovoltaics Inc. (EPV) exhibited one majority (hole) trap. The approach followed using the DLTS technique serves as a paradigm for revealing the presence of significant defect levels in absorber materials, and may be used to support the identification of remedial processing operations.

  5. Manganese exposure induces α-synuclein aggregation in the frontal cortex of non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verina, Tatyana; Schneider, Jay S; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2013-03-13

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) in the brain is a defining pathological feature of neurodegenerative disorders classified as synucleinopathies. They include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Occupational and environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) is associated with a neurological syndrome consisting of psychiatric symptoms, cognitive impairment and parkinsonism. In this study, we examined α-syn immunoreactivity in the frontal cortex of Cynomolgus macaques as part of a multidisciplinary assessment of the neurological effects produced by exposure to moderate levels of Mn. We found increased α-syn-positive cells in the gray matter of Mn-exposed animals, typically observed in pyramidal and medium-sized neurons in deep cortical layers. Some of these neurons displayed loss of Nissl staining with α-syn-positive spherical aggregates. In the white matter we also observed α-syn-positive glial cells and in some cases α-syn-positive neurites. These findings suggest that Mn exposure promotes α-syn aggregation in neuronal and glial cells that may ultimately lead to degeneration in the frontal cortex gray and white matter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Mn-induced neuronal and glial cell α-syn accumulation and aggregation in the frontal cortex of non-human primates.

  6. The Subclonal Structure and Genomic Evolution of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Ultra-deep Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin Jakob

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is primarily caused by alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Recent DNA sequencing studies suggests that HNSCC are very heterogeneous between patients; however the intra-patient subclonal...... structure remains unexplored due to lack of sampling multiple tumor biopsies from each patient. Materials and methods: To examine the clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution we applied whole-exome sequencing combined with targeted ultra-deep targeted sequencing on biopsies from 5stage IV...... complex subclonal architectures comprising distinct subclones only found in geographically distinct regions of the tumors. The metastatic potential of the tumor is acquired early in the tumor evolution, as indicated by the lymph node sharing the majority of the mutations with the tumor biopsies, while...

  7. Progress towards a process for the recycling of nickel metal hydride electric cells using a deep eutectic solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R.StJ. Foreman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction experiments relating to the recycling of the transition metals and lanthanides in nickel metal hydride cells are presented. The metal extraction is occurring from a deep eutectic solvent which is formed from chemicals suitable for use in food and related products. While it has been shown that the water content of the DES has a large effect on the extraction of transition metals by a mixture of chloride ionic liquid (Aliquat 336 and an aromatic solvent, the water content has a smaller effect on the solvent extraction of lanthanides with a solution of di(2-ethylhexyl hydrogen phosphate (DEHPA in a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbon. This study suggests that an industrial scale solvent extraction process for the recycling of metals from nickel hydride electrical cells will be feasible.

  8. Dexamethasone Rescues Neurovascular Unit Integrity from Cell Damage Caused by Systemic Administration of Shiga Toxin 2 and Lipopolysaccharide in Mice Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alipio; Jacobsen, Mariana; Geoghegan, Patricia A.; Cangelosi, Adriana; Cejudo, María Laura; Tironi-Farinati, Carla; Goldstein, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) that can lead to fatal encephalopathies. Neurological abnormalities may occur before or after the onset of systemic pathological symptoms and motor disorders are frequently observed in affected patients and in studies with animal models. As Stx2 succeeds in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and invading the brain parenchyma, it is highly probable that the observed neurological alterations are based on the possibility that the toxin may trigger the impairment of the neurovascular unit and/or cell damage in the parenchyma. Also, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced and secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) may aggravate the deleterious effects of Stx2 in the brain. Therefore, this study aimed to determine (i) whether Stx2 affects the neurovascular unit and parenchymal cells, (ii) whether the contribution of LPS aggravates these effects, and (iii) whether an inflammatory event underlies the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the observed injury. The administration of a sub-lethal dose of Stx2 was employed to study in detail the motor cortex obtained from a translational murine model of encephalopathy. In the present paper we report that Stx2 damaged microvasculature, caused astrocyte reaction and neuronal degeneration, and that this was aggravated by LPS. Dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory, reversed the pathologic effects and proved to be an important drug in the treatment of acute encephalopathies. PMID:23894578

  9. Dexamethasone rescues neurovascular unit integrity from cell damage caused by systemic administration of shiga toxin 2 and lipopolysaccharide in mice motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alipio Pinto

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2-producing Escherichia coli (STEC causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS that can lead to fatal encephalopathies. Neurological abnormalities may occur before or after the onset of systemic pathological symptoms and motor disorders are frequently observed in affected patients and in studies with animal models. As Stx2 succeeds in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB and invading the brain parenchyma, it is highly probable that the observed neurological alterations are based on the possibility that the toxin may trigger the impairment of the neurovascular unit and/or cell damage in the parenchyma. Also, lipopolysaccharide (LPS produced and secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC may aggravate the deleterious effects of Stx2 in the brain. Therefore, this study aimed to determine (i whether Stx2 affects the neurovascular unit and parenchymal cells, (ii whether the contribution of LPS aggravates these effects, and (iii whether an inflammatory event underlies the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the observed injury. The administration of a sub-lethal dose of Stx2 was employed to study in detail the motor cortex obtained from a translational murine model of encephalopathy. In the present paper we report that Stx2 damaged microvasculature, caused astrocyte reaction and neuronal degeneration, and that this was aggravated by LPS. Dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory, reversed the pathologic effects and proved to be an important drug in the treatment of acute encephalopathies.

  10. Neural stem cells and new neurons in the cerebral cortex of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tatsuki; Satou, Takao; Takemori, Kumiko; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Ito, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-01

    Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) are the only animal model that suffers from spontaneous cerebral stroke. In this study, we investigated the appearance of neural stem cells (NSCs) and new neurons in the penumbra and the subventricular zone (SVZ) after cerebral stroke in SHRSP. SHRSP before cerebral stroke were intraperitoneally injected with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). SHRSP were divided into acute and chronic phase groups after cerebral stroke. Brain sections from both groups were studied with cell-specific markers such as BrdU, a cell division and proliferation marker, sex-determining region Y-box 2, a marker of NSCs, nestin, an NSC and immature astrocyte marker, doublecortin, an immature new neuron marker, and neuron-specific nuclear protein, a marker of mature neurons. NSCs and new neurons appeared in the penumbra in the early stages after cerebral stroke, and these cells differentiated into mature neurons in the chronic phase. Furthermore, soon after being affected by a cerebral stroke, there were many new neurons and immature cells, which appear to be NSCs, in the ipsilateral SVZ. Immature cells and new neurons from the ipsilateral SVZ might migrate into the penumbra after cerebral stroke, and this is the first report of their observation after a spontaneous cerebral stroke.

  11. Olfactory consciousness and gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kensaku; Manabe, Hiroyuki; Narikiyo, Kimiya; Onisawa, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex receives multi-modality sensory inputs, including olfactory input, and is thought to be involved in conscious perception of the olfactory image of objects. Generation of olfactory consciousness may require neuronal circuit mechanisms for the "binding" of distributed neuronal activities, with each constituent neuron representing a specific component of an olfactory percept. The shortest neuronal pathway for odor signals to reach the orbitofrontal cortex is olfactory sensory neuron-olfactory bulb-olfactory cortex-orbitofrontal cortex, but other pathways exist, including transthalamic pathways. Here, we review studies on the structural organization and functional properties of the shortest pathway, and propose a model of neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying the temporal bindings of distributed neuronal activities in the olfactory cortex. We describe a hypothesis that suggests functional roles of gamma oscillations in the bindings. This hypothesis proposes that two types of projection neurons in the olfactory bulb, tufted cells and mitral cells, play distinct functional roles in bindings at neuronal circuits in the olfactory cortex: tufted cells provide specificity-projecting circuits which send odor information with early-onset fast gamma synchronization, while mitral cells give rise to dispersedly-projecting feed-forward binding circuits which transmit the response synchronization timing with later-onset slow gamma synchronization. This hypothesis also suggests a sequence of bindings in the olfactory cortex: a small-scale binding by the early-phase fast gamma synchrony of tufted cell inputs followed by a larger-scale binding due to the later-onset slow gamma synchrony of mitral cell inputs. We discuss that behavioral state, including wakefulness and sleep, regulates gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex.

  12. Olfactory consciousness and gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex and orbitofrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensaku eMori

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The orbitofrontal cortex receives multi-modality sensory inputs, including olfactory input, and is thought to be involved in conscious perception of the olfactory image of objects. Generation of olfactory consciousness requires neuronal circuit mechanisms for the ‘binding’ of distributed neuronal activities, with each constituent neuron representing a specific component of an olfactory percept. The shortest neuronal pathway for odor signals to reach the orbitofrontal cortex is olfactory sensory neuron – olfactory bulb – olfactory cortex – orbitofrontal cortex, but other pathways exist, including transthalamic pathways. Here, we review studies on the structural organization and functional properties of the shortest pathway, and propose a model of neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying the temporal bindings of distributed neuronal activities in the olfactory cortex. We describe a hypothesis that suggests functional roles of gamma oscillations in the bindings. This hypothesis proposes that two types of projection neurons in the olfactory bulb, tufted cells and mitral cells, play distinct functional roles in bindings at neuronal circuits in the olfactory cortex: tufted cells provide specificity-projecting circuits which send odor information with early-onset fast gamma synchronization, while mitral cells give rise to dispersedly-projecting feed-forward binding circuits which transmit the response synchronization timing with later-onset slow gamma synchronization. This hypothesis also suggests a sequence of bindings in the olfactory cortex: a small-scale binding by the early-phase fast gamma synchrony of tufted cell inputs followed by a larger-scale binding due to the later-onset slow gamma synchrony of mitral cell inputs. We discuss that behavioral state, including wakefulness and sleep, regulates gamma oscillation couplings across the olfactory bulb, olfactory cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex.

  13. Effects of salvianolic acid B on proliferation, neurite outgrowth and differentiation of neural stem cells derived from the cerebral cortex of embryonic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B is isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza,the root of which is widely used as a traditional Chinese medicine to treat stroke.However,little is known about how salvianolic acid B influences growth characteristics of neural stem cells (NSCs).The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of salvianolic acid B on proliferation,neurite outgrowth and differentiation of NSCs derived from the cerebral cortex of embryonic mice using MTT,flow cytometry,immunofluorescence and RT-PCR.It was found that 20 μg mL·1 and 40 μg mL·1 salvianolic acid B had similar effects on proliferation of NSCs,and a suitable concentration of salvianolic acid B increased the number of NSCs and their derivative neurospheres.The growth-promoting activity of salvianolic acid B was dependent on and associated with an accumulation in the G2/S-phase cell population.Salvianolic acid B also promoted the neurite outgrowth of NSCs and their differentiation into neurons.The mRNA for tau,GFAP and nestin were present in differentiating neurospheres induced by salvianolic acid B.However,high-level expression of tau mRNA and low-level expression of GFAP mRNA was detected in differentiated cells,in contrast to the control conditions.This collective evidence indicates that exogenous salvianolic acid B is capable of promoting proliferation of neurospheres and differentiation towards the neuronal lineage in vitro and may act in the proliferation of NSCs and may promote NSC differentiation into neuronal cells.

  14. Three dimensional visualization and fractal analysis of mosaic patches in rat chimeras: cell assortment in liver, adrenal cortex and cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Stephen; Zhou, Yue; Walterhouse, David; Taborn, Greg; Landini, Gabriel; Iannaccone, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The production of organ parenchyma in a rapid and reproducible manner is critical to normal development. In chimeras produced by the combination of genetically distinguishable tissues, mosaic patterns of cells derived from the combined genotypes can be visualized. These patterns comprise patches of contiguously similar genotypes and are different in different organs but similar in a given organ from individual to individual. Thus, the processes that produce the patterns are regulated and conserved. We have previously established that mosaic patches in multiple tissues are fractal, consistent with an iterative, recursive growth model with simple stereotypical division rules. Fractal dimensions of various tissues are consistent with algorithmic models in which changing a single variable (e.g. daughter cell placement after division) switches the mosaic pattern from islands to stripes of cells. Here we show that the spiral pattern previously observed in mouse cornea can also be visualized in rat chimeras. While it is generally held that the pattern is induced by stem cell division dynamics, there is an unexplained discrepancy in the speed of cellular migration and the emergence of the pattern. We demonstrate in chimeric rat corneas both island and striped patterns exist depending on the age of the animal. The patches that comprise the pattern are fractal, and the fractal dimension changes with the age of the animal and indicates the constraint in patch complexity as the spiral pattern emerges. The spiral patterns are consistent with a loxodrome. Such data are likely to be relevant to growth and cell division in organ systems and will help in understanding how organ parenchyma are generated and maintained from multipotent stem cell populations located in specific topographical locations within the organ. Ultimately, understanding algorithmic growth is likely to be essential in achieving organ regeneration in vivo or in vitro from stem cell populations.

  15. Three dimensional visualization and fractal analysis of mosaic patches in rat chimeras: cell assortment in liver, adrenal cortex and cornea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Iannaccone

    Full Text Available The production of organ parenchyma in a rapid and reproducible manner is critical to normal development. In chimeras produced by the combination of genetically distinguishable tissues, mosaic patterns of cells derived from the combined genotypes can be visualized. These patterns comprise patches of contiguously similar genotypes and are different in different organs but similar in a given organ from individual to individual. Thus, the processes that produce the patterns are regulated and conserved. We have previously established that mosaic patches in multiple tissues are fractal, consistent with an iterative, recursive growth model with simple stereotypical division rules. Fractal dimensions of various tissues are consistent with algorithmic models in which changing a single variable (e.g. daughter cell placement after division switches the mosaic pattern from islands to stripes of cells. Here we show that the spiral pattern previously observed in mouse cornea can also be visualized in rat chimeras. While it is generally held that the pattern is induced by stem cell division dynamics, there is an unexplained discrepancy in the speed of cellular migration and the emergence of the pattern. We demonstrate in chimeric rat corneas both island and striped patterns exist depending on the age of the animal. The patches that comprise the pattern are fractal, and the fractal dimension changes with the age of the animal and indicates the constraint in patch complexity as the spiral pattern emerges. The spiral patterns are consistent with a loxodrome. Such data are likely to be relevant to growth and cell division in organ systems and will help in understanding how organ parenchyma are generated and maintained from multipotent stem cell populations located in specific topographical locations within the organ. Ultimately, understanding algorithmic growth is likely to be essential in achieving organ regeneration in vivo or in vitro from stem cell populations.

  16. Silent Waters Run Deep. Quiescent stem cells in homeostasis and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Roth (Sabrina)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The Introduction summarizes the current literature on quiescence in adult stem cell niches and the various methods for the isolation of quiescent stem cells, outlines the complexity of the intestinal stem cell niche, and formulates the hypothesis that quiescent

  17. A randomized trial comparing ReCell system of epidermal cells delivery versus classic skin grafts for the treatment of deep partial thickness burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravante, G; Di Fede, M C; Araco, A; Grimaldi, M; De Angelis, B; Arpino, A; Cervelli, V; Montone, A

    2007-12-01

    Our purpose was to directly compare results obtained with the ReCell system and the classic skin grafting for epidermal replacement in deep partial thickness burns. We recruited all patients with deep partial thickness burns admitted at the Burn Centre of S. Eugenio Hospital in Rome over 2 years. Enrollment was conducted with a controlled strategy--sampling chart--that allowed homogeneous groups (ReCell and skin grafting) for age, gender, type of burns and total burn surface area (TBSA). We evaluated as primary endpoints of the study the (i) time for complete epithelization (both treated area and biopsy site) and (ii) aesthetic and functional quality of the epithelization (color, joint contractures). Secondary endpoints were the assessment of infections, inflammations or any adverse effects of the ReCell procedure, particular medications assumed, postoperative pain. Eighty-two patients were analyzed in two homogeneous groups. All of them received adequate epidermal replacement, but skin grafting was faster than ReCell (pskin grafting but, harvesting minor areas, can open possible future applications in the management of large-burns patients.

  18. Deep sequencing and proteomic analysis of the microRNA-induced silencing complex in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouzi, Imane; Moest, Hansjoerg; Wollscheid, Bernd; Schmugge, Markus; Eekels, Julia J M; Speer, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    During maturation, erythropoietic cells extrude their nuclei but retain their ability to respond to oxidant stress by tightly regulating protein translation. Several studies have reported microRNA-mediated regulation of translation during terminal stages of erythropoiesis, even after enucleation. In the present study, we performed a detailed examination of the endogenous microRNA machinery in human red blood cells using a combination of deep sequencing analysis of microRNAs and proteomic analysis of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Among the 197 different microRNAs detected, miR-451a was the most abundant, representing more than 60% of all read sequences. In addition, miR-451a and its known target, 14-3-3ζ mRNA, were bound to the microRNA-induced silencing complex, implying their direct interaction in red blood cells. The proteomic characterization of endogenous Argonaute 2-associated microRNA-induced silencing complex revealed 26 cofactor candidates. Among these cofactors, we identified several RNA-binding proteins, as well as motor proteins and vesicular trafficking proteins. Our results demonstrate that red blood cells contain complex microRNA machinery, which might enable immature red blood cells to control protein translation independent of de novo nuclei information.

  19. Atomic force microscopy stiffness tomography on living Arabidopsis thaliana cells reveals the mechanical properties of surface and deep cell-wall layers during growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radotić, Ksenija; Roduit, Charles; Simonović, Jasna; Hornitschek, Patricia; Fankhauser, Christian; Mutavdžić, Dragosav; Steinbach, Gabor; Dietler, Giovanni; Kasas, Sandor

    2012-08-08

    Cell-wall mechanical properties play a key role in the growth and the protection of plants. However, little is known about genuine wall mechanical properties and their growth-related dynamics at subcellular resolution and in living cells. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) stiffness tomography to explore stiffness distribution in the cell wall of suspension-cultured Arabidopsis thaliana as a model of primary, growing cell wall. For the first time that we know of, this new imaging technique was performed on living single cells of a higher plant, permitting monitoring of the stiffness distribution in cell-wall layers as a function of the depth and its evolution during the different growth phases. The mechanical measurements were correlated with changes in the composition of the cell wall, which were revealed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In the beginning and end of cell growth, the average stiffness of the cell wall was low and the wall was mechanically homogenous, whereas in the exponential growth phase, the average wall stiffness increased, with increasing heterogeneity. In this phase, the difference between the superficial and deep wall stiffness was highest. FTIR spectra revealed a relative increase in the polysaccharide/lignin content.

  20. Playing the electric light orchestra--how electrical stimulation of visual cortex elucidates the neural basis of perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicmil, Nela; Krug, Kristine

    2015-09-19

    Vision research has the potential to reveal fundamental mechanisms underlying sensory experience. Causal experimental approaches, such as electrical microstimulation, provide a unique opportunity to test the direct contributions of visual cortical neurons to perception and behaviour. But in spite of their importance, causal methods constitute a minority of the experiments used to investigate the visual cortex to date. We reconsider the function and organization of visual cortex according to results obtained from stimulation techniques, with a special emphasis on electrical stimulation of small groups of cells in awake subjects who can report their visual experience. We compare findings from humans and monkeys, striate and extrastriate cortex, and superficial versus deep cortical layers, and identify a number of revealing gaps in the 'causal map' of visual cortex. Integrating results from different methods and species, we provide a critical overview of the ways in which causal approaches have been used to further our understanding of circuitry, plasticity and information integration in visual cortex. Electrical stimulation not only elucidates the contributions of different visual areas to perception, but also contributes to our understanding of neuronal mechanisms underlying memory, attention and decision-making.

  1. Playing the electric light orchestra—how electrical stimulation of visual cortex elucidates the neural basis of perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicmil, Nela; Krug, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Vision research has the potential to reveal fundamental mechanisms underlying sensory experience. Causal experimental approaches, such as electrical microstimulation, provide a unique opportunity to test the direct contributions of visual cortical neurons to perception and behaviour. But in spite of their importance, causal methods constitute a minority of the experiments used to investigate the visual cortex to date. We reconsider the function and organization of visual cortex according to results obtained from stimulation techniques, with a special emphasis on electrical stimulation of small groups of cells in awake subjects who can report their visual experience. We compare findings from humans and monkeys, striate and extrastriate cortex, and superficial versus deep cortical layers, and identify a number of revealing gaps in the ‘causal map′ of visual cortex. Integrating results from different methods and species, we provide a critical overview of the ways in which causal approaches have been used to further our understanding of circuitry, plasticity and information integration in visual cortex. Electrical stimulation not only elucidates the contributions of different visual areas to perception, but also contributes to our understanding of neuronal mechanisms underlying memory, attention and decision-making. PMID:26240421

  2. Knockdown of Myo-Inositol Transporter SMIT1 Normalizes Cholinergic and Glutamatergic Function in an Immortalized Cell Line Established from the Cerebral Cortex of a Trisomy 16 Fetal Mouse, an Animal Model of Human Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Fernández-Olivares, Paola; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; González-Jamett, Arlek M; Shimahara, Takeshi; Segura-Aguilar, Juan; Caviedes, Raúl; Caviedes, Pablo

    2017-07-10

    The Na(+)/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT1) is overexpressed in human Down syndrome (DS) and in trisomy 16 fetal mice (Ts16), an animal model of the human condition. SMIT1 overexpression determines increased levels of intracellular myo-inositol, a precursor of phophoinositide synthesis. SMIT1 is overexpressed in CTb cells, an immortalized cell line established from the cerebral cortex of a Ts16 mouse fetus. CTb cells exhibit impaired cytosolic Ca(2+) signals in response to glutamatergic and cholinergic stimuli (increased amplitude and delayed time-dependent kinetics in the decay post-stimulation), compared to our CNh cell line, derived from the cerebral cortex of a euploid animal. Considering the role of myo-inositol in intracellular signaling, we normalized SMIT1 expression in CTb cells using specific mRNA antisenses. Forty-eight hours post-transfection, SMIT1 levels in CTb cells reached values comparable to those of CNh cells. At this time, decay kinetics of Ca(2+) signals induced by either glutamate, nicotine, or muscarine were accelerated in transfected CTb cells, to values similar to those of CNh cells. The amplitude of glutamate-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) signals in CTb cells was also normalized. The results suggest that SMIT1 overexpression contributes to abnormal cholinergic and glutamatergic Ca(2+) signals in the trisomic condition, and knockdown of DS-related genes in our Ts16-derived cell line could constitute a relevant tool to study DS-related neuronal dysfunction.

  3. Cellular properties of principal neurons in the rat entorhinal cortex. II. The medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Cathrin B; Witter, Menno P

    2012-06-01

    Principal neurons in different medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) layers show variations in spatial modulation that stabilize between 15 and 30 days postnatally. These in vivo variations are likely due to differences in intrinsic membrane properties and integrative capacities of neurons. The latter depends on inputs and thus potentially on the morphology of principal neurons. In this comprehensive study, we systematically compared the morphological and physiological characteristics of principal neurons in all MEC layers of newborn rats before and after weaning. We recorded simultaneously from up to four post-hoc morphologically identified MEC principal neurons in vitro. Neurons in L(ayer) I-LIII have dendritic and axonal arbors mainly in superficial layers, and LVI neurons mainly in deep layers. The dendritic and axonal trees of part of LV neurons diverge throughout all layers. Physiological properties of principal neurons differ between layers. In LII, most neurons have a prominent sag potential, resonance and membrane oscillations. Neurons in LIII and LVI fire relatively regular, and lack sag potentials and membrane oscillations. LV neurons show the most prominent spike-frequency adaptation and highest input resistance. The data indicate that adult-like principal neuron types can be differentiated early on during postnatal development. The results of the accompanying paper, in which principal neurons in the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) were described (Canto and Witter,2011), revealed that significant differences between LEC and MEC exist mainly in LII neurons. We therefore systematically analyzed changes in LII biophysical properties along the mediolateral axis of MEC and LEC. There is a gradient in properties typical for MEC LII neurons. These properties are most pronounced in medially located neurons and become less apparent in more laterally positioned ones. This gradient continues into LEC, such that in LEC medially positioned neurons share some properties

  4. Basement membrane and interstitial proteoglycans produced by MDCK cells correspond to those expressed in the kidney cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erickson, A C; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Multiple proteoglycans (PGs) are present in all basement membranes (BM) and may contribute to their structure and function, but their effects on cell behavior are not well understood. Their postulated functions include: a structural role in maintaining tissue histoarchitecture, or aid in selectiv...

  5. Cell-Type and State-Dependent Synchronization among Rodent Somatosensory, Visual, Perirhinal Cortex, and Hippocampus CA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinck, M.; Bos, J.J.; van Mourik-Donga, L.A; Oplaat, K.T.; Klein, G.A.; Jackson, J.C.; Gentet, L.J.; Pennartz, C.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Beta and gamma rhythms have been hypothesized to be involved in global and local coordination of neuronal activity, respectively. Here, we investigated how cells in rodent area S1BF are entrained by rhythmic fluctuations at various frequencies within the local area and in connected areas, and how

  6. Comparison of the behavior of CHO cells during cultivation in 24-square deep well microplates and conventional shake flask systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Chaturvedi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In biopharmaceutical production, the optimization of cell culture media and supplementation is a vital element of process development. Optimization is usually achieved through the screening of multiple media, feed and feeding strategies. However, most screening is performed in shake flasks, which makes the screening process very time consuming and inefficient. The use of small scale culture systems for the screening process can aid in the ability to screen multiple formulations during process development. In order to assess the suitability of 24 deep well (24DW plates with the Duetz sandwich-covers as a small scale culture system for process development, we have tested growth and production performance of CHO cells in 24DW plates and conventional shake flask cultures. Multiple studies were performed to assess well-to-well and plate-to-plate variability in 24DW plates. Additional studies were performed to determine the applicability of 24DW plates for cell culture medium and supplement screening in batch and fed batch processes. Cultures in 24DW plates exhibited similar kinetics in growth, viability and protein production to those cultured in shake flasks, suggesting that 24DW plates with Duetz sandwich-covers can be effectively used for high throughput cell culture screening.

