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Sample records for dedicated pet camera

  1. Clear-PEM, a dedicated PET camera for mammography

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary results suggest that Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) can offer a noninvasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques and aid in expeditiously establishing the diagnosis of cancer. A dedicated machine seems to offer better perspectives in terms of position resolution and sensitivity. This paper describes the concept of Clear-PEM, the system presently developed by the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN for an evaluation of this approach. This device is based on new crystals introduced by the Crystal Clear as well as on modern data acquisition techniques developed for the large experiments in high energy physics experiments.

  2. Gamma-camera 18F-FDG PET in diagnosis and staging of patients presenting with suspected lung cancer and comparison with dedicated PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oturai, Peter S; Mortensen, Jann; Enevoldsen, Henriette

    2004-01-01

    It is not clear whether high-quality coincidence gamma-PET (gPET) cameras can provide clinical data comparable with data obtained with dedicated PET (dPET) cameras in the primary diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected lung cancer. This study focuses on 2 main issues: direct comparison...

  3. PET with a dual-head coincidence gamma camera in head and neck cancer: A comparison with computed tomography and dedicated PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimny, M.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG PET) is a promising imaging tool for detecting and staging of primary or recurrent head and neck cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate a dual-head gamma camera modified for coincidence detection (KGK-PET) in comparison to computed tomography (CT) and dedicated PET (dPET). 50 patients with known or suspected primary or recurrent head and neck cancer were enrolled. 32 patients underwent KGK-PET and dPET using a one-day protocol. The sensitivity for the detection of primary/ recurrent head and neck cancer for KGK-PET and CT was 80% and 54%, respectively, specificity was 73% and 82%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lymph node metastases based on neck sides with KGK-PET was 71% (CT: 65%) and 88% (CT: 89%) respectively. In comparison to dPET, KGK-PET revealed concordant results in 32/32 patients with respect to primary tumor/recurrent disease and in 55/60 evaluated neck sides. All involved neck sides that were missed by KGK-PET were also negative with dPET. These results indicate that in patients with head and neck cancer KGK-PET reveals information, that are similar to dPET and complementary to CT. (orig.) [de

  4. Clear-PEM: A dedicated PET camera for improved breast cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M. C.; Almeida, P.; Balau, F.; Ferreira, N. C.; Fetal, S.; Fraga, F.; Martins, M.; Matela, N.; Moura, R.; Ortigao, C.; Peralta, L.; Rato, P.; Ribeiro, R.; Rodrigues, P.; Santos, A. I.; Trindade, A.; Varela, J.

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) can offer a non-invasive method for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Metabolic images from PEM using 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose, contain unique information not available from conventional morphologic imaging techniques like X-ray radiography. In this work, the concept of Clear-PEM, the system presently developed in the frame of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is described. Clear-PEM will be a dedicated scanner, offering better perspectives in terms of position resolution and detection sensitivity. (authors)

  5. Progress on dedicated animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, as the leading technology providing molecular imaging of biological processes, is widely used on living laboratory animals. High-resolution dedicated animal PET scanners have been developed. Although the dedicated animal PET faces obstacles and challenges, this advanced technology would play an important role in molecular biomedicine researches, such as diseases study, medicine development, and gene therapy

  6. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Hernández, Trinitat, E-mail: mtrinitat@eresa.com; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del [Department of Nuclear Medicine, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Roselló Ferrando, Joan [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good

  7. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Hernández, Trinitat; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo; Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del; Roselló Ferrando, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ("1"8F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good performance

  8. A basic study on lesion detectability for hot spot imaging of positron emitters with dedicated PET and positron coincidence gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Inoue, Tomio; Tian, Mei; Alyafei, Saleh; Oriuchi, Noboru; Khan, Nasim; Endo, Keigo; Li Sijin

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the correlations of detectability and the semi-quantification for hot spot imaging with positron emitters in positron emission tomography (PET) and with a positron coincidence detection system (PCD). Phantom study results for the measurement of the lesion-to-background (L/B) ratio ranged from 2.0 to 30.3, and detectability for hot spot lesion of PET and PCD were performed to correspond to clinical conditions. The detectability and semi-quantitative evaluation of hot spots from 4.4 mm to 36.9 mm in diameter were performed from the PET and PCD images. There were strong correlations between the L/B ratios derived from PET and PCD hot spot images and actual L/B ratios; but the L/B ratio derived from PET was higher than that from PCD with a significant difference of 10% to 54.8%. The detectability of hot spot imaging of PCD was lower than that of PET at 64.8% (PCD) versus 77.8% (PET). Even the actual L/B ratio was 8.0, hot spots more than 10.6 mm in diameter could be clearly identified with PCD imaging. The same identification could be achieved with PET imaging even when the actual L/B ratio was 4.0. This detailed investigation indicated that FDG PCD yielded results comparable to FDG PET on visual analysis and semi-quantitative analysis in detecting hot spots in phantoms, but semi-quantitative analysis of the L/B ratio with FDG PCD was inferior to that with FDG PET and the detectability of PCD in smaller hot spots was significantly poor. (author)

  9. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based ( CB ) PET. CB PET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CB PET in operation than cPET in the USA. CB PET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  10. Value of coincidence gamma camera PET for diagnosing head and neck tumors: functional imaging and image coregistration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Brinkbaeumer, K.; Schmid, R.; Hahn, K.

    2001-01-01

    54 patients suffering from head and neck tumors (30 m, 24 f, age: 32-67 years) were examined using dedicated PET and coincidence gamma camera PET after injection of 185-350 MBq [ 18 F]FDG. Examinations were carried out on the dedicated PET first (Siemens ECAT Exact HR+) followed by a scan on the coincidence gamma camera PET (Picker Prism 2000 XP-PCD, Marconi Axis g-PET 2 AZ). Dedicated PET was acquired in 3D mode, coincidence gamma camera PET was performed in list mode using an axial filter. Reconstruction of data was performed iteratively on both, dedicated PET and coincidence gamma camera PET. All patients received a CT scan in multislice technique (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Marconi MX 8000). Image coregistration was performed on an Odyssey workstation (Marconi). All findings have been verified by the gold standard histology or in case of negative histology by follow-up. Results: Using dedicated PET the primary or recurrent lesion was correctly diagnosed in 47/48 patients, using coincidence gamma camera PET in 46/48 patients and using CT in 25/48 patients. Metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes was diagnosed in 17/18 patients with dedicated PET, in 16/18 patients with coincidence gamma camera PET and in 15/18 with CT. False-positive results with regard to lymph node metastasis were seen with one patient for dedicated PET and hybrid PET, respectively, and with 18 patients for CT. In a total of 11 patients unknown metastatic lesions were seen with dedicated PET and with coincidence gamma camera PET elsewhere in the body (lung: n = 7, bone: n = 3, liver: n = 1). Additional malignant disease other than the head and neck tumor was found in 4 patients. (orig.) [de

  11. A PET imaging system dedicated to mammography

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The imaging system Clear-PEM for positron emission mammography, under development within the framework of the Crystal Clear Collaboration at CERN, is presented. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD) and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger and data acquisition system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and negligible dead-time. The detector module performance was characterized in detail.

  12. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  13. Evaluation of a video-based head motion tracking system for dedicated brain PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anishchenko, S.; Beylin, D.; Stepanov, P.; Stepanov, A.; Weinberg, I. N.; Schaeffer, S.; Zavarzin, V.; Shaposhnikov, D.; Smith, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    Unintentional head motion during Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data acquisition can degrade PET image quality and lead to artifacts. Poor patient compliance, head tremor, and coughing are examples of movement sources. Head motion due to patient non-compliance can be an issue with the rise of amyloid brain PET in dementia patients. To preserve PET image resolution and quantitative accuracy, head motion can be tracked and corrected in the image reconstruction algorithm. While fiducial markers can be used, a contactless approach is preferable. A video-based head motion tracking system for a dedicated portable brain PET scanner was developed. Four wide-angle cameras organized in two stereo pairs are used for capturing video of the patient's head during the PET data acquisition. Facial points are automatically tracked and used to determine the six degree of freedom head pose as a function of time. The presented work evaluated the newly designed tracking system using a head phantom and a moving American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. The mean video-tracking error was 0.99±0.90 mm relative to the magnetic tracking device used as ground truth. Qualitative evaluation with the ACR phantom shows the advantage of the motion tracking application. The developed system is able to perform tracking with accuracy close to millimeter and can help to preserve resolution of brain PET images in presence of movements.

  14. Design and evaluation of the MAMMI dedicated breast PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moliner, L.; González, A. J.; Soriano, A.; Sánchez, F.; Correcher, C.; Orero, A.; Carles, M.; Vidal, L. F.; Barberá, J.; Caballero, L.; Seimetz, M.; Vázquez, C.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A breast dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner has been developed based on monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). In this study, we describe the design of the PET system and report on its performance evaluation. Methods: MAMMI is a breast PET scanner based on monolithic LYSO crystals. It consists of 12 compact modules with a transaxial field of view (FOV) of 170 mm in diameter and 40 mm axial FOV that translates to cover up to 170 mm. The patient lies down in a prone position that facilitates maximum breast elongation. Quantitative performance analysis of the calculated method for the attenuation correction specifically developed for MAMMI, and based on PET image segmentation, has also been conducted in this evaluation. In order to fully determine the MAMMI prototype's performance, we have adapted the measurements suggested for National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 and NU 4-2008 protocol tests, as they are defined for whole-body and small animal PET scanners, respectively. Results: Spatial resolutions of 1.6, 1.8, and 1.9 mm were measured in the axial, radial, and tangential directions, respectively. A scatter fraction of 20.8% was obtained and the maximum NEC was determined to be 25 kcps at 44 MBq. The average sensitivity of the system was observed to be 1% for an energy window of (250 keV–750 keV) and a maximum absolute sensitivity of 1.8% was measured at the FOV center. Conclusions: The overall performance of the MAMMI reported on this evaluation quantifies its ability to produce high quality PET images. Spatial resolution values below 3 mm were measured in most of the FOV. Only the radial component of spatial resolution exceeds the 3 mm at radial positions larger than 60 mm. This study emphasizes the need for standardized testing methodologies for dedicated breast PET systems similar to NEMA standards for whole-body and small animal PET scanners.

  15. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, P.G.; Boehlen, T.T.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.P.W.; Ferrari, A.; Mancini, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Mairani, A.; Sala, Paola R.

    2013-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  16. Characterization of a PET Camera Optimized for Prostate Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi; Hu, Jicun; Wang, G.C.; Wilson, David; Oh, Sang; Huesman, RonaldH.; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the characterization of a positron emission tomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access and to position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivity with patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rows of 20 HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 detectors in the camera. The individual detectors are angled in the transaxial plane to point towards the prostate to reduce resolution degradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified HRRT data acquisition electronics. Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our dedicated-prostate camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less background (less randoms and lower scatter fraction) and a lower cost. We have completed construction of the camera. Characterization data and reconstructed images of several phantoms are shown. Sensitivity of a point source in the center is 946 cps/mu Ci. Spatial resolution is 4 mm FWHM in the central region

  17. Detector design issues for compact nuclear emission cameras dedicated to breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Craig S.

    2003-01-01

    Certain gamma ray and positron emitting radiotracers have shown great promise for use in the detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Unfortunately, standard nuclear emission cameras (SPECT, PET) found in the clinic are not practical for breast imaging of these emissions due to inadequate spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity, large and awkward size, and relatively high cost per study. High spatial and energy resolutions and sensitivity are needed for good lesion detectability. Due to these limitations of standard cameras, there has been recent research into the development of small, compact nuclear emission imagers dedicated for close-proximity breast imaging. The small detector head size means a variety of exotic detectors or collimators may be implemented to improve spatial and energy resolution and sensitivity performances at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we will present some of the compact gamma ray and annihilation photon imaging detector designs that have been proposed and/or developed for dedicated breast imaging. We will review the physics and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various detector configurations. Finally we will estimate the fundamental spatial resolution potential available with close-proximity nuclear emission imaging and discuss how one may approach those limits through proper detector design

  18. [F-18]FDG imaging of head and neck tumors: comparison of hybrid PET, dedicated PET and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Brinkbaeumer, K.; Schmid, R.; Poepperl, G.; Hahn, K.; Szeimies, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Aim of the study was to evaluate [F-18]FDG imaging of head and neck tumors using a Hybrid-PET device of the 2nd or 3rd generation. Examinations were compared to dedicated PET and Spiral-CT. Methods: 54 patients suffering from head and neck tumors were examined using dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET after injection of 185-350 MBq [F-18]FDG. Examinations were carried out on the dedicated PET first followed by a scan on the Hybrid-PET. Dedicated PET was acquired in 3D mode, Hybrid-PET was performed in list mode using an axial filter. Reconstruction of data was performed iteratively on both, dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET. All patients received a CT scan in multislice technique. All finding have been verified by the goldstandard histology or in case of negative histology by follow up. Results: Using dedicated PET the primary or recurrent lesion was correctly diagnosed in 47/48 patients, using Hybrid-PET in 46/48 patients and using CT in 25/48 patients. Metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes was diagnosed in 17/18 patients with dedicated PET, in 16/18 patients with Hybrid-PET and in 15/18 with CT. False positive results with regard to lymph node metastasis were seen with one patient for dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET, respectively, and with 18 patients for CT. In a total of 11 patients unknown metastastic lesions were seen with dedicated PET and with Hybrid-PET elsewhere in the body. Additional malignant disease other than the head and neck tumor was found in 4 patients. Conclusion: Using Hybrid-PET for [F-18]FDG imaging reveals a loss of sensitivity and specificity of about 1-5% as compared to dedicated PET in head and neck tumors. [F-18]FDG PET with both, dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET is superior to CT in the diagnosis of primary or recurrent lesions as well as in the assessment of lymph node involvement. (orig.) [de

  19. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng

    2015-01-01

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  20. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng [Institute of Medical Physics, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-18

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  1. A novel PET camera calibration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yerian, K.; Hartz, R.K.; Gaeta, J.M.; Marani, S.; Wong, W.H.; Bristow, D.; Mullani, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reconstructed time-of-flight PET images must be corrected for differences in the sensitivity of detector pairs, variations in the TOF gain between groups of detector pairs, and for shifts in the detector-pair timing windows. These calibration values are measured for each detector-pair coincidence line using a positron emitting ring source. The quality of the measured value for a detector pair depends on its statistics. To improve statistics, algorithms are developed which derive individual detector calibration values for efficiency, TOF offsets, and TOF fwhm from the raw detector-pair measurements. For the author's current TOFPET system there are 162,000 detector pairs which are reduced to 720 individual detector values. The data for individual detectors are subsequently recombined, improving the statistical quality of the resultant detector-pair values. In addition, storage requirements are significantly reduced by saving the individual detector values. These parameters are automatically evaluated on a routine basis and problem detectors reported for adjustment or replacement. Decomposing the detector-pair measurements into individual detector values significantly improves the calibration values used to correct camera artifacts in PET imaging

  2. A comparison of dedicated and hybrid PET imaging in detection of recurrences of colorectal cancer with [18]-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montravers, F.; Grahek, D.; Kerrou, K.; Younsi, N.; Petegnief, Y.; Talbot, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical performances of FDG using a CDET system (hybrid dual-head MARCONI gamma camera with sodium iodine crystal 19 mm flick) or a dedicated PET system (C-PET, ADAC) for the detection of colorectal cancer recurrences. We report an experience of 4 years with CDET (July 1997 - July 2001) and of 1.5 years with PET (January 2000 - July 2001). After fasting for 6h or more, 3-5 MBq/kg (for 2D - CDET) or 2 MBq/kg (for 3D - PET) of [18F]-FDG were injected i.v. and imaging (whole-body scan and at least one tomoscintigram for CDET or scanning of the torso for PET) was started one hour later. Reconstruction was performed by an iterative algorithm. Attenuation correction by an external source was only available for PET. 304 examinations (ex) were performed with CDET and 164 with PET. 230 CDET cases and 73 PET cases are currently available according to histology or to follow-up. These examinations were performed for suspicion of recurrence (157 CDET cases, 39 PET cases), in search for other localization when one or more resectable lesion(s) was (were) known (48 CDET cases, 24 CDET cases) or for evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy (25 CDET cases, 10 PET cases). Globally, sensitivity was 89 % with CDET and 92 % with PET, specificity was 93 % with CDET and 100 % with PET and accuracy was 90 % with CDET and 93 % with PET. These results confirmed that FDG is a powerful tool for the detection of colorectal recurrences and showed that no significative difference in accuracy (chi2 = .75 ; p = .4) was detectable between the two modalities interpreted by the same team and both performed 1 hour after injection. (author)

  3. Molecular imaging of small animals with dedicated PET tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatziioannou, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Biological discovery has moved at an accelerated pace in recent years, with a considerable focus on the transition from in vitro to in vivo models. As a result, there has been a significant increase in the need to adapt clinical imaging methods, as well as for novel imaging technologies for biological research. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a clinical imaging modality that permits the use of positron-labeled molecular imaging probes for non-invasive assays of biochemical processes. The imaging procedure can be repeatedly performed before and after interventions, thereby allowing each animal to be used as its own control. Positron-labeled compounds that target a range of molecular targets have been and continue to be synthesized, with examples of biological processes ranging from receptors and synthesis of transmitters in cell communication, to metabolic processes and gene expression. In animal research, PET has been used extensively in the past for studies of non-human primates and other larger animals. New detector technology has improved spatial resolution, and has made possible PET scanning for the study of the most important modern molecular biology model, the laboratory mouse. This paper presents the challenges facing PET technology as applied to small animal imaging, provides a historical overview of the development of small animal PET systems, and discusses the current state of the art in small animal PET technology. (orig.)

  4. ClearPEM: prototype PET device dedicated to breast imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Joao Varela

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have begun in Portugal on a new breast imaging system (ClearPEM) using positron emission tomography (PET). The system, developed by a Portuguese consortium in collaboration with CERN and laboratories participating in the Crystal Clear collaboration, will detect even the smallest tumours and thus help avoid unnecessary biopsies.

  5. A practical block detector for a depth encoding PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.G.; Moisan, C.; Hoskinson, E.M.

    1995-10-01

    The depth-of-interaction effect in block detectors degrades the image resolution in commercial PET cameras and impedes the natural evolution of smaller, less expensive cameras. A method for correcting the measured position of each detected gamma ray by measuring its depth-of-interaction was tested and found to recover 38% of the lost resolution in a table-top 50 cm diameter camera. To obtain the desired depth sensitivity, standard commercial detectors were modified by a simple and practical process, which is suitable for mass production of the detectors. The impact of the detectors modifications on central image resolution and on the ability of the camera to correct for object scatter were also measured. (authors)

  6. Usefulness of FDG PET for nodal staging using a dual head coincidence camera in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seok Nam; Park, Chan H.; Lee, Myoung Hoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Staging of lung cancer requires an accurate evaluation of the mediastinum. Positron imaging with dual head cameras may be not as sensitive as dedicated PET. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluated the usefulness of F-18 FDG coincidence (CoDe) PET using a dual-head gamma camera in the nodal staging of the lung cancer. CoDe-PET studies were performed in 51 patients with histologically proven non small cell lung cancer. CoDe-PET began 60 minutes after the injection of 111-185 MBq of F-18 FDG. CoDe-PET was performed using a dual-head gamma camera equipped with coincidence detection circuitry (Elscints Varicam, Haifa, lsrael). There was no attenuation correction made and reconstruction was done using a filtered back-projection. Surgery was performed in 49 patients CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. Any focal increased uptake was considered abnormal. The nodal stating of CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. Any focal increased uptake was considered abnormal. The nodal staging of CoDe-PET and of CT were compared with the nodal stating of surgical (49) and mediastinoscopical (2) pathology. All primary lung lesions were hypermetabolic and easily visualized. Compared with surgical nodal staging as a gold standard, false positives occurred in 13 CoDe PET and 17 CT studies and false negative occurred in 5 CoDe-PET and 4 CT studies. Assessment of lymph node involvement by CoDe-PET depicted a sensitivity of 67%, specificity of 64% and accuracy of 65%. CT revealed a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 53% and accuracy of 59% in the assessment of lymph node involvement. The detection of primary lesions were 100% but nodal staging was suboptimal for routine clinical use. This is mainly due to limited resolution of our system

  7. Dedication

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This work is dedicated, to my mom, Bridget, and my dad, (the late) Daniel Enwerem, who taught me to respect people but not fear them; and to those who are engaged or have been victims in the struggle for an egalitarian society in Nigeria.

  8. F-18 FDG PET with coincidence detection, dual-head gamma camera, initial experience in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.M.G.; Pocock, N.; Quach, T.; Camden, B.M.C. [Liverpool Health Services, Liverpool, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Ultrasound

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The development of Co-incidence Detection (CD) in gamma camera technology has allowed the use of positron radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice without dedicated PET facilities. We report our initial experience of this technology in Oncological applications. All patients were administered 200 MBq of F- 18 FDG intravenously in a fasting state, with serum glucose below 8.9 mmol/L., and hydration well maintained. Tomography was performed using an ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) dual-head gamma camera, 60 minutes after administration and immediately after voiding. Tomography of the torso required up to three collections depending on the length of the patient, with each collection requiring 32 steps of 40 second duration, and a 50% overlap. Tomography of the brain required a single collection with 32 steps of 80 seconds. Patients were scanned in the supine position. An iterative reconstruction algorithm was employed without attenuation correction. All patients had histologically confirmed malignancy. Scan findings were correlated with results of all conventional diagnostic imaging procedures that were pertinent to the evaluation and management of each individual patient`s disease. Correlation with tumour type and treatment status was also undertaken. F-18 FDG uptake as demonstrated by CD-PET was increased in tumour bearing sites. The degree of increased uptake varied with tumour type and with treatment status. Our initial experience with CD-PET has been very encouraging, and has led us to undertake prospective short and long term studies to define its role in oncology

  9. New cardiac cameras: single-photon emission CT and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology instrumentation has evolved significantly in the recent years. Concerns about radiation dose and long acquisition times have propelled developments of dedicated high-efficiency cardiac SPECT scanners. Novel collimator designs, such as multipinhole or locally focusing collimators arranged in geometries that are optimized for cardiac imaging, have been implemented to enhance photon-detection sensitivity. Some of these new SPECT scanners use solid-state photon detectors instead of photomultipliers to improve image quality and to reduce the scanner footprint. These new SPECT devices allow dramatic up to 7-fold reduction in acquisition times or similar reduction in radiation dose. In addition, new hardware for photon attenuation correction allowing ultralow radiation doses has been offered by some vendors. To mitigate photon attenuation artifacts for the new SPECT scanners not equipped with attenuation correction hardware, 2-position (upright-supine or prone-supine) imaging has been proposed. PET hardware developments have been primarily driven by the requirements of oncologic imaging, but cardiac imaging can benefit from improved PET image quality and improved sensitivity of 3D systems. The time-of-flight reconstruction combined with resolution recovery techniques is now implemented by all major PET vendors. These new methods improve image contrast and image resolution and reduce image noise. High-sensitivity 3D PET without interplane septa allows reduced radiation dose for cardiac perfusion imaging. Simultaneous PET/MR hybrid system has been developed. Solid-state PET detectors with avalanche photodiodes or digital silicon photomultipliers have been introduced, and they offer improved imaging characteristics and reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic MR fields. Higher maximum count rate of the new PET detectors allows routine first-pass Rb-82 imaging, with 3D PET acquisition enabling clinical utilization of dynamic imaging with myocardial flow

  10. Design studies of a depth encoding large aperture PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisan, C.; Rogers, J.G.; Buckley, K.R.; Ruth, T.J.; Stazyk, M.W.; Tsang, G.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of a wholebody PET tomograph with the capacity to correct for the parallax error induced by the Depth-Of-Interaction of γ-rays is assessed through simulation. The experimental energy, depth, and transverse position resolutions of BGO block detector candidates are the main inputs to a simulation that predicts the point source resolution of the Depth Encoding Large Aperture Camera (DELAC). The results indicate that a measured depth resolution of 7 mm (FWHM) is sufficient to correct a substantial part of the parallax error for a point source at the edge of the Field-Of-View. A search for the block specifications and camera ring radius that would optimize the spatial resolution and its uniformity across the Field-Of-View is also presented. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  11. Septa design for a prostate specific PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Jinyi; Huber, Jennifer S.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    The recent development of new prostate tracers has motivated us to build a low cost PET camera optimized to image the prostate. Coincidence imaging of positron emitters is achieved using a pair of external curved detector banks. The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. In this paper, we study the design of septa for the prostate camera using Monte Carlo simulations. The system performance is measured by the detectability of a prostate lesion. We have studied 17 septa configurations. The results show that the design of septa has a large impact on the lesion detection at a given activity concentration. Significant differences are also observed between the lesion detectability and the conventional noise equivalent count (NEC) performance, indicating that the NEC is not appropriate for the detection task

  12. Initial clinical experience with dedicated ultra fast solid state cardiac gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aland, Nusrat; Lele, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To analyze the imaging and diagnostic performance of new dedicated ultra fast solid state detector gamma camera and compare it with standard dual detector gamma camera in myocardial perfusion imaging. Material and Methods: In total 900 patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging between 1st February 2010 and 29th August 2010 either stress/rest or rest/stress protocol. There was no age or gender bias (there were 630 males and 270 females). 5 and 15 mCi of 99m Tc - Tetrofosmin/MIBI was injected for 1st and 2nd part of the study respectively. Waiting period after injection was 20 min for regular stress and 40 min for pharmacological stress and 40 min after rest injection. Acquisition was performed on solid state detector gamma camera for a duration of 5 min and 3 min for 1st and 2nd part respectively. Interpretation of myocardial perfusion was done and QGS/QPS protocol was used for EF analysis. Out of these, 20 random patients underwent back to back myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging on standard dual detector gamma camera on same day. There was no age or gender bias (there were 9 males, 11 females). Acquisition time was 20 min for each part of the study. Interpretation was done using Autocard and EF analyses with 4 DM SPECT. Images obtained were then compared with those of solid state detector gamma camera. Result: Good quality and high count myocardial perfusion images were obtained with lesser amount of tracer activity on solid state detector gamma camera. Obese patients also showed good quality images with less tracer activity. As compared to conventional dual detector gamma camera images were brighter and showed better contrast with solid state gamma camera. Right ventricular imaging was better seen. Analyses of diastolic dysfunction was possible with 16 frame gated studies with solid state gamma camera. Shorter acquisition time with comfortable position reduced possibility of patient motion. All cardiac views were obtained with no movement of the

  13. PET/CT and dedicated PET in breast cancer: Implications for classification, staging, and response monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.

    2013-01-01

    De PET-CT, een scan die gebruik maakt van radioactiviteit om tumoren in beeld te brengen, is een zinvol instrument voor beeldvorming van patiënten met borstkanker, met name van patiënten met een tumor groter dan drie centimeter of tumor-positieve lymfeklieren. De PET-CT is vooral van waarde voor de

  14. A dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner: Evaluation of basic performance characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Van Kampen, Will; Stolin, Alexander V; Gong, Wenbo; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Martone, Peter F; Smith, Mark F; Sarment, David; Clinthorne, Neal H; Perna, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Application of advanced imaging techniques, such as PET and x ray CT, can potentially improve detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately, both modalities have challenges in the detection of some lesions. The combination of the two techniques, however, could potentially lead to an overall improvement in diagnostic breast imaging. The purpose of this investigation is to test the basic performance of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT. The PET component consists of a rotating pair of detectors. Its performance was evaluated using the NEMA NU4-2008 protocols. The CT component utilizes a pulsed x ray source and flat panel detector mounted on the same gantry as the PET scanner. Its performance was assessed using specialized phantoms. The radiation dose to a breast during CT imaging was explored by the measurement of free-in-air kerma and air kerma measured at the center of a 16 cm-diameter PMMA cylinder. Finally, the combined capabilities of the system were demonstrated by imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom. Overall, performance of the PET component is comparable to many pre-clinical and other dedicated breast-PET scanners. Its spatial resolution is 2.2 mm, 5 mm from the center of the scanner using images created with the single-sliced-filtered-backprojection algorithm. Peak NECR is 24.6 kcps; peak sensitivity is 1.36%; the scatter fraction is 27%. Spatial resolution of the CT scanner is 1.1 lp/mm at 10% MTF. The free-in-air kerma is 2.33 mGy, while the PMMA-air kerma is 1.24 mGy. Finally, combined imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom illustrated the potential utility of the dual-modality images produced by the system. The basic performance characteristics of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner are good, demonstrating that its performance is similar to current dedicated PET and CT scanners. The potential value of this system is the capability to produce combined duality-modality images that could improve detection of breast disease. The next stage in development of this system

  15. Study of the personal radiation dose received by nuclear medicine technologists working in a dedicated PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, C.N.; Wallace, A.B.; Young, A.B.; Ibbetson, V.J.

    2005-01-01

    The use of dedicated PET scanners is becoming more widespread throughout Australia and the world. PET imaging utilises short-lived (-108 min), high-energy (511 keV) gamma-ray emitters, that could result in a high radiation dose being received by staff. As part of a larger staff and area monitoring project, this paper discusses the personal dose equivalent, H p (10), received by PET staff working in a dedicated PET centre. The typical H (10) received by staff was approximately 31 μSv. The average daily administered activity to patients at Austin Health was 1280 MBq

  16. Experience with dedicated ultra fast solid state cardiac gamma camera: technologist perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parab, Anil; Gaikar, Anil; Patil, Kashinath; Lele, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To describe technologist perspective of working with ultra fast solid state gamma camera and comparison with conventional dual head gamma camera. Material and Methods: 900 Myocardial Perfusion scan were carried out on dedicated solid state detector cardiac camera between 1st February 2010 till 29th August 2010. 27 studies were done back to back on a conventional dual head gamma camera. In 2 cases dual head isotope imaging was done (Thallium+ 99m Tc-tetrofosmin). Rest stress protocol was used in 600 patients and stress - rest protocol was used in 300. 1:3 ratio of injected activity was maintained for both protocols (5 mCi for 1st study and 15 mCi for second study). For Rest - Stress protocol, 5 mCi of 99m Tc - Tetrofosmin was injected at rest, 40 minutes later, 5 min image was acquired on the solid state detector. Patient was then stressed. 15 mCi 99m Tc - Tetrofosmin was injected at peak stress. Images were acquired 20 minutes later for 3 minutes (total duration of study 90-100 min). For stress rest protocol, 5 mCi 99m Tc - Tetrofosmin was injected at peak stress. 5 mCi images were acquired 20 minutes later. Rest injection of 15 mCi was given 1 hour post stress injection. Rest images were acquired 40 minutes after rest injection (total duration of study 110-120 min). Results: We observed even with lesser amount activity and acquisition time of 5 min/cardiac scan it showed high sensitivity count rate over 2.2-4.7 kcps (10 times more counts than standard gamma camera). System gives better energy resolution < 7%. Better image contrast. Dual isotope imaging can be possible. Spatial resolution 4.3-4.9 mm. Excellent quality images were obtained using low activities (5 mCi/15 mCi) using 1/3rd the acquisition time compared to conventional dual head gamma camera Even in obese patients 7 mCi/21 mCi activity yielded excellent images at 1/3 rd acquisition time Quick acquisition resulted in greater patient comfort and no motion artifact also due to non rotation of

  17. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir, E-mail: apour@ottawaheart.ca; Wells, R. Glenn [Physics Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiology, The University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y4W7 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  18. 18F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C; Carrino, John A; Lodge, Martin; Wang, Hao; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with (18)F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological (18)F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p = 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted.

  19. 18F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Lodge, Martin; Carrino, John A.; Wang, Hao; Wahl, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with 18 F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological 18 F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p= 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. (orig.)

  20. Clinical evaluation of 2D versus 3D whole-body PET image quality using a dedicated BGO PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visvikis, D.; Griffiths, D.; Costa, D.C.; Bomanji, J.; Ell, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D PET) results in higher system sensitivity, with an associated increase in the detection of scatter and random coincidences. The objective of this work was to compare, from a clinical perspective, 3D and two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions in terms of whole-body (WB) PET image quality with a dedicated BGO PET system. 2D and 3D WB emission acquisitions were carried out in 70 patients. Variable acquisition parameters in terms of time of emission acquisition per axial field of view (aFOV) and slice overlap between sequential aFOVs were used during the 3D acquisitions. 3D and 2D images were reconstructed using FORE+WLS and OSEM respectively. Scatter correction was performed by convolution subtraction and a model-based scatter correction in 2D and 3D respectively. All WB images were attenuation corrected using segmented transmission scans. Images were blindly assessed by three observers for the presence of artefacts, confidence in lesion detection and overall image quality using a scoring system. Statistically significant differences between 2D and 3D image quality were only obtained for 3D emission acquisitions of 3 min. No statistically significant differences were observed for image artefacts or lesion detectability scores. Image quality correlated significantly with patient weight for both modes of operation. Finally, no differences were seen in image artefact scores for the different axial slice overlaps considered, suggesting the use of five slice overlaps in 3D WB acquisitions. 3D WB imaging using a dedicated BGO-based PET scanner offers similar image quality to that obtained in 2D considering similar overall times of acquisitions. (orig.)

  1. Clinical utility of scintimammography: From the Anger-camera to new dedicated devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, Orazio [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: oschil@tiscali.it; Danieli, Roberta [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Romano, Pasquale [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Cossu, Elsa [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Simonetti, Giovanni [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy)

    2006-12-20

    Scintimammography is a functional imaging technique which uses a radiation detection camera to detect radionuclide tracers in the patient's breasts. Tracers are designed to accumulate in tumours more than in healthy tissue: the most used are Tc-99 m sestamibi and Tc-99 m tetrofosmin. Scintimammography is useful in some clinical indications as an adjunct to mammography: it is recommended for those lesions where additional information is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. Patients with dubious mammograms may benefit from this test, as well as women with dense breasts or with implants. Scintimammography is a valuable diagnostic tool also in patients with locally advanced breast cancer for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, using an Anger-camera this technique shows a high sensitivity only for cancers >1 cm. Since other modalities are increasingly employed for the early identification of small abnormalities, the issue of detecting small cancers is critical for the future development and clinical utility of breast imaging with radiopharmaceuticals. The use of high-resolution cameras dedicated for breast imaging is the best option to improve the detection of small cancers: they allow higher flexibility in patient positioning, and the availability of mammography-like projections. Moreover, the detector can be placed directly in contact with the breast allowing a mild compression with reduction of the breast's thickness, thus increasing the target-to-background ratio and the sensitivity. These new devices have the potential of increasing the total number of breast scintigraphies performed thereby enhancing the role of nuclear medicine in breast cancer imaging.

  2. Time of flight measurements based on FPGA using a breast dedicated PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, A; García-Olcina, R; Martos, J; Soret, J; Torres, J; Benlloch, J M; González, A J; Sánchez, F

    2014-01-01

    In this work the implementation of a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) using a Nutt delay line FPGA-based and applied on a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) device is going to be presented in order to check the system's suitability for Time of Flight (TOF) measurements. In recent years, FPGAs have shown great advantages for precise time measurements in PET. The architecture employed for these measurements is described in detail. The system developed was tested on a dedicated breast PET prototype, composed of LYSO crystals and Positive Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMTs). Two distinct experiments were carried out for this purpose. In the first test, system linearity was evaluated in order to calibrate the time measurements, providing a linearity error of less than 2% and an average time resolution of 1.4 ns FWHM. The second set of measurements tested system resolution, resulting in a FWHM as good as 1.35 ns. The results suggest that the coincidence window for the current PET can be reduced in order to minimize the random events and thus, achieve better image quality

  3. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2010-12-28

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  4. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2010-01-01

    We studied the performance of a dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation. The proposed system consists of two 4 cm thick 12 x 15 cm 2 area cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) panels with adjustable separation, which can be put in close proximity to the breast and/or axillary nodes. Unique characteristics distinguishing the proposed system from previous efforts in breast-dedicated PET instrumentation are the deployment of CZT detectors with superior spatial and energy resolution, using a cross-strip electrode readout scheme to enable 3D positioning of individual photon interaction coordinates in the CZT, which includes directly measured photon depth-of-interaction (DOI), and arranging the detector slabs edge-on with respect to incoming 511 keV photons for high photon sensitivity. The simulation results show that the proposed CZT dual-panel PET system is able to achieve superior performance in terms of photon sensitivity, noise equivalent count rate, spatial resolution and lesion visualization. The proposed system is expected to achieve ∼32% photon sensitivity for a point source at the center and a 4 cm panel separation. For a simplified breast phantom adjacent to heart and torso compartments, the peak noise equivalent count (NEC) rate is predicted to be ∼94.2 kcts s -1 (breast volume: 720 cm 3 and activity concentration: 3.7 kBq cm -3 ) for a ∼10% energy window around 511 keV and ∼8 ns coincidence time window. The system achieves 1 mm intrinsic spatial resolution anywhere between the two panels with a 4 cm panel separation if the detectors have DOI resolution less than 2 mm. For a 3 mm DOI resolution, the system exhibits excellent sphere resolution uniformity (σ rms /mean) ≤ 10%) across a 4 cm width FOV. Simulation results indicate that the system exhibits superior hot sphere visualization and is expected to visualize 2 mm diameter spheres with a 5:1 activity concentration ratio within

  5. Study and development of a PET device dedicated to cancer monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbussche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging first began at the end of the 19. century with the discover of X-rays by Roentgen. Then, numerous imaging modalities have been developed and are used now for a wide range of cases. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has a high sensitivity, is functional and quantitative, thus being of high interest in cancer monitoring. Nevertheless, PET is not as much spread in hospitals as magnetic resonance imaging and scanner. In this context, this work aims to prove the feasibility of PET dedicated for cancer monitoring. Thanks to instrumental developments such as light sharing in scintillating crystals, use of Silicon Photomultipliers, and an original geometry, cost is expected to be reduced while having same performances as commercial devices. An extensive study of light sharing within scintillating barrels has been made, through many parameters (crystal length, coating, data analysis...). An intrinsic spatial resolution of 4 mm has been measured over a 75 mm long crystal of LYSO, coated with teflon. From such a configuration, a first image has been reconstructed using two modules in coincidence. A spatial resolution of 5 mm has been measured in the image. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations has been made with experimental data as input, in order to measure the performances of the final PET device. Thanks to NEMA standard protocol, performances has been measured and compared to other systems. A spatial resolution of 4 mm has been reached, for a sensitivity of 2.5 cps/kBq. Quantification problem has been assessed, providing results similar to existing devices. (author) [fr

  6. Doses to nuclear technicians in a dedicated PET/CT centre utilising 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, T.; Stranden, E.; Bjering, K.; Evensen, M.; Holt, A.; Michalsen, H. M.; Wetteland, O.

    2007-01-01

    The first dedicated PET/CT centre in Norway was established at the Norwegian Radiumhospital in Oslo in 2005. Knowing that the introductions of PET-isotopes in nuclear medicine give increased occupational radiation dose to the technicians, a study was carried out in order to map the doses to staff members during different working operations and to see if any dose reducing measures were needed. The results of the study are in good agreement with other studies, and a technician dose of 20-25 nSv per injected MBq of 18 F seems to be representative for such centres. For an average injected activity of 350 MBq per patient, the dose limit is reached after handling around 3000 patients annually. For an annual number of less than 500 patients at the centre and rotation of the staff, an annual individual dose for the technicians would realistically be less than 2-3 mSv. Even a major increase in the number of patients will not result in individual doses near the ICRP dose limit. (authors)

  7. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5 pts (range: 12-32% increase in max D and 12-39% increase in SUV) and RT-CT detected PD in 3 pts (11-21% increase in max D, paired t test: p = 0.19). Stage-PET detected 28 mediastinal/hilar nodal sites. RT-PET detected PD in 11 of these lesions in 4 pts (31%) and CT detected similar progression in 8 lesions in 2 pts. RT-PET detected 10 new lesions in 3 pts (23%) resulting in upstaging to N3 in 2 pts (supraclavicular and hilar nodes) and M1 in 1 pt (bone). Conclusion: A dedicated RT PET-CT has the potential to detect disease progression and impact on RT planning in a large number of patients.

  8. PET with a coincidence gamma camera: results in selected oncological questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, I.; Haase, A; Adam, S.; Prueter, I.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Since early 1997, about 1660 investigations with coincidence gamma camera PET (CGC-PET) have been performed in our department, mostly undertaken for oncological questions. Based on these data, several retrospective and prospective studies were performed. In the following, the results in CUP (cancer of unknown primary) syndrome, melanoma and malignant lymphoma are presented. Methods: CGC-PET was performed after application of 250-350 MBq [ 18 F]FDG using a coincidence double head gamma camera with 19 mm Nal cristal. CUP-Syndrome: After completing conventional diagnostic procedures, 32 patients have been examined in a prospective study, including 25 patients with recently detected CUP and 7 patients undergoing restaging after therapy. Localization of the primary tumor was successful in 12 (38%) cases. Melanoma: We evaluated 50 studies in 41 patients suffering from melanoma, retrospectively. CGC-PET showed a sensitivity of 76%, and a specificity of 94%. In comparison to conventional diagnostic methods, CGC-PET delineated important additional information in 16%. CGC-PET was superior to morphological diagnostic tools in the differentiation between residual scar tissue and active tumor following immunochemotherapy. Malignant lymphoma: 29 CGC-PET in 29 patients were performed for staging of malignant lymphoma, sensitivity was 86% versus 88% for CT. Overall CGC-PET showed additional information to conventional diagnostic methods, but revealed problems in detecting small infiltrations of organs. In restaging malignant melanoma (26 patients, 33 studies), specificity of CGC-PET was superior to conventional diagnostics (92% versus 35%). (orig.) [de

  9. A prototype PET/SPECT/X-rays scanner dedicated for whole body small animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchota, Maritina; Georgiou, Maria; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios; Fragogeorgi, Eirini; Mikropoulos, Konstantinos; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Kagadis, George; Loudos, George

    2017-01-01

    To present a prototype tri-modal imaging system, consisting of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPET), a positron emission tomography (PET), and a computed tomography (CT) subsystem, evaluated in planar mode. The subsystems are mounted on a rotating gantry, so as to be able to allow tomographic imaging in the future. The system, designed and constructed by our group, allows whole body mouse imaging of competent performance and is currently, to the best of our knowledge, unequaled in a national and regional level. The SPET camera is based on two Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT), coupled to a pixilated Sodium Iodide activated with Thallium (NaI(Tl)) scintillator, having an active area of 5x10cm 2 . The dual head PET camera is also based on two pairs of PSPMT, coupled to pixelated berillium germanium oxide (BGO) scintillators, having an active area of 5x10cm 2 . The X-rays system consists of a micro focus X-rays tube and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) detector, having an active area of 12x12cm 2 . The scintigraphic mode has a spatial resolution of 1.88mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 107.5cpm/0.037MBq at the collimator surface. The coincidence PET mode has an average spatial resolution of 3.5mm (FWHM) and a peak sensitivity of 29.9cpm/0.037MBq. The X-rays spatial resolution is 3.5lp/mm and the contrast discrimination function value is lower than 2%. A compact tri-modal system was successfully built and evaluated for planar mode operation. The system has an efficient performance, allowing accurate and informative anatomical and functional imaging, as well as semi-quantitative results. Compared to other available systems, it provides a moderate but comparable performance, at a fraction of the cost and complexity. It is fully open, scalable and its main purpose is to support groups on a national and regional level and provide an open technological platform to study different detector components and

  10. Positron emission tomography with gamma camera in coincidence mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertel, A.; Hoer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-18 FDG has been estbalished in clinical diagnostics with first indications especially in oncology. To install a conventional PET tomography (dedicated PET) is financially costly and restricted to PET examinations only. Increasing demand for PET diagnostics on one hand and restricted financial resources in the health system on the other hand led industry to develop SPECT cameras to be operated in coincidence mode (camera PET) in order to offer nuclear medicine physicians cost-effective devices for PET diagnostic. At the same time camera PET is inferior to conventional PET regarding sensitivity and detection-efficiency for 511 keV photons. Does camera-PET offer a reliable alternative to conventional PET? The first larger comparative studies are now available, so a first apraisal about the technical clinical performance of camera-PET can be done. (orig.) [de

  11. PET with coincidence gamma cameras - clinical benefit from the radiooncologists' point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.; Feyerabend, T.; Stallmann, C.; Lauer, I.; Baehre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with FDG (FDG-PET) is a new technique, which displays the cellular metabolic activity. Since tumors exhibit an increased metabolic activity when compared to normal tissue, this imaging modality has a particularly high importance. FDG-PET is not only useful for localizing and staging of malignant tumors, but also to evaluate therapy response. In this context, PET is superior to morphologically orientated modalities, because therapeutically induced changes in glucose metabolism precede morphologic alterations. Numerous studies indicate, that PET will play an important role in radiooncology concerning therapy planning and monitoring the effects of therapy during and after treatment. Further clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the information provided by FDG-PET more precisely. Coincidence gamma cameras with adequate imaging characteristics will gain enhanced importance to meet these increasing demands. (orig.) [de

  12. Development of a circular shape Si-PM-based detector ring for breast-dedicated PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinji; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kato, Katsuhiko

    2018-02-01

    In clinical situations, various breast-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) systems have been used. However, clinical breast-dedicated PET systems have polygonal detector ring. Polygonal detector ring sometimes causes image artifact, so complicated reconstruction algorithm is needed to reduce artifact. Consequently, we developed a circular detector ring for breast-dedicated PET to obtain images without artifact using a simple reconstruction algorithm. We used Lu1.9Gd0.1SiO5 (LGSO) scintillator block which was made of 1.5 x 1.9 x 15 mm pixels that were arranged in an 8 x 24 matrix. As photodetectors, we used silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) arrays whose channel size was 3 x 3 mm. A detector unit was composed of four scintillator blocks, 16 Si-PM arrays and a light guide. The developed detector unit had angled configuration since the light guide was bending. A detector unit had three gaps with an angle of 5.625° between scintillator blocks. With these configurations, we could arrange 64 scintillator blocks in nearly circular shape (regular 64-sided polygon) using 16 detector units. The use of the smaller number of detector units could reduce the size of the front-end electronics circuits. The inner diameter of the developed detector ring was 260 mm. This size was similar to those of brain PET systems, so our breast-dedicated PET detector ring can measure not only breast but also brain. Measured radial, tangential and axial spatial resolution of the detector ring reconstructed by the filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm were 2.1 mm FWHM, 2.0 mm FWHM and 1.7 mm FWHM at center of field of view (FOV), respectively. The sensitivity was 2.0% at center of the axial FOV. With the developed detector ring, we could obtain high resolution image of the breast phantom and the brain phantom. We conclude that our developed Si-PM-based detector ring is promising for a high resolution breast-dedicated PET system that can also be used for brain PET system.

  13. Feasibility of a novel design of high resolution parallax-free Compton enhanced PET scanner dedicated to brain research

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, André; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Correia, J G; Garibaldi, F; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Nappi, E; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Schoenahl, F; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Zaidi, H

    2004-01-01

    A novel concept for a positron emission tomography (PET) camera module is proposed, which provides full 3D reconstruction with high resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. The key components are a matrix of long scintillator crystals and hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) with matched segmentation and integrated readout electronics. The HPDs read out the two ends of the scintillator package. Both excellent spatial (x, y, z) and energy resolution are obtained. The concept allows enhancing the detection efficiency by reconstructing a significant fraction of events which underwent Compton scattering in the crystals. The proof of concept will first be demonstrated with yttrium orthoaluminate perovskite (YAP):Ce crystals, but the final design will rely on other scintillators more adequate for PET applications (e.g. LSO:Ce or LaBr /sub 3/:Ce). A promising application of the proposed camera module, which is currently under development, is a high resolution 3D brain PET camera with an axial fi...

  14. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  15. F-18-FDG-hybrid-camera-PET in patients with postoperative fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.; Lehmann, K.; Siefker, U.; Meyer, I.; Altenvoerde, G.; Becker, W.; Sahlmann, C.O.; Schreiber, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Evaluation of F-18-FDG-hybrid-camera-PET imaging in patients with undetermined postoperative fever (POF). Methods: Prospective study of 18 patients (9 women, 9 men; age 23-85 years) suffering from POF with 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) using a dual headed coincidence camera (DHCC). Surgery had been performed 5-94 days prior to our investigation. 13 of the 18 patients received antibiotic therapy during the time of evaluation. Ten (55%) had an infectious and eight (45%) a norr infectious cause of fever. Results: Increased F-18-FDG-uptake outside the surgical wound occurred in 13 regions (infection n = 11, malignancy n = 2). The sensitivity of F-18-FDG-hybrid-camera-PET in imaging infection in areas outside the surgical wound was 86% and the specificity 100%, respectively. Antibiotic therapy did not negatively influence the results of F-18-FDG-scanning. Increased F-18-FDG-uptake within the surgical wound was seen in 8 of 18 patients. The sensitivity of F-18-FDG-hybrid-camera-PET in imaging infection within the surgical wound was 100% and the specificty 56%, respectively. The interval between surgery and F-18-FDG-scanning was significantly shorter in patients with false positive results compared with patients showing true negative results (median 34 vs. 54 days; p = 0,038). Conclusion: In POF-Patients, F-18-FDG transaxial tomography performed with a F-18-FDG-hybrid-camera-PET is sensitive in the diagnosis of inflammation and malignant disease within and outside the surgical wound. Because of the accumulation of the tracer both in granulation tissue and infection, the specificity in detecting the focus of fever within the surgical wound is poor. (orig.) [de

  16. A method for correcting the depth-of-interaction blurring in PET cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.G.

