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Sample records for decontamination technologies task

  1. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers during the

  2. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  3. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  4. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  5. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.R.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    This study identifies and technically assesses foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs. 4 refs

  6. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented

  7. Decontamination technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-01-01

    This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technology developments that may represent significant improvements over D and D technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water rector (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign D and D technologies of potential interest to the U.S. were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of D and D literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in D and D costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to U.S. needs

  8. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-01-01

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials

  9. New decontamination technologies for environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; McCoy, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    The technologies discussed represent a versatile collection of tools and approaches for environmental decontamination applications. The fixatives provide a means for gaining and maintaining control of large contaminated areas, for decontaminating large surface areas, and for protecting equipment and supplies used in decontamination operations. The other decontamination techniques together provide a method for removing loose surface contamination from almost all classes of materials and surfaces. These techniques should have wide application both as direct decontamination processes and for the cleaning of tools and equipment used in the decontamination operations

  10. Toshiba's decontamination technologies for the decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yuki; Yaita, Yumi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the decommissioning, two types of decontamination process are necessary, 1) system decontamination before dismantling and 2) decontamination of dismantling waste. Toshiba has been developing the decontamination technologies for the both purposes from the viewpoint of minimizing the secondary waste. For the system decontamination before dismantling, chemical decontamination process, such as T-OZON, can be applicable for stainless steel or carbon steel piping. For the decontamination of dismantling waste, several types of process have been developed to apply variety of shapes and materials. For the simple shape materials, physical decontamination process, such as blast decontamination, is effective. We have developed new blast decontamination process with highly durable zirconia particle. It can be used repeatedly and secondary waste can be reduced compared with conventional blast particle. For the complex shape materials, chemical decontamination process can be applied that formic acid decontamination process for carbon steel and electrolytic reduction decontamination process with organic acid for stainless steel. These chemicals can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and water and amount of secondary waste can be small. (author)

  11. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  12. Recent developments in chemical decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Chemical decontamination of parts of reactor coolant systems is a mature technology, used routinely in many BWR plants, but less frequently in PWRs. This paper reviews recent developments in the technology - corrosion minimization, waste processing and full system decontamination, including the fuel. Earlier work was described in an extensive review published in 1990.

  13. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  14. Study on LOMI decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fuduan; Yu Degui; Lu Jingju; Xie Yinyan

    1993-10-01

    The results of decontamination technique of Low-Oxidation-State Metal-Ion (LOMI) reagents developed from 1986 to 1991 in the laboratory are introduced. The experiments included preparation of LOMI reagents, de-filming efficiency, corrosion behavior of typical alloys, decontamination factors of reagents for contaminated materials and components have proved that the NP/LOMI decontamination method and treatment technique of waste water are feasible and have some advantages. The preparation of LOMI reagent with low concentration of formic acid by reduced pressure distilling technique and the utilization ratio of vanadium reached to 95% by second electrolysis are the main contributions of the study to the decontamination technique

  15. Riser equipment decontamination engineering task plan; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    On October 15, 1998, two Characterization Project Operations (CPO) employees were found to have contaminated clothing. An operator had 300,000-dpm/100cm2 beta/gamma, no alpha, contamination on his coat sleeve and a Radiation Control Technician (RCT) had 10,000 dpm/100cm2 beta/gamma, no alpha, on his shirt sleeve. The CPO swing shift crew was working in TX tank farm, performing sampling activities at 241-TX-113. TX tank farm is a ''clean farm'' and does not require anti-contamination clothing for entry. The CPO personnel were dressed in normal work clothes. An operator and an RCT were performing a pre-job survey that involved removing bagging around the riser equipment. When the RCT saw that the contamination readings from smear samples of the riser equipment were greater than expected, the job was suspended. Crew members were then directed to areas of lower background radiation for personnel surveys. During personnel surveys, reportable contamination was found on the coat sleeve of the operator who had been involved in the pre-job survey and on the shirt sleeve of the RCT who had been involved in the pre-job survey. No other personnel were found to be contaminated. Because of this off normal event Characterization Engineering was given the following corrective action: Examine the process methodology used for core sampling operations to determine practicality and potential long-term advantages of reducing personnel contact with contaminated equipment. This Engineering Task Plan ensures that LMHC 1998a, Corrective Action No.7 is completely addressed by Characterization Engineering. The deliverable is an Engineering Study that evaluates decontamination of riser equipment components and considers additional engineered features to reduce potential exposure to workers operating the riser equipment. This engineering study shall also address any released design features that have failed to be implemented

  16. Riser equipment decontamination engineering task plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    On October 15, 1998, two Characterization Project Operations (CPO) employees were found to have contaminated clothing. An operator had 300,000-dpm/100cm2 beta/gamma, no alpha, contamination on his coat sleeve and a Radiation Control Technician (RCT) had 10,000 dpm/100cm2 beta/gamma, no alpha, on his shirt sleeve. The CPO swing shift crew was working in TX tank farm, performing sampling activities at 241-TX-113. TX tank farm is a ''clean farm'' and does not require anti-contamination clothing for entry. The CPO personnel were dressed in normal work clothes. An operator and an RCT were performing a pre-job survey that involved removing bagging around the riser equipment. When the RCT saw that the contamination readings from smear samples of the riser equipment were greater than expected, the job was suspended. Crew members were then directed to areas of lower background radiation for personnel surveys. During personnel surveys, reportable contamination was found on the coat sleeve of the operator who had been involved in the pre-job survey and on the shirt sleeve of the RCT who had been involved in the pre-job survey. No other personnel were found to be contaminated. Because of this off normal event Characterization Engineering was given the following corrective action: Examine the process methodology used for core sampling operations to determine practicality and potential long-term advantages of reducing personnel contact with contaminated equipment. This Engineering Task Plan ensures that LMHC 1998a, Corrective Action No.7 is completely addressed by Characterization Engineering. The deliverable is an Engineering Study that evaluates decontamination of riser equipment components and considers additional engineered features to reduce potential exposure to workers operating the riser equipment. This engineering study shall also address any released design features that have failed to be implemented

  17. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  18. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Kwon, H S; Kim, G N. and others

    1999-03-01

    Through the project of 'Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology', the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  19. Two-step chemical decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1992-01-01

    An improved two-step chemical decontamination technique was recently developed at INEL. This memorandum documents the addition of this technology to the SRTC arsenal of decontamination technology. A two-step process using NAOH, KMnO 4 followed by HNO 3 was used for cleaning doorstops (small casks) in the SRTC High Level Caves in 1967. Subsequently, more aggressive chemical techniques have been found to be much more effective for our applications. No further work on two-step technology is planned

  20. Steam Generator Group Project. Task 6. Channel head decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Clark, R.L.; Reece, W.D.

    1984-08-01

    The Steam Generator Group Project utilizes a retired-from-service pressurized-water-reactor steam generator as a test bed and source of specimens for research. An important preparatory step to primary side research activities was reduction of the radiation field in the steam generator channel head. This task report describes the channel head decontamination activities. Though not a programmatic research objective it was judged beneficial to explore the use of dilute reagent chemical decontamination techniques. These techniques presented potential for reduced personnel exposure and reduced secondary radwaste generation, over currently used abrasive blasting techniques. Two techniques with extensive laboratory research and vendors prepared to offer commercial application were tested, one on either side of the channel head. As indicated in the report, both techniques accomplished similar decontamination objectives. Neither technique damaged the generator channel head or tubing materials, as applied. This report provides details of the decontamination operations. Application system and operating conditions are described

  1. Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material's decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting

  2. A remotely operated robot for decontamination tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudar, A.M.; Vandewalle, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers in the Robotics Development Group at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) have developed a robot which will be used to decontaminate a pipe gallery of a tank farm used for nuclear waste storage. Personnel access is required into this pipe gallery to inspect existing pipes and perform repairs to secondary containment walls around the tank farm. Presently, the pipe gallery is littered with debris of various sizes and its surface is contaminated with activity levels up to 2.5E6 DPM (disintegrations per minute) alpha and exposure levels as high as 20 Rad/hr. Cleaning up this pipe gallery win be the mission of an all-hydraulic robotic vehicle developed in-house at WSRC caged the ''Remote Decon'' robot. The Remote Decon is a tracked vehicle which utilizes skid steering and features a six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) manipulator arm, a five-DOF front end loader type bucket with a rotating brush for scrubbing and decontaminating surfaces, and a three-DOF pan/tilt mechanism with cameras and lights. The Remote Decon system is connected to a control console via a 200 foot tethered cable. The control console was designed with ergonomics and simplicity as the main design factors and features three joysticks, video monitors, LED panels, and audible alarms

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities

  4. Thermal decontamination of transformers: A new technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, P.Z.

    1992-01-01

    After evaluating a number of methods for decontaminating or disposing of transformers that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), it was concluded that no entirely satisfactory procedure or technology was yet available which was permanent, effective, safe, relatively simple, and based on proven technology or conventional practice. The most desirable compromise appears to be thermal decontamination. It is proposed to decontaminate transformers by controlled incineration in a specially designed, indirect-fired furnace which resembles the conventional bell-type, vertical elevator, metal heat treating type of furnace. The design differs in the incorporation of those essential features required to achieve oxidation of the organic components, to provide internal air circulation needed to ensure efficient heat and mass transfer, and other factors. The most appropriate decontamination facility would provide for implementation of the following procedures: draining of PCB-containing liquids from the transformer; limited disassembly of the transformer, which in most instances would imply only removal of the top cover to expose the insides; and controlled incineration with any vapors generated being conducted to a secondary combustion chamber. Experiments were conducted in a kiln to simulate the proposed transformer incinerator. Results show that exposure of the transformer segments to a temperature in the 950-1,000 degree C range for over 90 min is generally sufficient to reduce the PCB content to under 1 ppM. Based on the work conducted, a suitable bell furnace was constructed and added to the Swan Hills (Alberta) waste treatment facility. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Investigation on safety of gel decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhihui; Song Fengli; Wang Yongxian; Zhang Taoge

    2014-01-01

    Gel decontamination technology is an advanced decontamination process of metal contaminated by radionuclide. It has the advantages such as simple operation process, high decontaminating factor, etc. But the disadvantages are that it has high spraying pressure and is strongly corrosive, which has safety risk to the operator and equipment. The effect of such factors as spraying pressure on operators was analyzed based on process feature, and it is proposed that it be worthwhile to make further study on the corrosion of gels to spraying equipment, taking into account corrosion feature of gels to stainless steel. Meanwhile, the safety issue was demonstrated on collecting and handling wastes from gel decontamination process. And then, protective measures, study methods, and solutions are put forward. The results show that protection should be strengthened during spraying to reduce the effect of splashing and fogging on workers; the equipment should be cleaned in time to reduce the effect of corrosion, and reducers should be added into waste liquid to eliminate the effect of residual detergent. (authors)

  6. Technology for treatment of decontamination products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavkhuta, G.A.; Rozdzyalovskaya, L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The research concerning the methods of management and processing of products generated as the result of post Chernobyl decontamination activities is being carried out by the Institute of Radioecological Problems of Belarus Academy of Science (IRP) in the framework of the Belarus National Programme. The main goal of this work is choice and development of an appropriate system for treatment of the decontamination radwastes, based on currently available information and experimental studies. This paper presents the technological schemes being studied for treating the post-Chernobyl liquid and solid wastes and will also briefly discuss the approach being used to settle a problem on collecting/management of low-level radioactive ash wastes, generated from the use of contaminated fuel

  7. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Kwon, H. S.; Kim, G. N. and others

    1999-03-01

    Through the project of 'Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology', the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  8. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Kwon, H. S.; Kim, G. N. and others

    1999-03-01

    Through the project of D evelopment of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology , the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  9. New technologies for PCB [polychlorinated biphenyl] decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, I.

    1993-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) were mixed with chlorobenzenes to reduce viscosity and provide for both electrical insulation and convective heat transfers. These mixtures were known as askarels, and ca 99.8% of PCBs used in electrical applications are contained in askarel-filled transformers and capacitors. It is estimated that there are ca 180 million gal of PCB-contaminated oil distributed through over 3 million transformers in the USA. Technology used for decontaminating these transformers depends on the concentration of the PCB contamination. At low PCB concentrations of up to ca 2,000 ppM, chemical methods can be used; at higher concentrations, alternative disposal options become more attractive. For chemical treatment, a small mobile unit using quick-reacting reagents has been developed for on-site decontamination. For highly contaminated transformers, retrofilling is very attractive since the owner's liability is minimized at minimum cost. Conventional flush/drain procedures have such drawbacks as the inability to remove oil trapped in windings and the leaching of trapped PCBs back into the uncontaminated retrofill oil over time. A new process has been developed to solve the leaching problem and to decontaminate the drained askarel at room temperature using a catalyst. An alternative disposal strategy involves dismantling the transformer carcass, incinerating non-recyclable materials, and cleaning the metals and wire with solvent. 8 figs

  10. Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Morris, M.I.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D ampersand D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are 137 Cs, 238 U (and it daughters), and 60 Co, followed closely by 90 Sr and tritium, which account for -30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope

  11. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ''Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting

  12. Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D ampersand D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D ampersand D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D ampersand D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D ampersand D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R ampersand D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D ampersand D

  13. Decision Analysis System for Selection of Appropriate Decontamination Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.; Chinta, S.; Zanakis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    The principal objective for designing Decision Analysis System for Decontamination (DASD) is to support DOE-EM's endeavor to employ the most efficient and effective technologies for treating radiologically contaminated surfaces while minimizing personnel and environmental risks. DASD will provide a tool for environmental decision makers to improve the quality, consistency, and efficacy of their technology selection decisions. The system will facilitate methodical comparisons between innovative and baseline decontamination technologies and aid in identifying the most suitable technologies for performing surface decontamination at DOE environmental restoration sites

  14. Task 21 - Development of Systems Engineering Applications for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to: Develop a model (paper) to estimate the cost and waste generation of cleanup within the Environmental Management (EM) complex; Identify technologies applicable to decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations within the EM complex; Develop a database of facility information as linked to project baseline summaries (PBSs). The above objectives are carried out through the following four subtasks: Subtask 1--D and D Model Development, Subtask 2--Technology List; Subtask 3--Facility Database, and Subtask 4--Incorporation into a User Model

  15. Task 21 - Development of Systems Engineering Applications for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, T.A.

    1998-11-01

    The objectives of this task are to: Develop a model (paper) to estimate the cost and waste generation of cleanup within the Environmental Management (EM) complex; Identify technologies applicable to decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations within the EM complex; Develop a database of facility information as linked to project baseline summaries (PBSs). The above objectives are carried out through the following four subtasks: Subtask 1--D and D Model Development, Subtask 2--Technology List; Subtask 3--Facility Database, and Subtask 4--Incorporation into a User Model.

  16. Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D&D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and it daughters), and {sup 60}Co, followed closely by {sup 90}Sr and tritium, which account for {minus}30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope.

  17. Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.

    1975-01-01

    Development of special techniques has permitted the use of mild decontamination processes for the CANDU type reactor primary coolant circuit, overcoming many of the problems associated with conventional decontamination processes, which use strong, acidic reagents. (Author)

  18. Development of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technologies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun

    2010-04-01

    A laser ablation decontamination technology which is reportedly effective for a removal of fixed contaminants has been developed for three years as the first stage of the development. Lab scale experimental equipment was fabricated and the process variables have been assessed for determination of appropriate decontamination conditions at the laser wave lengths of 1,064 nm and 532 nm, respectively. The decontamination tests using radioactive specimens showed that the decontamination efficiency was about 100 which is quite a high value. An electrokinetic-flushing, an agglomeration leaching and a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology were development for a decontamination of radioactive soil wastes from the decommissioned sites of the TRIGA research reactor and the uranium conversion facilities. An electrokinetic-flushing process was found to be effective for soil wastes aged for a long time and an agglomeration leaching process was effective for soil wastes of surface contamination. On the other hand, a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology was found to be applicable for U or TRU bearing soil wastes. The remediation monitoring key technologies such as a representative sample taking and a measurement concept for the vertical distribution of radionuclides were developed for an assessment of the site remediation. Also an One-Dimensional Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Unsaturated Zone (FTUNS) code was developed to interpretate the radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone

  19. Review of decontamination technologies for chemical counter-terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchek, K.; Boudreau, L.; Hornof, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Fingas, M.F.; Gamble, R.L. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Div]|[Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). River Road Environmental Technology Centre

    2004-07-01

    The two categories of chemical agents that could be used in acts of chemical terrorism are conventional chemical warfare agents and commercial toxic chemicals. Industrial chemicals are easier to access than warfare agents, and must therefore be considered when evaluating decontamination techniques. This study involved a search of public-domain documents to identify decontamination technologies including: physical/mechanical treatment or removal; chemical treatment; and, biological methods including natural degradation and attenuation. The technologies were analyzed with reference to their effectiveness for specific groups of chemical agents, state of development, availability and costs. Results indicate that there are many decontamination methods available, both developed and under development, that work effectively for most agents. The two most common decontamination methods are oxidation and alkali hydrolysis followed by dehalogenation. Technology limitations and gaps were also identified, suggesting a need for more research to further the development of promising processes. 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H.J.; Kim, G.N.; Lee, K.W.; Chol, W.K.; Jung, C.H.; Kim, C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kwon, S.O.; Chung, C.M

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point.

  1. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.; Chol, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, C. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kwon, S. O.; Chung, C. M.

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point

  2. Report on practical use of new decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Hideyuki; Ono, Masahiro

    2000-03-01

    For removing surface contamination of a solid waste with radioactivity, technology of laser cleaning and vacuum arc cleaning has the possibility to obtain the high decontamination rate. We made a research for practical uses of these methods as a new cleaning technology from published papers and patents. From these results, we discussed about an applicability of laser cleaning and vacuum arc cleaning to decontaminate a body of centrifugal separator. At first, we investigate the solid surface cleaning technology with a laser or a vacuum arc from published papers in the world and the patents in Japan. The results were listed in tables. Each information was abstracted into a technical data sheet and sorted into a related technology (system or equipment). We also investigate the decontamination technology by the same way and the results were abstracted into technical data sheets and sorted into related technologies, too. As an application of the above research, we considered the process and the system for decontaminating a body of centrifugal separators (cylinders). In the system, the cleaning head is set inside the cylinder and the inner surface contaminated by radioactivity is removed by the irradiation of a YAG laser, a CO2 laser or a vacuum arc. The cylinder is rotated by rotational rings and moved towards the direction of the central axis and the whole inner surface of the cylinder is cleaned with a constant cleaning rate. We also estimated the costs of each decontamination technology. (author)

  3. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology

  4. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee

    2014-01-01

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO 2 , which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO 2 , a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO 2 was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO 2 decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO 2 requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO 2 is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO 2 . Supercritical CO 2 's advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative decontamination methods, as demonstrated

  5. Fighting Ebola through Novel Spore Decontamination Technologies for the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Doona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRecently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF, the World Health Organization (WHO, Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH, and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs, a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned. The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2 produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army – Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC’s novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established nonthermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers

  6. Decontamination technology of contaminated water with flocculating and settling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Adachi, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Hosobuchi, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    In the joint research and development of treatment systems of cooling water for cutting asphalt pavement surface with our authors' group, the liquid-solid separation technology by flocculating and settling technology, and the flocculants for the use of systems were developed. In this paper, the developed flocculating and settling technology and the flocculants are discussed first. Next, the demonstration tests of decontamination technology on the contaminated water in swimming pools in an elementary school located at Motomiya City, Fukushima Prefecture had been conducted by use of the stationary purification system of contaminated water and the flocculants compounding with or without iron ferrocianide developed by the preliminary test. It was clarified from the results that ionized cesium (Cs) rarely exists in the stagnant water in pools, ponds, lakes and so on at the time when nine months have passed since Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accidents. Further, it is necessary to use the flocculants compounding iron ferrocianide in the case where ionized Cs exists in water. From the above-mentioned results, the following problems were pointed out: One problem was cyanide dissolution in the purified water and the other one was the dissolution from the dehydration sludge. Finally, the high-performance mobile purification units of contaminated water which is capable for carrying with trucks have been developed, and the demonstration test was performed in Minami-soma City, Fukushima Prefecture to purify the contaminated water in a pond and generated by the high-pressure water washing in a Public Hall. From the test results, it was made clear that the dehydration sludge separated by liquid-solid settling of the contaminated water of around 1,000Bq/l became a high radiation dose of about 185,000Bq/l. (author)

  7. Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B.; Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species

  8. Study of decontamination and waste management technologies for contaminated rural and forest environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, A.; Davydchuk, V.; Firsakova, S.; Jouve, A.; Kutlakhmedov, Y.; Rose, K.; Zhouchenko, T.; Antzypaw, G.

    1996-01-01

    Pilot and demonstrative scale in situ trials of several decontamination technologies proposed in the framework of ECP-4 project were carried out in real conditions of Chernobyl Zone. Their results proved that industrial scale decontamination of various types of land is feasible. The management of radioactive waste arising from decontamination techniques can be provided by ecologically sound and efficient technologies

  9. Development of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Won, C. H.

    2010-04-01

    The research results could be used for a design of a remote ablation decontamination system and ultimately applicable for an decontamination of high radiation facilities such as the DUPIC and PIEF. The evaluation technology of decommissioning process must be developed and will be used for the ALARA planning tool of decommissioning process and demonstrated for tools of decommissioning equipment. Also, this technology can be used for tools workplaces with high work difficulty such as large-scale chemical plant, under water and space. It is expected that the technology for a volume reduction and self-disposal of dismantled concrete wastes can be contributed to the establishment of a management plan for radioactive dismantled concrete wastes through the minimization of final waste volume

  10. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  11. Fighting Ebola with novel spore decontamination technologies for the military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Kustin, Kenneth; Olinger, Gene G; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J; Leighton, Terrance

    2015-01-01

    Recently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF), the World Health Organization (WHO), Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs), a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned). The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2) produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC) and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC's novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established non-thermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers, using an array of Bacillus

  12. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNair, V.; Muth, T.; Shasteen, K.; Liby, A.; Hradil, G.; Mishra, B.