  7. Reproducibility of Illumina platform deep sequencing errors allows accurate determination of DNA barcodes in cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, J.B.; Urbanus, J.; Velds, A.; Rooij, van N.; Rohr, J.C.; Naik, S.H.; Schumacher, T.N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Next generation sequencing (NGS) of amplified DNA is a powerful tool to describe genetic heterogeneity within cell populations that can both be used to investigate the clonal structure of cell populations and to perform genetic lineage tracing. For applications in which both abundant and

  8. Ultrastructure of Purkinje cell perikarya and their dendritic processes in the rat cerebellar cortex in experimental encephalopathy induced by chronic application of valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E

    2001-12-01

    Long-term intragastric administration of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vuprol Polfa) to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, once daily at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg body weight showed morphological evidence of encephalopathy, manifested by numerous nonspecific changes within Purkinje cell perikarya and their dendritic processes. The first ultrastructural abnormalities appeared after 3 months. They became more severe in animals with longer survival and were most pronounced after 12 months. The changes were maintained both 1 and 3 months after drug withdrawal. Mitochondria of Purkinje cell perikarya were most severely affected. Damage to mitochondria was accompanied by disintegration and fragmentation of granular endoplasmic reticulum, dilation of channels and cisterns of Golgi apparatus, enlargement of smooth endoplasmic reticulum elements including submembranous cisterns, and accumulation of profuse lipofuscin deposits. Frequently, Purkinje cells appeared as dark ischemic neurones, with focally damaged cellular membrane and features of disintegration. Swollen Bergmann's astrocytes were seen among damaged Purkinje cells or at the site of their loss. The general pattern of submicroscopic alterations of Purkinje cell perikarya suggested severe disorders in several intercellular biochemical extents, including inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and abnormal protein synthesis, both of which could lead to lethal damage. Ultrastructural abnormalities within dendrites were characterized by damage to elements of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, which was considerably enlarged, with formation of large vacuolar structures situated deep in the dendroplasm. Mitochondrial lesions and alterations in cytoskeletal elements--disintegration of microtubules or even their complete loss--were also observed. The general pattern of abnormalities within the organelles and cytoskeletal elements of dendritic processes in Purkinje cells in the VPA chronic experimental model

  9. Place cells are more strongly tied to landmarks in deep than in superficial CA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiller, Tristan; Fattahi, Mohammad; Choi, June-Seek; Royer, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Environmental cues affect place cells responses, but whether this information is integrated versus segregated in distinct hippocampal cell populations is unclear. Here, we show that, in mice running on a treadmill enriched with visual-tactile landmarks, place cells are more strongly controlled by landmark-associated sensory inputs in deeper regions of CA1 pyramidal layer (CA1d). Many cells in CA1d display several firing fields correlated with landmarks, mapping positions slightly before or within the landmarks. Supporting direct involvement of sensory inputs, their firing fields show instantaneous responses to landmark manipulations, persist through change of context, and encode landmark identity and saliency. In contrast, cells located superficially in the pyramidal layer have single firing fields, are context specific and respond with slow dynamics to landmark manipulations. These findings suggest parallel and anatomically segregated circuits within CA1 pyramidal layer, with variable ties to landmarks, allowing flexible representation of spatial and non-spatial information. PMID:28218283

  10. Adolescent maturation of inhibitory inputs onto cingulate cortex neurons is cell-type specific and TrkB dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eVandenberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The maturation of inhibitory circuits during adolescence may be tied to the onset of mental health disorders such as schizophrenia. Neurotrophin signaling likely plays a critical role in supporting inhibitory circuit development and is also implicated in psychiatric disease. Within the neocortex, subcircuits may mature at different times and show differential sensitivity to neurotrophin signaling. We measured miniature inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC and mEPSCs in Layer 5 cell-types in the mouse anterior cingulate across the periadolescent period. We differentiated cell-types mainly by Thy1 YFP transgene expression and also retrobead injection labeling in the contralateral cingulate and ipsilateral pons. We found that YFP- neurons and commissural projecting neurons had lower frequency of mIPSCs than neighboring YFP+ neurons or pons projecting neurons in juvenile mice (P21-25. YFP- neurons and to a lesser extent commissural projecting neurons also showed a significant increase in mIPSC amplitude during the periadolescent period (P21-25 vs. P40-50, which was not seen in YFP+ neurons or pons projecting neurons. Systemic disruption of tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB signaling during P23-50 in TrkBF616A mice blocked developmental changes in mIPSC amplitude, without affecting miniature excitatory post synaptic currents (mEPSCs. Our data suggest that the maturation of inhibitory inputs onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons is cell-type specific. These data may inform our understanding of adolescent brain development across species and aid in identifying candidate subcircuits that may show greater vulnerability in mental illness.

  11. Fatal deep vein thrombosis after allogeneic reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of metastatic gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitsuji, Yuri; Mori, Shin-Ichiro; Kami, Masahiro; Yamada, Hirofumi; Shirakawa, Kazuo; Kishi, Yukiko; Murashige, Naoko; Kim, Sung-Won; Heike, Yuji; Takaue, Yoichi

    2004-08-01

    A 61-year-old man received reduced intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) for the treatment of metastatic gastric cancer. The cytoreductive course of RIST was uneventful until day 0, when fever suddenly developed and his performance status deteriorated. Edema developed in the bilateral lower extremities by day 7, which was diagnosed by Doppler ultrasonography as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) involving the femoral veins to the inferior vena cava. While the edema improved with anticoagulation treatment, gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) followed on day 13. Diarrhea subsided spontaneously, but hypoalbuminemia persisted, with the subsequent development of oliguria and jaundice on day 18. He died of sepsis on day 30, without any evidence of cancer progression. This case demonstrates that DVT is a potentially significant problem following RIST for solid tumors.

  12. The Mechanism of Abrupt Transition between Theta and Hyper-Excitable Spiking Activity in Medial Entorhinal Cortex Layer II Stellate Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispersky, Tilman; White, John A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that stellate cells (SCs) of the medial entorhinal cortex become hyper-excitable in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. These studies have also demonstrated the existence of recurrent connections among SCs, reduced levels of recurrent inhibition in epileptic networks as compared to control ones, and comparable levels of recurrent excitation among SCs in both network types. In this work, we investigate the biophysical and dynamic mechanism of generation of the fast time scale corresponding to hyper-excitable firing and the transition between theta and fast firing frequency activity in SCs. We show that recurrently connected minimal networks of SCs exhibit abrupt, threshold-like transition between theta and hyper-excitable firing frequencies as the result of small changes in the maximal synaptic (AMPAergic) conductance. The threshold required for this transition is modulated by synaptic inhibition. Similar abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes can be observed in single, self-coupled SCs, which represent a network of recurrently coupled neurons synchronized in phase, but not in synaptically isolated SCs as the result of changes in the levels of the tonic drive. Using dynamical systems tools (phase-space analysis), we explain the dynamic mechanism underlying the genesis of the fast time scale and the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, their dependence on the intrinsic SC's currents and synaptic excitation. This abrupt transition is mechanistically different from others observed in similar networks with different cell types. Most notably, there is no bistability involved. ‘In vitro’ experiments using single SCs self-coupled with dynamic clamp show the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, and demonstrate that our theoretical predictions are not an artifact of the model. In addition, these experiments show that high-frequency firing is burst-like with a duration modulated by an M-current. PMID

  13. Norepinephrine modulates pyramidal cell synaptic properties in the anterior piriform cortex of mice: age-dependent effects of β-adrenoceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinaba eGhosh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Early odor preference learning in rodents occurs within a sensitive period (≤postnatal day (P10-12, during which pups show a heightened ability to form an odor preference when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation (e.g. stroking. Norepinephrine (NE release from the locus coeruleus during stroking mediates this learning. However, in older pups, stroking loses its ability to induce learning. The cellular and circuitry mechanisms underpinning the sensitive period for odor preference learning is not well understood. We first established the sensitive period learning model in mice - odor paired with stroking induced odor preference in P8 but not P14 mice. This learning was dependent on NE-β-adrenoceptors as it was prevented by propranolol injection prior to training. We then tested whether there are developmental changes in pyramidal cell excitability and NE responsiveness in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC in mouse pups. Although significant differences of pyramidal cell intrinsic properties were found in two age groups (P8-11 and P14+, NE at two concentrations (0.1 and 10 μM did not alter intrinsic properties in either group. In contrast, in P8-11 pups, NE at 0.1 μM presynaptically decreased miniature IPSC and increased miniature EPSC frequencies. These effects were reversed with a higher dose of NE (10 μM, suggesting involvement of different adrenoceptor subtypes. In P14+ pups, NE at higher doses (1 and 10 μM acted both pre- and postsynaptically to promote inhibition. These results suggest that enhanced synaptic excitation and reduced inhibition by NE in the aPC network may underlie the sensitive period.

  14. Norepinephrine Modulates Pyramidal Cell Synaptic Properties in the Anterior Piriform Cortex of Mice: Age-Dependent Effects of β-adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhinaba; Purchase, Nicole C; Chen, Xihua; Yuan, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Early odor preference learning in rodents occurs within a sensitive period [≤postnatal day (P)10-12], during which pups show a heightened ability to form an odor preference when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation (e.g., stroking). Norepinephrine (NE) release from the locus coeruleus during stroking mediates this learning. However, in older pups, stroking loses its ability to induce learning. The cellular and circuitry mechanisms underpinning the sensitive period for odor preference learning is not well understood. We first established the sensitive period learning model in mice - odor paired with stroking induced odor preference in P8 but not P14 mice. This learning was dependent on NE-β-adrenoceptors as it was prevented by propranolol injection prior to training. We then tested whether there are developmental changes in pyramidal cell excitability and NE responsiveness in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) in mouse pups. Although significant differences of pyramidal cell intrinsic properties were found in two age groups (P8-11 and P14+), NE at two concentrations (0.1 and 10 μM) did not alter intrinsic properties in either group. In contrast, in P8-11 pups, NE at 0.1 μM presynaptically decreased miniature IPSC and increased miniature EPSC frequencies. These effects were reversed with a higher dose of NE (10 μM), suggesting involvement of different adrenoceptor subtypes. In P14+ pups, NE at higher doses (1 and 10 μM) acted both pre- and postsynaptically to promote inhibition. These results suggest that enhanced synaptic excitation and reduced inhibition by NE in the aPC network may underlie the sensitive period.

  15. The mechanism of abrupt transition between theta and hyper-excitable spiking activity in medial entorhinal cortex layer II stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Kispersky

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that stellate cells (SCs of the medial entorhinal cortex become hyper-excitable in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. These studies have also demonstrated the existence of recurrent connections among SCs, reduced levels of recurrent inhibition in epileptic networks as compared to control ones, and comparable levels of recurrent excitation among SCs in both network types. In this work, we investigate the biophysical and dynamic mechanism of generation of the fast time scale corresponding to hyper-excitable firing and the transition between theta and fast firing frequency activity in SCs. We show that recurrently connected minimal networks of SCs exhibit abrupt, threshold-like transition between theta and hyper-excitable firing frequencies as the result of small changes in the maximal synaptic (AMPAergic conductance. The threshold required for this transition is modulated by synaptic inhibition. Similar abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes can be observed in single, self-coupled SCs, which represent a network of recurrently coupled neurons synchronized in phase, but not in synaptically isolated SCs as the result of changes in the levels of the tonic drive. Using dynamical systems tools (phase-space analysis, we explain the dynamic mechanism underlying the genesis of the fast time scale and the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, their dependence on the intrinsic SC's currents and synaptic excitation. This abrupt transition is mechanistically different from others observed in similar networks with different cell types. Most notably, there is no bistability involved. 'In vitro' experiments using single SCs self-coupled with dynamic clamp show the abrupt transition between firing frequency regimes, and demonstrate that our theoretical predictions are not an artifact of the model. In addition, these experiments show that high-frequency firing is burst-like with a duration modulated by an M-current.

  16. Cell-attached single-channel recordings in intact prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons reveal compartmentalized D1/D5 receptor modulation of the persistent sodium current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eGorelova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The persistent Na current (INap is believed to be an important target of dopamine modulation in prefrontal cortex (PFC neurons. While past studies have tested the effects of dopamine on INap, the results have been contradictory largely because of difficulties in measuring INap using somatic whole-cell recordings. To circumvent these confounds we used the cell-attached patch-clamp technique to record single Na channels from the soma, proximal dendrite or proximal axon of intact prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons. Under baseline conditions, numerous well resolved Na channel openings were recorded that exhibited an extrapolated reversal potential of 73 mV, a slope conductance of 14-19pS and were blocked by TTX. While similar in most respects, the propensity to exhibit prolonged bursts lasting >40ms was many fold greater in the axon than the soma or dendrite. Bath application of the D1 agonist SKF81297 shifted the ensemble current activation curve leftward and increased the number of late events recorded from the proximal dendrite but not the soma or axon. However, the greatest effect was on prolonged bursting where the D1 agonist increased their occurrence 3 fold in the proximal dendrite and nearly 7 fold in the soma, but not at all in the axon. As a result, D1 activation equalized the probability of prolonged burst occurrence across the proximal axosomatodendritic region. Therefore, D1 modulation appears to be targeted mainly to Na channels in the proximal dendrite/soma and not the proximal axon. By circumventing the pitfalls of previous attempts to study the D1R modulation of INap, we demonstrate conclusively that D1R can increase the INap generated proximally, however questions still remain as to how D1R modulates Na currents in the more distal initial segment where most of the INap is normally generated.

  17. Beauty is Skin Deep: A Surface Monolayer Perspective on Nanoparticle Interactions with Cells and Biomacromolecules**

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Krishnendu; Bajaj, Avinash; Duncan, Bradley; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface recognition of biosystems is a critical component in the development of novel biosensors, delivery vehicles and for the therapeutic regulation of biological processes. Monolayer-protected nanoparticles present a highly versatile scaffold for selective interaction with biomacromolecules and cells. Through engineering of the monolayer surface, nanoparticles can be tailored for surface recognition of biomolecules and cells. This review highlights recent progress in nanoparticle-biomacrom...

  18. [The tangential segregation of simple and complex cells in the visual cortex and their connections. The universal neocortex modulus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebkasov, S A

    1998-01-01

    Guinea-pig studies testify that in rodents (like in higher mammals) the primary afferents from the thalamus and inferior cortical afferents converge on discrete columns about 200 mcm in size with zones of secondary convergence between them. The cortical columns seem to be primary basic and universal cortical modules, since they have similar dimensions and uniform organization in different mammals. The columns concentrate simple cells (with complex ones among them) and afferent inhibitory neurons; these models are involved in the first stage of cortical integration. Local connections of the primary modules differ from those of the secondary intermediary zones, which are poor narrow in rodents. The intermediary zones progressively develop in phylogeny, and in higher mammals they excel the primary modules in dimensions.

  19. In Vitro Neurotoxicity of PBDE-99: Immediate and Concentration-Dependent Effects on Protein Expression in Cerebral Cortex Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Henrik; Scholz, Birger; Kultima, Kim;

    2010-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are commonly used flame retardants in various consumer products. Pre- and postnatal exposure to congeners of PBDEs disrupts normal brain development in rodents. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to analyze concentration......-dependent differences in protein expression in cultured cortical cells isolated from rat fetuses (GD 21) after 24 h exposure to PBDE-99 (3, 10, or 30 muM). Changes on a post-translational level were studied using a 1 h exposure to 30 muM PBDE-99. The effects of 24 h exposure to 3 and 30 muM PBDE-99 on mRNA levels were...... effects of low-concentration PBDE-99 exposure are fundamentally different than effects of high-concentration exposure. Low-dose PBDE-99 exposure induced marked effects on cytoskeletal proteins, which was not correlated to cytotoxicity or major morphological effects, suggesting that other more regulatory...

  20. Cytological diagnosis of deep-seated cellular hemangioma of the parotid gland by using cell button technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Mannan, Rahul; Bhasin, Tejinder

    2016-01-01

    Intraparotid hemangioma of the children is a rare neoplasm, posing diagnostic dilemma to the diagnosticians as well as treating clinicians. A 2-month-old male infant presented with a diffuse swelling in the parotid region since birth that was gradually increasing in size. The ultrasonography (USG) report was suggestive of a right intraparotid mass of uncertain etiology; whereas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) report inclined toward a mass associated with chronic inflammatory pathology. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) suggested two differentials - a vascular neoplasm of the parotid gland and a spindle cell neoplasm with increased vascularity. The lesion was reaspirated and a cell button was constructed from the aspirated material to reach a conclusive diagnosis by histopathological evaluation and immunohistochemistry (IHC) before attempting any intervention to treat the infant. The final diagnosis after histopathological and IHC studies was given as deep cellular intraparotid hemangioma. Subsequently, the patient was treated with single sitting bleomycin sclerotherapy. A simple technique of cell button resulted in sparing of hospitalization and surgical procedure in the infant.

  1. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  2. Cell sorting enables interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of low BCR-ABL1 producing stem cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients beyond deep molecular remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kooten Niekerk, Peter B; Petersen, Charlotte C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Ommen, Hans B; Roug, Anne S; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter; Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2014-01-01

    The exact disease state of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients in deep molecular remission is unknown, because even the most sensitive quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods cannot identify patients prone to relapse after treatment withdrawal. To elucidate this, CD34(+) stem cell and progenitor cell subpopulations were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and their content of residual Philadelphia positive (Ph(+) ) cells was evaluated in 17 CML patients (major molecular response, n = 6; 4-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 expression (MR(4) ), n = 11) using both sensitive qPCR and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). Despite evaluating fewer cells, iFISH proved superior to mRNA-based qPCR in detecting residual Ph(+) stem cells (P = 0·005), and detected Ph(+) stem- and progenitor cells in 9/10 patients at frequencies of 2-14%. Moreover, while all qPCR(+) samples also were iFISH(+) , 9/33 samples were qPCR-/iFISH(+) , including all positive samples from MR(4) patients. Our findings show that residual Ph(+) cells are low BCR-ABL1 producers, and that DNA-based methods are required to assess the content of persisting Ph(+) stem cells in these patients. This approach demonstrates a clinically applicable manner of assessing residual disease at the stem cell level in CML patients in MR(4) , and may enable early and safe identification of candidates for tyrosine kinase inhibitor withdrawal.

  3. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  4. Loss of cofilin 1 disturbs actin dynamics, adhesion between enveloping and deep cell layers and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available During gastrulation, cohesive migration drives associated cell layers to the completion of epiboly in zebrafish. The association of different layers relies on E-cadherin based cellular junctions, whose stability can be affected by actin turnover. Here, we examined the effect of malfunctioning actin turnover on the epibolic movement by knocking down an actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin 1, using antisense morpholino oligos (MO. Knockdown of cfl1 interfered with epibolic movement of deep cell layer (DEL but not in the enveloping layer (EVL and the defect could be specifically rescued by overexpression of cfl1. It appeared that the uncoordinated movements of DEL and EVL were regulated by the differential expression of cfl1 in the DEL, but not EVL as shown by in situ hybridization. The dissociation of DEL and EVL was further evident by the loss of adhesion between layers by using transmission electronic and confocal microscopy analyses. cfl1 morphants also exhibited abnormal convergent extension, cellular migration and actin filaments, but not involution of hypoblast. The cfl1 MO-induced cell migration defect was found to be cell-autonomous in cell transplantation assays. These results suggest that proper actin turnover mediated by Cfl1 is essential for adhesion between DEL and EVL and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

  5. Integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses reveals the components of alkaloid metabolism in opium poppy cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schriemer David C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaver somniferum (opium poppy is the source for several pharmaceutical benzylisoquinoline alkaloids including morphine, the codeine and sanguinarine. In response to treatment with a fungal elicitor, the biosynthesis and accumulation of sanguinarine is induced along with other plant defense responses in opium poppy cell cultures. The transcriptional induction of alkaloid metabolism in cultured cells provides an opportunity to identify components of this process via the integration of deep transcriptome and proteome databases generated using next-generation technologies. Results A cDNA library was prepared for opium poppy cell cultures treated with a fungal elicitor for 10 h. Using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing, 427,369 expressed sequence tags (ESTs with an average length of 462 bp were generated. Assembly of these sequences yielded 93,723 unigenes, of which 23,753 were assigned Gene Ontology annotations. Transcripts encoding all known sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes were identified in the EST database, 5 of which were represented among the 50 most abundant transcripts. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS of total protein extracts from cell cultures treated with a fungal elicitor for 50 h facilitated the identification of 1,004 proteins. Proteins were fractionated by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and digested with trypsin prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Query of an opium poppy-specific EST database substantially enhanced peptide identification. Eight out of 10 known sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes and many relevant primary metabolic enzymes were represented in the peptide database. Conclusions The integration of deep transcriptome and proteome analyses provides an effective platform to catalogue the components of secondary metabolism, and to identify genes encoding uncharacterized enzymes. The establishment of corresponding transcript and protein databases generated by next-generation technologies in a

  6. Neuropsychology of prefrontal cortex

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The history of clinical frontal lobe study is long and rich which provides valuable insights into neuropsychologic determinants of functions of prefrontal cortex (PFC). PFC is often classified as multimodal association cortex as extremely processed information from various sensory modalities is integrated here in a precise fashion to form the physiologic constructs of memory, perception, and diverse cognitive processes. Human neuropsychologic studies also support the notion of different funct...

  7. Right hemisphere reading in a case of developmental deep dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Funnell, Elaine; Pitchford, Nicola; de Haan, Bianca; Morgan, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The right hemisphere hypothesis of deep dyslexia has received support from functional imaging studies of acquired deep dyslexia following damage to the left cerebral hemisphere, but no imaging studies of cases of developmental deep dyslexia, in which brain damage is not suspected, have been reported. In this paper, we report the first evidence of right hyperactivation in an adult case of developmental deep dyslexia. Hyperactivation was observed in the right inferior frontal cortex during fMRI...

  8. Rhythm generation through period concatenation in rat somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Kramer

    Full Text Available Rhythmic voltage oscillations resulting from the summed activity of neuronal populations occur in many nervous systems. Contemporary observations suggest that coexistent oscillations interact and, in time, may switch in dominance. We recently reported an example of these interactions recorded from in vitro preparations of rat somatosensory cortex. We found that following an initial interval of coexistent gamma ( approximately 25 ms period and beta2 ( approximately 40 ms period rhythms in the superficial and deep cortical layers, respectively, a transition to a synchronous beta1 ( approximately 65 ms period rhythm in all cortical layers occurred. We proposed that the switch to beta1 activity resulted from the novel mechanism of period concatenation of the faster rhythms: gamma period (25 ms+beta2 period (40 ms = beta1 period (65 ms. In this article, we investigate in greater detail the fundamental mechanisms of the beta1 rhythm. To do so we describe additional in vitro experiments that constrain a biologically realistic, yet simplified, computational model of the activity. We use the model to suggest that the dynamic building blocks (or motifs of the gamma and beta2 rhythms combine to produce a beta1 oscillation that exhibits cross-frequency interactions. Through the combined approach of in vitro experiments and mathematical modeling we isolate the specific components that promote or destroy each rhythm. We propose that mechanisms vital to establishing the beta1 oscillation include strengthened connections between a population of deep layer intrinsically bursting cells and a transition from antidromic to orthodromic spike generation in these cells. We conclude that neural activity in the superficial and deep cortical layers may temporally combine to generate a slower oscillation.

  9. Is a deep one-cell meridional circulation essential for the flux transport Solar Dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Gopal; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2014-01-01

    The solar activity cycle is successfully modeled by the flux transport dynamo, in which the meridional circulation of the Sun plays an important role. Most of the kinematic dynamo simulations assume a one-cell structure of the meridional circulation within the convection zone, with the equatorward return flow at its bottom. In view of the recent claims that the return flow occurs at a much shallower depth, we explore whether a meridional circulation with such a shallow return flow can still retain the attractive features of the flux transport dynamo (such as proper butterfly diagram, proper phase relation between the toroidal and poloidal fields). We consider additional cells of the meridional circulation below the shallow return flow---both the case of multiple cells radially stacked above one another and the case of more complicated cell patterns. As long as there is an equatorward flow in low latitudes at the bottom of the convection zone, we find that the solar behavior is approximately reproduced. Howeve...

  10. Deep transcriptome profiling of mammalian stem cells supports a regulatory role for retrotransposons in pluripotency maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fort, Alexandre; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Yamada, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The importance of microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs in the regulation of pluripotency has been documented; however, the noncoding components of stem cell gene networks remain largely unknown. Here we investigate the role of noncoding RNAs in the pluripotent state, with particular emphasis on nucl...

  11. Light-sheet Bayesian microscopy enables deep-cell super-resolution imaging of heterochromatin in live human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ying S; Zhu, Quan; Elkins, Keri; Tse, Kevin; Li, Yu; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Verma, Inder M; Cang, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin in the nucleus of human embryonic cells plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The architecture of heterochromatin and its dynamic organization remain elusive because of the lack of fast and high-resolution deep-cell imaging tools. We enable this task by advancing instrumental and algorithmic implementation of the localization-based super-resolution technique. Results We present light-sheet Bayesian super-resolution microscopy (LSBM). We adapt light-sheet illumination for super-resolution imaging by using a novel prism-coupled condenser design to illuminate a thin slice of the nucleus with high signal-to-noise ratio. Coupled with a Bayesian algorithm that resolves overlapping fluorophores from high-density areas, we show, for the first time, nanoscopic features of the heterochromatin structure in both fixed and live human embryonic stem cells. The enhanced temporal resolution allows capturing the dynamic change of heterochromatin with a lateral resolution of 50–60 nm on a time scale of 2.3 s. Conclusion Light-sheet Bayesian microscopy opens up broad new possibilities of probing nanometer-scale nuclear structures and real-time sub-cellular processes and other previously difficult-to-access intracellular regions of living cells at the single-molecule, and single cell level.

  12. NCI-H295R, a human adrenal cortex-derived cell line, expresses purinergic receptors linked to Ca²⁺-mobilization/influx and cortisol secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhisa Nishi

    Full Text Available Purinergic receptor expression and involvement in steroidogenesis were examined in NCI-H295R (H295R, a human adrenal cortex cell line which expresses all the key enzymes necessary for steroidogenesis. mRNA/protein for multiple P1 (A(2A and A(2B, P2X (P2X₅ and P2X₇, and P2Y (P2Y₁, P2Y₂, P2Y₆, P2Y₁₂, P2Y₁₃, and P2Y₁₄ purinergic receptors were detected in H295R. 2MeS-ATP (10-1000 µM, a P2Y₁ agonist, induced glucocorticoid (GC secretion in a dose-dependent manner, while other extracellular purine/pyrimidine agonists (1-1000 µM had no distinct effect on GC secretion. Extracellular purines, even non-steroidogenic ones, induced Ca²⁺-mobilization in the cells, independently of the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. Increases in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration induced by extracellular purine agonists were transient, except when induced by ATP or 2MeS-ATP. Angiotensin II (AngII: 100 nM and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 500 µM induced both GC secretion and Ca²⁺-mobilization in the presence of extracellular Ca²⁺ (1.2 mM. GC secretion by AngII was reduced by nifedipine (10-100 µM; whereas the Ca²⁺ channel blocker did not inhibit GC secretion by 2MeS-ATP. Thapsigargin followed by extracellular Ca²⁺ exposure induced Ca²⁺-influx in H295R, and the cells expressed mRNA/protein of the component molecules for store-operated calcium entry (SOCE: transient receptor C (TRPC channels, calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai-1, and the stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1. In P2Y₁-knockdown, 2MeS-ATP-induced GC secretion was significantly inhibited. These results suggest that H295R expresses a functional P2Y₁ purinergic receptor for intracellular Ca²⁺-mobilization, and that P2Y₁ is linked to SOCE-activation, leading to Ca²⁺-influx which might be necessary for glucocorticoid secretion.