    1993-11-01

    A method is presented for the purpose of correcting PET images for the blurring caused by variations in the depth-of-interaction in position-sensitive gamma ray detectors. In the case of a fine-cut 50x50x30 mm BGO block detector, the method is shown to improve the detector resolution by about 25%, measured in the geometry corresponding to detection at the edge of the field-of-view. Strengths and weaknesses of the method are discussed and its potential usefulness for improving the images of future PET cameras is assessed. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs

  17. A practical block detector for a depth-encoding PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.G.; Moisan, C.; Hoskinson, E.M.; Andreaco, M.S.; Williams, C.W.; Nutt, R.

    1996-01-01

    The depth-of-interaction effect in block detectors degrades the image resolution in commercial PET cameras and impedes the natural evolution of smaller, less expensive cameras. A method for correcting the measured position of each detected gamma ray by measuring its depth-of-interaction was tested and found to recover 38% of the lost resolution at 7.5 cm radius in a tabletop, 50-cm-diameter camera. To obtain the desired depth sensitivity, standard commercial detectors were modified by a simple and practical process that is suitable for mass production of the detectors. The impact of the detector modifications on central image resolution and on the ability of the camera to correct for object scatter were also measured

  18. The findings of F-18 FDG camera-based coincidence PET in acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S. N.; Joh, C. W.; Lee, M. H. [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of F-18 FDG coincidence PET (CoDe-PET) using a dual-head gamma camera in the assessment of patients with acute leukemia. F-18 FDG CoDE-PET studies were performed in 5 patients with acute leukemia (6 ALL and 2 AML) before or after treatment. CoDe-PET was performed utilizing a dual-head gamma camera equipped with 5/8 inch NaI(Tl) crystal. Image acquisition began 60 minutes after the injection of F-18 FDG in the fasting state. A whole trunk from cervical to inguinal regions or selected region were scanned. No attenuation correction was made and image reconstruction was done using filtered back-projection. CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. F-18 FDG image performed in 5 patients with ALL before therapy depicted multiple lymph node involvement and diffuse increased uptake involving axial skeleton, pelvis and femurs. F-18 FDG image done in 2 AML after chemotherapy showed only diffuse increased uptake in sternum, ribs, spine, pelvis and proximal femur and these may be due to G-CSF stimulation effect in view of drug history. But bone marrow histology showed scattered blast cell suggesting incomplete remission in one and completer remission in another. F-18 image done in 1 ALL after therapy showed no abnormal uptake. CoDe-PET with F-18 FDG in acute lymphoblastic lymphoma showed multiple lymphnode and bone marrow involvement in whole body. Therefore we conclude that CoDe-PET with F-18 FDG usefulness for evaluation of extent in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. But there was a limitation to assess therapy effectiveness during therapy due to reactive bone marrow.

  19. Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with a solid-state dedicated cardiac camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kacperski, Krzysztof; Hain, Sharon; Van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F; Erlandsson, Kjell; Sharir, Tali; Roth, Nathaniel; Waddington, Wendy A; Berman, Daniel S; Ell, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions. Of 27 consecutive patients recruited, 24 (64.5+/-11.8 years of age, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of (201)Tl (rest) and 250 MBq (99m)Tc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest are 21 min and 16 min, respectively. Rest (201)Tl for 6 min and simultaneous DR 15-min list mode gated scans were performed on a D-SPECT cardiac scanner. In 11 patients DR D-SPECT was performed first and in 13 patients conventional stress (99m)Tc-MIBI SPECT imaging was performed followed by DR D-SPECT. The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spill-over and scatter correction method. DR D-SPECT images were compared with rest (201)Tl D-SPECT and with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a five-point scale (0 normal, 4 absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores. Image quality was assessed on a four-point scale (1 poor, 4 very good) and gut activity was assessed on a four-point scale (0 none, 3 high). Conventional MPI studies were abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI showed 113 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 93 abnormal segments. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT showed 45 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 48 abnormal segments. The summed stress and rest scores on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT were highly correlated (r=0.9790 and 0.9694, respectively). The summed scores of rest (201)Tl D-SPECT and DR-DSPECT were also highly correlated (r=0.9968, pstress perfusion defects were significantly larger on stress DR D-SPECT images, and five of these patients were imaged earlier by D-SPECT than by conventional SPECT. Fast and high-quality simultaneous DR MPI is feasible with D-SPECT in a

  20. Simultaneous dual-radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with a solid-state dedicated cardiac camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kacperski, Krzysztof; Hain, Sharon; Van Gramberg, Dean; Hutton, Brian F.; Erlandsson, Kjell; Waddington, Wendy A.; Ell, Peter J.; Sharir, Tali; Roth, Nathaniel; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    We compared simultaneous dual-radionuclide (DR) stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel solid-state cardiac camera and a conventional SPECT camera with separate stress and rest acquisitions. Of 27 consecutive patients recruited, 24 (64.5±11.8 years of age, 16 men) were injected with 74 MBq of 201 Tl (rest) and 250 MBq 99m Tc-MIBI (stress). Conventional MPI acquisition times for stress and rest are 21 min and 16 min, respectively. Rest 201 Tl for 6 min and simultaneous DR 15-min list mode gated scans were performed on a D-SPECT cardiac scanner. In 11 patients DR D-SPECT was performed first and in 13 patients conventional stress 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT imaging was performed followed by DR D-SPECT. The DR D-SPECT data were processed using a spill-over and scatter correction method. DR D-SPECT images were compared with rest 201 Tl D-SPECT and with conventional SPECT images by visual analysis employing the 17-segment model and a five-point scale (0 normal, 4 absent) to calculate the summed stress and rest scores. Image quality was assessed on a four-point scale (1 poor, 4 very good) and gut activity was assessed on a four-point scale (0 none, 3 high). Conventional MPI studies were abnormal at stress in 17 patients and at rest in 9 patients. In the 17 abnormal stress studies DR D-SPECT MPI showed 113 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 93 abnormal segments. In the nine abnormal rest studies DR D-SPECT showed 45 abnormal segments and conventional MPI showed 48 abnormal segments. The summed stress and rest scores on conventional SPECT and DR D-SPECT were highly correlated (r=0.9790 and 0.9694, respectively). The summed scores of rest 201 Tl D-SPECT and DR-DSPECT were also highly correlated (r=0.9968, p 201 Tl D-SPECT acquisition. (orig.)

  1. Performance characteristics of a small animal PET camera for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, D.L.; Reader, A.J.; Julyan, P.J.; Zweit, J.; Jeavons, A.P.; Jones, T.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a novel type of animal PET camera, the quad High-Density Avalanche Chamber (HIDAC) was assessed for a non-rotating 16-module system. Spatial resolution was 1.0 mm, and invariant within a standard deviation ≤5%. Absolute sensitivity was 0.95%, and the scatter-background corrected sensitivity was 0.75%. The count rate capability was linear at typical activities used in animal imaging, with a 20% loss at 11.5 MBq. The camera demonstrates small regions of radiotracer uptake with excellent detail in the mouse

  2. Preliminary report on the development of a high resolution PET camera using semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Ishii, Keizo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sato, Takemi; Aoki, Yasushi; Aoki, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a PET camera using small semiconductor detectors, whose resolution is equivalent to the physical limit of spatial resolution. First, a coincidence system of 16 Schottky CdTe detectors of 0.5 mm width obtained a resolution of <1 mm and it was confirmed that the Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for high resolution PET. Next, the performance of a pair of 32 channel CdTe arrays (1.2 mm width per channel) was investigated for the development of the prototype of high resolution PET. The time resolution between opposing detector pair was 13 ns (FWHM) when high voltage (700 V) was applied. The image of a 0.6 mm diameter point source was obtained in an experiment with opposing detector arrays using four channels, indicating that, a higher resolution can be achieved with the 32 channel CdTe array

  3. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, S.; DeWitt, D.; MacDonald, L.; Hunter, W. C. J.; Van Leemput, K.; Miyaoka, R.

    2018-04-01

    PET detectors use signal multiplexing to reduce the total number of electronics channels needed to cover a given area. Using measured thin-beam calibration data, we tested a principal component based multiplexing scheme for scintillation detectors. The highly-multiplexed detector signal is no longer amenable to standard calibration methodologies. In this study we report results of a prototype multiplexing circuit, and present a new method for calibrating the detector module with multiplexed data. A 50 × 50 × 10 mm3 LYSO scintillation crystal was affixed to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depth-estimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge of the crystal. The positioned events followed the expected Beer–Lambert depth distribution. The proposed calibration and positioning method exhibited a scattered photon rejection rate that was a 55% improvement over the summed signal energy-windowing method.

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Lodge, Martin [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Hao [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology Biostatistics Division, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins University Hospitals, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with {sup 18}F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p= 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of benzodiazepine receptor SPECT and 18F-FDG PET using a coincidence detection camera in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissmeyer, M.; Geiger, L.; Luescher, D.; Krause, T.; Loevblad, K.; Donati, F.; Wielepp, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    significant. 18 F-FDG PET using a coincidence detection camera system shows slightly but not statistically significant higher subjective values of asymmetry in patients with medically intractable TLE than BDR SPECT. Thus, in institutions without a dedicated PET scanner, both methods provide useful additional functional information in the detection of epileptogenic foci, especially when combined with an additional interictal CBF SPECT. (author)

  6. Evaluation of 3D reconstruction algorithms for a small animal PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.A.; Gandler, W.R.; Seidel, J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of paired, opposing position-sensitive phototube scintillation cameras (SCs) operating in coincidence for small animal imaging with positron emitters is currently under study. Because of the low sensitivity of the system even in 3D mode and the need to produce images with high resolution, it was postulated that a 3D expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction algorithm might be well suited for this application. We investigated four reconstruction algorithms for the 3D SC PET camera: 2D filtered back-projection (FBP), 2D ordered subset EM (OSEM), 3D reprojection (3DRP), and 3D OSEM. Noise was assessed for all slices by the coefficient of variation in a simulated uniform cylinder. Resolution was assessed from a simulation of 15 point sources in the warm background of the uniform cylinder. At comparable noise levels, the resolution achieved with OSEM (0.9-mm to 1.2-mm) is significantly better than that obtained with FBP or 3DRP (1.5-mm to 2.0-mm.) Images of a rat skull labeled with 18 F-fluoride suggest that 3D OSEM can improve image quality of a small animal PET camera

  7. First full-beam PET acquisitions in proton therapy with a modular dual-head dedicated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportelli, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Ortuño, J. E.; Romano, F.; Santos, A.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-01-01

    During particle therapy irradiation, positron emitters with half-lives ranging from 2 to 20 min are generated from nuclear processes. The half-lives are such that it is possible either to detect the positron signal in the treatment room using an in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) system, right after the irradiation, or to quickly transfer the patient to a close PET/CT scanner. Since the activity distribution is spatially correlated with the dose, it is possible to use PET imaging as an indirect method to assure the quality of the dose delivery. In this work, we present a new dedicated PET system able to operate in-beam. The PET apparatus consists in two 10 cm × 10 cm detector heads. Each detector is composed of four scintillating matrices of 23 × 23 LYSO crystals. The crystal size is 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 16 mm. Each scintillation matrix is read out independently with a modularized acquisition system. The distance between the two opposing detector heads was set to 20 cm. The system has very low dead time per detector area and a 3 ns coincidence window, which is capable to sustain high single count rates and to keep the random counts relatively low. This allows a new full-beam monitoring modality that includes data acquisition also while the beam is on. The PET system was tested during the irradiation at the CATANA (INFN, Catania, Italy) cyclotron-based proton therapy facility. Four acquisitions with different doses and dose rates were analysed. In all cases the random to total coincidences ratio was equal or less than 25%. For each measurement we estimated the accuracy and precision of the activity range on a set of voxel lines within an irradiated PMMA phantom. Results show that the inclusion of data acquired during the irradiation, referred to as beam-on data, improves both the precision and accuracy of the range measurement with respect to data acquired only after irradiation. Beam-on data alone are enough to give precisions better than 1 mm

  8. First full-beam PET acquisitions in proton therapy with a modular dual-head dedicated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, G; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Ferretti, S; Kraan, A; Straub, K; Guerra, A Del; Rosso, V; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Romano, F; Tramontana, A; Ortuño, J E; Santos, A

    2014-01-01

    During particle therapy irradiation, positron emitters with half-lives ranging from 2 to 20 min are generated from nuclear processes. The half-lives are such that it is possible either to detect the positron signal in the treatment room using an in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) system, right after the irradiation, or to quickly transfer the patient to a close PET/CT scanner. Since the activity distribution is spatially correlated with the dose, it is possible to use PET imaging as an indirect method to assure the quality of the dose delivery. In this work, we present a new dedicated PET system able to operate in-beam. The PET apparatus consists in two 10 cm × 10 cm detector heads. Each detector is composed of four scintillating matrices of 23 × 23 LYSO crystals. The crystal size is 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 16 mm. Each scintillation matrix is read out independently with a modularized acquisition system. The distance between the two opposing detector heads was set to 20 cm. The system has very low dead time per detector area and a 3 ns coincidence window, which is capable to sustain high single count rates and to keep the random counts relatively low. This allows a new full-beam monitoring modality that includes data acquisition also while the beam is on. The PET system was tested during the irradiation at the CATANA (INFN, Catania, Italy) cyclotron-based proton therapy facility. Four acquisitions with different doses and dose rates were analysed. In all cases the random to total coincidences ratio was equal or less than 25%. For each measurement we estimated the accuracy and precision of the activity range on a set of voxel lines within an irradiated PMMA phantom. Results show that the inclusion of data acquired during the irradiation, referred to as beam-on data, improves both the precision and accuracy of the range measurement with respect to data acquired only after irradiation. Beam-on data alone are enough to give precisions better than 1

  9. Clear-PEM: A PET imaging system dedicated to breast cancer diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Albuquerque, E; Almeida, F G; Almeida, P; Amaral, P; Auffray, Etiennette; Bento, P; Bruyndonckx, P; Bugalho, R; Carriço, B; Cordeiro, H; Ferreira, M; Ferreira, N C; Gonçalves, F; Lecoq, Paul; Leong, C; Lopes, F; Lousã, P; Luyten, J; Martins, M V; Matela, N; Rato-Mendes, P; Moura, R; Nobre, J; Oliveira, N; Ortigão, C; Peralta, L; Rego, J; Ribeiro, R; Rodrigues, P; Santos, A I; Silva, J C; Silva, M M; Tavernier, Stefaan; Teixeira, I C; Texeira, J P; Trindade, A; Trummer, Julia; Varela, J

    2007-01-01

    The Clear-PEM scanner for positron emission mammography under development is described. The detector is based on pixelized LYSO crystals optically coupled to avalanche photodiodes and readout by a fast low-noise electronic system. A dedicated digital trigger (TGR) and data acquisition (DAQ) system is used for on-line selection of coincidence events with high efficiency, large bandwidth and small dead-time. A specialized gantry allows to perform exams of the breast and of the axilla. In this paper we present results of the measurement of detector modules that integrate the system under construction as well as the imaging performance estimated from Monte Carlo simulated data.

  10. Breast Imaging Utilizing Dedicated Gamma Camera and (99m)Tc-MIBI: Experience at the Tel Aviv Medical Center and Review of the Literature Breast Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Sapir, Einat; Golan, Orit; Menes, Tehillah; Weinstein, Yuliana; Lerman, Hedva

    2016-07-01

    The scope of the current article is the clinical role of gamma cameras dedicated for breast imaging and (99m)Tc-MIBI tumor-seeking tracer, as both a screening modality among a healthy population and as a diagnostic modality in patients with breast cancer. Such cameras are now commercially available. The technology utilizing a camera composed of a NaI (Tl) detector is termed breast-specific gamma imaging. The technology of dual-headed camera composed of semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride detectors that directly converts gamma-ray energy into electronic signals is termed molecular breast imaging. Molecular breast imaging system has been installed at the Department of Nuclear medicine at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv in 2009. The article reviews the literature well as our own experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Monte Carlo study of the acceptance to scattered events in a depth encoding PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisan, C.; Tupper, P.; Rogers, J.G.; DeJong, J.K.

    1995-10-01

    We present a Monte Carlo study of acceptance to scattered events in a Depth Encoding Large Aperture Camera (DELAC), a hypothetical PET scanner with the capacity to encode the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of incident γ-rays. The simulation is initially validated against the measured energy resolution and scatter fraction of the ECAT-953B scanner. It is then used to assess the response to scattered events in a PET camera made of position encoding blocks of the EXACT HR PLUS type, modified to have DOI resolution through a variation in the photopeak pulse height. The detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-rays, as well as for those that scattered in the object or left only part of their energy in the block, is studied for several combinations of DOI sensitivities and block thicknesses. The scatter fraction predicted by the simulation for DELACs of various ring radii is compared to that of the ECAT-953B as a function of the energy threshold. The results indicate that the poorer discrimination of object scatters with depth sensitive blocks does not lead to a dramatic increase of the scatter fraction. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  12. A 3D HIDAC-PET camera with sub-millimeter resolution for imaging small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeavons, A.P.; Chandler, R.A.; Dettmar, C.A.R.

    1999-01-01

    A HIDAC-PET camera consisting essentially of 5 million 0.5 mm gas avalanching detectors has been constructed for small-animal imaging. The particular HIDAC advantage--a high 3D spatial resolution--has been improved to 0.95 mm fwhm and to 0.7 mm fwhm when reconstructing with 3D-OSEM methods incorporating resolution recovery. A depth-of-interaction resolution of 2.5 mm is implicit, due to the laminar construction. Scatter-corrected sensitivity, at 8.9 cps/kBq (i.e. 0.9%) from a central point source, or 7.2 cps/kBq (543 cps/kBq/cm 3 ) from a distributed (40 mm diameter, 60 mm long) source is now much higher than previous, and other, work. A field-of-view of 100 mm (adjustable to 200 mm) diameter by 210 mm axially permits whole-body imaging of small animals, containing typically 4MBqs of activity, at 40 kcps of which 16% are random coincidences, with a typical scatter fraction of 44%. Throughout the field-of-view there are no positional distortions and relative quantitation is uniform to ± 3.5%, but some variation of spatial resolution is found. The performance demonstrates that HIDAC technology is quite appropriate for small-animal PET cameras

  13. ROKCY-12 (KCCH PET-dedicated cyclotron): main features and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, J. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yang, Y. T.; Jung, I. S.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, M. Y.; Jang, H. S.; Kim, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of 13 MeV cyclotron (ROKCY-12) that can be used for a Position Emission Tomography(PET) purpose. This cyclotron with a maximum beam energy of 13 MeV can produce radio isotopes especially 18 F which has a relatively short half lifetime of 110 minutes. First, we show the beam characteristics can be used to carry out the operation of ROCKY-12. Based on this, a computer program has been developed to determine main cyclotron parameters such as cyclotron magnet, RF system, ion source, vacuum system and other cyclotron operation parameters. And then we show the result of design and manufacturing feature of ROKCY-12. By using this design program, one can determines magnet yoke geometry and the average magnetic fields etc. And then the three-dimensional computer program OPERA-3D has been invoked to determine magnet pole tips. Validity of the design can be seen by investigating magnetic fields, radial and vertical focusing frequencies as a function of the beam energy. In this paper, we show the results of cyclotron beam by ROCKY-12. We designed 77.3 MHz RF system and ion source system. We tested RF resonance each coupling methods. We show the result of RF design and prototype operation. Developed ion source is PIG type. We described our design methods and implementation. We report the result of getting negative hydrogen ion. Cyclotron controller asks inputs of every sensor and output of every instrument for notifying current condition to operator. It has independent controllers, for example DC power supply, vacuum system, beam profile system, beam extraction system, RF system, ion source, cooling unit and so on. Basically, each control system uses RS-485 for communication to main control computer. Consumers reward products and services that feature quality, originality, a distinct personality and charm. The International Standardization Organization (ISO) requires, as its mission, that we achieve competitive superiority by

  14. Characterization and performance of monolithic detector blocks with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout for PET imaging of the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rato Mendes, Pedro; Sarasola Martin, Iciar; Canadas, Mario; Garcia de Acilu, Paz; Cuypers, Robin; Perez, Jose Manuel; Willmott, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a human brain PET scanner prototype compatible with MRI based on monolithic scintillator crystals, APD matrices and a dedicated ASIC front-end readout. In this work we report on the performance of individual detector modules and on the operation of such modules in PET coincidence. Results will be presented on the individual characterization of detector blocks and its ASIC front-end readout, with measured energy resolutions of 13% full-width half-maximum (FWHM) at 511 keV and spatial resolutions of the order of 2 mm FWHM. First results on PET coincidence performance indicate spatial resolutions as good as 2.1 mm FWHM for SSRB/FBP reconstruction of tomographic data obtained using a simple PET demonstrator based on a pair of monolithic detector blocks with ASIC readout.

  15. PET with coincidence gamma cameras - clinical benefit from the radiooncologists' point of view; PET mit Koinzidenz-Gammakameras - klinischer Nutzen aus der Sicht des Radioonkologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, E; Feyerabend, T; Stallmann, C; Lauer, I; Baehre, M [Universitaetsklinikum Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography with FDG (FDG-PET) is a new technique, which displays the cellular metabolic activity. Since tumors exhibit an increased metabolic activity when compared to normal tissue, this imaging modality has a particularly high importance. FDG-PET is not only useful for localizing and staging of malignant tumors, but also to evaluate therapy response. In this context, PET is superior to morphologically orientated modalities, because therapeutically induced changes in glucose metabolism precede morphologic alterations. Numerous studies indicate, that PET will play an important role in radiooncology concerning therapy planning and monitoring the effects of therapy during and after treatment. Further clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the information provided by FDG-PET more precisely. Coincidence gamma cameras with adequate imaging characteristics will gain enhanced importance to meet these increasing demands. (orig.) [German] Die Positronenemissionstomographie mit FDG (FDG-PET) ist ein neues Verfahren, das die Stoffwechselaktivitaet von Zellen bildlich wiedergibt. Da Tumorgewebe im Vergleich zu normalem Gewebe einen erhoehten Stoffwechsel aufweist, hat dieses Untersuchungsverfahren in der Onkologie einen besonders hohen Stellenwert. Neben der Lokalisations- und Ausbreitungsdiagnostik eignet sich die FDG-PET zur Erfolgsbeurteilung. Die PET ist hierin den anderen morphologischen Verfahren ueberlegen, da die Veraenderungen des Glukosemetabolismus durch therapeutische Massnahmen morphologischen Veraenderungen vorausgehen. Zahlreiche Untersuchungen lassen erkennen, dass die PET fuer die Radioonkologie einen wichtigen Stellenwert einnehmen wird. Dies betrifft die Bestrahlungsplanung und das Therapiemonitoring waehrend und nach einer Behandlung. Weitere klinische Studien sind notwendig, um die Aussagekraft der FDG-PET besser zu evaluieren. Den Koinzidenz-Gammakameras mit adaequaten Bildgebungseigenschaften kommt eine zunehmende Bedeutung zu, um

  16. Reconstruction in PET cameras with irregular sampling and depth of interaction capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virador, P.R.G.; Moses, W.W.; Huesman, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    The authors present 2D reconstruction algorithms for a rectangular PET camera capable of measuring depth of interaction (DOI). The camera geometry leads to irregular radial and angular sampling of the tomographic data. DOI information increases sampling density, allowing the use of evenly spaced quarter-crystal width radial bins with minimal interpolation of irregularly spaced data. In the regions where DOI does not increase sampling density (chords normal to crystal faces), fine radial sinogram binning leads to zero efficiency bins if uniform angular binning is used. These zero efficiency sinogram bins lead to streak artifacts if not corrected. To minimize these unnormalizable sinogram bins the authors use two angular binning schemes: Fixed Width and Natural Width. Fixed Width uses a fixed angular width except in the problem regions where appropriately chosen widths are applied. Natural Width uses angle widths which are derived from intrinsic detector sampling. Using a modified filtered-backprojection algorithm to accommodate these angular binning schemes, the authors reconstruct artifact free images with nearly isotropic and position independent spatial resolution. Results from Monte Carlo data indicate that they have nearly eliminated image degradation due to crystal penetration

  17. Value of F-18 FDG hybrid camera PET and MRI in early takayasu aortitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, J.; Becker, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Georg August University, Robert Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Grabbe, E.; Vosshenrich, R. [Department of Radiology, Georg August University, Robert Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Takayasu aortitis (TA) is a chronic inflammatory and fibrotic vasculitis of large- and medium-sized arteries. Early stages of the disease show a panarteritis and inflammatory wall thickening of the aorta and its branches, whereas advanced (fibrotic) stages comprise stenosis, aneurismatic transformation and occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging visualises early-stage disease with high accuracy and is considered to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of TA. The aim of this article is the detailed comparison of FDG-PET performed with a hybrid camera and MR imaging in five patients with early TA. Five patients (median age 60 years) were enrolled during an ongoing prospective study on [18F]2'-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) hybrid camera PET in patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO). These patients underwent MR imaging after establishing the diagnosis of TA. Abnormal FDG uptake in the wall of the aorta was noted in all patients. The bracheocephalic artery and the common carotid arteries were visualized in 3 cases. Increased uptake of the subclavian artery was found in 3 patients and in 4 patients pathological uptake was noted in the ilio-femoral vessels. Of 34 vascular regions studied, 26 (76%) showed elevated FDG uptake. On transversal MR images vessel wall thickening and contrast enhancement of the thoracic aorta was found in 4 patients (ascending aorta/aortic arch: n=2; descending aorta: n=3; abdominal aorta: n=1). Additionally, vessel wall pathologies of the subclavian and the common carotid arteries could be shown in 1 patient and in another patient in the ilio-femoral arteries. No abnormalities were found using contrast-enhanced MR angiography. Of 28 vascular regions studied, 9 (32%) showed vasculitis on MRI. The FDG-PET is a suitable whole-body screening method in the primary diagnosis of early TA, especially in those cases with early disease that present with uncharacteristic symptoms such as FUO. Both MRI and MRA remain indispensable in the exact

  18. Value of F-18 FDG hybrid camera PET and MRI in early takayasu aortitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.; Becker, W.; Grabbe, E.; Vosshenrich, R.

    2003-01-01

    Takayasu aortitis (TA) is a chronic inflammatory and fibrotic vasculitis of large- and medium-sized arteries. Early stages of the disease show a panarteritis and inflammatory wall thickening of the aorta and its branches, whereas advanced (fibrotic) stages comprise stenosis, aneurismatic transformation and occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging visualises early-stage disease with high accuracy and is considered to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of TA. The aim of this article is the detailed comparison of FDG-PET performed with a hybrid camera and MR imaging in five patients with early TA. Five patients (median age 60 years) were enrolled during an ongoing prospective study on [18F]2'-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) hybrid camera PET in patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO). These patients underwent MR imaging after establishing the diagnosis of TA. Abnormal FDG uptake in the wall of the aorta was noted in all patients. The bracheocephalic artery and the common carotid arteries were visualized in 3 cases. Increased uptake of the subclavian artery was found in 3 patients and in 4 patients pathological uptake was noted in the ilio-femoral vessels. Of 34 vascular regions studied, 26 (76%) showed elevated FDG uptake. On transversal MR images vessel wall thickening and contrast enhancement of the thoracic aorta was found in 4 patients (ascending aorta/aortic arch: n=2; descending aorta: n=3; abdominal aorta: n=1). Additionally, vessel wall pathologies of the subclavian and the common carotid arteries could be shown in 1 patient and in another patient in the ilio-femoral arteries. No abnormalities were found using contrast-enhanced MR angiography. Of 28 vascular regions studied, 9 (32%) showed vasculitis on MRI. The FDG-PET is a suitable whole-body screening method in the primary diagnosis of early TA, especially in those cases with early disease that present with uncharacteristic symptoms such as FUO. Both MRI and MRA remain indispensable in the exact

  19. Integration of gamma cameras and PET devices of multiple vendors in several locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Vollmar, C.; Sengupta, S.; Hahn, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Nuclear Medicine of the University of Munich consists of four independently operated locations with a total of 18 gamma cameras (of three vendors), one PET scanner and one coincidence gamma camera. Recent hardware improvements, the installation and development of fast networks and new technologies for storage of large data volumes all contribute to the propagation of digital reading and reporting of nuclear medicine studies. Thus, the vision of a fully digitized nuclear medicine department becomes reality. In 1997 the department started with a strategy to fully integrate the entire number of imaging devices into one network for filmless reading, archiving and distributing nuclear medicine studies throughout the hospitals. The decision was made to use HERMES workstations (Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden) to connect all primary imaging modalities. The purpose of the workstations located in the Nuclear Medicine departments is threefold: postprocessing, reading and archiving of all data. The workstations are networked throughout the different hospitals and are able to read the proprietary or DICOM data of the vendors of the gamma camera and PET equipment. The HERMES system is connected via DICOM interface to a long term storage device (AGFA, Germany). Additionally a JAVA (SUN Microsystems, USA) based software (JARVIS, Nuclear Diagnostics) is available to view all data from any computer using a web browser. Furthermore all data is linked to the hospital information system and selected imaging data are distributed throughout the hospitals. After commencement of full service of the network in 2000 the department is over 95 % filmfree. The high costs of purchasing hardware- and software-components are compensated for by saving costs of films and by the improvement of the work flow. Independently from these issues, filmless reporting proves to be advantageous over conventional film reading in many facts that justify to switch to a digital department

  20. Texture analysis of high-resolution dedicated breast {sup 18}F-FDG PET images correlates with immunohistochemical factors and subtype of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscoso, Alexis; Dominguez-Prado, Ines; Herranz, Michel; Argibay, Sonia; Silva-Rodriguez, Jesus [Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela CHUS-IDIS, Nuclear Medicine Department and Molecular Imaging Group, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ruibal, Alvaro [Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela CHUS-IDIS, Nuclear Medicine Department and Molecular Imaging Group, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fundacion Tejerina, Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Ferreiro, Anxo [Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela CHUS-IDIS, Pharmacy Department and Pharmacology Group, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Albaina, Luis [University Hospital A Coruna (SERGAS), Department of General Surgery, A Coruna (Spain); Pardo-Montero, Juan [Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela CHUS-IDIS, Nuclear Medicine Department and Molecular Imaging Group, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), Medical Physics Department, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aguiar, Pablo [Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela CHUS-IDIS, Nuclear Medicine Department and Molecular Imaging Group, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), Molecular Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2018-02-15

    This study aims to determine whether PET textural features measured with a new dedicated breast PET scanner reflect biological characteristics of breast tumors. One hundred and thirty-nine breast tumors from 127 consecutive patients were included in this analysis. All of them underwent a {sup 18}F-FDG PET scan before treatment. Well-known PET quantitative parameters such as SUV{sub m} {sub a} {sub x}, SUV{sub m} {sub e} {sub a} {sub n}, metabolically active tumor volume (MATV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were extracted. Together with these parameters, local, regional, and global heterogeneity descriptors, which included five textural features (TF), were computed. Immunohistochemical classification of breast cancer considered five subtypes: luminal A like (LA), luminal B like/HER2 - (LB -), luminal B like/HER2+ (LB+), HER2-positive-non-luminal (HER2pnl), and triple negative (TN). Associations between PET features and tumor characteristics were assessed using non-parametric hypothesis tests. Along with well-established associations, new correlations were found. HER2-positive tumors had significantly higher uptake (p < 0.001, AUCs > 0.70) and presented different global and regional heterogeneity (p = 0.002, p = 0.016, respectively, AUCs < 0.70). Nine out of ten analyzed features were significantly associated with immunohistochemical subtype. Uptake was lower for LA tumors (p < 0.001) with AUCs ranging from 0.71 to 0.88 for each subgroup comparison. Heterogeneity metrics were significantly associated when comparing LA and LB - (p < 0.01), being regional heterogeneity metrics more discriminative than any other parameter (AUC = 0.80 compared to AUC = 0.71 for SUV). LB+ and HER2pnl tumors also showed more regional heterogeneity than LA tumors (AUCs = 0.79 and 0.84, respectively). After comparison with whole-body PET studies, we observed an overall improvement in the classification ability of both non-heterogeneity metrics and textural features. PET parameters

  1. Validation of the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform for modelling a CsI(Tl) scintillation camera dedicated to small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, D; Buvat, I; Loudos, G; Strul, D; Santin, G; Giokaris, N; Donnarieix, D; Maigne, L; Spanoudaki, V; Styliaris, S; Staelens, S; Breton, V

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are increasingly used in scintigraphic imaging to model imaging systems and to develop and assess tomographic reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for improved image quantitation. GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) is a new Monte Carlo simulation platform based on GEANT4 dedicated to nuclear imaging applications. This paper describes the GATE simulation of a prototype of scintillation camera dedicated to small-animal imaging and consisting of a CsI(Tl) crystal array coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The relevance of GATE to model the camera prototype was assessed by comparing simulated 99m Tc point spread functions, energy spectra, sensitivities, scatter fractions and image of a capillary phantom with the corresponding experimental measurements. Results showed an excellent agreement between simulated and experimental data: experimental spatial resolutions were predicted with an error less than 100 μm. The difference between experimental and simulated system sensitivities for different source-to-collimator distances was within 2%. Simulated and experimental scatter fractions in a [98-82 keV] energy window differed by less than 2% for sources located in water. Simulated and experimental energy spectra agreed very well between 40 and 180 keV. These results demonstrate the ability and flexibility of GATE for simulating original detector designs. The main weakness of GATE concerns the long computation time it requires: this issue is currently under investigation by the GEANT4 and the GATE collaborations

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  3. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5

  4. Feasibility of a brain-dedicated PET-MRI system using four-layer DOI detectors integrated with an RF head coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, F.; Obata, T.; Shimizu, K.; Suga, M.; Inadama, N.; Tachibana, A.; Yoshida, E.; Ito, H.; Yamaya, T.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a PET-MRI system which consists of PET detectors integrated with the head coil of the MRI in order to realize high spatial resolution and high sensitivity in simultaneous measurements. In the PET-MRI system, the PET detectors which consist of a scintillator block, photo-detectors and front-end circuits with four-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding capability are placed close to the measured object. Therefore, the proposed system can achieve high sensitivity without degradation of spatial resolution at the edge of the field-of-view due to parallax error thanks to the four-layer DOI capability. In this paper, we fabricated a prototype system which consists of a prototype four-layer DOI-PET detector, a dummy PET detector and a prototype birdcage type head coil. Then we used the prototype system to evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI-PET detector and the reciprocal influence between the PET detectors and MRI images. The prototype DOI-PET detector consists of six monolithic multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) arrays (S11064-050P), a readout circuit board, two scintillator blocks and a copper shielding box. Each scintillator block consists of four layers of Lu 1.8 Gd 0.2 SiO 5 :Ce (LGSO) scintillators and reflectors are inserted between the scintillation crystals. The dummy detector has all these components except the two scintillator blocks. The head coil is dedicated to a 3.0 T MRI (MAGNETOM Verio, Siemens) and the two detectors are mounted in gaps between head coil elements. Energy resolution and crystal identification performance of the prototype four-layer DOI-PET detector were evaluated with and without MRI measurements by the gradient echo and spin echo methods. We identified crystal elements in all four layers from a 2D flood histogram and energy resolution of 15–18% was obtained for single crystal elements in simultaneous measurements. The difference between the average energy resolutions and photo-peak positions with and

  5. Added value of dedicated axillary hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI for improved axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer patients. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijnatten, Thiemo J.A. van; Goorts, B.; Voeoe, S.; Wildberger, J.E.; Boer, M. de; Kooreman, L.F.S.; Heuts, E.M.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Lobbes, M.B.I.; Smidt, M.L.

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and potential added value of dedicated axillary 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI, compared to standard imaging modalities (i.e. ultrasound [US], MRI and PET/CT), for axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer. Twelve patients with clinically node-positive breast cancer underwent axillary US and dedicated axillary hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI. Nine of the 12 patients also underwent whole-body PET/CT. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were measured for the primary breast tumor and the most FDG-avid axillary lymph node. A positive axillary lymph node on dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI was defined as a moderate to very intense FDG-avid lymph node. The diagnostic performance of dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI was calculated by comparing quantitative and its qualitative measurements to results of axillary US, MRI and PET/CT. The number of suspicious axillary lymph nodes was subdivided as follows: N0 (0 nodes), N1 (1-3 nodes), N2 (4-9 nodes) and N3 (≥ 10 nodes). According to dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI findings, seven patients were diagnosed with N1, four with N2 and one with N3. With regard to mean SUVmax, there was no significant difference in the primary tumor (9.0 [±5.0] vs. 8.6 [±5.7], p = 0.678) or the most FDG-avid axillary lymph node (7.8 [±5.3] vs. 7.7 [±4.3], p = 0.767) between dedicated axillary PET/MRI and PET/CT. Compared to standard imaging modalities, dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI resulted in changes in nodal status as follows: 40% compared to US, 75% compared to T2-weighted MRI, 40% compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, and 22% compared to PET/CT. Adding dedicated axillary 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI to diagnostic work-up may improve the diagnostic performance of axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer patients. (orig.)

  6. Added value of dedicated axillary hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI for improved axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer patients. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijnatten, Thiemo J.A. van; Goorts, B. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center+, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Voeoe, S.; Wildberger, J.E. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Boer, M. de [Maastricht University Medical Center+, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center+, Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kooreman, L.F.S. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuts, E.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, F.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Lobbes, M.B.I. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center+, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Smidt, M.L. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center+, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2018-02-15

    To investigate the feasibility and potential added value of dedicated axillary 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI, compared to standard imaging modalities (i.e. ultrasound [US], MRI and PET/CT), for axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer. Twelve patients with clinically node-positive breast cancer underwent axillary US and dedicated axillary hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI. Nine of the 12 patients also underwent whole-body PET/CT. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were measured for the primary breast tumor and the most FDG-avid axillary lymph node. A positive axillary lymph node on dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI was defined as a moderate to very intense FDG-avid lymph node. The diagnostic performance of dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI was calculated by comparing quantitative and its qualitative measurements to results of axillary US, MRI and PET/CT. The number of suspicious axillary lymph nodes was subdivided as follows: N0 (0 nodes), N1 (1-3 nodes), N2 (4-9 nodes) and N3 (≥ 10 nodes). According to dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI findings, seven patients were diagnosed with N1, four with N2 and one with N3. With regard to mean SUVmax, there was no significant difference in the primary tumor (9.0 [±5.0] vs. 8.6 [±5.7], p = 0.678) or the most FDG-avid axillary lymph node (7.8 [±5.3] vs. 7.7 [±4.3], p = 0.767) between dedicated axillary PET/MRI and PET/CT. Compared to standard imaging modalities, dedicated axillary hybrid PET/MRI resulted in changes in nodal status as follows: 40% compared to US, 75% compared to T2-weighted MRI, 40% compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, and 22% compared to PET/CT. Adding dedicated axillary 18F-FDG hybrid PET/MRI to diagnostic work-up may improve the diagnostic performance of axillary nodal staging in clinically node-positive breast cancer patients. (orig.)

  7. Performance Evaluation of a Dedicated Preclinical PET/CT System for the Assessment of Mineralization Process in a Mouse Model of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucher, Guillaume; Cameliere, Lucie; Fendri, Jihene; Abbas, Ahmed; Dupont, Kevin; Kamel, Said; Delcroix, Nicolas; Dupont, Axel; Berger, Ludovic; Manrique, Alain

    2018-04-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of positron emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) acquisition and reconstruction parameters on the assessment of mineralization process in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. All experiments were performed on a dedicated preclinical PET/CT system. CT was evaluated using five acquisition configurations using both a tungsten wire phantom for in-plane resolution assessment and a bar pattern phantom for cross-plane resolution. Furthermore, the radiation dose of these acquisition configurations was calculated. The PET system was assessed using longitudinal line sources to determine the optimal reconstruction parameters by measuring central resolution and its coefficient of variation. An in vivo PET study was performed using uremic ApoE -/- , non-uremic ApoE -/- , and control mice to evaluate optimal PET reconstruction parameters for the detection of sodium [ 18 F]fluoride (Na[ 18 F]F) aortic uptake and for quantitative measurement of Na[ 18 F]F bone influx (Ki) with a Patlak analysis. For CT, the use of 1 × 1 and 2 × 2 binning detector mode increased both in-plane and cross-plane resolution. However, resolution improvement (163 to 62 μm for in-plane resolution) was associated with an important radiation dose increase (1.67 to 32.78 Gy). With PET, 3D-ordered subset expectation maximization (3D-OSEM) algorithm increased the central resolution compared to filtered back projection (1.42 ± 0.35 mm vs. 1.91 ± 0.08, p PET resolution for preclinical study (FWHM = 0.98 mm). These PET reconstruction parameters allowed the detection of Na[ 18 F]F aortic uptake in 3/14 ApoE -/- mice and demonstrated a decreased Ki in uremic ApoE -/- compared to non-uremic ApoE -/- and control mice (p PET. In addition, improving the CT resolution was associated with a dramatic radiation dose increase.

  8. Gamma camera based Positron Emission Tomography: a study of the viability on quantification; Tomografia por emissao de positrons com sistemas PET/SPECT: um estudo da viabilidade de quantifizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzo, Lorena

    2005-07-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a Nuclear Medicine imaging modality for diagnostic purposes. Pharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used and images which represent the in vivo biochemical process within tissues can be obtained. The positron/electron annihilation photons are detected in coincidence and this information is used for object reconstruction. Presently, there are two types of systems available for this imaging modality: the dedicated systems and those based on gamma camera technology. In this work, we utilized PET/SPECT systems, which also allows for the traditional Nuclear Medicine studies based on single photon emitters. There are inherent difficulties which affect quantification of activity and other indices. They are related to the Poisson nature of radioactivity, to radiation interactions with patient body and detector, noise due to statistical nature of these interactions and to all the detection processes, as well as the patient acquisition protocols. Corrections are described in the literature and not all of them are implemented by the manufacturers: scatter, attenuation, random, decay, dead time, spatial resolution, and others related to the properties of each equipment. The goal of this work was to assess these methods adopted by two manufacturers, as well as the influence of some technical characteristics of PET/SPECT systems on the estimation of SUV. Data from a set of phantoms were collected in 3D mode by one camera and 2D, by the other. We concluded that quantification is viable in PET/SPECT systems, including the estimation of SUVs. This is only possible if, apart from the above mentioned corrections, the camera is well tuned and coefficients for sensitivity normalization and partial volume corrections are applied. We also verified that the shapes of the sources used for obtaining these factors play a role on the final results and should be delt with carefully in clinical quantification. Finally, the choice of the region

  9. Scanner calibration of a small animal PET camera based on continuous LSO crystals and flat panel PSPMTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benlloch, J.M.; Carrilero, V.; Gonzalez, A.J.; Catret, J.; Lerche, Ch.W.; Abellan, D.; Garcia de Quiros, F.; Gimenez, M.; Modia, J.; Sanchez, F.; Pavon, N.; Ros, A.; Martinez, J.; Sebastia, A.

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed a small animal PET with four identical detector modules, each consisting of a continuous LYSO crystal attached to a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube (PSPMT). The dimensions of the continuous crystal are 50x50 mm 2 and 10 mm thickness. The modules are separated 11 cm between each other in the scanner. In this paper we discuss the method used for the calibration of the camera for this special system with continuous detectors. We also present the preliminary values for the main performance parameters such as spatial and energy resolution, and sensitivity of the system

  10. Implementation and analysis of list mode algorithm using tubes of response on a dedicated brain and breast PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner, L.; Correcher, C.; González, A. J.; Conde, P.; Hernández, L.; Orero, A.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M. J.; Sánchez, F.; Soriano, A.; Vidal, L. F.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2013-02-01

    In this work we present an innovative algorithm for the reconstruction of PET images based on the List-Mode (LM) technique which improves their spatial resolution compared to results obtained with current MLEM algorithms. This study appears as a part of a large project with the aim of improving diagnosis in early Alzheimer disease stages by means of a newly developed hybrid PET-MR insert. At the present, Alzheimer is the most relevant neurodegenerative disease and the best way to apply an effective treatment is its early diagnosis. The PET device will consist of several monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to SiPM detectors. Monolithic crystals can reduce scanner costs with the advantage to enable implementation of very small virtual pixels in their geometry. This is especially useful for LM reconstruction algorithms, since they do not need a pre-calculated system matrix. We have developed an LM algorithm which has been initially tested with a large aperture (186 mm) breast PET system. Such an algorithm instead of using the common lines of response, incorporates a novel calculation of tubes of response. The new approach improves the volumetric spatial resolution about a factor 2 at the border of the field of view when compared with traditionally used MLEM algorithm. Moreover, it has also shown to decrease the image noise, thus increasing the image quality.

  11. Implementation and analysis of list mode algorithm using tubes of response on a dedicated brain and breast PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moliner, L.; Correcher, C.; González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Hernández, L.; Orero, A.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Soriano, A.; Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an innovative algorithm for the reconstruction of PET images based on the List-Mode (LM) technique which improves their spatial resolution compared to results obtained with current MLEM algorithms. This study appears as a part of a large project with the aim of improving diagnosis in early Alzheimer disease stages by means of a newly developed hybrid PET-MR insert. At the present, Alzheimer is the most relevant neurodegenerative disease and the best way to apply an effective treatment is its early diagnosis. The PET device will consist of several monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to SiPM detectors. Monolithic crystals can reduce scanner costs with the advantage to enable implementation of very small virtual pixels in their geometry. This is especially useful for LM reconstruction algorithms, since they do not need a pre-calculated system matrix. We have developed an LM algorithm which has been initially tested with a large aperture (186 mm) breast PET system. Such an algorithm instead of using the common lines of response, incorporates a novel calculation of tubes of response. The new approach improves the volumetric spatial resolution about a factor 2 at the border of the field of view when compared with traditionally used MLEM algorithm. Moreover, it has also shown to decrease the image noise, thus increasing the image quality

  12. Sub-millimetre DOI detector based on monolithic LYSO and digital SiPM for a dedicated small-animal PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinkowski, Radosław; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    The mouse model is widely used in a vast range of biomedical and preclinical studies. Thanks to the ability to detect and quantify biological processes at the molecular level in vivo, PET has become a well-established tool in these investigations. However, the need to visualize and quantify radiopharmaceuticals in anatomic structures of millimetre or less requires good spatial resolution and sensitivity from small-animal PET imaging systems. In previous work we have presented a proof-of-concept of a dedicated high-resolution small-animal PET scanner based on thin monolithic scintillator crystals and Digital Photon Counter photosensor. The combination of thin monolithic crystals and MLE positioning algorithm resulted in an excellent spatial resolution of 0.7 mm uniform in the entire field of view (FOV). However, the limitation of the scanner was its low sensitivity due to small thickness of the lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystals (2 mm). Here we present an improved detector design for a small-animal PET system that simultaneously achieves higher sensitivity and sustains a sub-millimetre spatial resolution. The proposed detector consists of a 5 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal optically coupled to a Digital Photon Counter. Mean nearest neighbour (MNN) positioning combined with depth of interaction (DOI) decoding was employed to achieve sub-millimetre spatial resolution. To evaluate detector performance the intrinsic spatial resolution, energy resolution and coincidence resolving time (CRT) were measured. The average intrinsic spatial resolution of the detector was 0.60 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). A DOI resolution of 1.66 mm was achieved. The energy resolution was 23% FWHM at 511 keV and CRT of 529 ps were measured. The improved detector design overcomes the sensitivity limitation of the previous design by increasing the nominal sensitivity of the detector block and retains an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution. (paper)

  13. Methodology for predicting the characteristics and performance of different PET camera designs: The choice of figures of merit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, F.; Defrise, M.; Kuyk, S.; Bossuyt, A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to compare different PET camera designs (ring and planar geometry), this paper proposes ''figures of merit which allow questions such as ''Is it better, given an particular design, to achieve a coincidence rate of 10 kHz with 5% randoms, or a 20 kHz rate with 10% randoms?'' to be answered. The authors propose a methodology based on information theory. The image is the three dimensional distribution which conveys the information to the human or electronic observer. The image is supposed to consist of discrete image elements (voxels) of uniform size, and each characterized by a coincidence density. The performance of a non-ideal imager can be studied by evaluating the effect on the visibility surface: the number of events per image element will be affected by the limited efficiency, geometrical acceptance angle, temporal resolution, energy resolution. The authors show that the effect of the degradations can be introduced in the formula by replacing the number of true coincidences by an effective number of coincidences. The non-ideal imager will distort the visibility surface, so the authors compare the performance of different PET cameras by comparing the different distortions which they induce and hence their ability to detect the information present in study objects

  14. Evaluation of pulmonary nodules and lung cancer with one-inch crystal gamma coincidence positron emission tomography/CT versus dedicated positron emission tomography/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moodie, K.; Lau, E.; Hicks, R. J.; Cherk, M. H.; Turlakow, A.; Skinner, S.; Kelly, M. J.; Kalff, V.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Dedicated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners using BGO and related detectors (d-PET) have become standard imaging instruments in many malignancies. Hybrid gamma camera systems using Nal detectors in coincidence mode (g-PET) have been compared to d-PET but reported usefulness has been variable when gamma cameras with half-inch to three-fourth-inch thick crystals have been used without CT. Our aim was to compare g-PET with a 1-in.-thick crystal and inbuilt CT for lesion localization and attenuation correction (g-PET/CT) and d-PET/CT in patients presenting with potential and confirmed lung malignancies. One hour after 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), patients underwent BGO d-PET/CT from jaw to proximal thigh. This was followed by one to two bed position g-PET/CT 194 + 27 min after FDG. Each study pair was independently analysed with concurrent CT. d-PET/CT was interpreted by a radiologist experienced in both PET and CT, and g-PET/CT by consensus reading of an experienced PET physician and an experienced CT radiologist, A TNM score was assigned and studies were then unblinded and compared. Fifty-seven patients underwent 58 scan pairs over 2 years. Eighty-nine percent concordance was shown between g-PET/CT and d-PET/CT for the assessment of I intrapulmonary lesions, with 100% concordance for intrapulmonary lesions I >10 mm (36 of 36). Eighty-eight per cent (51 of 58) concordance was shown between g-PET/CTand d-PET/CTforTNM staging. Coincidence imaging usingan optimized dual-head 1-in.-thick crystal gamma camera with inbuilt CT compares reasonably well with dedicated PET/CT for evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary lesions and staging of pulmonary malignancies and may be of some] value when d-PET/CT is not readily available.