    1996-01-01

    In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion plants. Options available for disposition of the nickel include decontamination and subsequent release or recycled product manufacture for restricted end use. Both of these options are evaluated during the course of this research effort. work during phase I of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to make stainless steel from barrier nickel feed. This paved the way for restricted end use products made from stainless steel. Also, after repeated trials and studies, the inducto-slag nickel decontamination process was eliminated as a suitable alternative. Electro-refining appeared to be a promising technology for decontamination of the diffusion plant barrier material. Goals for phase II included conducting experiments to facilitate the development of an electro-refining process to separate technetium from nickel. In parallel with those activities, phase II efforts were to include the development of the necessary processes to make useful products from radioactive scrap metal. Nickel from the diffusion plants as well as stainless steel and carbon steel could be used as feed material for these products

  13. Innovative decontamination technology by abrasion in vibratory vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, Silvio; Ilarri, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The possibility of using conventional vibratory vessel technology as a decontamination technique is the motivation for the development of this project. The objective is to explore the feasibility of applying the vibratory vessel technology for decontamination of radioactively-contaminated materials such as pipes and metal structures. The research and development of this technology was granted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Abrasion processes in vibratory vessels are widely used in the manufacture of metals, ceramics, and plastics. Samples to be treated, solid abrasive media and liquid media are set up into a vessel. Erosion results from the repeated impact of the abrasive particles on the surface of the body being treated. A liquid media, generally detergents or surfactants aid the abrasive action. The amount of material removed increases with the time of treatment. The design and construction of the machine were provided by Vibro, Argentina private company. Tests with radioactively-contaminated aluminum tubes and a stainless steel bar, were performed at laboratory level. Tests showed that it is possible to clean both the external and the internal surface of contaminated tubes. Results show a decontamination factor around 10 after the first 30 minutes of the cleaning time. (authors)

  14. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO{sub 2}, which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO{sub 2}, a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO{sub 2} was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO{sub 2} decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO{sub 2} requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO{sub 2} is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO{sub 2}. Supercritical CO{sub 2}'s advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative

  15. Technology demonstrations in the Decontamination and Decommissioning Focus Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes three large-scale demonstration projects sponsored jointly by the Decontamination and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA), and the three US Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Offices that successfully offered to deactivate or decommission (D ampersand D) one of its facilities using a combination of innovative and commercial D ampersand D technologies. The paper also includes discussions on recent technology demonstrations for an Advanced Worker Protection System, an Electrohydraulic Scabbling System, and a Pipe Explorer trademark. The references at the conclusion of this paper should be consulted for more detailed information about the large-scale demonstration projects and recent technology demonstrations sponsored by the DDFA

  16. Decontamination of Steam Generator tube using Abrasive Blasting Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Kim, G. N.; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of a technology development of volume reduction and self disposal for large metal waste project, We at KAERI and our Sunkwang Atomic Energy Safety (KAES) subcontractor colleagues are demonstrating radioactively contaminated steam generator tube by abrasive blasting technology at Kori-1 NPP. A steam generator is a crucial component in a PWR (pressurized Water Reactor). It is the crossing between the primary, contaminated, circuit and the secondary waste-steam circuit. The heat from the primary reactor coolant loop is transferred to the secondary side in thousands of small tubes. Due to several problems in the material of those tube, like SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking), insufficient control in water chemistry, which can be cause of tube leakage, more and more steam generators are replaced today. Only in Korea, already 2 of them are replaced and will be replaced in the near future. The retired 300 ton heavy Steam generator was stored at the storage waste building of Kori NPP site. The steam generator waste has a large volume, so that it is necessary to reduce its volume by decontamination. A waste reduction effect can be obtained through decontamination of the inner surface of a steam generator. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an optimum method for decontamination of the inner surface of bundle tubes. The dry abrasive blasting is a very interesting technology for the realization of three-dimensional microstructures in brittle materials like glass or silicon. Dry abrasive blasting is applicable to most surface materials except those that might be shattered by the abrasive. It is most effective on flat surface and because the abrasive is sprayed and can also applicable on 'hard to reach' areas such as inner tube ceilings or behind equipment. Abrasive decontamination techniques have been applied in several countries, including Belgium, the CIS, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the USA

  17. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2007-11-01

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution

  18. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  19. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technology for Decontamination of Space Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Thoma, Markus; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia; Müller, Meike; Semenov, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technology is very fast and effective in inactivation of all kinds of pathogens. It is used in hygiene and especially in medicine, since the plasma treatment can be applied to sensitive surfaces, like skin, too. In a first study to use CAP for the decontamination of space equipment we could show its potential as a quite promising alternative to the standard "dry heat" and H2O2 methods [Shimizu et al. Planetary and Space Science, 90, 60-71. (2014)]. In a follow-on study we continue the investigations to reach high application level of the technology. First, we redesign the actual setup to a plasma-gas circulation system, increasing the effectivity of inactivation and the sustainability. Additionally, we want to learn more about the plasma chemistry processes involved in the inactivation. Therefore, we perform detailed plasma and gas measurements and compare them to numerical simulations. The latter will finally be used to scale the decontamination system to sizes useful also for larger space equipment. Typical materials relevant for space equipment will be tested and investigated on surface material changes due to the plasma treatment. Additionally, it is planned to use electronic boards and compare their functionality before and after the CAP expose. We will give an overview on the status of the plasma decontamination project funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economics.

  20. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit

  1. Development of decommissioning, decontamination and reuse technology for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Choi, B. S.

    2012-03-01

    In this project, the foundation of decommissioning technology through the development of core technologies applied to maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear facility was established. First of all, we developed the key technology such as safety assessment technology for decommissioning work needed at the preparatory stage of decommissioning of the highly contaminated facilities and simultaneous measurement technology of the high-level alpha/beta contamination applicable to the operation and decommissioning of the nuclear facilities. Second, we developed a remotely controlled laser ablation decontamination system which is useful for a removal of fixed contaminants and developed a chemical gel decontamination technology for a removal of non-fixed contaminants during the maintenance and decommissioning works of high radiation hot cells which have been used for a recycling or treatment of spent fuels. Third, we developed a volume reduction and self-disposal technology for dismantled concrete wastes. Also, the technology for volume reduction and stabilization of the peculiar wastes(HEPA filter and organic mixed wastes), which have been known to be very difficult to treat and manage, generated from the high radioactive facilities in operation, improvement and repair and under decommissioning was developed. Finally, this research project was developed a system for the reduction of radiotoxicity of several uranium mixtures generated in the front- and back-end nuclear fuel cycles with characteristics of highly enhanced proliferation-resistance and more environmental friendliness, which can make the uranium to be recovered or separated from the mixtures with a high purity level enough for the uranium to be reused and to be classified as C-class level for burial near the surface, and then which result in the much reduction in volume of the uranium mixture wastes

  2. Developments in Decontamination Technologies of Military Personnel and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Utkarsh R.; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Individual protection is important for warfighters, first responders and civilians to meet the current threat of toxic chemicals and chemical warfare (CW) agents. Within the realm of individual protection, decontamination of warfare agents is not only required on the battlefield but also in laboratory, pilot plants, production and agent destruction sites. It is of high importance to evaluate various decontaminants and decontamination techniques for implementing the best practices in varying scenarios such as decontamination of personnel, sites and sensitive equipment.

  3. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology.

  4. Innovative Decontamination Technology for Use in Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.J.; Norton, C.J.; Fraikor, G.B.; Potter, G.L.; Chang, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    The results of bench scale tests demonstrated that TechXtract R RadPro TM technology (hereinafter referred to as RadPro R ) can provide 100% coverage of complex mockup gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) equipment and can decontaminate uranium (U) deposits with 98% to 99.99% efficiency. Deployment tests demonstrated RadPro R can be applied as foam, mist/fog, or steam, and fully cover the internal surfaces of complex mockup equipment, including large piping. Decontamination tests demonstrated that two formulations of RadPro R , one with neutron attenuators and one without neutron attenuators, could remove up to 99.99% of uranyl fluoride deposits, one of the most difficult to remove deposits in GDP equipment. These results were supplemented by results from previous tests conducted in 1994 that showed RadPro R could remove >97% of U and Tc-99 contamination from actual GDP components. Operational use of RadPro R at other DOE and commercial facilities also support these data. (authors)

  5. CO{sub 2} pellet decontamination technology at Westinghouse Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, T.L.; Aldrich, L.K. II; Bowman, E.V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Experimentation and testing with CO{sub 2} pellet decontamination technology is being conducted at Westinghosue Hanford Company (WHC), Richland, Washington. There are 1,100 known existing waste sites at Hanford. The sites specified by federal and state agencies are currently being studied to determine the appropriate cleanup methods best for each site. These sites are contaminated and work on them is in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). There are also 63 treatment, storage, and disposal units, for example: groups of waste tanks or drums. In 1992, there were 100 planned activities scheduled to bring these units into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) compliance or close them after waste removal. Ninety-six of these were completed. The remaining four were delayed or are being negotiated with regulatory agencies. As a result of past defense program activities at Hanford a tremendous volume of materials and equipment have accumulated and require remediation.

  6. TRU-waste decontamination and size reduction review, June 1983, US DOE/PNC technology exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A review of transuranic (TRU) noncombustible waste decontamination and size reduction technology is presented. Electropolishing, vibratory cleaning, and spray decontamination processes developed at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) are highlighted. TRU waste size reduction processes at (PNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), and SRL are also highlighted

  7. DECISION ANALYSIS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS FOR METAL AND MASONRY DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative analysis of innovative technologies for the non-aggressive removal of coatings from metal and masonry surfaces and the aggressive removal of one-quarter to one-inch thickness of surface from structural masonry. The technologies tested should be capable of being used in nuclear facilities. Innovative decontamination technologies are being evaluated under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the FIU-HCET technology assessment site in Miami, Florida. This study is being performed to support the OST, the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) Focus Area, and the environmental restoration of DOE facilities throughout the DOE complex by providing objective evaluations of currently available decontamination technologies

  8. Comprehensive investigation of the corrosion and surface chemical effects of the decontamination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo-Nagy, Andrea; Varga, Kalman; Deak-Horvath, Emese; Nemeth, Zoltan; Horvath, David; Schunk, Janos; Patek, Gabor

    2012-09-01

    Decontamination technologies are mainly developed to reduce the collective dose of the maintenance personnel at NPPs. The highest efficiency (i.e., the highest DF values) available without detrimental modification of the treated surface of structural material is the most important goal in the course of the application of a decontamination technology. A so-called 'soft' chemical decontamination technology has been developed - supported by the Paks Nuclear Power Plant - at the Institute of Radiochemistry and Radioecology of the University of Pannonia. The novel base technology can be effectively applied for the decontamination of the heat exchanger tubes of steam generators. In addition, by optimizing the main technological parameters (temperature, concentration of the liquid chemicals, flow rates, contact time, etc.) it can be utilized for specific applications such as decontamination of some dismountable devices and separable equipment or the total decontamination prior to plant dismantling (decommissioning) in the future. The aim of this work is to compare the efficiency, corrosion and surface chemical effects of some improved versions of the novel base-technology elaborated for decontamination of austenitic stainless steel surfaces. The experiments have been performed at laboratory conditions in decontamination model systems. The applied methods: γ-spectrometry, ICP-OES, voltammetry and SEM-EDX. The experimental results revealed that the efficiency of the base-technology mainly depends on the surface features of the stainless steel samples such as the chemical composition and thickness of the oxide layer, the nature (quantity, morphology and chemical composition) of the crystalline deposits. It has been documented that the improved version of the base-technology are suitable for the decontamination of both steel surfaces covered by chemically resistant large Cr-content crystals and that having compact oxide-layers (up to a thickness of 10

  9. Field Evaluation of Whole Airliner Decontamination Technologies - Wide-Body Aircraft With Dual-Use Application for Railcars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gale, William F; Gale, Hyacinth S; Watson, Jean

    2008-01-01

    ... vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP )* is discussed. The report is submitted in the context of a decontamination technology selection exercise, laboratory work conducted on the efficacy of thermal decontamination, and as a follow-on to a...

  10. Efficacy of liquid and foam decontamination technologies for chemical warfare agents on indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Bailey, Christopher G; Hanna, M Leslie; Hok, Saphon; Vu, Alex K; Reutter, Dennis J; Raber, Ellen

    2011-11-30

    Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of four decontamination formulations on typical indoor surfaces following exposure to the liquid chemical warfare agents sarin (GB), soman (GD), sulfur mustard (HD), and VX. Residual surface contamination on coupons was periodically measured for up to 24h after applying one of four selected decontamination technologies [0.5% bleach solution with trisodium phosphate, Allen Vanguard Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF™), U.S. military Decon Green™, and Modec Inc. and EnviroFoam Technologies Sandia Decontamination Foam (DF-200)]. All decontamination technologies tested, except for the bleach solution, performed well on nonporous and nonpermeable glass and stainless-steel surfaces. However, chemical agent residual contamination typically remained on porous and permeable surfaces, especially for the more persistent agents, HD and VX. Solvent-based Decon Green™ performed better than aqueous-based bleach or foams on polymeric surfaces, possibly because the solvent is able to penetrate the polymer matrix. Bleach and foams out-performed Decon Green for penetrating the highly polar concrete surface. Results suggest that the different characteristics needed for an ideal and universal decontamination technology may be incompatible in a single formulation and a strategy for decontaminating a complex facility will require a range of technologies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Current and Future Technologies for Microbiological Decontamination of Cereal Grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Agata; Ziuzina, Dana; Bourke, Paula

    2018-06-01

    Cereal grains are the most important staple foods for mankind worldwide. The constantly increasing annual production and yield is matched by demand for cereals, which is expected to increase drastically along with the global population growth. A critical food safety and quality issue is to minimize the microbiological contamination of grains as it affects cereals both quantitatively and qualitatively. Microorganisms present in cereals can affect the safety, quality, and functional properties of grains. Some molds have the potential to produce harmful mycotoxins and pose a serious health risk for consumers. Therefore, it is essential to reduce cereal grain contamination to the minimum to ensure safety both for human and animal consumption. Current production of cereals relies heavily on pesticides input, however, numerous harmful effects on human health and on the environment highlight the need for more sustainable pest management and agricultural methods. This review evaluates microbiological risks, as well as currently used and potential technologies for microbiological decontamination of cereal grains. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Development of decontamination technology for the decommissioned Bohunice A-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejci, F.; Majersky, D.; Solcanyi, M.; Sekely, S.; Kucharik, D.

    1991-01-01

    The main results of investigation into the decontamination technology for the equipment and buildings of the decommissioned A-1 nuclear power plant, achieved by the Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute in Trnava over the 1988-1990 period, are summarized. Mobile decontamination and recirculation equipment has been developed for pre-disassembling decontamination. A solution containing formic acid (19 g/l), EDTA-Na 4 (6 g/l) and thiourea (0.5 g/l) was used for decontamination of low-alloy steels; for materials from the steam generators and turbo-compressors, the decontamination factor (DF) of this solution was 30 to 150 per decontamination cycle. For high-alloy steels, a two-stage process comprising the use of an oxidation solution and a reduction solution appeared suitable. The oxidation solution contained potassium permanganate (0.6 g/l) and nitric acid (0.4 g/l), whereas the reduction solution, viz. Citrox 21, contained citric acid (0.5 g/l), oxalic acid (1.0 g/l) and EDTA-NA 4 (2.5 g/l). The DF is 10 to 50 in one oxidation-reduction cycle and 50-100 in two cycles. For the post-disassembling chemical decontamination, the contaminated material was cut into pieces 70 to 80 cm long, freed from grease and decontaminated chemically by submerging in the solution while applying treatment by ultrasound. A technology of electrochemical decontamination has also been developed. It appeared particularly suitable for structural materials of the primary coolant circuit comprising austenitic stainless steels and low-alloy steels after pre-disassembling chemical decontamination with remainders of the corrosion layer, and for structural materials of the secondary coolant circuit after chemical post-disassembling decontamination. Research in the field of decontamination of the building parts and of the outer surfaces of the structural materials concentrated mainly on the use of decontamination foams. Foaming solutions have been developed for the decontamination of PESL floors and

  13. Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Phillip N.; Hamachi, Kristina; McWilliams, Jennifer; Sohn, Michael D.

    2008-09-12

    The goal of this project was to answer the following questions concerning response to a future anthrax release (or suspected release) in a building: 1. Based on past experience, what rules of thumb can be determined concerning: (a) the amount of sampling that may be needed to determine the extent of contamination within a given building; (b) what portions of a building should be sampled; (c) the cost per square foot to decontaminate a given type of building using a given method; (d) the time required to prepare for, and perform, decontamination; (e) the effectiveness of a given decontamination method in a given type of building? 2. Based on past experience, what resources will be spent on evaluating the extent of contamination, performing decontamination, and assessing the effectiveness of the decontamination in abuilding of a given type and size? 3. What are the trade-offs between cost, time, and effectiveness for the various sampling plans, sampling methods, and decontamination methods that have been used in the past?

  14. Technology development for nuclear fuel cycle waste treatment - Decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Won, Hui Jun; Yoon, Ji Sup and others

    1997-12-01

    Through the project of D econtamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology development , the following were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Environmental remediation technology development. (author). 95 refs., 45 tabs., 163 figs

  15. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B: Decontamination, robotics/automation, waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the decontamination, robotics/automation, and WM data sheets

  16. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrakal, Suna [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-30

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

  17. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayrakal, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within

  18. A study on the applicability for primary system decontamination through analysis on NPP decommission technology and international experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Soon; Jung, Min Young; Lee, Sang Heon [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Decontamination is one of the most important technologies for the decommissioning of NPP. The purpose of decontamination is to reduce the Risk of exposure of the decommissioning workers, and to recycle parts of the plant components. Currently, there is a lack of data on the efficiency of the decontamination technologies for decommissioning. In most cases, the local radiation level can be lowered below a regulatory limitation by decontamination. Therefore, more efficient decontamination technology must be continuously developed. This work describes the practical experiences in the United States and the European countries for NPP decommissioning using these decontamination technologies. When the decommissioning of domestic nuclear power plant is planned and implemented, this work will be helpful as a reference of previous cases.

  19. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  20. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE's cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities

  1. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Ross, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Concrete surfaces contaminated with radionuclides present a significant challenge during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process. As structures undergo D and D, coating layers and/or surface layers of the concrete containing the contaminants must be removed for disposal in such a way as to present little to no risk to human health or the environment. The selection of a concrete decontamination technology that is safe, efficient, and cost-effective is critical to the successful D and D of contaminated sites. To support U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management objectives and to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the best-suited concrete floor decontamination technology(s) for a given site, two innovative and three baseline technologies have been assessed under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The innovative technologies assessed include the Pegasus Coating Removal System and Textron's Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling System. The three baseline technologies assessed include: the Wheelabrator Blastrac model 1-15D, the NELCO Porta Shot Blast trademark model GPx-1O-18 HO Rider, and the NELCO Porta Shot Blasttrademark model EC-7-2. These decontamination technology assessments provide directly comparable performance data that have previously been available for only a limited number of technologies under restrictive site-specific constraints. Some of the performance data collected during these technology assessments include: removal capability, production rate, removal gap, primary and secondary waste volumes, and operation and maintenance requirements. The performance data generated by this project is intended to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives

  2. Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment

  3. A state of the art report on the decontamination technology for dry ice blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. M.; Kim, K. H.; Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Yang, M. S.; Nam, S. H.; Kim, M. J.

    2000-05-01

    DUPIC fuel fabrication process is a dry processing technology to manufacture CANDU compatible fuel through a direct reprocessing fabrication process from spent PWR fuel. DUPIC fuel fabrication process consists of the slitting of the spent PWR fuel rods, OREOX processing, homogeneous mixing, pelletizing and sintering. All these processes should be conducted by remote means in a M6 hot cell at IMEF. Since DUPIC fuel fabrication process includes powder handling process of highly radioactive spent fuel, decontamination of highly radioactive particulates from all types of surfaces such as DUPIC fuel manufacturing equipment, hot cell floor, tools is very important to improve the safety of hot cell and reduce the dose exposure to operator, This report describes various technologies for dry ice blasting. It provides the fundamentals of dry ice blasting decontamination and technical review of dry ice blasting on the radioactive decontamination

  4. A state of the art report on the decontamination technology for dry ice blasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, J M; Kim, K H; Park, J J; Lee, H H; Yang, M S; Nam, S H; Kim, M J

    2000-05-01

    DUPIC fuel fabrication process is a dry processing technology to manufacture CANDU compatible fuel through a direct reprocessing fabrication process from spent PWR fuel. DUPIC fuel fabrication process consists of the slitting of the spent PWR fuel rods, OREOX processing, homogeneous mixing, pelletizing and sintering. All these processes should be conducted by remote means in a M6 hot cell at IMEF. Since DUPIC fuel fabrication process includes powder handling process of highly radioactive spent fuel, decontamination of highly radioactive particulates from all types of surfaces such as DUPIC fuel manufacturing equipment, hot cell floor, tools is very important to improve the safety of hot cell and reduce the dose exposure to operator, This report describes various technologies for dry ice blasting. It provides the fundamentals of dry ice blasting decontamination and technical review of dry ice blasting on the radioactive decontamination.

  5. The state of the art on the dry decontamination technologies applicable to highly radioactive contaminants and their needs for the national nuclear fuel cycle developent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Chol, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2000-12-01

    This report is intended to establish their needs to support the dry decontamination activities applicable to highly radioactive contaminants based on the requirement of technologies development suggested from the national nuclear fuel cycle projects, such as DUPIC, advanced spent fuel management and long-lived radionuclides conversion. The technology needs associated with decontamination addressed the requirements associated with the efficiency of decontamination technology, the reduction of secondary wastes, applicabilities and the remote operation. And also, Characterization and decontamination technologies for various contaminants are reviewed and analysed. Based on the assessment, Unit dry decontamination processes are selected and the schematic flow diagram for decontamination of highly radioactive contaminants

  6. The state of the art on the dry decontamination technologies applicable to highly radioactive contaminants and their needs for the national nuclear fuel cycle developent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K.W.; Won, H.J.; Jung, C.H.; Chol, W.K.; Kim, G.N.; Moon, J.K

    2000-12-01

    This report is intended to establish their needs to support the dry decontamination activities applicable to highly radioactive contaminants based on the requirement of technologies development suggested from the national nuclear fuel cycle projects, such as DUPIC, advanced spent fuel management and long-lived radionuclides conversion. The technology needs associated with decontamination addressed the requirements associated with the efficiency of decontamination technology, the reduction of secondary wastes, applicabilities and the remote operation. And also, Characterization and decontamination technologies for various contaminants are reviewed and analysed. Based on the assessment, Unit dry decontamination processes are selected and the schematic flow diagram for decontamination of highly radioactive contaminants.

  7. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE's cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE's gaseous diffusion plants

  8. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE`s cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE`s gaseous diffusion plants.

  9. Gaseous and air decontamination technologies for Clostridium difficile in the healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Pottage, T; Bennett, A; Walker, J

    2011-03-01

    The recent data for hospital-acquired infections suggest that infection rates for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile are beginning to decrease. However, while there is still pressure to maintain this trend, the resistance of C. difficile spores to standard detergents continues to present a problem for many UK hospitals trying to prevent its spread or control outbreaks. Alternative disinfection technologies such as gaseous decontamination are currently being marketed to the healthcare sector as an alternative/supplement to manual disinfection, and have been shown to be effective in reducing environmental contamination. When used correctly, they offer a complementary technology to manual cleaning that increases the probability of an effective reduction in viability and provides a comparatively uniform distribution of disinfectant. Three gaseous decontamination technologies are examined for their suitability in reducing environmental contamination with C. difficile: gaseous hydrogen peroxide, chlorine dioxide and ozone. Air decontamination and UV-based technologies are also briefly described. We conclude that while there is a role to play for these new technologies in the decontamination of ward surfaces contaminated with C. difficile, the requirement for both a preclean before use and the limited 'in vivo' evidence means that extensive field trials are necessary to determine their cost-effectiveness in a healthcare setting. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muth, T.R.; Moore, J.; Olson, D.; Mishra, B.