  13. Deep Proteomics of Breast Cancer Cells Reveals that Metformin Rewires Signaling Networks Away from a Pro-growth State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Francesca; Silvestri, Alessandra; Posca, Daniela; Pirrò, Stefano; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Castagnoli, Luisa; Mann, Matthias; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-03-23

    Metformin is the most frequently prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes. In addition to its hypoglycemic effects, metformin also lowers cancer incidence. This anti-cancer activity is incompletely understood. Here, we profiled the metformin-dependent changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of breast cancer cells using high-resolution mass spectrometry. In total, we quantified changes of 7,875 proteins and 15,813 phosphosites after metformin changes. To interpret these datasets, we developed a generally applicable strategy that overlays metformin-dependent changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome onto a literature-derived network. This approach suggested that metformin treatment makes cancer cells more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli and less sensitive to pro-growth stimuli. These hypotheses were tested in vivo; as a proof-of-principle, we demonstrated that metformin inhibits the p70S6K-rpS6 axis in a PP2A-phosphatase dependent manner. In conclusion, analysis of deep proteomics reveals both detailed and global mechanisms that contribute to the anti-cancer activity of metformin.

  14. Spatial frequency-based analysis of mean red blood cell speed in single microvessels: investigation of microvascular perfusion in rat cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonas Autio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous study has shown that prenatal exposure to X-ray irradiation causes cerebral hypo-perfusion during the postnatal development of central nervous system (CNS. However, the source of the hypo-perfusion and its impact on the CNS development remains unclear. The present study developed an automatic analysis method to determine the mean red blood cell (RBC speed through single microvessels imaged with two-photon microscopy in the cerebral cortex of rats prenatally exposed to X-ray irradiation (1.5 Gy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained a mean RBC speed (0.9±0.6 mm/sec that ranged from 0.2 to 4.4 mm/sec from 121 vessels in the radiation-exposed rats, which was about 40% lower than that of normal rats that were not exposed. These results were then compared with the conventional method for monitoring microvascular perfusion using the arteriovenous transit time (AVTT determined by tracking fluorescent markers. A significant increase in the AVTT was observed in the exposed rats (1.9±0.6 sec as compared to the age-matched non-exposed rats (1.2±0.3 sec. The results indicate that parenchyma capillary blood velocity in the exposed rats was approximately 37% lower than in non-exposed rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The algorithm presented is simple and robust relative to monitoring individual RBC speeds, which is superior in terms of noise tolerance and computation time. The demonstrative results show that the method developed in this study for determining the mean RBC speed in the spatial frequency domain was consistent with the conventional transit time method.

  15. Long-term effects of adolescent exposure to bisphenol A on neuron and glia number in the rat prefrontal cortex: Differences between the sexes and cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Leslie M; Sadowski, Renee N; Kim, Taehyeon; Willing, Jari; Juraska, Janice M

    2016-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor used in a variety of consumer products, has been found to alter the number of neurons in multiple brain areas in rats following exposure in perinatal development. Both the number of neurons and glia also change in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during adolescence, and this process is known to be influenced by gonadal hormones which could be altered by BPA. In the current study, we examined Long-Evans male and female rats that were administered BPA (0, 4, 40, or 400μg/kg/day) during adolescent development (postnatal days 27-46). In adulthood (postnatal day 150), the number of neurons and glia in the mPFC were stereologically assessed in methylene blue/azure II stained sections. There were no changes in the number of neurons, but there was a significant dose by sex interaction in number of glia in the mPFC. Pairwise comparisons between controls and each dose showed a significant increase in the number of glia between 0 and 40μg/kg/day in females, and a significant decrease in the number of glia between 0 and 4μg/kg/day in males. In order to determine the type of glial cells that were changing in these groups in response to adolescent BPA administration, adjacent sections were labelled with S100β (astrocytes) and IBA-1 (microglia) in the mPFC of the groups that differed. The number of microglia was significantly higher in females exposed to 40μg/kg/day than controls and lower in males exposed to 4μg/kg/day than controls. There were no significant effects of adolescent exposure to BPA on the number of astrocytes in male or females. Thus, adolescent exposure to BPA produced long-term alterations in the number of microglia in the mPFC of rats, the functional implications of which need to be explored.

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy to Countermeasure Cancer in Astronauts during Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.; Kindred, R. P.; Roach, A-N.; Edossa, A.; Kim, B. C.; Gonda, S. R.; Emami, K.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation can cause chromosomal mutations, which may lead to cancer in astronauts engaged in space exploration. Therefore, our goals are to develop countermeasures to prevent space-induced cancer using hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) and gene therapy. This presentation focuses on HSCT for cancer. Our previous experiments on a simulated, space-induced immuno-deficiency model (mouse hind limb unloading ) indicated that transplanted hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) could enhance the host's immunity by effectively eliminating bacterial infection (Ohi S, et. al. J Grav Physiol 10, P63-64, 2003; Ohi S, et. al. Proceedings of the Space Technology and Applications International Forum (STAIF) . American Institute of Physics, New York, pp. 938-950, 2004). Hence, we hypothesized that the HSCs might be effective in combating cancer as well. Studies of cocultured mouse HSCs with beta-galactosidase marked rat gliosarcoma spheroids (9L/lacZ), a cancer model, indicated antagonistic interactions , resulting in destruction of the spheroids by HSCs. Trypan Blue dye-exclusion assays were consistent with the conclusion. These results show potential usehlness of HSCT for cancer. Currently, the NASA Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB), a space analog tissue/cell culture system, is being used to study invasion of the gliosarcoma (GS) spheroids into mouse brain with or without co-cultured HSCs. This may simulate the metastasis of gliosarcoma to brain. There is a tendency for the HSCs to inhibit invasion of GS spheroids into brain, as evidenced by the X-gal staining.

  17. Deep-proteome mapping of WM-266-4 human metastatic melanoma cells: From oncogenic addiction to druggable targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litou, Zoi I.; Konstandi, Ourania A.; Giannopoulou, Aikaterini F.; Anastasiadou, Ema; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E.; Tsangaris, George Th.; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a malignant tumor of skin melanocytes that are pigment-producing cells located in the basal layer (stratum basale) of epidermis. Accumulation of genetic mutations within their oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes compels melanocytes to aberrant proliferation and spread to distant organs of the body, thereby resulting in severe and/or lethal malignancy. Metastatic melanoma’s heavy mutational load, molecular heterogeneity and resistance to therapy necessitate the development of novel biomarkers and drug-based protocols that target key proteins involved in perpetuation of the disease. To this direction, we have herein employed a nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) proteomics technology to profile the deep-proteome landscape of WM-266-4 human metastatic melanoma cells. Our advanced melanoma-specific catalogue proved to contain 6,681 unique proteins, which likely constitute the hitherto largest single cell-line-derived proteomic collection of the disease. Through engagement of UNIPROT, DAVID, KEGG, PANTHER, INTACT, CYTOSCAPE, dbEMT and GAD bioinformatics resources, WM-266-4 melanoma proteins were categorized according to their sub-cellular compartmentalization, function and tumorigenicity, and successfully reassembled in molecular networks and interactomes. The obtained data dictate the presence of plastically inter-converted sub-populations of non-cancer and cancer stem cells, and also indicate the oncoproteomic resemblance of melanoma to glioma and lung cancer. Intriguingly, WM-266-4 cells seem to be subjected to both epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) and mesenchymal-to-epithelial (MET) programs, with 1433G and ADT3 proteins being identified in the EMT/MET molecular interface. Oncogenic addiction of WM-266-4 cells to autocrine/paracrine signaling of IL17-, DLL3-, FGF(2/13)- and OSTP-dependent sub-routines suggests their critical contribution to the metastatic melanoma chemotherapeutic refractoriness. Interestingly, the

  18. Multiple sclerosis deep grey matter: the relation between demyelination, neurodegeneration, inflammation and iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Simeonidou, Constantina; Steinberger, Günther; Hametner, Simon; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Deretzi, Georgia; Kovacs, Gabor G; Kutzelnigg, Alexandra; Lassmann, Hans; Frischer, Josa M

    2014-12-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), diffuse degenerative processes in the deep grey matter have been associated with clinical disabilities. We performed a systematic study in MS deep grey matter with a focus on the incidence and topographical distribution of lesions in relation to white matter and cortex in a total sample of 75 MS autopsy patients and 12 controls. In addition, detailed analyses of inflammation, acute axonal injury, iron deposition and oxidative stress were performed. MS deep grey matter was affected by two different processes: the formation of focal demyelinating lesions and diffuse neurodegeneration. Deep grey matter demyelination was most prominent in the caudate nucleus and hypothalamus and could already be seen in early MS stages. Lesions developed on the background of inflammation. Deep grey matter inflammation was intermediate between low inflammatory cortical lesions and active white matter lesions. Demyelination and neurodegeneration were associated with oxidative injury. Iron was stored primarily within oligodendrocytes and myelin fibres and released upon demyelination. In addition to focal demyelinated plaques, the MS deep grey matter also showed diffuse and global neurodegeneration. This was reflected by a global reduction of neuronal density, the presence of acutely injured axons, and the accumulation of oxidised phospholipids and DNA in neurons, oligodendrocytes and axons. Neurodegeneration was associated with T cell infiltration, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in microglia and profound accumulation of iron. Thus, both focal lesions as well as diffuse neurodegeneration in the deep grey matter appeared to contribute to the neurological disabilities of MS patients.

  19. Deep frying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.

    2016-01-01

    Deep frying is one of the most used methods in the food processing industry. Though practically any food can be fried, French fries are probably the most well-known deep fried products. The popularity of French fries stems from their unique taste and texture, a crispy outside with a mealy soft inter

  20. Deep frying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, van K.N.

    2016-01-01

    Deep frying is one of the most used methods in the food processing industry. Though practically any food can be fried, French fries are probably the most well-known deep fried products. The popularity of French fries stems from their unique taste and texture, a crispy outside with a mealy soft inter

  1. Deep learning

    CERN Document Server

    Goodfellow, Ian; Courville, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Deep learning is a form of machine learning that enables computers to learn from experience and understand the world in terms of a hierarchy of concepts. Because the computer gathers knowledge from experience, there is no need for a human computer operator to formally specify all the knowledge that the computer needs. The hierarchy of concepts allows the computer to learn complicated concepts by building them out of simpler ones; a graph of these hierarchies would be many layers deep. This book introduces a broad range of topics in deep learning. The text offers mathematical and conceptual background, covering relevant concepts in linear algebra, probability theory and information theory, numerical computation, and machine learning. It describes deep learning techniques used by practitioners in industry, including deep feedforward networks, regularization, optimization algorithms, convolutional networks, sequence modeling, and practical methodology; and it surveys such applications as natural language proces...

  2. Deep Sequencing of HIV-Infected Cells: Insights into Nascent Transcription and Host-Directed Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinxia; Sova, Pavel; Green, Richard R.; Thomas, Matthew J.; Korth, Marcus J.; Proll, Sean; Xu, Jiabao; Cheng, Yanbing; Yi, Kang; Chen, Li; Peng, Zhiyu; Wang, Jun; Palermo, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyadenylated mature mRNAs are the focus of standard transcriptome analyses. However, the profiling of nascent transcripts, which often include nonpolyadenylated RNAs, can unveil novel insights into transcriptional regulation. Here, we separately sequenced total RNAs (Total RNAseq) and mRNAs (mRNAseq) from the same HIV-1-infected human CD4+ T cells. We found that many nonpolyadenylated RNAs were differentially expressed upon HIV-1 infection, and we identified 8 times more differentially expressed genes at 12 h postinfection by Total RNAseq than by mRNAseq. These expression changes were also evident by concurrent changes in introns and were recapitulated by later mRNA changes, revealing an unexpectedly significant delay between transcriptional initiation and mature mRNA production early after HIV-1 infection. We computationally derived and validated the underlying regulatory programs, and we predicted drugs capable of reversing these HIV-1-induced expression changes followed by experimental confirmation. Our results show that combined total and mRNA transcriptome analysis is essential for fully capturing the early host response to virus infection and provide a framework for identifying candidate drugs for host-directed therapy against HIV/AIDS. IMPORTANCE In this study, we used mass sequencing to identify genes differentially expressed in CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection. To our surprise, we found many differentially expressed genes early after infection by analyzing both newly transcribed unprocessed pre-mRNAs and fully processed mRNAs, but not by analyzing mRNAs alone, indicating a significant delay between transcription initiation and mRNA production early after HIV-1 infection. These results also show that important findings could be missed by the standard practice of analyzing mRNAs alone. We then derived the regulatory mechanisms driving the observed expression changes using integrative computational analyses. Further, we predicted drugs that

  3. Deep mutational scanning of an antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor using mammalian cell display and massively parallel pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Charles M; Juan, Veronica; Akamatsu, Yoshiko; DuBridge, Robert B; Doan, Minhtam; Ivanov, Alexander V; Ma, Zhiyuan; Polakoff, Dixie; Razo, Jennifer; Wilson, Keith; Powers, David B

    2013-01-01

    We developed a method for deep mutational scanning of antibody complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) that can determine in parallel the effect of every possible single amino acid CDR substitution on antigen binding. The method uses libraries of full length IgGs containing more than 1000 CDR point mutations displayed on mammalian cells, sorted by flow cytometry into subpopulations based on antigen affinity and analyzed by massively parallel pyrosequencing. Higher, lower and neutral affinity mutations are identified by their enrichment or depletion in the FACS subpopulations. We applied this method to a humanized version of the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody cetuximab, generated a near comprehensive data set for 1060 point mutations that recapitulates previously determined structural and mutational data for these CDRs and identified 67 point mutations that increase affinity. The large-scale, comprehensive sequence-function data sets generated by this method should have broad utility for engineering properties such as antibody affinity and specificity and may advance theoretical understanding of antibody-antigen recognition.

  4. Alpha-actinin expression at different differentiating time points from temporal lobe cerebral cortex neural stem cells to neuron-like cells using energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo YU; Hua Li; Zhe Du; Yang Hong; Meng Sang; Yuxiu Shi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-actinin (a-actinin) plays a key role in neuronal growth cone migration during directional differentiation from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neurons.OBJECTIVE: To detect in situ microdistribution and quantitative expression of a-actinin during directional differentiation of NSCs to neurons in the temporal lobe cerebral cortex of neonatal rats.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Between January 2006 and December 2008, culture and directional differentiation of NSCs were performed at Department of Histology and Embryology, Preclinical Medical College, China Medical University. Immune electron microscopy was performed at Department of Histology and Embryology and Department of Electron Micrology, Preclinical Medical College, China Medical University. Spectrum analysis was performed at Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, Mental Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences.MATERIALS: Basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor, type-1 insulin like growth factor, and a-actinin antibody were provided by Gibco BRL, USA; rabbit-anti-rat nestin monoclonal antibody, rabbit-anti-rat neuron specific enolase polyclonal antibody, and EDAX-9100 energy dispersive X-ray analysis were provided by PHILIPS Company, Netherlands.METHODS: NSCs, following primary and passage culture, were differentiated with serum culture medium (DMEM/F12+10% fetal bovine serum+2 ng/mL brain-derived nerve growth factor+2 ng/mL type-1 insulin like growth factor).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression of a-actinin in neuron-like cells was quantitatively and qualitatively detected with immunocytochemistry using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. RESULTS: Immunocytochemistry, combined with electron microscopy, indicated that positive a-actinin expression was like a spheroid particle with high electron density. In addition, the expression was gradually concentrated from the nuclear edge to the cytoplasm and expanded into developing neurites, during

  5. ß-Adrenoceptor Activation Enhances L-Type Calcium Channel Currents in Anterior Piriform Cortex Pyramidal Cells of Neonatal Mice: Implication for Odor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhinaba; Mukherjee, Bandhan; Chen, Xihua; Yuan, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Early odor preference learning occurs in one-week-old rodents when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation mimicking maternal care. ß-Adrenoceptors and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) are critically involved in this learning. However, whether ß-adrenoceptors interact directly with LTCCs in aPC…

  6. The cell-end marker TeaA and the microtubule polymerase AlpA contribute to microtubule guidance at the hyphal tip cortex of Aspergillus nidulans to provide polarity maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Norio; Mania, Daniel; Herrero, Saturnino; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Podolski, Marija; Howard, Jonathon; Fischer, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    In the absence of landmark proteins, hyphae of Aspergillus nidulans lose their direction of growth and show a zigzag growth pattern. Here, we show that the cell-end marker protein TeaA is important for localizing the growth machinery at hyphal tips. The central position of TeaA at the tip correlated with the convergence of the microtubule (MT) ends to a single point. Conversely, in the absence of TeaA, the MTs often failed to converge to a single point at the cortex. Further analysis suggested a functional connection between TeaA and AlpA (an ortholog of the MT polymerase Dis1/CKAP5/XMAP215) for proper regulation of MT growth at hyphal tips. AlpA localized at MT plus-ends, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays suggested that it interacted with TeaA after MT plus-ends reached the tip cortex. In vitro MT polymerization assays showed that AlpA promoted MT growth up to sevenfold. Addition of the C-terminal region of TeaA increased the catastrophe frequency of the MTs. Thus, the control of the AlpA activity through TeaA might be a novel principle for MT growth regulation after reaching the cortex. In addition, we present evidence that the curvature of hyphal tips also could be involved in the control of MT growth at hyphal tips.

  7. Coding of movements in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos P; Carpenter, Adam F

    2015-08-01

    The issue of coding of movement in the motor cortex has recently acquired special significance due to its fundamental importance in neuroprosthetic applications. The challenge of controlling a prosthetic arm by processed motor cortical activity has opened a new era of research in applied medicine but has also provided an 'acid test' for hypotheses regarding coding of movement in the motor cortex. The successful decoding of movement information from the activity of motor cortical cells using their directional tuning and population coding has propelled successful neuroprosthetic applications and, at the same time, asserted the utility of those early discoveries, dating back to the early 1980s.

  8. One-way calcium spill-over during signal transduction in Paramecium cells: from the cell cortex into cilia, but not in the reverse direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Marc R; Hardt, Martin; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Hentschel, Joachim; Klauke, Norbert; Plattner, Helmut

    2004-11-01

    We asked to what extent Ca(2+) signals in two different domains of Paramecium cells remain separated during different stimulations. Wild-type (7S) and pawn cells (strain d4-500r, without ciliary voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels) were stimulated for trichocyst exocytosis within 80 ms by quenched-flow preparation and analysed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), paralleled by fast confocal fluorochrome analysis. We also analysed depolarisation-dependent calcium signalling during ciliary beat rerversal, also by EDX, after 80-ms stimulation in the quenched-flow mode. EDX and fluorochrome analysis enable to register total and free intracellular calcium concentrations, [Ca] and [Ca(2+)], respectively. After exocytosis stimulation we find by both methods that the calcium signal sweeps into the basis of cilia, not only in 7S but also in pawn cells which then also perform ciliary reversal. After depolarisation we see an increase of [Ca] along cilia selectively in 7S, but not in pawn cells. Opposite to exocytosis stimulation, during depolarisation no calcium spill-over into the nearby cytosol and no exocytosis occurs. In sum, we conclude that cilia must contain a very potent Ca(2+) buffering system and that ciliary reversal induction, much more than exocytosis stimulation, involves strict microdomain regulation of Ca(2+) signals.

  9. Ephrin-B-dependent thymic epithelial cell-thymocyte interactions are necessary for correct T cell differentiation and thymus histology organization: relevance for thymic cortex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejalvo, Teresa; Munoz, Juan J; Tobajas, Esther; Fanlo, Lucía; Alfaro, David; García-Ceca, Javier; Zapata, Agustín

    2013-03-15

    Previous analysis on the thymus of erythropoietin-producing hepatocyte kinases (Eph) B knockout mice and chimeras revealed that Eph-Eph receptor-interacting proteins (ephrins) are expressed both on T cells and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and play a role in defining the thymus microenvironments. In the current study, we have used the Cre-LoxP system to selectively delete ephrin-B1 and/or ephrin-B2 in either thymocytes (EfnB1(thy/thy), EfnB2(thy/thy), and EfnB1(thy/thy)EfnB2(thy/thy) mice) or TECs (EfnB1(tec/tec), EfnB2(tec/tec), and EfnB1(tec/tec)EfnB2(tec/tec) mice) and determine the relevance of these Eph ligands in T cell differentiation and thymus histology. Our results indicate that ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 expressed on thymocytes play an autonomous role in T cell development and, expressed on TECs, their nonautonomous roles are partially overlapping. The effects of the lack of ephrin-B1 and/or ephrin-B2 on either thymocytes or TECs are more severe and specific on thymic epithelium, contribute to the cell intermingling necessary for thymus organization, and affect cortical TEC subpopulation phenotype and location. Moreover, ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 seem to be involved in the temporal appearance of distinct cortical TECs subsets defined by different Ly51 levels of expression on the ontogeny.

  10. Detecting Cortex Fragments During Bacterial Spore Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael B; Sorg, Joseph A

    2016-06-25

    The process of endospore germination in Clostridium difficile, and other Clostridia, increasingly is being found to differ from the model spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. Germination is triggered by small molecule germinants and occurs without the need for macromolecular synthesis. Though differences exist between the mechanisms of spore germination in species of Bacillus and Clostridium, a common requirement is the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan-like cortex which allows the spore core to swell and rehydrate. After rehydration, metabolism can begin and this, eventually, leads to outgrowth of a vegetative cell. The detection of hydrolyzed cortex fragments during spore germination can be difficult and the modifications to the previously described assays can be confusing or difficult to reproduce. Thus, based on our recent report using this assay, we detail a step-by-step protocol for the colorimetric detection of cortex fragments during bacterial spore germination.

  11. Developmental Markers Expressed in Neocortical Layers Are Differentially Exhibited in Olfactory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Brunjes

    Full Text Available Neurons in the cerebral cortex stratify on the basis of their time of origin, axonal terminations and the molecular identities assigned during early development. Olfactory cortices share many feature with the neocortex, including clear lamination and similar cell types. The present study demonstrates that the markers differentially expressed in the projection neurons of the cerebral cortex are also found in olfactory areas. Three of the four regions examined (pars principalis of the anterior olfactory nucleus: AONpP, anterior and posterior piriform cortices: APC, PPC, and the olfactory tubercle expressed transcription factors found in deep or superficial neurons in the developing neocortex, though large differences were found between areas. For example, while the AONpP, APC and PPC all broadly expressed the deep cortical marker CTIP2, NOR1 (NR4a3 levels were higher in AONpP and DAARP-32 was more prevalent in the APC and PPC. Similar findings were encountered for superficial cortical markers: all three regions broadly expressed CUX1, but CART was only observed in the APC and PPC. Furthermore, regional variations were observed even within single structures (e.g., NOR1 was found primarily in in the dorsal region of AONpP and CART expression was observed in a discrete band in the middle of layer 2 of both the APC and PPC. Experiments using the mitotic marker EDU verified that the olfactory cortices and neocortex share similar patterns of neuronal production: olfactory cells that express markers found in the deep neocortex are produced earlier than those that express superficial makers. Projection neurons were filled by retrograde tracers injected into the olfactory bulb to see if olfactory neurons with deep and superficial markers had different axonal targets. Unlike the cerebral cortex, no specificity was observed: neurons with each of the transcription factors examined were found to be labelled. Together the results indicate that olfactory

  12. Characterization of space charge layer deep defects in n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells by temperature dependent capacitance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharangarh, P. R.; Misra, D.; Georgiou, G. E.; Chin, K. K.

    2013-04-01

    Temperature Dependent Capacitance Spectroscopy (TDCS) was used to identify carrier trapping defects in thin film n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells, made with evaporated Cu as a primary back contact. By investigating the reverse bias junction capacitance, TDCS allows to identify the energy levels of depletion layer defects. The trap energy levels and trap concentrations were derived from temperature-dependent capacitance spectra. Three distinct deep level traps were observed from the high-temperature (T > 300 K) TDCS due to the ionization of impurity centers located in the depletion region of n+-CdS/p-CdTe junction. The observed levels were also reported by other characterization techniques. TDCS seems to be a much simpler characterization technique for accurate evaluation of deep defects in n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells.

  13. [Neuroanatomy of Frontal Association Cortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    The frontal association cortex is composed of the prefrontal cortex and the motor-related areas except the primary motor cortex (i.e., the so-called higher motor areas), and is well-developed in primates, including humans. The prefrontal cortex receives and integrates large bits of diverse information from the parietal, temporal, and occipital association cortical areas (termed the posterior association cortex), and paralimbic association cortical areas. This information is then transmitted to the primary motor cortex via multiple motor-related areas. Given these facts, it is likely that the prefrontal cortex exerts executive functions for behavioral control. The functional input pathways from the posterior and paralimbic association cortical areas to the prefrontal cortex are classified primarily into six groups. Cognitive signals derived from the prefrontal cortex are conveyed to the rostral motor-related areas to transform them into motor signals, which finally enter the primary motor cortex via the caudal motor-related areas. Furthermore, it has been shown that, similar to the primary motor cortex, areas of the frontal association cortex form individual networks (known as "loop circuits") with the basal ganglia and cerebellum via the thalamus, and hence are extensively involved in the expression and control of behavioral actions.

  14. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome 1,2,3

    OpenAIRE

    Kalmbach, Brian E.; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, ...

  15. Rhythmic spontaneous activity in the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Descalzo, V F; Reig, R; Figueroa, N A; Compte, A; Gallego, R

    2008-05-01

    Slow spontaneous rhythmic activity is generated and propagates in neocortical slices when bathed in an artificial cerebrospinal fluid with ionic concentrations similar to the ones in vivo. This activity is extraordinarily similar to the activation of the cortex in physiological conditions (e.g., slow-wave sleep), thus representing a unique in vitro model to understand how cortical networks maintain and control ongoing activity. Here we have characterized the activity generated in the olfactory or piriform cortex and endopiriform nucleus (piriform network). Because these structures are prone to generate epileptic discharges, it seems critical to understand how they generate and regulate their physiological rhythmic activity. The piriform network gave rise to rhythmic spontaneous activity consisting of a succession of up and down states at an average frequency of 1.8 Hz, qualitatively similar to the corresponding neocortical activity. This activity originated in the deep layers of the piriform network, which displayed higher excitability and denser connectivity. A remarkable difference with neocortical activity was the speed of horizontal propagation (114 mm/s), one order of magnitude faster in the piriform network. Properties of the piriform cortex subserving fast horizontal propagation may underlie the higher vulnerability of this area to epileptic seizures.

  16. Recurrent circuitry dynamically shapes the activation of piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Kevin M; Russo, Marco J; Sosulski, Dara L; Mulligan, Abigail A; Siegelbaum, Steven A; Axel, Richard

    2011-10-06

    In the piriform cortex, individual odorants activate a unique ensemble of neurons that are distributed without discernable spatial order. Piriform neurons receive convergent excitatory inputs from random collections of olfactory bulb glomeruli. Pyramidal cells also make extensive recurrent connections with other excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We introduced channelrhodopsin into the piriform cortex to characterize these intrinsic circuits and to examine their contribution to activity driven by afferent bulbar inputs. We demonstrated that individual pyramidal cells are sparsely interconnected by thousands of excitatory synaptic connections that extend, largely undiminished, across the piriform cortex, forming a large excitatory network that can dominate the bulbar input. Pyramidal cells also activate inhibitory interneurons that mediate strong, local feedback inhibition that scales with excitation. This recurrent network can enhance or suppress bulbar input, depending on whether the input arrives before or after the cortex is activated. This circuitry may shape the ensembles of piriform cells that encode odorant identity.