  15. Thermal regulation for APDs in a 1 mm3 resolution clinical PET camera: design, simulation and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Jinjian; Vandenbroucke, Arne; Levin, Craig S

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a 1 mm 3 resolution positron emission tomography camera dedicated to breast imaging. The camera collects high energy photons emitted from radioactively labeled agents introduced in the patients in order to detect molecular signatures of breast cancer. The camera comprises many layers of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystals coupled to position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). The main objectives of the studies presented in this paper are to investigate the temperature profile of the layers of LYSO–PSAPD detectors (a.k.a. ‘fins’) residing in the camera and to use these results to present the design of the thermal regulation system for the front end of the camera. The study was performed using both experimental methods and simulation. We investigated a design with a heat-dissipating fin. Three fin configurations are tested: fin with Al windows (FwW), fin without Al windows (FwoW) and fin with alumina windows (FwAW). A Fluent® simulation was conducted to study the experimentally inaccessible temperature of the PSAPDs. For the best configuration (FwW), the temperature difference from the center to a point near the edge is 1.0 K when 1.5 A current was applied to the Peltier elements. Those of FwoW and FwAW are 2.6 K and 1.7 K, respectively. We conclude that the design of a heat-dissipating fin configuration with ‘aluminum windows’ (FwW) that borders the scintillation crystal arrays of 16 adjacent detector modules has better heat dissipation capabilities than the design without ‘aluminum windows' (FwoW) and the design with ‘alumina windows’ (FwAW), respectively. (paper)

  16. ECAT ART - a continuously rotating PET camera: performance characteristics, initial clinical studies, and installation considerations in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Young, H.; Bloomfield, P.M.; Meikle, S.R.; Glass, D.; Myers, M.J.; Spinks, T.J.; Watson, C.C.; Luk, P.; Peters, A.M.; Jones, T.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in image reconstruction techniques have permitted the development of a commercial, rotating, partial ring, fully 3D scanner, the ECAT ART. The system has less than one-half the number of bismuth germanate detectors compared with a full ring scanner with the equivalent field of view, resulting in reduced capital cost. The performance characteristics, implications for installation in a nuclear medicine department, and clinical utility of the scanner are presented in this report. The sensitivity (20 cm diameter x 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, no scatter correction) is 11400 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 . This compares with 5800 and 40500 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 in 2D and 3D respectively for the equivalent full ring scanner (ECAT EXACT). With an energy window of 350-650 keV the maximum noise equivalent count (NEC) rate was 27 kcps at a radioactivity concentration of ∝15 kBq .ml -1 in the cylinder. Spatial resolution is ∝6 mm full width at half maximum on axis degrading to just under 8 mm at a distance of 20 cm off axis. Installation and use within the nuclear medicine department does not appreciably increase background levels of radiation on gamma cameras in adjacent rooms and the dose rate to an operator in the same room is 2 μSv .h -1 for a typical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) study with an initial injected activity of 370 MBq. The scanner has been used for clinical imaging with 18 F-FDG for neurological and oncological applications. Its novel use for imaging iron-52 transferrin for localising erythropoietic activity demonstrates its sensitivity and resolution advantages over a conventional dual-headed gamma camera. The ECAT ART provides a viable alternative to conventional full ring PET scanners without compromising the performance required for clinical PET imaging. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Clinical utility of 18-FDG-PET with a modified SPECT-camera using molecular coincidence detection in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, M. F.

    1998-09-01

    Malignant diseases are belonging to one of the most frequent reasons for mortality and morbidity of people in industrialized countries. In order to avoid inadequate therapy such as unnecessary operations etc. accurate diagnostic techniques are needed to assess malignancy of proven lesions, for staging of cancer or to assess success of therapy. Many studies have reported the value of PET in such cases. Because of limited financial resources we started PET with a Dual-head-SPECT-camera modified with a MCD-module in February 1997 in order to obtain quick access to clinical 18-FDG studies. The aim of this work was to compare the results of our system with reports of the so called 'state of the art'-PET and with other diagnostic techniques used in clinical oncology. So far 124 studies were performed with the MCD-mode using a standardized investigation protocol between February 1997 and May 1998. The applied dose of 18-FDG for oncological studies was about 185 MBq. The tracer was supplied from the radio-pharmaceutical unit of the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen. The obtained results were carefully compared with CT, MRI and conventional radiology. In addition, the final diagnosis (based on histology, surgical reports, autopsy and follow up) was also considered. Oncological studies were done either to assess malignancy in certain lesions (n = 25), for staging cancer (n = 77), or to assess success of therapy (n = 22). Sensitivity and specificity for all oncological cases were 99 % and 89 % respectively. One false negative scan was a pretreated CNS-lymphoma, where false positive studies were due to inflammation. (author)

  18. SENSROC4: An Multichannel Low-Noise Front-End Readout ASIC Dedicated to CZT Detectors for PET Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Gao, D.; Gan, B.; Wei, T.; Hu, Y.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design of a novel low-noise front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for our small animal PET systems which objective is to achieve the following performances, the spatial resolution of 1 mm 3 , the detection efficiency of 15 % and the time resolution of 1 ns. A cascade amplifier based on the PMOS input transistor is selected to realize the charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA) for the sake of good noise performances. The output of the CSA is split into two branches. One is connected to a slow shaper for energy measurements. The other is connected to a fast shaper for time acquisition. A novel monostable circuit is designed to adjust the time delay of the trigger signals so that the peak value of the shaped voltages can be sampled and stored. Based on the above techniques, an eight-channel front-end readout prototype chip is designed and implemented in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The die size is 2.286 mm x 2.282 mm. The input range of the ASIC is from 2000 e- to 180000 e-, reflecting to the energy of the gamma ray from 11.2 keV to 1 MeV. The gain of the readout channel is 65 V/pC. The best test result of ENC is 86.5 e- at zero farad plus 9.3 e- per pico-farad. The nonlinearity is less than 3 %. The crosstalk is less than 2 %. The power dissipation is about 9 mW/channel (authors)

  19. Physical effects of mechanical design parameters on photon sensitivity and spatial resolution performance of a breast-dedicated PET system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, V C; Lau, F W Y; Vandenbroucke, A; Levin, C S

    2010-11-01

    This study aims to address design considerations of a high resolution, high sensitivity positron emission tomography scanner dedicated to breast imaging. The methodology uses a detailed Monte Carlo model of the system structures to obtain a quantitative evaluation of several performance parameters. Special focus was given to the effect of dense mechanical structures designed to provide mechanical robustness and thermal regulation to the minuscule and temperature sensitive detectors. For the energies of interest around the photopeak (450-700 keV energy window), the simulation results predict a 6.5% reduction in the single photon detection efficiency and a 12.5% reduction in the coincidence photon detection efficiency in the case that the mechanical structures are interspersed between the detectors. However for lower energies, a substantial increase in the number of detected events (approximately 14% and 7% for singles at a 100-200 keV energy window and coincidences at a lower energy threshold of 100 keV, respectively) was observed with the presence of these structures due to backscatter. The number of photon events that involve multiple interactions in various crystal elements is also affected by the presence of the structures. For photon events involving multiple interactions among various crystal elements, the coincidence photon sensitivity is reduced by as much as 20% for a point source at the center of the field of view. There is no observable effect on the intrinsic and the reconstructed spatial resolution and spatial resolution uniformity. Mechanical structures can have a considerable effect on system sensitivity, especially for systems processing multi-interaction photon events. This effect, however, does not impact the spatial resolution. Various mechanical structure designs are currently under evaluation in order to achieve optimum trade-off between temperature stability, accurate detector positioning, and minimum influence on system performance.

  20. [Diagnostic use of positron emission tomography in France: from the coincidence gamma-camera to mobile hybrid PET/CT devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2010-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging method. PET is increasingly used for diagnostic purposes, especially in oncology. The most widely used radiopharmaceutical is FDG, a glucose analogue. Other radiopharmaceuticals have recently been registered or are in development. We outline technical improvements of PET machines during more than a decade of clinical use in France. Even though image quality has improved considerably and PET-CT hybrid machines have emerged, spending per examination has remained remarkably constant. Replacement and maintenance costs have remained in the range of 170-190 Euros per examination since 1997, whether early CDET gamma cameras or the latest time-of-flight PET/CT devices are used. This is mainly due to shorter acquisition times and more efficient use of FDG New reimbursement rates for PET/CT are needed in France in order to favor regular acquisition of state-of-the-art devices. One major development is the coupling of PET and MR imaging.

  1. The effect of the rotational orientation of circular photomultipliers in a PET camera block detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uribe, J.; Wong, Wai-Hoi; Hu, Guoju

    1996-01-01

    This is a study of the effects of geometric asymmetries in circular photomultipliers (PMT) on the design of PET position-sensitive block detectors. The dynodes of linear-focus circular PMT's are asymmetric relative to the axis of the photocathode, despite the rotational symmetry of the photocathode. Hence, there are regional photocathode differences in the anode signal, which affect the decoding characteristics of position sensitive block detectors. This orientation effect, as well as the effect of introducing light diffusers, are studied in a block detector design (BGO) using the PMT-quadrant-sharing configuration. The PMT studied is the Philips XP-1911 (19mm diameter). Seven symmetrical and representative orientations of the four decoding PMT were investigated, as well as one asymmetric orientation. The measurements performed include block-composite pulse-height spectra and crystal decoding maps. Two orientation effects were observed: (A) distortion variation in decoding maps, and (B) decoding resolution variation. The introduction of circular plastic pieces, used as light diffusers, prove to be useful by improving the decoding of crystals on the periphery of the detector block and minimizing distortion in the decoding map. These measurements have shown optimal PMT orientations for the PMT-quadrant-sharing design, as well as for conventional block designs

  2. Electronics for a prototype variable field of view PET camera using the PMT-quadrant-sharing detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wong, Wai-Hoi; Zhang, N.; Wang, J.; Uribe, J.; Baghaei, H.; Yokoyama, S.

    1999-06-01

    Electronics for a prototype high-resolution PET camera with eight position-sensitive detector modules has been developed. Each module has 16 BGO (Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/) blocks (each block is composed of 49 crystals). The design goals are component and space reduction. The electronics is composed of five parts: front-end analog processing, digital position decoding, fast timing, coincidence processing and master data acquisition. The front-end analog circuit is a zone-based structure (each zone has 3/spl times/3 PMTs). Nine ADCs digitize integration signals of an active zone identified by eight trigger clusters; each cluster is composed of six photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). A trigger corresponding to a gamma ray is sent to a fast timing board to obtain a time-mark, and the nine digitized signals are passed to the position decoding board, where a real block (four PMTs) can be picked out from the zone for position decoding. Lookup tables are used for energy discrimination and to identify the gamma-hit crystal location. The coincidence board opens a 70-ns initial timing window, followed by two 20-ns true/accidental time-mark lookup table windows. The data output from the coincidence board can be acquired either in sinogram mode or in list mode with a Motorola/IRONICS VME-based system.

  3. Evaluation of pulmonary nodules: comparison of a prototype dual crystal (LSO/NAI) dual head coincidence camera and full ring positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, U.; Raijmakers, P.G.H.M.; Lingen, A. van; Comans, E.F.I.; Pijpers, R.; Teule, G.J.J.; Hoekstra, O.S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the concordance of a prototype dual head coincidence camera (LSO-PS) and full ring PET (BGO-PET) using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the evaluation of pulmonary nodules (PNs). Materials and methods: Patients referred for evaluation of ≤3 PNs (≤3 cm diameter) were prospectively studied on the same day with both BGO-PET and LSO-PS. Imaging was performed at 60 and 120 min after injection of 370 MBq FDG, respectively. Images were independently interpreted by four observers with each observer blinded to the other modality for the same patient. Lesions were scored in terms of relative intensity versus background. Non-attenuation corrected (nonAC) BGO-PET was used as the reference test. Results: Forty-seven patients with 54 PNs (mean diameter 1.7 cm, S.D. 0.7) were included. Twelve nodules were in the ≤1.0 cm - 27 in the 1.1-2.0 cm - and 15 in the 2.1-3.0 cm range. Interobserver agreement was similar for both FDG imaging modalities. Using a sensitive assessment strategy with LSO-PS (≥ faint intensity deemed positive), there was a 97% (38/39, 95%CI 87-100%) concordance with BGO-PET and one false positive case with LSO-PS. Conservative reading (moderate or intense intensity deemed positive) resulted in a 92% (36/39, 95%CI 80-97%) concordance with BGO-PET, without false positives. The only lesion missed by LSO-PS using both assessment strategies involved a nodule 1.5 cm diameter that demonstrated moderate increased FDG uptake on BGO-PET. Conclusion: Depending on the test positivity criteria, LSO-PS demonstrates a high concordance (92-97%) with nonAC BGO-PET for the characterization of pulmonary nodules

  4. 18F-FDG imaging with a coincidence dual-headed gamma camera (Co-PET) in the diagnosis, staging and management of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Chu, J.; Pocock, N.; Quach, T.; Sorensen, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: FDG-PET has an established role in the management of lung cancer, while the experience with FDG-Co-PET is limited. Our study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of Co-PET in staging and management of lung cancer. Thirty-nine Co-PET studies were performed on our first 36 patients (pts) with primary lung cancer between November 1997 and October 1998. Tomography of brain and torso with an ADAC Solus MCD gamma camera was performed (60 min after 200 MBq of 18 FFDG and > 6 h fasting). Histology subgroups included squamous (14 pts), small cell (1), adeno-carcinoma (11), broncho-alveolar (1), large cell (8), carcinoid (1). CT/clinical staging subgroups included 18 pts in stage 1, 4 in stage 2, 7 in stage 3a, 2 in stage 3b, 8 in stage 4. Compared with CT/clinical staging, FDG upstaged 5 pts (14%) with regional nodal metastases (mets) and 8 pts (22%) with distant mets (cervical = 2, lung = 1, brain = 3, bone = 3, abdomen = 4). FDG under-staged 2 pts in 3 sites (all < 15 mm). Surgical nodal staging was performed in 14 pts: false-positives occurred in 3 CT and 1 Co-PET studies, and false-negatives in one CT/Co-PET. Site sensitivities for primary (smallest 7 mm) and regional lymph nodes are 100% and 88% respectively. Specificities for primary and regional nodes are 100% and 96% respectively. Co-PET also has impact on management: treatment intent (6 pts), radiotherapy fields (1), diagnosis of lung mets (2) and radiation pneumonitis (1). In conclusion, our initial data demonstrate FDG-Co-PET scanning could provide a valuable addition to conventional imaging studies in diagnosis, staging and management of lung cancer

  5. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  6. Development of the set of corrections for a gamma camera dedicated to research; Desarrollo del conjunto de correcciones para una gammacamara dedicada a investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez Insua, M.; Ambroa Rey, E. M.; Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Sueiro, J.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2013-07-01

    As part of a project for animal research, replaced electronics one of the gamma-cameras (GC) of the service that was out of use, with the aim of using it for SPECT. The implementation is therefore required of the corrections that allow image quality enough for SPECT from raw data supplied by the team. This has been developed software that enables to perform correction of power, uniform and linearity on the acquired data. For validation, change in several parameters indicative of the image quality has been evaluated. (Author)

  7. 68Ga-PSMA and 11C-Choline comparison using a tri-modality PET/CT-MRI (3.0 T) system with a dedicated shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Omar; Dos Santos, Gerardo; García Fontes, Margarita; Balter, Henia; Engler, Henry

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the detection rate of 68 Ga-PSMA versus 11 C-Choline in men with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence and to demonstrate the added value of a tri-modality PET/CT-MRI system. We analysed 36 patients who underwent both 11 C-Choline PET/CT and 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT scanning within a time window of 1-2 weeks. Additionally, for the 68 Ga-PSMA scan, we used a PET/CT-MRI (3.0 T) system with a dedicated shuttle, acquiring MRI images of the pelvis. Both scans were positive in 18 patients (50%) and negative in 8 patients (22%). Nine patients were positive with 68 Ga-PSMA alone (25%) and one with 11 C-Choline only (3%). The median detected lesion per patient was 2 for 68 Ga-PSMA (range 0-93) and 1 for 11 C-Choline (range 0-57). Tumour to background ratios in all concordant lesions ( n  = 96) were higher for 68 Ga-PSMA than for 11 C-Choline (110.3 ± 107.8 and 27.5 ± 17.1, mean ± S.D., for each tracer, respectively P  = 0.0001). The number of detected lesions per patient was higher for 11 C-Choline in those with PSA ≥ 3.3 ng/mL, while the number of detected lesions was independent of PSA levels for 68 Ga-PSMA using the same PSA cut-off value. Metastatic pelvic lesions were found in 25 patients (69%) with 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT, in 18 (50%) with 11 C-Choline PET/CT and in 21 (58%) with MRI (3.0 T). MRI was very useful in detecting recurrence in cases classified as indeterminate by means of PET/CT alone at prostate bed. In patients with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence 68 Ga-PSMA detected more lesions per patient than 11 C-Choline, regardless of PSA levels. PET/CT-MRI (3.0 T) system is a feasible imaging modality that potentially adds useful relevant information with increased accuracy of diagnosis.

  8. Trends in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT)

  9. The Kinetics and Reproducibility of 18F-Sodium Fluoride for Oncology Using Current PET Camera Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Karen A.; Shih, Joanna H.; Apolo, Andrea B.; Lindenberg, Liza; Mena, Esther; McKinney, Yolanda; Adler, Stephen S.; Turkbey, Baris; Dahut, William; Gulley, James L.; Madan, Ravi A.; Landgren, Ola; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the kinetics of 18F-sodium fluoride (NaF) and reassessed the recommended dose, optimal uptake period, and reproducibility using a current-generation PET/CT scanner. Methods In this prospective study, 73 patients (31 patients with multiple myeloma or myeloma precursor disease and 42 with prostate cancer) were injected with a mean administered dose of 141 MBq of 18F-NaF. Sixty patients underwent 3 sequential sessions of 3-dimensional PET/CT of the torso beginning ~15 min after 18F-NaF injection, followed by a whole-body 3-dimensional PET/CT at 2 h. The remaining 13 prostate cancer patients were imaged only at 2 and 3 h after injection. Twenty-one prostate cancer patients underwent repeat baseline studies (mean interval, 5.9 d) to evaluate reproducibility. Results The measured effective dose was 0.017 mSv/MBq, with the urinary bladder, osteogenic cells, and red marrow receiving the highest doses at 0.080, 0.077, and 0.028 mGy/MBq, respectively. Visual analysis showed that uptake in both normal and abnormal bone increased with time; however, the rate of increase decreased with time. A semiautomated workflow provided objective uptake parameters, including the mean standardized uptake value of all pixels within bone with SUVs greater than 10 and the average of the mean SUV of all malignant lesions identified by the algorithm. The values of these parameters for the images beginning at ~15 min and ~35 min were significantly different (0.3% change/minute). Differences between the later imaging time points were not significant (P 0.9) and relatively low critical percent change (the value above which a change can be considered real) for these parameters. The tumor-to-normal bone ratio, based on the SUVmax of identified malignant lesions, decreased with time; however, this difference was small, estimated at ~0.16%/min in the first hour. Conclusion 18F-NaF PET/CT images obtained with modest radiation exposures can result in highly reproducible imaging parameters

  10. F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) influences management in patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Thomas W.; Kalff, Victor; Cherk, Martin H.; Yap, Kenneth SK.; Evans, Peter; Kelly, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To assess the impact on clinical management of PET/CT in patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer. Methods: Between April 2006 and September 2008,25 PET/CT scans were performed using a dedicated PET/CT (22 scans) or a coincidence hybrid PET/CT camera (3 scans) in 23 patients with known or suspected pancreatic cancer. 17 scans were performed for initial evaluation and 8 for restaging of disease. The pre-PET/CT management plan and for intent were prospectively recorded in all cases. The post-PET/CT management plan was determined from the medical record and for discussions with treating clinicians. The impact of PET/CT on management was classified as High, Medium, Low or None, defined using ANZAPNM PET data collection project criteria. Follow-up was used to reconcile any discordance between PET/CT and conventional imaging. Results: Overall, PET/CT management impact was classified as high (n equal 7), medium (n equal 4), low (n equal 10) or none (n equal 4). Impact was either high or medium in l l/25 patients (44%) (95% confidence interval; 24 - 64%). Impact was high in 4/17 patients imaged for initial evaluation, predominantly by clarifying equivocal lesions on conventional imaging. In restaged patients, PET/CT impact was high in 3/8, and it correctly modified disease extent in 5/8. In the 16 discordant studies, PET/CT assessment was correct in 10, conventional imaging in 4 and there was insufficient information in 2. Conclusion: PET/CT has high or medium management impact in 44% of patients imaged for known or suspected pancreatic cancer, more commonly during restaging. Discordant PET/CT results were usually correct.

  11. Modeling and analysis of all the positron emitters simulation steps generated during the treatment phase in proton-therapy - from the beam to the PET camera - for the follow-up of the irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ty, C.V.N.

    2012-01-01

    Carlo modeling of the proton range using the GEANT4 software (versions 9.2 and 9.4) relying and using cross-sections; 3) A simulation of the PET acquisition using a simplified modeling and a Monte Carlo modeling. Our results show that a simplified modeling of the beam does not affect the estimation of the proton range. Besides, the Monte Carlo modeling of the PET camera enables modeling the noise present in the PET signal measured in a homogeneous area. Preliminary results of the PET camera modeling are presented in a head model (inhomogeneous). Finally, a simplified modeling of the PET camera enables evaluate the proton range in a homogeneous area with a 1 mm-precision, which is equivalent to the reproducibility of the PET offline measure as described in (Knopf et al., 2008). (author) [fr

  12. [F18]-FDG imaging of experimental animal tumours using a hybrid gamma-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lausson, S.; Maurel, G.; Kerrou, K.; Montravers, F.; Petegnief, Y.; Talbot, J.N.; Fredelizi, D.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical studies. This technology permits detection of compounds labelled with positron emitting radionuclides and in particular, [F18]-fluorodeoxyglucose ([F18]-FDG).[F18]-FDG uptake and accumulation is generally related to malignancy; some recent works have suggested the usefulness of PET camera dedicated to small laboratory animals (micro-PET). Our study dealt with the feasibility of [F18]-FDG imaging of malignant tumours in animal models by means of an hybrid camera dedicated for human scintigraphy. We evaluated the ability of coincidence detection emission tomography (CDET) using this hybrid camera to visualize in vivo subcutaneous tumours grafted to mice or rats. P815 murine mastocytoma grafted in syngeneic DBA/2 mice resulted with foci of very high FDG uptake. Tumours with a diameter of only 3 mm were clearly visualized. Medullary thyroid cancer provoked by rMTC 6/23 and CA77 lines in syngeneic Wag/Rij rat was also detected. The differentiated CA77 tumours exhibited avidity for [F18]-FDG and a tumour, which was just palpable (diameter lower than 2 mm), was identified. In conclusion, CDET-FDG is a non-invasive imaging tool which can be used to follow grafted tumours in the small laboratory animal, even when their size is smaller than 1 cm. It has the potential to evaluate experimental anticancer treatments in small series of animals by individual follow-up. It offers the opportunity to develop experimental PET research within a nuclear medicine or biophysics department, the shift to a dedicated micro-PET device being subsequently necessary. It is indeed compulsory to strictly follow the rules for non contamination and disinfection of the hybrid camera. (authors)

  13. Development of a liquid xenon Compton telescope dedicated to functional medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grignon, C.

    2007-12-01

    Functional imaging is a technique used to locate in three dimensions the position of a radiotracer previously injected in a patient. The two main modalities used for a clinical application to detect tumors, the SPECT and the PET, use solid scintillators as a detection medium. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the possibility of using liquid xenon in order to benefit from the intrinsic properties of this medium in functional imaging. The feasibility study of such a device has been performed by taking into account the technical difficulties specific to the liquid xenon. First of all, simulations of a liquid xenon PET has been performed using Monte-Carlo methods. The results obtained with a large liquid xenon volume are promising : we can expect a reduction of the injected activity of radiotracer, an improvement of the spatial resolution of the image and a parallax free camera. The second part of the thesis was focused on the development of a new concept of medical imaging, the three gamma imaging, based on the use of a new emitter: the 44 scandium. Associated to a classical PET camera, the Compton telescope is used to infer the incoming direction of the third gamma ray by triangulation. Therefore, it is possible to reconstruct the position of each emitter in three dimensions. This work convinced the scientific community to support the construction and characterization of a liquid xenon Compton telescope. The first camera dedicated to small animal imaging should then be operational in 2009. (author)

  14. Rapid evaluation of FDG imaging alternatives using head-to-head comparisons of full ring and gamma camera based PET scanners- a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslinghuis-Bajan, L.M.; Lingen, A. van; Mijnhout, G.S.; Teule, G.J.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Univ. Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hooft, L. [Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Univ. Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tulder, M. van [Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Univ. Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Inst. for Research in Extramural Medicine, Vrije Univ., Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deville, W. [Inst. for Research in Extramural Medicine, Vrije Univ., Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoekstra, O.S. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Univ. Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dept. of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Univ. Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-10-01

    Aim: While FDG full ring PET (FRPET) has been gradually accepted in oncology, the role of the cheaper gamma camera based alternatives (GCPET) is less clear. Since technology is evolving rapidly, ''tracker trials'' would be most helpful to provide a first approximation of the relative merits of these alternatives. As difference in scanner sensitivity is the key variable, head-to-head comparison with FRPET is an attractive study design. This systematic review summarises such studies. Methods: Nine studies were identified until July 1, 2000. Two observers assessed the methodological quality (Cochrane criteria), and extracted data. Results: The studies comprised a variety of tumours and indications. The reported GC- and FRPET agreement for detection of malignant lesions ranged from 55 to 100%, but with methodological limitations (blinding, standardisation, limited patient spectrum). Mean lesion diameter was 2.9 cm (SD 1.8), with only about 20% <1.5 cm. The 3 studies with the highest quality reported concordances of 74-79%, for the studied lesion spectrum. Contrast at GCPET was lower than that of FRPET, contrast and detection agreement were positively related. Logistic regression analysis suggested that pre-test indicators might be used to predict FRPET-GCPET concordance. Conclusion: In spite of methodological limitations, ''first generation'' GCPET devices detected sufficient FRPET positive lesions to allow prospective evaluation in clinical situations where the impact of FRPET is not confined to detection of small lesions (<1.5 cm). The efficiency of head-to-head comparative studies would benefit from application in a clinically relevant patient spectrum, with proper blinding and standardisation of acquisition procedures. (orig.)

  15. Limits of Tumor Detectability in Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Emre Erdi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nuclear medicine is becoming increasingly important in the early detection of malignancy. The advantage of nuclear medicine over other imaging modalities is the high sensitivity of the gamma camera. Nuclear medicine counting equipment has the capability of detecting levels of radioactivity which exceed background levels by as little as 2.4 to 1. This translates to only a few hundred counts per minute on a regular gamma camera or as few as 3 counts per minute when using coincidence detection on a positron emission tomography (PET camera. Material and Methods: We have experimentally measured the limits of detectability using a set of hollow spheres in a Jaszczak phantom at various tumor-to-background ratios. Imaging modalities for this work were (1 planar, (2 SPECT, (3 PET, and (4 planar camera with coincidence detection capability (MCD. Results: When there is no background (infinite contrast activity present, the detectability of tumors is similar for PET and planar imaging. With the presence of the background activity , PET can detect objects in an order of magnitude smaller in size than that can be seen by conventional planar imaging especially in the typical clinical low (3:1 T/B ratios. The detection capability of the MCD camera lies between a conventional nuclear medicine (planar / SPECT scans and the detection capability of a dedicated PET scanner Conclusion: Among nuclear medicine’s armamentarium, PET is the closest modality to CT or MR imaging in terms of limits of detection. Modern clinical PET scanners have a resolution limit of 4 mm, corresponding to the detection of tumors with a volume of 0.2 ml (7 mm diameter in 5:1 T/B ratio. It is also possible to obtain better resolution limits with dedicated brain and animal scanners. The future holds promise in development of new detector materials, improved camera design, and new reconstruction algorithms which will improve sensitivity, resolution, contrast, and thereby further

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.; Hines, H.

    2001-01-01

    ADAC Laboratories has two main imaging strengths: PET and Gamma Cameras. PET's three-dimensional imaging of metabolic function is used in oncology, with emerging opportunties in cardiology, genetic mapping and pharmaceuticals research. In oncology, PET imaging can provide comprehensive and accurate staging information which is not available from CT or MRI. In some cases, this information can lead to modification of treatment, for example from an aggressive approach to one of palliation. The SKYLight is the world's first and only gantry-free camera. It is a dual-detector variable angle camera designed for high throughput, with unsurpassed openness and patient access. (orig.)

  17. Diagnosis of myocardial viability by dual-head coincidence gamma camera fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with and without non-uniform attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, B.; Zimmy, M.; Kaiser, H.-J.; Schaefer, W.; Reinartz, P.; Buell, U.; Schwarz, E.R.; Dahl, J. vom

    2000-01-01

    This study assessed a dual-head coincidence gamma camera (hybrid PET) equipped with single-photon transmission for myocardial fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging by comparing this technique with conventional positron emission tomography (PET) using a dedicated ring PET scanner. Twenty-one patients were studied with dedicated FDG ring PET and FDG hybrid PET for evaluation of myocardial glucose metabolism, as well as technetium-99 m tetrofosmin single-photon emission tomography (SPET) to estimate myocardial perfusion. All patients underwent transmitted attenuation correction using germanium-68 rod sources for ring PET and caesium-137 point sources for hybrid PET. Ring PET and hybrid PET emission scans were started 61±12 and 98±15 min, respectively, after administration of 154±31 MBq FDG. Attenuation-corrected images were reconstructed iteratively for ring PET and hybrid PET (ac-hybrid PET), and non-attenuation-corrected images for hybrid PET (non-ac-hybrid PET) only. Tracer distribution was analysed semiquantitatively using a volumetric vector sampling method dividing the left ventricular wall into 13 segments. FDG distribution in non-ac-hybrid PET and ring PET correlated with r=0.36 (P<0.0001), and in ac-hybrid PET and ring PET with r=0.79 (P<0.0001). Non-ac-hybrid PET significantly overestimated FDG uptake in the apical and supra-apical segments, and underestimated FDG uptake in the remaining segments, with the exception of one lateral segment. Ac-hybrid PET significantly overestimated FDG uptake in the apical segment, and underestimated FDG uptake in only three posteroseptal segments. A three-grade score was used to classify diagnosis of viability by FDG PET in 136 segments with reduced perfusion as assessed by SPET. Compared with ring PET, non-ac-hybrid PET showed concordant diagnoses in 80 segments (59%) and ac-hybrid PET in 101 segments (74%) (P<0.001). Agreement between ring PET and non-ac-hybrid PET was best in the basal lateral wall and in the

  18. An Austrian framework for PET quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoletti, R.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Minear, G.; Bergmann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The European patient protection directive (97/43 EURATOM) requires regular routine quality control (QC) of PET imaging devices. Since no standards were available covering this area and in order to comply with the directive a joint working party of the Austrian societies of nuclear medicine and of medical physics have developed a set of procedures suitable for both dedicated PET scanners and gamma cameras operating in coincidence mode (GCPET). The routine procedures proposed include both manufacturer recommended procedures and tests for specific parameters and calibration procedures. Wherever possible, procedures adapted or derived from NEMA standards publication NU 2-2001 were used to permit direct comparison with specified parameters of image quality. For dedicated PET scanners the most important procedures are the checking of detector sensitivities and the attenuation calibration scan. With full ring scanners the attenuation calibration scan is a blank scan, with partial ring devices a special attenuation calibration phantom has to be used. Test protocols are specific to manufacturer and scanner type. They are usually performed automatically overnight. In addition, some instruments require special calibrations, e.g. gain adjustments or coincidence timing calibration. GCPET procedures include the frequent assessment in coincidence mode of detector uniformity, energy resolution and system sensitivity. Common to both dedicated PET and GCPET are the regular quarterly assessment of tomographic spatial resolution and the calibration of the system for quantitative measurements. As a total performance test for both systems assessment of image quality following NU 2-2001 was included, to be carried out after major system changes or repairs. The suite of QC procedures was tested on several dedicated PET and GCPET systems including all major manufacturers' systems. Due to missing hardware or software not all tests could be performed on all systems. Some of the

  19. First PET scans in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, Sergei

    2003-01-01

    First PET scans in Estonia were performed on 25th November 2002 in North Estonia Regional Hospital, Tallinn. Six patients with melanoma underwent scanning with FDG. This event was a result of thorough extensive preparations first started in 2000 during the European Association of Nuclear Medicine congress in Paris. During the congress first contacts were made with providers of mobile PET units. At the same time negotiations were begun with potential FDG suppliers. For the introduction of PET in Estonia mobile truckmounted scanning technology was chosen due to low level of initial investments. Of particular importance was also availability of maintenance personnel from the device providers. A significant prerequisite was potential availability of FDG from the neighbourhood - Finland and Sweden. The latter avoided the necessity for investments into local cyclotrons and local FDG production. For the first scanning experience the dedicated truckmounted PET-camera Accel, Siemens was brought by the International Hospital Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The device arrived by ferry from Stockholm to Tallinn harbour at 10 o'clock in the morning and left by ferry for Helsinki at 23 o'clock. The team-on-truck consisted of one technician for device operation, two drivers and two company representatives. North Estonia Regional Hospital provided three additional technicians for patient preparation and FDG injection, one nuclear medicine doctor and one specialist of biomedical engineering and medical physics. The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, Helsinki, Finland. The shipments were made by air. This was possible due to small distance between Tallinn and Helsinki of approximately 80 km due to the regular flight connections between the two cities. The FDG was shipped in two lots with a time interval of 4 hours. The patient selection was based on clinical and histopathology data. In all six patients the exam was justified for detailied staging and

  20. D-SPECT, a semiconductor camera: Technical aspects and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, C.; Bertrand, S.; Kelly, A.; Veyre, A.; Mestas, D.; Cachin, F.; Motreff, P.; Levesque, S.; Cachin, F.; Askienazy, S.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical practice in nuclear medicine has largely changed in the last decade, particularly with the arrival of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. New semiconductor cameras could represent the next evolution in our nuclear medicine practice. Due to the resolution and sensitivity improvement, this technology authorizes fast speed acquisitions, high contrast and resolution images performed with low activity injection. The dedicated cardiology D-SPECT camera (Spectrum Dynamics, Israel) is based on semiconductor technology and provides an original system for collimation and images reconstruction. We describe here our clinical experience in using the D-SPECT with a preliminary study comparing D-D.P.E.C.T. and conventional gamma camera. (authors)

  1. Demonstration of an Axial PET concept for brain and small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Beltrame, P; Clinthorne, N; Meddi, F; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Pauss, F; Djambazov, L; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Casella, C; Chesi, E; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    Standard Positron Emission Tomography (PET) cameras need to reach a compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity. To overcome this limitation we developed a novel concept of PET. Our AX-PET demonstrator is made of LYSO crystals aligned along the z coordinate (patient's axis) and WLS strips orthogonally placed with respect to the crystals. This concept offers full 3D localization of the photon interaction inside the camera. Thus the spatial resolution and the sensitivity can be simultaneously improved and the reconstruction of Compton interactions inside the detector is also possible. Moreover, by means of G-APDs for reading out the photons, both from LYSO and WLS, the detector is insensitive to magnetic fields and it is then suitable to be used in a combined PET/MRI apparatus. A complete Monte Carlo simulation and dedicated reconstruction software have been developed. The two final modules, each composed of 48 crystals and 156 WLS strips, have been built and fully characterized in a dedicated test se...

  2. AX-PET: A novel PET concept with G-APD readout

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, M; Casella, C; Chesi, E; De Leo, R; Dissertori, G; Fanti, V; Gillam, J E; Joram, C; Lustermann, W; Nappi, E; Oliver, J F; Pauss, F; Rafecas, M; Rudge, A; Ruotsalainen, U; Schinzel, D; Schneider, T; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Stapnes, S; Tuna, U; Weilhammer, P

    2012-01-01

    The AX-PET collaboration has developed a novel concept for high resolution PET imaging to overcome some of the performance limitations of classical PET cameras, in particular the compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity introduced by the parallax error. The detector consists of an arrangement of long LYSO scintillating crystals axially oriented around the field of view together with arrays of wave length shifter strips orthogonal to the crystals. This matrix allows a precise 3D measurement of the photon interaction point. This is valid both for photoelectric absorption at 511 key and for Compton scattering down to deposited energies of about 100 keV. Crystals and WLS strips are individually read out using Geiger-mode Avalanche Photo Diodes (G-APDs). The sensitivity of such a detector can be adjusted by changing the number of layers and the resolution is defined by the crystal and strip dimensions. Two AX-PET modules were built and fully characterized in dedicated test set-ups at CERN, with point-...

  3. Musculoskeletal MRI: dedicated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masciocchi, C.; Barile, A.; Satragno, L.

    2000-01-01

    The ''dedicated'' MRI units have characteristics of high diagnostic accuracy and lower installation and management costs as compared with whole-body systems. The dedicated MRI units are easy to install. The low weight allows their installation also under unfavorable circumstances. In a dedicated system cost-effectiveness and ease of installation must be accompanied by the capability of providing high-quality images. In our experience, the high number of examinations performed, the most part of which provided with the surgical controls, allowed an accurate evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of the dedicated magnet. We were not able to perform the examinations in only 3 % of cases due to the physical shape of the patient and the clinical condition of the patient which may hinder the correct positioning of the limb. The overlapping of the diagnostic accuracy of the E-scan and Artoscan units in the study of the lower limbs, compared with whole-body units and surgery, prompted us to exploit the potentialities of the E-Scan in the study of the shoulder. We had a good correlation between E-Scan, whole-body units, and surgical findings, which confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of the dedicated system. In conclusion, in our experience carried out in the musculoskeletal system, the dedicated magnets showed promising results. Their diagnostic reliability and utility was comparable to that obtained from conventional units operating at higher magnetic fields. (orig.)

  4. Neutron cameras for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from 16 N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with 16 N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins

  5. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  6. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Ananthakrishna Pillai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging.

  7. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-01-15

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions.

  8. Gamma camera based Positron Emission Tomography: a study of the viability on quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzo, Lorena

    2005-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a Nuclear Medicine imaging modality for diagnostic purposes. Pharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used and images which represent the in vivo biochemical process within tissues can be obtained. The positron/electron annihilation photons are detected in coincidence and this information is used for object reconstruction. Presently, there are two types of systems available for this imaging modality: the dedicated systems and those based on gamma camera technology. In this work, we utilized PET/SPECT systems, which also allows for the traditional Nuclear Medicine studies based on single photon emitters. There are inherent difficulties which affect quantification of activity and other indices. They are related to the Poisson nature of radioactivity, to radiation interactions with patient body and detector, noise due to statistical nature of these interactions and to all the detection processes, as well as the patient acquisition protocols. Corrections are described in the literature and not all of them are implemented by the manufacturers: scatter, attenuation, random, decay, dead time, spatial resolution, and others related to the properties of each equipment. The goal of this work was to assess these methods adopted by two manufacturers, as well as the influence of some technical characteristics of PET/SPECT systems on the estimation of SUV. Data from a set of phantoms were collected in 3D mode by one camera and 2D, by the other. We concluded that quantification is viable in PET/SPECT systems, including the estimation of SUVs. This is only possible if, apart from the above mentioned corrections, the camera is well tuned and coefficients for sensitivity normalization and partial volume corrections are applied. We also verified that the shapes of the sources used for obtaining these factors play a role on the final results and should be delt with carefully in clinical quantification. Finally, the choice of the region

  9. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.; Baer, Ul; Heinz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera has a plurality of exchangeable collimators, one of which is replaceably mounted in the ray inlet opening of the camera, while the others are placed on separate supports. Supports are swingably mounted upon a column one above the other

  10. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, P.A.; Steidley, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a collimation system for a gamma camera for use in nuclear medicine is described. When used with a 2-dimensional position sensitive radiation detector, the novel system can produce superior images than conventional cameras. The optimal thickness and positions of the collimators are derived mathematically. (U.K.)

  11. Picosecond camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decroisette, Michel

    A Kerr cell activated by infrared pulses of a model locked Nd glass laser, acts as an ultra-fast and periodic shutter, with a few p.s. opening time. Associated with a S.T.L. camera, it gives rise to a picosecond camera allowing us to study very fast effects [fr

  12. Novel geometrical concept of a high-performance brain PET scanner. Principle, design and performance estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguinot, J.; Braem, A.; Chesi, E.

    2006-01-01

    We present the principle, a possible implementation and performance estimates of a novel geometrical concept for a high-resolution positron emission tomograph. The concept, which can be for example implemented in a brain PET device, promises to lead to an essentially parallax-free 3D image reconstruction with excellent spatial resolution and contrast, uniform over the complete field of view. The key components are matrices of long axially oriented scintillator crystals which are read out at both extremities by segmented Hybrid Photon Detectors. We discuss the relevant design considerations for a 3D axial PET camera module, motivate parameter and material choices, and estimate its performance in terms of spatial and energy resolution. We support these estimates by Monte Carlo simulations and in some cases by first experimental results. From the performance of a camera module, we extrapolate to the reconstruction resolution of a 3D axial PET scanner in a semi-analytical way and compare it to an existing state-of-the art brain PET device. We finally describe a dedicated data acquisition system, capable to fully exploit the advantages of the proposed concept

  13. Evaluation of pulmonary lesions with 18FDG CoDo PET: comparison with CT, MRI and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Zy; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Myung Ho; Hwang, Sung Chul; Lee, Chul Joo; Pai, Moon Sun

    1998-01-01

    Dual-head gamma camera coincidence (PET) is one of the recent approaches to overcome the problems of the dedicated PET scans such as high cost and limited availability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 18 FDG coincidence detection (CoDe) PET in differentiating benign from malignant lesions and staging malignancy. Thirty-one patients with pulmonary lesions underwent 18 FDG CoDe PET. Patients were prepared for the study by overnight fasting. The images were acquired at about 1 hr postinjection of 3-10 mCi 18 FDG intravenously using dual head gamma camera (Elscint, Varicam) equipped with 5/8 inch thick NaI crystal. The images were analyzed visually. Pathologic proof of diagnosis was obtained by aspiration biopsy in 24 patients and by operation in 7 patients. Among 25 patients with pathologically proven malignant lesions ( 11 adenocarcinoma, 3 non-small cell lung cancer, 5 squamous cell cancer, 4 small cell lung cancer, 1 invasive thymoma and 1 adenosquamous cell cancer), 18 FDG CoDe PET could not detect only 1 lesion which was adenocarcinoma of less than 1 cm in size. In seven patients underwent lobectomy, 6 CoDe PET studies agreed with pathologic results. Whereas only 3 of 7 patients CT findings agreed with pathologic findings. However, 6 patients with benign lesions also showed positive FDG uptake. The false positive pathologies were due to tuberculosis, pneumonia, and granulomatous changes due to silicosis. 18 FDG CoDe PET was sensitive in the evaluation of lung lesions but was not specific for malignancy. 18 FDG CoDe PET was more sensitive than CT in nodal staging in limited number of patients studied thus far

  14. Evaluation of pulmonary lesions with {sup 18}FDG CoDo PET: comparison with CT, MRI and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Zy; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Myung Ho; Hwang, Sung Chul; Lee, Chul Joo; Pai, Moon Sun [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    Dual-head gamma camera coincidence (PET) is one of the recent approaches to overcome the problems of the dedicated PET scans such as high cost and limited availability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of {sup 18}FDG coincidence detection (CoDe) PET in differentiating benign from malignant lesions and staging malignancy. Thirty-one patients with pulmonary lesions underwent {sup 18}FDG CoDe PET. Patients were prepared for the study by overnight fasting. The images were acquired at about 1 hr postinjection of 3-10 mCi {sup 18}FDG intravenously using dual head gamma camera (Elscint, Varicam) equipped with 5/8 inch thick NaI crystal. The images were analyzed visually. Pathologic proof of diagnosis was obtained by aspiration biopsy in 24 patients and by operation in 7 patients. Among 25 patients with pathologically proven malignant lesions ( 11 adenocarcinoma, 3 non-small cell lung cancer, 5 squamous cell cancer, 4 small cell lung cancer, 1 invasive thymoma and 1 adenosquamous cell cancer), {sup 18}FDG CoDe PET could not detect only 1 lesion which was adenocarcinoma of less than 1 cm in size. In seven patients underwent lobectomy, 6 CoDe PET studies agreed with pathologic results. Whereas only 3 of 7 patients CT findings agreed with pathologic findings. However, 6 patients with benign lesions also showed positive FDG uptake. The false positive pathologies were due to tuberculosis, pneumonia, and granulomatous changes due to silicosis. {sup 18}FDG CoDe PET was sensitive in the evaluation of lung lesions but was not specific for malignancy. {sup 18}FDG CoDe PET was more sensitive than CT in nodal staging in limited number of patients studied thus far.

  15. Editors note, and Dedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mugnai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This Supplement to volume 50 of Phytopathologia Mediterranea contains original, peer reviewed research papers, prepared from presentations at the 7th International Workshop on Grapevine Trunk Diseases (IWGTD. This Workshop was held in Santa Cruz, Chile, 17–21 January 2010, and was organized by the International Council on Grapevine Trunk Diseases (ICGTD.  Publication of this Supplement has been financially assisted by the International Society for Plant Pathology (ISPP.This Supplementary Issue of Phytopathologia Mediterranea is dedicated to the memory of Dr Luigi Chiarappa, the founder and inspiration of the ICGTD.  

  16. Development of a liquid xenon Compton telescope dedicated to functional medical imaging; Etude et developpement d'un telescope compton au xenon liquide dedie a l'imagerie medicale fonctionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignon, C

    2007-12-15

    Functional imaging is a technique used to locate in three dimensions the position of a radiotracer previously injected in a patient. The two main modalities used for a clinical application to detect tumors, the SPECT and the PET, use solid scintillators as a detection medium. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the possibility of using liquid xenon in order to benefit from the intrinsic properties of this medium in functional imaging. The feasibility study of such a device has been performed by taking into account the technical difficulties specific to the liquid xenon. First of all, simulations of a liquid xenon PET has been performed using Monte-Carlo methods. The results obtained with a large liquid xenon volume are promising : we can expect a reduction of the injected activity of radiotracer, an improvement of the spatial resolution of the image and a parallax free camera. The second part of the thesis was focused on the development of a new concept of medical imaging, the three gamma imaging, based on the use of a new emitter: the 44 scandium. Associated to a classical PET camera, the Compton telescope is used to infer the incoming direction of the third gamma ray by triangulation. Therefore, it is possible to reconstruct the position of each emitter in three dimensions. This work convinced the scientific community to support the construction and characterization of a liquid xenon Compton telescope. The first camera dedicated to small animal imaging should then be operational in 2009. (author)

  17. Development of a liquid xenon Compton telescope dedicated to functional medical imaging; Etude et developpement d'un telescope compton au xenon liquide dedie a l'imagerie medicale fonctionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignon, C

    2007-12-15

    Functional imaging is a technique used to locate in three dimensions the position of a radiotracer previously injected in a patient. The two main modalities used for a clinical application to detect tumors, the SPECT and the PET, use solid scintillators as a detection medium. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the possibility of using liquid xenon in order to benefit from the intrinsic properties of this medium in functional imaging. The feasibility study of such a device has been performed by taking into account the technical difficulties specific to the liquid xenon. First of all, simulations of a liquid xenon PET has been performed using Monte-Carlo methods. The results obtained with a large liquid xenon volume are promising : we can expect a reduction of the injected activity of radiotracer, an improvement of the spatial resolution of the image and a parallax free camera. The second part of the thesis was focused on the development of a new concept of medical imaging, the three gamma imaging, based on the use of a new emitter: the 44 scandium. Associated to a classical PET camera, the Compton telescope is used to infer the incoming direction of the third gamma ray by triangulation. Therefore, it is possible to reconstruct the position of each emitter in three dimensions. This work convinced the scientific community to support the construction and characterization of a liquid xenon Compton telescope. The first camera dedicated to small animal imaging should then be operational in 2009. (author)

  18. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.; Baer, U.; Heinz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera has a plurality of exchangeable collimators, one of which is mounted in the ray inlet opening of the camera, while the others are placed on separate supports. The supports are swingably mounted upon a column one above the other through about 90 0 to a collimator exchange position. Each of the separate supports is swingable to a vertically aligned position, with limiting of the swinging movement and positioning of the support at the desired exchange position. The collimators are carried on the supports by means of a series of vertically disposed coil springs. Projections on the camera are movable from above into grooves of the collimator at the exchange position, whereupon the collimator is turned so that it is securely prevented from falling out of the camera head

  19. Dedicated accelerator and microprobe line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, K.G.; Hylten, G.; Hult, M.; Haakansson, K.; Knox, J.M.; Larsson, N.P.O.; Nilsson, C.; Pallon, J.; Schofield, R.; Swietlicki, E.; Tapper, U.A.S.; Yang Changyi

    1993-01-01

    The development of a dedicated facility for nuclear microprobe analysis and the experiences from using it are discussed. The general properties of the present Lund nuclear microprobe will be described and the advantages of using a dedicated accelerator discussed. (orig.)