    1994-01-01

    Recycle of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) from decommissioning of DOE uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons manufacturing facilities is mandatory to recapture the value of these metals and avoid the high cost of disposal by burial. The scrap metals conversion project detailed below focuses on the contaminated nickel associated with the gaseous diffusion plants. Stainless steel can be produced in MSC's vacuum induction melting process (VIM) to the S30400 specification using nickel as an alloy constituent. Further the case alloy can be rolled in MSC's rolling mill to the mechanical property specification for S30400 demonstrating the capability to manufacture the contaminated nickel into valuable end products at a facility licensed to handle radioactive materials. Bulk removal of Technetium from scrap nickel is theoretically possible in a reasonable length of time with the high calcium fluoride flux, however the need for the high temperature creates a practical problem due to flux volatility. Bulk decontamination is possible and perhaps more desirable if nickel is alloyed with copper to lower the melting point of the alloy allowing the use of the high calcium fluoride flux. Slag decontamination processes have been suggested which have been proven technically viable at the Colorado School of Mines

  11. Decontamination of paint-coated concrete in nuclear plants using laser technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthofer, Anton; Lippmann, Wolfgang; Hurtado, Antonio [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Chair of Hydrogen and Nuclear Technology

    2013-07-01

    A review of the state of the art shows the technical novelty of the combined project. The development of an all-in-one process for treatment hazard chemical contamination on concrete structures with online monitoring method reduces the laborious mechanic decontamination and post-treatment. For safe experimental investigations, a three-barrier-system was constructed and can be used for tests with - first - epoxy paint in order to analyze and optimize the process. Simulation models help to formulate a mathematic scheme of the decontamination process by laser technology. The goal is a decontamination system with an online analyzing system of the flue gas for a mobile and extensive component in nuclear and conventional decommission. (orig.)

  12. An appraisal of existing decontamination technology used in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech, J.S.; Frost, F.; Curran, A.R.; Grave, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    This report is a review of decontamination technology applied by industry to radioactively contaminated components in the U.S.A. In addition some newer techniques under development or recently emerging are discussed. Mechanical, chemical, manual and other techniques such as electropolishing and ultrasonics are reviewed. Whilst the emphasis is mainly on non-destructive techniques for components some discussion of segmentation is included as this is inevitable during concrete decontamination; and also when decontamination of components occurs as part of a decommissioning programme the use of segmentation techniques may facilitate the process. A bibliography has been included to facilitate further reading. It is important to consider the relevance of the US data in this report to the United Kingdom both to the learning curve of development and the different nuclear reactor systems in the respective countries. The authors have therefore listed some conclusions and recommendations which have become apparent to them whilst undertaking the study. (U.K.)

  13. Decontamination in preparation for dismantlement - AREVA's chemical decontamination technologies, projects performed and results obtained in the period 2011-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topf, C.; Sempere Belda, L.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the nuclear phase-out decreed by the German government, several nuclear power plants in the country have already ceased operation. The remaining ones will cease operation by 2022. This has turned Germany into one of the most active regions worldwide in the field of nuclear decommissioning, with new and emerging technologies being deployed on the field, and already preexisting technologies being put to the test, optimized and developed into full maturity. The chemistry services division of AREVA GmbH has already performed 5 Full System Decontaminations (FSD) in preparation for decommissioning in this period - three in PWRs and two in BWRs - along with other international projects of relevance for decommissioning operations. During a FSD, the complete primary circuit of a nuclear power plant including auxiliary systems is subject to a chemical treatment; designed to remove radioactive matter accumulated onto system surfaces during operation. Through the effective removal of this radioactive accumulations contact dose rates on the different components of the primary circuit can be consistently reduced by factors larger than 50. This results in much lower ambient dose rates and, hence, in very significant dose savings for subsequent decommissioning activities. Additionally, dismantlement operations of large components are considerably simplified and can be performed under conditions that wouldn't have been possible before. The project specific objectives and challenges, the technologies employed, and the results obtained are presented and commented here. (authors)

  14. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D ampersand D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D ampersand D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D ampersand D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D ampersand D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D ampersand D will be made available on request

  15. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 2: Technology logic diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 2 has been divided into five sections: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Robotics/Automation, and Waste Management. Each section contains logical breakdowns of the Y-12 D and D problems by subject area and identifies technologies that can be reasonably applied to each D and D challenge

  16. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 2: Technology logic diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 2 has been divided into five sections: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Robotics/Automation, and Waste Management. Each section contains logical breakdowns of the Y-12 D and D problems by subject area and identifies technologies that can be reasonably applied to each D and D challenge.

  17. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types

  18. Demonstration test on decontamination of contaminated pool water using liquid-solid settling technology with flocculants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Adachi, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Tagawa, Akihiro; Hosobuchi, Shigeki; Takanashi, Junko

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of supplying agricultural water, a stationary purification system for contaminated water had been developed on the basis of the liquid-solid settling technology using flocculants. Two kinds of flocculants had been developed on the basis of preliminary tests: one that compounds iron ferrocyanide and the other that does not. With the use of this system and flocculants, a demonstration test was conducted to apply the decontamination technology on contaminated water in two swimming pools in an elementary school located at Motomiya City, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. It is proved from the results that both the developed purification system and the flocculants can be established as a practicable decontamination technology for contaminated water: the treatment rate was 10 m 3 /hour and the elimination factor of radioactive materials was higher than 99%. (author)

  19. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A, Characterization, decontamination, dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, R.L. [ed.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration and waste management problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remedial action, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This report is part A of Volume 3 concerning characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement.

  20. LCA of strippable coatings and of steam vacuum technology used for nuclear plants decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidi, Giambattista; Cumo, Fabrizio; Santoli, Livio de

    2010-01-01

    The application of strippable coatings is an innovative technology for decontamination of nuclear plants and for any decontamination project aiming at removing surface contamination. An adhesive plastic coating is applied on the contaminated surface. The strippable coating is allowed to cure for up to 24 h, after which it can be easily peeled. The coating traps the contaminants in the polymer matrix. Strippable coatings are non-toxic and do not contain volatile compounds or heavy metals. Since the coating constitutes a solid waste, disposal is easier than treating contaminated liquid wastes, produced by the baseline technology: steam vacuum cleaning, based upon superheated pressurized water in order to remove contaminants from floors and walls. A life cycle assessment (LCA) has been carried out with the purpose of comparing the strippable coating with the steam vacuum technology. The functional unit of the study is represented by a surface of 1 m 2 to be decontaminated. The results of LCA achieved using Sima Pro 5.0 registered software confirm the good environmental performances of strippable coatings. Taking into account both LCA and environmental costs for liquid wastes, the advantages of strippable coatings will be more and more evident. (orig.)

  1. Demonstration and evaluation of the CORPEX trademark Nuclear Decontamination Process, Technical task plan No. SR152005. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    In June, 1995, the Decontamination and Decommissioning Focus Area funded a demonstration of the CORPEX Nuclear Decontamination Process in an Old Metallography Laboratory glovebox at the Savannah River Site. The objective of the demonstration was to prove the effectiveness of a new and innovative technology that would reduce the risks associated with future cleanups of plutonium-238 contaminated equipment in the DOE complex. After facility and vendor preparations in support of the demonstration, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) was informed by the vendor that the chemistry proposed for use in the decontamination process was not effective on sintered plutonium, which was the form of plutonium in the selected glovebox. After further technical evaluation, the demonstration was canceled. This report describes the work performed in support of the demonstration and the present status of the project. The CORPEX chemical process is a nondestructive cleaning method that removes only the contaminant and the matrix that fixed the contaminant to the surface. It does not damage the substrate. The cleaning agent is destroyed by the addition of proprietary oxidizers, leaving water, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gases, and a sludge as waste

  2. Advanced Decontamination Technologies: High Hydrostatic Pressure on Meat Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriga, Margarita; Aymerich, Teresa

    The increasing demand for “natural” foodstuffs, free from chemical additives, and preservatives has triggered novel approaches in food technology developments. In the last decade, practical use of high-pressure processing (HPP) made this emerging non-thermal technology very attractive from a commercial point of view. Despite the fact that the investment is still high, the resulting value-added products, with an extended and safe shelf-life, will fulfil the wishes of consumers who prefer preservative-free minimally processed foods, retaining sensorial characteristics of freshness. Moreover, unlike thermal treatment, pressure treatment is not time/mass dependant, thus reducing the time of processing.

  3. THE CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGIES OF SOIL’S DECONTAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana – Gabriela POPA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical soil degradation technologies are based on the pollutant conversion and immobilisation, or the mobilization, extraction and washing of pollutants. They use chemical agents that oxidize or reduce pollutants to less toxic or non-toxic forms and immobilize them in the underground environment in order to diminish their migration and the extent of pollution. Classification of chemical methods of depollution is based on the dominant reaction criterion: oxidation, reduction, neutralization, precipitation, chemical extraction, hydrolysis, dehalogenation, precipitation.

  4. Irradiation technologies used for combustion gases and diluted sulfurous gases decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva Z, Loreto

    1998-01-01

    A brief description of irradiation technology used for ambient decontamination is presented here. The system is adequate fort gas and liquid effluents and solid wastes. In particular, the characteristics and applications of the irradiation done with an electron beam to gas effluent is described, mainly to clean combustion gases and other industrial gases containing sulfur and nitrogen oxides, S O x and N O x , respectively. This technology permits the remove of these contaminants and the acquisition of a solid byproduct, an ammonia sulfate-nitrate, apt for fertilizer applications. (author)

  5. Low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizhnerov, L. V.; Konstantinov, Ye. A.; Prokopenko, V. A.; Sorokin, N. M.

    1997-01-01

    The report presents the results of research in developing a low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination founded on the of easily removed protective polymeric coating based on water and alcohol latexes and dispersion of polymers with special activating additives. The developed technology provides for the reduction of weakly fixed radioactive contamination of non-painted and painted surfaces to admissible levels (as a rule), it securely prevents and localizes contamination and does not generate secondary liquid radioactive wastes

  6. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  7. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  8. Agricultural pathogen decontamination technology-reducing the threat of infectious agent spread.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty, Rita G.; Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of infectious agricultural diseases, whether natural occurring or introduced intentionally, could have catastrophic impacts on the U.S. economy. Examples of such agricultural pathogens include foot and mouth disease (FMD), avian influenza (AI), citrus canker, wheat and soy rust, etc. Current approaches to mitigate the spread of agricultural pathogens include quarantine, development of vaccines for animal diseases, and development of pathogen resistant crop strains in the case of plant diseases. None of these approaches is rapid, and none address the potential persistence of the pathogen in the environment, which could lead to further spread of the agent and damage after quarantine is lifted. Pathogen spread in agricultural environments commonly occurs via transfer on agricultural equipment (transportation trailers, tractors, trucks, combines, etc.), having components made from a broad range of materials (galvanized and painted steel, rubber tires, glass and Plexiglas shields, etc), and under conditions of heavy organic load (mud, soil, feces, litter, etc). A key element of stemming the spread of an outbreak is to ensure complete inactivation of the pathogens in the agricultural environment and on the equipment used in those environments. Through the combination of enhanced agricultural pathogen decontamination chemistry and a validated inactivation verification methodology, important technologies for incorporation as components of a robust response capability will be enabled. Because of the potentially devastating economic impact that could result from the spread of infectious agricultural diseases, the proposed capability components will promote critical infrastructure protection and greater border and food supply security. We investigated and developed agricultural pathogen decontamination technologies to reduce the threat of infectious-agent spread, and thus enhance agricultural biosecurity. Specifically, enhanced detergency versions of the patented

  9. Analysis on the Current Status of Chemical Decontamination Technology of Steam Generators in the Oversea Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Taebin; Kim, Sukhoon; Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Juyub; Lee, Seunghee [FNC Technology Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The steam generators in Hanbit Unit 3 and 4 are scheduled to be replaced in 2018 and 2019, respectively. Nevertheless, the wastes from the dismantled steam generators are currently just on-site stored in the NPP because there are no disposal measures for the waste and lack of the decontamination techniques for large-sized metallic equipment. In contrast, in the oversea NPPs, there are many practical cases of chemical decontamination not only for oversized components in the NPPs such as reactor pressure vessel and steam generator, but also for major pipes. Chemical decontamination technique is more effective in decontaminating the components with complicated shape compared with mechanical one. Moreover, a high decontamination factor can be obtained by using strong solvent, and thereby most of radionuclides can be removed. Due to these advantages, the chemical decontamination has been used most frequently for operation of decontaminating the large-sized equipment. In this study, an analysis on the current status of chemical decontamination technique used for the steam generators of the foreign commercial NPPs was performed. In this study, the three major chemical decontamination processes were reviewed, which are applied to the decommissioning process of the steam generators in the commercial NPPs of the United States, Germany, and Belgium. The three processes have the different features in aspect of solvent, while those are based in common on the oxidation and reduction between the target metal surface and solvents. In addition, they have the same goals for improving the decontamination efficiency and decreasing the amount of the secondary waste generation. Based on the analysis results on component sub-processes and major advantages and disadvantages of each process, Table 2 shows the key fundamental technologies for decontamination of the steam generator in Korea and the major considerations in the development process of each technology. It is necessary to prepare

  10. Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 1: Technology evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    During World War 11, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built as part of the Manhattan Project to supply enriched uranium for weapons production. In 1945, Building 9201-4 (Alpha-4) was originally used to house a uranium isotope separation process based on electromagnetic separation technology. With the startup of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site gaseous diffusion plant In 1947, Alpha-4 was placed on standby. In 1953, the uranium enrichment process was removed, and installation of equipment for the Colex process began. The Colex process--which uses a mercury solvent and lithium hydroxide as the lithium feed material-was shut down in 1962 and drained of process materials. Residual Quantities of mercury and lithium hydroxide have remained in the process equipment. Alpha-4 contains more than one-half million ft 2 of floor area; 15,000 tons of process and electrical equipment; and 23,000 tons of insulation, mortar, brick, flooring, handrails, ducts, utilities, burnables, and sludge. Because much of this equipment and construction material is contaminated with elemental mercury, cleanup is necessary. The goal of the Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 is to provide a planning document that relates decontamination and decommissioning and waste management problems at the Alpha-4 building to the technologies that can be used to remediate these problems. The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 builds on the methodology transferred by the U.S. Air Force to the Environmental Management organization with DOE and draws from previous technology logic diagram-efforts: logic diagrams for Hanford, the K-25 Site, and ORNL

  11. Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 1: Technology evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    During World War 11, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was built as part of the Manhattan Project to supply enriched uranium for weapons production. In 1945, Building 9201-4 (Alpha-4) was originally used to house a uranium isotope separation process based on electromagnetic separation technology. With the startup of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site gaseous diffusion plant In 1947, Alpha-4 was placed on standby. In 1953, the uranium enrichment process was removed, and installation of equipment for the Colex process began. The Colex process--which uses a mercury solvent and lithium hydroxide as the lithium feed material-was shut down in 1962 and drained of process materials. Residual Quantities of mercury and lithium hydroxide have remained in the process equipment. Alpha-4 contains more than one-half million ft{sup 2} of floor area; 15,000 tons of process and electrical equipment; and 23,000 tons of insulation, mortar, brick, flooring, handrails, ducts, utilities, burnables, and sludge. Because much of this equipment and construction material is contaminated with elemental mercury, cleanup is necessary. The goal of the Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 is to provide a planning document that relates decontamination and decommissioning and waste management problems at the Alpha-4 building to the technologies that can be used to remediate these problems. The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 builds on the methodology transferred by the U.S. Air Force to the Environmental Management organization with DOE and draws from previous technology logic diagram-efforts: logic diagrams for Hanford, the K-25 Site, and ORNL.

  12. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  13. Decision Analysis Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this two-year investigation is to field test innovative technologies for coating and surface removal on concrete floors and compare the compiled data to baseline technologies, thereby ensuring that the best and most cost-effective options are developed and subsequently used during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sites. Comprehensive and comparable data will be collected in the areas of health and safety, operations, and secondary waste management. The technologies tested will include DOE-EM funded technologies and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential to meet the environmental restoration objectives. This report summarizes the activities performed during Fiscal Year 1996 (FY96) and describes the planned activities for Fiscal Year 1997 (FY97). Accomplishments for FY96 include the completion of preparatory work to begin field testing of innovative technologies. A total of seven technologies will be tested during FY97. As a part of this project, interactive computer software will be developed during FY97, allowing site-specific parameters and technology performance data to be considered when determining the best option given site-specific conditions

  14. Development of remote decontamination technologies improving internal environment of reactor buildings at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Koji; Hayashi, Hirotada; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The reactor buildings at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., which was seriously damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011, have been highly contaminated by radioactive materials. To safely and efficiently advance the processes related to the forthcoming decommissioning of the reactors, it is necessary to improve the hazardous environment inside the reactor buildings. During the more than four years that have elapsed since the Great East Japan Earthquake, Toshiba has been implementing various measures to reduce the ambient dose rates inside the reactor buildings through decontamination work and participation in a national project for the development of remote decontamination technologies for reactor buildings. A variety of vehicles and technologies to support decontamination work have been developed through these activities, and are significantly contributing to improvement of the environment inside the reactor buildings. (author)

  15. Progress report 1995 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laan, J.G. van der [ed.

    1996-07-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1995. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Blanket Development Programme, the Long Term Programme and in NET contracts. The topics concern: Irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and structural analysis on magnet coils. In addition the supporting and supplementary tasks and investigations in the category underlying technology are reported. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.).

  16. Progress report 1995 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J.G. van der

    1996-07-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1995. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Blanket Development Programme, the Long Term Programme and in NET contracts. The topics concern: Irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and structural analysis on magnet coils. In addition the supporting and supplementary tasks and investigations in the category underlying technology are reported. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.)

  17. Integration of improved decontamination and characterization technologies in the decommissioning of the CP-5 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.; Boing, L. E.

    2000-01-01

    The aging of research reactors worldwide has resulted in a heightened awareness in the international technical decommissioning community of the timeliness to review and address the needs of these research institutes in planning for and eventually performing the decommissioning of these facilities. By using the reactors already undergoing decommissioning as test beds for evaluating enhanced or new/innovative technologies for decommissioning, it is possible that new techniques could be made available for those future research reactor decommissioning projects. Potentially, the new technologies will result in: reduced radiation doses to the work force, larger safety margins in performing decommissioning and cost and schedule savings to the research institutes in performing the decommissioning of these facilities. Testing of these enhanced technologies for decontamination, dismantling, characterization, remote operations and worker protection are critical to furthering advancements in the technical specialty of decommissioning. Furthermore, regulatory acceptance and routine utilization for future research reactor decommissioning will be assured by testing and developing these technologies in realistically contaminated environments prior to use in the research reactors. The decommissioning of the CP-5 Research Reactor is currently in the final phase of dismantlement. In this paper the authors present results of work performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the development, testing and deployment of innovative and/or enhanced technologies for the decommissioning of research reactors

  18. Examining the decontaminability of surfaces from the beginnings of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.

    2003-01-01

    Parallel with the development of nuclear technology in the 1950s, methods of examining the decontaminability of surface materials were elaborated, improved, and partly standardized in many countries. In 1988, ISO 8690 was adopted as an internationally accepted method of examination (technically identical to DIN 25 415, Part 1). A first range of coatings for nuclear applications were compiled from the large number of commercial products available on the market on the basis of the test method developed since 1962 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and then at the Karlsruhe Research Center. Subsequently, the continuously improved test method was used to study, in mainly chemically curing two-component coatings, the reduction of gloss by dulling agents and fillers as well as various shades of color. Floor and container coatings were also examined for their resistance to radiation and to chemicals as well as wear. (orig.) [de

  19. Promising technology for the melting and decontamination of dismantled metal by an induction cold crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, M.; Tsurumaki, K.; Akiyama, T.; Fukumura, N.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ikenaga, Y.

    1998-01-01

    An induction cold crucible melting is one of the most promising technology for the reuse and decontamination of the radioactively contaminated metallic materials generated during the dismantling of nuclear facilities, because the crucible ensures a long life operation without generating the secondary wastes. Based on the knowledge obtained through the fundamental study using the crucible of 45 mm in diameter, the MERC(Melting and Recycling of Metals by -Cold Crucible) process was designed, manufactured and scaled up to 100-140 mm in diameter. Not only cylindrical sectional crucibles but also rectangular slab sectional crucibles were developed. The maximum power of the high frequency generator is 150 kW and the frequency is 25 kHz. In the MERC, either fragments of stainless steel or tubing and pipings with small section, which were the surrogates of contaminated metallic materials, were continuously supplied together with the flux for the decontamination, followed by melting in the crucible and pulling down by the precise withdrawal system ensuring the melt dome to be kept at a suitable level for the melting. The maximal withdrawal velocity employed was 12 mm/min. The Ingot and slab were cut in every 300 mm length by the mechanical saw. They were automatically transported to the outlet of the equipment by the conveying system. Heat efficiency of the MERC was more than 26%. The ingot surface was smooth and crack free, facilitating the removal of radioactive elements concentrated in a slag stuck on the ingot surface. There was no macro segregation inside. Tracer elements of Sr and Hf transferred to the slag, Cs and Zn to the dust. Co and Mn mostly remained in the ingot. However, up to 10% of Co could transfer to the slag. This work was done under the sponsorship of Science and Technology Agency of Japan. (author)

  20. Cutting and decontamination technologies for nuclear facility dismantling; Technologien zur Zerlegung und zur Dekontamination von kerntechnischen Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Felix; Grone, Georg von; Schultmann, Frank

    2017-03-15

    The German Government's decision to phase-out nuclear power will lead to a substantial increase of the number of nuclear decommissioning and dismantling projects. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities must meet the requirements of the radiation protection ordinance. This study deals with the decontamination and dismantling technologies available to meet radiation protection requirements. The aim of this study is to determine the state of the art in the field of decommissioning and dismantling technologies. Furthermore, future trends in the development and application of such technologies should be identified. A detailed study of current literature provides an overview of established decommissioning technologies. Moreover, experts were consulted in order to facilitate a practical assessment. The experts' statements indicate that (apart from the chemical decontamination of the primary circuit) the use of mechanical methods is generally preferred. Abrasive methods are rated as particularly efficient. According to the experts, the development of new decontamination technologies may allow a more efficient decontamination. However, the success of a new technology will be subject to its application costs. Mechanical technologies are preferred for the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The band saw has been identified as a standard tool in nuclear dismantling. The survey has concluded that there is no need for new dismantling technologies. The potential lies in the optimization of existing processes and techniques. With regard to remotely operated systems, experts' opinions vary on whether the use of these systems will increase in future. Most areas inside a nuclear facility have low radiation levels that allow the use of human labour for the dismantling. However, there is a need for an improvement in the allocation and management of decommissioning projects.

  1. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  2. Environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  3. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  4. Decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevec, J.; Lenore, C.; Ulbricht, S. [Babcock & Wilcox, Co., R& DD, Alliance, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. This report describes the results of the performance testing of chelates and solvents for the dissolution of uranium.