  17. The effect of the CdCl{sub 2} treatment on CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells studied using deep level transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komin, V.; Tetali, B.; Viswanathan, V.; Yu, S.; Morel, D.L.; Ferekides, C.S

    2003-05-01

    Thin film CdTe/CdS solar cells have been studied using deep level transient spectroscopy. The correlation-deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique was utilized as conventional analysis methods such as the boxcar-based approach were found to be inadequate under certain experimental conditions. The primary objective was to study the effect of a key processing step in the fabrication of thin film CdTe solar cells, namely the post-deposition heat treatment in the presence of CdCl{sub 2}. The substrate temperature as well as the ambient used during this process were varied around predetermined conditions for optimum solar cell performance, in order to identify performance-limiting defects, and in general improve our understanding of thin film CdTe solar cells. Solar cells without the CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment were also fabricated. A series of electron and hole traps were found in the various devices studied, with electron traps being present primarily in solar cells with limited performance.

  18. Analysis of radiation-damaged and annealed gallium arsenide and indium phosphide solar cells using deep-level transient spectroscopy techniques. Master's thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinzon, D.

    1991-03-01

    Degradation of solar cell performance from radiation damage was found to be reversed through annealing processes. The mechanisms behind the degradation and recovery is based on deep-level traps, or defects, in the lattice structure of the solar cell. Through a process known as Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), a correlation can be made between damage/recovery and trap energy level/concentration of the cell. Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) and Indium Phosphide (InP) solar cells were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation by a Dynamitron linear acceleration at two fluence levels of 1E1r and 1E15 electrons/cm sq. The process of annealing included thermal annealing at 90 c with forward bias current and thermal annealing alone for (GaAs). After each cycle, DLTS measurements were taken to determine the energy level of the traps and their concentration. Multiple cycles of irradiation, annealing and DLTS were performed to observe the correlation between degradation and recovery to trap energy level and concentration. The results show that the lower energy level traps are associated with the recovery of the cells while the higher level traps are associated with the overall permanent degradation of the cells.

  19. Dynamic expression of calretinin in embryonic and early fetal human cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eGonzalez-Gomez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Calretinin (CR is one of the earliest neurochemical markers in human corticogenesis. In embryos from Carnegie stages (CS 17 to 23, calbindin (CB and CR stain opposite poles of the incipient cortex suggesting early regionalization: CB marks the neuroepithelium of the medial boundary of the cortex with the choroid plexus (cortical hem. By contrast, CR is confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral and caudal ganglionic eminences at the pallial-subpallial boundary (PSB, or antihem, from where CR+/Tbr1- neurons migrate toward piriform cortex and amygdala as a component of the lateral cortical stream. At CS 19, columns of CR+ cells arise in the rostral cortex, and contribute at CS 20 to the monolayer of horizontal Tbr1+/CR+ and GAD+ cells in the preplate. At CS 21, the pioneer cortical plate appears as a radial aggregation of CR+/Tbr1+ neurons, which cover the entire future neocortex and extend the first corticofugal axons. CR expression in early human corticogenesis is thus not restricted to interneurons, but is also present in the first excitatory projection neurons of the cortex. At CS 21/22, the cortical plate is established following a lateral to medial gradient, when Tbr1+/CR- neurons settle within the pioneer cortical plate, and thus separate superficial and deep pioneer neurons. CR+ pioneer neurons disappear shortly after the formation of the cortical plate. Reelin+ Cajal-Retzius cells begin to express CR around CS21 (7/8 PCW. At CS 21-23, the CR+ SVZ at the PSB is the source of CR+ interneurons migrating into the cortical SVZ. In turn, CB+ interneurons migrate from the subpallium into the intermediate zone following the fibers of the internal capsule. Early CR+ and CB+ interneurons thus have different origins and migratory routes. CR+ cell populations in the embryonic telencephalon take part in a complex sequence of events not analyzed so far in other mammalian species, which may represent a distinctive trait of the initial steps

  20. Regulating prefrontal cortex activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders Bue

    2013-01-01

    of emotion-based actions, such as addiction and other impulse-related behaviors. In this review, we give an overview of the 5-HT2A receptor distribution (neuronal, intracellular, and anatomical) along with its functional and physiological effect on PFC activation, and how that relates to more recent findings......The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in mediating important higher-order cognitive processes such as decision making, prompting thereby our actions. At the same time, PFC activation is strongly influenced by emotional reactions through its functional interaction with the amygdala...... is highly expressed in the prefrontal cortex areas, playing an important role in modulating cortical activity and neural oscillations (brain waves). This makes it an interesting potential pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric modes characterized by lack of inhibitory control...

  1. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  2. Deep Stochastic Radar Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Tim Allan; Holder, Martin; Winner, Hermann; Kochenderfer, Mykel

    2017-01-01

    Accurate simulation and validation of advanced driver assistance systems requires accurate sensor models. Modeling automotive radar is complicated by effects such as multipath reflections, interference, reflective surfaces, discrete cells, and attenuation. Detailed radar simulations based on physical principles exist but are computationally intractable for realistic automotive scenes. This paper describes a methodology for the construction of stochastic automotive radar models based on deep l...

  3. Deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecun, Yann; Bengio, Yoshua; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2015-05-01

    Deep learning allows computational models that are composed of multiple processing layers to learn representations of data with multiple levels of abstraction. These methods have dramatically improved the state-of-the-art in speech recognition, visual object recognition, object detection and many other domains such as drug discovery and genomics. Deep learning discovers intricate structure in large data sets by using the backpropagation algorithm to indicate how a machine should change its internal parameters that are used to compute the representation in each layer from the representation in the previous layer. Deep convolutional nets have brought about breakthroughs in processing images, video, speech and audio, whereas recurrent nets have shone light on sequential data such as text and speech.

  4. High-Energy, Multicolor Femtosecond Pulses from the Deep Ultraviolet to the Near Infrared Generated in a Hydrogen-Filled Gas Cell and Hollow Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Motoyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate four-wave mixing in hydrogen gas using a gas cell and a hollow fiber for the generation of high-energy, multicolor femtosecond (fs optical pulses. Both a hydrogen-filled gas cell and hollow fiber lead to the generation of multicolor fs pulses in a broad spectral range from the deep ultraviolet to the near infrared. However, there is a difference in the energy distribution of the multicolor emission between the gas cell and the hollow fiber. The hydrogen-filled gas cell generates visible pulses with higher energies than the pulses created by the hollow fiber. We have generated visible pulses with energies of several tens of microjoules. The hydrogen-filled hollow fiber, on the other hand, generates ultraviolet pulses with energies of a few microjoules, which are higher than the energies of the ultraviolet pulses generated in the gas cell. In both schemes, the spectral width of each emission line supports a transform-limited pulse duration shorter than 15 fs. Four-wave mixing in hydrogen gas therefore can be used for the development of a light source that emits sub-20 fs multicolor pulses in a wavelength region from the deep ultraviolet to the near infrared with microjoule pulse energies.

  5. Induksi Ekstrak Pegagan Secara in vitro terhadap Proliferasi dan Diferensiasi Sel-Sel Otak Besar Anak Tikus (IN VITRO INDUCTION OF CENTELLA ASIATICA (PEGAGAN EXTRACT ON THE PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF NEWBORN RAT CORTEX CEREBRI CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ita Djuwita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the potency of Centella asiatica extract to induce proliferation andneurogenesis process of newborn rats cortex cerebri.   Research has been conducted on in vitro culture ofthree days old rat (Sprague Dawley cerebrum cells in DMEM (Dulbecco’s Modiûed Eagle’s Mediumcontaining 10% NEAA (Non Essential Amino Acid, 1 mM NaHCO3, 10% NBCS (Newborn Calf Serumand 50 µg/mL gentamycin (mDMEM, with and without Centella asiatica (CA leaf extracts. The experimentwas set in five groups of treatment consisted of positive control (mDMEM+30 µg/mL asiaticoside (AC,negative control (mDMEM, and mDMEM with three concentration of CA extract i.e. 100 ppm, 200 ppmand 400 ppm. Culture was done in 5% CO2 incubator at 37oC for six days. The parameters observed werecells proliferation based on Population Doubling Time (PDT, neuron and glia composition, and the lengthof axon and dendrite. Cells concentration were counted using Newbauer hemocytometer.  Neuron and gliacells were determined based on morphology after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining, and the length of axon anddendrite were measured using eyepiece micrometer. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan test.The results showed that Centella asiatica extract at concentration 100 ppm could induce neurogenesisand increased the axon length growth.  However, at concentration 200 and 400 ppm, CA extract  inhibitedthe neuronal cells proliferation and the axonal growth (P<0,05. In conclusion, induction of Centella asiaticaextracts at concentration of 100 ppm on the cortex cell cerebrum cells culture increase the axon lengthgrowth and tends to induce neurogenesis; however at higher concentration CA extract was neurotoxic.

  6. Ultra high resolution cation analysis of NGRIP deep ice via cryo-cell UV-laser-ablation ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Lunga, Damiano; Muller, Wolfgang; Olander Rasmussen, Sune; Svensson, Anders

    2014-05-01

    During glacial periods, Earth experienced abrupt climate change events that led to rapid natural warming/ cooling over a few years only (Steffensen et al., 2008). In order to investigate these rapid climate events especially in old thinned ice, highest spatial/time resolution analysis of climate proxies is required. A recently developed methodology at Royal Holloway University of London (Müller et al., 2011), which permits in situ chemical analysis of frozen ice with spatial (and thus time) resolution up to 0.1 mm (100 ?m) using cryo-cell UV-laser ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (UV-LA-ICPMS), has been optimized and utilized for analysis of (major) elements indicative of dust and/or sea salt (e.g. Fe, Al, Ca, Mg, Na), while maintaining detection limits in the low(est) ppb-range. NGRIP samples of Greenland Stadial GS22 (~86 ka, depth of ~2690 m), representing a minor δ18O shift (of about ± 4) within the stadial phase of D-O event 22, have been selected and analysed. With a single storm-event resolution capability, seasonal, annual and multiannual periodicity of elements have been identified and will be presented with particular focus on the phasing of the climate proxies. Corresponding results include also an optimized UV-LA-ICPMS methodology, particularly with reference to depth-profiling, assessing contamination of the sample surface and standardization. Finally, the location and distribution of soluble and insoluble micro-inclusions in deep ice have also been assessed concerning the partitioning of elements between grain boundaries and grain interiors. Results show that impurities tend to be concentrated along boundaries in clear (winter) ice, whereas in cloudy bands ('dirtier' ice) they distribute equally between boundaries and interiors. References Müller, W., Shelley, J.M.G., Rasmussen, S.O., 2011. Direct chemical analysis of frozen ice cores by UV-laser ablation ICPMS. J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 26, 2391-2395. Steffensen, J.P., Andersen

  7. Effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia on the expression of Nip3, cell apoptosis, β-amyloid protein deposit in mice brain cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yi-ming; CAI Kai-jin; CHEN Xiao-yong; WU Minx-ia; LIN Xi

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is the most important pathophysiologic feature of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). To explore the relationship between SAS and dementia, the effects of CIH on the expression of Nip3, neuron apoptosis andβ-amyloid protein deposit in the brain cortex of the frontal lobe of mice were evaluated in this study. Methods Thirty male ICR mice were divided into four groups: control group (A, n=-10, sham hypoxia/reoxygenation), 2 weeks CIH group (B, n=-5), 4 weeks CIH group (C, n=-5), and 8 weeks CIH group (D, n=10). The ICR mice were placed in a chamber and exposed to intermittent hypoxia (oxygen concentration changed periodically from (21.72±0.55)% to (6.84±0.47)% every two minutes, eight hours per day). Neuron apoptosis of the cortex of the frontal lobe was detected by means of terminal deoxy-nucleotidyl transferase-mediated in situ end labeling (TUNEL). Immunohistochemical staining was performed for measuring expression of Nip3 and β-amyloid protein. The ultrastructure of neurons was observed under a transmission electron microscope. Results TUNEL positive neurons in each square millimeter in the cortex of the frontal lobe were categorized by median or Ri into group A (1,5.5), group B (133, 13), group C (252, 21), and group D (318, 24). There were significant differences among the above four groups (P=0.000). The significance test was performed between the control group and each CIH group respectively: group A and B (P>0.05); group A and C (P 0.05); groups A and C (P<0.005); and groups A and D (P<0.005). There was no significant difference between groups B and C, groups B and D, and groups C and D. The expression of Nip3 was closely correlated with neuron apoptosis in the brain (P <0.05). The expression ofβ-amyloid protein in the brain of mice was negative in all CIH groups and the control group. Ultrastructure observation showed karyopyknosis of nucleus, swelling of chondriosomes, deposit of lipofuscins and degeneration of

  8. Effects of acetylcholine on neuronal properties in entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Heys

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex receives prominent cholinergic innervation from the medial septum and the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca (MSDB. To understand how cholinergic neurotransmission can modulate behavior, research has been directed towards identification of the specific cellular mechanisms in entorhinal cortex that can be modulated through cholinergic activity. This review focuses on intrinsic cellular properties of neurons in entorhinal cortex that may underlie functions such as working memory, spatial processing and episodic memory. In particular, the study of stellate cells in medial entorhinal has resulted in discovery of correlations between physiological properties of these neurons and properties of the unique spatial representation that is demonstrated through unit recordings of neurons in medial entorhinal cortex from awake-behaving animals. A separate line of investigation has demonstrated persistent firing behavior among neurons in entorhinal cortex that is enhanced by cholinergic activity and could underlie working memory. There is also evidence that acetylcholine plays a role in modulation of synaptic transmission that could also enhance mnemonic function in entorhinal cortex. Finally, the local circuits of entorhinal cortex demonstrate a variety of interneuron physiology, which is also subject to cholinergic modulation. Together these effects alter the dynamics of entorhinal cortex to underlie the functional role of acetylcholine in memory.

  9. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

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    Gouras Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV cone opsin or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M cone opsin, obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42% had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51% had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6% responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex.

  10. Deep Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Omer; Sadanandan, Sajith Kecheril; Wählby, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is an important vertebrate model organism in biomedical research, especially suitable for morphological screening due to its transparent body during early development. Deep learning has emerged as a dominant paradigm for data analysis and found a number of applications in computer vision and image analysis. Here we demonstrate the potential of a deep learning approach for accurate high-throughput classification of whole-body zebrafish deformations in multifish microwell plates. Deep learning uses the raw image data as an input, without the need of expert knowledge for feature design or optimization of the segmentation parameters. We trained the deep learning classifier on as few as 84 images (before data augmentation) and achieved a classification accuracy of 92.8% on an unseen test data set that is comparable to the previous state of the art (95%) based on user-specified segmentation and deformation metrics. Ablation studies by digitally removing whole fish or parts of the fish from the images revealed that the classifier learned discriminative features from the image foreground, and we observed that the deformations of the head region, rather than the visually apparent bent tail, were more important for good classification performance.

  11. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low ( 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  12. The anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has a role in attention, analysis of sensory information, error recognition, problem solving, detection of novelty, behavior, emotions, social relations, cognitive control, and regulation of visceral functions. This area is active whenever the individual feels some emotions, solves a problem, or analyzes the pros and cons of an action (if it is a right decision. Analogous areas are also found in higher mammals, especially whales, and they contain spindle neurons that enable complex social interactions. Disturbance of ACC activity is found in dementias, schizophrenia, depression, the obsessive-compulsive syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  13. Noradrenalin and dopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex

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    Shinobu eNomura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cerebral cortex, whereas the cortical distribution ofdopaminergic fibers is more restricted. However, the relative functional impact ofnoradrenalin and dopamine receptors in various cortical regions is largely unknown. Using aspecific genetic label, we first confirmed that noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cortexwhereas dopaminergic fibers were present in all layers of restricted medial and lateral areasbut only in deep layers of other areas. Imaging of a genetically-encoded sensor revealed thatnoradrenalin and dopamine widely activate PKA in cortical pyramidal neurons of frontal,parietal and occipital regions with scarce dopaminergic fibers. Responses to noradrenalin hadhigher amplitude, velocity and occurred at more than 10 fold lower dose than those elicited bydopamine, whose amplitude and velocity increased along the antero-posterior axis. Thepharmacology of these responses was consistent with the involvement of Gs-coupled beta1adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors, but the inhibition of both noradrenalin anddopamine responses by beta adrenergic antagonists was suggestive of the existence of beta1-D1/D5 heteromeric receptors. Responses also involved Gi-coupled alpha2 adrenergic and D2-like dopaminergic receptors that markedly reduced their amplitude and velocity andcontributed to their cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Our results reveal that noradrenalin anddopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex withmoderate regional and laminar differences. These receptors can thus mediate widespreadeffects of both catecholamines, which are reportedly co-released by cortical noradrenergicfibers beyond the territory of dopaminergic fibers.

  14. Sensing with the Motor Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Suminski, Aaron J.

    2011-01-01

    The primary motor cortex is a critical node in the network of brain regions responsible for voluntary motor behavior. It has been less appreciated, however, that the motor cortex exhibits sensory responses in a variety of modalities including vision and somatosensation. We review current work that emphasizes the heterogeneity in sensori-motor responses in the motor cortex and focus on its implications for cortical control of movement as well as for brain-machine interface development.

  15. Building an artificial actin cortex on microscopic pillar arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayadi, R; Roos, W H

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells obtain their morphology and mechanical strength from the cytoskeleton and in particular from the cross-linked actin network that branches throughout the whole cell. This actin cortex lies like a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) biopolymer network just below the cell membrane, to which it

  16. Leukemic stem cell persistence in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in deep molecular response induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the impact of therapy discontinuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Jean Claude; Bonnet, Marie Laure; Sorel, Nathalie; Sloma, Ivan; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Rea, Delphine; Legros, Laurence; Marfaing-Koka, Anne; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Ame, Shanti; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Rousselot, Philippe; Turhan, Ali G.

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has modified the natural history of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) allowing an increase of the overall and disease-free survival, especially in patients in whom molecular residual disease becomes undetectable. However, it has been demonstrated that BCR-ABL1- expressing leukemic stem cells (LSCs) persist in patients in deep molecular response. It has also been shown that the discontinuation of Imatinib leads to a molecular relapse in the majority of cases. To determine a possible relationship between these two phenomena, we have evaluated by clonogenic and long-term culture initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays, the presence of BCR-ABL1-expressing LSCs in marrow samples from 21 patients in deep molecular response for three years after TKI therapy (mean duration seven years). LSCs were detected in 4/21 patients. Discontinuation of TKI therapy in 13/21 patients led to a rapid molecular relapse in five patients (4 without detectable LSCs and one with detectable LSCs). No relapse occurred in the eight patients still on TKI therapy, whether LSCs were detectable or not. Thus, this study demonstrates for the first time the in vivo efficiency of TKIs, both in the progenitor and the LSC compartments. It also confirms the persistence of leukemic stem cells in patients in deep molecular response, certainly at the origin of relapses. Finally, it emphasizes the difficulty of detecting residual LSCs due to their rarity and their low BCR-ABL1 mRNA expression. PMID:27167108

  17. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects and annealing effects in the proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation induced deep-level defects and the recombination parameters in the proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells were investigated over a wide range of proton energies (from 50 KeV to 10 MeV) and proton fluences (from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 13th P/sq cm), using DLTS, I-V, C-V, and SEM-EMIC measurement techniques. The measurements were used to determine the defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, carrier lifetimes, and the hole diffusion lengths in the GaAs LPE layers. Results show that a good correlation was obtained between the measured defect parameters and the dark recombination current as well as the performance parameters of the solar cells. The most damages to the cell were produced by the 200 KeV protons. In addition, the effects of low temperatures (200 to 400 C) thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and the dark current of the 200 KeV proton irradiated samples were examined.

  18. Deep level transient spectroscopy on ZnO/CdS/CuGa{sub x}In{sub 1-x}Se{sub 2} photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, W.W.; Yip, L.S.; Greenspan, J.E.; Shih, I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-11-13

    The trap properties of ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} and ZnO/CdS/CuGa{sub 0.3}In{sub 0.7}Se{sub 2} PV cells were investigated. It is believed that an argon (Ar) annealing prior to the junction formation could reduce the density of deep traps close to the mid-gap of single-crystal CuInSe{sub 2}. While no minority carrier traps were observed in ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} PV cells, results on ZnO/CdS/CuGa{sub 0.3}In{sub 0.7}Se{sub 2} PV cells suggested the co-existence of both the majority and minority carrier traps. Furthermore, there is evidence showing deep traps close to the mid-gap of Ar annealed single-crystal CuGa{sub 0.3}In{sub 0.7}Se{sub 2}

  19. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces expression of p27(kip¹) and FoxO3a in female rat cerebral cortex and PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangfei; Liu, Jiao; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Chen, Gang; Iwata, Takeo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Duan, Zhiqing; Wan, Chunhua; Jiang, Junkang

    2014-05-02

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent toxin that alters normal brain development, producing cognitive disability and motor dysfunction. Previous studies in rats have proved that female rats are more sensitive to TCDD lethality than male ones. Recent studies have shown that TCDD induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but the regulatory proteins involved in these processes have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we constructed an acute TCDD injury female rat model, and investigated the effects of TCDD on apoptosis and expression of cell cycle regulators, forkhead box class O 3a (FoxO3a) and p27(kip1), in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased levels of active caspase-3 were observed in the cerebral cortex of female rats treated with TCDD, suggesting that TCDD-induced apoptosis occurs in the CNS. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated-dUTP nick-end labeling assay showed that apoptosis primarily occurred in neurons. Furthermore, Western blot analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry showed a significant up-regulation of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) in the cerebral cortex. Immunofluorescent labeling indicated that FoxO3a and p27(kip1) were predominantly localized in apoptotic neurons, but not in astrocytes. In vitro experiments using PC12, a rat neuron-like pheochromocytoma cell line, also revealed that TCDD induced apoptosis and an increase in FoxO3a and p27(kip1) expression. Furthermore, knockdown of FoxO3a expression inhibited p27(kip1) transcription and TCDD-induced apoptosis. Based on our data, induction of FoxO3a may play an important role in TCDD-induced neurotoxicity.

  20. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  1. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Cho Yoon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC, has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca2+ and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca2+ and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca2+ and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  2. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2015-12-10

    Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC), has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST) has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca(2+) and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  3. Inhibition by somatostatin interneurons in olfactory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Large

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST interneurons onto pyramidal cells, parvalbumin (PV interneurons and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre and G42 that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS interneurons rather than regular (RS or low threshold spiking (LTS phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that somatostatin interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing.

  4. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  5. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  6. Contextual modulation of primary visual cortex by auditory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, L S; Paton, A T; Muckli, L

    2017-02-19

    Early visual cortex receives non-feedforward input from lateral and top-down connections (Muckli & Petro 2013 Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 23, 195-201. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.020)), including long-range projections from auditory areas. Early visual cortex can code for high-level auditory information, with neural patterns representing natural sound stimulation (Vetter et al. 2014 Curr. Biol. 24, 1256-1262. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.020)). We discuss a number of questions arising from these findings. What is the adaptive function of bimodal representations in visual cortex? What type of information projects from auditory to visual cortex? What are the anatomical constraints of auditory information in V1, for example, periphery versus fovea, superficial versus deep cortical layers? Is there a putative neural mechanism we can infer from human neuroimaging data and recent theoretical accounts of cortex? We also present data showing we can read out high-level auditory information from the activation patterns of early visual cortex even when visual cortex receives simple visual stimulation, suggesting independent channels for visual and auditory signals in V1. We speculate which cellular mechanisms allow V1 to be contextually modulated by auditory input to facilitate perception, cognition and behaviour. Beyond cortical feedback that facilitates perception, we argue that there is also feedback serving counterfactual processing during imagery, dreaming and mind wandering, which is not relevant for immediate perception but for behaviour and cognition over a longer time frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  7. Contextual modulation of primary visual cortex by auditory signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, A. T.

    2017-01-01

    Early visual cortex receives non-feedforward input from lateral and top-down connections (Muckli & Petro 2013 Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 23, 195–201. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.01.020)), including long-range projections from auditory areas. Early visual cortex can code for high-level auditory information, with neural patterns representing natural sound stimulation (Vetter et al. 2014 Curr. Biol. 24, 1256–1262. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.020)). We discuss a number of questions arising from these findings. What is the adaptive function of bimodal representations in visual cortex? What type of information projects from auditory to visual cortex? What are the anatomical constraints of auditory information in V1, for example, periphery versus fovea, superficial versus deep cortical layers? Is there a putative neural mechanism we can infer from human neuroimaging data and recent theoretical accounts of cortex? We also present data showing we can read out high-level auditory information from the activation patterns of early visual cortex even when visual cortex receives simple visual stimulation, suggesting independent channels for visual and auditory signals in V1. We speculate which cellular mechanisms allow V1 to be contextually modulated by auditory input to facilitate perception, cognition and behaviour. Beyond cortical feedback that facilitates perception, we argue that there is also feedback serving counterfactual processing during imagery, dreaming and mind wandering, which is not relevant for immediate perception but for behaviour and cognition over a longer time frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Auditory and visual scene analysis’. PMID:28044015

  8. Cholinergic excitation in mouse primary vs. associative cortex: region-specific magnitude and receptor balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Michael K; Bailey, Craig D C; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-08-01

    Cholinergic stimulation of the cerebral cortex is essential for tasks requiring attention; however, there is still some debate over which cortical regions are required for such tasks. There is extensive cholinergic innervation of both primary and associative cortices, and transient release of acetylcholine (ACh) is detected in deep layers of the relevant primary and/or associative cortex, depending on the nature of the attention task. Here, we investigated the electrophysiological effects of ACh in layer VI, the deepest layer, of the primary somatosensory cortex, the primary motor cortex, and the associative medial prefrontal cortex. Layer VI pyramidal neurons are a major source of top-down modulation of attention, and we found that the strength and homogeneity of their direct cholinergic excitation was region-specific. On average, neurons in the primary cortical regions showed weaker responses to ACh, mediated by a balance of contributions from both nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptors. Conversely, neurons in the associative medial prefrontal cortex showed significantly stronger excitation by ACh, mediated predominantly by nicotinic receptors. The greatest diversity of responses to ACh was found in the primary somatosensory cortex, with only a subset of neurons showing nicotinic excitation. In a mouse model with attention deficits only under demanding conditions, cholinergic excitation was preserved in primary cortical regions but not in the associative medial prefrontal cortex. These findings demonstrate that the effect of ACh is not uniform throughout the cortex, and suggest that its ability to enhance attention performance may involve different cellular mechanisms across cortical regions.