  20. 'PET -Compton' system. Comparative evaluation with PET system using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Arista Romeu, Eduardo; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Bolannos Perez, Lourdes; Rubio Rodriguez, Juan A; Perez Morales, Jose M.; Arce Dubois, Pedro; Vela Morales, Oscar; Willmott Zappacosta, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in small animals has actually achieved spatial resolution round about 1 mm and currently there are under study different approaches to improve this spatial resolution. One of them combines PET technology with Compton Cameras. This paper presents the idea of the so called 'PET-Compton' systems and includes comparative evaluation of spatial resolution and global efficiency in both PET and PET-Compton system by means of Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code. Simulation is done on a PET-Compton system consisting of LYSO-LuYAP scintillating detectors of particular small animal PET scanner named 'Clear-PET' and for Compton detectors based on CdZnTe semiconductor. A group of radionuclides that emits a positron (e + ) and γ quantum almost simultaneously and fulfills some selection criteria for their possible use in PET-Compton systems for medical and biological applications were studied under simulation conditions. (Author)

  1. [Microeconomics of introduction of a PET system based on the revised Japanese National Insurance reimbursement system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Katsumi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Kusano, Shoichi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2003-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate an annual balance before-hand when an institution installs a PET system because the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system set the cost of a FDG PET study as 75,000 yen. A break-even point was calculated in an 8-hour or a 24-hour operation of a PET system, based on the total costs reported. The break-even points were as follows: 13.4, 17.7, 22.1 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The break-even points were 19.9, 25.5, 31.2 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in a full PET system operation of 24 hours. The results indicate no profit would accrue in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The annual profit and break-even point for the total cost including the initial investment would be respectively 530 million yen and 2.8 years in a 24-hour operation with 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system.

  2. Microeconomics of introduction of a PET system based on the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Katsumi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Kusano, Shoichi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2003-01-01

    It is crucial to evaluate an annual balance beforehand when an institution installs a PET system because the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system set the cost of a FDG PET study as 75,000 yen. A break-even point was calculated in an 8-hour or a 24-hour operation of a PET system, based on the total costs reported. The break-even points were as follows: 13.4, 17.7, 22.1 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The break-even points were 19.9, 25.5, 31.2 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in a full PET system operation of 24 hours. The results indicate no profit would accrue in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The annual profit and break-even point for the total cost including the initial investment would be respectively 530 million yen and 2.8 years in a 24-hour operation with 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system. (author)

  3. Scintillating camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasbloem, H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a scintillating camera and in particular to an apparatus for determining the position coordinates of a light pulse emitting point on the anode of an image intensifier tube which forms part of a scintillating camera, comprising at least three photomultipliers which are positioned to receive light emitted by the anode screen on their photocathodes, circuit means for processing the output voltages of the photomultipliers to derive voltages that are representative of the position coordinates; a pulse-height discriminator circuit adapted to be fed with the sum voltage of the output voltages of the photomultipliers for gating the output of the processing circuit when the amplitude of the sum voltage of the output voltages of the photomultipliers lies in a predetermined amplitude range, and means for compensating the distortion introduced in the image on the anode screen

  4. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, K.H.; Kotschak, O.; Conrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera with a simplified setup as compared with the state of engineering is described permitting, apart from good localization, also energy discrimination. Behind the usual vacuum image amplifier a multiwire proportional chamber filled with trifluorine bromium methane is connected in series. Localizing of the signals is achieved by a delay line, energy determination by means of a pulse height discriminator. With the aid of drawings and circuit diagrams, the setup and mode of operation are explained. (ORU) [de

  5. First validation of myocardial flow reserve assessed by dynamic 99mTc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT camera: head to head comparison with 15O-water PET and fractional flow reserve in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. The WATERDAY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Denis; Roule, Vincent; Nganoa, Catherine; Roth, Nathaniel; Baavour, Raphael; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Beygui, Farzin; Manrique, Alain

    2018-07-01

    We assessed the feasibility of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve (MFR) estimation using dynamic SPECT with a novel CZT camera in patients with stable CAD, in comparison with 15 O-water PET and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Thirty patients were prospectively included and underwent FFR measurements in the main coronary arteries (LAD, LCx, RCA). A stenosis ≥50% was considered obstructive and a FFR abnormal if ≤0.8. All patients underwent a dynamic rest/stress 99m Tc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT and 15 O-water PET for MBF and MFR calculation. Net retention kinetic modeling was applied to SPECT data to estimate global uptake values, and MBF was derived using Leppo correction. Ischemia by PET and CZT-SPECT was considered present if MFR was lower than 2 and 2.1, respectively. CZT-SPECT yielded higher stress and rest MBF compared to PET for global and LAD and LCx territories, but not in RCA territory. MFR was similar in global and each vessel territory for both modalities. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value of CZT-SPECT were, respectively, 83.3, 95.8, 93.3, 100 and 85.7% for the detection of ischemia and 58.3, 84.6, 81.1, 36.8 and 93% for the detection of hemodynamically significant stenosis (FFR ≤ 0.8). Dynamic 99m Tc-sestamibi CZT-SPECT was technically feasible and provided similar MFR compared to 15 O-water PET and high diagnostic value for detecting impaired MFR and abnormal FFR in patients with stable CAD.

  6. PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohliger, Michael A; Hope, Thomas A; Chapman, Jocelyn S; Chen, Lee-May; Behr, Spencer C; Poder, Liina

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging and PET using 2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoroglucose (FDG) are both useful in the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies. MR imaging is superior for local staging of disease whereas fludeoxyglucose FDG PET is superior for detecting distant metastases. Integrated PET/MR imaging scanners have great promise for gynecologic malignancies by combining the advantages of each modality into a single scan. This article reviews the technology behind PET/MR imaging acquisitions and technical challenges relevant to imaging the pelvis. A dedicated PET/MR imaging protocol; the roles of PET and MR imaging in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and future directions for PET/MR imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of a Multimodality Flow Phantom and Its Application for Assessment of Dynamic SPECT and PET Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrani-Juma, Hanif; Clarkin, Owen J; Pourmoghaddas, Amir; Driscoll, Brandon; Wells, R Glenn; deKemp, Robert A; Klein, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Simple and robust techniques are lacking to assess performance of flow quantification using dynamic imaging. We therefore developed a method to qualify flow quantification technologies using a physical compartment exchange phantom and image analysis tool. We validate and demonstrate utility of this method using dynamic PET and SPECT. Dynamic image sequences were acquired on two PET/CT and a cardiac dedicated SPECT (with and without attenuation and scatter corrections) systems. A two-compartment exchange model was fit to image derived time-activity curves to quantify flow rates. Flowmeter measured flow rates (20-300 mL/min) were set prior to imaging and were used as reference truth to which image derived flow rates were compared. Both PET cameras had excellent agreement with truth ( [Formula: see text]). High-end PET had no significant bias (p > 0.05) while lower-end PET had minimal slope bias (wash-in and wash-out slopes were 1.02 and 1.01) but no significant reduction in precision relative to high-end PET ( 0.3). SPECT (without scatter and attenuation corrections) slope biases were noted (0.85 and 1.32) and attributed to camera saturation in early time frames. Analysis of wash-out rates from non-saturated, late time frames resulted in excellent agreement with truth ( [Formula: see text], slope = 0.97). Attenuation and scatter corrections did not significantly impact SPECT performance. The proposed phantom, software and quality assurance paradigm can be used to qualify imaging instrumentation and protocols for quantification of kinetic rate parameters using dynamic imaging.

  8. Present and future aspects of PET examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomio

    2003-01-01

    The PET examination gives the body distribution image of a compound labeled with the positron emitter manufactured by cyclotron. Recently, PET with F18-deoxyglucose (FDG) attracts considerable attention because the imaging is particularly useful for cancer detection. Since the technique was authorized by the United States (US) official health insurance in 1998, the number of the examination is increasing, which is also under similar situation in Japan due to the latest partial authorization for some malignant tumors. In Japan, about 30,000 examinations per year are carried out, half of which, in private hospitals. Their purpose is increasingly for cancer detection. For future PET examination, awaited are improvement of PET camera and development of a novel imaging agent. PET/CT imaging is for the former and F18-α-methyltyrosine, for the latter. Miniaturization of cyclotron, FDG delivery system, improved FDG synthetic method, popularization of PET/CT, development of PET camera for health examination, clinical trial of a novel imaging agent, and spread of PET health examination and operation of PET Center, are expected for future progress of PET technique. (N.I.)

  9. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The light pulse output of a scintillator, on which incident collimated gamma rays impinge, is detected by an array of photoelectric tubes each having a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to outputs of the phototubes develops the scintillation event position coordinate electrical signals with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as is possible to obtain less distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution as compared to conventional planar photocathode gamma cameras

  10. Radioisotope camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tausch, L.M.; Kump, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic ciruit corrects distortions caused by the distance between the individual photomultiplier tubes of the multiple radioisotope camera on one hand and between the tube configuration and the scintillator plate on the other. For this purpose the transmission characteristics of the nonlinear circuits are altered as a function of the energy of the incident radiation. By this means the threshold values between lower and higher amplification are adjusted to the energy level of each scintillation. The correcting circuit may be used for any number of isotopes to be measured. (DG) [de

  11. Lung PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest PET scan; Lung positron emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging; ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  12. Development of a novel depth of interaction PET detector using highly multiplexed G-APD cross-strip encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, A., E-mail: armin.kolb@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Parl, C.; Liu, C. C.; Pichler, B. J. [Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard Karls University, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Mantlik, F. [Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard Karls University, 72076 Tübingen, Germany and Department of Empirical Inference, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Lorenz, E. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Renker, D. [Department of Physics, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a prototype PET detector module for a combined small animal positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) system. The most important factor for small animal imaging applications is the detection sensitivity of the PET camera, which can be optimized by utilizing longer scintillation crystals. At the same time, small animal PET systems must yield a high spatial resolution. The measured object is very close to the PET detector because the bore diameter of a high field animal MR scanner is limited. When used in combination with long scintillation crystals, these small-bore PET systems generate parallax errors that ultimately lead to a decreased spatial resolution. Thus, we developed a depth of interaction (DoI) encoding PET detector module that has a uniform spatial resolution across the whole field of view (FOV), high detection sensitivity, compactness, and insensitivity to magnetic fields. Methods: The approach was based on Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (G-APD) detectors with cross-strip encoding. The number of readout channels was reduced by a factor of 36 for the chosen block elements. Two 12 × 2 G-APD strip arrays (25μm cells) were placed perpendicular on each face of a 12 × 12 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal block with a crystal size of 1.55 × 1.55 × 20 mm. The strip arrays were multiplexed into two channels and used to calculate the x, y coordinates for each array and the deposited energy. The DoI was measured in step sizes of 1.8 mm by a collimated {sup 18}F source. The coincident resolved time (CRT) was analyzed at all DoI positions by acquiring the waveform for each event and applying a digital leading edge discriminator. Results: All 144 crystals were well resolved in the crystal flood map. The average full width half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of the detector was 12.8% ± 1.5% with a FWHM CRT of 1.14 ± 0.02 ns. The average FWHM DoI resolution over 12 crystals was 2.90

  13. Performances evaluation of the coincidence detection on a gamma-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreuille, O. de; Gaillard, J.F.; Brasse, D.; Bendriem, B.; Groiselle, C.; Rocchisani, J.M.; Moretti, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the VERTEX gamma-camera (ADAC) working in coincidence mode are investigated using a protocol derived from the NEMA and IEC recommendations. With a field of view determined by two rectangular detectors (50.8 cm x 40 cm) composed of NaI crystal, this camera allows a 3-D acquisition with different energy window configurations: photopeak-photopeak only (PP) and photopeak-photopeak + photopeak-Compton (PC). An energy resolution of 11% and a scatter fraction of 27% and 33% for the 3D-PP and 3D-PC mode respectively are the main significant results of our study. The spatial resolution equals 5.9 mm and the limit of the detectability ranges from 16 mm to 13 mm for a contrast of 2.5: as a function of the random estimation, the maximum of the Noise Equivalent Count rate varies from 3 kcps to 4.5 kcps for the PP mode and from 3.85 kcps to 6.1 kcps for the PC mode. These maxima are reached for a concentration of 8 kBq/ml for the PP mode and 5 kBq/ml for the PC mode. These values are compared with the results obtained by other groups for the VERTEX gamma camera and several dedicated PET systems. (authors)

  14. Dedication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den C.

    1967-01-01

    Joséphine Th. Koster entered her service at the Rijksherbarium as an assistant, April 1930, in the midst of the economic crisis. She was engaged as an, unsalaried collaborator, the then current type of position the Netherlands’ State could offer its scientific offspring. When Prof. Dr. H. J. Lam,

  15. Dedication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1948-01-01

    It is not without some pride and much satisfaction that the present volume, fourth planned in the series, second in sequence of publication, is brought to a successful end. Satisfaction I feel through the fact that the scheme and aim of this work is not only understood by the scientific-botanical

  16. Dedication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1959-01-01

    CARL FREDRICK ALBERT CHRISTENSEN (1872-1942) was the founder of modern fern taxonomy. To appreciate the scope of his work, it is necessary to understand the confusions of thought on the subject which persisted through the 19th century and were still evident in the summary prepared (by DIELS) for

  17. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  18. Scalable cloud without dedicated storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batkovich, D. V.; Kompaniets, M. V.; Zarochentsev, A. K.

    2015-05-01

    We present a prototype of a scalable computing cloud. It is intended to be deployed on the basis of a cluster without the separate dedicated storage. The dedicated storage is replaced by the distributed software storage. In addition, all cluster nodes are used both as computing nodes and as storage nodes. This solution increases utilization of the cluster resources as well as improves fault tolerance and performance of the distributed storage. Another advantage of this solution is high scalability with a relatively low initial and maintenance cost. The solution is built on the basis of the open source components like OpenStack, CEPH, etc.

  19. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, B.; Heinzelmann, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    A gamma camera is described which obviates the distortion of locating signals generally caused by the varied light conductive capacities of the light conductors in that the flow of light through each light conductor may be varied by means of a shutter. A balancing of the flow of light through each of the individual light conductors, in effect, collective light conductors may be balanced on the basis of their light conductive capacities or properties, so as to preclude a distortion of the locating signals caused by the varied light conductive properties of the light conductors. Each light conductor has associated therewith two, relative to each other, independently adjustable shutters, of which one forms a closure member and the other an adjusting shutter. In this embodiment of the invention it is thus possible to block all of the light conductors leading to a photoelectric transducer, with the exception of those light conductors which are to be balanced. The balancing of the individual light conductors may then be obtained on the basis of the output signals of the photoelectric transducer. (auth)

  20. Scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zioni, J.; Klein, Y.; Inbar, D.

    1975-01-01

    The scintillation camera is to make pictures of the density distribution of radiation fields created by the injection or administration radioactive medicaments into the body of the patient. It contains a scintillation crystal, several photomultipliers and computer circuits to obtain an analytical function at the exits of the photomultiplier which is dependent on the position of the scintillations at the time in the crystal. The scintillation crystal is flat and spatially corresponds to the production site of radiation. The photomultipliers form a pattern whose basic form consists of at least three photomultipliers. They are assigned to at least two crossing parallel series groups where a vertical running reference axis in the crystal plane belongs to each series group. The computer circuits are each assigned to a reference axis. Each series of a series group assigned to one of the reference axes in the computer circuit has an adder to produce a scintillation dependent series signal. Furthermore, the projection of the scintillation on this reference axis is calculated. A series signal is used for this which originates from a series chosen from two neighbouring photomultiplier series of this group. The scintillation must have appeared between these chosen series. They are termed as basic series. The photomultiplier can be arranged hexagonally or rectangularly. (GG/LH) [de

  1. PET-COMPTON System. Comparative evaluation with PET System using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Arista Romeu, Eduardo; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera HernAndez, Ibrahin; Bolannos Perez, Lourdes; Rubio Rodriguez, Juan A.; Perez Morales, Jose M.; Arce Dubois, Pedro; Vela Morales, Oscar; Willmott Zappacosta, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in small animals has actually achieved spatial resolution round about 1 mm and currently there are under study different approaches to improve this spatial resolution. One of them combines PET technology with Compton Cameras. This paper presents the idea of the so called PET-Compton systems and has included comparative evaluation of spatial resolution and global efficiency in both PET and PET-Compton system by means of Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code. Simulation was done on a PET-Compton system made-up of LYSO-LuYAP scintillating detectors of particular small animal PET scanner named Clear-PET and for Compton detectors based on CdZnTe semiconductor. A group of radionuclides that emits a positron (e+) and quantum almost simultaneously and fulfills some selection criteria for their possible use in PET-Compton systems for medical and biological applications were studied under simulation conditions. By means of analytical reconstruction using SSRB (Single Slide Rebinning) method were obtained superior spatial resolution in PET-Compton system for all tested radionuclides (reaching sub-millimeter values of for 22Na source). However this analysis done by simulation have shown limited global efficiency values in PET-Compton system (in the order of 10 -5 -10 -6 %) instead of values around 5*10 -1 % that have been achieved in PET system. (author)

  2. Dynamic imaging with coincidence gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhmassi, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a technique to calculate dynamic parameters from data acquired using gamma-camera PET (gc PET). Our method is based on an algorithm development for dynamic SPECT, which processes all decency projection data simultaneously instead of reconstructing a series of static images individually. The algorithm was modified to account for the extra data that is obtained with gc PET (compared with SPEC). The method was tested using simulated projection data for both a SPECT and a gc PET geometry. These studies showed the ability of the code to reconstruct simulated data with a varying range of half-lives. The accuracy of the algorithm was measured in terms of the reconstructed half-life and initial activity for the simulated object. The reconstruction of gc PET data showed improvement in half-life and activity compared to SPECT data of 23% and 20%, respectively (at 50 iterations). The gc PET algorithm was also tested using data from an experimental phantom and finally, applied to a clinical dataset, where the algorithm was further modified to deal with the situation where the activity in certain pixels decreases and then increases during the acquisition. (author)

  3. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution clinical PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freese, D. L.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Electrical Engineering, Radiology, Physics, and BioEngineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent

  4. Current status and future perspective of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Chul

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality that consists of systemic administration to a subject of a radiopharmaceutical labeled with a positron-emitting radionuclide. Following administration, its distribution in the organ or structure under study can be assessed as a function of time and space by (1) detecting the annihilation radiation resulting from the interaction of the positrons with matter, and (2) reconstructing the distribution of the radioactivity from a series of that used in computed tomography (CT). The nuclides most generally exhibit chemical properties that render them particularly desirable in physiological studies. The radionuclides most widely used in PET are F-18, C-11, O-15 and N-13. Regarding to the number of the current PET Centers worldwide (based on ICP data), more than 300 PET Centers were in operation in 2000. The use of PET technology grew rapidly compared to that in 1992 and 1996, particularly in the USA, which demonstrates a three-fold rise in PET installations. In 2001, 194 PET Centers were operating in the USA. In 1994, two clinical and research-oriented PET Centers at Seoul National University Hospital and Samsung Medical Center, was established as the first dedicated PET and Cyclotron machines in Korea, followed by two more PET facilities at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Ajou Medical Center, Yonsei University Medical Center, National Cancer Center and established their PET Center. Catholic Medical School and Pusan National University Hospital have finalized a plan to install PET machine in 2002, which results in total of nine PET Centers in Korea. Considering annual trends of PET application in four major PET centers in Korea in Asan Medical Center recent six years (from 1995 to 2000), a total of 11,564 patients have been studied every year and the number of PET studies has shown steep growth year upon year. We had, 1,020 PET patients in 1995. This number increased to 1,196, 1,756, 2,379, 3

  5. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  6. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  7. New findings on cerebral ammonia uptake in HE using functional (13)N-ammonia PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging technique suitable for studies of brain ammonia metabolism. Dynamic (13)N-ammonia PET yields time-courses of radioactivity concentrations in brain (PET camera) and blood (samples). Ahl et al. (Hepatology 40:73-79, 2004) and Keiding et al. (Hepatology 43:42-50, 2006...

  8. An emerging indication of FDG-PET: pleural tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogova, S.; Kerrou, K.; Montravers, F.; Grahek, D.; Aide, N.; Jacob, T.; Younsi, N.; Cailleux, N.; Talbot, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of malignant pleural tumours is difficult by means of radiology and also histology. Nevertheless an early diagnose, in particular in those people exposed to asbestos, and an accurate staging are key factors for a better survival. There is thus a potential role for FD G imaging in these relatively rare cancers. In our series, were are currently able to evaluate 22 FD G examinations performed in 16 patients referred for apparently isolated pleural lesions. Twelve FD G examinations were performed with a dedicated PET machine (C-PET, Adac) and ten with a coincidence detection gamma camera (Irix, Picker). The precise clinical settings were the following: characterisation of pleural masses or search for the unknown primary tumour in case of adenocarcinoma (6 cases), staging of a mesothelioma (5 cases), suspicion of recurrence and/or residual lesions (11 cases). The pleural lesions took-up FD G in all cases. By adding our results to data of the five previously published studies, the sensitivity for detecting malignant pleural lesions that are not yet characterised as primary pleural cancer is 99% and the specificity 79%. There was in our series one false positive result due to an inflammatory lesion. False negative results for the detection of lymph node invasion occurred in three patients and were in relation with an infra-centimetric size and the difficulty to distinguish, on FD G images, mediastinal lymph nodes from a widespread pleural and pulmonary extension of cancer. A change in patient management was induced by the FD G examination in 4 patients (25%) and the evolution confirmed that the choice was appropriate. Unknown lesions that could have modified the management were discovered in two other patients. This study highlights the fact that FD G imaging has an impact on the management of patients with solitary pleural lesions and can detect recurrences, in some cases even more accurately than invasive procedures with histology. From our

  9. The use of a Micromegas as a detector for gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbouchi, Asma; Trabelsi, Adel

    2008-01-01

    The micromegas (Micro Mesh Gaseaous) is a gas detector; it was developed by I.Giomattaris and G.Charpak for application in the field of experimental particle physics. But the polyvalence of this detector makes it to be used in several areas such as medical imaging. This detector has an X-Y readout capability of resolution less than 100μm, an energy resolution down to 14% for energy range 1-10 keV and an overall efficiency of 70%. Monte carlo simulation is widely used in nuclear medicine. It allows predicting the behaviour of system. Gate (Geant4 for Application Tomography Emission) is a platform for monte carlo simulation. It is dedicated to PET/SPECT (Position Emission Tomography / single Photon Emission Tomography) applications. Our goal is to model a gamma camera that use a Micromegas as a detector and to compare their performances (energy resolution, point spread function...) with those of a scintillated gamma camera by using Gate

  10. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which ... Gaining or losing a lot of weight quickly Strange behavior Being sluggish and tired Trouble getting up ...

  11. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  12. Gate Simulation of a Gamma Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abidi, Sana; Mlaouhi, Zohra

    2008-01-01

    Medical imaging is a very important diagnostic because it allows for an exploration of the internal human body. The nuclear imaging is an imaging technique used in the nuclear medicine. It is to determine the distribution in the body of a radiotracers by detecting the radiation it emits using a detection device. Two methods are commonly used: Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and the Positrons Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we are interested on modelling of a gamma camera. This simulation is based on Monte-Carlo language and in particular Gate simulator (Geant4 Application Tomographic Emission). We have simulated a clinical gamma camera called GAEDE (GKS-1) and then we validate these simulations by experiments. The purpose of this work is to monitor the performance of these gamma camera and the optimization of the detector performance and the the improvement of the images quality. (Author)

  13. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Pet Allergy ▸ Pet Allergy Quiz Share | Pet Allergy Quiz More than half of U.S. households ... cat family. Yet, millions of people suffer from pet allergies. Take this quiz to test your knowledge ...

  14. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; Schulthess von, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET Ge68 ) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET CT ) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET Ge68 and PET CT . Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET CT in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET Ge68 images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET Ge68 and PET CT images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional 68 Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the non-attenuation-corrected PET images also be

  15. Usefulness of FDG-PET in the evaluation of patients with colon and rectal cancer in a PET center in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jofre, M J; Massardo, L T; Canessa, J; Sierralta, P; Gonzalez, P [Molecular Imaging PET Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Military Hospital, Santiago (Chile)

    2007-11-15

    Introduction: FDG, PET is a useful imaging technique in the management of patients with gastrointestinal tumours, mainly in oesophageal and colorectal cancer. In Chile, colorectal cancer is a prevalent disease, representing the 7th cause of death in men and 6th in women. The aim of the study was to assess FDG-PET value in the management of colorectal cancer in the first PET center in Chile. Material and Methods: Population: In a retrospective analysis, we studied 130 patients with 159 PET scans, 56% corresponded to women. Group A rectal cancer: 42 patients (55 studies), mean age 61 {+-} 11 y.o. (range 39-80) Group B colon cancer: 88 patients (104 studies), mean age 61 {+-} 11 y.o. (range 39-80). Referral: In the whole population, 53% were studied by recurrence suspicion (31% with increased CEA levels with negative anatomical imaging), 33% for re-staging, 8% for therapy control and 6% for staging. Eighty-five % was submitted to surgery (range: lm -7y) and 42% presented local or distance dissemination; 70% have received chemotherapy and 23% associated radiotherapy. Technique: Whole-body images were acquired with a dedicated high resolution PET Siemens Ecat Exact HR+ camera 60 minutes after injection of intravenous F18-FDG, produced at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (mean dose: 12 mCi). Visual analysis and semi-quantitative standardized uptake value (SUV) were performed by a consensus of 5 nuclear medicine physicians. Results: 65% of the PET studies were positive, showing hypermetabolic tumoral uptake (63% studies in colon cancer and 69% in rectal cancer). In 30% from the positive cases liver lesions were found, 52% of them without other lesions. In 75% from positive studies there was extrahepatic involvement. In the group B, local recurrence was found in 37%. In 48% cases there was good correlation between anatomical images available and FDG and in 42% new unknown lesions were found with PET. CEA levels: they were available in 62% of the cases (71% of them

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  17. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  19. “Calibration-on-the-spot”: How to calibrate an EMCCD camera from its images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In order to count photons with a camera, the camera must be calibrated. Photon counting is necessary, e.g., to determine the precision of localization-based super-resolution microscopy. Here we present a protocol that calibrates an EMCCD camera from information contained in isolated, diffraction-......-limited spots in any image taken by the camera, thus making dedicated calibration procedures redundant by enabling calibration post festum, from images filed without calibration information....

  20. Dedicated education unit: student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Vicki M; Coe, Michael T; Hanita, Makoto; Moscato, Susan R

    2014-01-01

    The study compared students' perceptions of their clinical learning experiences in a dedicated education unit (DEU) with their experiences in traditional clinical education. Unlike traditional academic-instructor models, expert nurses in the DEU provide clinical education to students with faculty support. This repeated measures design used student surveys, supplemented by focus group data. Students were more likely to agree that their clinical learning experience was high quality and they had a consistent mentoring relationship during DEU rotations. Students also reported the quality of the unit's learning environment, the leadership style of the nurse manager, and the nursing care on the unit was more favorable in DEUs than traditional units. Consistent with their changed role in DEUs, faculty members were less active in helping students integrate theory and practice. These findings provide additional evidence of the value that the DEU model contributes to high-quality clinical education.

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Adapting Virtual Camera Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment aspects such as narrative and interaction completely depend on the camera since the camera defines the player’s point of view. Most research works in automatic camera control aim to take the control of this aspect from the player to automatically gen- er...

  3. Robust real-time extraction of respiratory signals from PET list-mode data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, André; Zhang, Bin; Olivier, Patrick; Goedicke, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    Respiratory motion, which typically cannot simply be suspended during PET image acquisition, affects lesions’ detection and quantitative accuracy inside or in close vicinity to the lungs. Some motion compensation techniques address this issue via pre-sorting (‘binning’) of the acquired PET data into a set of temporal gates, where each gate is assumed to be minimally affected by respiratory motion. Tracking respiratory motion is typically realized using dedicated hardware (e.g. using respiratory belts and digital cameras). Extracting respiratory signals directly from the acquired PET data simplifies the clinical workflow as it avoids handling additional signal measurement equipment. We introduce a new data-driven method ‘combined local motion detection’ (CLMD). It uses the time-of-flight (TOF) information provided by state-of-the-art PET scanners in order to enable real-time respiratory signal extraction without additional hardware resources. CLMD applies center-of-mass detection in overlapping regions based on simple back-positioned TOF event sets acquired in short time frames. Following a signal filtering and quality-based pre-selection step, the remaining extracted individual position information over time is then combined to generate a global respiratory signal. The method is evaluated using seven measured FDG studies from single and multiple scan positions of the thorax region, and it is compared to other software-based methods regarding quantitative accuracy and statistical noise stability. Correlation coefficients around 90% between the reference and the extracted signal have been found for those PET scans where motion affected features such as tumors or hot regions were present in the PET field-of-view. For PET scans with a quarter of typically applied radiotracer doses, the CLMD method still provides similar high correlation coefficients which indicates its robustness to noise. Each CLMD processing needed less than 0.4 s in total on a standard

  4. Robust real-time extraction of respiratory signals from PET list-mode data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Andre; Zhang, Bin; Olivier, Patrick; Goedicke, Andreas

    2018-05-01

    Respiratory motion, which typically cannot simply be suspended during PET image acquisition, affects lesions' detection and quantitative accuracy inside or in close vicinity to the lungs. Some motion compensation techniques address this issue via pre-sorting ("binning") of the acquired PET data into a set of temporal gates, where each gate is assumed to be minimally affected by respiratory motion. Tracking respiratory motion is typically realized using dedicated hardware (e.g. using respiratory belts and digital cameras). Extracting respiratory signalsdirectly from the acquired PET data simplifies the clinical workflow as it avoids to handle additional signal measurement equipment. We introduce a new data-driven method "Combined Local Motion Detection" (CLMD). It uses the Time-of-Flight (TOF) information provided by state-of-the-art PET scanners in order to enable real-time respiratory signal extraction without additional hardware resources. CLMD applies center-of-mass detection in overlapping regions based on simple back-positioned TOF event sets acquired in short time frames. Following a signal filtering and quality-based pre-selection step, the remaining extracted individual position information over time is then combined to generate a global respiratory signal. The method is evaluated using 7 measured FDG studies from single and multiple scan positions of the thorax region, and it is compared to other software-based methods regarding quantitative accuracy and statistical noise stability. Correlation coefficients around 90% between the reference and the extracted signal have been found for those PET scans where motion affected features such as tumors or hot regions were present in the PET field-of-view. For PET scans with a quarter of typically applied radiotracer doses, the CLMD method still provides similar high correlation coefficients which indicates its robustness to noise. Each CLMD processing needed less than 0.4s in total on a standard multi-core CPU

  5. Readout and characterisation of new silicon pixel photodiode array for use in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, P.; Ward, G.; Lerch, R.; Rozenfeld, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is a functional imaging tool, which is able to quantify physiological, and biochemical processes in vivo using short-lived cyclotron-produced radiotracers. The main physical principle of PET is the simultaneous measurement of two 511 keV photons which are emitted in opposite directions following the annihilation of a positron in tissue. The accuracy of tracking these photons determines the accuracy of localising the radiotracer in the body, which is referred to as the spatial resolution of the system. Compared with conventional single photon imaging with gamma cameras, PET provides superior spatial resolution and sensitivity. However, compared with anatomical imaging techniques, the spatial resolution remains relatively poor at approximately 4-6 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM), compared with 1 mm FWHM for MRI. The Centre for Medical Radiation Physics at the University of Wollongong is developing a new Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detection sub-module that will significantly improve the spatial resolution of PET. The new sub-module design is simple and robust to minimise module assembly complications and is completely independent of photomultiplier tubes. The new sub-module has also been designed to maximise its flexibility for easy sub-module coupling so as to form a complete, customised, detection module to be used in PET scanners dedicated to human brain and breast, and small animal studies. A new computer controlled gantry allows the system to be used for PET and SPECT applications. Silicon 8x8 detector arrays have been developed by CMRP and will be optically coupled scintillation crystals and readout using the VIKING tM hybrid preamplifier chip to form the basis of the new module Characterisation of the pixel photodiode array has been performed to check the uniformity of the response of the array. This characterisation has been done using a pulsed, near infra-red laser diode system and alpha particles

  6. High-Speed Data Acquisition and Digital Signal Processing System for PET Imaging Techniques Applied to Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. D.; Benlloch, J. M.; Cerda, J.; Lerche, Ch. W.; Pavon, N.; Sebastia, A.

    2004-06-01

    This paper is framed into the Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) project, whose aim is to develop an innovative gamma ray sensor for early breast cancer diagnosis. Currently, breast cancer is detected using low-energy X-ray screening. However, functional imaging techniques such as PET/FDG could be employed to detect breast cancer and track disease changes with greater sensitivity. Furthermore, a small and less expensive PET camera can be utilized minimizing main problems of whole body PET. To accomplish these objectives, we are developing a new gamma ray sensor based on a newly released photodetector. However, a dedicated PEM detector requires an adequate data acquisition (DAQ) and processing system. The characterization of gamma events needs a free-running analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with sampling rates of more than 50 Ms/s and must achieve event count rates up to 10 MHz. Moreover, comprehensive data processing must be carried out to obtain event parameters necessary for performing the image reconstruction. A new generation digital signal processor (DSP) has been used to comply with these requirements. This device enables us to manage the DAQ system at up to 80 Ms/s and to execute intensive calculi over the detector signals. This paper describes our designed DAQ and processing architecture whose main features are: very high-speed data conversion, multichannel synchronized acquisition with zero dead time, a digital triggering scheme, and high throughput of data with an extensive optimization of the signal processing algorithms.

  7. Methodology for creating dedicated machine and algorithm on sunflower counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muracciole, Vincent; Plainchault, Patrick; Mannino, Maria-Rosaria; Bertrand, Dominique; Vigouroux, Bertrand

    2007-09-01

    In order to sell grain lots in European countries, seed industries need a government certification. This certification requests purity testing, seed counting in order to quantify specified seed species and other impurities in lots, and germination testing. These analyses are carried out within the framework of international trade according to the methods of the International Seed Testing Association. Presently these different analyses are still achieved manually by skilled operators. Previous works have already shown that seeds can be characterized by around 110 visual features (morphology, colour, texture), and thus have presented several identification algorithms. Until now, most of the works in this domain are computer based. The approach presented in this article is based on the design of dedicated electronic vision machine aimed to identify and sort seeds. This machine is composed of a FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) and a PC bearing the GUI (Human Machine Interface) of the system. Its operation relies on the stroboscopic image acquisition of a seed falling in front of a camera. A first machine was designed according to this approach, in order to simulate all the vision chain (image acquisition, feature extraction, identification) under the Matlab environment. In order to perform this task into dedicated hardware, all these algorithms were developed without the use of the Matlab toolbox. The objective of this article is to present a design methodology for a special purpose identification algorithm based on distance between groups into dedicated hardware machine for seed counting.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations in small animal PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Susana [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: susana.silva@fc.ul.pt; Jan, Sebastien [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV/DRM, Orsay (France); Almeida, Pedro [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Instituto de Biofisica e Engenharia Biomedica, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-10-01

    This work is based on the use of an implemented Positron Emission Tomography (PET) simulation system dedicated for small animal PET imaging. Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE), a Monte Carlo simulation platform based on the Geant4 libraries, is well suited for modeling the microPET FOCUS system and to implement realistic phantoms, such as the MOBY phantom, and data maps from real examinations. The use of a microPET FOCUS simulation model with GATE has been validated for spatial resolution, counting rates performances, imaging contrast recovery and quantitative analysis. Results from realistic studies of the mouse body using {sup -}F and [{sup 18}F]FDG imaging protocols are presented. These simulations include the injection of realistic doses into the animal and realistic time framing. The results have shown that it is possible to simulate small animal PET acquisitions under realistic conditions, and are expected to be useful to improve the quantitative analysis in PET mouse body studies.

  9. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Otte, Andreas; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van

    2014-01-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  10. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-09-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  11. Small animal PET: aspects of performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Simone; Bauer, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Dedicated small animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems are increasingly prevalent in industry (e.g. for preclinical drug development) and biological research. Such systems permit researchers to perform animal studies of a longitudinal design characterised by repeated measurements in single animals. With the advent of commercial systems, scanners have become readily available and increasingly popular. As a consequence, technical specifications are becoming more diverse, making scanner systems less broadly applicable. The investigator has, therefore, to make a decision regarding which type of scanner is most suitable for the intended experiments. This decision should be based on gantry characteristics and the physical performance. The first few steps have been taken towards standardisation of the assessment of performance characteristics of dedicated animal PET systems, though such assessment is not yet routinely implemented. In this review, we describe current methods of evaluation of physical performance parameters of small animal PET scanners. Effects of methodologically different approaches on the results are assessed. It is underscored that particular attention has to be paid to spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance. Differences in performance measurement methods are described with regard to commercially available systems, namely the Concorde MicroPET systems P4 and R4 and the quad-HIDAC. Lastly, consequences of differences in scanner performance parameters are rated with respect to applications of small animal PET. (orig.)

  12. Computer vision camera with embedded FPGA processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, Antoine; Ouellet, Denis; Arias-Estrada, Miguel

    2000-03-01

    Traditional computer vision is based on a camera-computer system in which the image understanding algorithms are embedded in the computer. To circumvent the computational load of vision algorithms, low-level processing and imaging hardware can be integrated in a single compact module where a dedicated architecture is implemented. This paper presents a Computer Vision Camera based on an open architecture implemented in an FPGA. The system is targeted to real-time computer vision tasks where low level processing and feature extraction tasks can be implemented in the FPGA device. The camera integrates a CMOS image sensor, an FPGA device, two memory banks, and an embedded PC for communication and control tasks. The FPGA device is a medium size one equivalent to 25,000 logic gates. The device is connected to two high speed memory banks, an IS interface, and an imager interface. The camera can be accessed for architecture programming, data transfer, and control through an Ethernet link from a remote computer. A hardware architecture can be defined in a Hardware Description Language (like VHDL), simulated and synthesized into digital structures that can be programmed into the FPGA and tested on the camera. The architecture of a classical multi-scale edge detection algorithm based on a Laplacian of Gaussian convolution has been developed to show the capabilities of the system.

  13. Radiation camera exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martone, R.J.; Yarsawich, M.; Wolczek, W.

    1976-01-01

    A system and method for governing the exposure of an image generated by a radiation camera to an image sensing camera is disclosed. The exposure is terminated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined quantity of radiation, defining a radiation density, occurring in a predetermined area. An index is produced which represents the value of that quantity of radiation whose accumulation causes the exposure termination. The value of the predetermined radiation quantity represented by the index is sensed so that the radiation camera image intensity can be calibrated to compensate for changes in exposure amounts due to desired variations in radiation density of the exposure, to maintain the detectability of the image by the image sensing camera notwithstanding such variations. Provision is also made for calibrating the image intensity in accordance with the sensitivity of the image sensing camera, and for locating the index for maintaining its detectability and causing the proper centering of the radiation camera image

  14. GRACE star camera noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Nate

    2016-08-01

    Extending results from previous work by Bandikova et al. (2012) and Inacio et al. (2015), this paper analyzes Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) star camera attitude measurement noise by processing inter-camera quaternions from 2003 to 2015. We describe a correction to star camera data, which will eliminate a several-arcsec twice-per-rev error with daily modulation, currently visible in the auto-covariance function of the inter-camera quaternion, from future GRACE Level-1B product releases. We also present evidence supporting the argument that thermal conditions/settings affect long-term inter-camera attitude biases by at least tens-of-arcsecs, and that several-to-tens-of-arcsecs per-rev star camera errors depend largely on field-of-view.

  15. Solid state video cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Cristol, Y

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Video Cameras reviews the state of the art in the field of solid-state television cameras as compiled from patent literature. Organized into 10 chapters, the book begins with the basic array types of solid-state imagers and appropriate read-out circuits and methods. Documents relating to improvement of picture quality, such as spurious signal suppression, uniformity correction, or resolution enhancement, are also cited. The last part considerssolid-state color cameras.

  16. A real-time monitoring study of the personal dose received by a nuclear medicine technologist (NMT)administering FDG in a high patient throughout PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.; Hickson, K.; Bradley, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: With the increasing success and developing applications of PET-CT, especially in relation to Oncology I Staging, il is possible thai the number of PET scans may overtake traditional gamma camera scanning as the major scanning I procedure. This rapid growth in PET studies has already resulted in an increasing radiation exposure cost to NMT'. Previous I personnel dosimetry surveys by our group have established the increasing dose impacts of PET and PET-CT investigations Bo staff (7, 2).

  17. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  18. PeneloPET, a Monte Carlo PET simulation tool based on PENELOPE: features and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, S; Herraiz, J L; Vicente, E; Udias, J M [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, as an essential tool for the research and development of new scanners and for advanced image reconstruction. PeneloPET, a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo tool, is presented and validated in this work. PeneloPET is based on PENELOPE, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the transport in matter of electrons, positrons and photons, with energies from a few hundred eV to 1 GeV. PENELOPE is robust, fast and very accurate, but it may be unfriendly to people not acquainted with the FORTRAN programming language. PeneloPET is an easy-to-use application which allows comprehensive simulations of PET systems within PENELOPE. Complex and realistic simulations can be set by modifying a few simple input text files. Different levels of output data are available for analysis, from sinogram and lines-of-response (LORs) histogramming to fully detailed list mode. These data can be further exploited with the preferred programming language, including ROOT. PeneloPET simulates PET systems based on crystal array blocks coupled to photodetectors and allows the user to define radioactive sources, detectors, shielding and other parts of the scanner. The acquisition chain is simulated in high level detail; for instance, the electronic processing can include pile-up rejection mechanisms and time stamping of events, if desired. This paper describes PeneloPET and shows the results of extensive validations and comparisons of simulations against real measurements from commercial acquisition systems. PeneloPET is being extensively employed to improve the image quality of commercial PET systems and for the development of new ones.

  19. PeneloPET, a Monte Carlo PET simulation tool based on PENELOPE: features and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, S; Herraiz, J L; Vicente, E; Udias, J M; Vaquero, J J; Desco, M

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, as an essential tool for the research and development of new scanners and for advanced image reconstruction. PeneloPET, a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo tool, is presented and validated in this work. PeneloPET is based on PENELOPE, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the transport in matter of electrons, positrons and photons, with energies from a few hundred eV to 1 GeV. PENELOPE is robust, fast and very accurate, but it may be unfriendly to people not acquainted with the FORTRAN programming language. PeneloPET is an easy-to-use application which allows comprehensive simulations of PET systems within PENELOPE. Complex and realistic simulations can be set by modifying a few simple input text files. Different levels of output data are available for analysis, from sinogram and lines-of-response (LORs) histogramming to fully detailed list mode. These data can be further exploited with the preferred programming language, including ROOT. PeneloPET simulates PET systems based on crystal array blocks coupled to photodetectors and allows the user to define radioactive sources, detectors, shielding and other parts of the scanner. The acquisition chain is simulated in high level detail; for instance, the electronic processing can include pile-up rejection mechanisms and time stamping of events, if desired. This paper describes PeneloPET and shows the results of extensive validations and comparisons of simulations against real measurements from commercial acquisition systems. PeneloPET is being extensively employed to improve the image quality of commercial PET systems and for the development of new ones.

  20. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent the spread of germs between pets and people. Keep pets and their supplies out of the kitchen, and ... a local wildlife rehabilitation facility. More Information Healthy Pets Healthy People Clean Hands Save Lives! Stay Healthy at Animal ...

  1. Usefulness of Integrated PET/MRI in Head and Neck Cancer: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Jin; Seo, Hyo Jung; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, E. Edmund; Kang, Keon Wook; Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, Junekey; Lee, Dong Soo

    2014-01-01

    The new modality of an integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has recently been introduced but not validated. Our objective was to evaluate clinical performance of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/MRI in patients with head and neck cancer. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2013 and February 2013. Ten patients (eight men, two women; mean age, 61.4±13.4 years) with histologically proven head and neck tumors were enrolled.Whole-body PET/MRI and regional positron emission tomography (PET) with dedicated MRI were sequentially obtained. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUVmean, metabolic tumor volume, total lesion glycolysis and contrast enhancement were analyzed. A total of ten whole-body positron emission tomography (PET), ten regional positron emission tomography (PET), ten dedicated MRI and ten regional PET/gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (Gd)-MRI images were analyzed for initial staging. Two nuclear medicine physicians analyzed positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/MRI with a consensus. One radiologist analyzed dedicated MRI. The primary lesions and number of metastatic lymph nodes analyzed from each image were compared. Eight patients were diagnosed with head and neck cancer (one tongue cancer, four tonsillar cancers, one nasopharyngeal cancer and two hypopharyngeal cancers) by histological diagnosis. Two benign tumors (pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin tumor) were diagnosed with surgical operation. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) and regional positron emission tomography (PET) attenuated by MRI showed good image quality for the lesion detection. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) and regional positron emission tomography (PET) detected ten primary sites and compensated for a missed lesion on dedicated MRI. A discordant number of suspicious lymph node metastases was noted according to the different images; 22, 16, 39 and 40 in the whole-body positron

  2. Pharmacological studies of the lung with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    1986-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), known to be used for lung ventilation and perfusion studies, can also be used in pharmacology to obtain information that is otherwise not available. The lung takes up biologically active substances which can be inactivated or activated, and synthesises and releases others. Such information in man has been obtained from samples of human lungs, or from in vivo first-pass studies, invasive or not, as well as from in vivo kinetic studies using external detection methods with scintillation cameras. PET provides now quantitative regional data in the human lung

  3. Cameras in mobile phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, Ville; Viinikanoja, Jarkko; Alakarhu, Juha

    2006-04-01

    One of the fastest growing markets in consumer markets today are camera phones. During past few years total volume has been growing fast and today millions of mobile phones with camera will be sold. At the same time resolution and functionality of the cameras has been growing from CIF towards DSC level. From camera point of view the mobile world is an extremely challenging field. Cameras should have good image quality but in small size. They also need to be reliable and their construction should be suitable for mass manufacturing. All components of the imaging chain should be well optimized in this environment. Image quality and usability are the most important parameters to user. The current trend of adding more megapixels to cameras and at the same time using smaller pixels is affecting both. On the other hand reliability and miniaturization are key drivers for product development as well as the cost. In optimized solution all parameters are in balance but the process of finding the right trade-offs is not an easy task. In this paper trade-offs related to optics and their effects to image quality and usability of cameras are discussed. Key development areas from mobile phone camera point of view are also listed.

  4. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  5. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-01-01

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems

  6. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...... a broader field of applications. Deploying this type of sensor in vision systems eliminates the illumination problems of normal greyscale and RGB cameras. This survey provides an overview of the current applications of thermal cameras. Applications include animals, agriculture, buildings, gas detection......, industrial, and military applications, as well as detection, tracking, and recognition of humans. Moreover, this survey describes the nature of thermal radiation and the technology of thermal cameras....

  7. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  8. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  9. Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; MacLeod, T.