  5. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  6. Assessment, evaluation, and testing of technologies for environmental restoration, decontamination, and decommissioning and high level waste management. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management objectives are being assessed and evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objectives of the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites

  7. Assessment, evaluation, and testing of technologies for environmental restoration, decontamination, and decommissioning and high level waste management. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management objectives are being assessed and evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objectives of the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  8. RA Reactor operation and maintenance (I-IX), part VIII, Task 3.08/05, Decontamination of the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecevic, V.

    1963-12-01

    Permanent increase of radiation in the heavy water system was noticed during first three year of the RA reactor operation, even when the reactor was shutdown. It was found that there was no failure of the fuel element cladding. Radioactive cobalt was found in the heavy water which was rather strange. During repair of the heavy water system, it has been found that stellite was used for coating the heavy water pumps. Since stellite is a cobalt alloy, this could have been the source of radioactive cobalt in the heavy water. The stellite coating was damaged due to friction and particle of cobalt appeared in the coolant, they were activated since they were in the core. decontamination of the heavy water and the heavy water coolant loop was a must . Beside the detailed report on the contamination and decontamination of the heavy water system this volume includes 14 annexes describing the investigation of the event and the whole procedure of decontamination

  9. Development of Decontamination Technology for Separating Radioactive Constituents from Contaminated Concrete Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, G. W.; Choi, W. K.; Jung, U. S.

    2010-01-01

    The large amount of contaminated concrete produced during decommissioning procedures and available decontamination. In Korea, more than more than 60 tons of concrete wastes contaminated with uranium compounds have been generated from UCP (Uranium Conversion Plant) by dismantling. A recycling or a volume reduction of the concrete wastes through the application of appropriate treatment technologies have merits from the view point of an increase in a resource recycling as well as a decrease in the amount of wastes to be disposed of resulting in a reduction of a disposal cost and an enhancement of the disposal safety. For unconditional release of building and reduction of radioactive concrete waste, mechanical methods and thermal stress methods have been selected. In the advanced countries, such as France, Japan, Germany, Sweden, and Belgium, techniques for reduction and reuse of the decommissioning concrete wastes have applied to minimize the total radioactive concrete waste volume by thermal and mechanical processes. It was found that volume reduction of contaminated concrete can be achieved by separation of the fine cement stone and coarse gravel. Typically, the contaminated layer is only 1∼10mm thick because cementitious materials are porous media, the penetration of radionuclides may occur up to several centimenters from the surface of a material. Most of the dismantled concrete wastes are slightly contaminated rather than activated. This decontamination can be accomplished during the course of a separation of the concrete wastes contaminated with radioactive materials through a thermal treatment step of the radionuclide (e.g. cesium and strontium), transportation of the radionuclide to fine aggregates through a mechanical treatment step. Concrete is a structural material which generally consists of a binder (cement), water, and aggregate. The interaction between highly charged calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) particles in the presence of divalent calcium

  10. Fiscal year 1996 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Waste Management Program, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photobriefing Book describes the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site (ANL-E) near Lemont, Illinois. This book summarizes current D and D projects, reviews fiscal year (FY) 1996 accomplishments, and outlines FY 1997 goals. A section on D and D Technology Development provides insight on new technologies for D and D developed or demonstrated at ANL-E. Past projects are recapped and upcoming projects are described as Argonne works to accomplish its commitment to, ''Close the Circle on the Splitting of the Atom.'' Finally, a comprehensive review of the status and goals of the D and D Program is provided to give a snap-shot view of the program and the direction it's taking as it moves into FY 1997. The D and D projects completed to date include: Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility; East Area Surplus Facilities; Experimental Boiling Water Reactor; M-Wing Hot Cell Facilities; Plutonium Gloveboxes; and Fast Neutron Generator

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation is a generalized planning document that identifies broad categories of issues that keep ORNL outside full compliance with the law and other legally binding agreements. Possible generic paths to compliance, issues, and the schedule for resolution of the issues one identified. The role of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) is then to identify specific site issues (problems), identify specific technologies that can be brought to bear on the issues, and assess the current status and readiness of these remediation technologies within the constraints of the schedule commitment. Regulatory requirements and commitments contained in the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation are also included in the TLD as constraints to the application of immature technological solutions. Some otherwise attractive technological solutions may not be employed because they may not be deployable on the schedule enumerated in the regulatory agreements. The roadmap for ORNL includes a list of 46 comprehensive logic diagrams for WM of low-level, radioactive-mixed, hazardous, sanitary and industrial. and TRU waste. The roadmapping process gives comparisons of the installation as it exists to the way the installation should exist under full compliance. The identification of the issues is the goal of roadmapping. This allows accurate and timely formulation of activities.

  12. The Impact of Experience and Technology Change on Task-Technology Fit of a Collaborative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Jakob H.; Eierman, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    This study continues a long running effort to examine collaborative writing and editing tools and the factors that impact Task-Technology Fit and Technology Acceptance. Previous studies found that MS Word/email performed better than technologies such as Twiki, Google Docs, and Office Live. The current study seeks to examine specifically the impact…

  13. Instructor Perceptions of Web Technology Feature and Instructional Task Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Troy J.; Reed, Diana; Suh, Inchul; Njoroge, Joyce W.

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory study, university faculty (instructor) perceptions of the extent to which eight unique features of Web technology are useful for various instructional tasks are identified. Task-technology fit propositions are developed and tested using data collected from a survey of instructors in business, pharmacy, and arts/humanities. It…

  14. Testing and evaluation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Harris, M.T.; Ally, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    The goals and objectives of the technical task plan (TTP) are to (1) describe the nature and extent of concrete contamination within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and emerging and commercial technologies applicable to these problems; (2) to match technologies to the concrete problems and recommend up to four demonstrations; (3) to initiate recommended demonstrations; and (4) to continue investigation and evaluation of the application of electrokinetic decontamination processes to concrete. This document presents findings of experimental and theoretical studies of the electrokinetic decontamination (EK) process and their implications for field demonstrations. This effort is an extension of the work performed under TTP 142005, ''Electroosmotic Concrete Decontamination. The goals of this task were to determine the applicability of EK for treating contaminated concrete and, if warranted, to evaluate EK as a potential technology for demonstration. 62 refs

  15. Status of sodium removal and component decontamination technology in the SNR programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubold, W [INTERATOM GmbH, Bergisch Gladbach (Germany); Smit, C Ch [MT-TNO Dept. 50-MW Sodium Component Test Facility, Hengelo (Netherlands); Stade, K Ch [Kernkraftwerk-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    1978-08-01

    This paper summarizes the experience with sodium removal and component decontamination processes within the framework of the SNR project since the IAEA Specialists Meeting on 'Decontamination of Plant Components from Sodium and Radioactivity' at Dounreay, April 9-12, 1973. The moist nitrogen process has been successfully applied to remove sodium from all 66 fuel elements of the KNK I core. Progress has been obtained in removing sodium from fuel elements and large components by vacuum distillation. Areas where future development is required are identified. (author)

  16. Status of sodium removal and component decontamination technology in the SNR programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, W.; Smit, C.Ch.; Stade, K.Ch.

    1978-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience with sodium removal and component decontamination processes within the framework of the SNR project since the IAEA Specialists Meeting on 'Decontamination of Plant Components from Sodium and Radioactivity' at Dounreay, April 9-12, 1973. The moist nitrogen process has been successfully applied to remove sodium from all 66 fuel elements of the KNK I core. Progress has been obtained in removing sodium from fuel elements and large components by vacuum distillation. Areas where future development is required are identified. (author)

  17. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets.

  18. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets

  19. 0-6803 : technology task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Texas 83rd Legislature charged the Texas Department : of Transportation (TxDOT) with examining and : evaluating innovative transportation technologies to : decrease costs, reduce traffic congestion, enhance : safety, and increase economic producti...

  20. NASA Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task, Overview and Project Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, James G.

    2014-01-01

    An overview presentation of NASA's Remediation Technology Collaboration Development Task including the following project summaries: in situ groundwater monitor, in situ chemical oxidation, in situ bioremediation, horizontal multi-port well, and high resolution site characterization.

  1. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  2. Composition of CBRN Decontamination Effluent and Development of Surrogate Mixtures for Testing Effluent Treatment Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    possible, the site around the wash stations is graded to allow the wash water to run off to a pit, where it can seep into the earth or be collected...Caustic soda solution Radioisotopes /Nuclear Residuals Soap with warm water DS2 = Decontamination Solution 2 STB = Super Tropical bleach HTH = High... DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  3. An improved technology for decontaminating ruthenium in uranium purification cycle by hydroxylamine pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhanshun; Zhu Zhixuan; Zhang Pilu

    1996-01-01

    The Influences of hydroxylamine concentration, pretreatment time, acidity and the concentration of stabilizer have been studied, and the best pretreatment condition for the improvement of Ru decontamination in uranium purification cycle by hydroxylamine pretreatment has been obtained. The results show that no satisfactory result can be obtained by solely using hydroxylamine as pretreatment agent unless a small amount of hydrazine is added into the pretreatment system as stabilizer

  4. Progress report 1994 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.T.

    1995-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1994. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.)

  5. Progress report 1992 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.T.

    1993-08-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1992. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.)

  6. Progress report 1994 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, H T [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1994. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.).

  7. Progress report 1993 on fusion technology tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klippel, H T [ed.

    1994-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1993. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.).

  8. Progress report 1993 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.T.

    1994-09-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1993. The work is organized in RandD contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Solid Breeder Blanket Programme, the Long Term Programme and in JET and NET contracts. The topics concern: irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and stress analysis on magnet coils. List of publications and staff members are also given. (orig.)

  9. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Is it health information technology? : Task complexity and work substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina Palomino, Hector; Rutkowski, Anne; Verhulst, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    New technology is making it possible to replace professions built on complex knowledge, e.g. medicine. In our exploratory research we examined how Information Technologies might be replacing some of the tasks formerly processed by physician anesthesiologists (MDAs). Data (N=1178) were collected at a

  11. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  12. Innovative ways of decontaminating nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremmer, Jan; Gentes, Sascha; Ambos, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The great variety of surfaces to be decontaminated in a nuclear power plant increases demand for economic solutions and efficient processing systems. The Institute for Technology and Management in Building (TMB) of the University of Karlsruhe (TH) is working on this task in the new professorship of Sascha Gentes and, together with sat Kerntechnik GmbH, developing innovative techniques and tools for surface decontamination. In this effort, sat.Kerntechnik GmbH contributes 50% to the funding of the new professorship at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, the merger of the University of Karlsruhe and the Karlsruhe Research Center. The new professorship will extend its work also to various other innovative concepts to be employed not only in demolition but also in maintenance and operation of nuclear facilities. Above and beyond theoretical approaches, practical solutions are in the focus of work. For this reason, new developments are elaborated in close cooperation with the respective users. (orig.)

  13. Integration of improved decontamination and characterization technologies in the decommissioning of the CP-5 research reactor, United States of America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L E; Bhattacharyya, S K [Technology Development Division, Decommissioning Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The aging of research reactors worldwide has resulted in a heightened awareness in the international decommissioning community of the timeliness to review and address the needs of research reactor operators in planning for and eventually performing the decommissioning of these types of facilities. Many reactors already undergoing decommissioning can be used as test beds for evaluating enhanced or new/innovative technologies for decommissioning; it is possible that new techniques could be made available for future research reactor-decommissioning projects. Potentially, the new technologies will result in: reduced radiation doses to the work force, larger safety margins in performing decommissioning and cost and schedule savings to the decommissioners in performing the decommissioning of these facilities. Testing of these enhanced technologies for decontamination, dismantling, characterization, remote operations and worker protection are critical to furthering advancements in the technical specialty of decommissioning. Furthermore, regulatory acceptance and routine utilization for future research decommissioning will be assured by testing and developing these technologies in realistically contaminated environments prior to their use in actual research reactor decommissioning. The decommissioning of the CP-5 Research Reactor located at the ANL-East Site has been completed. In this paper we present results of work performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the development, testing and deployment of innovative and/or enhanced technologies for the decommissioning of research reactors. In addition, details are provided on other related U.S. D and D activities, which may be useful to the international research reactor D and D community. (author)

  14. Integration of improved decontamination and characterization technologies in the decommissioning of the CP-5 research reactor, United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    The aging of research reactors worldwide has resulted in a heightened awareness in the international decommissioning community of the timeliness to review and address the needs of research reactor operators in planning for and eventually performing the decommissioning of these types of facilities. Many reactors already undergoing decommissioning can be used as test beds for evaluating enhanced or new/innovative technologies for decommissioning; it is possible that new techniques could be made available for future research reactor-decommissioning projects. Potentially, the new technologies will result in: reduced radiation doses to the work force, larger safety margins in performing decommissioning and cost and schedule savings to the decommissioners in performing the decommissioning of these facilities. Testing of these enhanced technologies for decontamination, dismantling, characterization, remote operations and worker protection are critical to furthering advancements in the technical specialty of decommissioning. Furthermore, regulatory acceptance and routine utilization for future research decommissioning will be assured by testing and developing these technologies in realistically contaminated environments prior to their use in actual research reactor decommissioning. The decommissioning of the CP-5 Research Reactor located at the ANL-East Site has been completed. In this paper we present results of work performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in the development, testing and deployment of innovative and/or enhanced technologies for the decommissioning of research reactors. In addition, details are provided on other related U.S. D and D activities, which may be useful to the international research reactor D and D community. (author)

  15. Tritium tasks for the net fusion technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.

    1990-01-01

    Six Tritium Technology tasks have been undertaken in the BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL Research Center of the French Atomic Energy Commission, in June 1986, as part of the NET Tritium Technology Program. Four of these six studies concern the torus exhaust gas purification and two of them are more specific of the involved materials. In 1988, the studies themselves have begun and the objective of this document is to indicate, for each task, the main results which have been obtained during the period 1988-89, for allowing a global valuation of the progress state as well as an anticipation for carrying out the works

  16. Appropriate technology for rural India - solar decontamination of water for emergency settings and small communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gagandeep; Roy, Sheela; Balraj, Vinohar

    2006-09-01

    A commercial solar water heating system was evaluated for its effectiveness in decontaminating drinking water with a view to use in emergency situations. A total of 18 seeding experiments carried out over 6 months with 10(5) to 10(7)Escherichia coli/ml showed that the solar heater produced 125 l of bacteriologically safe water in 4 h when the ambient temperature was above 30 degrees C, with a holding time of at least 2 h. The solar water heating system is inexpensive, easy to transport and set up and could provide safer drinking water for 50 people a day. It would be effective in the decrease and prevention of waterborne disease in emergency situations, and is appropriate for use in small communities.

  17. Decontamination sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Emiko; Kanesaki, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The decontamination sheet of the present invention is formed by applying an adhesive on one surface of a polymer sheet and releasably appending a plurality of curing sheets. In addition, perforated lines are formed on the sheet, and a decontaminating agent is incorporated in the adhesive. This can reduce the number of curing operation steps when a plurality steps of operations for radiation decontamination equipments are performed, and further, the amount of wastes of the cured sheets, and operator's exposure are reduced, as well as an efficiency of the curing operation can be improved, and propagation of contamination can be prevented. (T.M.)

  18. Strategic alliance for environmental restoration -- An innovative approach to government and industry collaboration for decontamination and decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aker, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The world's largest environmental cleanup effort is focused upon the DOE weapons complex. These cleanup efforts parallel those which will be required as the commercial nuclear industry reaches the end of licensed life. The Strategic Alliance for Environmental Restoration (Strategic Alliance), reflects the cooperative interest of industry, commercial nuclear utilities, university and national laboratory team members to bring a collaborative best-in-class approach to finding, and providing effective delivery of innovative environmental remediation technologies to the DOE Complex and subsequently to industry. The collaborative team of the Strategic Alliance includes ComEd, Duke Engineering and Services, 3M, ICF Kaiser, Florida International University, Argonne National Laboratory in concert with DOE. The Strategic Alliance approach to technology qualification and deployment provides DOE, through a Cooperative Agreement, with a new way of bringing industry principles to technology research and developed activities. This paper will describe the approach and activities the Strategic Alliance is taking to provide cost effective technology solutions to DOE/Industry needs for decontamination and decommissioning needs

  19. Information seeking research needs extension towards tasks and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalervo Järvelin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the research into information seeking and its directions at a general level. We approach this topic by analysis and argumentation based on past research in the domain. We begin by presenting a general model of information seeking and retrieval (IS&R which is used to derive nine broad dimensions that are needed to analyze IS&R. Past research is then contrasted with the dimensions and shown not to cover the dimensions sufficiently. Based on an analysis of the goals of information seeking research, and a view on human task performance augmentation, it is then shown that information seeking is intimately associated with, and dependent on, other aspects of work; tasks and technology included. This leads to a discussion on design and evaluation frameworks for IS&R, based on which two action lines are proposed: information retrieval research needs extension towards more context and information seeking research needs extension towards tasks and technology.

  20. Control of technology as a public and private task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhof, P.

    1988-01-01

    In the opinion of the author the control of technology is as well a public as a private task. But due to the constitutional order first of all it is incumbent on the state to control technical installations. This state supervisory function cannot be replaced by private self-control. (WG) [de

  1. Decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki; Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-01-01

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  2. Decontamination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-10-27

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  3. Full system decontamination. AREVAs experience in decontamination prior to decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topf, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Minimizing collective radiation exposure and producing free-release material are two of the highest priorities in the decommissioning of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Full System Decontamination (FSD) is the most effective measure to reduce source term and remove oxide layer contamination within the plant systems. FSD is typically a decontamination of the primary coolant circuit and the auxiliary systems. In recent years AREVA NP has performed several FSDs in PWRs and BWRs prior to decommissioning by applying the proprietary CORD copyright family and AMDA copyright technology. Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination or CORD represents the chemical decontamination process while AMDA stands for Automated Mobile Decontamination Appliance, AREVA NPs decontamination equipment. Described herein are the excellent results achieved for the FSDs applied at the German PWRs Stade in 2004 and Obrigheim in 2007 and for the FSDs performed at the Swedish BWRs, Barsebaeck Unit 1 in 2007 and Barsebaeck Unit 2 in 2008. All four FSDs were performed using the AREVA NP CORD family decontamination technology in combination with the AREVA NP decontamination equipment, AMDA. (orig.)

  4. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  5. Decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevec, J.; Lenore, C.; Ulbricht, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. Current approaches to the decontamination of metals most often involve one of four basic process types: (1) chemical, (2) manual and mechanical, (3) electrochemical, and (4) ultrasonic. open-quotes Hardclose quotes chemical decontamination solutions, capable of achieving decontamination factors (Df's) of 50 to 100, generally involve reagent concentrations in excess of 5%, tend to physically degrade the surface treated, and generate relatively large volumes of secondary waste. open-quotes Softclose quotes chemical decontamination solutions, capable of achieving Df's of 5 to 10, normally consist of reagents at concentrations of 0.1 to 1%, generally leave treated surfaces in a usable condition, and generate relatively low secondary waste volumes. Under contract to the Department of Energy, the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company is developing a chemical decontamination process using chelating agents to remove uranium compounds and other actinide species from process equipment

  6. Study on the evaluation of decontamination and decommissioning technologies and their demands in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Won, H. J.; Kim, G. N.; Jung, K. J.; Chung, U. S.; Lee, D. G.; Kim, C. J.; Kim, S. H.; Chung, J. M.; Kwon, S. O. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    D and D market demand, the current status of the technology, technology items applicable to the domestic market and the future prospect of technologies not self-developed in Korea were evaluated. In the evaluation of D and D market demand and the current status of the technology, 1) the market demand was investigated on the D and D objects such as the research reactors, the nuclear power plants and the nuclear fuel cycle development facilities from 2001 to 2010, and 2) the technology demand for decommissioning of the nuclear power plants from 2001 to 2030 were investigated. In the evaluation of the technology items applicable to the domestic market, 1) the analysis of the technologies derived from the technology requirements on D and D objects and their related similar technologies was performed, and 2) the technology items applicable to the domestic market were derived from the evaluation of the suitability on the domestic technology requirements. The promising technologies applicable to the domestic market were derived from the integrated evaluation of the technological factors(innovation, internationally competitive power and the difficulty of the technology development), economical factors (domestic demand and substitution effect of foreign currency) and domestically applicable factors (applicability on the industry and a ripple effect). The background of the technology development such as business applicability and the technology demonstration effect through the integrated management of the decommissioning of TRIGA reactor and the uranium conversion facility was also analyzed. 10 refs., 9 figs., 28 tabs. (Author)

  7. 'No touch' technologies for environmental decontamination: focus on ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David J; Kanamori, Hajime; Rutala, William A

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews 'no touch' methods for disinfection of the contaminated surface environment of hospitalized patients' rooms. The focus is on studies that assessed the effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) light devices, hydrogen peroxide systems, and self-disinfecting surfaces to reduce healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The contaminated surface environment in hospitals plays an important role in the transmission of several key nosocomial pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp., Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter spp., and norovirus. Multiple clinical trials have now demonstrated the effectiveness of UV light devices and hydrogen peroxide systems to reduce HAIs. A limited number of studies have suggested that 'self-disinfecting' surfaces may also decrease HAIs. Many studies have demonstrated that terminal cleaning and disinfection with germicides is often inadequate and leaves environmental surfaces contaminated with important nosocomial pathogens. 'No touch' methods of room decontamination (i.e., UV devices and hydrogen peroxide systems) have been demonstrated to reduce key nosocomial pathogens on inoculated test surfaces and on environmental surfaces in actual patient rooms. Further UV devices and hydrogen peroxide systems have been demonstrated to reduce HAI. A validated 'no touch' device or system should be used for terminal room disinfection following discharge of patients on contact precautions. The use of a 'self-disinfecting' surface to reduce HAI has not been convincingly demonstrated.

  8. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  9. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  10. Tests for improvement of decontamination factors on RWTP technological line of precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovici, C.