  9. Motor cortex stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27-31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27-31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  10. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa De Rose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39, and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD. During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  11. Human Development VIII: A Theory of “Deep” Quantum Chemistry and Cell Consciousness: Quantum Chemistry Controls Genes and Biochemistry to Give Cells and Higher Organisms Consciousness and Complex Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep quantum chemistry is a theory of deeply structured quantum fields carrying the biological information of the cell, making it able to remember, intend, represent the inner and outer world for comparison, understand what it “sees”, and make choices on its structure, form, behavior and division. We suggest that deep quantum chemistry gives the cell consciousness and all the qualities and abilities related to consciousness. We use geometric symbolism, which is a pre-mathematical and philosophical approach to problems that cannot yet be handled mathematically. Using Occam’s razor we have started with the simplest model that works; we presume this to be a many-dimensional, spiral fractal. We suggest that all the electrons of the large biological molecules’ orbitals make one huge “cell-orbital”, which is structured according to the spiral fractal nature of quantum fields. Consciousness of single cells, multi cellular structures as e.g. organs, multi-cellular organisms and multi-individual colonies (like ants and human societies can thus be explained by deep quantum chemistry. When biochemical activity is strictly controlled by the quantum-mechanical super-orbital of the cell, this orbital can deliver energetic quanta as biological information, distributed through many fractal levels of the cell to guide form and behavior of an individual single or a multi-cellular organism. The top level of information is the consciousness of the cell or organism, which controls all the biochemical processes. By this speculative work inspired by Penrose and Hameroff we hope to inspire other researchers to formulate more strict and mathematically correct hypothesis on the complex and coherence nature of matter, life and consciousness.

  12. Antibody-supervised deep learning for quantification of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in hematoxylin and eosin stained breast cancer samples

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    Riku Turkki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immune cell infiltration in tumor is an emerging prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. The gold standard for quantification of immune cells in tissue sections is visual assessment through a microscope, which is subjective and semi-quantitative. In this study, we propose and evaluate an approach based on antibody-guided annotation and deep learning to quantify immune cell-rich areas in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained samples. Methods: Consecutive sections of formalin-fixed parafin-embedded samples obtained from the primary tumor of twenty breast cancer patients were cut and stained with H&E and the pan-leukocyte CD45 antibody. The stained slides were digitally scanned, and a training set of immune cell-rich and cell-poor tissue regions was annotated in H&E whole-slide images using the CD45-expression as a guide. In analysis, the images were divided into small homogenous regions, superpixels, from which features were extracted using a pretrained convolutional neural network (CNN and classified with a support of vector machine. The CNN approach was compared to texture-based classification and to visual assessments performed by two pathologists. Results: In a set of 123,442 labeled superpixels, the CNN approach achieved an F-score of 0.94 (range: 0.92-0.94 in discrimination of immune cell-rich and cell-poor regions, as compared to an F-score of 0.88 (range: 0.87-0.89 obtained with the texture-based classification. When compared to visual assessment of 200 images, an agreement of 90% (k = 0.79 to quantify immune infiltration with the CNN approach was achieved while the inter-observer agreement between pathologists was 90% (k = 0.78. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that deep learning can be applied to quantify immune cell infiltration in breast cancer samples using a basic morphology staining only. A good discrimination of immune cell-rich areas was achieved, well in concordance with both leukocyte antigen expression and

  13. Antibody-supervised deep learning for quantification of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in hematoxylin and eosin stained breast cancer samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riku Turkki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immune cell infiltration in tumor is an emerging prognostic biomarker in breast cancer. The gold standard for quantification of immune cells in tissue sections is visual assessment through a microscope, which is subjective and semi-quantitative. In this study, we propose and evaluate an approach based on antibody-guided annotation and deep learning to quantify immune cell-rich areas in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stained samples. Methods: Consecutive sections of formalin-fixed parafin-embedded samples obtained from the primary tumor of twenty breast cancer patients were cut and stained with H&E and the pan-leukocyte CD45 antibody. The stained slides were digitally scanned, and a training set of immune cell-rich and cell-poor tissue regions was annotated in H&E whole-slide images using the CD45-expression as a guide. In analysis, the images were divided into small homogenous regions, superpixels, from which features were extracted using a pretrained convolutional neural network (CNN and classified with a support of vector machine. The CNN approach was compared to texture-based classification and to visual assessments performed by two pathologists. Results: In a set of 123,442 labeled superpixels, the CNN approach achieved an F-score of 0.94 (range: 0.92-0.94 in discrimination of immune cell-rich and cell-poor regions, as compared to an F-score of 0.88 (range: 0.87-0.89 obtained with the texture-based classification. When compared to visual assessment of 200 images, an agreement of 90% (k = 0.79 to quantify immune infiltration with the CNN approach was achieved while the inter-observer agreement between pathologists was 90% (k = 0.78. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that deep learning can be applied to quantify immune cell infiltration in breast cancer samples using a basic morphology staining only. A good discrimination of immune cell-rich areas was achieved, well in concordance with both leukocyte antigen expression and

  14. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  15. Morphogenetic and histogenetic roles of the temporal-spatial organization of cell proliferation in the vertebrate corticogenesis as revealed by inter-specific analyses of the optic tectum cortex development

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    Melina eRapacioli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system areas displaying the highest structural and functional complexity correspond to the so called cortices, i.e. concentric alternating neuronal and fibrous layers. Corticogenesis, i.e. the development of the cortical organization, depends on the temporal-spatial organization of several developmental events: (a the duration of the proliferative phase of the neuroepithelium, (b the relative duration of symmetric (expansive versus asymmetric (neuronogenic sub phases, (c the spatial organization of each kind of cell division, (e the time of determination and cell cycle exit and (f the time of onset of the postmitotic neuronal migration and (g the time of onset of the neuronal structural and functional differentiation. The first five events depend on molecular mechanisms that perform a fine tuning of the proliferative activity. Changes in any of them significantly influence the cortical size or volume (tangential expansion and radial thickness, morphology, architecture and also impact on neuritogenesis and synaptogenesis affecting the cortical wiring. This paper integrates information, obtained in several species, on the developmental roles of cell proliferation in the development of the optic tectum cortex, a multilayered associative area of the dorsal (alar midbrain. The present review (1 compiles relevant information on the temporal and spatial organization of cell proliferation in different species (fish, amphibians, birds and mammals, (2 revises the main molecular events involved in the isthmic organizer determination and localization, (3 describes how the patterning installed by isthmic organizer is translated into spatially organized neural stem cell proliferation (i.e. by means of growth factors, receptors, transcription factors, signaling pathways, etc. and (4 describes the morpho- and histogenetic effect of a spatially organized cell proliferation in the above mentioned species. A brief section on the optic tectum

  16. Development and Organization of the Evolutionarily Conserved Three-Layered Olfactory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The olfactory cortex is part of the mammalian cerebral cortex together with the neocortex and the hippocampus. It receives direct input from the olfactory bulbs and participates in odor discrimination, association, and learning (Bekkers and Suzuki, 2013). It is thought to be an evolutionarily conserved paleocortex, which shares common characteristics with the three-layered general cortex of reptiles (Aboitiz et al., 2002). The olfactory cortex has been studied as a “simple model” to address sensory processing, though little is known about its precise cell origin, diversity, and identity. While the development and the cellular diversity of the six-layered neocortex are increasingly understood, the olfactory cortex remains poorly documented in these aspects. Here is a review of current knowledge of the development and organization of the olfactory cortex, keeping the analogy with those of the neocortex. The comparison of olfactory cortex and neocortex will allow the opening of evolutionary perspectives on cortical development.

  17. Cultivation of Cerebral Cortex Neuronal Cells of Newborn BALB/c Mice%新生BALB/c小鼠大脑皮质神经元细胞培养方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛岗; 苏芸; 王革非; 许燕璇; 李康生

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish a method for cultivation of cerebral cortex neuronal cells of newborn BALB/c mice. Methods: The cortexes from newborn(less than 24 h) BALB/c mice were obtained and digested by 0.25% trypsin, and then dissociated into single cell suspension. About 1×106 cells were seeded onto each 35 mm dish which was coated by poly-L-lysine overnight previously. After cultivated in seeding medium for 6 h, the neuron cells were cultured in neurobasal medium containing B27, FBS, and glutamine. Cytosine arabinofurannside was added to the cultures at a final concentration of 5 mg/mL on 40 h. Results: The neuron cells showed a typical morphorlogy at day 5. As indicated by indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies against neuron specific βⅢ tubulin, the purity of the neuronal cultures was 93%. Conlusion: The optimized method to culture neuron from BALB/c mice was established.%目的:经改良和优化,建立高纯度BALB/c小鼠大脑皮质神经元培养的方法.方法:采用L-多聚赖氨酸包被细胞培养板,取新生BALB/c小鼠(出生24 h内)大脑皮质组织,经0.25%胰酶消化后吹打成单个细胞,按1×106/孔接种于35 mm的六孔板中,用神经元细胞培养种植液培养6 h后换神经元细胞培养饲养液,培养40 h时加入阿糖胞苷抑制神经胶质细胞的生长,随时观察神经元培养情况.结果:培养5 d的神经元细胞形态最为典型;经免疫荧光方法鉴定,神经元细胞纯度为93%.结论:经方法改良与优化,获得了高纯度的原代培养小鼠大脑皮质神经元细胞.

  18. Integrated analysis of gene expression, CpG island methylation, and gene copy number in breast cancer cells by deep sequencing.

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    Zhifu Sun

    Full Text Available We used deep sequencing technology to profile the transcriptome, gene copy number, and CpG island methylation status simultaneously in eight commonly used breast cell lines to develop a model for how these genomic features are integrated in estrogen receptor positive (ER+ and negative breast cancer. Total mRNA sequence, gene copy number, and genomic CpG island methylation were carried out using the Illumina Genome Analyzer. Sequences were mapped to the human genome to obtain digitized gene expression data, DNA copy number in reference to the non-tumor cell line (MCF10A, and methylation status of 21,570 CpG islands to identify differentially expressed genes that were correlated with methylation or copy number changes. These were evaluated in a dataset from 129 primary breast tumors. Gene expression in cell lines was dominated by ER-associated genes. ER+ and ER- cell lines formed two distinct, stable clusters, and 1,873 genes were differentially expressed in the two groups. Part of chromosome 8 was deleted in all ER- cells and part of chromosome 17 amplified in all ER+ cells. These loci encoded 30 genes that were overexpressed in ER+ cells; 9 of these genes were overexpressed in ER+ tumors. We identified 149 differentially expressed genes that exhibited differential methylation of one or more CpG islands within 5 kb of the 5' end of the gene and for which mRNA abundance was inversely correlated with CpG island methylation status. In primary tumors we identified 84 genes that appear to be robust components of the methylation signature that we identified in ER+ cell lines. Our analyses reveal a global pattern of differential CpG island methylation that contributes to the transcriptome landscape of ER+ and ER- breast cancer cells and tumors. The role of gene amplification/deletion appears to more modest, although several potentially significant genes appear to be regulated by copy number aberrations.

  19. Entorhinal cortex and consolidated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori

    2014-07-01

    The entorhinal cortex is thought to support rapid encoding of new associations by serving as an interface between the hippocampus and neocortical regions. Although the entorhinal-hippocampal interaction is undoubtedly essential for initial memory acquisition, the entorhinal cortex contributes to memory retrieval even after the hippocampus is no longer necessary. This suggests that during memory consolidation additional synaptic reinforcement may take place within the cortical network, which may change the connectivity of entorhinal cortex with cortical regions other than the hippocampus. Here, I outline behavioral and physiological findings which collectively suggest that memory consolidation involves the gradual strengthening of connection between the entorhinal cortex and the medial prefrontal/anterior cingulate cortex (mPFC/ACC), a region that may permanently store the learned association. This newly formed connection allows for close interaction between the entorhinal cortex and the mPFC/ACC, through which the mPFC/ACC gains access to neocortical regions that store the content of memory. Thus, the entorhinal cortex may serve as a gatekeeper of cortical memory network by selectively interacting either with the hippocampus or mPFC/ACC depending on the age of memory. This model provides a new framework for a modification of cortical memory network during systems consolidation, thereby adding a fresh dimension to future studies on its biological mechanism.

  20. Using vitamin E to prevent the impairment in behavioral test, cell loss and dendrite changes in medial prefrontal cortex induced by tartrazine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafati, Ali; Nourzei, Nasrin; Karbalay-Doust, Saied; Noorafshan, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Tartrazine is a food color that may adversely affect the nervous system. Vitamin E is a neuro-protective agent. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of tartrazine and vitamin E on the performance of rats in memory and learning tests as well as the structure of medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). The rats were first divided into seven groups which received the followings for a period of seven weeks: distilled water, corn oil, vitamin E (100mg/kg/day), a low dose (50mg/kg/day) and a high dose (50mg/kg/day) of tartrazine with and without vitamin E. Behavioral tests were conducted and the brain was extracted for stereological methods The high dose of tartrazine decreased the exploration time of novel objects (PE plus tartrazine prevented the above-mentioned changes. An acceptable daily dose of tartrazine could induce impairment in spatial memory and dendrite structure. Moreover, a high dose of tartrazine may defect the visual memory, mPFC structure, the spatial memory and also cause dendrite changes. Vitamin E could prevent the behavioral and structural changes.

  1. Deep immune profiling by mass cytometry links human T and NK cell differentiation and cytotoxic molecule expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengsch, Bertram; Ohtani, Takuya; Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Bovenschen, Niels; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Wherry, E John

    2017-03-19

    The elimination of infected or tumor cells by direct lysis is a key T and NK cell effector function. T and NK cells can kill target cells by coordinated secretion of cytotoxic granules containing one or both pore-forming proteins, perforin and granulysin and combinations of granzyme (Gzm) family effector proteases (in humans: Gzm A, B, K, M and H). Understanding the pattern of expression of cytotoxic molecules and the relationship to different states of T and NK cells may have direct relevance for immune responses in autoimmunity, infectious disease and cancer. Approaches capable of simultaneously evaluating expression of multiple cytotoxic molecules with detailed information on T and NK differentiation state, however, remain limited. Here, we established a high dimensional mass cytometry approach to comprehensively interrogate single cell proteomic expression of cytotoxic programs and lymphocyte differentiation. This assay identified a coordinated expression pattern of cytotoxic molecules linked to CD8 T cell differentiation stages. Coordinated high expression of perforin, granulysin, Gzm A, Gzm B and Gzm M was associated with markers of late effector memory differentiation and expression of chemokine receptor CX3CR1. However, classical gating and dimensionality reduction approaches also identified other discordant patterns of cytotoxic molecule expression in CD8 T cells, including reduced perforin, but high Gzm A, Gzm K and Gzm M expression. When applied to non-CD8 T cells, this assay identified different patterns of cytotoxic molecule co-expression by CD56(hi) versus CD56(dim) defined NK cell developmental stages; in CD4 T cells, low expression of cytotoxic molecules was found mainly in TH1 phenotype cells, but not in Tregs or T follicular helper cells (TFH). Thus, this comprehensive, single cell, proteomic assessment of cytotoxic protein co-expression patterns demonstrates specialized cytotoxic programs in T cells and NK cells linked to their differentiation

  2. Remodeling of the piriform cortex after lesion in adult rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sharyn L; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Zhou, Lijun; Song, Yeajin; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2014-09-10

    Denervation of the piriform cortex by bulbotomy causes a series of important cellular changes in the inhibitory interneurons of layer I and transsynaptic apoptosis of a large number of pyramidal neurons in outer layer II within 24 h. In this study, we report that following the marked loss of neurons in outer layer II, the piriform cortex is reconstituted by the addition of newly formed neurons that restore the number to a preinjury level within 30 days. We provide evidence that the number of newly divided neuronal progenitors increases after injury and further show that a population of doublecortin-positive cells that resides in the piriform cortex decreases after injury. Taken together, these findings suggest that the piriform cortex has significant neurogenic potential that is activated following sensory denervation and may contribute toward the replacement of neurons in outer layer II.

  3. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  4. Auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear responses in chinchillas.

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    Alex León

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochlear microphonics (CM, auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments. We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the

  5. Deep blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    From southern New Mexico to the Great Slave Lake of Canada, scientists from the United States and Canada recently detonated 10 underground chemical explosions to generate a clearer picture of the Earth's crust and upper mantle. Called Project Deep Probe, the experiment is designed to see through the crust and into the upper mantle to a depth of 300 miles.In the United States, Earth scientists from Rice University, Purdue University, and the University of Oregon are participating in the project. “Researchers hope to get a picture of the upper mantle beneath the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado Plateau, to understand the role the mantle played in formation and uplift,” says Alan Levander of Rice. To enhance that “picture,” 750 portable seismographs were placed along a roughly north-south line extending from Crownpoint, New Mexico to Edmonton, Alberta. The seismic recordings will be used to enhance weak seismic waves that penetrated the upper mantle.

  6. Inhibition of aminoacylase 3 protects rat brain cortex neuronal cells from the toxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal mercapturate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bragin, Anatol [Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Faull, Kym [Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pasarow Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [Institute of Genomics and Proteomics, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Damoiseaux, Robert; Schibler, Matthew J. [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pushkin, Alexander, E-mail: apushkin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) and acrolein (ACR) are highly reactive neurotoxic products of lipid peroxidation that are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Conjugation with glutathione (GSH) initiates the 4HNE and ACR detoxification pathway, which generates the mercapturates of 4HNE and ACR that can be excreted. Prior work has shown that the efficiency of the GSH-dependent renal detoxification of haloalkene derived mercapturates is significantly decreased upon their deacetylation because of rapid transformation of the deacetylated products into toxic compounds mediated by β-lyase. The enzymes of the GSH-conjugation pathway and β-lyases are expressed in the brain, and we hypothesized that a similar toxicity mechanism may be initiated in the brain by the deacetylation of 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. The present study was performed to identify an enzyme(s) involved in 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate deacetylation, characterize the brain expression of this enzyme and determine whether its inhibition decreases 4HNE and 4HNE-mercapturate neurotoxicity. We demonstrated that of two candidate deacetylases, aminoacylases 1 (AA1) and 3 (AA3), only AA3 efficiently deacetylates both 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. AA3 was further localized to neurons and blood vessels. Using a small molecule screen we generated high-affinity AA3 inhibitors. Two of them completely protected rat brain cortex neurons expressing AA3 from the toxicity of 4HNE-mercapturate. 4HNE-cysteine (4HNE-Cys) was also neurotoxic and its toxicity was mostly prevented by a β-lyase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. The results suggest that the AA3 mediated deacetylation of 4HNE-mercapturate may be involved in the neurotoxicity of 4HNE.

  7. Egocentric and allocentric representations in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Stephen M; Brimijoin, W Owen; Bizley, Jennifer K

    2017-06-01

    A key function of the brain is to provide a stable representation of an object's location in the world. In hearing, sound azimuth and elevation are encoded by neurons throughout the auditory system, and auditory cortex is necessary for sound localization. However, the coordinate frame in which neurons represent sound space remains undefined: classical spatial receptive fields in head-fixed subjects can be explained either by sensitivity to sound source location relative to the head (egocentric) or relative to the world (allocentric encoding). This coordinate frame ambiguity can be resolved by studying freely moving subjects; here we recorded spatial receptive fields in the auditory cortex of freely moving ferrets. We found that most spatially tuned neurons represented sound source location relative to the head across changes in head position and direction. In addition, we also recorded a small number of neurons in which sound location was represented in a world-centered coordinate frame. We used measurements of spatial tuning across changes in head position and direction to explore the influence of sound source distance and speed of head movement on auditory cortical activity and spatial tuning. Modulation depth of spatial tuning increased with distance for egocentric but not allocentric units, whereas, for both populations, modulation was stronger at faster movement speeds. Our findings suggest that early auditory cortex primarily represents sound source location relative to ourselves but that a minority of cells can represent sound location in the world independent of our own position.

  8. 不同胎龄人胎脑皮质额叶神经干细胞发育规律%Developmental features of neural stem cells in frontal cortex of embryonic human brain at various ages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹晓娟; 封志纯

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neural stem cells(NSCs) have been used to treat brain injury or some degenerating diseases of nervous system. Since in vitro culture conditions for NSCs differ from normal physiological conditions, whether the properties of the cultured cells are consistent with those of cells under physiological conditions? Therefore, inducing endogenous NSCs to proliferate and differentiate may be more promising for practise of NSCs.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the developmental properties of NSCs in frontal cortex of embryonic human brain at various ages.DESIGN: It was a randomized experimental study.SETTING: This study was conducted at Department of Pediatrics, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 90 16-to-36-week-old fetuses underwent inducing abortion by water bag were selected at the Obstetrics & Gynecology Department of Zhujiang Hospital Affiliated to Southern Medical University from October 2003 to March 2004. Brain tissue was taken from the frontal cortex of the aborted fetuses. All the mothers had normal physical examination findings. The informed consents on inducing abortion by water bag had been obtained from relatives and the mothers. The study was conducted with a prior permission from the competent department of the First Military Medical University. According to their ages, the fetuses were divided into 6 groups,16-week group, 20-week group, 24-week group, 28-week group and 36-week group, each group containing 15 cases.METHODS: After inducing abortion by water bag, under axenic conditions, the aborted fetus was dissected, with the scalp excisd, the skull opened and the membrane covering brain pull apart. Then the frontal cerebral cortex was taken out, fixed and sliced. Employing immunohistochemical staining and light microscope, distribution, morphological features, phenotypes, growth patterns and quantity of NSCs in the frontal cortex were observed. Morphological features of the cells and

  9. Deep absorption band in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films and solar cells observed by transparent piezoelectric photothermal spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakata, Sho; Atarashi, Akiko [Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Yagi, Masakazu [Kagawa National College of Technology, Mitoyo-shi 769-1192 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) using a transparent piezoelectric photo-thermal (Tr-PPT) method was carried out on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films (both CIGS/Mo/SLG and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG) and solar cells (ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG). Using the Tr-PPT method, the high background absorption in the below gap region observed in both a microphone and a conventional transducer PAS spectra was strongly reduced. This high background absorption came from the CIGS/Mo interface. This result proves that the Tr-PPT PAS is the surface sensitive method. In the below-band region, a bell-shape deep absorption band has been observed at 0.76 eV, in which a full-width at the half-maximum value was 70-120 meV. This deep absorption band was observed for both CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG and ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG structures. The peak energy of the absorption band was independent of the alloy composition for 0.25≤Ga/III≤0.58. Intensity of the PA signal was negatively correlated to the Na concentration at the CIGS film surface. The origin of the 0.76 eV peak is discussed with relation to native defects such as a Cu-vacancy-related defect (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Chemosensory Learning in the Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund eRolls

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Taste is a primary reinforcer. Olfactory-taste and visual-taste association learning takes place in the primate including human orbitofrontal cortex to build representations of flavour. Rapid reversal of this learning can occur using a rule-based learning system that can be reset when an expected taste or flavour reward is not obtained, that is by negative reward prediction error, to which a population of neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex responds. The representation in the orbitofrontal cortex but not the primary taste or olfactory cortex is of the reward value of the visual / olfactory / taste / input as shown by devaluation experiments in which food is fed to satiety, and by correlations with the activations with subjective pleasantness ratings in humans. Sensory-specific satiety for taste, olfactory, visual, and oral somatosensory inputs produced by feeding a particular food to satiety are implemented it is proposed by medium-term synaptic adaptation in the orbitofrontal cortex. Cognitive factors, including word-level descriptions, modulate the representation of the reward value of food in the orbitofrontal cortex, and this effect is learned it is proposed by associative modification of top-down synapses onto neurons activated by bottom-up taste and olfactory inputs when both are active in the orbitofrontal cortex. A similar associative synaptic learning process is proposed to be part of the mechanism for the top-down attentional control to the reward value vs the sensory properties such as intensity of taste and olfactory inputs in the orbitofrontal cortex, as part of a biased activation theory of selective attention.

  11. Not All the Organelles of Living Cells Are Equal! Or Are They? Engaging Students in Deep Learning and Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Abour H.; Siuda, JoElla Eaglin; Jedlicka, Dianne M.; Bondoc, Jasper Marc; Movahedzadeh, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The cell is the fundamental basis for understanding biology much like the atom is the fundamental basis for understanding physics. Understanding biology requires the understanding of the fundamental functions performed by components within each cell. These components, or organelles, responsible for both maintenance and functioning of the cell…

  12. [Macro- and microscopic systematization of cerebral cortex malformations in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, A P; Milovanova, O A

    2011-01-01

    For the first time in pediatric pathologicoanatomic practice the complete systematization of cerebral cortex malformations is represented. Organ, macroscopic forms: microencephaly, macroencephaly, micropolygyria, pachygyria, schizencephaly, porencephaly, lissencephaly. Histic microdysgenesis of cortex: type I includes isolated abnormalities such as radial (IA) and tangential (I B) subtypes of cortical dislamination; type II includes sublocal cortical dislamination with immature dysmorphic neurons (II A) and balloon cells (II B); type III are the combination focal cortical dysplasia with tuberous sclerosis of the hippocampus (III A), tumors (III B) and malformations of vessels, traumatic and hypoxic disorders (III C). Band heterotopias. Subependimal nodular heterotopias. Tuberous sclerosis. Cellular typification of cortical dysplasia: immature neurons and balloon cells.

  13. Upregulation of endothelial cell adhesion molecules characterizes veins close to granulomatous infiltrates in the renal cortex of cats with feline infectious peritonitis and is indirectly triggered by feline infectious peritonitis virus-infected monocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Delphine D; Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Roukaerts, Inge D M; Baetens, Wendy; Van Bockstael, Sebastiaan; De Gryse, Gaëtan M A; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2016-10-01

    One of the most characteristic pathological changes in cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a multifocal granulomatous phlebitis. Although it is now well established that leukocyte extravasation elicits the inflammation typically associated with FIP lesions, relatively few studies have aimed at elucidating this key pathogenic event. The upregulation of adhesion molecules on the endothelium is a prerequisite for stable leukocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion that necessarily precedes leukocyte diapedesis. Therefore, the present work focused on the expression of the EC adhesion molecules and possible triggers of EC activation during the development of FIP. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the endothelial expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) was elevated in veins close to granulomatous infiltrates in the renal cortex of FIP patients compared to non-infiltrated regions and specimens from healthy cats. Next, we showed that feline venous ECs become activated when exposed to supernatant from feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV)-infected monocytes, as indicated by increased adhesion molecule expression. Active viral replication seemed to be required to induce the EC-stimulating activity in monocytes. Finally, adhesion assays revealed an increased adhesion of naive monocytes to ECs treated with supernatant from FIPV-infected monocytes. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that FIPV activates ECs to increase monocyte adhesion by an indirect route, in which proinflammatory factors released from virus-infected monocytes act as key intermediates.