    On-Orbit Small Debris Tracking and Characterization is a technical gap in the current National Space Situational Awareness necessary to safeguard orbital assets and crew. This poses a major risk of MOD damage to ISS and Exploration vehicles. In 2015 this technology was added to NASAs Office of Chief Technologist roadmap. For missions flying in or assembled in or staging from LEO, the physical threat to vehicle and crew is needed in order to properly design the proper level of MOD impact shielding and proper mission design restrictions. Need to verify debris flux and size population versus ground RADAR tracking. Use of ISS for In-Situ Orbital Debris Tracking development provides attitude, power, data and orbital access without a dedicated spacecraft or restricted operations on-board a host vehicle as a secondary payload. Sensor Applicable to in-situ measuring orbital debris in flux and population in other orbits or on other vehicles. Could enhance safety on and around ISS. Some technologies extensible to monitoring of extraterrestrial debris as well To help accomplish this, new technologies must be developed quickly. The Small Orbital Stereo Tracking Camera is one such up and coming technology. It consists of flying a pair of intensified megapixel telephoto cameras to evaluate Orbital Debris (OD) monitoring in proximity of International Space Station. It will demonstrate on-orbit optical tracking (in situ) of various sized objects versus ground RADAR tracking and small OD models. The cameras are based on Flight Proven Advanced Video Guidance Sensor pixel to spot algorithms (Orbital Express) and military targeting cameras. And by using twin cameras we can provide Stereo images for ranging & mission redundancy. When pointed into the orbital velocity vector (RAM), objects approaching or near the stereo camera set can be differentiated from the stars moving upward in background.

  10. Health Examination by PET. (1) Cancer Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Cancer examination by positron emission tomography (PET) started in Japan in 1994 and has been rapidly popularized. This paper describes author's experience of the examination in his hospital along the recent Japanese guideline for the PET cancer examination. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is intravenously injected at 3.7 (or 4.6, for diabetic patients) MBq/kg after 4-5 hr fasting and 40 min later, imaging is conducted with additional delayed scan at 2 hr to reduce the possible false positive. Image is taken by the equipment with PET-specific camera, of which quality assurance (QA) is maintained according to the guideline, and 3D image is constructed by the ordered subset expectation maximization method. Number of examinees during 4.5 years are 18,210 (M/F=9,735/8,475), and 236 (1.3%), together with use of other test measures like ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical marker and occult blood as well, are found to have cancer of thyroid, large bowel, lung, breast and others. The false negative rate by PET alone is 78/236 (33%) for cancer. PET examination has problems of image reading and specificity of organs, and tasks of informed consent, test cost, increased exchange of information and radiation exposure. However, PET cancer examination will be established as a routine diagnostic tool when the accumulated evidence of early cancer detection is shown useful for improving the survival rate and for reducing the medicare cost. (T.I.)

  11. Technology challenges in small animal PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive nuclear imaging modality allowing biochemical processes to be investigated in vivo with sensitivity in the picomolar range. For this reason, PET has the potential to play a major role in the emerging field of molecular imaging by enabling the study of molecular pathways and genetic processes in living animals non-invasively. The challenge is to obtain a spatial resolution that is appropriate for rat and mouse imaging, the preferred animal models for research in biology, while achieving a sensitivity adequate for real-time measurement of rapid dynamic processes in vivo without violating tracer kinetic principles. An overview of the current state of development of dedicated small animal PET scanners is given, and selected applications are reported and discussed with respect to performance and significance to research in biology

  12. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated

  13. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  14. Gamma camera image acquisition, display, and processing with the personal microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, J.L.; Pratt, J.P.; Roberts, D.R.; Johnson, T.; Feyerabend, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors evaluated the potential of a microcomputer for direct acquisition, display, and processing of gamma camera images. Boards for analog-to-digital conversion and image zooming were designed, constructed, and interfaced to the Macintosh II (Apple Computer, Cupertino, Calif). Software was written for processing of single, gated, and time series images. The system was connected to gamma cameras, and its performance was compared with that of dedicated nuclear medicine computers. Data could be acquired from gamma cameras at rates exceeding 200,000 counts per second, with spatial resolution exceeding intrinsic camera resolution. Clinical analysis could be rapidly performed. This system performed better than most dedicated nuclear medicine computers with respect to speed of data acquisition and spatial resolution of images while maintaining full compatibility with the standard image display, hard-copy, and networking formats. It could replace such dedicated systems in the near future as software is refined

  15. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  16. Gamma camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Gerber, M.S.; Schlosser, P.A.; Steidley, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed description is given of a novel gamma camera which is designed to produce superior images than conventional cameras used in nuclear medicine. The detector consists of a solid state detector (e.g. germanium) which is formed to have a plurality of discrete components to enable 2-dimensional position identification. Details of the electronic processing circuits are given and the problems and limitations introduced by noise are discussed in full. (U.K.)

  17. SmartPET: Applying HPGe and pulse shape analysis to small-animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rjc@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Mather, A.R.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P.; Turk, G. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hall, C.J.; Lazarus, I. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R.A. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2007-08-21

    The SmartPET project is the development of a prototype small-animal imaging system based on the use of Hyperpure Germanium (HPGe) detectors. The use of digital electronics and application of Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques provide fine spatial resolution, while the excellent intrinsic energy resolution of HPGe detectors makes the system ideal for multi-nuclide imaging. As a result, the SmartPET system has the potential to function as a dual modality imager, operating as a dual-head Positron Emission Tomography (PET) camera or in a Compton Camera configuration for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. In this paper, we discuss how the use of simple PSA techniques greatly improves the position sensitivity of the detector yielding improved spatial resolution in reconstructed images. The PSA methods presented have been validated by comparison to data from high-precision scanning of the detectors. Results from this analysis are presented along with initial images from the SmartPET system, which demonstrates the impact of these techniques on PET images.

  18. PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, F.; Pawitan, Y.; Harrison, R.L.; Lewellen, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    In statistical terms, filtered backprojection can be viewed as smoothed Least Squares (LS). In this paper, the authors report on improvement in LS resolution by: incorporating locally adaptive smoothers, imposing positivity and using statistical methods for optimal selection of the resolution parameter. The resulting algorithm has high computational efficiency relative to more elaborate Maximum Likelihood (ML) type techniques (i.e. EM with sieves). Practical aspects of the procedure are discussed in the context of PET and illustrations with computer simulated and real tomograph data are presented. The relative recovery coefficients for a 9mm sphere in a computer simulated hot-spot phantom range from .3 to .6 when the number of counts ranges from 10,000 to 640,000 respectively. The authors will also present results illustrating the relative efficacy of ML and LS reconstruction techniques

  19. CyberPET: a PET service distributed over a wide area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloy, W.J.; Hellwig, D.; Schaeffer, A.; Hoffmann, P.; Lens, V.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Demonstration of bi-directional PET data transmission, interactive display and co-registration, for the purpose of correlative imaging, treatment planning and teaching. Material and Method: In the year 2000, the initial problem to attend was to provide an effective PET service to a hospital (in Luxemburg) which lies 150 km away from a PET center (in another country). Once this solved, the procedure was expanded (in 2001) to co-registration with CT/MRI scans performed locally, and with radiotherapy simulation CT performed in another center 25 km away (in 2002). Equipment from various vendors was used (Siemens, Adac, GE, Hermes). With preliminary agreement of the national medical aid, patients are sent from the Nuclear Medicine Dept of the Centre Hospitalier in Luxemburg (CHL) to the Dept NM of the Saarland University Medical Center for PET examination. The digital data are then sent from the Siemens PET camera to a PC connected to the LAN, and then to a FTP server (Healthnet). The data are similarly collected by a PC of the hospital network in Luxemburg, and transferred to a Hermes NM station. The Dicom PET data are converted on the fly to Interfile, displayed interactively as any other tomographic data, printed and available on the NM image server. Since 2001, the PET data are co-registered with whole-body CT data recorded at CHL according to a specific protocol (see other paper of this group). Now in 2002, we are busy implementing the co-registration of PET data and simulation CT data obtained from the Centre Baclesse (CFB, 25 km from CHL) for the treatment planning of brain tumours (input into an ADAC system). Furthermore, we plan to send the data (after deletion of their digital ID) to a (South African) university which does not yet dispose of a PET camera, to allow the training of their registrars. Results: For the end-user clinician at CHL and CFB , the PET data have the quality of 'live data', which can be examined interactively, along with other imaging

  20. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  1. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  2. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C. [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University of Rome “La Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Soluri, A., E-mail: alessandro.soluri@ibb.cnr.it [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  3. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 8} rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  4. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10 6 - 10 8 rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  5. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, Stefano; Dewitt, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize...... and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge...... the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depthestimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution...

  6. Selective-imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Landa, Joseph; Cha, Jae H.; Krapels, Keith A.

    2015-05-01

    How can we design cameras that image selectively in Full Electro-Magnetic (FEM) spectra? Without selective imaging, we cannot use, for example, ordinary tourist cameras to see through fire, smoke, or other obscurants contributing to creating a Visually Degraded Environment (VDE). This paper addresses a possible new design of selective-imaging cameras at firmware level. The design is consistent with physics of the irreversible thermodynamics of Boltzmann's molecular entropy. It enables imaging in appropriate FEM spectra for sensing through the VDE, and displaying in color spectra for Human Visual System (HVS). We sense within the spectra the largest entropy value of obscurants such as fire, smoke, etc. Then we apply a smart firmware implementation of Blind Sources Separation (BSS) to separate all entropy sources associated with specific Kelvin temperatures. Finally, we recompose the scene using specific RGB colors constrained by the HVS, by up/down shifting Planck spectra at each pixel and time.

  7. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each detector ring or offset ring includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and a plurality of scintillation crystals are positioned relative to the photomultiplier tubes whereby each tube is responsive to more than one crystal. Each alternate crystal in the ring is offset by one-half or less of the thickness of the crystal such that the staggered crystals are seen by more than one photomultiplier tube. This sharing of crystals and photomultiplier tubes allows identification of the staggered crystal and the use of smaller detectors shared by larger photomultiplier tubes thereby requiring less photomultiplier tubes, creating more scanning slices, providing better data sampling, and reducing the cost of the camera. The offset detector ring geometry reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  8. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  9. FDG PET/CT findings in a clinically diagnosed case of childhood autism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manglunia, Ashmi S.; Puranik, Ameya D.

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multifactorial etiology and varied presentation, in which early diagnosis is crucial to the implementation of early treatment. A 6-year-old child clinically diagnosed with autism, and a normal magnetic resonance imaging underwent dedicated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) as an ancillary investigation. PET image showed diffuse bilateral temporal hypometabolism. Although PET imaging is currently not indicated in the evaluation of autism, characteristic imaging patterns on PET can provide corroborative information and increase the diagnostic confidence for the same

  10. DARE: a dedicated aerosols retrieval instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Court, A.J.; Smorenburg, K.; Courrèges-Lacoste, G.B.; Visser, H.; Leeuw, G. de; Decae, R.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of aerosols is a largely unresolved problem. A dedicated instrument aimed at aerosols would be able to reduce the large uncertainties connected to this kind of remote sensing. TNO is performing a study of a space based instrument for aerosol measurements, together with the

  11. Various dedicated imaging systems for routine nuclear medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bela Kari; Tamas Gyorke; Erno Mako; Laszlo Nagy; Jozsef Turak; Oszkar Partos

    2004-01-01

    The most essential problems of nuclear medical imaging are resolution, signal/noise ratio (S/N) and sensitivity. Nowadays, the vast majority of the Anger system gamma cameras in clinical application are using parallel projection. The main problem of this projection method is the highly dependence of the image quality on the distance from the collimator surface as well as any improvement in the resolution with the distance -i.e. reduction of image blur- significantly reduces sensitivity. The aim of our research and development work was to create imaging geometry, collimator and detector constructions optimized to particular organs (brain, heart, thyroid), where it is simultaneously possible to increase the resolution and sensitivity. Main concept of the imaging geometry construction is based on the size, location and shape of a particular organ. In case of brain SPECT imaging a multiple head (4 heads in cylinder symmetric approximation) arrangement with extra high intrinsic resolution (<2.5 mm) dedicated detector design provide feasible solution for routine clinical application. The imaging system was essentially designed for Tc-99m and I-123 isotopes. The application field can be easily extended for functional small animal research and new born baby studies. Very positive feedbacks were received from both technical (stability and reproducibility of the technical parameters) and clinical sides in the past 2 years routine applications. A unique, novel conception ultra compact dedicated dual head SPECT system has been created only for 2D, 3D nuclear cardiac applications for Tc-99m and T1-201 labeled radio-pharmaceuticals. The two rectangular detectors (with <2.6 mm intrinsic resolution) are mounted fix in 90 degree geometry and move inside the special formed gantry arrangement. The unique and unusual gantry is designed to keep the detector heads as close as possible to the patient, while the patient is not exposed by any moving part. This special construction also

  12. Automatic Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Preuss, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Automatically generating computer animations is a challenging and complex problem with applications in games and film production. In this paper, we investigate howto translate a shot list for a virtual scene into a series of virtual camera configurations — i.e automatically controlling the virtual...

  13. The world's fastest camera

    CERN Multimedia

    Piquepaille, Roland

    2006-01-01

    This image processor is not your typical digital camera. It took 6 years to 20 people and $6 million to build the "Regional Calorimeter Trigger"(RCT) which will be a component of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, one of the detectors on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland (1 page)

  14. FDG-PET identification of intraperitoneal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamez, C.; Jimenez-Hoyuelam, J.M.; Rebollo, A.C.; Gonzalez, P.; Rico, J.M.; Alba, E.; Sacchetti, A.; Lopez-Rueda, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Peritoneal metastases (PM) are usually from intra-abdominal primary neoplasms, such as carcinoma of the stomach, colon, ovary, and pancreas, or from intra-abdominal lymphoma. Metastases disseminate throughout the peritoneum in four ways: 1) direct spread along peritoneal ligaments, mesenteries and omenta; 2) via the flow of ascitis fluid. 3) lymphatic extension, and 4) embolic hematogenous spread. Although CT is quite specific in identifying PM it is not very sensitive, and peritoneal lavage or biopsy can be very useful but have sampling errors. This study assessed the clinical value of FDG-PET for the detection of PM of malignant diseases. Materials and Methods: 15 FDG-PET scans of patients referred for recurrence (mean age = 54 y/o, sex = 6M, 9F), with metabolic abnormalities suspicious findings of PM from carcinoma of the colon (7), ovary (3), lymphoma (2), pancreas (1), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (1) and melanoma (1) were reviewed. The whole-body studies were performed 50 min following the intravenous administration of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG, in a high resolution dedicated PET scanner (Advance, GEMS), with images reconstructed using a iterative algorithm with segmented attenuation correction. Visual interpretation and SUV values were correlated with CT/MRI findings and biopsy/follow-up. Results: Of the 15 patients, 7 showed <3 sites of focal uptake and 8 presented multiple foci or a diffuse hypermetabolism in the abdomen (SUVmax3.04-18.83 g/ml). 6 patients had biopsy confirmation by PET-directed surgery (6 proven PM, 0 negative biopsies). 11 FDG-PET scans had correspondence with the CT/MRI findings and 4 showed discrepancies (PET positive-CT/MRI negative in patients with isolated raising tumor markers levels or unsuspected PM). FDG-PET influenced the therapeutic management in 2 patients as presented multiple metastases leading them from surgery to chemotherapy. Conclusion: When used as a complementary imaging tool to the conventional work up, FDG-PET is

  15. Pets and Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good news is that this rarely happens. Most pet-to-people diseases can be avoided by following a few ... your doctor Can a parasite cause death in people and pets? Can human disease from a parasite be treated ...

  16. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  17. [Principles of PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthien-Baumann, B

    2018-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a procedure in nuclear medicine, which is applied predominantly in oncological diagnostics. In the form of modern hybrid machines, such as PET computed tomography (PET/CT) and PET magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) it has found wide acceptance and availability. The PET procedure is more than just another imaging technique, but a functional method with the capability for quantification in addition to the distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, the results of which are used for therapeutic decisions. A profound knowledge of the principles of PET including the correct indications, patient preparation, and possible artifacts is mandatory for the correct interpretation of PET results.

  18. Camera network video summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rameswar; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K.

    2017-05-01

    Networks of vision sensors are deployed in many settings, ranging from security needs to disaster response to environmental monitoring. Many of these setups have hundreds of cameras and tens of thousands of hours of video. The difficulty of analyzing such a massive volume of video data is apparent whenever there is an incident that requires foraging through vast video archives to identify events of interest. As a result, video summarization, that automatically extract a brief yet informative summary of these videos, has attracted intense attention in the recent years. Much progress has been made in developing a variety of ways to summarize a single video in form of a key sequence or video skim. However, generating a summary from a set of videos captured in a multi-camera network still remains as a novel and largely under-addressed problem. In this paper, with the aim of summarizing videos in a camera network, we introduce a novel representative selection approach via joint embedding and capped l21-norm minimization. The objective function is two-fold. The first is to capture the structural relationships of data points in a camera network via an embedding, which helps in characterizing the outliers and also in extracting a diverse set of representatives. The second is to use a capped l21-norm to model the sparsity and to suppress the influence of data outliers in representative selection. We propose to jointly optimize both of the objectives, such that embedding can not only characterize the structure, but also indicate the requirements of sparse representative selection. Extensive experiments on standard multi-camera datasets well demonstrate the efficacy of our method over state-of-the-art methods.

  19. PET/CT cardiology: an area whose boundaries are still out of sight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucignani, Giovanni [University of Milan and Unit of Molecular Imaging, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Division of Radiation Therapy, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) performed with PET/CT cameras allow us to obtain concurrently information on the presence and degree of alterations of myocardial perfusion and metabolism and on coronary arteries calcification. Furthermore, by gated myocardial perfusion studies, PET may provide crucial information on regional coronary blood flow reserve and endothelial dysfunction. A number of recent papers provide some insight on the potential of PET/CT in cardiology and in the assessment of various cardiovascular diseases including various types of vasculitis and metabolic diseases.

  20. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dregely, Isabel; Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F.; Metz, Stephan; Kuschan, Marika; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.; Haase, Axel

    2015-01-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative 18 F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  1. The AMFEC: a tool for dedications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor Escobar, H.; Gomar Vidal, J.

    2014-01-01

    The process of dedication, consists of a series of activities intended to ensure that a component of commercial grade can be used in applications related with the Security at nuclear facilities. However, in one of the steps of essential dedication, is often the problem defined with certain accuracy the most relevant characteristics or critical acceptance of the component characteristics, which through its verification, give by valid the commercial component for security-related use. Due to lack of information, they can sometimes not be identified clearly, and therefore it is necessary to resort to some alternative method that will allow us to define them, the AMFEC (analysis of failure modes, effects and criticality. (Author)

  2. Dedication of Fermilab's LHC Remote Operations Center

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Fermilab's Remote Operations Center will be dedicated simultaneously at Fermilab in the U.S. and from CMS (Point 5) in Cessy, France. Speakers will include: from the U.S. DOE Undersecretary for Science Raymond Orbach and Fermilab Director Pier Oddone (U.S.); and from CERN Director General Robert Aymar, CMS Spokesperson Jim Virdee, LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans and US CMS Project Manager Joel Butler.

  3. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions

  4. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  5. Assessing the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of soft tissue musculoskeletal malignancies: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etchebehere, Elba C. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Sirio Libanes Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hobbs, Brian P.; Milton, Denai R. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Malawi, Osama [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Houston, TX (United States); Patel, Shreyaskumar; Benjamin, Robert S. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Sarcoma Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Macapinlac, Homer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Twelve years ago a meta-analysis evaluated the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing musculoskeletal soft tissue lesions (MsSTL). Currently, PET/CT has substituted PET imaging; however, there has not been any published meta-analysis on the use of PET/CT or a comparison of PET/CT with PET in the diagnosis of MsSTL. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to identify the current diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and determine if there is added value when compared to PET. A systematic review of English articles was conducted, and MEDLINE PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Embase were searched from 1996 to March 2015. Studies exploring the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (or dedicated PET) compared to histopathology in patients with MsSTL undergoing investigation for malignancy were included. Our meta-analysis included 14 articles composed of 755 patients with 757 soft tissue lesions. There were 451 (60 %) malignant tumors and 306 benign lesions. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (and dedicated PET) mean sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for diagnosing MsSTL were 0.96 (0.90, 1.00), 0.77 (0.67, 0.86), 0.88 (0.85, 0.91), 0.86 (0.78, 0.94), and 0.91 (0.83, 0.99), respectively. The posterior mean (95 % highest posterior density interval) for the AUC was 0.92 (0.88, 0.96). PET/CT had higher specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value when compared to a dedicated PET (0.85, 0.89, and 0.91 vs 0.71, 0.85, and 0.82, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and dedicated PET are both highly accurate in the diagnosis of MsSTL. PET/CT is more accurate and specific and has a higher positive predictive value than PET. (orig.)

  6. PET/SPECT/CT multimodal imaging in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisgard, R.; Alberini, J.L.; Jego, B.; Siquier, K.; Theze, B.; Guillermet, S.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Inserm, U803, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Background. - In the therapy monitoring of breast cancer, conventional imaging methods include ultrasound, mammography, CT and MRI, which are essentially based on tumor size modifications. However these modifications represent a late consequence of the biological response and fail to differentiate scar or necrotic tissue from residual viable tumoral tissue. Therefore, a current objective is to develop tools able to predict early response to treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) are imaging modalities able to provide extremely sensitive quantitative molecular data and are widely used in humans and animals. Results. - Mammary epithelial cells of female transgenic mice expressing the polyoma middle T onco-protein (Py M.T.), undergo four distinct stages of tumour progression, from pre malignant to malignant stages. Stages are identifiable in the mammary tissue and can lead to the development of distant metastases Longitudinal studies by dynamic whole body acquisitions by multimodal imaging including PET, SPECT and Computed Tomography (CT) allow following the tumoral evolution in Py M.T. mice in comparison with the histopathological analysis. At four weeks of age, mammary hyperplasia was identified by histopathology, but no abnormalities were found by palpation or detected by PET with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose. Such as in some human mammary cancers, the sodium iodide sym-porter (N.I.S.) in tumoral mammary epithelial cells is expressed in this mouse model. In order to investigate the expression of N.I.S. in the Py M.T. mice mammary tumours, [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} imaging was performed with a dedicated SPECT/CT system camera (B.I.O.S.P.A.C.E. Gamma Imager/CT). Local uptake of [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} was detected as early as four weeks of age. The efficacy of chemotherapy was evaluated in this mouse model using a conventional regimen (Doxorubicine, 100 mg/ kg) administered weekly from nine to

  7. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each ring contains a plurality of scintillation detectors which are positioned around an inner circumference with a septum ring extending inwardly from the inner circumference along each outer edge of each ring. An additional septum ring is positioned in the middle of each ring of detectors and parallel to the other septa rings, whereby the inward extent of all the septa rings may be reduced by one-half and the number of detectors required in each ring is reduced. The additional septa reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  8. Gamma ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.-H.; Robbins, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    An Anger gamma ray camera is improved by the substitution of a gamma ray sensitive, proximity type image intensifier tube for the scintillator screen in the Anger camera. The image intensifier tube has a negatively charged flat scintillator screen, a flat photocathode layer, and a grounded, flat output phosphor display screen, all of which have the same dimension to maintain unit image magnification; all components are contained within a grounded metallic tube, with a metallic, inwardly curved input window between the scintillator screen and a collimator. The display screen can be viewed by an array of photomultipliers or solid state detectors. There are two photocathodes and two phosphor screens to give a two stage intensification, the two stages being optically coupled by a light guide. (author)

  9. NSTX Tangential Divertor Camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquemore, A.L.; Ted Biewer; Johnson, D.; Zweben, S.J.; Nobuhiro Nishino; Soukhanovskii, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Strong magnetic field shear around the divertor x-point is numerically predicted to lead to strong spatial asymmetries in turbulence driven particle fluxes. To visualize the turbulence and associated impurity line emission near the lower x-point region, a new tangential observation port has been recently installed on NSTX. A reentrant sapphire window with a moveable in-vessel mirror images the divertor region from the center stack out to R 80 cm and views the x-point for most plasma configurations. A coherent fiber optic bundle transmits the image through a remotely selected filter to a fast camera, for example a 40500 frames/sec Photron CCD camera. A gas puffer located in the lower inboard divertor will localize the turbulence in the region near the x-point. Edge fluid and turbulent codes UEDGE and BOUT will be used to interpret impurity and deuterium emission fluctuation measurements in the divertor

  10. Scanning gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, L.W.; Batter, J.F. Jr.; Stout, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning system for a gamma camera providing for the overlapping of adjacent scan paths is described. A collimator mask having tapered edges provides for a graduated reduction in intensity of radiation received by a detector thereof, the reduction in intensity being graduated in a direction normal to the scanning path to provide a blending of images of adjacent scan paths. 31 claims, 15 figures

  11. Gamma camera display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera having an array of photomultipliers coupled via pulse shaping circuitry and a resistor weighting circuit to a display for forming an image of a radioactive subject is described. A linearizing circuit is coupled to the weighting circuit, the linearizing circuit including a nonlinear feedback circuit with diode coupling to the weighting circuit for linearizing the correspondence between points of the display and points of the subject. 4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures

  12. Comparison of polarimetric cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget , Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188...polarimetric camera, remote sensing, space systems 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 93 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18...2016. Hermann Hall, Monterey, CA. The next data in Figure 37. were collected on 01 December 2016 at 1226 PST on the rooftop of the Marriot Hotel in

  13. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander; Grueneisen, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino M.; Grafe, Hong; Forsting, Michael; Bockisch, Andreas; Umutlu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  14. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Sawicki, Lino M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Dusseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Grafe, Hong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: verena.ruhlmann@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  15. Thoracic staging in lung cancer: prospective comparison of 18F-FDG PET/MR imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Köhler, Jens; Nensa, Felix; Gauler, Thomas; Gomez, Benedikt; Reis, Henning; Stamatis, Georgios; Kühl, Hilmar; Hartung, Verena; Heusner, Till A

    2014-03-01

    Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients depend on the tumor stage. PET/CT with (18)F-FDG is widely accepted as the diagnostic standard of care. The purpose of this study was to compare a dedicated pulmonary (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging protocol with (18)F-FDG PET/CT for primary and locoregional lymph node staging in NSCLC patients using histopathology as the reference. Twenty-two patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age ± SD, 65.1 ± 9.1 y) with histopathologically confirmed NSCLC underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT, followed by (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging, including a dedicated pulmonary MR imaging protocol. T and N staging according to the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging manual was performed by 2 readers in separate sessions for (18)F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR imaging, respectively. Results from histopathology were used as the standard of reference. The mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(mean) and SUV(max), respectively) and maximum diameter of the primary tumor was measured and compared in (18)F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. PET/MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT agreed on T stages in 16 of 16 of patients (100%). All patients were correctly staged by (18)F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR (100%), compared with histopathology. There was no statistically significant difference between (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging for lymph node metastases detection (P = 0.48). For definition of thoracic N stages, PET/MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were concordant in 20 of 22 patients (91%). PET/MR imaging determined the N stage correctly in 20 of 22 patients (91%). (18)F-FDG PET/CT determined the N stage correctly in 18 of 22 patients (82%). The mean differences for SUV(mean) and SUV(max) of NSCLC in (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 0.21 and -5.06. These differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The SUV(mean) and SUV(max) measurements derived from (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET

  16. Implementation and application of simulation platform of PET based on GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Shixun; Liu Haojia

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a tool for obtaining functional image in vivo and GATE is a dedicated software for PET/SPECT simulation based on Mentor Carlo Method. It encapsulates the Geant4 libraries to achieve a modular and provides a number of new characteristics. In practice, a simulation platform of PET has been builded employing GATE based on Ubuntu operating system, including many keys and skills in the process. We have exploited benchmark PET, a testing example in GATE, and implemented PET scanner simulation in the end. Through analyzing the simulation data, the result demonstrate that predictive goal has been reached. The work provides the foundation for investigating PET scanner and optimizing the algorithm of tomograph image reconstruction. (authors)

  17. Simulation study comparing the helmet-chin PET with a cylindrical PET of the same number of detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdella M.; Tashima, Hideaki; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-06-01

    There is a growing interest in developing brain PET scanners with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and studies of brain functions. Sensitivity of the PET scanner can be improved by increasing the solid angle. However, conventional PET scanners are designed based on a cylindrical geometry, which may not be the most efficient design for brain imaging in terms of the balance between sensitivity and cost. We proposed a dedicated brain PET scanner based on a hemispheric shape detector and a chin detector (referred to as the helmet-chin PET), which is designed to maximize the solid angle by increasing the number of lines-of-response in the hemisphere. The parallax error, which PET scanners with a large solid angle tend to have, can be suppressed by the use of depth-of-interaction detectors. In this study, we carry out a realistic evaluation of the helmet-chin PET using Monte Carlo simulation based on the 4-layer GSO detector which consists of a 16  ×  16  ×  4 array of crystals with dimensions of 2.8  ×  2.8  ×  7.5 mm3. The purpose of this simulation is to show the gain in imaging performance of the helmet-chin PET compared with the cylindrical PET using the same number of detectors in each configuration. The sensitivity of the helmet-chin PET evaluated with a cylindrical phantom has a significant increase, especially at the top of the (field-of-view) FOV. The peak-NECR of the helmet-chin PET is 1.4 times higher compared to the cylindrical PET. The helmet-chin PET provides relatively low noise images throughout the FOV compared to the cylindrical PET which exhibits enhanced noise at the peripheral regions. The results show the helmet-chin PET can significantly improve the sensitivity and reduce the noise in the reconstructed images.

  18. Solitary pulmonary nodules: accuracy and cost-effectiveness of sodium iodide FDG-PET using Australian data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, C.J.; Miles, K.A.; Griffiths, M.R.; Wong, D.; Pitman, A.G.; Hicks, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    This study uses Australian data to confirm the accuracy of dedicated sodium iodide (NaI) fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in evaluating indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) and to determine the conditions under which PET could play a cost-effective role in this evaluation. Ninety-two patients from two Australian hospitals in different states underwent FDG-PET for evaluation of an SPN. Observed values for prior probability of malignancy and diagnostic accuracy of PET were applied to previously published decision tree models using published Australian health care costs. The accuracy of FDG-PET was 93% with a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. The prior probability of malignancy (0.54), PET sensitivity and PET specificity indicated cost savings per patient of up to EUR 455 (A$ 774) based on a PET cost of EUR 706 (A$ 1,200). PET would remain cost-effective for levels of prior probability up to 0.8-0.9 and a PET cost of EUR 736-1,161 (A$ 1,252-A$ 1,974). It is concluded that NaI PET is accurate, cost saving and cost-effective for the characterisation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules in Australia. Comparison with previous reports from the United States confirms that FDG-PET can remain cost-effective despite population differences in medical costs, disease prevalence and PET diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  19. PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Gent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences, Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-04-01

    Addresses a variety of aspects of neurotransmission in the brain. Details the latest results in probe development. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT of Neurobiological Systems combines the expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the development of novel probes and techniques for the investigation of neurobiological systems has achieved international recognition. Various aspects of neurotransmission in the brain are discussed, such as visualization and quantification of (more than 20 different) neuroreceptors, neuroinflammatory markers, transporters, and enzymes as well as neurotransmitter synthesis, ?-amyloid deposition, cerebral blood flow, and the metabolic rate of glucose. The latest results in probe development are also detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by radiochemists and nuclear medicine specialists to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to anyone in the field of clinical or preclinical neuroscience, from the radiochemist and radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested neurobiologist and general practitioner. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences. Other volumes focus on PET and SPECT in psychiatry and PET and SPECT in neurology''.

  20. Automated radiochemical processing for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, H.C.; Schmidt, D.G.; Bida, G.T.; Wieland, B.W.; Pekrul, E.; Kingsbury, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    With the recent emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a viable clinical tool, there is a need for a convenient, cost-effective source of the positron emitter-labeled radiotracers labeled with carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15, and fluorine-18. These short-lived radioisotopes are accelerator produced and thus, require a cyclotron and radiochemistry processing instrumentation that can be operated 3 in a clinical environment by competant technicians. The basic goal is to ensure safety and reliability while setting new standards for economy and ease of operation. The Siemens Radioisotope Delivery System (RDS 112) is a fully automated system dedicated to the production and delivery of positron-emitter labeled precursors and radiochemicals required to support a clinical PET imaging program. Thus, the entire RDS can be thought of as an automated radiochemical processing apparatus

  1. PET radiation exposure control for nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Yumiko; Kikuta, Daisuke; Anzai, Taku

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the number of clinical PET centers is increasing all over Japan. For this reason, the monitoring and control of radiation exposure of employees, especially nurses, in PET-dedicated clinics and institutions are becoming very important issues for their health. We measured the radiation exposure doses of the nurses working at Nishidai Diagnostic Imaging Center, and analyzed the exposure data obtained from them. The exposure doses of the nurses were found to be 4.8 to 7.1 mSv between April 2003 and March 2004. We found that the nurses were mostly exposed to radiation when they had to have contact with patients received an FDG injection or they had trouble with the FDG automatic injection system. To keep radiation exposure of nurses to a minimum we reconfirmed that a proper application of the three principles of protection against radiation exposure was vital. (author)

  2. Development of a hardware-based registration system for the multimodal medical images by USB cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Michiaki; Minato, Kotaro; Watabe, Hiroshi; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iida, Hidehiro

    2009-01-01

    There are several medical imaging scanners and each modality has different aspect for visualizing inside of human body. By combining these images, diagnostic accuracy could be improved, and therefore, several attempts for multimodal image registration have been implemented. One popular approach is to use hybrid image scanners such as positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT. However, these hybrid scanners are expensive and not fully available. We developed multimodal image registration system with universal serial bus (USB) cameras, which is inexpensive and applicable to any combinations of existed conventional imaging scanners. The multiple USB cameras will determine the three dimensional positions of a patient while scanning. Using information of these positions and rigid body transformation, the acquired image is registered to the common coordinate which is shared with another scanner. For each scanner, reference marker is attached on gantry of the scanner. For observing the reference marker's position by the USB cameras, the location of the USB cameras can be arbitrary. In order to validate the system, we scanned a cardiac phantom with different positions by PET and MRI scanners. Using this system, images from PET and MRI were visually aligned, and good correlations between PET and MRI images were obtained after the registration. The results suggest this system can be inexpensively used for multimodal image registrations. (author)

  3. Fast and Practical Head Tracking in Brain Imaging with Time-of-Flight Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl

    2013-01-01

    scanners. Particularly in MRI and PET, the newest generation of TOF cameras could become a method of tracking small and large scale patient movement in a fast and user friendly way required in clinical environments. We present a novel methodology for fast tracking from TOF point clouds without the need...

  4. Development of compact DOI-measurable PET detectors for simultaneous PET/MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Lou, Kai [Rice University (United States)

    2015-05-18

    It is critically needed yet challenging to develop compact PET detectors with high sensitivity and uniform, high imaging resolution for improving the performance of simultaneous PET/MR imaging, particularly for an integrated/inserted small-bore system. Using the latest “edge-less” SiPM arrays for DOI measurement using the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout, we developed several compact PET detectors suited for PET/MR imaging. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together along all sides to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5x1.5 and 2.0x2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or capacitor-based signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables to dedicated ASIC frontend electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition positioned outside the MRI scanner for coincidence event selection. Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ~18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2-3 mm DOI resolution. A large size detector panel can be scaled up with these modular detectors and different PET systems can be flexibly configured with the scalable readout electronics and data acquisition, providing an important design advantage for different system and application requirements. It is expected that standard shielding of detectors, electronics and signal transfer lines can be applied for simultaneous PET/MR imaging applications, with desired DOI measurement capability to enhance the PET performance and image quality.

  5. Development of compact DOI-measurable PET detectors for simultaneous PET/MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai

    2015-01-01

    It is critically needed yet challenging to develop compact PET detectors with high sensitivity and uniform, high imaging resolution for improving the performance of simultaneous PET/MR imaging, particularly for an integrated/inserted small-bore system. Using the latest “edge-less” SiPM arrays for DOI measurement using the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout, we developed several compact PET detectors suited for PET/MR imaging. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together along all sides to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5x1.5 and 2.0x2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or capacitor-based signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables to dedicated ASIC frontend electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition positioned outside the MRI scanner for coincidence event selection. Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ~18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2-3 mm DOI resolution. A large size detector panel can be scaled up with these modular detectors and different PET systems can be flexibly configured with the scalable readout electronics and data acquisition, providing an important design advantage for different system and application requirements. It is expected that standard shielding of detectors, electronics and signal transfer lines can be applied for simultaneous PET/MR imaging applications, with desired DOI measurement capability to enhance the PET performance and image quality.

  6. Camera System MTF: combining optic with detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torben B.; Granger, Zachary A.

    2017-08-01

    MTF is one of the most common metrics used to quantify the resolving power of an optical component. Extensive literature is dedicated to describing methods to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for stand-alone optical components such as a camera lens or telescope, and some literature addresses approaches to determine an MTF for combination of an optic with a detector. The formulations pertaining to a combined electro-optical system MTF are mostly based on theory, and assumptions that detector MTF is described only by the pixel pitch which does not account for wavelength dependencies. When working with real hardware, detectors are often characterized by testing MTF at discrete wavelengths. This paper presents a method to simplify the calculation of a polychromatic system MTF when it is permissible to consider the detector MTF to be independent of wavelength.

  7. Selecting Safe Pets (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supplies (pet bowls, pet bed, leash, etc.) as gifts, then selecting the pet as a family. That way, everyone has time to really think about whether your family is ready for a pet. Key Questions Before adopting or purchasing any pet, talk to all family members, discuss ...

  8. Radiation-resistant camera tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahata, Takao; Manabe, Sohei; Makishima, Yasuhiro

    1982-01-01

    It was a long time ago that Toshiba launched on manufacturing black-and-white radiation-resistant camera tubes employing nonbrowning face-plate glass for ITV cameras used in nuclear power plants. Now in compliance with the increasing demand in nuclear power field, the Company is at grips with the development of radiation-resistant single color-camera tubes incorporating a color-stripe filter for color ITV cameras used under radiation environment. Herein represented are the results of experiments on characteristics of materials for single color-camera tubes and prospects for commercialization of the tubes. (author)

  9. Pet-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  10. Development of continuous detectors for a high resolution animal PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, S.; Cherry, S.R.; Ricci, A.R.; Shao, Y.; Phelps, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The authors propose a design for a high resolution, gamma-camera style detector that is suitable for use in a positron emission tomograph dedicated to small animal research. Through Monte Carlo simulation the authors modeled the performance of a detector composed of one 76.2 x 76.2 x 8 mm thick LSO crystal coupled to a 3 in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PS-PMT). The authors investigated the effect of optical coupling compounds, surface treatment and dept of interaction on the quantity (efficiency) and distribution (spread) of scintillation photons reaching the photocathode. They also investigated linearization of the position response. The authors propose a PET system consisting of fourteen of these detectors in 2 rings, yielding a 16 cm diameter by 15 cm long tomograph. It would operate in 3-D mode subtending a 68% solid angle to the center. The expected spatial resolution is (≤2 mm), with a system efficiency of ∼ 10% at the center (200 keV lower threshold) and a singles count rate capability of approximately 10 6 cps per detector

  11. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    section unearths what characterizes the literature on camera movement. The second section of the dissertation delineates the history of camera movement itself within narrative cinema. Several organizational principles subtending the on-screen effect of camera movement are revealed in section two...... but they are not organized into a coherent framework. This is the task that section three meets in proposing a functional taxonomy for camera movement in narrative cinema. Two presumptions subtend the taxonomy: That camera movement actively contributes to the way in which we understand the sound and images on the screen......, commentative or valuative manner. 4) Focalization: associating the movement of the camera with the viewpoints of characters or entities in the story world. 5) Reflexive: inviting spectators to engage with the artifice of camera movement. 6) Abstract: visualizing abstract ideas and concepts. In order...

  12. Ford F250 Dedicated CNG Pickup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eudy, Leslie

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is encouraging the use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). To support this activity, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of light-duty AFVs. In this study, we tested a pair of 1998 Ford F-250 pickups: one dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) model and a gasoline model as closely matched as possible. Each vehicle was run through a series of tests to evaluate acceleration, fuel economy, braking, and cold-start capabilities, as well as more subjective performance indicators such as handling, climate control, and noise

  13. Multi Camera Multi Object Tracking using Block Search over Epipolar Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Sargolzaei

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present strategy for multi-objects tracking in multi camera environment for the surveillance and security application where tracking multitude subjects are of utmost importance in a crowded scene. Our technique assumes partially overlapped multi-camera setup where cameras share common view from different angle to assess positions and activities of subjects under suspicion. To establish spatial correspondence between camera views we employ an epipolar geometry technique. We propose an overlapped block search method to find the interested pattern (target in new frames. Color pattern update scheme has been considered to further optimize the efficiency of the object tracking when object pattern changes due to object motion in the field of views of the cameras. Evaluation of our approach is presented with the results on PETS2007 dataset..

  14. Dedicated Filter for Robust Occupancy Grid Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KS Nagla

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor based perception of the environment is an emerging area of the mobile robot research where sensors play a pivotal role. For autonomous mobile robots, the fundamental requirement is the convergent of the range information in to high level internal representation. Internal representation in the form of occupancy grid is commonly used in autonomous mobile robots due to its various advantages. There are several sensors such as vision sensor, laser rage finder, and ultrasonic and infrared sensors etc. play roles in mapping. However the sensor information failure, sensor inaccuracies, noise, and slow response are the major causes of an error in the mapping. To improve the reliability of the mobile robot mapping multisensory data fusion is considered as an optimal solution. This paper presents a novel architecture of sensor fusion frame work in which a dedicated filter (DF is proposed to increase the robustness of the occupancy grid for indoor environment. The technique has been experimentally verified for different indoor test environments. The proposed configuration shows improvement in the occupancy grid with the implementation of dedicated filters.

  15. Dedicated low-field MRI in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquet, P; Breton, E; Goetz, C; Constantinesco, A; Marin, C

    2009-01-01

    The rationale of this work is to point out the relevance of in vivo MR images of mice obtained using a dedicated low-field system. For this purpose a small 0.1 T water-cooled electro-magnet and solenoidal radio frequency (RF) transmit-receive coils were used. All MR images were acquired in three-dimensional (3D) mode. An isolation cell was designed allowing easy placement of the RF coils and simple delivery of gaseous anesthesia as well as warming of the animal. Images with and without contrast agent were obtained in total acquisition times on the order of half an hour to four hours on normal mice as well as on animals bearing tumors. Typical in plane pixel dimensions range from 200 x 200 to 500 x 500 μm 2 with slice thicknesses ranging between 0.65 and 1.50 mm. This work shows that, besides light installation and low cost, dedicated low-field MR systems are suitable for small rodents imaging, opening this technique even to small research units.

  16. Dedicated low-field MRI in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, P.; Breton, E.; Goetz, C.; Marin, C.; Constantinesco, A.

    2009-09-01

    The rationale of this work is to point out the relevance of in vivo MR images of mice obtained using a dedicated low-field system. For this purpose a small 0.1 T water-cooled electro-magnet and solenoidal radio frequency (RF) transmit-receive coils were used. All MR images were acquired in three-dimensional (3D) mode. An isolation cell was designed allowing easy placement of the RF coils and simple delivery of gaseous anesthesia as well as warming of the animal. Images with and without contrast agent were obtained in total acquisition times on the order of half an hour to four hours on normal mice as well as on animals bearing tumors. Typical in plane pixel dimensions range from 200 × 200 to 500 × 500 µm2 with slice thicknesses ranging between 0.65 and 1.50 mm. This work shows that, besides light installation and low cost, dedicated low-field MR systems are suitable for small rodents imaging, opening this technique even to small research units.

  17. Automatic inference of geometric camera parameters and inter-camera topology in uncalibrated disjoint surveillance cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, Richard J. M.; Bouma, Henri; Baan, Jan; Eendebak, Pieter T.; van Rest, Jeroen H. C.

    2015-10-01

    Person tracking across non-overlapping cameras and other types of video analytics benefit from spatial calibration information that allows an estimation of the distance between cameras and a relation between pixel coordinates and world coordinates within a camera. In a large environment with many cameras, or for frequent ad-hoc deployments of cameras, the cost of this calibration is high. This creates a barrier for the use of video analytics. Automating the calibration allows for a short configuration time, and the use of video analytics in a wider range of scenarios, including ad-hoc crisis situations and large scale surveillance systems. We show an autocalibration method entirely based on pedestrian detections in surveillance video in multiple non-overlapping cameras. In this paper, we show the two main components of automatic calibration. The first shows the intra-camera geometry estimation that leads to an estimate of the tilt angle, focal length and camera height, which is important for the conversion from pixels to meters and vice versa. The second component shows the inter-camera topology inference that leads to an estimate of the distance between cameras, which is important for spatio-temporal analysis of multi-camera tracking. This paper describes each of these methods and provides results on realistic video data.

  18. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Healthy pets healthy people. www.cdc.gov/healthypets . Updated July 19, 2016. ...

  19. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Krishnendu [Ohio Medical Physics Consulting, Dublin, Ohio 43017 (United States); Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Chen, Yu. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  1. Development of PET in Latin America. Experience of the first PET-Cyclotron Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutor, C.A.; Frias, L.

    2002-01-01

    Mendoza's government. This local economic condition allowed our institution to install the cyclotron and the PET camera in 1997. A staff trained abroad made possible the first 18 FDG studies in 1999 and despite the efforts to run the center, 18 FDG-PET images have shown us an improvement in cost-effectiveness of the patient's treatment, making the effort worthy. Even knowing about the risk and benefits of running a PET -Cyclotron Center, we encourage installing other centers in Latin America in the near future

  2. Multiparametric evaluation by simultaneous PET-MRI examination in patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Carlo; Romeo, Valeria; Aiello, Marco; Mesolella, Massimo; Iorio, Brigida; Barbuto, Luigi; Cantone, Elena; Nicolai, Emanuele; Covello, Mario

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between metabolic 18Fluoro-Deoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG/PET) and morpho-functional parameters derived by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer. To assess the clinical impact of PET/MRI examination on patient's staging and treatment planning. 16 patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer were enrolled and underwent whole body PET/CT followed by a dedicated PET/MRI of the head/neck region. Data were separately evaluated by two blinded groups: metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K trans , V e , k ep and iAUC) maps were obtained by positioning regions of interest (ROIs). Tumoral local extension assessed on PET/MRI was compared to endoscopic findings. A good inter-observer agreement was found in anatomical location and local extension of PET/MRI lesions (Cohen's kappa 0.9). PET/CT SUV measures highly correlate with ones derived by PET/MRI (e.g., p=0.96 for measures on VOI). Significant correlations among metabolic, diffusion and perfusion parameters have been detected. PET/MRI had a relevant clinical impact, confirming endoscopic findings (6 cases), helping treatment planning (9 cases), and modifying endoscopic primary staging (1 case). PET/MRI is useful for primary staging of laryngeal cancer, allowing simultaneous collection of metabolic and functional data and conditioning the therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Imaging with PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PET deals with biochemistry and metabolic changes that occur at molecular level. Hence, PET differs fundamentally from other imaging modalities. CT imaging is based on tissue density, whereas MRI conveys anatomic information based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. CT and MRI are useful in clinical diagnosis only when disease process has caused significant anatomic alterations. However, in most disease conditions chemical changes precede anatomic changes, that can be detected by PET technology. Thus, PET can provide earliest and unique information about ongoing disease process long before anatomic or structural changes take place. There is no other modality available at present that can replace PET technology. Although PET produces cross-sectional images like that obtained in MRI or CT, they represent circulation, function and metabolism, and not anatomic structure. PET is extremely sensitive measuring quantitatively concentration of tracers in nano to pico-molar range. Thus, PET enables merger of biochemistry and biology in medicine giving birth to molecular medicine that focuses on identifying the molecular errors of disease leading to developing molecular corrections including gene therapy. Molecular imaging with PET has been playing a role in examining the biological nature of a disease condition and its characterization to guide selection and evaluation of treatment. (author)

  5. A survey of PET activity in Germany during 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, Gunnar; Nosske, Dietmar; Minkov, Vladimir; Glatting, Gerhard; Reske, Sven N.

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most powerful molecular imaging technique currently available for clinical use. The aim of this study was to provide public health information on PET procedures carried out in Germany - a country with a very high number of PET installations. To this end, all facilities that in 1999 were running at least one dedicated PET system were contacted and requested to provide information in a questionnaire on the radiopharmaceuticals applied, the total number and age distribution of patients and volunteers examined, the main diagnostic applications and the range of administered activities. Based on the information provided by 48 of the 60 PET facilities in Germany, an annual frequency of about 0.34 PET procedures per 1,000 inhabitants was estimated, associated with an annual per capita effective dose of about 1.9 μSv. Averaged over all PET procedures, the mean effective dose to patients was 5.6 mSv. The age distribution of patients and volunteers was skewed markedly towards higher ages; only a very small fraction ( 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), which was utilised in more than 84% of all PET procedures. For this tracer, the median value for activities applied for examinations in the three-dimensional (3D) acquisition mode was only half of that used for two-dimensional (2D) measurements. Based on a statistical analysis of the distribution of mean FDG activities administered to patients in the 48 PET facilities who responded to our inquiry, diagnostic reference levels of 370 and 200 MBq are proposed for the 2D and the 3D mode, respectively. (orig.)