    1998-01-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive wastes are produced from diverse applications of radionuclides and radioactive materials in industry, medicine, agriculture and research. Many of the liquid wastes need treatment for safe management. Chemical precipitation process is well established for the removal of radioactive from LLW and ILW. The precipitation of insoluble compounds is one of the oldest and most used process for the treatment of aqueous waste. The precipitation can be performed either in a simple step or by combined chemical treatment which mainly includes as radioactive carries iron oxo-hydroxides, iron phosphate, calcium phosphate and cooper ferrocyanide. The contaminants are removed from LLW and ILW during precipitation by different mechanisms such as: coagulation and flocculation process, precipitation and co-precipitation, adsorption on the coagulant aid, ion exchange and physical enmeshment by coagulant aid. All these processes are directly dependent on the precipitate properties and its structure which are connected with the initial system composition and the precipitation procedure. Chemical precipitation method for treatment of LLW and ILW by co-precipitation of caesium with cooper ferrocyanide was employed on the real radioactive wastes where the volumes were 3 m 3 , 24 m 3 and 30 m 3 . The percentage removals of Cs-137 from 2285 Bq, 1310 Bq and 1232 Bq per litre of real effluents were 98.8%, 98.9% and 99.1%, respectively. Test runs for removal of Cs-137 from the wastes varied from 90% to 95%. High decontamination factors were observed in the pH range of 9 to 10.5. (author)

  11. Task summary: Hot demonstration of proposed commercial nuclide removal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Travis, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclides represent only a small fraction of the components in millions of gallons of storage tank supernatant at various sites, including Oak Ridge, Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho. Most of the radioactivity is contributed by cesium, strontium, and technetium along with high concentrations of sodium and potassium salts. The purpose of this task is to test and select sorbents and commercial removal technologies supplied by ESP for removing and concentrating the radionuclides, thereby reducing the volume of waste to be stored or disposed

  12. Multimedia technologies in university libraries: opportunities and tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavalbekh Serkhan Ali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia technologies (MMT are considered as a factor of qualitative changes of informational environment of education. Leading role of libraries in the process of integration of MMT environment of university is determined. Influence of libraries experience in usage of informational technologies both traditional and computer-aided, Internet in particular is observed. Determined that introduction of MMT noticeable improving the importance of library in MMT environment organization of universities, improvement of library informational service. Tasks of university libraries with integration into united media space are defining.

  13. DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weger, Hans; Kodanda, Raja Tilek Meruva; Mazumdar, Anindra; Srivastava, Rajiv Ph.D.; Ebadian, M.A. Ph.D.

    2003-01-01

    Four hand-held tools were tested for failed high-level waste melter decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The forces felt by the tools during operation were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer since they will be operated by a remote manipulator. The efficiency of the tools was also recorded. Melter D and D consists of three parts: (1) glass fracturing: removing from the furnace the melted glass that can not be poured out through normal means, (2) glass cleaning: removing the thin layer of glass that has formed over the surface of the refractory material, and (3) K-3 refractory breakup: removing the K-3 refractory material. Surrogate glass, from a formula provided by the Savannah River Site, was melted in a furnace and poured into steel containers. K-3 refractory material, the same material used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, was utilized for the demonstrations. Four K-3 blocks were heated at 1150 C for two weeks with a glass layer on top to simulate the hardened glass layer on the refractory surface in the melter. Tools chosen for the demonstrations were commonly used D and D tools, which have not been tested specifically for the different aspects of melter D and D. A jackhammer and a needle gun were tested for glass fracturing; a needle gun and a rotary grinder with a diamond face wheel (diamond grinder) were tested for glass cleaning; and a jackhammer, diamond grinder, and a circular saw with a diamond blade were tested for refractory breakup. The needle gun was not capable of removing or fracturing the surrogate glass. The diamond grinder only had a removal rate of 3.0 x 10-4 kg/s for K-3 refractory breakup and needed to be held firmly against the material. However, the diamond grinder was effective for glass cleaning, with a removal rate of 3.9 cm2/s. The jackhammer was successful in fracturing glass and breaking up the K-3 refractory block. The jackhammer had a glass-fracturing rate of 0.40 kg/s. The jackhammer split the K-3 refractory

  14. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  15. Decontamination technology verification test on scraping surface soil on the highway roadside slopes using unmanned scraping machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinaka, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Mitsuru; Shibuya, Susumu; Kasai, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    The restore the normal life in the contaminated area, reconstruction of the infrastructure is necessary and early decontamination of roads and roadside slopes of highway are required. Decontamination work of roadside slopes is conducted only by hand working so far, but on the high and steep roadside slopes it is desirable to carry out decontamination work by an unmanned scraping machine to reduce working hours and improve safety. In this verification test, decontamination work of the roadside slope of highway, of which area was 20m W x 15m L and divided into two sections, was implemented by the machine or by hand, and working hours and radiation exposure dose were measured. As the results of the test, working hours and radiation exposure dose by the machine were 49% and 63% respectively compared to those by hand. Based on the results, cost and radiation dose for decontamination work on larger slopes were evaluated. Cost by the machine is estimated to be less than that by hand where the area is over 4,000m 2 . It is confirmed that the decontamination work of roadside slopes by the machine can be done more quickly and safely in comparison with hand working. (author)

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth

  17. Gas phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion process equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.; Neiswander, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    D ampersand D of the process facilities at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) will be an enormous task. The EBASCO estimate places the cost of D ampersand D of the GDP at the K-25 Site at approximately $7.5 billion. Of this sum, nearly $4 billion is associated with the construction and operation of decontamination facilities and the dismantlement and transport of contaminated process equipment to these facilities. In situ long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas phase decontamination is being developed and demonstrated at the K-25 site as a technology that has the potential to substantially lower these costs while reducing criticality and safeguards concerns and worker exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials. The objective of gas phase decontamination is to employ a gaseous reagent to fluorinate nonvolatile uranium deposits to form volatile LJF6, which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The LTLT process permits the decontamination of the inside of gas-tight GDP process equipment at room temperature by substituting a long exposure to subatmospheric C1F for higher reaction rates at higher temperatures. This paper outlines the concept for applying LTLT gas phase decontamination, reports encouraging laboratory experiments, and presents the status of the design of a prototype mobile system. Plans for demonstrating the LTLT process on full-size gaseous diffusion equipment are also outlined briefly

  18. Pilot-scale decontamination solution test results HGTP-93-0702-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemmer, R.G.; Allen, R.P.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1993-05-01

    Decontamination solution testing constitutes a task of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The HGTP provides technical support to the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Grout Disposal Program. Cementitious grout has been identified as the waste form for low-level radioactive waste. Grout processing equipment, including mixers, pumps, and piping, will require periodic maintenance. Decontamination of components is needed to reduce radiation dose to maintenance workers. The purpose of this work was to develop and test methods for decontaminating grout processing equipment. The proposed method of decontamination is to use a mild chemical solution, such as a 6 N citric acid to dissolve the grout. The method should effectively remove grout without causing degradation of grout processing equipment

  19. Determination of vapor-liquid equilibrium data and decontamination factors needed for the development of evaporator technology for use in volume reduction of radioactive waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    A program is currently in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste streams. By concentrating radioactive waste streams, disposal costs can be significantly reduced. To effectively reduce the volume of waste, the evaporator must achieve high decontamination factors so that the distillate is sufficiently free of radioactive material. One technology that shows a great deal of potential for this application is being developed by LICON, Inc. In this program, Argonne plans to apply LICON's evaporator designs to the processing of radioactive solutions. Concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of the evaporator include, criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. To design an effective process for concentrating waste streams, both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed. The key issue, however, is the high decontamination factors that have been demonstrated by this equipment. Two major contributions were made to this project. First, a literature survey was completed to obtain available solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data. Some vapor-liquid data necessary for the project but not available in the literature was obtained experimentally. Second, the decontamination factor for the evaporator was determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA)

  20. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system

  1. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs).

  2. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs)

  3. Nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Decontamination may be accomplished by chemical, electrical, or mechanical means. Recently there have been significant developments in all three categories as well as an increased tendency to combine techniques, either simultaneously (e.g. by adding chemicals to water jets) or sequentially (e.g. by using a mechanical method to remove loose contamination, followed by a chemical method for more tightly bound activity). Some developments in the different techniques are discussed, together with typical applications of each. (author)

  4. Decontaminating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Toshiharu; Shibuya, Kiichiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of eliminating radioactive contaminations capable of ease treatment for decontaminated liquid wastes and grinding materials. Method: Those organic grinding materials such as fine wall nuts shell pieces cause no secondary contaminations since they are softer as compared with inorganic grinding materials, less pulverizable upon collision against the surface to be treated, being capable of reusing and producing no fine scattering powder. In addition, they can be treated by burning. The organic grinding material and water are sprayed by a nozzle to the surface to be treated, and decontaminated liquid wastes are separated into solid components mainly composed of organic grinding materials and liquid components mainly composed of water by filtering. The thus separated solid components are recovered in a storage tank for reuse as the grinding material and, after repeating use, subjected to burning treatment. While on the other hand, water is recovered into a storage tank and, after repeating use, purified by passing through an ion exchange resin-packed column and decontaminated to discharge. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. The experience of utilization of electro-migration technology for soil decontamination from cesium-137 under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Prozorov, L.B.; Martyanov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    The essence of methods for soil decontamination based on electrokinetic processes is that, in the field of constant current, contaminated particles-ions, depending on their charge mark, move to anode or cathode sides. If such a field is created in the soil containing ions of radionuclides or heavy metals, those ions-contaminants will begin to concentrated in the cathode or anode zone, i.e. soil decontamination with ion electric migration process takes place. During the recent tour years specialists from Mos RPA (Moscow Research-and-Production Association) Radon (Russia) have been conducting an extensive investigation on the utilization of electrokinetic processes for decontamination of soils from radionuclides and heavy metals

  6. Bulk Building Material Characterization and Decontamination Using a Concrete Floor and Wall Contamination Profiling Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.; Charters, G.; Blauvelt, D.

    2002-01-01

    The concrete profiling technology, RadPro(trademark) has four major components: a drill with a specialized cutting and sampling head, drill bits, a sample collection unit and a vacuum pump. The equipment in conjunction with portable radiometric instrumentation produces a profile of radiological or chemical contamination through the material being studied. The drill head is used under hammer action to penetrate hard surfaces. This causes the bulk material to be pulverized as the drill travels through the radioactive media efficiently transmitting to the sampling unit a representative sample of powdered bulk material. The profiling equipment is designed to sequentially collect all material from the hole. The bulk material samples are continuously retrieved by use of a specially designed vacuumed sample retrieval unit that prevents cross contamination of the clean retrieved samples. No circulation medium is required with this profiling process; therefore, the only by-product from drilling is the sample. The data quality, quantity, and representativeness may be used to produce an activity profile from the hot spot surface into the bulk building material. The activity data obtained during the profiling process is reduced and transferred to building drawings as part of a detailed report of the radiological problem. This activity profile may then be expanded to ultimately characterize the facility and expedite waste segregation and facility closure at a reduced cost and risk

  7. Decontamination of soils and materials containing medium-fired PuO{sub 2} using inhibited fluorides with polymer filtration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temer, D.J.; Villarreal, R.; Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination of soils and/or materials from medium-fired plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) with an effective and efficient decontamination agent that will not significantly dissolve the matrix requires a new and innovative technology. After testing several decontamination agents and solutions for dissolution of medium-fired PuO{sub 2}, the most successful decontamination solutions were fluoride compounds, which were effective in breaking the Pu-oxide bond but would not extensively dissolve soil constituents and other materials. The fluoride compounds, tetra fluoboric acid (HBF{sub 4}) and hydrofluorosilicic acid (H{sub 2}F{sub 6}Si), were effective in dissolving medium-fired PuO{sub 2}, and did not seem to have the potential to dissolve the matrix. In both compounds, the fluoride atom is attached to a boron or silicon atom that inhibits the reactivity of the fluoride towards other compounds or materials containing atoms less attracted to the fluoride atom in an acid solution. Because of this inhibition of the reactivity of the fluoride ion, these compounds are termed inhibited fluoride compounds or agents. Both inhibited fluorides studied effectively dissolved medium-fired PuO{sub 2} but exhibited a tendency to not attack stainless steel or soil. The basis for selecting inhibited fluorides was confirmed during leaching tests of medium-fired PuO{sub 2} spiked into soil taken from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When dissolved in dilute HNO{sub 3}, HCl, or HBr, both inhibited fluoride compounds were effective at solubilizing the medium-fired PuO{sub 2} from spiked INEL soil.

  8. Geographic assistance of decontamination strategy elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydchuk, V.; Arapis, G.

    1996-01-01

    Those who elaborates the strategy of decontamination of vast territories is to take into consideration the heterogeneity of such elements of landscape as relief, lithology, humidity and types of soils and, vegetation, both on local and regional level. Geographic assistance includes evaluation of efficacy of decontamination technologies in different natural conditions, identification of areas of their effective application and definition of ecological damage, estimation of balances of the radionuclides in the landscapes to create background of the decontamination strategy

  9. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  10. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  11. Excimer laser decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentis, Marc L.; Delaporte, Philippe C.; Marine, Wladimir; Uteza, Olivier P.

    2000-04-01

    The application of excimer laser ablation process to the decontamination of radioactive surfaces is discussed. This technology is very attractive because it allows to efficiently remove the contaminated particles without secondary waste production. To demonstrate the capability of such technology to efficiently decontaminate large area, we studied and developed a prototype which include a XeCl laser, an optical fiber delivery system and an ablated particles collection cell. The main physical processes taking place during UV laser ablation will be explained. The influence of laser wavelength, pulse duration and absorption coefficient of material will be discussed. Special studies have been performed to understand the processes which limit the transmission of high average power excimer laser through optical fiber, and to determine the laser conditions to optimize the value of this transmission. An in-situ spectroscopic analysis of laser ablation plasma allows the real time control of the decontamination. The results obtained for painting or metallic oxides removal from stainless steel surfaces will be presented.

  12. Technological development toward nuclear reactor decommissioning. Utilization of 3D measurement data (6D CAD™) and system decontamination (T-OZON™)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Koji; Hatakeyama, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Toshiba Corporation has been developing the technologies related to decommissioning for more than 30 years, and making them into practical use. This paper introduced 6D CAD™, which applies the CAD system that is effective for rational planning at the initial stage and effective for managing the progress of construction work, as well as T-OZON™ method, which is effective for reducing the exposure of construction workers. This 6D CAD™ can deal with the following items necessary for decommissioning work: (1) decommissioning management such as schedule control and yearly exposure dose management, (2) management such as planning and implementation of procedures, as well as waste management and traceability, and (3) essential technologies such as the optimization of dismantling plan, reduction in processing/disposal cost, database construction for engineering information, measurement of reactor inside, and measurement of radiation dose and database construction of its information. T-OZON™ method is a chemical decontamination technology that can be applied to pre-demolition decontamination aimed at reducing the exposure of workers and reducing the amount of radioactive materials in the dust generated during dismantling work, and greatly reducing the secondary waste originated from used chemicals. Oxalic acid is used as a reducing agent, and ozone water is used as an oxidizing agent. This method has been applied over 200 times mainly for BWR. The application to PWR has been tested by experiments, and prospects for achieving the target value for decontamination have been obtained for both materials of SUS 304 and Alloy 600. (A.O.)

  13. Soil decontamination with Extraksol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquin, J.; Mourato, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Extraksol process is a mobile decontamination technology which treats unconsolidated materials by solvent extraction. Treatment with Extraksol involves material washing, drying and solvent regeneration. Contaminant removal is achieved through desorption/dissolution mechanisms. The treated material is dry and acceptable to be reinstalled in its original location. The process provides a fast, efficient and versatile alternative for decontamination of soil and sludge. The organic contaminants extracted from the matrix are transferred to the extraction fluids. These are thereafter concentrated in the residues of distillation after solvent regeneration. Removal and concentration of the contaminants ensures an important waste volume reduction. This paper presents the process is operational principles and the steps involved in Extraksol's development with results of the pilot tests and full-scale demonstrations

  14. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  15. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  16. Decontamination technologies evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, J.

    1996-01-01

    Testing has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on in situ recyclable abrasives grit blasting, concrete cleaning (using scabbling, chemicals and electro-kinetics) and laser light ablation of metals. Several small scale tests have also been conducted with strippable coatings, CO 2 pellet blasting and various other techniques. The results of this testing is summarized in this paper

  17. [Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis.

  18. Local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, P [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Novozybkov, Bryansk region (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernnobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here.

  19. Local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Ramzaev, V.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  20. Gas-phase decontamination demonstration on PORTS cell X-25-4-2. Final technology status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddle, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Long-Term, Low Temperature (LTLT) process is a gas-phase in situ decontamination technique which has been tested by LMES/K-25 personnel on the laboratory scale with promising results. The purpose of the Gas-Phase Decontamination Demonstration at PORTS was to evaluate the LTLT process on an actual diffusion cascade cell at conditions similar to those used in the laboratory testing. The demonstration was conducted on PORTS diffusion cell X-25-4-2 which was one of the X-326 Building cells which was permanently shutdown as part of the Suspension of HEU Production at PORTS. The demonstration full-scale test consisted of rendering the cell leak-tight through the installation of Dresser seals onto the process seals, exposing the cell to the oxidants ClF 3 and F 2 for a period of 105 days and evaluating the effect of the clean-up treatment on cell samples and coupons representing the major diffusion cascade materials of construction. The results were extrapolated to determine the effectiveness of LTLT decontamination over the range of historical uranium isotope assays present in the diffusion complex. It was determined that acceptable surface contamination levels could be obtained in all of the equipment in the lower assay cascades which represents the bulk of the equipment contained in the diffusion complex

  1. Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer

    2007-02-01

    Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or “dirty bomb”) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the “old reliable” methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency

  2. Cost Savings through Innovation in Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, Neal A.

    2003-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost effective technologies for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsored large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs) to help bring new technologies into the D and D programs. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of needs defining specific problems where improved technologies could be incorporated into ongoing D and D tasks. The needs fell into 5 major categories--characterization, dismantlement, safety, material dispositioning, and decontamination. Technologies were carefully selected that provide a large benefit for a small investment. The technologies must provide significant improvements in cost, safety, radiation exposure, waste volume reduction, or schedule savings and widely applicable throughout the DOE complex. The LSDDP project provided training for the new technologies and worked with technology suppliers to resolve any questions that arose. Since 1998, 26 technologies have been demonstrated or deployed through the LSDDP for the D and D program at the INEEL. Of the 26 demonstrated and deployed technologies, 14 were in characterization, 3 were in decontamination, 4 were in dismantlement, 3 were in safety, and 2 were in material dispositioning. To promote the use of these technologies at other sites within the DOE complex, the LSDDP team published fact sheets, videos, technology summary reports, articles in INEEL star newspaper, posters, and maintained an internet home page on the project. As a result, additional deployments have taken place at the Hanford, Mound, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Ashtabula, and West Valley. Eight of the 26 technologies evaluated were developed in foreign countries. The technologies demonstrated have been shown to be faster, less expensive, and

  3. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  4. Decontamination solution development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Fetrow, L.K.; Kjarmo, H.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study was conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Hanford Grout Technology Program (HGTP). The objective of this study was to identify decontamination solutions capable of removing radioactive contaminants and grout from the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) process equipment and to determine the impact of these solutions on equipment components and disposal options. The reference grout used in this study was prepared with simulated double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) and a dry blend consisting of 40 wt % limestone flour, 28 wt % blast furnace slag, 28 wt % fly ash, and 4 wt % type I/II Portland cement

  5. CB decontamination for first responders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, M.D.G.; Purdon, J.G.; Burczyk, A. [Defence Research and Development Canada Suffield, Ralston, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The Universal Containment System (UCS) is designed to contain, mitigate and decontaminate chemical, biological and radiological warfare agents. The UCS consists of a lightweight, tent-like enclosure filled with a water-based surface decontaminating foam (SDF). The Canadian government funded a project to advance the understanding of the behaviour of the UCS. This paper described the success of the project as well as the technological advances in the UCS formulation and equipment. Vapour desorption experiments were conducted in which SDF was applied onto 12 surfaces found in a typical office environment. Both mustard and nerve agent were studied on the test surfaces. Both scrubbing and non-scrubbing decontamination methods were tested. SDF effectively decontaminated the non-porous substances, particularly when the scrubbing procedure was used. Results were more complicated for the non-porous samples. A dye added to the agent was useful for determining the fate of the agent. Liquid phase studies were conducted in which the reaction between SDF and various agents were studied in the liquid phase in order to estimate the rate of reaction, the stoichiometry and the reaction products formed. Both SDF and the commercial decontamination agent CASCAD were found to effectively kill 100 per cent of anthrax spores. The significance of this project to first responders was considerable. Changes to the formulation and equipment of UCS will increase its usefulness and safety. Users will also have a better knowledge of the amount of decontamination needed for complete effectiveness in specific situations. Recommendations have been made for use of the product on a range of indoor surfaces. Field trials have shown the blast mitigation and agent decontamination ability of the foam under explosive situations. 15 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Technical task plan for Acquire Commercial Technology for Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, L.B.

    1995-01-01

    Objective is to determine from industry their best approaches to retrieving waste from the Single Shell Tanks. This task plan describes the first 18 months of work; the task will be further defined as the work progresses. The retrieval is to be demonstrated on tank 241-C-106

  7. Foam process for application of decontamination agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.M.; Miller, J.R.; Frazier, R.S.; Walter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results and observations of a study performed by the authors to parametrically evaluate the performance characteristics of a foam process for application of decontamination agents. The initial tests were established to assess foam quality. Subsequent tests determined the ability of the foam as a carrier of chemical systems, and established system operating parameters. The technique was then applied in an actual decontamination task to verify effectiveness of these established parameters and to determine decontamination reduction factors. 4 figures, 5 tables

  8. Analysis of decontamination methods used at nuclear power plants and in other facilities. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlaha, Josef

    2011-10-01

    Methods used in the Czech Republic and in other countries are described. The following topics are treated: Introduction into decontamination; Chemical methods; Foam methods; Electrochemical methods; Mechanical methods; Other methods; Decontamination of civil engineering structures; Technologies suitable for disposal decontamination; and Effect of decontamination on waste management. (P.A.)