  14. Metagenomics, single cell genomics, and steady-state free energy flux provide insight into the biogeochemical cycling of deep, meteoric water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnabosco, C.; Lau, C. M.; Ryan, K.; Kieft, T. L.; Snyder, L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Hendrickson, S.; Pullin, M. J.; Slater, G. F.; Simkus, D.; Borgonie, G.; van Heerden, E.; Kuloyo, O.; Maleke, M.; Tlalajoe, T.; Vermeulen, J.; Vermeulen, F.; Munro, A.; Pienaar, M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Grim, S. L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Prior to the onset of high-throughput sequencing, the study of biogeochemical cycling in the terrestrial deep subsurface was limited to geochemical, thermodynamic, culture dependent microbial and low-throughput molecular analyses. Here, we present an integration of these traditional methods with high-throughput metagenomic and single cell analysis of 3.1 km deep water collected from a borehole (TT107) located in AngloGold Ashanti's TauTona Au Mine of South Africa and intersecting a fracture within a Witwatersrand Supergroup quartzite. The low salinity fracture water encountered at this depth is meteoric in origin and has a subsurface residence time on the order of a few thousand years. Aqueous geochemistry and estimated steady-state free energy flux values suggest that redox reactions are driven by the oxidation of abundant, energy-rich substrates including H2, CO, CH4, formate, and propanoate. The majority of the metagenome's sequences related to the phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, which contain several bacterial species that are likely to exhibit chemoautotrophic metabolism. Sequence data confirms that many of these bacteria have the ability reduce of sulfur and nitrogen species via dissimilatory pathways. Thermincola were the most abundant firmicutes at this location and were sequenced at the single cell level. Notably, Thermincola sp. are capable of reducing metals and may utilize energy rich manganese reduction pathways at TT107. The CH4 at this site is of abiological origin (δ13C-C1-3 = -43.5 to -44.3 VPDB; δ2H-C1-3 = -345 to -200 VSMOW) despite the metagenome containing several sequences that are closely related to methanogens in the archaeal phyla Euryarchaeota. Alternatively, these archaea may belong to a group of euryarchaetoa commonly referred to as anaerobic mehanotrophic archaea (ANME) - suggesting that anaerobic oxidation (AOM) of abiogenic CH4 coupled to the reduction of sulfate species may be occurring at this site. Sequences for pmoA and s

  15. Environmental Enrichment Prevent the Juvenile Hypoxia-Induced Developmental Loss of Parvalbumin-Immunoreactive Cells in the Prefrontal Cortex and Neurobehavioral Alterations Through Inhibition of NADPH Oxidase-2-Derived Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingqiang; Wu, Jing; Huo, Lan; Luo, Liang; Song, Xi; Fan, Fei; Lu, Yiming; Liang, Dong

    2016-12-01

    We compared the expression of phenotype of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive cells in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of juvenile rats reared in enriched environment (EE) after daily intermittent hypoxia (IH) exposure to those reared in standard environment (SE) and investigated the involvement of NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX2)-derived oxidative stress in the IH-induced neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral consequences in a juvenile rat model of obstructive sleep apnea. Postnatal day 21 (P21) rats were exposed to IH or room air 8 h daily for 14 consecutive days. After the daily exposure, the rats were raised in SE or EE. In the PFC of P34 rats, we determined the impact (i) of IH exposures on NOX2-derived oxidative stress and PV immunoreactivity, (ii) of pharmacological NOX2 inhibition on IH-induced oxidative stress and PV immunoreactivity, and (iii) of EE on the IH-induced oxidative stress and PV immunoreactivity. Behavioral testing of psychiatric anxiety was carried out consecutively in the open-field test and elevated plus maze at P35 and P36. The results showed IH exposures increased NOX2 expression in the PFC of P34 rats, which was accompanied with elevation of NOX activity and indirect markers of oxidative stress (4-HNE). IH exposures increased 4-HNE immunoreactivity in cortical PV cells, which was accompanied with reduction of PV immunoreactivity. Treatment of IH rats with the antioxidant/NOX inhibitor apocynin prevented the PV cells loss in the PFC and reversed the IH-induced psychiatric anxiety. EE attenuated the NOX2-derived oxidative stress and reversed the PV-immunoreactivity reduction in the PFC induced by IH. Our data suggest that EE might prevent the juvenile hypoxia-induced developmental loss of PV cells in the PFC and attenuate the neurobehavioral alterations through inhibition of NOX2-derived oxidative stress.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated threonine 435 phosphorylation of p65 nuclear factor-κB subunit in endothelial cells induces vasogenic edema and neutrophil infiltration in the rat piriform cortex following status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ji-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Status epilepticus (SE induces severe vasogenic edema in the piriform cortex (PC accompanied by neuronal and astroglial damages. To elucidate the mechanism of SE-induced vasogenic edema, we investigated the roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α in blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption during vasogenic edema and its related events in rat epilepsy models provoked by pilocarpine-induced SE. Methods SE was induced by pilocarpine in rats that were intracerebroventricularly infused with saline-, and soluble TNF p55 receptor (sTNFp55R prior to SE induction. Thereafter, we performed Fluoro-Jade B staining and immunohistochemical studies for TNF-α and NF-κB subunits. Results Following SE, most activated microglia showed strong TNF-α immunoreactivity. In addition, TNF p75 receptor expression was detected in endothelial cells as well as astrocytes. In addition, only p65-Thr435 phosphorylation was increased in endothelial cells accompanied by SMI-71 expression (an endothelial barrier antigen. Neutralization of TNF-α by soluble TNF p55 receptor (sTNFp55R infusion attenuated SE-induced vasogenic edema and neuronal damages via inhibition of p65-Thr435 phosphorylation in endothelial cells. Furthermore, sTNFp55R infusion reduced SE-induced neutrophil infiltration in the PC. Conclusion These findings suggest that impairments of endothelial cell functions via TNF-α-mediated p65-Thr 485 NF-κB phosphorylation may be involved in SE-induced vasogenic edema. Subsequently, vasogenic edema results in extensive neutrophil infiltration and neuronal-astroglial loss.

  17. Combination of deep eutectic solvent and ionic liquid to improve biocatalytic reduction of 2-octanone with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Du, Peng-Xuan; Zong, Min-Hua; Li, Ning; Lou, Wen-Yong

    2016-05-01

    The efficient anti-Prelog asymmetric reduction of 2-octanone with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cells was successfully performed in a biphasic system consisting of deep eutectic solvent (DES) and water-immiscible ionic liquid (IL). Various DESs exerted different effects on the synthesis of (R)-2-octanol. Choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ChCl/EG) exhibited good biocompatibility and could moderately increase the cell membrane permeability thus leading to the better results. Adding ChCl/EG increased the optimal substrate concentration from 40 mM to 60 mM and the product e.e. kept above 99.9%. To further improve the reaction efficiency, water-immiscible ILs were introduced to the reaction system and an enhanced substrate concentration (1.5 M) was observed with C4MIM·PF6. Additionally, the cells manifested good operational stability in the reaction system. Thus, the efficient biocatalytic process with ChCl/EG and C4MIM·PF6 was promising for efficient synthesis of (R)-2-octanol.

  18. Combination of deep eutectic solvent and ionic liquid to improve biocatalytic reduction of 2-octanone with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Du, Peng-Xuan; Zong, Min-Hua; Li, Ning; Lou, Wen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The efficient anti-Prelog asymmetric reduction of 2-octanone with Acetobacter pasteurianus GIM1.158 cells was successfully performed in a biphasic system consisting of deep eutectic solvent (DES) and water-immiscible ionic liquid (IL). Various DESs exerted different effects on the synthesis of (R)-2-octanol. Choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ChCl/EG) exhibited good biocompatibility and could moderately increase the cell membrane permeability thus leading to the better results. Adding ChCl/EG increased the optimal substrate concentration from 40 mM to 60 mM and the product e.e. kept above 99.9%. To further improve the reaction efficiency, water-immiscible ILs were introduced to the reaction system and an enhanced substrate concentration (1.5 M) was observed with C4MIM·PF6. Additionally, the cells manifested good operational stability in the reaction system. Thus, the efficient biocatalytic process with ChCl/EG and C4MIM·PF6 was promising for efficient synthesis of (R)-2-octanol.

  19. Role of voltage-gated calcium channels in the regulation of aldosterone production from zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Paula Q; Guagliardo, Nick A; Klein, Peter M; Hu, Changlong; Breault, David T; Beenhakker, Mark P

    2016-10-15

    Zona glomerulosa cells (ZG) of the adrenal gland constantly integrate fluctuating ionic, hormonal and paracrine signals to control the synthesis and secretion of aldosterone. These signals modulate Ca(2+) levels, which provide the critical second messenger to drive steroid hormone production. Angiotensin II is a hormone known to modulate the activity of voltage-dependent L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels that are expressed on the plasma membrane of ZG cells in many species. Because the ZG cell maintains a resting membrane voltage of approximately -85 mV and has been considered electrically silent, low voltage-activated T-type Ca(2+) channels are assumed to provide the primary Ca(2+) signal that drives aldosterone production. However, this view has recently been challenged by human genetic studies identifying somatic gain-of-function mutations in L-type CaV 1.3 channels in aldosterone-producing adenomas of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. We provide a review of these assumptions and challenges, and update our understanding of the state of the ZG cell in a layer in which native cellular associations are preserved. This updated view of Ca(2+) signalling in ZG cells provides a unifying mechanism that explains how transiently activating CaV 3.2 channels can generate a significant and recurring Ca(2+) signal, and how CaV 1.3 channels may contribute to the Ca(2+) signal that drives aldosterone production.

  20. BCL11B/CTIP2 is highly expressed in GABAergic interneurons of the mouse somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikouei, Kasra; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In the nervous system, BCL11B is crucial for the development of deep layer corticospinal projection neurons and striatal medium spiny neurons and is often used as a marker for the aforementioned cell types. However, the expression of BCL11B in subtypes of non-excitatory neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) has not been reported in the mouse. In this study we show that BCL11B is extensively expressed in S1 GABAergic interneurons, throughout the three main subgroups (somatostatin-, parvalbumin- and 5HT3a-expresssing). Almost all BCL11B positive cells in the upper S1 layers were GABAergic interneurons and surprisingly, almost 40% of the BCL11B positive neurons in layer V were GABAergic interneurons. Single cell mRNA sequencing data revealed higher Bcl11b expression in S1 interneurons compared to deep layer pyramidal neurons. The highest levels of Bcl11b expression were found within the 5HT3a population, specifically in putative neurogliaform interneuron subclasses (5HT3a-positive but not expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide). In the light of our findings we suggest caution using BCL11B as a single marker to identify neurons.

  1. DeepPy: Pythonic deep learning

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    2016-01-01

    This technical report introduces DeepPy – a deep learning framework built on top of NumPy with GPU acceleration. DeepPy bridges the gap between highperformance neural networks and the ease of development from Python/NumPy. Users with a background in scientific computing in Python will quickly be able to understand and change the DeepPy codebase as it is mainly implemented using high-level NumPy primitives. Moreover, DeepPy supports complex network architectures by letting the user compose mat...

  2. DeepPy: Pythonic deep learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    This technical report introduces DeepPy – a deep learning framework built on top of NumPy with GPU acceleration. DeepPy bridges the gap between highperformance neural networks and the ease of development from Python/NumPy. Users with a background in scientific computing in Python will quickly...... be able to understand and change the DeepPy codebase as it is mainly implemented using high-level NumPy primitives. Moreover, DeepPy supports complex network architectures by letting the user compose mathematical expressions as directed graphs. The latest version is available at http...

  3. Alterations in cortical thickness and neuronal density in the frontal cortex of Albert Einstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B; Harvey, T

    1996-06-07

    Neuronal density, neuron size, and the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortical surface area were measured in the right pre-frontal cortex of Albert Einstein and five elderly control subjects. Measurement of neuronal density used the optical dissector technique on celloidin-embedded cresyl violet-stained sections. The neurons counted provided a systematic random sample for the measurement of cell body cross-sectional area. Einstein's cortex did not differ from the control subjects in the number of neurons under 1 mm2 of cerebral cortex or in mean neuronal size. Because Einstein's cortex was thinner than the controls he had a greater neuronal density.

  4. The subclonal structure and genomic evolution of oral squamous cell carcinoma revealed by ultra-deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Thomassen, Mads; Larsen, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are very heterogeneous between patients; however the subclonal structure remains unexplored mainly due to studies using only a single biopsy per patient. To deconvolutethe clonal structure and describe the genomic cancer evolution...

  5. Radiation-induced apoptosis in developing fetal rat cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Nam, Taek Keun; Lee, Min Cheol; Ahn, Sung Ja; Song, Ju Young; Park, Seung Jin; Nah, Byung Sik [College of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    The study was performed to investigate apoptosis by radiation in the developing fetal rat brain. Fetal brains were irradiated in utero between the 17th and 19th days of fetal life(E17-19) by linear accelerator. A dose of irradiation ranging from 1 Gy to 4 Gy was used to evaluate dose dependency. To test time dependency the rats were irradiated with 2 Gy and then the fetal brain specimens were removed at variable time course; 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours after the onset of irradiation. Immunohistochemical staining using in situ TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) technique was used for apoptotic cells. The cerebral cortex, including three zones of cortical zone (CZ), intermediate zone (IZ), and ventricular zone (VZ), was examined. TUNEL positive cells revealed typical features of apoptotic cells under light microscope in the fetal rat cerebral cortex. Apoptotic cells were not found in the cerebral cortex of non-irradiated fetal rats, but did appear in the entire cerebral cortex after 1 Gy irradiation, and were more extensive at the ventricular and intermediate zones than at the cortical zone. The extent of apoptosis was increased with increasing doses of radiation. Apoptosis reached the peak at 6 hours after the onset of 2 Gy irradiation and persisted until 24 hours. Typical morphologic features of apoptosis by irradiation were observed in the developing fetal rat cerebral cortex. It was more extensive at the ventricular and intermediate zones than at the cortical zone, which suggested that stem cells or early differentiating cells are more radiosensitive than differentiated cells of the cortical zone.

  6. Relationship between endothelial cell protein C receptor gene 6936A/G polymorphisms and deep venous thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xu-dong; TIAN Lu; LI Ming; JIN Wei; ZHANG Hong-kun; ZHENG Cheng-fei

    2011-01-01

    Background Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can result in pulmonary embolism, a fatal complication that is due to the dislodgement and movement of a blood clot (thrombus) from a limb into the lungs. Genetic risk factors related to DVT development include mutations in coagulation proteins, especially the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), a component of the anticoaguiation protein C (PC) pathway. The objective of the present study was to analyze the relationship between the 6936A/G polymorphism in the EPCR gene and the occurrence of DVT.Methods This study involved 65 patients with DVT and 71 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all subjects. Plasma levels of soluble EPCR (sEPCR) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Genomic DNA was extracted and EPCR gene product was amplified by a standard PCR reaction.Gene product bands were sequenced to identify EPCR gene polymorphisms.Results In the control group, the level of sEPCR in subjects with 6936AG genotype was significantly higher than that in subjects with 6936AA genotype ((0.97±0.32) pg/ml vs. (0.61±0.24) pg/ml, P <0.01). Similarly in the DVT group, the level of sEPCR in subjects with the 6936AG were greater than that in subjects with the 6936AA genotype ((0.87±0.21) pg/ml vs. (0.50±0.18) pg/ml, P <0.01). The sEPCR level in DVT patients was significantly higher than that in healthy controls ((0.68±0.32) pg/ml vs. (0.54±0.22) pg/ml, P <0.05). The 6936AG genotype frequency in DVT patients was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (P <0.05). In contrast, the 6936AA genotype frequency in DVT patients was lower than that in healthy controls (P <0.05). Subjects carrying 6936AG had an increased risk of thrombosis (OR=2.75, 95% CI:1.04-7.30, P <0.05).Conclusions EPCR gene 6936A/G polymorphism is associated with increased plasma levels of sEPCR. Subjects carrying 6936AG likely have an increased risk of thrombosis.

  7. Translational and structural requirements of the early nodulin gene enod40, a short-open reading frame-containing RNA, for elicitation of a cell-specific growth response in the alfalfa root cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, C; Johansson, C; Charon, C; Manyani, H; Sautter, C; Kondorosi, A; Crespi, M

    2001-01-01

    A diversity of mRNAs containing only short open reading frames (sORF-RNAs; encoding less than 30 amino acids) have been shown to be induced in growth and differentiation processes. The early nodulin gene enod40, coding for a 0.7-kb sORF-RNA, is expressed in the nodule primordium developing in the root cortex of leguminous plants after infection by symbiotic bacteria. Ballistic microtargeting of this gene into Medicago roots induced division of cortical cells. Translation of two sORFs (I and II, 13 and 27 amino acids, respectively) present in the conserved 5' and 3' regions of enod40 was required for this biological activity. These sORFs may be translated in roots via a reinitiation mechanism. In vitro translation products starting from the ATG of sORF I were detectable by mutating enod40 to yield peptides larger than 38 amino acids. Deletion of a Medicago truncatula enod40 region between the sORFs, spanning a predicted RNA structure, did not affect their translation but resulted in significantly decreased biological activity. Our data reveal a complex regulation of enod40 action, pointing to a role of sORF-encoded peptides and structured RNA signals in developmental processes involving sORF-RNAs.

  8. Developmental patterns of doublecortin expression and white matter neuron density in the postnatal primate prefrontal cortex and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Fung

    Full Text Available Postnatal neurogenesis occurs in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus, and evidence suggests that new neurons may be present in additional regions of the mature primate brain, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Addition of new neurons to the PFC implies local generation of neurons or migration from areas such as the subventricular zone. We examined the putative contribution of new, migrating neurons to postnatal cortical development by determining the density of neurons in white matter subjacent to the cortex and measuring expression of doublecortin (DCX, a microtubule-associated protein involved in neuronal migration, in humans and rhesus macaques. We found a striking decline in DCX expression (human and macaque and density of white matter neurons (humans during infancy, consistent with the arrival of new neurons in the early postnatal cortex. Considering the expansion of the brain during this time, the decline in white matter neuron density does not necessarily indicate reduced total numbers of white matter neurons in early postnatal life. Furthermore, numerous cells in the white matter and deep grey matter were positive for the migration-associated glycoprotein polysialiated-neuronal cell adhesion molecule and GAD65/67, suggesting that immature migrating neurons in the adult may be GABAergic. We also examined DCX mRNA in the PFC of adult schizophrenia patients (n = 37 and matched controls (n = 37 and did not find any difference in DCX mRNA expression. However, we report a negative correlation between DCX mRNA expression and white matter neuron density in adult schizophrenia patients, in contrast to a positive correlation in human development where DCX mRNA and white matter neuron density are higher earlier in life. Accumulation of neurons in the white matter in schizophrenia would be congruent with a negative correlation between DCX mRNA and white matter neuron density and support the hypothesis of a migration deficit in

  9. Investigation of electrically active defects in InGaAs quantum wire intermediate-band solar cells using deep-level transient spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqri, Noor alhuda Al; Felix, Jorlandio F.; Aziz, Mohsin; Kunets, Vasyl P.; Jameel, Dler; Taylor, David; Henini, Mohamed; Abd El-sadek, Mahmmoud S.; Furrow, Colin; Ware, Morgan E.; Benamara, Mourad; Mortazavi, Mansour; Salamo, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    InGaAs quantum wire (QWr) intermediate-band solar cell-based nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electrical and interface properties of these solar cell devices, as determined by current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques, were found to change with temperature over a wide range of 20-340 K. The electron and hole traps present in these devices have been investigated using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS results showed that the traps detected in the QWr-doped devices are directly or indirectly related to the insertion of the Si δ-layer used to dope the wires. In addition, in the QWr-doped devices, the decrease of the solar conversion efficiencies at low temperatures and the associated decrease of the integrated external quantum efficiency through InGaAs could be attributed to detected traps E1QWR_D, E2QWR_D, and E3QWR_D with activation energies of 0.0037, 0.0053, and 0.041 eV, respectively.

  10. Hydrophilic Conjugated Polymers with Large Bandgaps and Deep-Lying HOMO Levels as an Efficient Cathode Interlayer in Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhulin; Zhang, Lianjie; Chen, Junwu; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Two hydrophilic conjugated polymers, PmP-NOH and PmP36F-NOH, with polar diethanol-amine on the side chains and main chain structures of poly(meta-phenylene) and poly(meta-phenylene-alt-3,6-fluorene), respectively, are successfully synthesized. The films of PmP-NOH and PmP36F-NOH show absorption edges at 340 and 343 nm, respectively. The calculated optical bandgaps of the two polymers are 3.65 and 3.62 eV, respectively, the largest ones so far reported for hydrophilic conjugated polymers. PmP-NOH and PmP36F-NOH also possess deep-lying highest occupied molecular orbital levels of -6.19 and -6.15 eV, respectively. Inserting PmP-NOH and PmP36F-NOH as a cathode interlayer in inverted polymer solar cells with a PTB7/PC71 BM blend as the active layer, high power conversion efficiencies of 8.58% and 8.33%, respectively, are achieved, demonstrating that the two hydrophilic polymers are excellent interlayers for efficient inverted polymer solar cells.

  11. Investigation of electrically active defects in InGaAs quantum wire intermediate-band solar cells using deep-level transient spectroscopy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Saqri, Noor Alhuda; Felix, Jorlandio F; Aziz, Mohsin; Kunets, Vasyl P; Jameel, Dler; Taylor, David; Henini, Mohamed; Abd El-Sadek, Mahmmoud S; Furrow, Colin; Ware, Morgan E; Benamara, Mourad; Mortazavi, Mansour; Salamo, Gregory

    2017-01-27

    InGaAs quantum wire (QWr) intermediate-band solar cell-based nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electrical and interface properties of these solar cell devices, as determined by current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) techniques, were found to change with temperature over a wide range of 20-340 K. The electron and hole traps present in these devices have been investigated using deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS results showed that the traps detected in the QWr-doped devices are directly or indirectly related to the insertion of the Si δ-layer used to dope the wires. In addition, in the QWr-doped devices, the decrease of the solar conversion efficiencies at low temperatures and the associated decrease of the integrated external quantum efficiency through InGaAs could be attributed to detected traps E1QWR_D, E2QWR_D, and E3QWR_D with activation energies of 0.0037, 0.0053, and 0.041 eV, respectively.

  12. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult with Involvement of the Calvarium, Cerebral Cortex and Brainstem: Discussion of Pathophysiology and Rationale for the Use of Intravenous Immune Globulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dardis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 64-year-old male who presented with symptoms and signs of brain involvement, including seizures and hypopituitarism. The diagnosis was confirmed with a biopsy of a lytic skull lesion. The disease affecting the bone showed no sign of progression following a short course of cladribine. Signs of temporal lobe involvement led to an additional biopsy, which showed signs of nonspecific neurodegeneration and which triggered status epilepticus. Lesions noted in the brainstem were typical for the paraneoplastic inflammation reported in this condition. These lesions improved after treatment with cladribine. They remained stable while on treatment with intravenous immune globulin.

  13. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult with Involvement of the Calvarium, Cerebral Cortex and Brainstem: Discussion of Pathophysiology and Rationale for the Use of Intravenous Immune Globulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardis, Christopher; Aung, Thandar; Shapiro, William; Fortune, John; Coons, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in a 64-year-old male who presented with symptoms and signs of brain involvement, including seizures and hypopituitarism. The diagnosis was confirmed with a biopsy of a lytic skull lesion. The disease affecting the bone showed no sign of progression following a short course of cladribine. Signs of temporal lobe involvement led to an additional biopsy, which showed signs of nonspecific neurodegeneration and which triggered status epilepticus. Lesions noted in the brainstem were typical for the paraneoplastic inflammation reported in this condition. These lesions improved after treatment with cladribine. They remained stable while on treatment with intravenous immune globulin. PMID:25873887

  14. Neural Dynamics and Information Representation in Microcircuits of Motor Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro eTsubo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain has to analyze and respond to external events that can change rapidly from time to time, suggesting that information processing by the brain may be essentially dynamic rather than static. The dynamical features of neural computation are of significant importance in motor cortex that governs the process of movement generation and learning. In this paper, we discuss these features based primarily on our recent findings on neural dynamics and information coding in the microcircuit of rat motor cortex. In fact, cortical neurons show a variety of dynamical behavior from rhythmic activity in various frequency bands to highly irregular spike firing. Of particular interest are the similarity and dissimilarity of the neuronal response properties in different layers of motor cortex. By conducting electrophysiological recordings in slice preparation, we report the phase response curves of neurons in different cortical layers to demonstrate their layer-dependent synchronization properties. We then study how motor cortex recruits task-related neurons in different layers for voluntary arm movements by simultaneous juxtacellular and multiunit recordings from behaving rats. The results suggest an interesting difference in the spectrum of functional activity between the superficial and deep layers. Furthermore, the task-related activities recorded from various layers exhibited power law distributions of inter-spike intervals (ISIs, in contrast to a general belief that ISIs obey Poisson or Gamma distributions in cortical neurons. We present a theoretical argument that this power law of in vivo neurons may represent the maximization of the entropy of firing rate with limited energy consumption of spike generation. Though further studies are required to fully clarify the functional implications of this coding principle, it may shed new light on information representations by neurons and circuits in motor cortex.

  15. Immunocytochemical expression of monocarboxylate transporters in the human visual cortex at midgestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Laurence; Baud, Olivier; Monier, Anne; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre; Evrard, Philippe; Verney, Catherine

    2004-01-31

    Lactate and the other monocarboxylates are a major energy source for the developing brain. We investigated the immunocytochemical expression of two monocarboxylate transporters, MCT1 and MCT2, in the human visual cortex between 13 and 26 post-ovulatory weeks. We used immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence techniques to determine whether these transporters co-localized with markers for blood vessels (CD34), neurons (microtubule-associated protein 2 [MAP2], SMI 311), radial glia (vimentin), or astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP], S100beta protein). MCT1 immunoreactivity was visible in blood vessel walls as early as the 13th week of gestation mainly in the cortical plate and subplate. At this stage, less than 10% of vessels in the ventricular layer expressed MCT1, whereas all blood vessels walls showed this immunoreactivity at the 26th gestational week. Starting at the 19th week of gestation, sparse MCT1 positive cell bodies were detected, some of them co-localized with MAP2 immunoreactivity. MCT2 immunoreactivity was noted in astrocytic cell bodies from week 19 and spread subsequently to the astrocyte end-feet in contact with blood vessels. MCTs immunoreactivities were most marked in the subplate and deep cortical plate, where the most differentiated neurons were located. Our findings suggest that monocarboxylate trafficking between vessels (MCT1), astrocytes (MCT2) and some postmitotic neurons (MCT1) could develop gradually toward 20 gestational weeks (g.w.). These data suggest that lactate or other monocarboxylates could represent a significant energy source for the human visual cortex at this early stage.

  16. Representation of individual elements of a complex call sequence in primary auditory cortex

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    Mark Nelson Wallace

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Conspecific communication calls can be rhythmic or contain extended, discontinuous series of either constant or frequency modulated harmonic tones and noise bursts separated by brief periods of silence. In the guinea pig, rhythmic calls can produce isomorphic responses within the primary auditory cortex (AI where single units respond to every call element. Other calls such as the chutter comprise a series of short irregular syllables that vary in their spectral content and are more like human speech. These calls can also evoke isomorphic responses, but may only do so in fields in the auditory belt and not in AI. Here we present evidence that cells in AI treat the individual elements within a syllable as separate auditory objects and respond selectively to one or a subset of them. We used a single chutter exemplar to compare single/multi-unit responses in the low-frequency portion of AI - AI(LF and the low-frequency part of the thalamic medial geniculate body - MGB(LF in urethane anaesthetised guinea pigs. Both thalamic and cortical cells responded with brief increases in firing rate to one, or more, of the 8 main elements present in the chutter call. Almost none of the units responded to all 8 elements. While there were many different combinations of responses to between one and five of the elements, MBG(LF and AI(LF neurons exhibited the same specific types of response combinations. Nearby units in the upper layers of the cortex tended to respond to similar combinations of elements while the deep layers were less responsive. Thus the responses from a number of AI units would need to be combined in order to represent the entire chutter call. Our results don’t rule out the possibility of constructive convergence but there was no evidence that a convergence of inputs within AI led to a complete representation of all eight elements.