  6. Images to visualize the brain. PET: Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Diagnosis instrument and research tool, Positron Emission Tomography permits advanced technological developments on positron camera, on molecule labelling and principally on very complex 3D image processing. Cyceron Centre in Caen-France works on brain diseases and try to understand the mechanism of observed troubles and to assess the treatment efficiency with PET. Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot of CEA-France establishes a mapping of cognitive functions in PET as vision areas, anxiety regions, brain organization of language, different attention forms, voluntary actions and motor functions

  7. [Indications and instructions to patients for a positron emission tomography-PET scan. The importance of the hybridic PET/CT-computerised tomography scan and which specialty should be responsible for its function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammaticos, Philip; Datseris, Ioannis; Gerali, Sofia; Papantoniou, Vassilios; Valsamaki, Pipitsa; Boundas, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Indications and instructions to patients for performing a positron emission tomography - PET scan are mentioned. Although PET camera was developed in 1970 its clinical indications were established in about 1998. The hybridic PET/CT- computerized tomography scanner appeared in 2001 and its clinical indications are still under discussion. These discussions refer to both the use of PET/CT as an acquisition correction and anatomic localization device for PET images (AC/A) and to its use as a diagnostic CT scan (dCT). Most of the patients submitted for a PET scan have already done a dCT scan. This was the case in 286 out of the first 300 patients referred to "Evangelismos" hospital in Athens for a PET scan. These two scans can be matched electronically. Extra cost, space, personnel and radiation absorption dose especially in children, are additional factors to be considered in using the PET/CT scanner. The specialty of Nuclear Medicine is now based on the PET camera, its best part and main equipment for molecular imaging. It is very much easier and faster for a Nuclear Medicine physician who routinely reports tomographic PET and SPET images, to be familiar with the CT images than for a Radiologist to get to "know how" about the PET camera and the whole Nuclear Medicine Department. Nuclear Medicine is about open radiation sources, molecular imaging, specific radio-pharmacology, radiobiology, radiation protection etc, while on the other hand in some countries, Nuclear Physicians have already spent, as part of their official training, six months in a Radiology Department whose function is considered to be at least 25% about the CT scanner. We come to the conclusion that the PET/CT scanner should be under the responsibility of the Nuclear Medicine Department and the Radiologist should act as an advisor.

  8. Cheetah: A high frame rate, high resolution SWIR image camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neys, Joel; Bentell, Jonas; O'Grady, Matt; Vermeiren, Jan; Colin, Thierry; Hooylaerts, Peter; Grietens, Bob

    2008-10-01

    A high resolution, high frame rate InGaAs based image sensor and associated camera has been developed. The sensor and the camera are capable of recording and delivering more than 1700 full 640x512pixel frames per second. The FPA utilizes a low lag CTIA current integrator in each pixel, enabling integration times shorter than one microsecond. On-chip logics allows for four different sub windows to be read out simultaneously at even higher rates. The spectral sensitivity of the FPA is situated in the SWIR range [0.9-1.7 μm] and can be further extended into the Visible and NIR range. The Cheetah camera has max 16 GB of on-board memory to store the acquired images and transfer the data over a Gigabit Ethernet connection to the PC. The camera is also equipped with a full CameralinkTM interface to directly stream the data to a frame grabber or dedicated image processing unit. The Cheetah camera is completely under software control.

  9. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) dedication - on complex electronic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Kwang Young; Kim, Joong Han; Koo, In Soo; Lee, Sang Yong

    2008-01-01

    In future more complicated IT-based hardware and software is supposed to used in the safety-grade systems in nuclear power plants. Also there are the efforts to establish the criteria for CGI dedications in NRC and CEC dedication in other standard organizations. The highly complicated components, i.e. CEC should be dedication plans. Thus work to be done in later is to prepare the strategies, plans, guide and procedures that is more specific for CEC dedication

  10. Business administration of PET facilities. A cost analysis of three facilities utilizing delivery FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, Naohiro; Oku, Shinya; Fujii, Ryo; Furui, Yuji; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) has been proved to be a powerful imaging tool in clinical oncology. The number of PET facilities in Japan has remarkably increased over the last decade. Furthermore, the approval of delivery fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in 2005 resulted in a tremendous expansion of the PET institutions without a cyclotron facility. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost analysis of PET institutions that utilized delivery FDG. Three PET facilities using delivery FDG were investigated about the costs for PET service. Fixed costs included depreciation costs for construction and medical equipments such as positron camera. Variable costs consisted of costs for medical materials including delivery FDG. The break-even point was analyzed in each of three institutions. In the three hospitals (A, B and C), the annual number of PET scan was 1,591, 1,637 and 914, while cost per scan was accounted as 110,262 yen, 111,091 yen, and 134,192 yen, respectively. The break-even point was calculated to be 2,583, 2,679 and 2,081, respectively. PET facilities utilizing delivery FDG seemed to have difficulty in business administration. Such a situation suggests the possibility that the current supply of PET facilities might exceed actual demand for the service. The efficiency of resource allocation should be taken into consideration in the future health service researches on PET. (author)

  11. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Demir; Türkay Toklu; Mohammad Abuqbeitah; Hüseyin Çetin; H. Sezer Sezgin; Nami Yeyin; Kerim Sönmezoğlu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated...

  12. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H. Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated asp...

  13. Video Chat with Multiple Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    MacCormick, John

    2012-01-01

    The dominant paradigm for video chat employs a single camera at each end of the conversation, but some conversations can be greatly enhanced by using multiple cameras at one or both ends. This paper provides the first rigorous investigation of multi-camera video chat, concentrating especially on the ability of users to switch between views at either end of the conversation. A user study of 23 individuals analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of permitting a user to switch between views at...

  14. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  15. A dedicated fund supports technological innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The Knowledge and Technology Transfer (KTT) Group is calling on CERN Departments to take their technology out of the confines of the laboratory and make it ready for dissemination. For the first time, projects can apply for financial support from the newly established KTT Fund.   Scientific inquiry can lead to unexpected developments for society when researchers apply their expertise for public use. CERN actively encourages this transfer of knowledge and technology and, for the first time, has created a dedicated fund to provide financial support to projects aiming at disseminating their technologies to external audiences. CERN’s technology transfer schemes were formalised in the recent Policy on the Management of Intellectual Property in Technology Transfer, approved in March. Revenues generated by commercial exploitation will be distributed between the members of the team that developed the technology, their Department, and the KTT Fund for reinvestment in further KTT projects. &qu...

  16. Optical Design Using Small Dedicated Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Douglas C.

    1980-09-01

    Since the time of the 1975 International Lens Design Conference, we have developed a series of optical design programs for Hewlett-Packard desktop computers. The latest programs in the series, OSLO-25G and OSLO-45G, have most of the capabilities of general-purpose optical design programs, including optimization based on exact ray-trace data. The computational techniques used in the programs are similar to ones used in other programs, but the creative environment experienced by a designer working directly with these small dedicated systems is typically much different from that obtained with shared-computer systems. Some of the differences are due to the psychological factors associated with using a system having zero running cost, while others are due to the design of the program, which emphasizes graphical output and ease of use, as opposed to computational speed.

  17. [18F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT for whole-body staging in patients with recurrent malignancies of the female pelvis: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Grueneisen, Johannes; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Umutlu, Lale; Ruhlmann, Verena; Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye; Heusch, Philipp; Kraff, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in recurrent ovarian and cervical cancer in comparison to PET/CT. A group of 19 patients with suspected recurrence of pelvic malignancies (ovarian cancer, 11 patients; cervical cancer, 8 patients) scheduled for an [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT were subsequently enrolled for a PET/MRI. The scan protocol comprised: (1) a T1-W axial VIBE after contrast agent adminstration, (2) an axial T2-W HASTE, (3) a coronal TIRM, (4) an axial DWI, and dedicated MR sequences of the female pelvis including (5) a T1-W VIBE before contrast agent adminstration, (6) a sagittal T2-W TSE, and (7) a sagittal T1-W dynamic VIBE. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated separately by two readers regarding lesion count, lesion localization, lesion conspicuity (four-point scale), lesion characterization (benign/malignant/indeterminate) and diagnostic confidence (three-point scale). All available data (histology, prior examinations, PET/CT, PET/MRI, follow-up examinations) served as standard of reference. Median values were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Metastatic lesions were present in 16 of the 19 patients. A total of 78 lesions (malignant, 58; benign, 20) were described. Both PET/CT and PET/MRI allowed correct identification of all malignant lesions and provided equivalent conspicuity (3.86 ± 0.35 for PET/CT, 3.91 ± 0.28 for PET/MRI; p > 0.05). Diagnostic confidence was significantly higher for PET/MRI in malignant (p < 0.01) and benign lesions (p < 0.05). Both PET/CT and PET/MRI offer an equivalently high diagnostic value for recurrent pelvic malignancies. PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic confidence in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Considering the reduced radiation dose and superior lesion discrimination, PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative to PET/CT in the future. (orig.)

  18. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT for whole-body staging in patients with recurrent malignancies of the female pelvis: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Grueneisen, Johannes; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Kraff, Oliver [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in recurrent ovarian and cervical cancer in comparison to PET/CT. A group of 19 patients with suspected recurrence of pelvic malignancies (ovarian cancer, 11 patients; cervical cancer, 8 patients) scheduled for an [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT were subsequently enrolled for a PET/MRI. The scan protocol comprised: (1) a T1-W axial VIBE after contrast agent adminstration, (2) an axial T2-W HASTE, (3) a coronal TIRM, (4) an axial DWI, and dedicated MR sequences of the female pelvis including (5) a T1-W VIBE before contrast agent adminstration, (6) a sagittal T2-W TSE, and (7) a sagittal T1-W dynamic VIBE. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated separately by two readers regarding lesion count, lesion localization, lesion conspicuity (four-point scale), lesion characterization (benign/malignant/indeterminate) and diagnostic confidence (three-point scale). All available data (histology, prior examinations, PET/CT, PET/MRI, follow-up examinations) served as standard of reference. Median values were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Metastatic lesions were present in 16 of the 19 patients. A total of 78 lesions (malignant, 58; benign, 20) were described. Both PET/CT and PET/MRI allowed correct identification of all malignant lesions and provided equivalent conspicuity (3.86 ± 0.35 for PET/CT, 3.91 ± 0.28 for PET/MRI; p > 0.05). Diagnostic confidence was significantly higher for PET/MRI in malignant (p < 0.01) and benign lesions (p < 0.05). Both PET/CT and PET/MRI offer an equivalently high diagnostic value for recurrent pelvic malignancies. PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic confidence in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Considering the reduced radiation dose and superior lesion discrimination, PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative to PET/CT in the future. (orig.)

  19. 47 CFR 69.125 - Dedicated signalling transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dedicated signalling transport. 69.125 Section... (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.125 Dedicated signalling transport. (a) Dedicated signalling transport shall consist of two elements, a signalling link charge and a signalling transfer point...

  20. A Motionless Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Omniview, a motionless, noiseless, exceptionally versatile camera was developed for NASA as a receiving device for guiding space robots. The system can see in one direction and provide as many as four views simultaneously. Developed by Omniview, Inc. (formerly TRI) under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, the system's image transformation electronics produce a real-time image from anywhere within a hemispherical field. Lens distortion is removed, and a corrected "flat" view appears on a monitor. Key elements are a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD), image correction circuitry and a microcomputer for image processing. The system can be adapted to existing installations. Applications include security and surveillance, teleconferencing, imaging, virtual reality, broadcast video and military operations. Omniview technology is now called IPIX. The company was founded in 1986 as TeleRobotics International, became Omniview in 1995, and changed its name to Interactive Pictures Corporation in 1997.

  1. Gamma camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Gerber, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma camera system having control components operating in conjunction with a solid state detector is described. The detector is formed of a plurality of discrete components which are associated in geometrical or coordinate arrangement defining a detector matrix to derive coordinate signal outputs. These outputs are selectively filtered and summed to form coordinate channel signals and corresponding energy channel signals. A control feature of the invention regulates the noted summing and filtering performance to derive data acceptance signals which are addressed to further treating components. The latter components include coordinate and enery channel multiplexers as well as energy-responsive selective networks. A sequential control is provided for regulating the signal processing functions of the system to derive an overall imaging cycle

  2. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector planes positioned side-by-side around a patient area to detect radiation. Each plane includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and at least two rows of scintillation crystals on each photomultiplier tube extend across to adjacent photomultiplier tubes for detecting radiation from the patient area. Each row of crystals on each photomultiplier tube is offset from the other rows of crystals, and the area of each crystal on each tube in each row is different than the area of the crystals on the tube in other rows for detecting which crystal is actuated and allowing the detector to detect more inter-plane slides. The crystals are offset by an amount equal to the length of the crystal divided by the number of rows. The rows of crystals on opposite sides of the patient may be rotated 90 degrees relative to each other

  3. The Circular Camera Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    It has been an accepted precept in film theory that specific stylistic features do not express specific content. Nevertheless, it is possible to find many examples in the history of film in which stylistic features do express specific content: for instance, the circular camera movement is used...... repeatedly to convey the feeling of a man and a woman falling in love. This raises the question of why producers and directors choose certain stylistic features to narrate certain categories of content. Through the analysis of several short film and TV clips, this article explores whether...... or not there are perceptual aspects related to specific stylistic features that enable them to be used for delimited narrational purposes. The article further attempts to reopen this particular stylistic debate by exploring the embodied aspects of visual perception in relation to specific stylistic features...

  4. Automatic locking radioisotope camera lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosauer, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    The lock of the present invention secures the isotope source in a stored shielded condition in the camera until a positive effort has been made to open the lock and take the source outside of the camera and prevents disconnection of the source pigtail unless the source is locked in a shielded condition in the camera. It also gives a visual indication of the locked or possible exposed condition of the isotope source and prevents the source pigtail from being completely pushed out of the camera, even when the lock is released. (author)

  5. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm 3 GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a 22 Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that 18 F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging

  6. One year report from the T.R.P. A.P.-H.P. center; Impact of the PET with [18F] - FDG on the medical decision in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.N.; Montravers, F.; Grahek, D.; Kerrou, K.; Younsi, N.; Cailleux, N.; Vaylet, C.; Nguyen, C.; Zanotti, P.; Itti, E.; Malek, Z.; Peker, C.; Toubert, M.E.; Benelhadj, S.; Duet, M.

    2001-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of FDG-PET has been recognised by the French Medicine Agency since 1998. A PET centre equipped with a dedicated camera suited for oncological routine examination has been opened at the beginning of the year 2000, associating 5 hospitals and their network of oncologists. The present article has several aims. It reports quantitatively, monthly and indication by indication on the number of examinations performed during the opening year, to give possibly helpful information to the future PET centres in France. During the year 2000, 656 FDG-PET examination has been performed in 605 patients, who dwelt in Paris for 28% of them, in the rest of Ile de France region for 47 %, in other French regions or even abroad for 25%. 83% of the patients came has out-patients. The article also briefly enumerates the clinical study protocols that have been designed and approved by the Scientific Committee and started during the year 2000, the inclusions being still underway. Finally, the article includes the main results of our study on the clinical impact of FDG-PET. Such results have been already published outside France: in a meta-analysis involving more than 5000 patients, the modification rate of patients' management was calculated to be 30%. However, the evaluation of this impact from the referring clinician's perspective that seems more impartial has only been performed recently by two Californian teams by means of a questionnaire retrospective survey. We used the same questionnaire (translated into French language) and the same methodology. One questionnaire was sent to the referring physician for each of the 476 who underwent a routine FDG-PET study for a registered clinical indication during the year 2000. 348 responses (73%) were received and included in the study. Globally, the disease was upstaged in 26% of the cases and down-staged in 9%. Inter-modality management changes (change from a scheduled therapeutic modality for a different one) were

  7. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  8. Japanese guideline for the oncology FDG-PET/CT data acquisition protocol. Synopsis of Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukukita, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Matsumoto, Keiichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Shimada, Naoki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Senda, Michio

    2014-01-01

    This synopsis outlines the Japanese guideline Version 2.0 for the data acquisition protocol of oncology FDG-PET/CT scans that was created by a joint task force of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine Technology, the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine and the Japanese Council of PET Imaging, and was published in Kakuigaku-Gijutsu 2013; 33:377-420 in Japanese. The guideline aims at standardizing the PET image quality among PET centers and different PET camera models by providing criteria for the IEC body phantom image quality as well as for the patient PET image quality based on the noise equivalent count (NEC), NEC density and liver signal-to-noise ratio, so that the appropriate scanning parameters can be determined for each PET camera. This Version 2.0 covers issues that were not focused on in Version 1.0, including the accuracy of the standardized uptake value (SUV), effect of body size together with adjustment of scanning duration, and time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction technique. Version 2.0 also presents data acquired with new PET camera models that were not tested in Version 1.0. Reference values for physical indicators of phantom image quality have been updated as well. (author)

  9. Birds Kept as Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pet’s health Visit a veterinarian who has experience with pet birds for routine check-ups to keep your bird healthy and prevent infectious diseases. If your bird becomes sick or dies within a month after purchase or adoption: Contact your veterinarian. Inform the pet ...

  10. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  11. A triple GEM gamma camera for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anulli, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Balla, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Bencivenni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Corradi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); D' Ambrosio, C. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Domenici, D. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Felici, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Gatta, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy); Morone, M.C. [Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per immagini, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Murtas, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati INFN, Frascati (Italy)]. E-mail: fabrizio.murtas@lnf.infn.it; Schillaci, O. [Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per immagini, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy)

    2007-03-01

    A Gamma Camera for medical applications 10x10cm{sup 2} has been built using a triple GEM chamber prototype. The photon converters placed in front of the three GEM foils, has been realized with different technologies. The chamber, High Voltage supplied with a new active divider made in Frascati, is readout through 64 pads, 1mm{sup 2} wide, organized in a row of 8cm long, with LHCb ASDQ chip. This Gamma Camera can be used both for X-ray movie and PET-SPECT imaging; this chamber prototype is placed in a scanner system, creating images of 8x8cm{sup 2}. Several measurements have been performed using phantom and radioactive sources of Tc99m(140keV) and Na22(511keV). Results on spatial resolution and image reconstruction are presented.

  12. Design Optimization of a TOF, Breast PET Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eunsin; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with limited angle geometry can provide flexibility in detector placement around the patient as well as the ability to combine it with other imaging modalities. A primary challenge of a stationary limited angle scanner is the reduced image quality due to artifacts present in the reconstructed image leading to a loss in quantitative information. Previously it has been shown that using time-of-flight (TOF) information in image recons...

  13. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  14. Oncology PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of this article, likening medical images to 'Where is Waldo?' I indicate the concept of diagnostic process of PET/CT imaging, so that medical physics specialists could understand the role of each imaging modality and infer our distress for image diagnosis. Then, I state the present situation of PET imaging and the basics (e.g. health insurance coverage, clinical significance, principle, protocol, and pitfall) of oncology FDG-PET imaging which accounts for more than 99% of all clinical PET examinations in Japan. Finally, I would like to give a wishful prospect of oncology PET that will expand to be more cancer-specific in order to assess therapeutic effects of emerging molecular targeted drugs targeting the 'hallmarks of cancer'. (author)

  15. Multiparametric evaluation by simultaneous PET-MRI examination in patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaliere, Carlo; Romeo, Valeria; Aiello, Marco; Mesolella, Massimo; Iorio, Brigida; Barbuto, Luigi; Cantone, Elena; Nicolai, Emanuele; Covello, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PET/MRI is feasible and useful for primary staging of laryngeal cancer. • PET/MRI simultaneously provides morphological, metabolic and functional parameters of tumoral laryngeal lesions. • PET/MRI allows an appropriate tumoral staging in terms of lesion extension with significant impact on therapeutic strategies. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between metabolic 18Fluoro-Deoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG/PET) and morpho-functional parameters derived by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer. To assess the clinical impact of PET/MRI examination on patient’s staging and treatment planning. Methods: 16 patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer were enrolled and underwent whole body PET/CT followed by a dedicated PET/MRI of the head/neck region. Data were separately evaluated by two blinded groups: metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K trans , V e , k ep and iAUC) maps were obtained by positioning regions of interest (ROIs). Tumoral local extension assessed on PET/MRI was compared to endoscopic findings. Results: A good inter-observer agreement was found in anatomical location and local extension of PET/MRI lesions (Cohen’s kappa 0.9). PET/CT SUV measures highly correlate with ones derived by PET/MRI (e.g., p = 0.96 for measures on VOI). Significant correlations among metabolic, diffusion and perfusion parameters have been detected. PET/MRI had a relevant clinical impact, confirming endoscopic findings (6 cases), helping treatment planning (9 cases), and modifying endoscopic primary staging (1 case). Conclusions: PET/MRI is useful for primary staging of laryngeal cancer, allowing simultaneous collection of metabolic and functional data and conditioning the therapeutic strategies.

  16. Multiparametric evaluation by simultaneous PET-MRI examination in patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, Carlo [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 113-80143, Naples (Italy); Romeo, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.romeo@unina.it [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Aiello, Marco [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 113-80143, Naples (Italy); Mesolella, Massimo; Iorio, Brigida [Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive and Odontostomatologic Science, ENT Section, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Barbuto, Luigi [Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cantone, Elena [Department of Neuroscience, Reproductive and Odontostomatologic Science, ENT Section, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, Emanuele; Covello, Mario [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 113-80143, Naples (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • PET/MRI is feasible and useful for primary staging of laryngeal cancer. • PET/MRI simultaneously provides morphological, metabolic and functional parameters of tumoral laryngeal lesions. • PET/MRI allows an appropriate tumoral staging in terms of lesion extension with significant impact on therapeutic strategies. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the relationship between metabolic 18Fluoro-Deoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG/PET) and morpho-functional parameters derived by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer. To assess the clinical impact of PET/MRI examination on patient’s staging and treatment planning. Methods: 16 patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer were enrolled and underwent whole body PET/CT followed by a dedicated PET/MRI of the head/neck region. Data were separately evaluated by two blinded groups: metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K{sub trans}, V{sub e}, k{sub ep} and iAUC) maps were obtained by positioning regions of interest (ROIs). Tumoral local extension assessed on PET/MRI was compared to endoscopic findings. Results: A good inter-observer agreement was found in anatomical location and local extension of PET/MRI lesions (Cohen’s kappa 0.9). PET/CT SUV measures highly correlate with ones derived by PET/MRI (e.g., p = 0.96 for measures on VOI). Significant correlations among metabolic, diffusion and perfusion parameters have been detected. PET/MRI had a relevant clinical impact, confirming endoscopic findings (6 cases), helping treatment planning (9 cases), and modifying endoscopic primary staging (1 case). Conclusions: PET/MRI is useful for primary staging of laryngeal cancer, allowing simultaneous collection of metabolic and functional data and conditioning the therapeutic strategies.

  17. Development of baby cyclotron for PET in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, J.S.; Kim, Y.S.; Hu, J.Y.; Shin, Y.C.; Yoon, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Development of a 13 MeV cyclotron for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been in progress since April 1999 at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital (KCCH). The study has been carried out in a joint collaboration between KCCH and the Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH). Increasing desire for an uninterrupted, reliable and timely supply of the isotopes to customers has prompted obtaining a dedicated 5-13 MeV cyclotron for PET applications and pursuing the purchase of another 30MeV medical cyclotron in the very near future. A decision has been made to design the PET cyclotron in Korea. This will not only ease the problems associated with maintenance during operation but also keep the door open for continuous upgrading of the machine in the future

  18. The "All Sky Camera Network"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Andy

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the "All Sky Camera Network" came to life as an outreach program to connect the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) exhibit "Space Odyssey" with Colorado schools. The network is comprised of cameras placed strategically at schools throughout Colorado to capture fireballs--rare events that produce meteorites.…

  19. The Eye of the Camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rompay, Thomas Johannes Lucas; Vonk, Dorette J.; Fransen, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of security cameras on prosocial behavior. Results from previous studies indicate that the presence of others can trigger helping behavior, arising from the need for approval of others. Extending these findings, the authors propose that security cameras can likewise

  20. Accuracy Potential and Applications of MIDAS Aerial Oblique Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, M.

    2012-07-01

    Airborne oblique cameras such as Fairchild T-3A were initially used for military reconnaissance in 30s. A modern professional digital oblique camera such as MIDAS (Multi-camera Integrated Digital Acquisition System) is used to generate lifelike three dimensional to the users for visualizations, GIS applications, architectural modeling, city modeling, games, simulators, etc. Oblique imagery provide the best vantage for accessing and reviewing changes to the local government tax base, property valuation assessment, buying & selling of residential/commercial for better decisions in a more timely manner. Oblique imagery is also used for infrastructure monitoring making sure safe operations of transportation, utilities, and facilities. Sanborn Mapping Company acquired one MIDAS from TrackAir in 2011. This system consists of four tilted (45 degrees) cameras and one vertical camera connected to a dedicated data acquisition computer system. The 5 digital cameras are based on the Canon EOS 1DS Mark3 with Zeiss lenses. The CCD size is 5,616 by 3,744 (21 MPixels) with the pixel size of 6.4 microns. Multiple flights using different camera configurations (nadir/oblique (28 mm/50 mm) and (50 mm/50 mm)) were flown over downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. Boresight fights for 28 mm nadir camera were flown at 600 m and 1,200 m and for 50 mm nadir camera at 750 m and 1500 m. Cameras were calibrated by using a 3D cage and multiple convergent images utilizing Australis model. In this paper, the MIDAS system is described, a number of real data sets collected during the aforementioned flights are presented together with their associated flight configurations, data processing workflow, system calibration and quality control workflows are highlighted and the achievable accuracy is presented in some detail. This study revealed that the expected accuracy of about 1 to 1.5 GSD (Ground Sample Distance) for planimetry and about 2 to 2.5 GSD for vertical can be achieved. Remaining systematic

  1. ACCURACY POTENTIAL AND APPLICATIONS OF MIDAS AERIAL OBLIQUE CAMERA SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne oblique cameras such as Fairchild T-3A were initially used for military reconnaissance in 30s. A modern professional digital oblique camera such as MIDAS (Multi-camera Integrated Digital Acquisition System is used to generate lifelike three dimensional to the users for visualizations, GIS applications, architectural modeling, city modeling, games, simulators, etc. Oblique imagery provide the best vantage for accessing and reviewing changes to the local government tax base, property valuation assessment, buying & selling of residential/commercial for better decisions in a more timely manner. Oblique imagery is also used for infrastructure monitoring making sure safe operations of transportation, utilities, and facilities. Sanborn Mapping Company acquired one MIDAS from TrackAir in 2011. This system consists of four tilted (45 degrees cameras and one vertical camera connected to a dedicated data acquisition computer system. The 5 digital cameras are based on the Canon EOS 1DS Mark3 with Zeiss lenses. The CCD size is 5,616 by 3,744 (21 MPixels with the pixel size of 6.4 microns. Multiple flights using different camera configurations (nadir/oblique (28 mm/50 mm and (50 mm/50 mm were flown over downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. Boresight fights for 28 mm nadir camera were flown at 600 m and 1,200 m and for 50 mm nadir camera at 750 m and 1500 m. Cameras were calibrated by using a 3D cage and multiple convergent images utilizing Australis model. In this paper, the MIDAS system is described, a number of real data sets collected during the aforementioned flights are presented together with their associated flight configurations, data processing workflow, system calibration and quality control workflows are highlighted and the achievable accuracy is presented in some detail. This study revealed that the expected accuracy of about 1 to 1.5 GSD (Ground Sample Distance for planimetry and about 2 to 2.5 GSD for vertical can be achieved. Remaining

  2. MO-AB-206-01: PET Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkington, T. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  3. MO-AB-206-01: PET Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkington, T.

    2016-01-01

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  4. 18F-FDG PET in children with lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depas, Gisele; Barsy, Caroline De; Foidart, Jacqueline; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland; Jerusalem, Guy; Hoyoux, Claire; Dresse, Marie-Francoise; Fassotte, Marie-France; Paquet, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) in children with lymphomas, at various stages of their disease. Twenty-eight children (mean age 12.5 years, 14 girls, 14 boys) with Hodgkin's disease (HD, n=17) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, n=11) were evaluated. Patients were investigated at initial staging (n=19), early in the course of treatment (n=19), at the end of treatment (n=16) and during long-term follow-up (n=19). A total of 113 whole-body PET studies were performed on dedicated scanners. PET results were compared with the results of conventional methods (CMs) such as physical examination, laboratory studies, chest X-rays, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and bone scan when available. At initial evaluation (group 1), PET changed the disease stage and treatment in 10.5% of the cases. In early evaluation of the response to treatment (group 2), PET failed to predict two relapses and one incomplete response to treatment. In this group, however, PET did not show any false positive results. There were only 4/75 false positive results for PET among patients studied at the end of treatment (group 3, specificity 94%) or during the systematic follow-up (group 4, specificity 95%), as compared with 27/75 for CMs (specificity 54% and 66%, respectively). 18 F-FDG-PET is a useful tool for evaluating children with lymphomas. Large prospective studies are needed to appreciate its real impact on patient management. (orig.)

  5. Cost effective nuclear commercial grade dedication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletz, J.J.; Marston, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new computerized database method to create/edit/view specification technical data sheets (mini-specifications) for procurement of spare parts for nuclear facility maintenance and to develop information that could support possible future facility life extension efforts. This method may reduce cost when compared with current manual methods. The use of standardized technical data sheets (mini-specifications) for items of the same category improves efficiency. This method can be used for a variety of tasks, including: Nuclear safety-related procurement; Non-safety related procurement; Commercial grade item procurement/dedication; Evaluation of replacement items. This program will assist the nuclear facility in upgrading its procurement activities consistent with the recent NUMARC Procurement Initiative. Proper utilization of the program will assist the user in assuring that the procured items are correct for the applications, provide data to assist in detecting fraudulent materials, minimize human error in withdrawing database information, improve data retrievability, improve traceability, and reduce long-term procurement costs

  6. Virtual Machine Scheduling in Dedicated Computing Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boettger, Stefan; Zicari, V Roberto

    2014-01-08

    Time-critical applications process a continuous stream of input data and have to meet specific timing constraints. A common approach to ensure that such an application satisfies its constraints is over-provisioning: The application is deployed in a dedicated cluster environment with enough processing power to achieve the target performance for every specified data input rate. This approach comes with a drawback: At times of decreased data input rates, the cluster resources are not fully utilized. A typical use case is the HLT-Chain application that processes physics data at runtime of the ALICE experiment at CERN. From a perspective of cost and efficiency it is desirable to exploit temporarily unused cluster resources. Existing approaches aim for that goal by running additional applications. These approaches, however, a) lack in flexibility to dynamically grant the time-critical application the resources it needs, b) are insufficient for isolating the time-critical application from harmful side-effects i...

  7. A subjective scheduler for subjective dedicated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Fakhrizal, Said Reza; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Multiple access technique is one of important techniques within medium access layer in TCP/IP protocol stack. Each network technology implements the selected access method. Priority can be implemented in those methods to differentiate services. Some internet networks are dedicated for specific purpose. Education browsing or tutorial video accesses are preferred in a library hotspot, while entertainment and sport contents could be subjects of limitation. Current solution may use IP address filter or access list. This paper proposes subjective properties of users or applications are used for priority determination in multiple access techniques. The NS-2 simulator is employed to evaluate the method. A video surveillance network using WiMAX is chosen as the object. Subjective priority is implemented on WiMAX scheduler based on traffic properties. Three different traffic sources from monitoring video: palace, park, and market are evaluated. The proposed subjective scheduler prioritizes palace monitoring video that results better quality, xx dB than the later monitoring spots.

  8. Conception of comics dedicated to optics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machemy, Jacques; Bousquet, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    Optics' teaching is commonly based on the use of lessons including several mathematical tools. For example, ray tracing can be described through matrix algebra, and interference and polarization can be supported by the use of complex numbers. Thus, the numerous mathematical descriptions included in the optics' lessons represent a real difficulty for students having insufficient skills in mathematics. Moreover, despite of very impressive optical effects one can observe in real life, e.g. rainbows, their description in optics' courses is often considered as too academic and boring, and finally not really exciting. In this context, we have invented a new type of comics dedicated to optics' learning. Based on a dialogue between two imaginary characters, one considered as the young student and the other one as the old teacher, we have chosen to reduce the role of mathematics and to mix realistic and unrealistic elements in the drawing to complete the explanations faster. Starting from reflection and refraction, the Snell's laws then allow for describing natural phenomena such as mirage and rainbow as well as technical points such as light propagation into an optical fiber and the measurement of the refraction index. The first volume presented here will be evaluated during the fall semester 2015 in different high schools and at university through a linked survey and the students will also get access to an online version while the following parts are in preparation.

  9. Gamma camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Gerber, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The invention provides a composite solid state detector for use in deriving a display, by spatial coordinate information, of the distribution or radiation emanating from a source within a region of interest, comprising several solid state detector components, each having a given surface arranged for exposure to impinging radiation and exhibiting discrete interactions therewith at given spatially definable locations. The surface of each component and the surface disposed opposite and substantially parallel thereto are associated with impedence means configured to provide for each opposed surface outputs for signals relating the given location of the interactions with one spatial coordinate parameter of one select directional sense. The detector components are arranged to provide groupings of adjacently disposed surfaces mutually linearly oriented to exhibit a common directional sense of the spatial coordinate parameter. Means interconnect at least two of the outputs associated with each of the surfaces within a given grouping for collecting the signals deriving therefrom. The invention also provides a camera system for imaging the distribution of a source of gamma radiation situated within a region of interest

  10. Initial clinical results of simultaneous {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in comparison to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiessa, K.; Gawlitza, M.; Kuehn, A.; Fuchs, J.; Kahn, T.; Stumpp, P. [University Hospital of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Purz, S.; Steinhoff, K.G.; Sabri, O.; Kluge, R. [University Hospital of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Boehm, A. [University Hospital of Leipzig, ENT Department, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of simultaneous {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as well as their single components in head and neck cancer patients. In a prospective study 17 patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for staging or follow-up and an additional {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI scan with whole-body imaging and dedicated examination of the neck. MRI, CT and PET images as well as PET/MRI and PET/CT examinations were evaluated independently and in a blinded fashion by two reader groups. Results were compared with the reference standard (final diagnosis determined in consensus using all available data including histology and follow-up). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. A total of 23 malignant tumours were found with the reference standard. PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 82.7 %, a specificity of 87.3 %, a PPV of 73.2 % and a NPV of 92.4 %. Corresponding values for PET/MRI were 80.5, 88.2, 75.6 and 92.5 %. No statistically significant difference in diagnostic capability could be found between PET/CT and PET/MRI. Evaluation of the PET part from PET/CT revealed highest sensitivity of 95.7 %, and MRI showed best specificity of 96.4 %. There was a high inter-rater agreement in all modalities (Cohen's kappa 0.61-0.82). PET/MRI of patients with head and neck cancer yielded good diagnostic capability, similar to PET/CT. Further studies on larger cohorts to prove these first results seem justified. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  12. Towards integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, Daniel H.; Thorwath, Daniela; Schmidt, Holger; Quick, Harald H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Multimodality imaging has become an important adjunct of state-of-the-art radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning. Recently, simultaneous PET/MR hybrid imaging has become clinically available and may also contribute to target volume delineation and biological individualization in RT planning. For integration of PET/MR hybrid imaging into RT treatment planning, compatible dedicated RT devices are required for accurate patient positioning. In this study, prototype RT positioning devices intended for PET/MR hybrid imaging are introduced and tested toward PET/MR compatibility and image quality. Methods: A prototype flat RT table overlay and two radiofrequency (RF) coil holders that each fix one flexible body matrix RF coil for RT head/neck imaging have been evaluated within this study. MR image quality with the RT head setup was compared to the actual PET/MR setup with a dedicated head RF coil. PET photon attenuation and CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the hardware components has been quantitatively evaluated by phantom scans. Clinical application of the new RT setup in PET/MR imaging was evaluated in anin vivo study. Results: The RT table overlay and RF coil holders are fully PET/MR compatible. MR phantom and volunteer imaging with the RT head setup revealed high image quality, comparable to images acquired with the dedicated PET/MR head RF coil, albeit with 25% reduced SNR. Repositioning accuracy of the RF coil holders was below 1 mm. PET photon attenuation of the RT table overlay was calculated to be 3.8% and 13.8% for the RF coil holders. With CT-based AC of the devices, the underestimation error was reduced to 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Comparable results were found within the patient study. Conclusions: The newly designed RT devices for hybrid PET/MR imaging are PET and MR compatible. The mechanically rigid design and the reproducible positioning allow for straightforward CT-based AC. The systematic evaluation within this study provides the

  13. Motion and Emotional Behavior Design for Pet Robot Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Tai; Yang, Yu-Ting; Miao, Shih-Heng; Wong, Ching-Chang

    A pet robot dog with two ears, one mouth, one facial expression plane, and one vision system is designed and implemented so that it can do some emotional behaviors. Three processors (Inter® Pentium® M 1.0 GHz, an 8-bit processer 8051, and embedded soft-core processer NIOS) are used to control the robot. One camera, one power detector, four touch sensors, and one temperature detector are used to obtain the information of the environment. The designed robot with 20 DOF (degrees of freedom) is able to accomplish the walking motion. A behavior system is built on the implemented pet robot so that it is able to choose a suitable behavior for different environmental situation. From the practical test, we can see that the implemented pet robot dog can do some emotional interaction with the human.

  14. Hybrid PET/MRI insert: B0 field optimization by applying active and passive shimming on PET detector level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, Jakob [Department of Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Weissler, Bjoern [Philips Research Europe, Aachen (Germany); Schulz, Volkmar [Department of Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Combining PET and MRI into a hybrid device is challenging since both systems might influence each other. A typical interference problem of such a combined device is the distortion of the MRI’s B{sub 0} field distribution due to the material brought inside the MRI’s FOV which is in particular challenging for small-bore PET-systems. High field homogeneity is needed for a good MRI acquisition in general as well as in certain applications. Typically, active shimming using dedicated coils is applied to improve the field homogeneity. However, these techniques are limited especially for localized distortion profiles with higher-order characteristics caused by PET/MRI inserts. As a consequence, we are exploring the potential application of shimming on PET detector level (for the Hyperion-II{sup D} PET/MRI insert), meaning that the distortion profile caused by PET modules is compensated using additional magnetic materials (passive shimming) and DC coils (active shimming). To explore the technique, B{sub 0} field measurements have been performed using a whole-body phantom in combination with the MRI body coil. An FFE sequence was used to measure distortion maps of DC loops and small magnetic objects (capacitors, ferrites). These distortion maps served as input for a software framework which has been written to perform the field optimization. The implementation was verified by measurements and fits were performed to extract characteristic parameters of the tested objects. Finally, the implemented software framework was used to homogenize a measured distortion map produced by a single PET module by superimposing distortion corrections from additional simulated materials. The resulting superimposed distortion map showed a significantly improved B{sub 0} field map quality (reduced spectral width and improved homogeneity). The simulated susceptibility distribution will be applied on PET module level and tested in experiments. Results and details about this study will be

  15. Development of a simple photon emission computed tomography dedicated to the small animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekaert, V.

    2006-11-01

    The development of in vivo small animal imaging becomes essential to study human pathologies. The ImaBio project of Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC) fits in the process of developing new instruments for biomedical applications with the development of a multimodality imaging platform dedicated to small animal imaging (AMISSA). This thesis presents the study, the design and the development of a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) which will be integrated to the AMISSA platform. The result of these developments is the possibility to obtain the spatial distribution of an injected molecule into the animal. The SPECT technical solutions are based on the acquired knowledge of the institute allowing the conception of a device with cameras adapted to the gamma detection produced by the radiotracers used in single photon imaging. In order to cover the entire of the transverse field of view, four gamma cameras are arranged in a ring around the volume of interest. Each camera consists of 5 individual modules based on a YAP:Ce crystal array, a multi-anode photomultiplier and a dedicated multichannel electronic device. Finally, 20 detection modules were calibrated to give the same result for an identical energy deposit. The data are acquired then process to extract the positions and the energies deposited by gamma photons in the crystals. This last information is then gathered to build the projections. The 3D reconstructed image from the projections is carried out by the sequence of two algorithms, analytical and iterative OS-EM, both modified to take into account the singular geometry of our detection system. Finally, the obtained image is fused with the anatomical information given by the micro Computed Tomography system. (author)

  16. Initial Experience With Simultaneous 18F-FDG PET/MRI in the Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis and Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanneman, Kate; Kadoch, Michael; Guo, Henry H; Jamali, Mehran; Quon, Andrew; Iagaru, Andrei; Herfkens, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare combined PET/MRI with PET/CT and cardiac MRI in the evaluation of cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. Ten patients (4 men and 6 women; 56.1 ± 9.6 years old) were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of suspected cardiac sarcoidosis or myocarditis. Written informed consent was obtained. Following administration of 9.9 ± 0.9 mCi F-FDG, patients underwent standard cardiac PET/CT followed by combined PET/MRI using a simultaneous 3-T scanner. Cardiac MRI sequences included ECG-triggered cine SSFP, T2-weighted, and late gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Myocardial involvement was assessed with separate analysis of combined PET/MRI, PET/CT, and cardiac MRI data using dedicated postprocessing software. Estimates of radiation dose were derived from the applied doses of F-FDG and CT protocol parameters. Imaging was acquired with a delay from F-FDG injection of 90.2 ± 27.4 minutes for PET/CT and 207.7 ± 40.3 minutes for PET/MRI. Total scan time for PET/MRI was significantly longer than for PET/CT (81.4 ± 14.8 vs 12.0 minutes, P PET/MRI compared with PET/CT (6.9 ± 0.6 vs 8.2 ± 1.1 mSv, P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in the number of positive cases identified between combined PET/MRI (n = 10 [100%]), PET/CT (n = 6 [60%]), and cardiac MRI (n = 8 [80%]), P = 0.091. Simultaneous cardiac PET/MRI is feasible in the evaluation of cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis achieving diagnostic image quality.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow measurement using a scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillation camera connected to auxillary equipment with off-line data processing or connected to an on-line dedicated computer system permits measurement of hemispheric and regional cerebral blood flow. Reliable flow values are obtained from regions limited in size by spatial resolution and the count rates achieved. Flow measurements obtained with the camera are able to resolve inhomogeneities of cerebral circulation in normal subjects. In a variety of clinical conditions, the localization, severity and extent of flow alterations are shown. Results of flow measurements in individual cases elucidate the pathogenesis of neurologic deficits, quantify the damage to the brain, indicate therapeutic measures of potential value and permit an estimation of the further clinical course. With restricted spatial resolution, flow measurements after intravenous 133 Xe injection are also feasible

  18. Dynamic Human Body Modeling Using a Single RGB Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyu; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we present a novel automatic pipeline to build personalized parametric models of dynamic people using a single RGB camera. Compared to previous approaches that use monocular RGB images, our system can model a 3D human body automatically and incrementally, taking advantage of human motion. Based on coarse 2D and 3D poses estimated from image sequences, we first perform a kinematic classification of human body parts to refine the poses and obtain reconstructed body parts. Next, a personalized parametric human model is generated by driving a general template to fit the body parts and calculating the non-rigid deformation. Experimental results show that our shape estimation method achieves comparable accuracy with reconstructed models using depth cameras, yet requires neither user interaction nor any dedicated devices, leading to the feasibility of using this method on widely available smart phones.

  19. A fast algorithm for computer aided collimation gamma camera (CACAO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Franck, D.; Pihet, P.; Ballongue, P.

    2000-08-01

    The computer aided collimation gamma camera is aimed at breaking down the resolution sensitivity trade-off of the conventional parallel hole collimator. It uses larger and longer holes, having an added linear movement at the acquisition sequence. A dedicated algorithm including shift and sum, deconvolution, parabolic filtering and rotation is described. Examples of reconstruction are given. This work shows that a simple and fast algorithm, based on a diagonal dominant approximation of the problem can be derived. Its gives a practical solution to the CACAO reconstruction problem.

  20. Experience with PET FDG - Preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo, Teresa; Jofre, Josefina; Canessa, Jose; Gonzalez, Patricio; Humeres, Pamela; Sierralta, Paulina; Galaz, Rodrigo; Miranda, Karina

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this preliminary communication was to analyse the indications and data in initial group of patients studied with first dedicated PET scanner in the country at Hospital Militar in Santiago Chile. The main application of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-Fluoro deoxyglucose (FDG) is related with oncological patients management. We studied 136 patients, 131 (97%) with known or suspected malignant disease and remaining 5 for cardiological or neuropsychiatric disease. Ten patients were controlled diabetics (1 insulin dependent). Their mean age was 51.6±18 years ranging from 6 to 84 years and 65% were females. A total of 177 scans were acquired using a dedicated PET (Siemens HR + with 4mm resolution) system. Mean F18-FDG injected dose was 477±107 MBq (12.9±2.9 mCi). Mean blood glucose levels, performed prior the injection, were 94±17mg/dl (range 62-161). F18-FDG was obtained from the cyclotron IBA Cyclone 18/9 installed in the Chilean Agency of Nuclear Energy, distant about 15 miles away from the clinical PET facility. PET studies were analyzed by at least 4 independent observers visually. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in some cases. Image fusion of FDG images with recent anatomical (CT, MRI) studies was performed where available. Data acquisition protocol consisted in 7-8 beds/study from head to mid-thighs, with 6-7-min/bed acquisitions, 36% transmission with germanium 68 rods. Data was reconstructed with standard OSEM protocol. The main indications included pulmonary lesions in 31%, gastrointestinal cancers in 21%, melanoma in 13% and lymphoma in 9% patients. The remaining were of breast, thyroid, testes, ovary, musculoskeletal (soft tissue and bone), brain tumour etc. Abnormal focal tracer uptake was observed in 83/131 oncological patients, 54% corroborating with clinical diagnosis of primary tumor or recurrence while 46% showed new metastatic localization. FDG scans were normal 36/131 patients. In 9 patients

  1. Experience with PET FDG - Preliminary analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massardo, Teresa; Jofre, Josefina; Canessa, Jose; Gonzalez, Patricio; Humeres, Pamela; Sierralta, Paulina; Galaz, Rodrigo; Miranda, Karina [Centro PET de Imagenes Moleculares, Hospital Militar de Santiago, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this preliminary communication was to analyse the indications and data in initial group of patients studied with first dedicated PET scanner in the country at Hospital Militar in Santiago Chile. The main application of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-Fluoro deoxyglucose (FDG) is related with oncological patients management. We studied 136 patients, 131 (97%) with known or suspected malignant disease and remaining 5 for cardiological or neuropsychiatric disease. Ten patients were controlled diabetics (1 insulin dependent). Their mean age was 51.6{+-}18 years ranging from 6 to 84 years and 65% were females. A total of 177 scans were acquired using a dedicated PET (Siemens HR + with 4mm resolution) system. Mean F18-FDG injected dose was 477{+-}107 MBq (12.9{+-}2.9 mCi). Mean blood glucose levels, performed prior the injection, were 94{+-}17mg/dl (range 62-161). F18-FDG was obtained from the cyclotron IBA Cyclone 18/9 installed in the Chilean Agency of Nuclear Energy, distant about 15 miles away from the clinical PET facility. PET studies were analyzed by at least 4 independent observers visually. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in some cases. Image fusion of FDG images with recent anatomical (CT, MRI) studies was performed where available. Data acquisition protocol consisted in 7-8 beds/study from head to mid-thighs, with 6-7-min/bed acquisitions, 36% transmission with germanium 68 rods. Data was reconstructed with standard OSEM protocol. The main indications included pulmonary lesions in 31%, gastrointestinal cancers in 21%, melanoma in 13% and lymphoma in 9% patients. The remaining were of breast, thyroid, testes, ovary, musculoskeletal (soft tissue and bone), brain tumour etc. Abnormal focal tracer uptake was observed in 83/131 oncological patients, 54% corroborating with clinical diagnosis of primary tumor or recurrence while 46% showed new metastatic localization. FDG scans were normal 36/131 patients. In 9

  2. Special Issue Dedication to Stephen H. Schneider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Baer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It is with both pleasure and sadness that we dedicate this special climate change issue of Portal to the late Dr. Stephen H. Schneider. Steve, as he was known to his friends and colleagues, was as rare a bird as any he sought out in his passion as a birdwatcher. A brilliant climate scientist, author of countless books and papers, path breaking inter-disciplinarian, eminent public communicator, mentor to dozens of young scholars; the list of roles and adulatory adjectives could fill an IPCC special report. Steve would have appreciated this special issue, with its multidisciplinary approach, and its quest for solutions based on analytical scholarship. He understood better than most the inseparability of normative and descriptive concerns, the need for academics and scientists of all kinds to be involved with public processes of communication, policy design and deliberation. While his last book was called “Science as a Contact Sport,” the unspoken title of his career might have been “Science as a Public Service.” He was endlessly testifying, consulting and giving interviews, and encouraged others to learn to do the same. Notwithstanding a battle with lymphoma in the last decade (chronicled in the wonderful book The Patient from Hell, Steve maintained a frenetic level of activity and was still going strong when he was felled by a pulmonary embolism in July of 2010 at age 65. He leaves behind a legacy embodied in his publications, institutions like the IPCC and the journal Climatic Change, and in the hearts and minds of the countless persons he interacted with, mentored, and loved. Exuberant, passionate, full of warmth and good humor, Steve was a mensch among mensches. He will be sorely missed. Paul Baer, with the assistance of Terry Root and Ian McGregor.