  9. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  10. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  11. Full system decontamination feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; LeSurf, J.E.; Walschot, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical decontaminations have been performed on subsystems in light water reactors (BWRs and PWRs) but none on the full system (including the fuel) of large, (>500 MWe) investor owned reactors. Full system decontaminations on pressure-tubed reactors have been shown to facilitate maintenance, inspection, repair and replacement of reactor components. Further advantages are increased reactor availability and plant life extension. A conceptual study has been performed for EPRI (for PWRs) and Commonwealth Edison Co (for BWRs) into the applicability and cost benefit of full system decontaminations (FSD). The joint study showed that FSDs in both PWRs and BWRs, with or without the fuel included in the decontamination, are feasible and cost beneficial provided a large amount of work is to be done following the decontamination. The large amounts of radioactive waste generated can be managed using current technologies. Considerable improvements in waste handling, and consequent cost savings, can be obtained if new techniques which are now reaching commercial application are used. (author)

  12. Controlling Hospital-Acquired Infection: Focus on the Role of the Environment and New Technologies for Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY There is increasing interest in the role of cleaning for managing hospital-acquired infections (HAI). Pathogens such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multiresistant Gram-negative bacilli, norovirus, and Clostridium difficile persist in the health care environment for days. Both detergent- and disinfectant-based cleaning can help control these pathogens, although difficulties with measuring cleanliness have compromised the quality of published evidence. Traditional cleaning methods are notoriously inefficient for decontamination, and new approaches have been proposed, including disinfectants, steam, automated dispersal systems, and antimicrobial surfaces. These methods are difficult to evaluate for cost-effectiveness because environmental data are not usually modeled against patient outcome. Recent studies have reported the value of physically removing soil using detergent, compared with more expensive (and toxic) disinfectants. Simple cleaning methods should be evaluated against nonmanual disinfection using standardized sampling and surveillance. Given worldwide concern over escalating antimicrobial resistance, it is clear that more studies on health care decontamination are required. Cleaning schedules should be adapted to reflect clinical risk, location, type of site, and hand touch frequency and should be evaluated for cost versus benefit for both routine and outbreak situations. Forthcoming evidence on the role of antimicrobial surfaces could supplement infection prevention strategies for health care environments, including those targeting multidrug-resistant pathogens. PMID:25278571

  13. A scaffold easy to decontaminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourek, D.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional scaffold used in the assembling work and in revisions of technological facilities at nuclear power plants has many drawbacks. The most serious of them are a high amount of radioactive waste arising from the decontamination (planing) of the floor timber and from the discarding of damaged irreparable parts, and a considerable corrosion of the carbon steel supporting structure after the decontamination. A detailed description is given of a novel scaffold assembly which can be decontaminated and which exhibits many assets, in particular a good mechanical resistance (also to bad weather), a lower weight, and the use of prepreg floor girders for the construction of service platforms or scaffold bridges which can readily be assembled from the pressed pieces in a modular way. (Z.S.). 4 figs., 4 refs

  14. EDF guide book for decontamination at power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorennec, C.; Bemer, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant components or equipment often need to be more or less decontaminated before undergoing maintenance. In order to coordinate the activities of the different maintenance specialists belonging to the corporate or site organizations, the management of EDF/Nuclear and Fossil Division has created a decontamination task force. One of the objectives of this task force was to elaborate the present Guide Book for Decontamination at Power Plants. This paper provides assistance to nuclear plants operators in the very specific field of decontamination

  15. Language Tasks Using Touch Screen and Mobile Technologies: Reconceptualizing Task-Based CALL for Young Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Martine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how the use of mobile technologies (iPods and tablets) in language classrooms contributes to redesigning task-based approaches for young language learners. The article is based on a collaborative action research (CAR) project in Early French Immersion classrooms in the province of Alberta, Canada. The data collection included…

  16. Soil decontamination criteria report, November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A program to access the extent of transuranic soil contamination at DOE sites and to develop methods for their decontamination is underway at Rocky Flats. As part of this program, acceptable soil contamination levels for plutonium proposed by a number of authorities over the past couple of decades were reviewed. From this review, goals for soil decontamination work are proposed. These goals, which relate to the disposition of the products of a decontamination process, are summarized as follows (dpm/g will refer to disintegrations per minute of transuranic nuclides per gram of soil): soil fractions having less than 30 dpm can be disposed of as surface soil with unrestricted usage. Fine soil fractions (less than 100 μm) that have less than 500 dpm and coarse soil fractions that have less than 1000 dpm can be disposed of as subsurface soil as long as usage is controlled to ensure compliance with EPA dosage guidance. Soil concentrates that have an activity greater than the above values but less than 22,000 dpm should be interred in an approved, low level waste burial site. Soil concentrates that are greater than 22,000 dpm should be stored as retrievable waste. Changes in the technical and legal areas of soil decontamination are rapid. Permissible soil decontamination levels will change as will decontamination technology and the ability to monitor the effectiveness of the decontamination processes. As a result, annual updates of decontamination criteria, goals, and monitoring are expected

  17. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused

  18. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H. [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Fusion Neutron Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  19. A study on dry decontamination using ion exchange polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Ahn, Byung Gil

    1997-12-01

    Through the project of A study on dry decontamination using ion exchange polymer , the followings were investigated. 1. Highly probable decontamination technologies for the decontamination were investigated. 2. Development of gel type decontamination agent using ion-exchange resin powder (mixed type) as an ion exchanger. 3. Manufacturing of contaminated specimens (5 kinds) with Cs-137 solution and dust / Cs-137 solution. 4. Decontamination performance evaluation of the manufactured agent. 5. Analysis of composition (XRF) and the structure of surface of specimens (optic micrography). (author). 20 refs., 11 figs

  20. Application of GIS Technology for Town Planning Tasks Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyashko, G. A.

    2017-11-01

    For developing territories, one of the most actual town-planning tasks is to find out the suitable sites for building projects. The geographic information system (GIS) allows one to model complex spatial processes and can provide necessary effective tools to solve these tasks. We propose several GIS analysis models which can define suitable settlement allocations and select appropriate parcels for construction objects. We implement our models in the ArcGIS Desktop package and verify by application to the existing objects in Primorsky Region (Primorye Territory). These suitability models use several variations of the analysis method combinations and include various ways to resolve the suitability task using vector data and a raster data set. The suitability models created in this study can be combined, and one model can be integrated into another as its part. Our models can be updated by other suitability models for further detailed planning.

  1. Decontamination and dismantlement of Plant 7 at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertin, M.; Borgman, T.; Zebick, B.

    1994-01-01

    Decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) tasks have been successfully completed on Plant 7 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. The seven story facility was radiologically, chemically, and biologically contaminated. The work involved the D ampersand D work beginning with safe shutdown and gross decontamination, and ended with removal of the structural steel. A series of lessons learned were gained which include use of explosives, bidding tactics, safe shutdown, building decontamination and lockdown, use of seam climbers, etc

  2. Dual-arm manipulation module for use in decontamination and decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.R.; Haley, D.C.; Dixon, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    A dual-arm manipulation module is under development for application in decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) tasks. The development is led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with support from Sandia National Laboratories, and with university and industry participation. The project is part of the Robotics Technology Development Program funded by the US Department of Energy, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Office of Technology Development. The dual-arm module is designed to provide dexterous manipulation capability for remote characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement operations, and the module is reconfigurable to meet various deployment requirements. Remote manipulation capability can benefit D ampersand D activities through reduced worker exposure to both contaminant and industrial hazards. When tasks conditions permit, increased use of robotic features reduce costs by increased efficiency of operation

  3. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  4. Reactive decontamination formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giletto, Anthony [College Station, TX; White, William [College Station, TX; Cisar, Alan J [Cypress, TX; Hitchens, G Duncan [Bryan, TX; Fyffe, James [Bryan, TX

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  5. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  6. Information, Technology and Information Worker Productivity: Task Level Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Sinan Aral; Erik Brynjolfsson; Marshall Van Alstyne

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to reveal the fine-grained relationships between IT use, patterns of information flows, and individual information-worker productivity, we study task level practices at a midsize executive recruiting firm. We analyze both project-level and individual-level performance using: (1) detailed accounting data on revenues, compensation, project completion rates, and team membership for over 1300 projects spanning 5 years, (2) direct observation of over 125,000 email messages over a peri...

  7. Task-technology fit of video telehealth for nurses in an outpatient clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Finkelstein, Stanley M

    2014-07-01

    Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task-technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task-technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time-motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task-technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task-technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task-technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology.

  8. Decontamination between dismantling of the Rapsodie primary coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, J.R.; Gauchon, J.P.; Antoine, P.

    1991-01-01

    The large-scale decontamination of FBR sodium loops is a novel task, as only a limited number of laboratory-scale results are available to date. The principal objective of this work is to develop a suitable decontamination procedure for application to the primary loops of the RAPSODIE fast breeder reactor as part of decommissionning to Stage 2

  9. Overcoming barriers to ITS : lessons from other technologies : final task E report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The Task E report involves an analysis of franchises and license agreements for the provision of public services, which is the fourth in a series in the study. Overcoming Barriers to ITS - Lessons from Other Technologies. This report follows alternat...

  10. A 10-Year Assessment of Information and Communication Technology Tasks Required in Undergraduate Agriculture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Leslie D.; Johnson, Donald M.; Cox, Casandra

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess required information and communication technology (ICT) tasks in selected undergraduate agriculture courses in a land-grant university during a 10-year period. Selected agriculture faculty members in the fall 1999 (n = 63), 2004 (n = 55), and 2009 (n = 64) semesters were surveyed to determine the ICT tasks they required…

  11. Tool Choice for E-Learning: Task-Technology Fit through Media Synchronicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Wang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    One major challenge in online education is how to select appropriate e-learning tools for different learning tasks. Based on the premise of Task-Technology Fit Theory, this study suggests that the effectiveness of student learning in online courses depends on the alignment between two. Furthermore, it conceptualizes the formation of such a fit…

  12. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  13. Report of the task group on fermentation technology.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andrews, RJ

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available An ad hoc meeting held in Bloemfontein on 29th November, 1976, identified a need for greater contact between South African research groups involved in fermentation technology. The meeting also suggested that the stimulation of research and training...

  14. Nonthermal physical technologies to decontaminate and extend the shelf-life of fruits and vegetables: Trends aiming at quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinela, José; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2017-07-03

    Minimally processed fruits and vegetables are one of the major growing sectors in food industry. This growing demand for healthy and convenient foods with fresh-like properties is accompanied by concerns surrounding efficacy of the available sanitizing methods to appropriately deal with food-borne diseases. In fact, chemical sanitizers do not provide an efficient microbial reduction, besides being perceived negatively by the consumers, dangerous for human health, and harmful to the environment, and the conventional thermal treatments may negatively affect physical, nutritional, or bioactive properties of these perishable foods. For these reasons, the industry is investigating alternative nonthermal physical technologies, namely innovative packaging systems, ionizing and ultraviolet radiation, pulsed light, high-power ultrasound, cold plasma, high hydrostatic pressure, and dense phase carbon dioxide, as well as possible combinations between them or with other preservation factors (hurdles). This review discusses the potential of these novel or emerging technologies for decontamination and shelf-life extension of fresh and minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Advantages, limitations, and challenges related to its use in this sector are also highlighted.

  15. Task 11 - systems analysis of environmental management technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy & Environment Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech.

  16. Task 11 - systems analysis of environmental management technologies. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musich, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy ampersand Environment Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech

  17. Decontamination device for pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    Pipelines to be decontaminated are parts of pipelines contaminated with radioactive materials, and they are connected to a fluid transfer means (for example, a bladeless pump) and a ball collector by way of a connector. The fluid of a mixture of chemical decontaminating liquid and spheres is sent into pipelines to be decontaminated. The spheres are, for example, heat resistant porous hard or soft rubber spheres. The fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated are circulated by way of bypassing means. The inner surface of the pipelines is decontaminated by the circulation of the fluid. When the bypass means is closed, the fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated is sent to the ball collector, and the spheres are captured by a hopper. Further, the liquid is sent to the filtrating means to filter the chemical contaminating liquid, and sludges contained in the liquid are captured. (I.N.)

  18. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  19. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  20. Decontamination system study for the Tank Waste Retrieval System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutzel, T.; Manhardt, J.

    1994-05-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's decontamination study in support of the Tank Waste Retrieval System (TWRS) development program. Problems associated with waste stored in existing single shell tanks are discussed as well as the justification for the TWRS program. The TWRS requires a decontamination system. The subsystems of the TWRS are discussed, and a list of assumptions pertinent to the TWRS decontamination system were developed. This information was used to develop the functional and operational requirements of the TWRS decontamination system. The requirements were combined with a comprehensive review of currently available decontamination techniques to produced a set of evaluation criteria. The cleaning technologies and techniques were evaluated, and the CO 2 blasting decontamination technique was chosen as the best technology for the TWRS

  1. Magnetic separation for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Worl, L.A.; deAguero, K.J.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Hill, D.D.; Tolt, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is a physical separation process that is used to extract magnetic particles from mixtures. The technology is used on a large scale in the kaolin clay industry to whiten or brighten kaolin clay and increase its value. Because all uranium and plutonium compounds are slightly magnetic, HGMS can be used to separate these contaminants from non-magnetic soils. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was signed in 1992 between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Company (LESAT) to develop HGMS for soil decontamination. This paper reports progress and describes the HGMS technology

  2. Decontamination of body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harase, Chieko.

    1989-01-01

    There are two important points for an effective application of decontamination procedures. One is the organizing method of responsible decontamination teams. The team should be directed by medical doctor with the knowledge of decontamination of radionuclides. The other point is the place of application of the decontamination. Hospitals and clinics, especially with a department of nuclear medicine, or specialized units such as an emergency medical center are preferable. Before decontamination procedures are initiated, adequate monitoring of the body surface should be undertaken by a competent person in order to demarcate the areas which are contaminated. There are fundamental principles which are applicable to all decontamination procedures. (1) Precautions must always be taken to prevent further spread of contamination during decontamination operations. (2) Mild decontamination methods should be tried before resorting to treatment which can damage the body surface. The specific feature of each contamination varies widely in radionuclides involved, place and area of the contamination, condition of the contaminated skin such as whether the skin is wounded or not, and others. Soap and water are usually good detergents in most cases. If they fail, orange oil cream (SUPERDECONCREAM, available from Tokyo Engineering Co.) specially prepared for decontamination of radionuclides of most fission and corrosion products may be used. Contaminated hair should be washed several times with an efficient shampoo. (author)

  3. Development of decontamination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.; Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.

    1976-01-01

    PVC floorings, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination. Rubber floorings, fabricated by chemical reactions between polymers, vulcanization materials and fillers, show decontamination results depending definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontaminate. Increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness and the homogenity of cleaning pastes based on hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, titanium oxide and polyethylene powders is strongly depended on the content of hydrochloric acid. Reduction of the content of this component to less than 2 w/O remains the effectiveness unchanged only if the titanium oxide-polyethylene powder mixture is substituted by a high density, highly surface active powder material. This type of paste containing no hydrochloric acid shows nearly the same decontamination effectiveness as standard pickling pastes containing about 30% hydrochlorid acid. Properly prepared salt powder turn out to be easily and successfully applied to metal surfaces by a flame spray technique. The thin layer of molten salts is a very effective decontamination to samples contaminated in the primary loop of a PWR. (orig.) [de

  4. Real-time Planning Support: A Task-technology Fit Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Krauth (Elfriede)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPlanning technology by itself is not sufficient to improve planning performance. What are the factors that determine the extent to which the benefits of planning technology are realized? In order to answer this question, this dissertation studies four mechanisms of fit between task and

  5. LMS Use and Instructor Performance: The Role of Task-Technology Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Tanya; Klobas, Jane; Renzi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of learning management systems (LMS) has changed the way in which instructors work. This paper uses Goodhue and Thompson's (1995) technology-to-performance chain (TPC) to explore the roles of task-technology fit (TTF) and level of LMS use in the performance impacts of LMS for instructors. A mixed method approach was used: an…

  6. Development of filtration equipment to reuse PFC decontamination wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Lee, Sung Yeol; Won, Hui Jun; Jung Chong Hun; Oh, Won Zin; Park, Jin Ho

    2005-01-01

    When PFC(Perfluorocarbonate) decontamination technology is applied to removal of radioactive contaminated particulate adhered at surface during the operation of nuclear research facilities, it is necessary to develop a filtration equipment to reuse of PFC solution due to high price, also to minimize the volume of second wastewater. Contaminated characteristics of hot particulate was investigated and a filtration process was presented to remove suspended radioactive particulate from PFC decontamination wastewater generated on PFC decontamination

  7. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  8. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes--a transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S M C; Ferreira Jorge, R M; Castro, P M L

    2009-10-30

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the most common sources of soil pollution. However, the major drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, thus leading to the treatment of the off-gas resulting from volatilisation. As such, a combination of an air-injection bioventing system and a biotrickling filter was applied for the treatment of contaminated soil, the latter aiming at the treatment of the emissions resulting from the bioventing process. With a moisture content of 10%, soil contaminated with toluene at two different concentrations, namely 2 and 14 mg g soil(-1), were treated successfully using an air-injection bioventing system at a constant air flow rate of ca. 0.13 dm(3) min(-1), which led to the removal of ca. 99% toluene, after a period of ca. 5 days of treatment. A biotrickling filter was simultaneously used to treat the outlet gas emissions, which presented average removal efficiencies of ca. 86%. The proposed combination of biotechnologies proved to be an efficient solution for the decontamination process, when an excessive air flow rate was applied, reducing both the soil contamination and the outlet gas emissions, whilst being able to reduce the treatment time required by bioventing only.

  9. Chemical decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent Phase I. Final report, September 1993--June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment

  10. Development of surface decontamination technology for radioactive waste using plasma. Dust behaviors in the treatment of oxide films using a low-pressure arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Kazuo; Furukawa, Shizue; Amakawa, Tadashi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Kanbe, Hiromu

    2002-01-01

    We are developing the surface treatment technique using low-pressure arc as a new decontamination technology for radioactive wastes from nuclear facilities. For the practical use, effective dust collection methods are necessary, because dust is generated from oxide films on the surface during the treatment. The method using gas stream and filters may be one of them, but the behavior of the dust has not been examined yet. We studied the basic behavior of the dust and the possibilities of dust control by gas stream as follows. 1. Most of the dust attached to the anode in the case of no gas blow. 2. Dust attachment to the anode was reduced to about half using small cross section type anode. It seems to be possible to reduce the dust attachment by proper choice of electrode shape. 3. The dust attachment was reduced to 10 to 40 percent by the gas blow to the side of arc. The dust control by gas stream might be possible. (author)

  11. Decontamination of floor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirous, F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are presented put on the surfaces of floors of radiochemical workplaces. The mechanism is described of retaining the contaminant in the surface of the flooring, ways of reducing the hazards of floor surface contamination, decontamination techniques and used decontamination agents. (J.P.)

  12. COMPILATION OF AVAILABLE DATA ON BUILDING DECONTAMINATION ALTERNATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents an analysis of selected technologies that have been tested for their potential effectiveness in decontaminating a building that has been attacked using biological or chemical warfare agents, or using toxic industrial compounds. The technologies selected to be ...

  13. MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

    1998-05-01

    One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from the nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from US waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect the environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions. The handling of contaminated sediments in the Port of New York/New Jersey (Port) exemplifies this problem. This paper describes a multicultural team that has formed as the result of a Congressional mandate for the development of procedures suitable for the decontamination of sediments in the Port under the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 1992 (Section 405C) and 1996 (Section 226).

  14. Assessing user acceptance towards automated and conventional sink use for hand decontamination using the technology acceptance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Carolyn H; Mackrill, Jamie B; Cain, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) prevents harmful contaminants spreading in settings including domestic, health care and food handling. Strategies to improve HH range from behavioural techniques through to automated sinks that ensure hand surface cleaning. This study aimed to assess user experience and acceptance towards a new automated sink, compared to a normal sink. An adapted version of the technology acceptance model (TAM) assessed each mode of handwashing. A within-subjects design enabled N = 46 participants to evaluate both sinks. Perceived Ease of Use and Satisfaction of Use were significantly lower for the automated sink, compared to the conventional sink (p technology. We provide recommendations for future HH technology development to contribute a positive user experience, relevant to technology developers, ergonomists and those involved in HH across all sectors. Practitioner Summary: The need to facilitate timely, effective hand hygiene to prevent illness has led to a rise in automated handwashing systems across different contexts. User acceptance is a key factor in system uptake. This paper applies the technology acceptance model as a means to explore and optimise the design of such systems.

  15. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  16. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  17. Influence of Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  18. Concept definition for space station technology development experiments. Experiment definition, task 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The second task of a study with the overall objective of providing a conceptual definition of the Technology Development Mission Experiments proposed by LaRC on space station is discussed. During this task, the information (goals, objectives, and experiment functional description) assembled on a previous task was translated into the actual experiment definition. Although still of a preliminary nature, aspects such as: environment, sensors, data acquisition, communications, handling, control telemetry requirements, crew activities, etc., were addressed. Sketches, diagrams, block diagrams, and timeline analyses of crew activities are included where appropriate.

  19. Equipment decontamination: A brief survey of the DOE complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-03-01

    Deactivation at DOE facilities has left a tremendous amount of contaminated equipment behind. In-situ methods are needed to decontaminate the interiors of the equipment sufficiently to allow either free release or land disposal. A brief survey was completed of the DOE complex on their needs for equipment decontamination with in-situ technology to determine (1) the types of contamination problems within the DOE complex, (2) decontamination processes that are being used or are being developed within the DOE, and (3) the methods that are available to dispose of spent decontamination solutions. In addition, potential sites for testing decontamination methods were located. Based on the information obtained from these surveys, the Rocky Flats Plant and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory appear to be best suited to complete the initial testing of the decontamination processes

  20. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripp, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO{sub 2} pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used.

  1. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO 2 pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used

  2. Decontamination Efficacy Testing of COTS SteriFx Prodcuts for Mass Personnel and Casualty Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    amounts of water for at least 15 min. Ingestion : If alert give several glasses of water or milk . Do not induce vomiting. Contact poison control center...strong oxidants that can harm skin and eyes. A safe, easily disseminated and effective alternative biological decontamination agent is needed to address...outlined in our preliminary work, shows that the technology has a very low risk of doing harm to personnel in decontamination scenarios, or that

  3. Retrieval process development and enhancements project Fiscal year 1995: Simulant development technology task progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golcar, G.R.; Bontha, J.R.; Darab, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD ampersand E) project is to develop an understanding of retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, gather data on these technologies, and relate the data to specific tank problems such that end-users have the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. The development of waste simulants is an integral part of this effort. The work of the RPD ampersand E simulant-development task is described in this document. The key FY95 accomplishments of the RPD ampersand E simulant-development task are summarized below

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory tasks supporting the Office of Technology Development national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a concise summary of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) tasks being conducted for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD). The summaries are useful to principal investigators who want to link their work to others doing similar work, to staff in DOE operating programs who are looking for better solutions to current problems, and to private industry which may be interested in teaming with PNL to commercialize the technology. The tasks are organized within Hanford's overall Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), which is a hierarchical organization of the Hanford mission into subordinate missions. The technology development tasks are all in WBS 3.2. The first subordinate steps under WBS 3.2 are general categories of technology development, such as Soils and Groundwater Cleanup. The next level is the Integrated Program (IP) and Integrated Demonstration (ID) level. An IP is a centrally managed series of projects which explore and develop a particular technology, such as characterization, for application to a wide spectrum of problems. An ID brings multiple technology systems to bear on an actual problem; for example, a carbon tetrachloride plume migrating through the soil is being remediated with biological agents, heating the soil, and destruction of the contamination in vapor removed from the soil. IDs and IPs are identified by an alphanumeric code: GSO2 is the second ID under Groundwater and Soils Cleanup. The final step in the breakout is the Technical Task Plan (TTP). These are individual tasks which support the ID/IP. They are identified by a six-digit number in the format 3211-01. The WBS structure for Technology Development down to the ID/IP level is shown

  5. A study on implementation plan of decontamination and decommissioning R and D and evaluation of KAERI soil decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.