  17. Culture and identification of neural stem cell derived from auditory cortex of embryo mouse%胚胎小鼠听皮层区域神经干细胞的分离培养及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任红苗; 王宜南; 陈继川; 吴晓平; 张波; 刘媛; 张世昌

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过剖腹手术从C57BL/6胎鼠(El4左右)中获得听皮层区域组织,进行神经干细胞体外培养和分化鉴定,探索新的自体NSC移植治疗来源.方法 选取孕14天左右的C57BL/6小鼠,剖腹取出胎鼠,分离听皮层区域组织,在体外无血清培养得到NSC,用免疫荧光细胞染色法进行NSC特异性标记物(Nestin)、增殖能力(BrdU)及多向分化潜能的鉴定.结果 听皮层区域组织在体外通过无血清培养能够得到大量细胞球,经Nestin及Brdu鉴定为NSC球且具有较高增殖能力.NSC球在体外分化后产生β微管蛋白(β-TubulinⅢ)阳性的神经元以及胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)阳性的星形胶质细胞.结论 胎鼠听皮层区域在体外无血清培养可获得大量具有增殖能力和多向分化潜能NSCs,是自体NSCs移植治疗新的种子来源.%Objective To culture and identify the neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from auditory cortex in C57BI7 6 embryo mouse (E14 days) by laparotomy and search for a new source of NSCs for self-transplantation therapy. Methods Auditory cortex was obtained from embryo mouse acquired from C57BL/6 pregnancy mouse (E14days) by laparotomy. NSCs were isolated from auditory cortex and cultured in serum-free medium in vitro. Fluorescence immunocytochemis-try was carried out to examine the expression of NSCs marker (nestin), self-proliferation (Brdu), and the multipotential of differentiation. Results A large number of NSCs examined by Nestin could be harvested from Al in vitro in serum-free media. They expressed Brdu, showing their potential of self-proliferation. They were also able to differentiate into β-Tubu-lin Ⅲ positive neurons and GFAP positive astrocytes. Conclusion NSCs can be obtained from Al of embryo mouse by in vitro serum-free culture, with potentials of self-proliferation and multipotential of differentiation. This can be applied to self-transplantation therapy as a new source of NSCs.

  18. Development of Rostral Prefrontal Cortex and Cognitive and Behavioural Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumontheil, Iroise; Burgess, Paul W.; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2008-01-01

    Information on the development and functions of rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC), or Brodmann area 10, has been gathered from different fields, from anatomical development to functional neuroimaging in adults, and put forward in relation to three particular cognitive and behavioural disorders. Rostral PFC is larger and has a lower cell density in…

  19. The expression of EPOR in renal cortex during postnatal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xiao

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO, known for its role in erythroid differentiation, has been shown to be an important growth factor for brain and heart. EPO is synthesized by fibroblast-like cells in the renal cortex. Prompted by this anatomical relationship and its significant impact on the maturation process of brain and heart, we asked whether EPO could play a role during the development of renal cortex. The relationship between the development of renal cortex and the change of EPO receptor (EPOR, through which EPO could act as a renotropic cytokine, became interesting to us. In this study, the day of birth was recorded as postnatal day 0(P0. P7, P14, P21, P28, P35, P42 and mature mice (postnatal days>56 were used as the animal model of different developmental stages. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to detect the expression of EPOR in mouse renal cortex. Results showed that expression of EPOR decreased with the development of renal cortex and became stable when kidney became mature. The expression of EPOR was detected at the renal tubule of all developmental stages and a relatively higher expression was observed at P14. However, at the renal corpuscle the expression was only observed at P7 and quickly became undetectable after that. All these suggested that a translocation of EPOR from renal corpuscle to renal tubule may take place during the developmental process of renal cortex. Also, EPO may be an essential element for the maturation of renal cortex, and the requirement for EPO was changed during postnatal development process.

  20. 额叶皮层神经干细胞定向诱导分化类神经元的超微结构观察%Study on the ultrastructure of directional differentiation neuron-like cells of temporal lobe cerebral cortex neuron stem cell (NSC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻博; 刘云会; 刘冬娟; 石玉秀; 刘跃华; 杨蓓; 杜喆

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究大鼠额叶皮层神经干细胞(NSC)定向诱导分化类神经元细胞过程中的超微结构变化.方法 取Wistar出生24h新生鼠额叶脑组织加入神经生长因子进行干细胞的原代及继代培养SABC Nestin鉴定并定向培养,于1、3、7d进行扫描电镜观察.结果 神经干细胞诱导分化第7天的类神经元细胞扫描电镜观察可见胞体饱满,有树枝状分支,末端见鸭蹼状膨大的生长;透射电镜下观察可见细胞胞质中有大量的粗面内质网、线粒体与高尔基复体,脂滴糖原颗粒及微丝、微管,核膜、核仁清楚.结论 大脑额叶皮层神经干细胞经定向诱导分化形态学上能够分化成类神经元细胞结构.%Objective To evaluate the ultrastructure on frontal lobe cerebral cortex neuron stem cell ( NSC)in the process of directional differentiation neuron-like cells.Method Newborn Wistar animal in 24 hour was used,and the frontal lobe cerebral cortex tissue was scraped,primary generation and secondary culture with nerve nutrition factor were conducted.Immunochemistry SABC method was used to identify Nestin.Scan electron microscope(SEM)sample was prepared and observed on cover glass which taken from the raise board contain directional differentiation neuron at 1,3,7 day.Results Nearly mature,full soma,dendritic branches,duck palm shape apical cone on the terminal were obviously observed on SEM at 7 days.Some synapse type structure appeared on the cell surface.Organelles,massive RER,Golgi apparatus and the fat drop glycogen pellet was rich on TEM at 7 days.Microfilament and microtubule were in line,big and round nucleolus were clear.All these neuron-like cells characteristic were obvious and easy to see.Conclusions This study indicates that the frontal lobe cerebral cortex nerve stem cell can be directional induced differentiate to neuron-like cells.

  1. Three-dimensional microtomographic imaging of human brain cortex

    CERN Document Server

    Mizutania, Ryuta; Uesugi, Kentaro; Ohyama, Masami; Takekoshi, Susumu; Osamura, R Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an x-ray microtomographic technique for imaging the three-dimensional structure of the human cerebral cortex. Neurons in the brain constitute a neural circuit as a three-dimensional network. The brain tissue is composed of light elements that give little contrast in a hard x-ray transmission image. The contrast was enhanced by staining neural cells with metal compounds. The obtained structure revealed the microarchitecture of the gray and white matter regions of the frontal cortex, which is responsible for the higher brain functions.

  2. Early Signaling in Primary T Cells Activated by Antigen Presenting Cells Is Associated with a Deep and Transient Lamellal Actin Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kole T Roybal

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling transduction critically depends on molecular interactions that are in turn governed by dynamic subcellular distributions of the signaling system components. Comprehensive insight into signal transduction requires an understanding of such distributions and cellular structures driving them. To investigate the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC we have imaged more than 60 signaling intermediates during T cell stimulation with microscopy across resolution limits. A substantial number of signaling intermediates associated with a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell, as characterized in detail here. By mapping the more than 60 signaling intermediates onto the spatiotemporal features of cell biological structures, the lamellum and other ones previously described, we also define distinct spatial and temporal characteristics of T cell signal initiation, amplification, and core signaling in the activation of primary T cells by APCs. These characteristics differ substantially from ones seen when T cells are activated using common reductionist approaches.

  3. Greedy Deep Dictionary Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Tariyal, Snigdha; Majumdar, Angshul; Singh, Richa; Vatsa, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new deep learning tool called deep dictionary learning. Multi-level dictionaries are learnt in a greedy fashion, one layer at a time. This requires solving a simple (shallow) dictionary learning problem, the solution to this is well known. We apply the proposed technique on some benchmark deep learning datasets. We compare our results with other deep learning tools like stacked autoencoder and deep belief network; and state of the art supervised dictionary learning t...

  4. Greedy Deep Dictionary Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Tariyal, Snigdha; Majumdar, Angshul; Singh, Richa; Vatsa, Mayank

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new deep learning tool called deep dictionary learning. Multi-level dictionaries are learnt in a greedy fashion, one layer at a time. This requires solving a simple (shallow) dictionary learning problem, the solution to this is well known. We apply the proposed technique on some benchmark deep learning datasets. We compare our results with other deep learning tools like stacked autoencoder and deep belief network; and state of the art supervised dictionary learning t...

  5. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS, noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF, that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods—the standard Z-score (STDZ method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ method—together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ. Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping.

  6. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue.

  7. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultras...

  8. Effects of ACTH on RNA synthesis and migration in the adrenal cortex cells of the young rat, as shown by radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, M.C.; Vitor, A.B.; Magalhaes, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of ACTH on the RNA synthesis in adrenal zona fasciculata cells of the young rat were studied by light and electron microscope radioautography. Two units of ACTH were administered sc to animals and immediately followed by an iv injection of (/sup 3/)uridine. ACTH-injected and control rats, which received the isotope alone, were sacrificed at various time intervals. Labelling over extranucleolar areas was higher in the ACTH-treated animals at 20 min, then becoming lower than in the controls at 60 min and 24 h. Nucleolar radioactivity, however, was consistently decreased by ACTH at all experimental times. Apart from these changes in the rate of synthesis, the over-all curves of labelling were similar to those in the control animals with a striking peak at 1 h. The short-term increase in extranucleolar RNA synthesis observed after ACTH injection was considered to be consistent with the hypothesis that an enhanced extranucleolar synthesis of mRNA takes place early in stimulated animals and is associated with the synthesis of steroidogenic proteins. On the other hand, the relatively decreased uridine uptake of the label by the nucleolus in ACTH-treated animals, suggests an inhibition of nucleolar transcription with diminished pre-rRNA formation in treated animals.

  9. Long-term plasticity in the regulation of olfactory bulb activity by centrifugal fibers from piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauthron, Joy L; Stripling, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-16

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are activated synaptically via two main pathways. Mitral/tufted (M/T) cells form dendrodendritic synapses on granule cells that can be activated by antidromic stimulation of the lateral olfactory tract (LOT). Centrifugal fibers originating from the association fiber (AF) system in piriform cortex (PC) make axodendritic synapses on granule cells within the granule cell layer (GCL) that can be activated by orthodromic stimulation of AF axons in the PC. We explored functional plasticity in the AF pathway by recording extracellularly from individual M/T cells and presumed granule cells in male Long-Evans rats under urethane anesthesia while testing their response to LOT and AF stimulation. Presumed granule cells driven synaptically by LOT stimulation (type L cells) were concentrated in the superficial half of the GCL and were activated at short latencies, whereas those driven synaptically by AF stimulation (type A cells) were concentrated in the deep half of the GCL and were activated at longer latencies. Type A cells were readily detected only in animals in which the AF input to the GCL had been previously potentiated by repeated high-frequency stimulation. An additional bout of high-frequency stimulation administered under urethane caused an immediate increase in the number of action potentials evoked in type A cells by AF test stimulation and a concomitant increase in inhibition of M/T cells. These results underscore the importance of the role played in olfactory processing by PC regulation of OB activity and document the long-lasting potentiation of that regulation by repeated high-frequency AF activation.

  10. Immunoprofiling of rice root cortex reveals two cortical subdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia eHenry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation and differentiation of aerenchyma, i.e., air-containing cavities that are critical for flooding tolerance, take place exclusively in the cortex. The understanding of development and differentiation of the cortex is thus an important issue; however, studies on this tissue are limited, partly because of the lack of available molecular tools. We screened a commercially available library of cell wall antibodies to identify markers of cortical tissue in rice roots. Out of the 174 antibodies screened, eight were cortex-specific. Our analysis revealed that two types of cortical tissues are present in rice root seedlings. We named these cell layers 'inner' and 'outer' based on their location relative to the stele. We then used the antibodies to clarify cell identity in lateral roots. Without these markers, previous studies could not distinguish between the cortex and sclerenchyma in small lateral roots. By immunostaining lateral root sections, we showed that the internal ground tissue in small lateral roots has outer cortical identity.

  11. The Functions of the Orbitofrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2004-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex contains the secondary taste cortex, in which the reward value of taste is represented. It also contains the secondary and tertiary olfactory cortical areas, in which information about the identity and also about the reward value of odours is represented. The orbitofrontal cortex also receives information about the sight…

  12. Evolutionary specializations of human association cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, R.B.; Passingham, R.E.; Neubert, F.X.; Verhagen, L.; Sallet, J.

    2017-01-01

    Is the human brain a big ape brain? We argue that the human association cortex is larger than would be expected for an equivalent ape brain, suggesting human association cortex is a unique adaptation. The internal organization of the human association cortex shows modifications of the ape plan in

  13. An Ultra-Deep Targeted Sequencing Gene Panel Improves the Prognostic Stratification of Patients With Advanced Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Chen, Shu-Jen; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Yang, Lan-Yan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-02-01

    An improved prognostic stratification of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and pathologically positive (pN+) nodes is urgently needed. Here, we sought to examine whether an ultra-deep targeted sequencing (UDT-Seq) gene panel may improve the prognostic stratification in this patient group.A mutation-based signature affecting 10 genes (including genetic mutations in 6 oncogenes and 4 tumor suppressor genes) was devised to predict disease-free survival (DFS) in 345 primary tumor specimens obtained from pN+ OSCC patients. Of the 345 patients, 144 were extracapsular spread (ECS)-negative and 201 were ECS-positive. The 5-year locoregional control, distant metastases, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival (OS) rates served as outcome measures.The UDT-Seq panel was an independent risk factor (RF) for 5-year locoregional control (P = 0.0067), distant metastases (P = 0.0001), DFS (P stratification for all the survival endpoints as compared with traditional AJCC staging (P stratification than traditional AJCC staging. It was also able to predict prognosis in OSCC patients regardless of ECS presence.

  14. Effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane on proliferation of neural stem cells in rat cerebral cortex%七氟醚和异氟醚对大鼠大脑皮质神经干细胞增殖的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林函; 刘劲; 李纯; 王佩芳; 高雅静; 马晓晓; 王春满; 梅虹霞; 连庆泉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane on the proliferation of neural stem cells in rat cerebral cortex.Methods The neural stem cells were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15 days of gestation and cultured at a density of (1-2) × 106 cells/ml.The cells of 3rd generation were seeded in 6-well plates coated with poly-lysine and randomly divided into 3 groups (n =24 wells each) using a random number table:control group (group C),sevoflurane group (group S) and isoflurane group (group Ⅰ).In S and Ⅰ groups,the cells were exposed to 4.9% sevoflurane and 2.8% isoflurane in a mixture of 5% CO2-95% O2 for 6 h,respectively.The cells were exposed to a mixture of 5 % CO2-95 % O2 for 6 h in group C.After 6 h of exposure,the plates were removed and the cells were continuously incubated for 2 h in an incubator at 37 ℃.The proliferation of cells was detected by immunocytochemistry and microplate method.The expression of proliferation-related genes such as signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3),Sox2,Notchl and P21 mRNA was detected using quantitative real-time PCR.The expression of total STAT3 protein and phosphorylated STAT3 protein (p-STAT3) was determined using Western blot.Results Compared with C group,the rate of proliferation was significantly decreased,and the expression of p-STAT3 was down-regulated in I and S groups,and the expression of STAT3 mRNA was down-regulated in Ⅰ group (P < 0.05),and no significant change was found in the expression of STAT3 mRNA in S group (P > 0.05).There was no significant difference in the expression of Sox2,Notch1 and P21 mRNA and total STAT3 protein between the three groups (P > 0.05).Conclusion Sevoflurane and isoflurane both can inhibit the proliferation of neural stem cells in the rat cerebral cortex,and the mechanism may be that sevoflurane inhibits activation of STAT3 protein,however,isoflurane not only inhibits the activation of STAT3 protein,but also inhibit

  15. Spatiotemporal deep imaging of syncytium induced by the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Mina; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzaki, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Maruyama, Daisuke; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2017-03-25

    Parasite infections cause dramatic anatomical and ultrastructural changes in host plants. Cyst nematodes are parasites that invade host roots and induce a specific feeding structure called a syncytium. A syncytium is a large multinucleate cell formed by cell wall dissolution-mediated cell fusion. The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is a major soybean pathogen. To investigate SCN infection and the syncytium structure, we established an in planta deep imaging system using a clearing solution ClearSee and two-photon excitation microscopy (2PEM). Using this system, we found that several cells were incorporated into the syncytium; the nuclei increased in size and the cell wall openings began to be visible at 2 days after inoculation (DAI). Moreover, at 14 DAI, in the syncytium developed in the cortex, there were thickened concave cell wall pillars that resembled "Parthenon pillars." In contrast, there were many thick board-like cell walls and rarely Parthenon pillars in the syncytium developed in the stele. We revealed that the syncytia were classified into two types based on the pattern of the cell wall structures, which appeared to be determined by the position of the syncytium inside roots. Our results provide new insights into the developmental process of syncytium induced by cyst nematode and a better understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the syncytium in host roots.

  16. Separating the influence of the cortex and foam on the mechanical properties of porcupine quills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; McKittrick, Joanna

    2013-11-01

    Lightweight thin cylinders filled with a foam have applications as collapsible energy absorbers for crashworthy and flotation applications. The local buckling compressive strength and Young's modulus are dependent on material and geometrical properties. Porcupine quills have a thin cortex filled with closed-cell foam, and are entirely composed of α-keratin. The cortex carries the majority of the compressive load, but the foam is able to accommodate and release some of the deformation of the cortex during buckling. The presence of the foam increases the critical buckling strength, buckling strain and elastic strain energy absorption over that of the cortex. Good agreement is found between experimental results and modeled predictions. A strain distribution map of the foam close to the buckled cortex demonstrates that the deformation of the cells plays an important role in accommodating local buckling of the cortex. The robust connection between the foam and cortex results in superior crushing properties compared to synthetic sandwich structure where the foam normally separates from the shell. The foam/cortex construction of the quill can guide future biomimetic fabrications of light weight buckle-resistant columns.

  17. Cerebral Cortex Expression of Gli3 Is Required for Normal Development of the Lateral Olfactory Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni-Maria Amaniti

    Full Text Available Formation of the lateral olfactory tract (LOT and innervation of the piriform cortex represent fundamental steps to allow the transmission of olfactory information to the cerebral cortex. Several transcription factors, including the zinc finger transcription factor Gli3, influence LOT formation by controlling the development of mitral cells from which LOT axons emanate and/or by specifying the environment through which these axons navigate. Gli3 null and hypomorphic mutants display severe defects throughout the territory covered by the developing lateral olfactory tract, making it difficult to identify specific roles for Gli3 in its development. Here, we used Emx1Cre;Gli3fl/fl conditional mutants to investigate LOT formation and colonization of the olfactory cortex in embryos in which loss of Gli3 function is restricted to the dorsal telencephalon. These mutants form an olfactory bulb like structure which does not protrude from the telencephalic surface. Nevertheless, mitral cells are formed and their axons enter the piriform cortex though the LOT is shifted medially. Mitral axons also innervate a larger target area consistent with an enlargement of the piriform cortex and form aberrant projections into the deeper layers of the piriform cortex. No obvious differences were found in the expression patterns of key guidance cues. However, we found that an expansion of the piriform cortex temporally coincides with the arrival of LOT axons, suggesting that Gli3 affects LOT positioning and target area innervation through controlling the development of the piriform cortex.

  18. Oscillations in sensorimotor cortex in movement disorders: an electrocorticography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Andrea L; Ryapolova-Webb, Elena S; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lim, Daniel A; Starr, Philip A

    2012-02-01

    Movement disorders of basal ganglia origin may arise from abnormalities in synchronized oscillatory activity in a network that includes the basal ganglia, thalamus and motor cortices. In humans, much has been learned from the study of basal ganglia local field potentials recorded from temporarily externalized deep brain stimulator electrodes. These studies have led to the theory that Parkinson's disease has characteristic alterations in the beta frequency band (13-30 Hz) in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical network. However, different disorders have rarely been compared using recordings in the same structure under the same behavioural conditions, limiting straightforward assessment of current hypotheses. To address this, we utilized subdural electrocorticography to study cortical oscillations in the three most common movement disorders: Parkinson's disease, primary dystonia and essential tremor. We recorded local field potentials from the arm area of primary motor and sensory cortices in 31 subjects using strip electrodes placed temporarily during routine surgery for deep brain stimulator placement. We show that: (i) primary motor cortex broadband gamma power is increased in Parkinson's disease compared with the other conditions, both at rest and during a movement task; (ii) primary motor cortex high beta (20-30 Hz) power is increased in Parkinson's disease during the 'stop' phase of a movement task; (iii) the alpha-beta peaks in the motor and sensory cortical power spectra occur at higher frequencies in Parkinson's disease than in the other two disorders; and (iv) patients with dystonia have impaired movement-related beta band desynchronization in primary motor and sensory cortices. The findings support the emerging hypothesis that disease states reflect abnormalities in synchronized oscillatory activity. This is the first study of sensorimotor cortex local field potentials in the three most common movement disorders.

  19. Wrinkling of a spherical lipid interface induced by actomyosin cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Nishigami, Yukinori; Sonobe, Seiji; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    Actomyosin actively generates contractile forces that provide the plasma membrane with the deformation stresses essential to carry out biological processes. Although the contractile property of purified actomyosin has been extensively studied, to understand the physical contribution of the actomyosin contractile force on a deformable membrane is still a challenging problem and of great interest in the field of biophysics. Here, we reconstitute a model system with a cell-sized deformable interface that exhibits anomalous curvature-dependent wrinkling caused by the actomyosin cortex underneath the spherical closed interface. Through a shape analysis of the wrinkling deformation, we find that the dominant contributor to the wrinkled shape changes from bending elasticity to stretching elasticity of the reconstituted cortex upon increasing the droplet curvature radius of the order of the cell size, i.e., tens of micrometers. The observed curvature dependence is explained by the theoretical description of the cortex elasticity and contractility. Our present results provide a fundamental insight into the deformation of a curved membrane induced by the actomyosin cortex.

  20. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

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    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  1. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  2. Early GABAergic circuitry in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei; Sinning, Anne; Kilb, Werner

    2014-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex GABAergic signaling plays an important role in regulating early developmental processes, for example, neurogenesis, migration and differentiation. Transient cell populations, namely Cajal-Retzius in the marginal zone and thalamic input receiving subplate neurons, are integrated as active elements in transitory GABAergic circuits. Although immature pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic synaptic inputs already at fetal stages, they are integrated into functional GABAergic circuits only several days later. In consequence, GABAergic synaptic transmission has only a minor influence on spontaneous network activity during early corticogenesis. Concurrent with the gradual developmental shift of GABA action from excitatory to inhibitory and the maturation of cortical synaptic connections, GABA becomes more important in synchronizing neuronal network activity.

  3. Retinal oscillations carry visual information to cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Koepsell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic relay cells fire action potentials that transmit information from retina to cortex. The amount of information that spike trains encode is usually estimated from the precision of spike timing with respect to the stimulus. Sensory input, however, is only one factor that influences neural activity. For example, intrinsic dynamics, such as oscillations of networks of neurons, also modulate firing pattern. Here, we asked if retinal oscillations might help to convey information to neurons downstream. Specifically, we made whole-cell recordings from relay cells to reveal retinal inputs (EPSPs and thalamic outputs (spikes and then analyzed these events with information theory. Our results show that thalamic spike trains operate as two multiplexed channels. One channel, which occupies a low frequency band (<30 Hz, is encoded by average firing rate with respect to the stimulus and carries information about local changes in the visual field over time. The other operates in the gamma frequency band (40-80 Hz and is encoded by spike timing relative to retinal oscillations. At times, the second channel conveyed even more information than the first. Because retinal oscillations involve extensive networks of ganglion cells, it is likely that the second channel transmits information about global features of the visual scene.

  4. Endothelial cell protein C receptor gene 6936A/G and 4678G/C polymorphisms as risk factors for deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoheir, Naguib; Eldanasouri, Nabiel; Abdel-Aal, Asmaa A; Hosny, Karim Adel; Abdel-Ghany, Wafaa M

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances the generation of activated protein C by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. A soluble form of EPCR (sEPCR) is present in plasma. Two polymorphisms in the EPCR gene (6936A/G and 4678G/C) have been reported to influence the risk of venous thromboembolism. We aimed to investigate the relation between EPCR gene polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678C/G) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and their relations to sEPCR level. This study involved 90 patients with DVT and 90 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Plasma levels of sEPCR were measured in 45 cases of the primary DVT by ELISA. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used for detection of EPCR polymorphisms (6936A/G and 4678G/C). Regarding 6936A/G, our results demonstrated that mutant genotypes (AG, GG) were associated with an increased risk for DVT [P factor against DVT (P = 0.014, OR 0.289, 95% CI 0.108-0.776) as well as its mutant allele C (P = 0.02, OR 0.600, 95% CI 0.388-0.927), but it had no effect on sEPCR level. Our data suggest that 6936A/G polymorphism is a risk factor for DVT and is associated with elevated plasma levels of sEPCR, while 4678G/C polymorphism plays a role in protection against DVT.

  5. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 in neuronal maturation and gliogenesis during cortex development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixing Ma; Qingyu Li; Zhengyu Zhang; Yufang Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple-layer structure of the cerebral cortex is important for its functions. Such a structure is generated based on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells. Notch functions as a molecular switch for neural stem/progenitor cell fate during cortex development but the mechanism remains unclear. Biochemical and cellular studies showed that Notch receptor activation induces several proteases to release the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) might be a physiological rate-limiting S2 enzyme for Notch activation. Nestin-driven conditional ADAM10 knockout in mouse cortex showed that ADAM10 is critical for maintenance of the neural stem cell population during early embryonic cortex development. However, the expression pattern and function of ADAM10 during later cerebral cortex development remains poorly understood. We performed in situ hybridization for ADAM10 mRNA and immunofluorescent analysis to determine the expression of ADAM10 and NICD in mouse cortex from embryonic day 9 (E14.5) to postnatal day 1 (P1). ADAM10 and NICD were highly co-localized in the cortex of E16.5 to P1 mice. Comparisons of expression patterns of ADAM10 with Nestin (neural stem cell marker), Tuj1 (mature neuron marker), and S100β (glia marker) showed that ADAM10 expression highly matched that of S100β and partially matched that of Tuj1 at later embryonic to early postnatal cortex developmental stages. Such expression patterns indicated that ADAM10-Notch signaling might have a critical function in neuronal maturation and gliogenesis during cortex development.