  3. Multimodality Registration without a Dedicated Multimodality Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Beattie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality scanners that allow the acquisition of both functional and structural image sets on a single system have recently become available for animal research use. Although the resultant registered functional/structural image sets can greatly enhance the interpretability of the functional data, the cost of multimodality systems can be prohibitive, and they are often limited to two modalities, which generally do not include magnetic resonance imaging. Using a thin plastic wrap to immobilize and fix a mouse or other small animal atop a removable bed, we are able to calculate registrations between all combinations of four different small animal imaging scanners (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and computed tomography [CT] at our disposal, effectively equivalent to a quadruple-modality scanner. A comparison of serially acquired CT images, with intervening acquisitions on other scanners, demonstrates the ability of the proposed procedures to maintain the rigidity of an anesthetized mouse during transport between scanners. Movement of the bony structures of the mouse was estimated to be 0.62 mm. Soft tissue movement was predominantly the result of the filling (or emptying of the urinary bladder and thus largely constrained to this region. Phantom studies estimate the registration errors for all registration types to be less than 0.5 mm. Functional images using tracers targeted to known structures verify the accuracy of the functional to structural registrations. The procedures are easy to perform and produce robust and accurate results that rival those of dedicated multimodality scanners, but with more flexible registration combinations and while avoiding the expense and redundancy of multimodality systems.

  4. A new methodological approach for PET implementation in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Elena; Ferretti, Alice; Capirci, Carlo; Grassetto, Gaia; Gava, Marcello; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Virdis, Graziella; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Massaro, Arianna; Rubello, Domenico; Nibale, Otello

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a new methodological approach to using PET information in radiotherapy treatment planning has been discussed. Computed tomography (CT) represents the primary modality to plan personalized radiation treatment, because it provides the basic electron density map for correct dose calculation. If PET scanning is also performed it is typically coregistered with the CT study. This operation can be executed automatically by a hybrid PET/CT scanner or, if the PET and CT imaging sets have been acquired through different equipment, by a dedicated module of the radiotherapy treatment planning system. Both approaches have some disadvantages: in the first case, the bore of a PET/CT system generally used in clinical practice often does not allow the use of certain bulky devices for patient immobilization in radiotherapy, whereas in the second case the result could be affected by limitations in window/level visualization of two different image modalities, and the displayed PET volumes can appear not to be related to the actual uptake into the patient. To overcome these problems, at our centre a specific procedure has been studied and tested in 30 patients, allowing good results of precision in the target contouring to be obtained. The process consists of segmentation of the biological target volume by a dedicated PET/CT console and its export to a dedicated radiotherapy system, where an image registration between the CT images acquired by the PET/CT scanner and a large-bore CT is performed. The planning target volume is contoured only on the large-bore CT and is used for virtual simulation, to individuate permanent skin markers on the patient.

  5. Development of underwater camera using high-definition camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kenji; Watanabe, Masato; Takashima, Masanobu; Kawamura, Shingo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In order to reduce the time for core verification or visual inspection of BWR fuels, the underwater camera using a High-Definition camera has been developed. As a result of this development, the underwater camera has 2 lights and 370 x 400 x 328mm dimensions and 20.5kg weight. Using the camera, 6 or so spent-fuel IDs are identified at 1 or 1.5m distance at a time, and 0.3mmφ pin-hole is recognized at 1.5m distance and 20 times zoom-up. Noises caused by radiation less than 15 Gy/h are not affected the images. (author)

  6. Polarizing aperture stereoscopic cinema camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Lenny

    2012-07-01

    The art of stereoscopic cinematography has been held back because of the lack of a convenient way to reduce the stereo camera lenses' interaxial to less than the distance between the eyes. This article describes a unified stereoscopic camera and lens design that allows for varying the interaxial separation to small values using a unique electro-optical polarizing aperture design for imaging left and right perspective views onto a large single digital sensor, the size of the standard 35 mm frame, with the means to select left and right image information. Even with the added stereoscopic capability, the appearance of existing camera bodies will be unaltered.

  7. Control system for gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    An improved gamma camera arrangement is described which utilizing a solid state detector, formed of high purity germanium. the central arrangement of the camera operates to effect the carrying out of a trapezoidal filtering operation over antisymmetrically summed spatial signals through gated integration procedures utilizing idealized integrating intervals. By simultaneously carrying out peak energy evaluation of the input signals, a desirable control over pulse pile-up phenomena is achieved. Additionally, through the use of the time derivative of incoming pulse or signal energy information to initially enable the control system, a low level information evaluation is provided serving to enhance the signal processing efficiency of the camera

  8. Upgrading of analogue cameras using modern PC based computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardom, M.F.; Matos, L.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The use of computers along with analogue cameras enables them to perform tasks involving time-activity parameters. The INFORMENU system converts a modern PC computer into a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system with a total cost affordable to emerging economic countries, and easily adaptable to all existing cameras. Materials and Methods: In collaboration with nuclear medicine physicians, an application including hardware and software was developed by a private firm. The system runs smoothly on Windows 98 and its operation is very easy. The main features are comparable to the brand commercial computer systems; such as image resolution until 1024 x 1024, low count loss at high count rate, uniformity correction, integrated graphical and text reporting, and user defined clinical protocols. Results: The system is used in more than 20 private and public institutions. The count loss is less than 1% in all the routine work, improvement of uniformity correction of 3-5 times, improved utility of the analogue cameras. Conclusion: The INFORMENU system improves the utility of analogue cameras permitting the inclusion of dynamic clinical protocols and quantifications, helping the development of the nuclear medicine practice. The operation and maintenance costs were lowered. The end users improve their knowledge of modern nuclear medicine

  9. Fully integrated digital GAMMA camera-computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Eisner, R.L.; Gober, A.; Plankey, M.; Fajman, W.

    1985-01-01

    Although most of the new non-nuclear imaging techniques are fully digital, there has been a reluctance in nuclear medicine to abandon traditional analog planar imaging in favor of digital acquisition and display. The authors evaluated a prototype digital camera system (GE STARCAM) in which all of the analog acquisition components are replaced by microprocessor controls and digital circuitry. To compare the relative effects of acquisition matrix size on image quality and to ascertain whether digital techniques could be used in place of analog imaging, Tc-99m bone scans were obtained on this digital system and on a comparable analog camera in 10 patients. The dedicated computer is used for camera setup including definition of the energy window, spatial energy correction, and spatial distortion correction. The display monitor, which is used for patient positioning and image analysis, is 512/sup 2/ non-interlaced, allowing high resolution imaging. Data acquisition and processing can be performed simultaneously. Thus, the development of a fully integrated digital camera-computer system with optimized display should allow routine utilization of non-analog studies in nuclear medicine and the ultimate establishment of fully digital nuclear imaging laboratories

  10. Construction and tests of an in-beam PET-like demonstrator for hadrontherapy beam ballistic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montarou, G., E-mail: montarou@clermont.in2p3.fr [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Bony, M.; Busato, E.; Chadelas, R. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Donnarieix, D. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Force, P.; Guicheney, C.; Insa, C.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Magne, M.; Martin, F. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Millardet, C. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Nivoix, M.; Podlyski, F.; Rozes, A. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France)

    2017-02-11

    We present the first results obtained with a detector, called Large Area Pixelized Detector (LAPD), dedicated to the study the ballistic control of the beam delivered to the patient by in-beam and real time detection of secondary particles, emitted during its irradiation in the context of hadrontherapy. These particles are 511 keV γ from the annihilation of a positron issued from the β{sup +} emitters induced in the patient tissues along the beam path. The LAPD basic concepts are similar to a conventional PET camera. The 511 keV γ are detected and the reconstructed lines of response allow to measure the β{sup +} activity distribution. Nevertheless, when trying to use γ from positron annihilation for the ballistic control in hadrontherapy, the large prompt γ background should be taken into account and properly rejected. First reconstruction results, obtained with a phantom filled with a high intensity FDG source at the cancer research centre of Clermont-Ferrand are shown. We also report results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre with one third of the detector, using proton and carbon ion beams.

  11. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF...

  12. A fast preamplifier concept for SiPM-based time-of-flight PET detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J.; Seifert, S.; Schreuder, F.; Dendooven, P.; Löhner, H.; Vinke, R.; Schaart, D. R.; van Dam, H.T.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer high gain and fast response to light, making them interesting for fast timing applications such as time-of-flight (TOF) PET. To fully exploit the potential of these photosensors, dedicated preamplifiers that do not deteriorate the rise time and signal-to-noise

  13. PET studies in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  14. Use of commercial grade item dedication to reduce procurement costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosch, F.

    1995-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, the Nuclear Regulatory Industry (NRC) began inspecting utility practices of procuring and dedicating commercial grade items intended for plant safety-related applications. As a result of the industry efforts to address NRC concerns, nuclear utilities have enhanced existing programs and procedures for dedication of commercial grade items. Though these programs were originally enhanced to meet NRC concerns, utilities have discovered that the dedication of commercial grade items can also reduce overall procurement costs. This paper will discuss the enhancement of utility dedication programs and demonstrates how utilities have utilized them to reduce procurement costs

  15. PET and Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Funda Sevencan; Songul A. Vaizoglu

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water,...

  16. Analyzer for gamma cameras diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oramas Polo, I.; Osorio Deliz, J. F.; Diaz Garcia, A.

    2013-01-01

    This research work was carried out to develop an analyzer for gamma cameras diagnostic. It is composed of an electronic system that includes hardware and software capabilities, and operates from the acquisition of the 4 head position signals of a gamma camera detector. The result is the spectrum of the energy delivered by nuclear radiation coming from the camera detector head. This system includes analog processing of position signals from the camera, digitization and the subsequent processing of the energy signal in a multichannel analyzer, sending data to a computer via a standard USB port and processing of data in a personal computer to obtain the final histogram. The circuits are composed of an analog processing board and a universal kit with micro controller and programmable gate array. (Author)

  17. Astronomy and the camera obscura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, M.

    2000-02-01

    The camera obscura (from Latin meaning darkened chamber) is a simple optical device with a long history. In the form considered here, it can be traced back to 1550. It had its heyday during the Victorian era when it was to be found at the seaside as a tourist attraction or sideshow. It was also used as an artist's drawing aid and, in 1620, the famous astronomer-mathematician, Johannes Kepler used a small tent camera obscura to trace the scenery.

  18. The future of consumer cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Moltisanti, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades multimedia, and in particular imaging devices (camcorders, tablets, mobile phones, etc.) have been dramatically diffused. Moreover the increasing of their computational performances, combined with an higher storage capability, allows them to process large amount of data. In this paper an overview of the current trends of consumer cameras market and technology will be given, providing also some details about the recent past (from Digital Still Camera up today) and forthcoming key issues.

  19. ITEM-QM solutions for EM problems in image reconstruction exemplary for the Compton Camera

    CERN Document Server

    Pauli, Josef; Anton, G

    2002-01-01

    Imaginary time expectation maximation (ITEM), a new algorithm for expectation maximization problems based on the quantum mechanics energy minimalization via imaginary (euclidian) time evolution is presented. Both (the algorithm as well as the implementation (http://www.johannes-pauli.de/item/index.html) are published under the terms of General GNU public License (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html). Due to its generality ITEM is applicable to various image reconstruction problems like CT, PET, SPECT, NMR, Compton Camera, tomosynthesis as well as any other energy minimization problem. The choice of the optimal ITEM Hamiltonian is discussed and numerical results are presented for the Compton Camera.

  20. Towards Implementing an MR-based PET Attenuation Correction Method for Neurological Studies on the MR-PET Brain Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; van der Kouwe, Andre; Benner, Thomas; Michel, Christian J.; Hamm, Michael; Fenchel, Matthias; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A number of factors have to be considered for implementing an accurate attenuation correction (AC) in a combined MR-PET scanner. In this work, some of these challenges were investigated and an AC method based entirely on the MR data obtained with a single dedicated sequence was developed and used for neurological studies performed with the MR-PET human brain scanner prototype. Methods The focus was on the bone/air segmentation problem, the bone linear attenuation coefficient selection and the RF coil positioning. The impact of these factors on the PET data quantification was studied in simulations and experimental measurements performed on the combined MR-PET scanner. A novel dual-echo ultra-short echo time (DUTE) MR sequence was proposed for head imaging. Simultaneous MR-PET data were acquired and the PET images reconstructed using the proposed MR-DUTE-based AC method were compared with the PET images reconstructed using a CT-based AC. Results Our data suggest that incorrectly accounting for the bone tissue attenuation can lead to large underestimations (>20%) of the radiotracer concentration in the cortex. Assigning a linear attenuation coefficient of 0.143 or 0.151 cm−1 to bone tissue appears to give the best trade-off between bias and variability in the resulting images. Not identifying the internal air cavities introduces large overestimations (>20%) in adjacent structures. Based on these results, the segmented CT AC method was established as the “silver standard” for the segmented MR-based AC method. Particular to an integrated MR-PET scanner, ignoring the RF coil attenuation can cause large underestimations (i.e. up to 50%) in the reconstructed images. Furthermore, the coil location in the PET field of view has to be accurately known. Good quality bone/air segmentation can be performed using the DUTE data. The PET images obtained using the MR-DUTE- and CT-based AC methods compare favorably in most of the brain structures. Conclusion An MR-DUTE-based AC

  1. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    information on clinical PET in oncology for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists and clinical practitioners. Possible ideas for cost effectiveness of clinical PET in oncology are mentioned. The information is also intended to be useful in decision making to improve clinical management of cancer patients when allocating resources dedicated to the health care system. This is a critical issue that is important for the development of both clinical oncology and nuclear medicine in IAEA member states. The IAEA can be instrumental in the advancement of programmes which focus on the IAEA's coordinated research projects and technical cooperation project

  2. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  3. Computing camera heading: A study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, John Jiaxiang

    2000-08-01

    An accurate estimate of the motion of a camera is a crucial first step for the 3D reconstruction of sites, objects, and buildings from video. Solutions to the camera heading problem can be readily applied to many areas, such as robotic navigation, surgical operation, video special effects, multimedia, and lately even in internet commerce. From image sequences of a real world scene, the problem is to calculate the directions of the camera translations. The presence of rotations makes this problem very hard. This is because rotations and translations can have similar effects on the images, and are thus hard to tell apart. However, the visual angles between the projection rays of point pairs are unaffected by rotations, and their changes over time contain sufficient information to determine the direction of camera translation. We developed a new formulation of the visual angle disparity approach, first introduced by Tomasi, to the camera heading problem. Our new derivation makes theoretical analysis possible. Most notably, a theorem is obtained that locates all possible singularities of the residual function for the underlying optimization problem. This allows identifying all computation trouble spots beforehand, and to design reliable and accurate computational optimization methods. A bootstrap-jackknife resampling method simultaneously reduces complexity and tolerates outliers well. Experiments with image sequences show accurate results when compared with the true camera motion as measured with mechanical devices.

  4. Initial experience with a prototype dual-crystal (LSO/NaI) dual-head coincidence camera in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Urvi; Boellaard, Ronald; Comans, Emile F.I.; Raijmakers, Pieter G.H.M.; Pijpers, Rik J.; Teule, Gerrit J.J.; Lingen, Arthur van; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Miller, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of a prototype dual-crystal [lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)/sodium iodide (NaI)] dual-head coincidence camera (DHC) for PET and SPET (LSO-PS), in comparison to BGO-PET with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in oncology. This follows earlier reports that LSO-PS has noise-equivalent counting (NEC) rates comparable to partial ring BGO-PET, i.e. clearly higher than standard NaI DHCs. Twenty-four randomly selected oncological patients referred for whole-body FDG-PET underwent BGO-PET followed by LSO-PS. Four nuclear medicine physicians were randomised to read a single scan modality, in terms of lesion intensity, location and likelihood of malignancy. BGO-PET was considered the gold standard. Forty-eight lesions were classified as positive with BGO-PET, of which LSO-PS identified 73% (95% CI 60-86%). There was good observer agreement for both modalities in terms of intensity, location and interpretation. Lesions were missed by LSO-PS in 13 patients in the chest (n=6), neck (n=3) and abdomen (n=4). The diameter of these lesions was estimated to be 0.5-1 cm. Initial results justify further evaluation of LSO-PS in specific clinical situations, especially if a role as an instrument of triage for PET is foreseen. (orig.)

  5. In-beam PET at high-energy photon beams: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.; Enghardt, W.

    2006-04-01

    For radiation therapy with carbon ion beams, either for the stable isotope 12C or for the radioactive one 11C, it has been demonstrated that the β+-activity distribution created or deposited, respectively, within the irradiated volume can be visualized by means of positron emission tomography (PET). The PET images provide valuable information for quality assurance and precision improvement of ion therapy. Dedicated PET scanners have been integrated into treatment sites at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (HIMAC), Japan, and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany, to make PET imaging feasible during therapeutic irradiation (in-beam PET). A similar technique may be worthwhile for radiotherapy with high-energy bremsstrahlung. In addition to monitoring the dose delivery process which in-beam PET has been primarily developed for, it may be expected that radiation response of tissue can be detected by means of in-beam PET. We investigate the applicability of PET for treatment control in the case of using bremsstrahlung spectra produced by 15-50 MeV electrons. Target volume activation due to (γ, n) reactions at energies above 20 MeV yields moderate β+-activity levels, which can be employed for imaging. The radiation from positrons produced by pair production is not presently usable because the detectors are overloaded due to the low duty factor of medical electron linear accelerators. However, the degradation of images caused by positron motion between creation and annihilation seems to be tolerable.

  6. Energy Secretary Dedicates ESIF at NREL | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    3 » Energy Secretary Dedicates ESIF at NREL Energy Secretary Dedicates ESIF at NREL September 18 prey. Enlarge image Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (center) joins NREL Director Dan Arvizu (left) and newest Energy Department supercomputer. The high performance computer inside NREL's new Energy Systems

  7. Dedicated auxiliary power units for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.; Weijer, C.J.T. van de

    1998-01-01

    The use of a dedicated auxiliary power unit is essential to utilize the potential that hybrid vehicles offer for efficient and ultra-clean transportation. An example of a hybrid project at the TNO Road-Vehicles Research Institute shows the development and the results of a dedicated auxiliary power

  8. Coherence in Professional Education: Does It Foster Dedication and Identification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggen, Kåre; Terum, Lars Inge

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the impact of professional education on students' dedication to and identification with a profession. The premise is that professional education is not only about knowledge acquisition and reasoning but also about attitudes and aspirations. In fostering dedication and identification, students' experiences of relevance seem to…

  9. MO-AB-206-02: Testing Gamma Cameras Based On TG177 WG Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  10. MO-AB-206-02: Testing Gamma Cameras Based On TG177 WG Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halama, J.

    2016-01-01

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  11. Decreased occipital lobe metabolism by FDG-PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnes, Lilja; Nalluri, Abhinav; Cohen, Jesse; Jones, Krystyna M.; Zan, Elcin; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Venkatesan, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare brain metabolism patterns on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT in anti–NMDA receptor and other definite autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and to assess how these patterns differ between anti–NMDA receptor neurologic disability groups. Methods: Retrospective review of clinical data and initial dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT studies for neurology inpatients with definite AE, per published consensus criteria, treated at a single academic medical center over a 10-year period. Z-score maps of FDG-PET/CT were made using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projections in comparison to age group–matched controls. Brain region mean Z scores with magnitudes ≥2.00 were interpreted as significant. Comparisons were made between anti–NMDA receptor and other definite AE patients as well as among patients with anti–NMDA receptor based on modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at the time of FDG-PET/CT. Results: The medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic in 6 of 8 patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis and as a group (Z = −4.02, interquartile range [IQR] 2.14) relative to those with definite AE (Z = −2.32, 1.46; p = 0.004). Among patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, the lateral and medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic for patients with mRS 4–5 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −3.69, IQR 1; medial occipital lobe Z = −4.08, 1) compared with those with mRS 0–3 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −0.83, 2; p occipital lobe Z = −1.07, 2; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Marked medial occipital lobe hypometabolism by dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT may serve as an early biomarker for discriminating anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis from other AE. Resolution of lateral and medial occipital hypometabolism may correlate with improved neurologic status in anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis. PMID:29159205

  12. Sub-Camera Calibration of a Penta-Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, K.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    Penta cameras consisting of a nadir and four inclined cameras are becoming more and more popular, having the advantage of imaging also facades in built up areas from four directions. Such system cameras require a boresight calibration of the geometric relation of the cameras to each other, but also a calibration of the sub-cameras. Based on data sets of the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark for multi platform photogrammetry the inner orientation of the used IGI Penta DigiCAM has been analyzed. The required image coordinates of the blocks Dortmund and Zeche Zollern have been determined by Pix4Dmapper and have been independently adjusted and analyzed by program system BLUH. With 4.1 million image points in 314 images respectively 3.9 million image points in 248 images a dense matching was provided by Pix4Dmapper. With up to 19 respectively 29 images per object point the images are well connected, nevertheless the high number of images per object point are concentrated to the block centres while the inclined images outside the block centre are satisfying but not very strongly connected. This leads to very high values for the Student test (T-test) of the finally used additional parameters or in other words, additional parameters are highly significant. The estimated radial symmetric distortion of the nadir sub-camera corresponds to the laboratory calibration of IGI, but there are still radial symmetric distortions also for the inclined cameras with a size exceeding 5μm even if mentioned as negligible based on the laboratory calibration. Radial and tangential effects of the image corners are limited but still available. Remarkable angular affine systematic image errors can be seen especially in the block Zeche Zollern. Such deformations are unusual for digital matrix cameras, but it can be caused by the correlation between inner and exterior orientation if only parallel flight lines are used. With exception of the angular affinity the systematic image errors for corresponding

  13. Validation of GEANT3 simulation studies with a dual-head PMT ClearPET TM prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Ziemons, K; Streun, M; Pietrzyk, U

    2004-01-01

    The ClearPET TM project is proposed by working groups of the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC) to develop a 2/sup nd/ generation high performance small animal positron emission tomograph (PET). High sensitivity and high spatial resolution is foreseen for the ClearPET TM camera by using a phoswich arrangement combining mixed lutetium yttrium aluminum perovskite (LuYAP:Ce) and lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillating crystals. Design optimizations for the first photomultiplier tube (PMT) based ClearPET camera are done with a Monte-Carlo simulation package implemented on GEANT3 (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland). A dual-head prototype has been built to test the frontend electronics and was used to validate the implementation of the GEANT3 simulation tool. Multiple simulations were performed following the experimental protocols to measure the intrinsic resolution and the sensitivity profile in axial and radial direction. Including a mean energy resolution of about 27.0% the simulated intrinsic resolution is about (...

  14. A simple data loss model for positron camera systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.; Dahlbom, M.

    1994-01-01

    A simple model to describe data losses in PET cameras is presented. The model is not intended to be used primarily for dead time corrections in existing scanners, although this is possible. Instead the model is intended to be used for data simulations in order to determine the figures of merit of future camera systems, based on data handling state-of-art solutions. The model assumes the data loss to be factorized into two components, one describing the detector or block-detector performance and the other the remaining data handling such as coincidence determinations, data transfer and data storage. Two modern positron camera systems have been investigated in terms of this model. These are the Siemens-CTI ECAT EXACT and ECAT EXACT HR systems, which both have an axial field-of-view (FOV) of about 15 cm. They both have retractable septa and can acquire data from the whole volume within the FOV and can reconstruct volume image data. An example is given how to use the model for live time calculation in a futuristic large axial FOV cylindrical system

  15. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  16. PET in neuro-oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, K.L.

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain tumor patients. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry. It therefore provides different information about tumors when compared to histological or

  17. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Healthy Pets Healthy People : CDC website with helpful resources and information on health benefits of pets and disease risks Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles ...

  18. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  19. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  20. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care.......The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants...... critically assessed the current state of PET/MRI, both clinically and as a research tool, and attempted to chart future directions. The meeting addressed the use of PET/MRI and workflows in oncology, neurosciences, infection, inflammation and chronic pain syndromes, as well as deeper discussions about how...

  1. Novel Geometrical Concept of a High Performance Brain PET Scanner Principle, Design and Performance Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Séguinot, Jacques; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Weilhammer, P; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Correia, J G; Ribeiro da Silva, M; Garibaldi, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Schoenahl, F; Zaidi, H

    2006-01-01

    We present the principle, a possible implementation and performance estimates of a novel geometrical concept for a high resolution positron emission tomograph. The concept, which can for example be implemented in a brain PET device, promisses to lead to an essentially parallax free 3D image reconstruction with excellent spatial resolution and constrast, uniform over the complete field of view. The key components are matrices of long axially oriented scintillator crystals which are read out at both extremities by segmented Hybrid Photon Detectors. We discuss the relevant design considerations for a 3D axial PET camera module, motivate parameter and material choices, and estimate its performance in terms of spatial and energy resolution. We support these estimates by Monte Carlo simulations and in some cases by first experimental results. From the performance of a camera module, we extrapolate to the reconstruction resolution of a 3D axial PET scanner in a semi-analytical way and compare it to an existing state...

  2. The fly's eye camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, L.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.; Jaskó, A.; Vida, K.; Oláh, K.; Mezö, G.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce the Fly's Eye Camera System, an all-sky monitoring device intended to perform time domain astronomy. This camera system design will provide complementary data sets for other synoptic sky surveys such as LSST or Pan-STARRS. The effective field of view is obtained by 19 cameras arranged in a spherical mosaic form. These individual cameras of the device stand on a hexapod mount that is fully capable of achieving sidereal tracking for the subsequent exposures. This platform has many advantages. First of all it requires only one type of moving component and does not include unique parts. Hence this design not only eliminates problems implied by unique elements, but the redundancy of the hexapod allows smooth operations even if one or two of the legs are stuck. In addition, it can calibrate itself by observed stars independently from both the geographical location (including northen and southern hemisphere) and the polar alignment of the full mount. All mechanical elements and electronics are designed within the confines of our institute Konkoly Observatory. Currently, our instrument is in testing phase with an operating hexapod and reduced number of cameras.

  3. Event detection intelligent camera development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szappanos, A.; Kocsis, G.; Molnar, A.; Sarkozi, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new camera system 'event detection intelligent camera' (EDICAM) is being developed for the video diagnostics of W-7X stellarator, which consists of 10 distinct and standalone measurement channels each holding a camera. Different operation modes will be implemented for continuous and for triggered readout as well. Hardware level trigger signals will be generated from real time image processing algorithms optimized for digital signal processor (DSP) and field programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures. At full resolution a camera sends 12 bit sampled 1280 x 1024 pixels with 444 fps which means 1.43 Terabyte over half an hour. To analyse such a huge amount of data is time consuming and has a high computational complexity. We plan to overcome this problem by EDICAM's preprocessing concepts. EDICAM camera system integrates all the advantages of CMOS sensor chip technology and fast network connections. EDICAM is built up from three different modules with two interfaces. A sensor module (SM) with reduced hardware and functional elements to reach a small and compact size and robust action in harmful environment as well. An image processing and control unit (IPCU) module handles the entire user predefined events and runs image processing algorithms to generate trigger signals. Finally a 10 Gigabit Ethernet compatible image readout card functions as the network interface for the PC. In this contribution all the concepts of EDICAM and the functions of the distinct modules are described

  4. Video camera use at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, M.L.; Langan, M.O.; Owen, D.E.

    1990-08-01

    A survey of US nuclear power plants was conducted to evaluate video camera use in plant operations, and determine equipment used and the benefits realized. Basic closed circuit television camera (CCTV) systems are described and video camera operation principles are reviewed. Plant approaches for implementing video camera use are discussed, as are equipment selection issues such as setting task objectives, radiation effects on cameras, and the use of disposal cameras. Specific plant applications are presented and the video equipment used is described. The benefits of video camera use --- mainly reduced radiation exposure and increased productivity --- are discussed and quantified. 15 refs., 6 figs

  5. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C. M.; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway

  6. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    techniques, laser positioning may affect setup accuracy and couch deflection may be greater than scanners dedicated to radiotherapy. The full set of departmental commissioning and routine quality assurance tests applied to radiotherapy CT simulators must be carried out on the PET-CT scanner. CT image quality must be optimized for radiotherapy planning whilst understanding that the appearance will differ between scanners and may affect delineation. PET-CT quality assurance schedules will need to be added to and modified to incorporate radiotherapy quality assurance. Methods of working for radiotherapy and PET staff will change to take into account considerations of both parties. PET to CT alignment must be subject to quality control on a loaded and unloaded couch preferably using a suitable emission phantom, and tested throughout the whole data pathway. Data integrity must be tested throughout the whole pathway and a system included to verify that delineated structures are transferred correctly. Excellent multidisciplinary team communication and working is vital, and key staff members on both sides should be specifically dedicated to the project. Patient pathway should be clearly devised to optimize patient care and the resources of all departments. Recruitment of a cohort of patients into a methodology study is valuable to test the quality assurance methods and pathway.

  7. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  8. The GISMO-2 Bolometer Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Timothy M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the concept for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera) which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISM0-2 will operate Simultaneously in the 1 mm and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 x 40 TES-based Backshort Under Grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 x 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISM0-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2 mm bolometer camera which is successfully operating at the 30m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regular IRAM call for proposals.

  9. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  10. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Vazquez-Corral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as \\(XYZ\\, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE \\(\\Delta E\\ error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3for the \\(\\Delta E\\ error, 7& for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures.

  11. PET imaging of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common place and often chronic. Most inflammatory cells have increased uptake of glucose which is enhanced in the presence of local cytokines. Therefore, imaging glucose metabolism by the means of 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) holds significant promise in imaging focal inflammation. Most of the work published involved small series of patients with either vasculitis, sarcoid or rheumatoid arthritis. It would appear that FDG PET is a simple and effective technique to identify inflammatory tissue in these conditions. There is even some work to suggest that by comparing baseline and early post therapy scans clinical outcome can be predicted. This would appear to be true with vasculitis as well as retroperitoneal fibrosis. The number of patients in each study is small but the evidence is compelling enough to recommend FDG PET imaging in the routine care of these patients.

  12. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  13. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  14. EDICAM (Event Detection Intelligent Camera)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP RMI, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Szabolics, T., E-mail: szabolics.tamas@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP RMI, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Kocsis, G.; Szepesi, T.; Dunai, D. [Wigner RCP RMI, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We present EDICAM's hardware modules. ► We present EDICAM's main design concepts. ► This paper will describe EDICAM firmware architecture. ► Operation principles description. ► Further developments. -- Abstract: A new type of fast framing camera has been developed for fusion applications by the Wigner Research Centre for Physics during the last few years. A new concept was designed for intelligent event driven imaging which is capable of focusing image readout to Regions of Interests (ROIs) where and when predefined events occur. At present these events mean intensity changes and external triggers but in the future more sophisticated methods might also be defined. The camera provides 444 Hz frame rate at full resolution of 1280 × 1024 pixels, but monitoring of smaller ROIs can be done in the 1–116 kHz range even during exposure of the full image. Keeping space limitations and the harsh environment in mind the camera is divided into a small Sensor Module and a processing card interconnected by a fast 10 Gbit optical link. This camera hardware has been used for passive monitoring of the plasma in different devices for example at ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS with the first version of its firmware. The new firmware and software package is now available and ready for testing the new event processing features. This paper will present the operation principle and features of the Event Detection Intelligent Camera (EDICAM). The device is intended to be the central element in the 10-camera monitoring system of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator.

  15. Novel PET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, C.R.

    2001-03-01

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of novel molecular sensors that utilize the phenomena of Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET). PET design can be incorporated into molecules to allow them to selectively bind certain guest molecules. PET works by the modulation of electron potentials within a molecule. Binding events between a host and guest can, if designed suitably, change these potentials enough to cause a transfer of electronic charge within the molecular sensor. This event can be accurately and sensitively monitored by the use of ultra violet or fluorescence spectroscopy. A sensor molecule can be constructed by matching the guest to a suitable receptor site and incorporating this into a molecule containing a fluorophore with the correct electron potential characteristics. By using existing synthetic routes as well as exploiting new pathways these sensor molecules C n be constructed to contain a fluorophore separated from a guest receptor(s) by suitable spacers units. When put together these facets go to creating molecules that by design are sensitive and selective for certain guest molecules or functional groups. This methodology allows the synthetic chemist to rationally design and synthesise PET sensors, tailored to the needs of the guest. In this thesis the synthesis and evaluation of a novel PET sensors for D-glucosamine, disaccharides and fluoride is presented. It is believed that the novel sensors using the PET phenomenon presented in this thesis are a worthwhile extension of previous works undertaken by other groups around the world and shows new pathways to increasingly complex and sophisticated sensor molecular design. (author)

  16. Correcting for respiratory motion in liver PET/MRI: preliminary evaluation of the utility of bellows and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, Thomas A.; Verdin, Emily F.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Corvera, Carlos University; Nakakura, Eric K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of bellows-based respiratory compensation and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging to correct for respiratory motion in the setting of dedicated liver PET/MRI. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Six patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor were imaged using Ga-68 DOTA-TOC PET/MRI. Whole body imaging and a dedicated 15-min liver PET acquisition was performed, in addition to navigated and breath-held hepatobiliary phase (HBP) MRI. Liver PET data was reconstructed three ways: the entire data set (liver PET), gated using respiratory bellows (RC-liver PET), and a non-gated data set reconstructed using the same amount of data used in the RC-liver PET (shortened liver PET). Liver lesions were evaluated using SUV max , SUV peak , SUV mean , and Vol isocontour . Additionally, the displacement of each lesion between the RC-liver PET images and the navigated and breath-held HBP images was calculated. Respiratory compensation resulted in a 43 % increase in SUVs compared to ungated data (liver vs RC-liver PET SUV max 26.0 vs 37.3, p < 0.001) and a 25 % increase compared to a non-gated reconstruction using the same amount of data (RC-liver vs shortened liver PET SUV max 26.0 vs 32.6, p < 0.001). Lesion displacement was minimized using navigated HBP MRI (1.3 ± 1.0 mm) compared to breath-held HBP MRI (23.3 ± 1.0 mm). Respiratory bellows can provide accurate respiratory compensation when imaging liver lesions using PET/MRI, and results in increased SUVs due to a combination of increased image noise and reduced respiratory blurring. Additionally, navigated HBP MRI accurately aligns with respiratory compensated PET data.

  17. Correcting for respiratory motion in liver PET/MRI: preliminary evaluation of the utility of bellows and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hope, Thomas A. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Verdin, Emily F. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bergsland, Emily K. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ohliger, Michael A. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Corvera, Carlos University; Nakakura, Eric K. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of bellows-based respiratory compensation and navigated hepatobiliary phase imaging to correct for respiratory motion in the setting of dedicated liver PET/MRI. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Six patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor were imaged using Ga-68 DOTA-TOC PET/MRI. Whole body imaging and a dedicated 15-min liver PET acquisition was performed, in addition to navigated and breath-held hepatobiliary phase (HBP) MRI. Liver PET data was reconstructed three ways: the entire data set (liver PET), gated using respiratory bellows (RC-liver PET), and a non-gated data set reconstructed using the same amount of data used in the RC-liver PET (shortened liver PET). Liver lesions were evaluated using SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub peak}, SUV{sub mean}, and Vol{sub isocontour}. Additionally, the displacement of each lesion between the RC-liver PET images and the navigated and breath-held HBP images was calculated. Respiratory compensation resulted in a 43 % increase in SUVs compared to ungated data (liver vs RC-liver PET SUV{sub max} 26.0 vs 37.3, p < 0.001) and a 25 % increase compared to a non-gated reconstruction using the same amount of data (RC-liver vs shortened liver PET SUV{sub max} 26.0 vs 32.6, p < 0.001). Lesion displacement was minimized using navigated HBP MRI (1.3 ± 1.0 mm) compared to breath-held HBP MRI (23.3 ± 1.0 mm). Respiratory bellows can provide accurate respiratory compensation when imaging liver lesions using PET/MRI, and results in increased SUVs due to a combination of increased image noise and reduced respiratory blurring. Additionally, navigated HBP MRI accurately aligns with respiratory compensated PET data.

  18. Markerless 3D Head Tracking for Motion Correction in High Resolution PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter

    relying on markers. Data-driven motion correction is problematic due to the physiological dynamics. Marker-based tracking is potentially unreliable, and it is extremely hard to validate when the tracking information is correct. The motion estimation is essential for proper motion correction of the PET......This thesis concerns application specific 3D head tracking. The purpose is to improve motion correction in position emission tomography (PET) brain imaging through development of markerless tracking. Currently, motion correction strategies are based on either the PET data itself or tracking devices...... images. Incorrect motion correction can in the worst cases result in wrong diagnosis or treatment. The evolution of a markerless custom-made structured light 3D surface tracking system is presented. The system is targeted at state-of-the-art high resolution dedicated brain PET scanners with a resolution...

  19. Real-time vehicle matching for multi-camera tunnel surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelača, Vedran; Niño Castañeda, Jorge Oswaldo; Frías-Velázquez, Andrés; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2011-03-01

    Tracking multiple vehicles with multiple cameras is a challenging problem of great importance in tunnel surveillance. One of the main challenges is accurate vehicle matching across the cameras with non-overlapping fields of view. Since systems dedicated to this task can contain hundreds of cameras which observe dozens of vehicles each, for a real-time performance computational efficiency is essential. In this paper, we propose a low complexity, yet highly accurate method for vehicle matching using vehicle signatures composed of Radon transform like projection profiles of the vehicle image. The proposed signatures can be calculated by a simple scan-line algorithm, by the camera software itself and transmitted to the central server or to the other cameras in a smart camera environment. The amount of data is drastically reduced compared to the whole image, which relaxes the data link capacity requirements. Experiments on real vehicle images, extracted from video sequences recorded in a tunnel by two distant security cameras, validate our approach.

  20. The Sydney University PAPA camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    1994-04-01

    The Precision Analog Photon Address (PAPA) camera is a photon-counting array detector that uses optical encoding to locate photon events on the output of a microchannel plate image intensifier. The Sydney University camera is a 256x256 pixel detector which can operate at speeds greater than 1 million photons per second and produce individual photon coordinates with a deadtime of only 300 ns. It uses a new Gray coded mask-plate which permits a simplified optical alignment and successfully guards against vignetting artifacts.

  1. Streak cameras and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernet, J.M.; Imhoff, C.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last several years, development of various measurement techniques in the nanosecond and pico-second range has led to increased reliance on streak cameras. This paper will present the main electronic and optoelectronic performances of the Thomson-CSF TSN 506 cameras and their associated devices used to build an automatic image acquisition and processing system (NORMA). A brief survey of the diversity and the spread of the use of high speed electronic cinematography will be illustrated by a few typical applications [fr

  2. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  3. Editorial: A dedication to Professor Jan Evetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Harald; Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Barber, Zoe; Somekh, Rob; Glowacki, Bartek

    2006-03-01

    A few days before the beginning of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity we learned that Professor Jan Evetts, a pioneer of superconductor research, a brilliant scientist, a wonderful person and a great personal friend, had passed away. We therefore decided to dedicate the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity to the memory of Jan Evetts. The following citation is based on material provided by his former supervisor (D Dew-Hughes) and his closest co-workers in Cambridge. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan Evetts passed away after losing his second battle with cancer on 24th August 2005. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the superconductivity community is incalculable, as attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He entered the college in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for

  4. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  5. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiping Shao; Cherry, Simon R.; Meadors, Ken; Siegel, Stefan; Silverman, Robert W.; Farahani, Keyvan; Marsden, Paul K.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a prototype PET detector which is compatible with a clinical MRI system to provide simultaneous PET and MR imaging. This single-slice PET system consists of 48 2x2x10mm 3 LSO crystals in a 38 mm diameter ring configuration that can be placed inside the receiver coil of the MRI system, coupled to three multi-channel photomultipliers housed outside the main magnetic field via 4 m long and 2 mm diameter optical fibres. The PET system exhibits 2 mm spatial resolution, 41% energy resolution at 511 keV and 20 ns timing resolution. Simultaneous PET and MR phantom images were successfully acquired. (author)

  6. Direct comparison of 18F-FDG and 11C-methionine PET in suspected recurrence of glioma: sensitivity, inter-observer variability and prognostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laere, Koen Van; Ceyssens, Sarah; Mortelmans, Luc; Calenbergh, Frank Van; Groot, Tjibbe de; Bormans, Guy; Menten, Johan; Flamen, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 11 C-methionine (MET) PET imaging studies allow the investigation of metabolism and amino acid transport in brain tumours. Their (relative) usefulness and prognostic value in suspected recurrence or progression of primary brain tumours after previous therapy is an issue of debate. The aim of this study was to compare directly both radioligands in this setting. Cerebral uptake of FDG and MET was determined sequentially on the same day in 30 patients (21 males, nine females; age 40.4±15.6 years), on average 4.0 years (range 0.1-18) after therapy for a primary brain tumour (23 grade II-IV astrocytomas, four oligodendrogliomas and three mixed oligo-astrocytomas). Images were acquired on a Siemens HR+ dedicated PET camera. Two observers scored FDG and MET scans independently. Semi-quantitative indices defined by the tumour (maximum)-to-background ratio were calculated based on manual ROI delineation and by using MET ROIs for FDG after automated co-registration. Patient follow-up was conducted until the last contact with inconspicuous clinical findings (average 41 months, range 12-62 months after PET) [(n=10)] or until death (n=20). Overall median survival was 15.0 months. MET showed pathologically increased uptake in 28/30 scans, and FDG in 17/30. The inter-observer agreement was 100% for MET and 73% for FDG. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, significant differences were found for both FDG (cut-off 0.8, log-rank p=0.007) and MET (cut-off 2.2, log-rank p=0.014). The combination of FDG and MET information resulted in the highest prognostic accuracy (p=0.003), while MET alone was the best prognostic predictor in the subgroup of patients with primary astrocytoma (n=23). FDG and MET PET studies provide complementary prognostic information in patients with suspected brain tumour recurrence or progression after primary therapy. MET is considered the single agent of choice in the evaluation of these patients because of its sensitivity and

  7. Direct comparison of {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 11}C-methionine PET in suspected recurrence of glioma: sensitivity, inter-observer variability and prognostic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laere, Koen Van; Ceyssens, Sarah; Mortelmans, Luc [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Calenbergh, Frank Van [University Hospital Leuven, Department of Neurosurgery, Leuven (Belgium); Groot, Tjibbe de; Bormans, Guy [University Hospital Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Leuven (Belgium); Menten, Johan [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Radiotherapy, Leuven (Belgium); Flamen, Patrick [University Hospital Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Bordet Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-01-01

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) PET imaging studies allow the investigation of metabolism and amino acid transport in brain tumours. Their (relative) usefulness and prognostic value in suspected recurrence or progression of primary brain tumours after previous therapy is an issue of debate. The aim of this study was to compare directly both radioligands in this setting. Cerebral uptake of FDG and MET was determined sequentially on the same day in 30 patients (21 males, nine females; age 40.4{+-}15.6 years), on average 4.0 years (range 0.1-18) after therapy for a primary brain tumour (23 grade II-IV astrocytomas, four oligodendrogliomas and three mixed oligo-astrocytomas). Images were acquired on a Siemens HR+ dedicated PET camera. Two observers scored FDG and MET scans independently. Semi-quantitative indices defined by the tumour (maximum)-to-background ratio were calculated based on manual ROI delineation and by using MET ROIs for FDG after automated co-registration. Patient follow-up was conducted until the last contact with inconspicuous clinical findings (average 41 months, range 12-62 months after PET) [(n=10)] or until death (n=20). Overall median survival was 15.0 months. MET showed pathologically increased uptake in 28/30 scans, and FDG in 17/30. The inter-observer agreement was 100% for MET and 73% for FDG. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, significant differences were found for both FDG (cut-off 0.8, log-rank p=0.007) and MET (cut-off 2.2, log-rank p=0.014). The combination of FDG and MET information resulted in the highest prognostic accuracy (p=0.003), while MET alone was the best prognostic predictor in the subgroup of patients with primary astrocytoma (n=23). FDG and MET PET studies provide complementary prognostic information in patients with suspected brain tumour recurrence or progression after primary therapy. MET is considered the single agent of choice in the evaluation of these patients because of its

  8. Multimodal speech data acquisition with the use of EMA, fast-speed video cameras and a dedicated microphone array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swiecinski, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic Articulography (EMA) is a technology created over two decades ago. EMA enables to acquire spatiotemporal data from sensors placed on the tongue in order to obtain information about the positioning of the tongue, its shape and dynamics during vocalizations of various sounds of human

  9. Temporal lobe dysfunction in childhood autism: a PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddaert, N.; Poline, J.B.; Brunelle, F.; Zilbovicius, M.; Boddaert, N.; Brunelle, F.; Chabane, N.; Barthelemy, C.; Zilbovicius, M.; Bourgeois, M.; Samson, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Childhood autism is a severe developmental disorder that impairs the acquisition of some of the most important skills in human life. Progress in understanding the neural basis of childhood autism requires clear and reliable data indicating specific neuro-anatomical or neuro-physiological abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to research localized brain dysfunction in autistic children using functional brain imaging. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) in 21 primary autistic children and 10 age-matched non autistic children. A statistical parametric analysis of rCBF images revealed significant bilateral temporal hypoperfusion in the associative auditory cortex (superior temporal gyrus) and in the multimodal cortex (superior temporal sulcus) in the autistic group (p<0.001). In addition, temporal hypoperfusion was detected individually in 77% of autistic children. These findings provide robust evidence of well localized functional abnormalities in autistic children located in the superior temporal lobe. Such localized abnormalities were not detected with the low resolution PET camera (14-22). This study suggests that high resolution PET camera combined with statistical parametric mapping is useful to understand developmental disorders. (authors)

  10. Detection of prostate cancer by an FDG-PET cancer screening program: results from a Japanese nationwide survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Senda, Michio; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Terauchi, Takashi; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze detection rates and effectiveness of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) cancer screening program for prostate cancer in Japan, which is defined as a cancer-screening program for subjects without known cancer. It contains FDG-PET aimed at detection of cancer at an early stage with or without additional screening tests such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 92,255 asymptomatic men underwent the FDG-PET cancer screening program. Of these, 504 cases with findings of possible prostate cancer in any screening method were analyzed. Of the 504 cases, 165 were verified as having prostate cancer. Of these, only 61 cases were detected by FDG-PET, which result in 37.0% relative sensitivity and 32.8% positive predictive value (PPV). The sensitivity of PET/computed tomography (CT) scanner was higher than that of dedicated PET (44.0% vs. 20.4%). However, the sensitivity of FDG-PET was lower than that of PSA and pelvic MRI. FDG-PET did not contribute to improving the sensitivity and PPV when performed as combined screening. PSA should be included in FDG-PET cancer screening programs to screen for prostate cancer

  11. President Roosevelt's 1940 Dedication of the First NCI Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watch this video excerpt of the dedication of the National Institute of Health, October 31, 1940. President Roosevelt spoke of the importance of the National Cancer Institute, which would be located in Building 6.

  12. Evaluating the use of dedicated swab for rapid antigen detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the use of dedicated swab for rapid antigen detection testing in group a ... African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology ... Several generations of rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) have been developed to facilitate ...

  13. Don't Forget About Dedicated Sea Mine Countermeasures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Potts, Malcolm H

    2005-01-01

    .... Struggling through the Korean Conflict, the U.S. Navy began a slow improvement of MCM forces leading up to the first Gulf War where experiences led to the conclusion that a well equipped dedicated MCM force structure is essential...

  14. Minimizing Warehouse Space with a Dedicated Storage Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fumi

    2013-07-01

    inevitably be supported by warehouse management system software. On the contrary, the proposed methodology relies upon a dedicated storage policy, which is easily implementable by companies of all sizes without the need for investing in expensive IT tools.

  15. High-speed holographic camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaro, Marc

    The high-speed holographic camera is a disgnostic instrument using holography as an information storing support. It allows us to take 10 holograms, of an object, with exposures times of 1,5ns, separated in time by 1 or 2ns. In order to get these results easily, no mobile part is used in the set-up [fr

  16. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  17. Gamma camera with reflectivity mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a radiographic camera comprising: a scintillator; a plurality of photodectors positioned to face said scintillator; a plurality of masked regions formed upon a face of said scintillator opposite said photdetectors and positioned coaxially with respective ones of said photodetectors for decreasing the amount of internal reflection of optical photons generated within said scintillator. (auth)

  18. Atlas of PET/MR imaging in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratib, Osman; Schwaiger, Markus; Beyer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous illustrated clinical cases in different oncology domains. Includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. Interactive version based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring the widest compatibility. Edited by three international opinion leaders/imaging experts in the field. This new project on PET/MR imaging in oncology includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. The interactive version of the atlas is based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring compatibility with any computer operating system as well as a dedicated version for Apple iPad and iPhone. The book opens with an introduction to the principles of hybrid imaging that pays particular attention to PET/MR imaging and standard PET/MR acquisition protocols. A wide range of illustrated clinical case reports are then presented. Each case study includes a short clinical history, findings, and teaching points, followed by illustrations, legends, and comments. The multimedia version of the book includes dynamic movies that allow the reader to browse through series of rotating 3D images (MIP or volume rendered), display blending between PET and MR, and dynamic visualization of 3D image volumes. The movies can be played either continuously or sequentially for better exploration of sets of images. The editors of this state-of-the-art publication are key opinion leaders in the field of multimodality imaging. Professor Osman Ratib (Geneva) and Professor Markus Schwaiger (Munich) were the first in Europe to initiate the clinical adoption of PET/MR imaging. Professor Thomas Beyer (Zurich) is an internationally renowned pioneering physicist in the field of hybrid imaging. Individual clinical cases presented in this book are co-authored by leading international radiologists and nuclear physicians experts in the use of PET and MRI.