    2001-08-01

    A. Decontamination Technology Development of Uranium Conversion Facility. Understanding of uranium conversion facility and related decontamination technologies, and analysis of current status of decontamination technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion of the erformance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility B. Treatment Technology Development of Uranium Sludge Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status. Suggestion of treatment methodology of uranium slurry and cooperative R and D among industries, universities and research institute. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility C. Decommissioning Technology Development Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status and the overview of decommissioning technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of TRIGA decommissioning D. Evaluation of KAERI Soil Decontamination Technology. Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology. Performance of soil decontamination test using solvent flushing test equipment for evaluation of residual radioactivity after decontami- nation and modeling of the results

  6. A study on implementation plan of decontamination and decommissioning R and D and evaluation of KAERI soil decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N

    2001-08-01

    A. Decontamination Technology Development of Uranium Conversion Facility. Understanding of uranium conversion facility and related decontamination technologies, and analysis of current status of decontamination technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion of the erformance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility B. Treatment Technology Development of Uranium Sludge Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status. Suggestion of treatment methodology of uranium slurry and cooperative R and D among industries, universities and research institute. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility C. Decommissioning Technology Development Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status and the overview of decommissioning technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of TRIGA decommissioning D. Evaluation of KAERI Soil Decontamination Technology. Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology. Performance of soil decontamination test using solvent flushing test equipment for evaluation of residual radioactivity after decontami- nation and modeling of the results.

  7. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also

  8. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D and D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been

  9. Dry decontamination for tritiated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhengkun; Wu Tao; Dan Guiping; Xie Yun

    2009-01-01

    To aim at decontamination of tritiated wastes, we have developed and fabricated a dry tritium decontamination system, which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination of various alloy by UV, ozone and heating. The result indicates that the elevation of temperature can obviously improve decontamination effect. With 3 h irradiation by 365 nm UV at 220 degree C, it has a decontamination rate of 99% to stainless steel surface. Ozone can more obviously improve decontamination effect when metal was heated. Ozone has a decontamination effect beyond 95% to stainless steel, aluminum and brass at 220 degree C. Tritium surface concentration of metal has a little increase after decontamination. (authors)

  10. Small Engine Technology (SET) Task 24 Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Lysbeth

    2003-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Engines & Systems, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International Inc., documenting work performed during the period June 1999 through December 1999 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Small Engine Technology (SET) Program, Contract No. NAS3-27483, Task Order 24, Business and Regional Aircraft System Studies. The work performed under SET Task 24 consisted of evaluating the noise reduction benefits compared to the baseline noise levels of representative 1992 technology aircraft, obtained by applying different combinations of noise reduction technologies to five business and regional aircraft configurations. This report focuses on the selection of the aircraft configurations and noise reduction technologies, the prediction of noise levels for those aircraft, and the comparison of the noise levels with those of the baseline aircraft.

  11. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  12. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  13. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  14. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory decontamination and decommissioning robotics development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, M.D.

    1993-04-01

    As part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) Decontamination ampersand Decommissioning (D ampersand D) robotics program, a task was designed to integrate the plasma arc cutting technology being developed under the Waste Facility Operations (WFO) robotics program into D ampersand D cutting applications. The plasma arc cutting technology is based upon the use of a high energy plasma torch to cut metallic objects. Traditionally, D ampersand D workers removing equipment and processes from a facility have used plasma arc cutting to accomplish this task. The worker is required to don a protective suit to shield from the high electromagnetic energy released from the cutting operation. Additionally, the worker is required to don protective clothing to shield against the radioactive materials and contamination. This protective clothing can become restrictive and cumbersome to work in. Because some of the work areas contain high levels of radiation, the worker is not allowed to dwell in the environment for sustained periods of time. To help alleviate some of the burdens required to accomplish this task, reduce or eliminate the safety hazardous to the worker, and reduce the overall cost of remediation, a program was established though the Office of Technology Development (OTD) to design and develop a robotic system capable of performing cutting operations using a plasma arc torch. Several D ampersand D tasks were identified having potential for use of the plasma arc cutting technology. The tasks listed below were chosen to represent common D ampersand D type activities where the plasma arc cutting technology can be applied

  15. Tasks and challenges in prototype development with novel technology - an empirical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Poul Martin; Guðlaugsson, Tómas Vignir; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a thematic analysis of 138 monthly reports from a joint industrial and academic project where multiple prototypes were developed based on the same technology. The analysis was based on tasks and challenges described in the reports by project managers over a period of three years...

  16. R&D manpower and technological performance : The impact of demographic and task-related diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faems, D.L.M.; Subramaniam, A.

    2013-01-01

    We assess the impact of R&D manpower diversity on firms' technological performance. Relying on insights from two theoretical perspectives on team diversity (i.e. social categorization perspective and information decision-making perspective), we hypothesize that both demographic and task-related

  17. A simple and feasible method of effectiveness evaluation on radioactive decontamination action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lin; Geng Xiaobing; Sun Jian; Wang Jihong; Guo Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decontamination is a vital task in nuclear emergency response. The assessment of decontamination effectiveness is of great importance to decision-making. An index system for effectiveness evaluation of radioactive decontamination action in nuclear emergency response is produced. A method of decontamination effectiveness evaluation based on analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation is presented. Index weights are determined through analytic hierarchy process. And scores of objects in each hierarchy are judged by fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. Then comprehensive effectiveness of the top object can be obtained, which can offer a basis for decision-making of decontamination action. (authors)

  18. Chelant screening and refinement tests - Phase I, Task 2. Topical progress report, December 1993--June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. This report describes efforts towards evaluating solvents for the decontamination of metals and removal of uranium

  19. Pilot plant study - Phase I, Task 5. Topical report, September 1994--June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. This report describes the solvents and decontamination of process equipment (uranium removal)

  20. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  1. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  2. Recommendations for skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Further to the reecommendations for determining the surface contamination of the skin and estimating the radiation exposure of the skin after contamination (SAAS-Mitt--89-16), measures for skin decontamination are recommended. They are necessary if (1) after simple decontamination by means of water, soap and brush without damaging the skin the surface contamination limits are exceeded and the radiation exposure to be expected for the undamaged healthy skin is estimated as to high, and if (2) a wound is contaminated. To remove skin contaminations, in general universally applicable, non-aggressive decontamination means and methods are sufficient. In special cases, nuclide-specific decontamination is required taking into account the properties of the radioactive substance

  3. Some remarks about decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, A.

    1990-01-01

    Decontamination in itself is not the elimination of a problem, but corresponds to move that problem from one place to another. It is beneficial only if the contamination is less of a nuisance when moved to the ''other place''. Therefore any prospective decontamination process is to be considered essentially in terms of cost-benefit, and in particular in terms of reducing the burden on the waste management systems. The paper is not intended to deal with and to review critically the technical aspects of the various decontamination processes which are currently available. Its aim is to call the attention of those who may be faced with the problem of large-scale decontamination, so that this operation is carried out after all practical aspects have been examined. (author)

  4. Chemical decontamination: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Wood, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The source of radioactive contamination in various types of power reactors is discussed. The methods of chemical decontamination vary with the manner in which the radioactive contaminants are deposited on the surface. Two types of dilute decontamination systems are available. One system uses organic acids and chelating agents, which are mildly reducing in nature. In this process, the oxide contaminants are removed by simple acidic dissolution and reductive dissolution. The second type of decontamination process is based on low oxidation state metal ions, which are more strongly reducing and do not require a corrosion inhibitor. All processes commercially available for decontamination of power reactors are not detailed here, but a few key issues to be considered in the selection of a process are highlighted. 2 figures, 2 tables

  5. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  6. Special zone territory decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Golubev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Special zone is the Chernobyl' NPP operating site (OS). OS decontamination is described including reactor ruins from the accident moment. The process was begun from reactor bombardment with absorbing and filtering materials (sand, clay, lead, boron compounds). Then were produced soil shovelling, territory filling by dry concrete and laying concrete layer with thickness up to 300 mm. NPP room and equipment decontamination is described. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Technology-enhanced learning on campus: insights from EUNIS e-Learning Task Force

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrell, Gill; Alves, Paulo; Bubas, Goran; Engert, Steffi; Epelboin, Yves; Madey, Jan; Palma, José; Piteira, Martinha; Restivo, T.M.; Ribeiro, Ligia; Sidelmann Rossen, Dorte; Soares, Filomena; Uhomoibhi, James

    2011-01-01

    In 2010 the EUNIS e-Learning Task Force (ELTF) members collaborated on a review of tools and technologies in use across our member institutions. One of the key features of that paper was the use of technology to give off-campus learners, such as distance learners, those undertaking field studies and learners in the workplace a richly supported learning experience. Building on the success of that collaboration, the ELTF members have turned their attention this year to the use of technology on ...

  8. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  9. An investigation on task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems for nursing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ju-Ling; Chen, Rai-Fu

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates factors affecting the fit between nursing tasks and mobile nursing information systems and the relationships between the task-technology fit of mobile nursing information systems and nurse performance from the perspective of task-technology fit. Survey research recruited nursing staffs as subjects from selected case hospital. A total of 310 questionnaires were sent out, and 219 copies were obtained, indicating a valid response rate of 70.6%. Collected data were analyzed using the structural equation modeling technique. Our study found that dependence tasks have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.234, Pinformation identification (γ=0.478, Pinformation acquisition (γ=0.213, Pintroduction of mobile nursing information systems in assisting nursing practices can help facilitate both independent and dependent nursing tasks. Our study discovered that the supporting functions of mobile nursing information systems have positive effects on information integration and interpretation (γ=0.365, Pinformation acquisition (γ=0.253, Pinformation systems have positive effects on information acquisition (γ=0.318, Pinformation integration and interpretation (γ=0.143, Pinformation identification (β=.055, Pinformation acquisition (β=.176, Pinformation integration and interpretation (β=.706, Pinformation systems have positive effects on nursing performance, indicating 83.2% of totally explained variance. As shown, the use of mobile nursing information systems could provide nursing staffs with real-time and accurate information to increase efficiency and effectiveness in patient-care duties, further improving nursing performance.

  10. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  11. Assessing consumer benefits of selected gas appliance technology center tasks. Topical report, April-December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.R.; Bournakis, A.D.; Worek, W.M.; Kalensky, D.C.; Dombrowski, L.P.

    1992-12-01

    The Gas Appliance Technology Center (GATC) was created in 1983 to assist the gas industry in bringing about a new generation of reasonably priced, advanced gas appliances. The objective of the report is to evaluate consumer benefits of sixteen selected GATC tasks for the time period between 1983 and 1990. Tasks were selected for review based upon their degree of industry impact and how well they represented activities in the four targeted research areas of Space Conditioning, Commercial Appliances, Residential Appliances, and Codes and Standards

  12. The potential impact of 3D telepresence technology on task performance in emergency trauma care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Cairns, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    a simulated emergency situation 60 paramedics diagnosed and treated a trauma victim while working alone or in collaboration with a physician via 2D video or a 3D proxy. Analysis of paramedics' task performance shows that the fewest harmful procedures occurred in the 3D proxy condition. Paramedics in the 3D...... proxy condition also reported higher levels of self-efficacy. These results indicate 3D telepresence technology has potential to improve paramedics' performance of complex emergency medical tasks and improve emergency trauma health care when designed appropriately....

  13. Sensor Technology Integration for Efficient and Cost-Effective D and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varona, J. M.; Lagos, L. E.

    2002-01-01

    The deactivation and decommissioning of radiologically contaminated facilities require the use of a multitude of technologies to perform characterization, decontamination, dismantlement, and waste management. Current baseline technologies do not provide adequate tools to perform this work in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Examples of such tasks that can be modified to enhance the D and D work include: floor and wall decontamination, pipe decontamination, and surveillance and monitoring. FIU-HCET's Technology Development, Integration and Deployment (TDID) group aims to enhance the D and D process by integrating sensor technology to existing decontamination and remote surveillance tools. These integrated systems have been demonstrated throughout the DOE Complex and commercial nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Finding new ways of integrating technologies utilized in the decommissioning and surveillance and monitoring process has been a goal of this group during the past several years. Current and previous integration projects include: Mobile Integrated Piping Decontamination and Characterization System, On-Line Decontamination and Characterization System, In-Situ Pipe Decontamination and Unplugging System, Remote Hazardous Environment Surveyor (RHES), and the Online Handheld grit blasting decontamination system As a result of integrating sensors with D and D tools, the resulting technologies have removed the downtime currently found in baseline processes by allowing operators and project managers to have real-time contamination data during the specified D and D process. This added component allows project managers to verify that full decontamination and surveillance has been conducted. Through successful demonstration and deployments of the TDID-developed technologies, FIU-HCET has provided tools that can impact the cost, schedule and health and safety of D and D operations in a positive way, leading to shorter downtimes and significant cost

  14. Guide for decontamination in P.W.R. power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herisson, J.; Glorennec, C.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power plant components or equipment often need to be more ore less decontaminated before maintenance. In order to coordinate the activities of the various maintenance specialists belonging to the corporate or Site Organizations, the Management of EDF/Nuclear and Fossil Division has created a 'Decontamination Task Force'. The first objective of this Task Force was to prepare this 'Decontamination Guide for Nuclear Power Plants'. This document is the result of a close collaboration, within a specific working group, between representatives of Nuclear Fossil Division (from Nuclear Power Plants and Corporate Departments) and EDF Project and Construction Group. It will provide assistance to Nuclear Plants Operators in the very specific field of decontamination. (author)

  15. Radiation decontamination of meat lyophylized products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for a powder soups and sauces composed with lyophylizated meat. Technology of lyophylization is not always accompanied by thermal treatment of raw materials. That is the reason the meat lyophylization process does not ensure as good microbiological quality as is required. Degree of microbiological decontamination and organoleptic properties of lyophilized meat were investigated after radiation treatment

  16. Radiation decontamination of meat lyophilized products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owczarczyk, H.B.; Migdal, W.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for powder soups and sauces compose with lyophilized products. Technology of lyophilization is not always accompanied by thermal treatment of raw materials. That is the reason the products lyophilization process does not ensure as good microbiological quality as is required. Degree of microbiological decontamination and organoleptic properties of lyophilized meat were investigated after radiation treatment. (author)

  17. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  18. Artificial intelligence and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Artificial Intelligence Task Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The Artificial Intelligence Task Team was organized to review the status of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology, identify guidelines for AI work, and to identify work required to allow the nuclear industry to realize maximum benefit from this technology. The state of the nuclear industry was analyzed to determine where the application of AI technology could be of greatest benefit. Guidelines and criteria were established to focus on those particular problem areas where AI could provide the highest possible payoff to the industry. Information was collected from government, academic, and private organizations. Very little AI work is now being done to specifically support the nuclear industry. The AI Task Team determined that the establishment of a Strategic Automation Initiative (SAI) and the expansion of the DOE Technology Transfer program would ensure that AI technology could be used to develop software for the nuclear industry that would have substantial financial payoff to the industry. The SAI includes both long and short term phases. The short-term phase includes projects which would demonstrate that AI can be applied to the nuclear industry safely, and with substantial financial benefit. The long term phase includes projects which would develop AI technologies with specific applicability to the nuclear industry that would not be developed by people working in any other industry

  19. Cleanout and decontamination of radiochemical hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, J.E.; Holton, L.K. Jr.; Katayama, Y.B.; Gose, J.E.; Haun, F.E.; Dierks, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing and employing advanced remote and contact technologies in cleaning out and decontaminating six radiochemical hot cells at Hanford under the Department of Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The program is using a series of remote and contact decontamination techniques to reduce costs and to significantly lower radiation doses to workers. Refurbishment of the cover blocks above the air lock trench reduced radiation exposure in the air lock and cleanout and decontamination of an analytical cell achieved a reduction in radioactive contamination. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-approved Type B burial boxes are also being used to reduce waste disposal costs and radiation doses. PNL is currently decommissioning its pilot-scale radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter. Special tools have been developed and are being used to accomplish the world's first such effort. 4 refs., 5 figs

  20. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

    1993-10-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  1. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R.

    1993-10-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D ampersand D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D ampersand D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D ampersand D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility

  2. The Creative Application of Science, Technology and Work Force Innovations to the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charboneau, S.; Klos, B.; Heineman, R.; Skeels, B.; Hopkins, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) consists of a number of process and support buildings for handling plutonium. Building construction began in the late 1940's to meet national priorities and became operational in 1950 producing refined plutonium salts and metal for the United States nuclear weapons program The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material for fabrication into a nuclear device for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race. PFP has now completed its mission and is fully engaged in deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). At this time the PFP buildings are planned to be reduced to ground level (slab-on-grade) and the site remediated to satisfy national, Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington state requirements. The D and D of a highly contaminated plutonium processing facility presents a plethora of challenges. PFP personnel approached the D and D mission with a can-do attitude. They went into D and D knowing they were facing a lot of challenges and unknowns. There were concerns about the configuration control associated with drawings of these old process facilities. There were unknowns regarding the location of electrical lines and the condition and contents of process piping containing chemical residues such as strong acids and caustics. The gloveboxes were highly contaminated with plutonium and chemical residues. Most of the glovebox windows were opaque with splashed process chemicals that coated the windows or etched them, reducing visibility to near zero. Visibility into the glovebox was a serious worker concern. Additionally, all the gloves in the gloveboxes were degraded and unusable. Replacing gloves in gloveboxes was necessary to even begin glovebox clean-out. The sheer volume of breathing air needed was also an issue. These and other challenges and PFP

  3. RA Reactor operation and maintenance (I-IX), part VIII, Task 3.08/05, Decontamination of the reactor; Pogon i odrzavanje reaktora (I-IX), VIII Deo, Zadatak 3.08/05 Dekontaminacija reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecevic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Reaktor RA, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    Permanent increase of radiation in the heavy water system was noticed during first three year of the RA reactor operation, even when the reactor was shutdown. It was found that there was no failure of the fuel element cladding. Radioactive cobalt was found in the heavy water which was rather strange. During repair of the heavy water system, it has been found that stellite was used for coating the heavy water pumps. Since stellite is a cobalt alloy, this could have been the source of radioactive cobalt in the heavy water. The stellite coating was damaged due to friction and particle of cobalt appeared in the coolant, they were activated since they were in the core. decontamination of the heavy water and the heavy water coolant loop was a must . Beside the detailed report on the contamination and decontamination of the heavy water system this volume includes 14 annexes describing the investigation of the event and the whole procedure of decontamination.

  4. Innovative nuclear thermal propulsion technology evaluation: Results of the NASA/DOE Task Team study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, S.; Borowski, S.; Helms, I.; Diaz, N.; Anghaie, S.; Latham, T.

    1991-01-01

    In response to findings from two NASA/DOE nuclear propulsion workshops held in the summer of 1990, six task teams were formed to continue evaluation of various nuclear propulsion concepts. The Task Team on Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) created the Innovative Concepts Subpanel to evaluate thermal propulsion concepts which did not utilize solid fuel. The Subpanel endeavored to evaluate each of the concepts on a ''level technological playing field,'' and to identify critical technologies, issues, and early proof-of-concept experiments. The concepts included the liquid core fission, the gas core fission, the fission foil reactors, explosively driven systems, fusion, and antimatter. The results of the studies by the panel will be provided. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning

  6. The application of metal cutting technologies in tasks performed in radioactive environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogle, R.F.; Younkins, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The design and use of equipment to perform work in radioactive environments is uniquely challenging. Some tasks require that the equipment be operated by a person wearing a plastic suit or full face respirator and donning several pairs of rubber gloves. Other applications may require that the equipment be remotely controlled. Other important, design considerations include material compatibility, mixed waste issues, tolerance to ionizing radiation, size constraints and weight capacities. As always, there is the ''We need it ASAP'' design criteria. This paper describes four applications where different types of metal cutting technologies were used to successfully perform tasks in radioactive environments. The technologies include a plasma cutting torch, a grinder with an abrasive disk, a hydraulic shear, and a high pressure abrasive water jet cutter

  7. Robotics and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Robotics Task Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    A task team was formed at the request of the Department of Energy to evaluate and assess technology development needed for advanced robotics in the nuclear industry. The mission of these technologies is to provide the nuclear industry with the support for the application of advanced robotics to reduce nuclear power generating costs and enhance the safety of the personnel in the industry. The investigation included robotic and teleoperated systems. A robotic system is defined as a reprogrammable, multifunctional manipulator designed to move materials, parts, tools, or specialized devices through variable programmed motions for the performance of a variety of tasks. A teleoperated system includes an operator who remotely controls the system by direct viewing or through a vision system

  8. Report of the Technology Service - Annex B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.; Stosic, T.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the organisational structure of the technology service and its activities and tasks: routine control of reactor parameters and cooperation with the reactor users; development of methodology of reactor control and its application; control of heavy water and gas system operation; dosimetry measurements of contamination in the reactor building; technical aspects of radiation protection; decontamination and accident analysis [sr

  9. Gentilly 1: decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.; Denault, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Gentilly 1 station, a 250-MW(e) light-water-cooled and heavy-water-moderated nuclear reactor, is being decommissioned to a static state (variant of stage 1) condition by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). The scope of the decontamination program at the Gentilly 1 site includes the fuel pool and associated systems, the decontamination center, the laundry, the feedwater pumps and piping systems, the service building ventilation and drainage systems, and miscellaneous floor and wall areas. After an extensive literature review for acceptable decontamination methods, it was decided that the decontamination equipment used at Gentilly 1 during the program would include a hydrolaser, a scarifier, chipping hammers, a steam cleaner, an ultrasonic bath, and cutting tools. In addition, various foams, acids, detergents, surfactants, and abrasives are used alone and in tandem with the above equipment. This paper highlights the result of these decontaminations, their effectiveness, and the recommendation for future application. The methodology in performing these operations are also presented

  10. A Case-Based Exploration of Task/Technology Fit in a Knowledge Management Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    have a difficult time articulating to others. Researchers who subscribe to the constructionist perspective view knowledge as an inherently social ...Acceptance Model With Task-Technology Fit Constructs. Information & Management, 36, 9-21. Dooley, D. (2001). Social Research Methods (4th ed.). Upper...L. (2006). Social Research Methods : Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches (6 ed.). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc. Nonaka, I. (1994). A Dynamic

  11. A review of chemical decontamination systems for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    With the downsizing of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, many of its buildings and facilities will be decommissioned and dismantled. As part of this decommissioning, some form of decontamination will be required. To develop an appropriate technology for in situ chemical decontamination of equipment interiors in the decommissioning of DOE nuclear facilities, knowledge of the existing chemical decontamination methods is needed. This paper attempts to give an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. This survey revealed that aqueous systems are the most widely used for the decontamination and cleaning of metal surfaces. We have subdivided the aqueous systems by types of chemical solvent: acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and proprietary. Two other systems, electropolishing and foams and gels, are also described in this paper

  12. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet U.S. DOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services

  13. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a US Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet USDOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services. 2 refs., 1 fig

  14. Portable electronic assistive technology to improve vocational task completion in young adults with an intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, James C; Collet-Klingenberg, Lana

    2017-01-01

    This article summarizes a review of empirical literature from 2000 to 2015 that involved the use of specific portable technology to support persons with an intellectual disability in completing work-related tasks. Nineteen studies were identified for review, with an emphasis on the identification of (a) the characteristics of participants and settings, (b) the types of portable technology and prompting formats used, (c) the research designs utilized, (d) the independent and dependent variables, (e) the measures of reliability and validity, and (f) the overall effectiveness of the interventions. The authors provide an interpretation of the findings as well as the implications of the results and recommended areas for future research.

  15. Task 10 -- Technology development integration. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, T.A.; Daly, D.J.; Jones, M.L.