  6. EFFECTS OF CULTURED ASTROCYTES FROM RAT CEREBRAL CORTEX ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PC12 CELLS%星形神经胶质细胞对PC12细胞生长发育的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫永炎; 陈瑗; 周玫; 张宝

    2000-01-01

    在神经系统的生长发育过程中,星形胶质细胞对神经元生长发育的作用是一项重要的研究课题。本文以体外培养的SD大鼠大脑皮质星形胶质细胞与PC12神经元按不同细胞数目比例(50:1~1:1)共同培养,并用其制备的条件培养液培养PC12细胞,用快速灵敏的MTT比色法测定PC12神经元的细胞活力,用光学相差显微镜观察PC12细胞形态学变化。结果显示,星形胶质细胞条件培养液可增强PC12细胞活力(MTT测定的 OD值由0.255±0.012提高到0.510±0.036,P<0.001,且细胞折光性较对照组强),却不能促使PC12神经元突起的生出。将星形胶质细胞与PC12细胞按30:1~1:1的比例共同培养时,既可提高PC12细胞折光性和光晕又可促使其突起的生长;如按50:1~40:1的比例共同培养时,只观察到提高PC12细胞折光性和光晕,而无促使其突起生长发育的作用。本文结果提示,PC12神经元细胞活力的提高与星形胶质细胞分泌到条件培养液中的可溶性因子有关,而PC12神经元突起生长发育可能是和与星形胶质细胞的直接接触以及二者的细胞数且比有关。%To investigate effects of cultured astrocytes from Sprague Dawley rat cerebral cortex on the development of PC12 cellsderived from rat pheochromocytoma, PC12 cells were cocultured with astrocyte according to different astrocytes/neurons ratio(50:1~1:1) , or with serum-free conditioned medium of astrocytes(ACM). The vitality of PC12 cells was measured by sensi-tive MTT method and their morphologic features were observed by Olympus light microscope. The results showed: (1) WhenPC12 cells were cultured with ACM, compared with the control group, the vitality of PC12 cells was increased significantly (0.255+0. 012 vs 0. 510±0. 036, P<0. 001) and the morphological changes were not obvious in the experimental group. (2) WhenPC12 cells were cocultured with astrocyte in the ratio of 30: 1

  7. Effects of cultured astrocytes from rat cerebral cortex onthe neurite development of PC12 cells%星形神经胶质细胞对PC12神经元突起生长发育的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫永炎; 邵紫韫; 陈瑗; 周玫; 张宝

    2004-01-01

    背景:星形细胞对神经元有提供营养、支持及调节突触活性作用,但它对神经元发育的影响还尚不清楚.目的:探讨体外培养的Sprague Dawley大鼠大脑皮质星形细胞对PC12神经元突起生长发育的作用.设计:完全随机设计,对照实验研究.方法:以培养的星形细胞与PC12神经元按不同细胞数目比例(50:1~1:1)共同培养,并用其制备的条件培养液培养PG12细胞.主要观察指标:用快速灵敏的MTT'比色法测定PC12神经元的细胞活力,用光学相差显微镜观察PC12细胞形态学变化.结果:①星形细胞条件培养液可增强PG12细胞活力(MTT测定的A值由0.255±0.012提高到0.510±0.036,P<0.001),却不能促使PC12神经元突起的生出.②当将星形细胞与PC12细胞按30:1~1:1的比例共同培养时,既可提高PC12细胞折光性和光晕又可促使其突起的生长;但按50:1~40:1的比例共同培养时,只观察到提高PC12细胞折光性和光晕,而无促使其突起生长发育的作用.结论:PC12神经元细胞活力的提高与星形细胞分泌到条件培养液中的可溶性因子有关,而PC12神经元突起生长发育可能是和与星形细胞的直接接触以及二者的细胞数目比有关.%BACKGROUND: Although astrocytes are kown to provide structural andtrophic support to neurons and modulate synaptic activity, their role is farfrom being completely understood.OBJECTIVE: To investigate effects of cultured astrocytes fromSprague-Dawley rat cerebral cortex on the neurite development of PC12 cellsderived from rat pheochromocytoma.DESIGN: Completely randomized controlled trial.METHODS: PC12 cells were co-cultured with astrocyte according to dif-ferent astrocytes/neurons ratio(50: 1 -1: 1), or cultured with serum-freeconditioned medium of astrocytes (ACM).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The vitality of PC12 cells was measuredby sensitive MTT method and their morphologic features were observed byOlympus light microscope.RFSULTS: When PC

  8. Fractal dimension of apical dendritic arborization differs in the superficial and the deep pyramidal neurons of the rat cerebral neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puškaš, Nela; Zaletel, Ivan; Stefanović, Bratislav D; Ristanović, Dušan

    2015-03-04

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex have specific structure and pattern of organization that involves the presence of apical dendrite. Morphology of the apical dendrite is well-known, but quantification of its complexity still remains open. Fractal analysis has proved to be a valuable method for analyzing the complexity of dendrite morphology. The aim of this study was to establish the fractal dimension of apical dendrite arborization of pyramidal neurons in distinct neocortical laminae by using the modified box-counting method. A total of thirty, Golgi impregnated neurons from the rat brain were analyzed: 15 superficial (cell bodies located within lamina II-III), and 15 deep pyramidal neurons (cell bodies situated within lamina V-VI). Analysis of topological parameters of apical dendrite arborization showed no statistical differences except in total dendritic length (p=0.02), indicating considerable homogeneity between the two groups of neurons. On the other hand, average fractal dimension of apical dendrite was 1.33±0.06 for the superficial and 1.24±0.04 for the deep cortical neurons, showing statistically significant difference between these two groups (pfractal dimension values, apical dendrites of the superficial pyramidal neurons tend to show higher structural complexity compared to the deep ones.

  9. Triterpenoid saponins from Cortex Albiziae

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Kun; Zhao, Yuying

    2004-01-01

    Cortex Albiziae, the dried stem bark of a leguminous plant, Albizia julibrissin Durazz, was specified in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (1995 edit.) as a traditional Chinese medicine to be used.to relieve melancholia and uneasiness of body and mind, to invigorate the circulation of blood and subside a swelling. In a course of our quality assessment of traditional Chinese medicines, the n-BuOH soluble part of 95% EtOH extracts from the stem barks of Albizia julibrissin was subjected to a series of sol...

  10. Developmental and functional biology of the primate fetal adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesiano, S; Jaffe, R B

    1997-06-01

    The unique characteristics of the primate (particularly human) fetal adrenal were first realized in the early 1900s when its morphology was examined in detail and compared with that of other species. The unusual architecture of the human fetal adrenal cortex, with its unique and disproportionately enlarged fetal zone, its compact definitive zone, and its dramatic remodeling soon after birth captured the interest of developmental anatomists. Many detailed anatomical studies describing the morphology of the developing human fetal adrenal were reported between 1920 and 1960, and these morphological descriptions have not changed significantly. More recently, it has become clear that fetal adrenal cortical growth involves cellular hypertrophy, hyperplasia, apoptosis, and migration and is best described by the migration theory, i.e. cells proliferate in the periphery, migrate centripetally, differentiate during their migration to form the functional cortical zones, and then likely undergo apoptosis in the center of the cortex. Consistent with this model, cells of intermediate phenotype, arranged in columnar cords typical of migration, have been identified between the definitive and fetal zones. This cortical area has been referred to as the transitional zone and, based on the expression of steroidogenic enzymes, we consider it to be a functionally distinct cortical zone. Elegant experiments during the 1950s and 1960s demonstrated the central role of the primate fetal adrenal cortex in establishing the estrogenic milieu of pregnancy. Those findings were among the first indications of the function and physiological role of the human fetal adrenal cortex and led Diczfalusy and co-workers to propose the concept of the feto-placental unit, in which DHEA-S produced by the fetal adrenal cortex is used by the placenta for estrogen synthesis. Tissue and cell culture techniques, together with improved steroid assays, revealed that the fetal zone is the primary source of DHEA

  11. Movement Initiation Signals in Mouse Whisker Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Varun; Esmaeili, Vahid; Kiritani, Taro; Galan, Katia; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2016-12-21

    Frontal cortex plays a central role in the control of voluntary movements, which are typically guided by sensory input. Here, we investigate the function of mouse whisker primary motor cortex (wM1), a frontal region defined by dense innervation from whisker primary somatosensory cortex (wS1). Optogenetic stimulation of wM1 evokes rhythmic whisker protraction (whisking), whereas optogenetic inactivation of wM1 suppresses initiation of whisking. Whole-cell membrane potential recordings and silicon probe recordings of action potentials reveal layer-specific neuronal activity in wM1 at movement initiation, and encoding of fast and slow parameters of movements during whisking. Interestingly, optogenetic inactivation of wS1 caused hyperpolarization and reduced firing in wM1, together with reduced whisking. Optogenetic stimulation of wS1 drove activity in wM1 with complex dynamics, as well as evoking long-latency, wM1-dependent whisking. Our results advance understanding of a well-defined frontal region and point to an important role for sensory input in controlling motor cortex. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Imprecise Whisker Map in the Neonatal Rat Barrel Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrukhina, Olga; Suchkov, Dmitry; Khazipov, Roustem; Minlebaev, Marat

    2015-10-01

    The somatosensory barrel cortex in rodents contains a topographic map of the facial whiskers where each cortical barrel is tuned to a corresponding whisker. However, exactly when this correspondence is established during development and how precise the functional topography of the whisker protomap is at birth, before the anatomical formation of barrels, are questions that remain unresolved. Here, using extracellular and whole-cell recordings from the barrel cortex of 0- to 7-day-old (P0-7; P0 = day of birth) rat pups in vivo, we report a low level of tuning to the principal whisker at P0-1, with multiple adjacent whiskers evoking large multi- and single-unit responses and excitatory postsynaptic currents in cortical neurons. Additionally, we found broad and largely overlapping projection fields (PFs) for neighboring whiskers in the barrel cortex at P0-1. Starting from P2-3, a segregated whisker map emerged, characterized by preferential single whisker tuning and segregated whisker PFs. These results indicate that the functional whisker protomap in the somatosensory cortex is imprecise at birth, that for 2-3 days after birth, whiskers compete for the cortical target territories, and that formation of a segregated functional whisker map coincides with emergence of the anatomical barrel map. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in rat occipital cortex after callosotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lepore

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadal steroidogenesis can be influenced by direct neural links between the central nervous system and the gonads. It is known that androgen receptor (AR is expressed in many areas of the rat brain involved in neuroendocrine control of reproduction, such as the cerebral cortex. It has been recently shown that the occipital cortex exerts an inhibitory effect on testicular stereoidogenesis by a pituitary-independent neural mechanism. Moreover, the complete transection of the corpus callosum leads to an increase in testosterone (T secretion of hemigonadectomized rats. The present study was undertaken to analyze the possible corticocortical influences regulating male reproductive activities. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: 1 intact animals as control; 2 rats undergoing sham callosotomy; 3 posterior callosotomy; 4 gonadectomy and posterior callosotomy. Western blot analysis showed no remarkable variations in cortical AR expression in any of the groups except in group I where a significant decrease in AR levels was found. Similarly, both immunocytochemical study and cell count estimation showed a lower AR immunoreactivity in occipital cortex of callosotomized rats than in other groups. In addition, there was no difference in serum T and LH concentration between sham-callosotomized and callosotomized rats. In conclusion, our results show that posterior callosotomy led to a reduction in AR in the right occipital cortex suggesting a putative inhibiting effect of the contralateral cortical area.

  14. Dimensionality of object representations in monkey inferotemporal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehky, Sidney R; Kiani, Roozbeh; Esteky, Hossein; Tanaka, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    We have calculated the intrinsic dimensionality of visual object representations in anterior inferotemporal (AIT) cortex, based on responses of a large sample of cells stimulated with photographs of diverse objects. Because dimensionality was dependent on data set size, we determined asymptotic dimensionality as both the number of neurons and number of stimulus image approached infinity. Our final dimensionality estimate was 93 (SD: ± 11), indicating that there is basis set of approximately 100 independent features that characterize the dimensions of neural object space. We believe this is the first estimate of the dimensionality of neural visual representations based on single-cell neurophysiological data. The dimensionality of AIT object representations was much lower than the dimensionality of the stimuli. We suggest that there may be a gradual reduction in the dimensionality of object representations in neural populations going from retina to inferotemporal cortex as receptive fields become increasingly complex.

  15. Effect of prenatal exposure to ethanol on the development of cerebral cortex: I. Neuronal generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol causes profound disruptions in the development of the cerebral cortex. Therefore, the effect of in utero ethanol exposure on the generation of neurons was determined. Pregnant rats were fed a liquid diet in which ethanol constituted 37.5% of the total caloric content (Et) or pair-fed an isocaloric control diet (Ct) from gestational day (GD) 6 to the day of birth. The time of origin of cortical neurons was determined in the mature pups of females injected with (3H)thymidine on one day during the period from GD 10 to the day of birth. The brains were processed by standard autoradiographic techniques. Ethanol exposure produced multiple defects in neuronal ontogeny. The period of generation was 1-2 days later for Et-treated rats than for rats exposed prenatally to either control diet. Moreover, the generation period was 1-2 days longer in Et-treated rats. The numbers of neurons generated on a specific day was altered; from GD 12-19 significantly fewer neurons were generated in Et-treated rats than in Ct-treated rats, whereas after GD 19 more neurons were born. The distribution of neurons generated on a specific day was disrupted; most notable was the distribution of late-generated neurons in deep cortex of Et-treated rats rather than in superficial cortex as they are in controls. Cortical neurons in Et-treated rats tended to be smaller than in Ct-treated rats, particularly early generated neurons in deep cortex. The late-generated neurons in Et-treated rats were of similar size to those in Ct-treated rats despite their abnormal position in deep cortex. Neurons in Ct-treated rats tended to be rounder than those in Et-treated rats which were more polarized in the radial orientation.

  16. 初级视觉皮层“简单”与“复杂”神经元动力学的计算建模%Computational modeling of the dynamics of simple and complex cells in primary visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶乐天; 蔡申瓯

    2011-01-01

    本文回顾了我们在哺乳动物视觉皮层的建模工作.利用初级视觉皮层的大规模神经元网络模型,我们解释了初级视觉皮层里“简单”与“复杂”神经元现象的网络机制.所谓的“简单”细胞对视觉刺激的反应近似线性,而“复杂”细胞对视觉刺激是非线性的.我们的模型成功地再现了简单和复杂细胞分布的实验数据.%We review our work on computational modeling of the mammalian visual cortex.In particular,we explain the network mechanism of how simple and complex cells arise in a large scale neuronal network model of primary visual cortex.The simple cells are so-called because they respond approximately linearly to visual stimulus,whereas the complex cells exhibit nonlinear response to visual stimulation.Our model reproduces qualitatively the experimentally observed distributions of simple and complex cells.

  17. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultrasound signal attenuation and distortion caused by a relatively thick skull.

  18. Functioning of Circuits Connecting Thalamus and Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, S Murray

    2017-03-16

    Glutamatergic pathways in thalamus and cortex are divided into two distinct classes: driver, which carries the main information between cells, and modulator, which modifies how driver inputs function. Identifying driver inputs helps to reveal functional computational circuits, and one set of such circuits identified by this approach are cortico-thalamo-cortical (or transthalamic corticocortical) circuits. This, in turn, leads to the conclusion that there are two types of thalamic relay: first order nuclei (such as the lateral geniculate nucleus) that relay driver input from a subcortical source (i.e., retina), and higher order nuclei (such as the pulvinar) which are involved in these transthalamic pathways by relaying driver input from layer 5 of one cortical area to another. This thalamic division is also seen in other sensory pathways and beyond these so that most of thalamus by volume consists of higher-order relays. Many, and perhaps all, direct driver connections between cortical areas are paralleled by an indirect cortico-thalamo-cortical (transthalamic) driver route involving higher order thalamic relays. Such thalamic relays represent a heretofore unappreciated role in cortical functioning, and this assessment challenges and extends conventional views regarding both the role of thalamus and mechanisms of corticocortical communication. Finally, many and perhaps the vast majority of driver inputs relayed through thalamus arrive via branching axons, with extrathalamic targets often being subcortical motor centers. This raises the possibility that inputs relayed by thalamus to cortex also serve as efference copies, and this may represent an important feature of information relayed up the cortical hierarchy via transthalamic circuits. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:713-739, 2017.

  19. Multi-column Deep Neural Networks for Image Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Cireşan, Dan; Meier, Ueli; Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods of computer vision and machine learning cannot match human performance on tasks such as the recognition of handwritten digits or traffic signs. Our biologically plausible deep artificial neural network architectures can. Small (often minimal) receptive fields of convolutional winner-take-all neurons yield large network depth, resulting in roughly as many sparsely connected neural layers as found in mammals between retina and visual cortex. Only winner neurons are trained. ...

  20. Prefrontal cortex glutamate and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Simone; Schubert, Florian; Jaedke, Maren; Gallinat, Jürgen; Bajbouj, Malek

    2012-10-01

    Extraversion is considered one of the core traits of personality. Low extraversion has been associated with increased vulnerability to affective and anxiety disorders. Brain imaging studies have linked extraversion, approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and glutamatergic neurotransmission. However, the relationship between extraversion and glutamate in the DLPFC has not been investigated so far. In order to address this issue, absolute glutamate concentrations in the DLPFC and the visual cortex as a control region were measured by 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in 29 subjects with high and low extraversion. We found increased glutamate levels in the DLPFC of introverts as compared with extraverts. The increased glutamate concentration was specific for the DLPFC and negatively associated with state anxiety. Although preliminary, results indicate altered top-down control of DLPFC due to reduced glutamate concentration as a function of extraversion. Glutamate measurement with 1H-MRS may facilitate the understanding of biological underpinnings of personality traits and psychiatric diseases associated with dysfunctions in approach behaviour and the production of positive emotional states.

  1. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er(3+)/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er(3+)/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy.

  2. The germinal zones of the basal ganglia but not the septum generate GABAergic interneurons for the cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Anna N; Alfonsi, Fabienne; Humphreys, Michael P; Choi, Christina K P; Rocha, Susana F; Kessaris, Nicoletta

    2010-09-08

    Cortical interneurons originate from subpallial precursors and migrate into the cortex during development. Using genetic lineage tracing in transgenic mice we examine the contribution of two germinal zones, the septum and the lateral ganglionic eminence/caudal ganglionic eminence (LGE/CGE) to interneurons of the cortex. We find that the septal neuroepithelium does not generate interneurons for the neocortex. There is, however, clear migration of cells from the LGE/CGE to the cortex. Comparison of the dynamics of cortical colonization by the two major cohorts of interneurons originating in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and the LGE/CGE has shown differences in the timing of migration and initial route of entry into the cortex. LGE/CGE-derived interneurons enter the cortex later than the MGE-derived ones. They invade the cortex through the subventricular/intermediate zone route and only later disperse within the cortical plate and the marginal zone. During the first postnatal week MGE interneurons move extensively to acquire their laminar position within the cortical plate whereas LGE/CGE-derived cells remain largely within the upper layers of the cortex. The two populations intermingle in the adult cortex but have distinct neurochemical properties and different overall distributions. LGE/CGE-derived interneurons account for one third of the total GABAergic interneuron population in the adult cortex.

  3. Postsynaptic Signals Mediating Induction of Long-Term Synaptic Depression in the Entorhinal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saïd Kourrich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex receives a large projection from the piriform cortex, and synaptic plasticity in this pathway may affect olfactory processing. In vitro whole cell recordings have been used here to investigate postsynaptic signalling mechanisms that mediate the induction of long-term synaptic depression (LTD in layer II entorhinal cortex cells. To induce LTD, pairs of pulses, using a 30-millisecond interval, were delivered at 1 Hz for 15 minutes. Induction of LTD was blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist APV and by the calcium chelator BAPTA, consistent with a requirement for calcium influx via NMDA receptors. Induction of LTD was blocked when the FK506 was included in the intracellular solution to block the phosphatase calcineurin. Okadaic acid, which blocks activation of protein phosphatases 1 and 2a, also prevented LTD. Activation of protein phosphatases following calcium influx therefore contributes to induction of LTD in layer II of the entorhinal cortex.

  4. Postsynaptic Signals Mediating Induction of Long-Term Synaptic Depression in the Entorhinal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourrich, Saïd; Glasgow, Stephen D.; Caruana, Douglas A.; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex receives a large projection from the piriform cortex, and synaptic plasticity in this pathway may affect olfactory processing. In vitro whole cell recordings have been used here to investigate postsynaptic signalling mechanisms that mediate the induction of long-term synaptic depression (LTD) in layer II entorhinal cortex cells. To induce LTD, pairs of pulses, using a 30-millisecond interval, were delivered at 1 Hz for 15 minutes. Induction of LTD was blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist APV and by the calcium chelator BAPTA, consistent with a requirement for calcium influx via NMDA receptors. Induction of LTD was blocked when the FK506 was included in the intracellular solution to block the phosphatase calcineurin. Okadaic acid, which blocks activation of protein phosphatases 1 and 2a, also prevented LTD. Activation of protein phosphatases following calcium influx therefore contributes to induction of LTD in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. PMID:18670611

  5. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  6. Deep Learning in Bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Seonwoo; Lee, Byunghan; Yoon, Sungroh

    2016-01-01

    In the era of big data, transformation of biomedical big data into valuable knowledge has been one of the most important challenges in bioinformatics. Deep learning has advanced rapidly since the early 2000s and now demonstrates state-of-the-art performance in various fields. Accordingly, application of deep learning in bioinformatics to gain insight from data has been emphasized in both academia and industry. Here, we review deep learning in bioinformatics, presenting examples of current res...

  7. In vivo electroporation to physiologically identified deep brain regions in postnatal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Nami; Kawasaki, Kazuha; Satoh, Takemasa; Hata, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation is widely used to research the central nervous system (CNS). The manipulation of molecular expression in a small number of neurons permits the detailed investigation of the role of specific molecules on the function and morphology of the neurons. Electroporation is a broadly used technique for gene transfer in the CNS. However, the targeting of gene transfer using electroporation in postnatal animals was restricted to the cortex, hippocampus, or the region facing the ventricle in previous reports. Electroporation targeting of deep brain structures, such as the thalamus, has been difficult. We introduce a novel electroporation technique that enables gene transfer to a physiologically identified deep brain region using a glass pipette. We recorded neural activity in young-adult mice to identify the location of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus, using a glass pipette electrode containing the plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The location of the LGN was confirmed by monitoring visual responses, and the plasmid solution was pressure-injected into the recording site. Voltage pulses were delivered through the glass pipette electrode. Several EGFP-labeled somata and dendrites were observed in the LGN after a few weeks, and labeled axons were found in the visual cortex. The EGFP-expressing structures were observed in detail sufficient to reconstruct their morphology in three dimensions. We further confirmed the applicability of this technique in cats. This method should be useful for the transfer of various genes into cells in physiologically identified brain regions in rodents and gyrencephalic mammals.

  8. Electrophysiological and morphological properties of neurons in layer 5 of the rat postrhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Joseph B; Connors, Barry W; Burwell, Rebecca D

    2012-09-01

    The postrhinal (POR) cortex of the rat is homologous to the parahippocampal cortex of the primate based on connections and other criteria. POR provides the major visual and visuospatial input to the hippocampal formation, both directly to CA1 and indirectly through connections with the medial entorhinal cortex. Although the cortical and hippocampal connections of the POR cortex are well described, the physiology of POR neurons has not been studied. Here, we examined the electrical and morphological characteristics of layer 5 neurons from POR cortex of 14- to 16-day-old rats using an in vitro slice preparation. Neurons were subjectively classified as regular-spiking (RS), fast-spiking (FS), or low-threshold spiking (LTS) based on their electrophysiological properties and similarities with neurons in other regions of neocortex. Cells stained with biocytin included pyramidal cells and interneurons with bitufted or multipolar dendritic patterns. Similarity analysis using only physiological data yielded three clusters that corresponded to FS, LTS, and RS classes. The cluster corresponding to the FS class was composed entirely of multipolar nonpyramidal cells, and the cluster corresponding to the RS class was composed entirely of pyramidal cells. The third cluster, corresponding to the LTS class, was heterogeneous and included both multipolar and bitufted dendritic arbors as well as one pyramidal cell. We did not observe any intrinsically bursting pyramidal cells, which is similar to entorhinal cortex but unlike perirhinal cortex. We conclude that POR includes at least two major classes of neocortical inhibitory interneurons, but has a functionally restricted cohort of pyramidal cells.

  9. Characterization of Axo-Axonic Synapses in the Piriform Cortex of Mus musculus

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-posi...

  10. Practice explains abolished behavioural adaptation after human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex lesions

    OpenAIRE

    van Steenbergen, H.; E. Haasnoot; Bocanegra, B.R.; Berretty, E.W.; Hommel, B.

    2015-01-01

    The role of mid-cingulate cortex (MCC), also referred to as dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, in regulating cognitive control is a topic of primary importance in cognitive neuroscience. Although many studies have shown that MCC responds to cognitive demands, lesion studies in humans are inconclusive concerning the causal role of the MCC in the adaptation to these demands. By elegantly combining single-cell recordings with behavioural methods, Sheth et al. [Sheth, S. et al. Human dorsal anteri...

  11. Role of YpeB in Cortex Hydrolysis during Germination of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The infectious agent of the disease anthrax is the spore of Bacillus anthracis. Bacterial spores are extremely resistant to environmental stresses, which greatly hinders spore decontamination efforts. The spore cortex, a thick layer of modified peptidoglycan, contributes to spore dormancy and resistance by maintaining the low water content of the spore core. The cortex is degraded by germination-specific lytic enzymes (GSLEs) during spore germination, rendering the cells vulnerable to common ...

  12. Inhibition in the Human Auditory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Inui

    Full Text Available Despite their indispensable roles in sensory processing, little is known about inhibitory interneurons in humans. Inhibitory postsynaptic potentials cannot be recorded non-invasively, at least in a pure form, in humans. We herein sought to clarify whether prepulse inhibition (PPI in the auditory cortex reflected inhibition via interneurons using magnetoencephalography. An abrupt increase in sound pressure by 10 dB in a continuous sound was used to evoke the test response, and PPI was observed by inserting a weak (5 dB increase for 1 ms prepulse. The time course of the inhibition evaluated by prepulses presented at 10-800 ms before the test stimulus showed at least two temporally distinct inhibitions peaking at approximately 20-60 and 600 ms that presumably reflected IPSPs by fast spiking, parvalbumin-positive cells and somatostatin-positive, Martinotti cells, respectively. In another experiment, we confirmed that the degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of the prepulse, but not on the amplitude of the prepulse-evoked cortical response, indicating that the prepulse-evoked excitatory response and prepulse-evoked inhibition reflected activation in two different pathways. Although many diseases such as schizophrenia may involve deficits in the inhibitory system, we do not have appropriate methods to evaluate them; therefore, the easy and non-invasive method described herein may be clinically useful.

  13. Mapping Prefrontal Cortex Functions in Human Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that the prefrontal cortex, as the seat of most higher brain functions, is functionally silent during most of infancy. This review highlights recent work concerned with the precise mapping (localization) of brain activation in human infants, providing evidence that prefrontal cortex exhibits functional activation much…

  14. Ultrastructural features of dopamine axon terminals in the anteromedial and the suprarhinal cortex of adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguéla, P; Watkins, K C; Descarries, L

    1988-02-23

    The ultrastructural features and synaptic relationships of dopamine (DA) axon terminals were examined in the prefrontal cortex of adult rat after immunocytochemical staining with a highly specific polyclonal antiserum directed against DA-glutaraldehyde-lysyl-protein conjugate (donated by M. Geffard). Single and serial ultrathi