  19. FDG PET in the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Yeung, H.W.D.; Pui, J.; Macapinlac, H.; Liebovitz, E.; Rusch, V.; Goy, A.; Larson, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To evaluate the role of PET in the diagnosis of vasculitis. Methods: We report a case of giant cell arteritis diagnosed by FDG-PET in a 75-year-old woman with a fever of unknown origin. The patient presented with a 3 month history of fatigue, fevers, headaches, visual disturbance and jaw claudication. Diagnosis of temporal arteritis was initially excluded because of a normal ESR. CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass, suspicious for malignancy. An FDG-PET scan for pre-operative evaluation was acquired 45 minutes after intravenous injection of 10 mCi F18-FDG, on a dedicated PET scanner. Image reconstruction was performed using an iterative algorithm with segmented attenuation correction. The study identified striking localisation of FDG to the entire aorta, left main coronary artery, and subclavian, carotid and common iliac arteries bilaterally (SUV max range 4-4.5 g/ml), suggestive of large vessel arteritis. Subsequent excisional biopsy of the mediastinal mass confirmed giant cell vasculitis of a large muscular artery in thymic tissue. No malignancy was detected. A repeat ESR was 129 mm/hr. The patient was commenced on oral Prednisone, with prompt improvement of symptoms, ESR and anaemia and complete normalisation of the FDG-PET scan within two weeks. This case suggests a potential role of FDG-PET in the non-invasive diagnosis, classification and follow-up of giant cell arteritis, and possibly other vasculitides, so far notoriously difficult to diagnose, relying usually on a constellation of non-specific symptoms, laboratory investigations or invasive pathologic and angiographic means. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  20. Atlas of PET/MR imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratib, Osman [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland). Nuclear Medicine Division; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Beyer, Thomas (eds.) [General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering

    2013-08-01

    Numerous illustrated clinical cases in different oncology domains. Includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. Interactive version based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring the widest compatibility. Edited by three international opinion leaders/imaging experts in the field. This new project on PET/MR imaging in oncology includes digital interactive software matching the cases in the book. The interactive version of the atlas is based on the latest web standard, HTML5, ensuring compatibility with any computer operating system as well as a dedicated version for Apple iPad and iPhone. The book opens with an introduction to the principles of hybrid imaging that pays particular attention to PET/MR imaging and standard PET/MR acquisition protocols. A wide range of illustrated clinical case reports are then presented. Each case study includes a short clinical history, findings, and teaching points, followed by illustrations, legends, and comments. The multimedia version of the book includes dynamic movies that allow the reader to browse through series of rotating 3D images (MIP or volume rendered), display blending between PET and MR, and dynamic visualization of 3D image volumes. The movies can be played either continuously or sequentially for better exploration of sets of images. The editors of this state-of-the-art publication are key opinion leaders in the field of multimodality imaging. Professor Osman Ratib (Geneva) and Professor Markus Schwaiger (Munich) were the first in Europe to initiate the clinical adoption of PET/MR imaging. Professor Thomas Beyer (Zurich) is an internationally renowned pioneering physicist in the field of hybrid imaging. Individual clinical cases presented in this book are co-authored by leading international radiologists and nuclear physicians experts in the use of PET and MRI.

  1. Multiple Sensor Camera for Enhanced Video Capturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Hajime; Kanki, Yoshinori; Iwai, Yoshio; Yachida, Masahiko

    A resolution of camera has been drastically improved under a current request for high-quality digital images. For example, digital still camera has several mega pixels. Although a video camera has the higher frame-rate, the resolution of a video camera is lower than that of still camera. Thus, the high-resolution is incompatible with the high frame rate of ordinary cameras in market. It is difficult to solve this problem by a single sensor, since it comes from physical limitation of the pixel transfer rate. In this paper, we propose a multi-sensor camera for capturing a resolution and frame-rate enhanced video. Common multi-CCDs camera, such as 3CCD color camera, has same CCD for capturing different spectral information. Our approach is to use different spatio-temporal resolution sensors in a single camera cabinet for capturing higher resolution and frame-rate information separately. We build a prototype camera which can capture high-resolution (2588×1958 pixels, 3.75 fps) and high frame-rate (500×500, 90 fps) videos. We also proposed the calibration method for the camera. As one of the application of the camera, we demonstrate an enhanced video (2128×1952 pixels, 90 fps) generated from the captured videos for showing the utility of the camera.

  2. PET-CT imaging fusion in the assessment of head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Denise Takehana dos; Chojniak, Rubens; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmao Paraiso

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors have established a methodological approach to evaluate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma aiming at identifying and distinguishing high metabolic activity inside the lesion, combining in a single examination, functional, metabolic and morphological data simultaneously acquired by means of different non-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) device. Materials and Methods: The study population included 17 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma submitted to a non-dedicated 18 F-FDG-PET imaging at Department of Diagnostic Imaging of Hospital do Cancer, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. CT and 18 F-FDG-PET images were simultaneously acquired in a non-dedicated device. The original data were transferred to an independent workstation by means of the Entegra 2 NT software to generate PET-CT imaging fusion. Results: The findings were defined as positive in the presence of a well defined focal area of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake in regions not related with the normal biodistribution of the tracer. Conclusion: The fusion of simultaneously acquired images in a single examination ( 18 F-FDGPET and CT) has allowed the topographic-metabolic mapping of the lesion as well as the localization of high metabolic activity areas inside the tumor, indicating recidivation or metastasis and widening the array of alternatives for radiotherapy or surgical planning. (author)

  3. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma; PET y PET/CT en melanoma maligno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  4. I Love Petting Zoos!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-23

    This Kidtastics podcast helps children learn about how to stay safe and healthy when visiting petting zoos and other animal exhibits.  Created: 3/23/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/23/2010.

  5. PET's indsats under lup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peer Henrik

    2006-01-01

    En undersøgelseskommission nedsat i 1999. Fem medlemmer skal undersøge PET's efterretningsvirksomhed i forhold til politiske partier, faglige konflikter og politisk ideologiske bevægelser i Danmark under den kolde krig. Kommissionens rapport forventes færdig næste år. Udgivelsesdato: 2. juli 2006...

  6. Choosing a Pet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    THE capital boasts countless markets of all kinds,but some of its insect,bird and pet markets immortalize Beijing culture and folkloric traditions.Don’t miss it! The Huasheng Tianqiao Market,south of the famous Panjiayuan Antique Market, was moved a few years ago and rebuilt in the

  7. PET CT and lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about Tc and lymphomas. Classification and clinical cases of various cancer such as gastro duodenal or ulcer, mama, medullary, lymph and neck, leukemia, nodular sclerosis. Metabolic information, anatomical nature of lymphoma and its clinical presentation determine the extent that PET should be used in the patient.

  8. Design and performance of an acquisition and control system for a positron camera with novel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symonds-Tayler, J.R.N.; Reader, A.J.; Flower, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A Sun-based data acquisition and control (DAQ) system has been designed for PETRRA, a whole-body positron camera using large-area BaF 2 -TMAE detectors. The DAQ system uses a high-speed digital I/O card (S16D) installed on the S-bus of a SPARC10 and a specially-designed Positron Camera Interface (PCI), which also controls both the gantry and horizontal couch motion. Data in the form of different types of 6-byte packets are acquired in list mode. Tests with a signal generator show that the DAQ system should be able to cater for coincidence count-rates up to 100 kcps. The predicted count loss due to the DAQ system is ∼13% at this count rate, provided asynchronous-read based software is used. The list-mode data acquisition system designed for PETRRA could be adapted for other 3D PET cameras with similar data rates

  9. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface

  10. Poster - 01: LabPET II Pixelated APD-Based PET Scanner for High-Resolution Preclinical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte, Roger; Arpin, Louis; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Bergeron, Mélanie; Bouchard, Jonathan; Bouziri, Haithem; Cadorette, Jules; Gaudin, Émilie; Jürgensen, Nadia; Koua, Konin Calliste; Trépanier, Pierre-Yves Lauzier; Leroux, Jean-Daniel; Loignon-Houle, Francis; Njejimana, Larissa; Paillé, Maxime; Paulin, Caroline; Pepin, Catherine; Pratte, Jean-François; Samson, Arnaud; Thibaudeau, Christian [Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, CIMS/CRCHUS, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, CIMS/CRCHUS, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, 3IT, Université de Sherbrooke, Novalgo Inc., Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, CIMS/CRCHUS, 3IT, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, 3IT, Université de Sherbrooke (Canada); and others

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: LabPET II is a new generation APD-based PET scanner designed to achieve sub-mm spatial resolution using truly pixelated detectors and highly integrated parallel front-end processing electronics. Methods: The basic element uses a 4×8 array of 1.12×1.12 mm{sup 2} Lu{sub 1.9}Y{sub 0.1}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LYSO) scintillator pixels with one-to-one coupling to a 4×8 pixelated monolithic APD array mounted on a ceramic carrier. Four detector arrays are mounted on a daughter board carrying two flip-chip, 64-channel, mixed-signal, application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC) on the backside interfacing to two detector arrays each. Fully parallel signal processing was implemented in silico by encoding time and energy information using a dual-threshold Time-over-Threshold (ToT) scheme. The self-contained 128-channel detector module was designed as a generic component for ultra-high resolution PET imaging of small to medium-size animals. Results: Energy and timing performance were optimized by carefully setting ToT thresholds to minimize the noise/slope ratio. ToT spectra clearly show resolved 511 keV photopeak and Compton edge with ToT resolution well below 10%. After correction for nonlinear ToT response, energy resolution is typically 24±2% FWHM. Coincidence time resolution between opposing 128-channel modules is below 4 ns FWHM. Initial imaging results demonstrate that 0.8 mm hot spots of a Derenzo phantom can be resolved. Conclusion: A new generation PET scanner featuring truly pixelated detectors was developed and shown to achieve a spatial resolution approaching the physical limit of PET. Future plans are to integrate a small-bore dedicated mouse version of the scanner within a PET/CT platform.

  11. F-18 FDG PET finding in autonomous thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan H.; Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seek Nam; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    F-18 FDG PET has become an important diagnostic imaging modality of various malignancies including thyroid cancer. Focal hypermetabolic lesion in the thyroid gland is usually considered malignant (Fig.1), although some benign lesions are also hypermetabolic. The aim of our poster presentation is to demonstrate F-18- FDG PET finding in autonomous thyroid nodules (ATN) and to avoid confusion in the interpretation of F-18-FDG PET performed for the evaluation of thyroid malignancy. Two patients with ATN (one with toxic and the other with nontoxic) underwent F-18-PET. ATN was proven by Tc-99m pertechnate thyroid scan (TS) and thyroid function tests (TFTs) were performed. First patient with ATN was asymptomatic and had a long history of thyroid nodule. Second patient was suffering from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and he was mildly thyrotoxic clinically and chemically. Gamma camera based F-18 FDG PET was performed utilizing Elscints Varicam (Haifa, Israel) one hour after IV administration of 111 MBq (3mCi) F-18 FDG. Patients were fasting more than 6 hours prior ot FDG injection. First patients was scanned the neck and second patient had scan of the whole trunk including neck for the evaluation of AML. Both nontoxic and toxic ATNs were hypermetabolic and it was impossible to differentiate benign from malignancy. Biopsy of nodule of the first patient and surgical removal of the nodule in the second patient was benign. Benign nontoxic and toxic ATNs are F-18 FDG avid. The reason for this is that ATN has increased glycolysis and iodide metabolism. Therefore, focal increased FDG uptake within the thyroid gland should be interpreted with TS and TFTs for an accurate diagnosis when F-18 FDG PET is used in the evaluation of thyroid malignancy

  12. A new gamma camera for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schotanus, P.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the detection of annihiliation radiation employing a new principle: radiation is absorbed in a barium fluoride (BaF 2) crystal and the resulting scintillation light is detected in a multiwire proportional chamber filled with a photsensitive vapour. The application of such a detector for PET is new; the use of a high density fast scintillator in combination with a low pressure wire chamber offers a good detection efficiency and permits high count rates because of the small dead time. In this work, the physical background of the above detection mechanism is explored and the performance parameters of a gamma camera using this new principle, are determined. Furthermore, a comprehensive research on the scintillation mechanism and physical characteristics of the increasingly popular BaF 2 scintillator is presented. Also, a new class of ultraviolet (UV) scintillation materials, consisting of rare earth doped fluorides, is introduced. (author). 211 refs.; 30 figs.; 17 tabs

  13. Development of the LBNL positron emission mammography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Wang, Jimmy; Maltz, Jonathon S.; Qi, Jinyi; Mandelli, Emanuele; Moses, William W.

    2002-01-01

    We present the construction status of the LBNL Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) camera, which utilizes a PET detector module with depth of interaction measurement consisting of 64 LSO crystals (3x3x30 mm3) coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PDs). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal, and the PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We have completed construction of all 42 PEM detector modules. All data acquisition electronics have been completed, fully tested and loaded onto the gantry. We have demonstrated that all functions of the custom IC work using the production rigid-flex boards and data acquisition system. Preliminary detector module characterization and coincidence data have been taken using the production system, including initial images

  14. Architectural Design Document for Camera Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Architecture of camera simulator models and data interface for the Maneuvering of Inspection/Servicing Vehicle (MIV) study.......Architecture of camera simulator models and data interface for the Maneuvering of Inspection/Servicing Vehicle (MIV) study....

  15. Selecting a digital camera for telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricoski, Chris; Ferguson, A Stewart

    2009-06-01

    The digital camera is an essential component of store-and-forward telemedicine (electronic consultation). There are numerous makes and models of digital cameras on the market, and selecting a suitable consumer-grade camera can be complicated. Evaluation of digital cameras includes investigating the features and analyzing image quality. Important features include the camera settings, ease of use, macro capabilities, method of image transfer, and power recharging. Consideration needs to be given to image quality, especially as it relates to color (skin tones) and detail. It is important to know the level of the photographer and the intended application. The goal is to match the characteristics of the camera with the telemedicine program requirements. In the end, selecting a digital camera is a combination of qualitative (subjective) and quantitative (objective) analysis. For the telemedicine program in Alaska in 2008, the camera evaluation and decision process resulted in a specific selection based on the criteria developed for our environment.

  16. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding area...

  17. Improved positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of rings of detectors positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom, and a plurality of scintillation crystals positioned relative to the photomultiplier tubes whereby each tube is responsive to more than one crystal. Each alternate crystal in the ring may be offset by one-half or less of the thickness of the crystal such that the staggered crystals are seen by more than one photomultiplier tube. This sharing of crystals and photomultiplier tubes allows identification of the staggered crystal and the use of smaller detectors shared by larger photomultiplier tubes thereby requiring less photomultiplier tubes, creating more scanning slices, providing better data sampling, and reducing the cost of the camera. (author)

  18. Vehicular camera pedestrian detection research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiahui

    2018-03-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology, it has made great development, but at the same time of highway traffic more convenient in highway traffic and transportation. However, in the meantime, traffic safety accidents occur more and more frequently in China. In order to deal with the increasingly heavy traffic safety. So, protecting the safety of people's personal property and facilitating travel has become a top priority. The real-time accurate pedestrian and driving environment are obtained through a vehicular camera which are used to detection and track the preceding moving targets. It is popular in the domain of intelligent vehicle safety driving, autonomous navigation and traffic system research. Based on the pedestrian video obtained by the Vehicular Camera, this paper studies the trajectory of pedestrian detection and its algorithm.

  19. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  20. PET or PET-CT with cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    At present, cancer screening remains a lot of debate in contemporary medical practice. Many constitutes have done a lot of experiments in cancer screening. The same version is that recommendations and decisions regarding cancer screening should be based on reliable data, not self- approbation. Now, some institutes advocate 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET-CT for cancer screening, here, discussed status quo, potential financial, radiation safety and statistical data in 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET- CT cancer screening. (authors)

  1. Observations of the Perseids 2012 using SPOSH cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margonis, A.; Flohrer, J.; Christou, A.; Elgner, S.; Oberst, J.

    2012-09-01

    The Perseids are one of the most prominent annual meteor showers occurring every summer when the stream of dust particles, originating from Halley-type comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, intersects the orbital path of the Earth. The dense core of this stream passes Earth's orbit on the 12th of August producing the maximum number of meteors. The Technical University of Berlin (TUB) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) organize observing campaigns every summer monitoring the Perseids activity. The observations are carried out using the Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head (SPOSH) camera system [0]. The SPOSH camera has been developed by DLR and Jena-Optronik GmbH under an ESA/ESTEC contract and it is designed to image faint, short-lived phenomena on dark planetary hemispheres. The camera features a highly sensitive backilluminated 1024x1024 CCD chip and a high dynamic range of 14 bits. The custom-made fish-eye lens offers a 120°x120° field-of-view (168° over the diagonal). Figure 1: A meteor captured by the SPOSH cameras simultaneously during the last 2011 observing campaign in Greece. The horizon including surrounding mountains can be seen in the image corners as a result of the large FOV of the camera. The observations will be made on the Greek Peloponnese peninsula monitoring the post-peak activity of the Perseids during a one-week period around the August New Moon (14th to 21st). Two SPOSH cameras will be deployed in two remote sites in high altitudes for the triangulation of meteor trajectories captured at both stations simultaneously. The observations during this time interval will give us the possibility to study the poorly-observed postmaximum branch of the Perseid stream and compare the results with datasets from previous campaigns which covered different periods of this long-lived meteor shower. The acquired data will be processed using dedicated software for meteor data reduction developed at TUB and DLR. Assuming a successful campaign, statistics, trajectories

  2. The MVACS Robotic Arm Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H. U.; Hartwig, H.; Kramm, R.; Koschny, D.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Thomas, N.; Fernades, M.; Smith, P. H.; Reynolds, R.; Lemmon, M. T.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Tanner, R.; Boss, B. J.; Oquest, C.; Paige, D. A.

    2001-08-01

    The Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) is one of the key instruments newly developed for the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor payload of the Mars Polar Lander. This lightweight instrument employs a front lens with variable focus range and takes images at distances from 11 mm (image scale 1:1) to infinity. Color images with a resolution of better than 50 μm can be obtained to characterize the Martian soil. Spectral information of nearby objects is retrieved through illumination with blue, green, and red lamp sets. The design and performance of the camera are described in relation to the science objectives and operation. The RAC uses the same CCD detector array as the Surface Stereo Imager and shares the readout electronics with this camera. The RAC is mounted at the wrist of the Robotic Arm and can characterize the contents of the scoop, the samples of soil fed to the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer, the Martian surface in the vicinity of the lander, and the interior of trenches dug out by the Robotic Arm. It can also be used to take panoramic images and to retrieve stereo information with an effective baseline surpassing that of the Surface Stereo Imager by about a factor of 3.

  3. Coaxial fundus camera for opthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Luciana; Castro, Guilherme; Castro Neto, Jarbas C.

    2015-09-01

    A Fundus Camera for ophthalmology is a high definition device which needs to meet low light illumination of the human retina, high resolution in the retina and reflection free image1. Those constraints make its optical design very sophisticated, but the most difficult to comply with is the reflection free illumination and the final alignment due to the high number of non coaxial optical components in the system. Reflection of the illumination, both in the objective and at the cornea, mask image quality, and a poor alignment make the sophisticated optical design useless. In this work we developed a totally axial optical system for a non-midriatic Fundus Camera. The illumination is performed by a LED ring, coaxial with the optical system and composed of IR of visible LEDs. The illumination ring is projected by the objective lens in the cornea. The Objective, LED illuminator, CCD lens are coaxial making the final alignment easily to perform. The CCD + capture lens module is a CCTV camera with autofocus and Zoom built in, added to a 175 mm focal length doublet corrected for infinity, making the system easily operated and very compact.

  4. The PETRRA positron camera: design, characterization and results of a physical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divoli, A; Flower, M A; Erlandsson, K; Reader, A J; Evans, N; Meriaux, S; Ott, R J; Stephenson, R; Bateman, J E; Duxbury, D M; Spill, E J

    2005-01-01

    The PETRRA positron camera is a large-area (600 mm x 400 mm sensitive area) prototype system that has been developed through a collaboration between the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Institute of Cancer Research/Royal Marsden Hospital. The camera uses novel technology involving the coupling of 10 mm thick barium fluoride scintillating crystals to multi-wire proportional chambers filled with a photosensitive gas. The performance of the camera is reported here and shows that the present system has a 3D spatial resolution of ∼7.5 mm full-width-half-maximum (FWHM), a timing resolution of ∼3.5 ns (FWHM), a total coincidence count-rate performance of at least 80-90 kcps and a randoms-corrected sensitivity of ∼8-10 kcps kBq -1 ml. For an average concentration of 3 kBq ml -1 as expected in a patient it is shown that, for the present prototype, ∼20% of the data would be true events. The count-rate performance is presently limited by the obsolete off-camera read-out electronics and computer system and the sensitivity by the use of thin (10 mm thick) crystals. The prototype camera has limited scatter rejection and no intrinsic shielding and is, therefore, susceptible to high levels of scatter and out-of-field activity when imaging patients. All these factors are being addressed to improve the performance of the camera. The large axial field-of-view of 400 mm makes the camera ideally suited to whole-body PET imaging. We present examples of preliminary clinical images taken with the prototype camera. Overall, the results show the potential for this alternative technology justifying further development

  5. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk still...

  6. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  7. A camera specification for tendering purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunt, M.J.; Davies, M.D.; Kenyon, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    A standardized document is described which is suitable for sending to companies which are being invited to tender for the supply of a gamma camera. The document refers to various features of the camera, the performance specification of the camera, maintenance details, price quotations for various options and delivery, installation and warranty details. (U.K.)

  8. Read the Label First: Protect Your Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the importance of reading pet products labels before purchasing and using any product to insure the safety of your pets. Find tips for ways to reduce the changes of pets accessing potentially dangerous products.

  9. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  10. Dedication increases productivity: an analysis of the implementation of a dedicated medical team in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pedro; Paiva, José Artur

    2017-12-01

    In several European countries, emergency departments (EDs) now employ a dedicated team of full-time emergency medicine (EM) physicians, with a distinct leadership and bed-side emergency training, in all similar to other hospital departments. In Portugal, however, there are still two very different models for staffing EDs: a classic model, where EDs are mostly staffed with young inexperienced physicians from different medical departments who take turns in the ED in 12-h shifts and a dedicated model, recently implemented in some hospitals, where the ED is staffed by a team of doctors with specific medical competencies in emergency medicine that work full-time in the ED. Our study assesses the effect of an intervention in a large academic hospital ED in Portugal in 2002, and it is the first to test the hypothesis that implementing a dedicated team of doctors with EM expertise increases the productivity and reduces costs in the ED, maintaining the quality of care provided to patients. A pre-post design was used for comparing the change on the organisational model of delivering care in our medical ED. All emergency medical admissions were tracked in 2002 (classic model with 12-h shift in the ED) and 2005/2006 (dedicated team with full-time EM physicians), and productivity, costs with medical human resources and quality of care measures were compared. We found that medical productivity (number of patients treated per hour of medical work) increased dramatically after the creation of the dedicated team (X 2 KW = 31.135; N = 36; p work reduced both in regular hours and overtime. Moreover, hospitalisation rates decreased and the length of stay in the ED increased significantly after the creation of the dedicated team. Implementing a dedicated team of doctors increased the medical productivity and reduced costs in our ED. Our findings have straightforward implication for Portuguese policymakers aiming at reducing hospital costs while coping with increased ED demand.

  11. PET studies in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ( 18 F-F-DOPA) and for ( 11 C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs

  12. PET studies in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik and Max-Planck-Inst. fuer neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ({sup 18}F-F-DOPA) and for ({sup 11}C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs.

  13. Pet Overpopulation: An Economic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Coate; Brian Knight

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of pet overpopulation. It develops a tractable dynamic model whose positive predictions square well with key features of the current U.S. market for pets. The model is used to understand, from a welfare economic perspective, the sense in which there is \\overpopulation" of pets and the underlying causes of the problem. The paper also employs the model to consider what policies might be implemented to deal with the problem. A calibrated example is developed to i...

  14. Click synthesis of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mei; Kuang Chunxiang

    2009-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on synthesis radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). The recent years witnessed applications of click chemistry to PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis,because of its distinctive advantages including high speed,yield and stereospecificity under mild conditions. Synthesis of 18 F-labeled and 11 C-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and intermediates via click chemistry are reviewed. The future trend of click chemistry for the synthesis of PET radiopharmaceutical is prospected. (authors)

  15. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiou, Nikos [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Charalampos, Tsoumpas [Division of Biomedical Imaging, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  16. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimiou, Nikos; Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Charalampos, Tsoumpas; Loudos, George

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  17. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 307-312

  18. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 307-312

  19. A prospective multi-centre study of the value of FDG-PET as part of a structured diagnostic protocol in patients with fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; Vos, Fidel J.; Meer, Jos W.M. van der; Mudde, Aart H.; Dofferhoff, Anton S.M.; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de; Rijnders, Anton J.; Krabbe, Paul F.M.; Corstens, Frans H.M.; Oyen, Wim J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) accumulates in neoplastic cells and in activated inflammatory cells, positron emission tomography (PET) with FDG could be valuable in diagnosing patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO). The aim of this study was to validate the use of FDG-PET as part of a structured diagnostic protocol in the general patient population with FUO. From December 2003 to July 2005, 70 patients with FUO were recruited from one university hospital (n=38) and five community hospitals (n=32). A structured diagnostic protocol including FDG-PET was used. A dedicated, full-ring PET scanner was used for data acquisition. FDG-PET scans were interpreted by two staff members of the department of nuclear medicine without further clinical information. The final clinical diagnosis was used for comparison with the FDG-PET results. Of all scans, 33% were clinically helpful. The contribution of FDG-PET to the final diagnosis did not differ significantly between patients diagnosed in the university hospital and patients diagnosed in the community hospitals. FDG-PET contributed significantly more often to the final diagnosis in patients with continuous fever than in patients with periodic fever. FDG-PET was not helpful in any of the patients with normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). FDG-PET is a valuable imaging technique as part of a diagnostic protocol in the general patient population with FUO and a raised ESR or CRP. (orig.)

  20. Extended suicide with a pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases.

  1. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  2. Relative camera localisation in non-overlapping camera networks using multiple trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John, V.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present an automatic camera calibration algorithm using multiple trajectories in a multiple camera network with non-overlapping field-of-views (FOV). Visible trajectories within a camera FOV are assumed to be measured with respect to the camera local co-ordinate system.

  3. Intraindividual comparison of F-18-FLT PET and F-18 FET PET in brain tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Cheon, G. J.; Cho, Y. S.; Kwak, H. S.; Lee, C. H.; Choi, C. W.; Lim, S. M.

    2003-01-01

    To compare findings on FLT PET with FET PET, we prospectively undertaken FLT, FET and FDG PET in same patient with suspected primary/metastatic and recurrent brain tumors. Seventeen studies in 16 patients (47 8.3 years, M: F 10: 6) with brain tumor (3 for initial diagnosis, 6 for therapeutic response, 6 for detecting recurrence, 1 for diagnosis and recurrence both) were included. Brain tumors were 14 gliomas (6 high- grade 9 low-grade by the WHO classification), 2 metastatic brain tumors and 1 CNS lymphoma. 18F-FDG, FLT and FET PET were performed within two weeks. Attenuation-corrected brain images were acquired 30 minutes after injection of 370-555 MBq FDG, FLT and FET with a dedicated PET scanner (ECAT HR scanner, Siemens-CTI). Maximum SUV (max SUV) and relative uptake defined by FLT and FET accumulation within the tumor in relation to a contralateral control region (max SUV for tumor/ mean SUV for contralateral normal gray matter) were calculated. 26 tumor foci were analyzed. Relative FLT uptake (4.17 2.4, 0.58 to 7.45) was grater than than FET uptake (2.03 1.17, 0.92 to 4.53 (p<0.0006)) and FDG uptake (1.16 0.34, 0.76 to 2.08). Among FLT, FET and FDG uptakes in 20 tumor foci, correlation were poor. the relative FLT uptake of high-grade glioma was higher than low-glioma (6.070.76 vs 3.11 2.15, p=0.002), however, relative FET uptake was not different significantly (2.68 1.51, high-grade vs 1.970.78, low-grade). The correlation between tumor grade (high vs low grade) and relative uptake (FLT and FET) was shown only with relative FLT uptake (r=0.62, p=0.002). The best cut off value of relative FLT uptake between high-grade and low-grade glioma was 4.54 (AUC: 0.89 sensitivity: 100 specificity: 86.7%). Compared with FET uptake, FLT uptake showed much higher contrast and associated with tumor grade. Further study, evaluation of proliferative index of Ki-67 and its relationship with FLT and FET uptake, are ongoing

  4. Thoracic cavity definition for 3D PET/CT analysis and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W; Higgins, William E

    2015-07-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) serve as the standard imaging modalities for lung-cancer management. CT gives anatomical details on diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs), while PET gives highly specific functional information. During the lung-cancer management process, a patient receives a co-registered whole-body PET/CT scan pair and a dedicated high-resolution chest CT scan. With these data, multimodal PET/CT ROI information can be gleaned to facilitate disease management. Effective image segmentation of the thoracic cavity, however, is needed to focus attention on the central chest. We present an automatic method for thoracic cavity segmentation from 3D CT scans. We then demonstrate how the method facilitates 3D ROI localization and visualization in patient multimodal imaging studies. Our segmentation method draws upon digital topological and morphological operations, active-contour analysis, and key organ landmarks. Using a large patient database, the method showed high agreement to ground-truth regions, with a mean coverage=99.2% and leakage=0.52%. Furthermore, it enabled extremely fast computation. For PET/CT lesion analysis, the segmentation method reduced ROI search space by 97.7% for a whole-body scan, or nearly 3 times greater than that achieved by a lung mask. Despite this reduction, we achieved 100% true-positive ROI detection, while also reducing the false-positive (FP) detection rate by >5 times over that achieved with a lung mask. Finally, the method greatly improved PET/CT visualization by eliminating false PET-avid obscurations arising from the heart, bones, and liver. In particular, PET MIP views and fused PET/CT renderings depicted unprecedented clarity of the lesions and neighboring anatomical structures truly relevant to lung-cancer assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recent developments in gamma camera technology for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Economic pressure, competition from alternative modalities and an increasing awareness of patient radiation exposure have triggered a rapid development of novel technology for cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in recent years. The trend clearly goes towards systems with higher sensitivity and resolution, and towards faster acquisition protocols. Those goals are achieved by various measures: On the one hand, several manufacturers have integrated novel semiconductor detector materials together with innovative collimators into dedicated cardiac scanners. On the other hand, new collimators and reconstruction algorithms have lead to increased speed and accuracy of conventional gamma cameras. Imaging times now can be reduced to as much as 10% of that of previous standard protocols, and/or injected activity can be reduced. This is achieved without loss of diagnostic accuracy. These novel developments are still in early phases of clinical implementation. Their potential for a profound change of the clinical practice of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, however, becomes increasingly obvious. (orig.)

  6. Operating dedicated data centers – is it cost-effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, M; Hogue, R; Hollowell, C; Strecker-Kellog, W; Wong, A; Zaytsev, A

    2014-01-01

    The advent of cloud computing centres such as Amazon's EC2 and Google's Computing Engine has elicited comparisons with dedicated computing clusters. Discussions on appropriate usage of cloud resources (both academic and commercial) and costs have ensued. This presentation discusses a detailed analysis of the costs of operating and maintaining the RACF (RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility) compute cluster at Brookhaven National Lab and compares them with the cost of cloud computing resources under various usage scenarios. An extrapolation of likely future cost effectiveness of dedicated computing resources is also presented.

  7. Operating Dedicated Data Centers - Is It Cost-Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, M.; Hogue, R.; Hollowell, C.; Strecker-Kellog, W.; Wong, A.; Zaytsev, A.

    2014-06-01

    The advent of cloud computing centres such as Amazon's EC2 and Google's Computing Engine has elicited comparisons with dedicated computing clusters. Discussions on appropriate usage of cloud resources (both academic and commercial) and costs have ensued. This presentation discusses a detailed analysis of the costs of operating and maintaining the RACF (RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility) compute cluster at Brookhaven National Lab and compares them with the cost of cloud computing resources under various usage scenarios. An extrapolation of likely future cost effectiveness of dedicated computing resources is also presented.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation for dual head gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Yousif Bashir Soliman

    2015-12-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique was used widely in medical physics applications. In nuclear medicine MC was used to design new medical imaging devices such as positron emission tomography (PET), gamma camera and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Also it can be used to study the factors affecting image quality and internal dosimetry, Gate is on of monte Carlo code that has a number of advantages for simulation of SPECT and PET. There is a limit accessibilities in machines which are used in clinics because of the work load of machines. This makes it hard to evaluate some factors effecting machine performance which must be evaluated routinely. Also because of difficulties of carrying out scientific research and training of students, MC model can be optimum solution for the problem. The aim of this study was to use gate monte Carlo code to model Nucline spirit, medico dual head gamma camera hosted in radiation and isotopes center of Khartoum which is equipped with low energy general purpose LEGP collimators. This was used model to evaluate spatial resolution and sensitivity which is important factor affecting image quality and to demonstrate the validity of gate by comparing experimental results with simulation results on spatial resolution. The gate model of Nuclide spirit, medico dual head gamma camera was developed by applying manufacturer specifications. Then simulation was run. In evaluation of spatial resolution the FWHM was calculated from image profile of line source of Tc 99m gammas emitter of energy 140 KeV at different distances from modeled camera head at 5,10,15,20,22,27,32,37 cm and for these distances the spatial resolution was founded to be 5.76, 7.73, 10.7, 13.8, 14.01,16.91, 19.75 and 21.9 mm, respectively. These results showed a decrement of spatial resolution with increase of the distance between object (line source) and collimator in linear manner. FWHM calculated at 10 cm was compared with experimental results. The

  9. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmário Barbosa Santos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Furthermore, experiments are proposed by using the images obtained by the camera for 3D visualization through a pair of anaglyph glasses, and the estimation of relative depth by triangulation is discussed.

  10. Single Camera Calibration in 3D Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caius SULIMAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Camera calibration is a necessary step in 3D vision in order to extract metric information from 2D images. A camera is considered to be calibrated when the parameters of the camera are known (i.e. principal distance, lens distorsion, focal length etc.. In this paper we deal with a single camera calibration method and with the help of this method we try to find the intrinsic and extrinsic camera parameters. The method was implemented with succes in the programming and simulation environment Matlab.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of PET and PET/Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Hermansson, Ronnie; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    measure by means of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when considering the replacement of the standard regimen by a new diagnostic procedure. This article discusses economic assessments of PET and PET/computed tomography reported until mid-July 2014. Forty-seven studies on cancer and noncancer...

  12. Optimisation of a dual head semiconductor Compton camera using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, L.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L697ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ljh@ns.ph.liv.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L697ZE (United Kingdom); Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Lazarus, I. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-01

    Conventional medical gamma-ray camera systems utilise mechanical collimation to provide information on the position of an incident gamma-ray photon. Systems that use electronic collimation utilising Compton image reconstruction techniques have the potential to offer huge improvements in sensitivity. Position sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems are being evaluated as part of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Compton camera system. Data have been acquired from the orthogonally segmented planar SmartPET detectors, operated in Compton camera mode. The minimum gamma-ray energy which can be imaged by the current system in Compton camera configuration is 244 keV due to the 20 mm thickness of the first scatter detector which causes large gamma-ray absorption. A simulation package for the optimisation of a new semiconductor Compton camera has been developed using the Geant4 toolkit. This paper will show results of preliminary analysis of the validated Geant4 simulation for gamma-ray energies of SPECT, 141 keV.

  13. Collimator changer for scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupa, E.C.; Meeder, R.L.; Richter, E.K.

    1976-01-01

    A collimator changing assembly mounted on the support structure of a scintillation camera is described. A vertical support column positioned proximate the detector support column with a plurality of support arms mounted thereon in a rotatable cantilevered manner at separate vertical positions. Each support arm is adapted to carry one of the plurality of collimators which are interchangeably mountable on the underside of the detector and to transport the collimator between a store position remote from the detector and a change position underneath said detector

  14. Robot Tracer with Visual Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar Lubis, Abdul; Dwi Lestari, Yuyun; Dafitri, Haida; Azanuddin

    2017-12-01

    Robot is a versatile tool that can function replace human work function. The robot is a device that can be reprogrammed according to user needs. The use of wireless networks for remote monitoring needs can be utilized to build a robot that can be monitored movement and can be monitored using blueprints and he can track the path chosen robot. This process is sent using a wireless network. For visual robot using high resolution cameras to facilitate the operator to control the robot and see the surrounding circumstances.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  16. Dedicating time to volunteering : Values, engagement, and commitment to beneficiaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shantz, A.; Saksida, T.; Alfes, K.

    2014-01-01

    A moderated mediation model was developed to explain the variation in the amount of time volunteers dedicate to their chosen voluntary cause. Data from 534 volunteers of an international aid and development agency in the United Kingdom revealed a positive relationship between prosocial values and

  17. Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication for Leak Detection Relays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOCH, M.R.; JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis

  18. Spectrograph dedicated to measuring tropospheric trace gas constituents from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Laan, E.C.; Deutz, A.F.; Escudero-Sanz, I.; Bokhove, H.; Hoegee, J.; Aben, I.; Jongma, R.; Landgraf, J.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Houweling, S.; Weele, M. van; Oss, R. van; Oord, G. van den; Levelt, P.

    2005-01-01

    Several organizations in the Netherlands are cooperating to develop user requirements and instrument concepts in the line of SCIAMACHY and OMI but with an increased focus on measuring tropospheric constituents from space. The concepts use passive spectroscopy in dedicated wavelength sections in the

  19. Performance of TCP over UMTS common and dedicated channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, Anthony; Heijenk, Geert; Bruma, Cezar; Gameiro, A.

    2003-01-01

    Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) is a third-generation cellular network that enables high-speed wireless Internet access. This paper investigates the performance of Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over UMTS utilizing a common and four dedicated transport channels with bit rates

  20. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  1. Virginia Tech's College Of Natural Resources Dedicates Cheatham Hall Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to funding by private donors, Alyce Cheatham and her family of Portland, Oregon, Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources will dedicate a much-needed, three-story addition to its current Cheatham Hall on Wednesday, March 19, at 2:30 p.m.

  2. Cost of a dedicated ART clinic | Harling | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background. The provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being rolled out across South Africa. Little evidence exists on the cost of running clinics for ART provision. Objectives. To determine the cost per patient-month enrolled in an ART programme and per patient-visit for a dedicated, public-sector ART clinic in a ...

  3. Service differentiation in spare parts supply through dedicated stocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, Elisa; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate keeping dedicated stocks at customer sites in addition to stock kept at some central location as a tool for applying service differentiation in spare parts supply. We study the resulting two-echelon system in a multi-item setting, both under backordering and under emergency shipments

  4. Towards Effective Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces Dedicated to Gait Rehabilitation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Castermans

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the field of walk rehabilitation. Motor cortex signals in bipedal monkeys have been interpreted to predict walk kinematics. Epidural electrical stimulation in rats and in one young paraplegic has been realized to partially restore motor control after spinal cord injury. However, these experimental trials are far from being applicable to all patients suffering from motor impairments. Therefore, it is thought that more simple rehabilitation systems are desirable in the meanwhile. The goal of this review is to describe and summarize the progress made in the development of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces dedicated to motor rehabilitation systems. In the first part, the main principles of human locomotion control are presented. The paper then focuses on the mechanisms of supra-spinal centers active during gait, including results from electroencephalography, functional brain imaging technologies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, positron-emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT] and invasive studies. The first brain-computer interface (BCI applications to gait rehabilitation are then presented, with a discussion about the different strategies developed in the field. The challenges to raise for future systems are identified and discussed. Finally, we present some proposals to address these challenges, in order to contribute to the improvement of BCI for gait rehabilitation.

  5. Silicon Detectors for PET and SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Eric R.

    Silicon detectors use state-of-the-art electronics to take advantage of the semiconductor properties of silicon to produce very high resolution radiation detectors. These detectors have been a fundamental part of high energy, nuclear, and astroparticle physics experiments for decades, and they hold great potential for significant gains in both PET and SPECT applications. Two separate prototype nuclear medicine imaging systems have been developed to explore this potential. Both devices take advantage of the unique properties of high resolution pixelated silicon detectors, designed and developed as part of the CIMA collaboration and built at The Ohio State University. The first prototype is a Compton SPECT imaging system. Compton SPECT, also referred to as electronic collimation, is a fundamentally different approach to single photon imaging from standard gamma cameras. It removes the inherent coupling of spatial resolution and sensitivity in mechanically collimated systems and provides improved performance at higher energies. As a result, Compton SPECT creates opportunities for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals based on higher energy isotopes as well as opportunities to expand the use of current isotopes such as 131I due to the increased resolution and sensitivity. The Compton SPECT prototype consists of a single high resolution silicon detector, configured in a 2D geometry, in coincidence with a standard NaI scintillator detector. Images of point sources have been taken for 99mTc (140 keV), 131I (364keV), and 22Na (511 keV), demonstrating the performance of high resolution silicon detectors in a Compton SPECT system. Filtered back projection image resolutions of 10 mm, 7.5 mm, and 6.7 mm were achieved for the three different sources respectively. The results compare well with typical SPECT resolutions of 5-15 mm and validate the claims of improved performance in Compton SPECT imaging devices at higher source energies. They also support the potential of

  6. Clinical value of FDG hybrid-PET in staging and restaging of malignant lymphoma. Compared with conventional diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, R.; Maschek, W.; Hatzl-Griesenhofer, M.; Huber, H.; Wimmer, G.; Wahl, G.; Fridrik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Aim of the present retrospective study was to validate the clinical value of F-18-FDG PET imaging in lymphoma patients with a dual head camera modified for coincidence detection. Staging before and after oncological treatment was compared with a conservative diagnostic approach. Methods: 48 patients (28 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 20 Hodgkin's disease) received FDG-Hybrid-PET scans. Pretherapeutic staging was realized in 28 patients, 9 of them had control studies after they had completed therapy. Totally 29 persons were examined for posttherapeutic restaging. Computed tomography imaging and lymph node sonography was performed in all cases. Results were validated by clinical follow-up, in three cases a recidive was proven by biopsy. Results: CT and ultrasound detected 77 lesions in 28 patients compared with 100 visualized by PET, but this difference in pretherapeutic staging did not reach significance at p>0.05 by Fisher's t-test. Hybrid-PET obtained a sensitivity of 93%, a specifity of 79%, a positive of 82% and a negative predictive value of 92% for detection of residual disease. The values for CT+US were 87%, 64%, 72% and 88% respectively. Conclusion: FDG Hybrid-PET is as or even more accurate than standard morphologic diagnostic methods for prestaging in malignant lymphoma. Additionally, there is a substancial benefit for therapy monitoring of residual disease using coincidence detection PET with a 3/4-inch crystal gamma camera. (orig.) [de

  7. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  8. Welfare assessment in pet rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, F.; Koene, P.; Beerda, B.

    2009-01-01

    One million pet rabbits are kept in The Netherlands, but there are no data available on their behaviour and welfare. This study seeks to assess the welfare of pet rabbits in Dutch households and is a first step in the development of a welfare assessment system. In an internet survey, housing

  9. Selected PET radiomic features remain the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Tsuyoshi, Hideaki; Kanno, Masafumi; Yamada, Shizuka; Kobayashi, Masato; Narita, Norihiko; Kimura, Hirohiko; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Yoshida, Yoshio; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2018-04-17

    We investigated whether PET radiomic features are affected by differences in the scanner, scan protocol, and lesion location using 18 F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR scans. SUV, TMR, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and homogeneity strongly correlated between PET/CT and PET/MR images. SUVs were significantly higher on PET/MR 0-2 min and PET/MR 0-10 min than on PET/CT in gynecological cancer ( p = 0.008 and 0.008, respectively), whereas no significant difference was observed between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images in oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer. TMRs on PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min increased in this order in gynecological cancer and oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer. In contrast to conventional and histogram indices, 4 textural features (entropy, homogeneity, SRE, and LRE) were not significantly different between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images. 18 F-FDG PET radiomic features strongly correlated between PET/CT and PET/MR images. Dixon-based attenuation correction on PET/MR images underestimated tumor tracer uptake more significantly in oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer than in gynecological cancer. 18 F-FDG PET textural features were affected less by differences in the scanner and scan protocol than conventional and histogram features, possibly due to the resampling process using a medium bin width. Eight patients with gynecological cancer and 7 with oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer underwent a whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and regional PET/MR scan in one day. PET/MR scans were performed for 10 minutes in the list mode, and PET/CT and 0-2 min and 0-10 min PET/MR images were reconstructed. The standardized uptake value (SUV), tumor-to-muscle SUV ratio (TMR), skewness, kurtosis, entropy, homogeneity, short-run emphasis (SRE), and long-run emphasis (LRE) were compared between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images.

  10. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  11. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2001-01-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D 2 receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D 1 receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D 2 receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [ 11 C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [ 11 C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D 2 receptors. [ 11 C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D 2 receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D 2 occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D 2 receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D 2 , dopamine D 1 receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT 2A receptors have been studied with [ 11 C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT 1A receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [ 11 C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly been developed, and serotonin transporters have recently begun to be

  12. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  13. Upgrade of the JET gamma-ray cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, S.; Curuia, M.; Anghel, M.; Constantin, M.; David, E.; Craciunescu, T.; Falie, D.; Pantea, A.; Tiseanu, I.; Kiptily, V.; Prior, P.; Edlington, T.; Griph, S.; Krivchenkov, Y.; Loughlin, M.; Popovichev, S.; Riccardo, V; Syme, B.; Thompson, V.; Lengar, I.; Murari, A.; Bonheure, G.; Le Guern, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The JET gamma-ray camera diagnostics have already provided valuable information on the gamma-ray imaging of fast ion in JET plasmas. The applicability of gamma-ray imaging to high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium JET discharges is strongly dependent on the fulfilment of rather strict requirements for the characterisation of the neutron and gamma-ray radiation fields. These requirements have to be satisfied within very stringent boundary conditions for the design, such as the requirement of minimum impact on the co-existing neutron camera diagnostics. The JET Gamma-Ray Cameras (GRC) upgrade project deals with these issues with particular emphasis on the design of appropriate neutron/gamma-ray filters ('neutron attenuators'). Several design versions have been developed and evaluated for the JET GRC neutron attenuators at the conceptual design level. The main design parameter was the neutron attenuation factor. The two design solutions, that have been finally chosen and developed at the level of scheme design, consist of: a) one quasi-crescent shaped neutron attenuator (for the horizontal camera) and b) two quasi-trapezoid shaped neutron attenuators (for the vertical one). The second design solution has different attenuation lengths: a short version, to be used together with the horizontal attenuator for deuterium discharges, and a long version to be used for high performance deuterium and DT discharges. Various neutron-attenuating materials have been considered (lithium hydride with natural isotopic composition and 6 Li enriched, light and heavy water, polyethylene). Pure light water was finally chosen as the attenuating material for the JET gamma-ray cameras. The neutron attenuators will be steered in and out of the detector line-of-sight by means of an electro-pneumatic steering and control system. The MCNP code was used for neutron and gamma ray transport in order to evaluate the effect of the neutron attenuators on the neutron field of the

  14. Observations of the Perseids 2013 using SPOSH cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margonis, A.; Elgner, S.; Christou, A.; Oberst, J.; Flohrer, J.

    2013-09-01

    between the two observing stations ensures a large overlapping area of the cameras' field of views allowing the triangulation of approximately every meteor captured by the two observing systems. The acquired data will be reduced using dedicated software developed at TUB and DLR. Assuming a successful campaign, statistics, trajectories and photometric properties of the processed double-station meteors will be presented at the conference. Furthermore, a first order statistical analysis of the meteors processed during the 2012 and the new 2013 campaigns will be presented [1].

  15. Toward implementing an MRI-based PET attenuation-correction method for neurologic studies on the MR-PET brain prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; van der Kouwe, Andre; Benner, Thomas; Michel, Christian J; Hamm, Michael; Fenchel, Matthias; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2010-09-01

    Several factors have to be considered for implementing an accurate attenuation-correction (AC) method in a combined MR-PET scanner. In this work, some of these challenges were investigated, and an AC method based entirely on the MRI data obtained with a single dedicated sequence was developed and used for neurologic studies performed with the MR-PET human brain scanner prototype. The focus was on the probl