    1997-12-31

    Task 10 activities by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) have focused on the identification and integration of new cleanup technologies for use in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Program to address environmental issues within the nuclear defense complex. Under Subtask 10A, activities focused on a review of technology needs compiled by the Site Technology Coordination Groups as part of an ongoing assessment of the relevance of the EM Cooperative Agreement Program activities to EM site needs. Work under this subtask was completed August 31. Work under Task 10B had as its goal assisting in the definition and development of specific models to demonstrate several approaches to be used by DOE to encourage the commercialization of environmental technologies. This activity included identification and analysis of economic and regulatory factors affecting feasibility of commercial development of two specific projects and two general models to serve as a mechanism for the transfer of federally supported or developed environmental technologies to the private sector or for rapid utilization in the federal government`s efforts to clean up the weapons complex.

  16. Reservoir Maintenance and Development Task Report for the DOE Geothermal Technologies Office GeoVision Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Thomas Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Finger, John T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carrigan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foris, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kennedy, Mack B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Corbet, Thomas F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doughty, Christine A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pye, Steven [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnenthal, Eric L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the key findings from the Reservoir Maintenance and Development (RM&D) Task of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) Geothermal Vision Study (GeoVision Study). The GeoVision Study had the objective of conducting analyses of future geothermal growth based on sets of current and future geothermal technology developments. The RM&D Task is one of seven tasks within the GeoVision Study with the others being, Exploration and Confirmation, Potential to Penetration, Institutional Market Barriers, Environmental and Social Impacts, Thermal Applications, and Hybrid Systems. The full set of findings and the details of the GeoVision Study can be found in the final GeoVision Study report on the DOE-GTO website. As applied here, RM&D refers to the activities associated with developing, exploiting, and maintaining a known geothermal resource. It assumes that the site has already been vetted and that the resource has been evaluated to be of sufficient quality to move towards full-scale development. It also assumes that the resource is to be developed for power generation, as opposed to low-temperature or direct use applications. This document presents the key factors influencing RM&D from both a technological and operational standpoint and provides a baseline of its current state. It also looks forward to describe areas of research and development that must be pursued if the development geothermal energy is to reach its full potential.

  17. TMI-2 containment decontamination plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, F.

    1980-01-01

    Because of other priorities such as reentry, purging, and recovery, containment decontamination is only in the preliminary planning stages. This paper summarizes the study with emphasis on the remote decontamination techniques

  18. Radioactive decontamination of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    After a recall of some definitions relating to decontamination techniques and of the regulation into effect, the principles to be respected to arrange rationally work zones are quoted while insisting more particularly on the types of coatings which facilitate maintenance operations and the dismantling of these installations. Then, the processes and equipments to use in decontamination units for routine or particular operations are described; the list of recommended chemical products to decontaminate the equipment is given. The influence of these treatments on the state and the duration of life of equipments is studied, and some perfectible methods are quoted. In the appendix, are given: the limits of surface contamination accepted in the centers; a standard project which defines the criteria of admissible residual contamination in wastes considered as cold wastes; some remarks on the interest that certain special ventilation and air curtain devices for the protection of operators working on apparatus generating contaminated dusts [fr

  19. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiation decontamination of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, M.; Sattar, A.; Ahmad, W.A.; Khan, I.

    1990-06-01

    In this report radiation decontamination was initiated to investigate the red pepper, which is widely consumed in all parts of Pakistan. The samples were collected from local market and prepared for gamma radiation at dose level of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kGy. The measurement of total fungal count was carried out immediately after irradiation and the at two months storage interval. It was reported that radiation dose 10.0 kGy is suitable for complete decontamination of red pepper. (A.B.)

  1. Advanced robotics for decontamination and dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.R.; Haley, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) robotics technology application area of the US Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program is explained and described. D ampersand D robotic systems show real promise for the reduction of human exposure to hazards, for improvement of productivity, and for the reduction of secondary waste generation. Current research and development pertaining to automated floor characterization, robotic equipment removal, and special inspection is summarized. Future research directions for these and emerging activities is given

  2. Situations of decontamination promotion activities. Efforts by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Fukushima Revitalization Headquarters, Decontamination Promotion Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Takahiko; Ito, Kei; Takizawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    As for the decontamination of the soil contaminated with radioactive materials, decontamination is on the way in compliance with the 'Act on Special Measures Concerning the Handling of Environmental Pollution by Radioactive Materials by the NPS Accident Associated with the Tohoku District - Off the Pacific Ocean' (hereinafter, the Act on Special Measures). Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), as the party concerned to the accident, is cooperating with decontamination activities conducted by countries and municipalities under the Act on Special Measures. Total number of people cooperated by the Decontamination Promotion Office amounts to about 120,000 people. The cooperation to the decontamination by countries and municipalities covers the following fields: provision of knowledge of radiation, training of site management and supervisors, and proposal such as the decontamination method suitable for the site. As cooperation to various monitoring, there is a traveling monitoring that performs radiation measurement from the vehicles. As cooperation in the farming and industrial resumption toward the reconstruction, the group has implemented support for the distribution promotion of the holdup that was stuck in distribution due to contamination with radioactive substances. As decontamination related technology, the following are performed: (1) preparation of radiation understanding promotion tool, (2) development of precise individual dose measurement technology, and (3) development and utilization of decontamination effect analysis program. In the future, this group will perform the follow-up for decontamination, and measures toward the lifting of evacuation order. It will install the basis to perform various technical analyses on decontamination, and will further intensify technical cooperation. (A.O.)

  3. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  4. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are 137 Cs, 238 U (and its daughters), 60 Co, 90 Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 x 10 8 ft 2 or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling

  5. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  6. Decontamination demonstration facility (D.D.F) modularization/mobility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility

  7. Laser Decontamination of Surfaces Contaminated with Cs+ Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baigalmaaa, B.; Won, H. J.; Moon, J. K.; Jung, C. H.; Lee, K. W.; Hyun, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Laser decontamination technology has been proven to be an efficient method for a surface modification of metals and concretes contaminated with radioactive isotopes. Furthermore, the generation of a secondary waste is negligible. The radioactivity of hot cells in the DFDF (Dupic Fuel Development Facility) is presumed to be very high and the predominant radionuclide is Cs-137. A series of laser decontamination studies by a fabricated Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system were performed on stainless steel specimens artificially contaminated with Cs+ ion. Decontamination characteristics of the stainless steel were analyzed by SEM and EPMA

  8. System decontamination as a tool to control radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Bertholdt, H.O. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Since chemical decontamination of the Reactor Coolant Systems (RCS) and subsystems has the highest potential to reduce radiation fields in a short term this technology has gained an increasing importance. The available decontamination process at Siemens, i.e., the CORD processes, will be described. It is characterized by using permanganic acid for preoxidation and diluted organic acid for the decontamination step. It is a regenerative process resulting in very low waste volumes. This technology has been used frequently in Europe and Japan in both RCS and subsystems. An overview will be given i.e. on the 1993 applications. This overview will include plant, scope, date of performance, system volume specal features of the process removed activities, decon factor time, waste volumes, and personnel dose during decontamination. This overview will be followed by an outlook on future developments in this area.

  9. Prioritization of tasks in the draft LWR safety technology program plan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, E.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Parkinson, W.J.; Ritzman, R.L.; vonHerrmann, J.L.; Wood, P.J.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe both the approach taken and the results produced in the SAI effort to prioritize the tasks in the Sandia draft LWR Safety Technology Program Plan. This work used the description of important safety issues developed in the Reactor Safety Study (2) to quantify the effect of safety improvements resulting from a research and development program on the risk from nuclear power plants. Costs of implementation of these safety improvements were also estimated to allow a presentation of the final results in a value (i.e., risk reduction) vs. impact (i.e., implementation costs) matrix

  10. Decontamination for radiators by friction effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Radiators are equipped with cars, vending machines and outdoor units of air conditioners. Aluminum metal surfaces in their heat exchange part have been contaminated by radioactive material taking in dust after the nuclear accident. The dust adhering to the metal surface could be removed by flushing with water immediately after scattering radioactive material. But radioactive material such as cesium cannot be removed by water washing, because of growth of the oxide film and transfer of the nuclides in the metal surface due to aging. On the other hand, we have verified the effect of decontamination of radiators by friction cleaning using a cross flow shredder (CFS) and solvent washing of crushed metallic chips, as a different approach to high-pressure washing decontamination, and confirmed a certain decontamination effect. This paper describes the results of program, “Processing Technology of Radioactive Material Removal by Cross Flow Shredder,” in August to December 2015, on support of FY 2015 Demonstration Test Project for Decontamination and Volume Reduction of Ministry of the Environment. (author)

  11. Design of a tritium decontamination workstation based on plasma cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniazzi, A.B.; Shmayda, W.T.; Fishbien, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A design for a tritium decontamination workstation based on plasma cleaning is presented. The activity of tritiated surfaces are significantly reduced through plasma-surface interactions within the workstation. Such a workstation in a tritium environment can routinely be used to decontaminate tritiated tools and components. The main advantage of such a station is the lack of low level tritiated liquid waste. Gaseous tritiated species are the waste products with can with present technology be separated and contained

  12. Metallic surfaces decontamination by using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Metal surface cleaning appears to be one of the major priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. The research and the development of a new technology that is able to meet the actual requirements (i.e. waste volume minimization, liquid effluents and chemicals free process...) seems to be the main commitment. Currently, a wide panel of technologies already exists (e.g. blasting, disk sander, electro-decontamination...) but for some of them, the efficiency is limited (e.g, Dry Ice blasting) and for others, the wastes production (liquid and/or solid) remains an important issue. One answer could be the use of a LASER light process. Since a couple of years, the Clean- Up Business Unit of the AREVA group investigates this decontamination technology. Many tests have been already performed in inactive (i.e. on simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides) or active conditions (i.e. pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and metallic pieces covered with grease). The paper will describe the results obtained in term of decontamination efficiency during all our validation process. Metallographic characterizations (i.e. SEM, X-ray scattering) and radiological analysis will be provided. We will also focus our paper on the future deployment of the LASER technology and its commercial use at La Hague reprocessing facility in 2013. (authors)

  13. A decontamination technique for decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Hosaka, K.; Kuribayashi, N.; Ishikura, T.

    1993-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive metallic waste is generated from decommissioned commercial nuclear reactors. It is necessary from the point of environmental protection and resource utilization to decontaminate the contaminated metallic waste. A decommissioning waste processing system has been previously proposed considering such decommissioning waste characteristics as its large quantity, large radioactivity range, and various shapes and materials. The decontamination process in this system was carried out by abrasive blasting as pretreatment, electrochemical decontamination as the main process, and ultrasonic cleaning in water as post-treatment. For electrochemical decontamination, electrolytic decontamination for simple shaped waste and REDOX decontamination for complicated shaped waste were used as effective decontamination processing. This time, various kinds of actual radioactive contaminated samples were taken from operating power plants to simulate the decontamination of decommissioning waste. After analyzing the composition, morphogenesis and surface observation, electrolytic decontamination, REDOX decontamination, and ultrasonic cleaning experiments were carried out by using these samples. As a result, all the samples were decontaminated below the assumed exemption level(=4 x 10 -2 Bq/g). A maximum decontamination factor of over 104 was obtained by both electrolytic and REDOX decontamination. The stainless steel sample was easy to decontaminate in both electrochemical decontaminations because of its thin oxidized layer. The ultrasonic cleaning process after electrochemical decontamination worked effectively for removing adhesive sludge and the contaminated liquid. It has been concluded from the results mentioned above that electrolytic decontamination and REDOX decontamination are effective decontamination process for decontaminating decommissioning waste

  14. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Decontamination for free release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. OPO fabric decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Bar, J.; Grujbar, V.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of five polypropylene-based man-made fabrics were studied with regard to the degree of contamination and possibilities of decontamination in order to assess their suitability as material for protective clothing in the nuclear industry. The contamination degree of the fabrics in an aqueous solution of a fission product mixture was found to be low. Soaking in a mixture of the Sapon detergent and sodium hexametaphosphate at a concentration of both materials of 1 g/l with subsequent washing in a solution of the Zenit detergent at a concentration of 3 g/l was suggested as the most suitable decontamination procedure. It reduces the initial contamination by almost 99%. (Z.M.)

  18. Sensitive Equipment Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    a ceramic-like material Polonium - 210 Metallic foil Radium-226 Radium bromide or radium chloride Strontium-90 Metallic strontium, strontium...extremely toxic toxins. 3.1.1.5 Routes of Infection Pathogenic microorganisms are transferred to human beings largely via air and food (including...regularly in the pharmaceutical industry to decontaminate manufacturing clean rooms. It is also used to sterilize packages used to store foods . It has

  19. Decommissioning and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Cantrel, E.; Valenduc, P.; Noynaert, L.

    2009-01-01

    The SCK-CEN has built a large know-how in decommissioning and decontamination, thanks to its BR3 decommissioning project. In 2007, the decommissioning activities at BR3 have been continued according to the strategy. This article discusses main realisations the following domains: decommissioning of the neutron shield tank and installation of new ventilation for the controlled area, dismantling of the former one and characterization of the stack

  20. Laser decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michishita, Shizuo; Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    One end of an optical fiber inserted into an inner cylinder is opposed to a wall surface to be decontaminated, and an opened top end of an intermediate cylinder circumferentially surrounding the inner cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated, an open end of an outer cylinder circumferentially surrounding the intermediate cylinder is tightly in contact with the wall surface to be decontaminated. Dust removing holes are perforated in the vicinity of the top end of the intermediate cylinder while being in communication with the inside and the outside of the intermediate cylinder, and one end of an air supply tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the inner cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder. The other end of the air supply tube is connected to an air supply device, one end of a sucking tube is in communication with the space between the outer circumferential surface of the intermediate cylinder and the inner circumferential surface of the outer cylinder, the other end of the sucking tube is connected to a sucking device, and the other end of the optical fiber is connected to a laser generation device. The laser generation device is operated while determining the air sucking amount increased than the air supply amount, the materials deposited on the wall surface are crushed and peeled off, and the peeled off materials are transferred by air flow to a filter and collected. (N.H.)

  1. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes

  2. Effect of Organic Solvents in Preparation of Silica-Based Chemical Gel Decontaminates for Decontamination of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk Bon; Jung, Chong Hun; Kim, Chang Ki; Choi, Byung Seon; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment such as stainless steel components, other iron-based steel and alloys, metal surfaces, structural materials and so on. Chemical decontamination technology in particular is a highly effective method to remove the radioactive contamination through a chemical dissolution or a redox reaction. However, this method has the serious drawback due to the generation of large amounts of the radioactive liquid wastes. Recently, a few literatures have been reported for the preparation of the chemical gel decontaminants to reduce the amount of the radioactive liquid wastes and to enhance the decontamination efficiency through increasing the contact time between the gels and the radioactive contaminants. In the preparation of the chemical gels, the control of the viscosity highly depends on the amount of a coviscosifier used among the components of the chemical gels consisted of a viscosifier, a coviscosifier, and a chemical decontaminant. In this works, a new effective method for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the organic solvents. The mixture solution of the coviscosifier and organic solvent was more effective in the control of the viscosity compared with that of the coviscosifier only in gels. Furthermore, the decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels measured by using the multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed the high decontamination factor for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on the surface of the stainless steel 304

  3. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  4. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project

  5. Overview of nonchemical decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.

    1984-09-01

    The decontamination techniques summarized in this paper represent a variety of surface cleaning methods developed or adapted for component and facility-type decontamination applications ranging from small hand tools to reactor cavities and other large surface areas. The major conclusion is that decontamination is a complex, demanding technical discipline. It requires knowledgeable, experienced and well-trained personnel to select proper techniques and combinations of techniques for the varied plant applications and to realize their full performance potential. Unfortunately, decontamination in many plants has the lowest priority of almost any activity. Operators are unskilled and turnover is so frequent that expensive decontamination capabilities remain unused while decontamination operations revert to the most rudimentary type of hand scrubbing and water spray cleaning

  6. Investigation of electro-kinetic methods for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The choices of effective methods for ecological system decontamination, their perfection and introduction into practical use have been actual tasks for the Ural region. The objective of this work has been to study the potentials of electrical kinetics method of ISOTRON Corporation (US) for decontamination of the Urals soils. Results obtained have shown the method proposed to be usable for decontaminating some types of soils from strontium and plutonium; it is low effective for decontamination in the area of South-Urals radioactive plume. Thus, a low effectiveness can be expected in podsolic and leached laterite characterized by a high content of loamy sand and sandy soils, as well as for sobby-podsolic ones. The method can be promising for decontamination of soils and wastes from chemical contaminants, such as Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Hg, and others. Important advantages of this method compared to others have been its simplicity, small amount of wastes, and feasibility of decontamination in areas difficult to access. (authors)

  7. Decontamination of radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daryoko, M.; Yatim, S.; Suseno, H.; Wiratmo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable coating method use phosphoric glycerol and irradiated latex as supporting agents have been investigated. The investigation used some decontaminating agents: EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid and potassium permanganate were combined with phosphoric glycerol supporting agent, then EDTA Na 2 , sodium citric, sodium oxalic and potassium permanganate were combined with irradiated latex supporting agent. The study was needed to obtain the representative operating data, will be implemented to decontamination the Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The experiment used 50x50x1 mm stainless steel samples and contaminated by Cs-137 about 1.1x10 -3 μCi/cm 2 . This samples according to inner cover of Hot Cell material, and Hot Cell activities. The decontamination factor results of the investigation were: phosphoric glycerol as supporting agent, about 20 (EDTA as decontaminating agent) to 47 (oxalic acid as decontaminating agent), and irradiated latex as supporting agent, about 11.5 (without decontamination agent) to 27 (KMnO 4 as decontaminating agent). All composition of the investigation have been obtained the good results, and can be implemented for decontamination of Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The irradiated latex could be recommended as supporting agent without decontaminating agent, because it is very easy to operate and very cheap cost. (author)

  8. Manual on decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The manual is intended for those who are responsible for the organization and implementation of decontamination programmes for facilities where radioactive materials are handled mainly on a laboratory scale. It contains information and guidelines on practical methods for decontaminating working spaces, equipment, laboratory benches and protective clothing. Useful information is also provided on the removal of loose skin contamination from personnel by mild, non-medical processes. Methods of removing skin contamination needing medical supervision, or of internal decontamination, which is entirely a medical process, are not covered in this manual. Large-scale decontamination of big nuclear facilities is also considered as outside its scope

  9. Decontamination of TRU glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.H.

    1978-03-01

    Two glove boxes that had been used for work with transuranic nuclides (TRU) for about 12 years were decontaminated in a test program to collect data for developing a decontamination facility for large equipment highly contaminated with alpha emitters. A simple chemical technique consisting of a cycle of water flushes and alkaline permanganate and oxalic acid washes was used for both boxes. The test showed that glove boxes and similar equipment that are grossly contaminated with transuranic nuclides can be decontaminated to the current DIE nonretrievable disposal guide of <10 nCi TRU/g with a moderate amount of decontamination solution and manpower. Decontamination of the first box from an estimated 1.3 Ci to about 5 mCi (6 nCi/g) required 1.3 gallons of decontamination solution and 0.03 man-hour of work for each square foot of surface area. The second box was decontaminated from an estimated 3.4 Ci to about 2.8 mCi (4.2 nCi/g) using 0.9 gallon of decontamination solution and 0.02 man-hour for each square foot of surface area. Further reductions in contamination were achieved by repetitive decontamination cycles, but the effectiveness of the technique decreased sharply after the initial cycle

  10. Internet Usage, User Satisfaction, Task-Technology Fit, and Performance Impact among Public Sector Employees in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Osama; Abdullah, Zaini; Ramayah, T.; Mutahar, Ahmed M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The internet technology becomes an essential tool for individuals, organizations, and nations for growth and prosperity. The purpose of this paper is to integrate the DeLone and McLean IS success model with task-technology fit (TTF) to explain the performance impact of Yemeni Government employees. Design/methodology/approach:…

  11. Volume reduction and material recirculation by freon decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berners, O.; Buhmann, D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshiaki, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of freon in a large variety of decontamination in the nuclear and non-nuclear fields. As far as the contamination is loose or smerable, surfaces of nearly all materials can be decontaminated. Freon is electrically non-conductive, chemically neutral and has a low surface tension. So it is capable of creeping under the contaminant and loosening or dissolving it. Used freon can be collected, cleaned and recirculated. Its cleaning can be done easily by evaporation at its lower vapor point of about 48 degrees C (104 degrees F). Good decontamination results could be achieved, expensive materials, tools and equipment could be recirculated. Big volumes of materials could get separated from their contaminants, which is the real radioactive waste. Freon decontamination is an effective, overall economical and approved technology to volume reduction and material recirculation

  12. Ten factors to consider when developing usability scenarios and tasks for health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Saleem, Jason J

    2018-02-01

    The quality of usability testing is highly dependent upon the associated usability scenarios. To promote usability testing as part of electronic health record (EHR) certification, the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology requires that vendors test specific capabilities of EHRs with clinical end-users and report their usability testing process - including the test scenarios used - along with the results. The ONC outlines basic expectations for usability testing, but there is little guidance in usability texts or scientific literature on how to develop usability scenarios for healthcare applications. The objective of this article is to outline key factors to consider when developing usability scenarios and tasks to evaluate computer-interface based health information technologies. To achieve this goal, we draw upon a decade of our experience conducting usability tests with a variety of healthcare applications and a wide range of end-users, to include healthcare professionals as well as patients. We discuss 10 key factors that influence scenario development: objectives of usability testing; roles of end-user(s); target performance goals; evaluation time constraints; clinical focus; fidelity; scenario-related bias and confounders; embedded probes; minimize risks to end-users; and healthcare related outcome measures. For each factor, we present an illustrative example. This article is intended to aid usability researchers and practitioners in their efforts to advance health information technologies. The article provides broad guidance on usability scenario development and can be applied to a wide range of clinical information systems and applications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. IMPORTANCE OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY IN REALIZATION OF CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL TASKS OF PRESCHOOL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvezdan Arsić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid scientific and technological development imposes numerous changes in all spheres of life and work. In such circumstances, a computer has become a part of all aspects of life: economy, education, free time, family. Since children in contemporary society increasingly acquire knowledge before the school age, the question is how to prepare them for the world in which we live, bearing in mind how significantly different it is from the world in which the previous generations grew up. The research was aimed at examining the attitudes of preschool teachers about the importance of computers in the realization of educational activities in preschool institutions. The study included 54 teachers from Kosovo and Metohija: Kosovska Mitrovica, Donja Gušterica and Ropotovo. The research results indicate that digital technology is a very important and a useful didactic tool in the realization of educational activities in preschool institutions and that preschool teachers have the required competence to implement the technology. However, they are not satisfied with the quality of their ICT education and training during their studies; they also feel that their institutions do not provide adequate working conditions for the use of computers in the realization of educational tasks.

  14. Recent developments in collaborative CBRN decontamination science : a retrospective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanofsky, N. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Volchek, K.; Fingas, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science and Technology Division, Environmental Technology Centre, Science and Technology Branch; Filatov, B. [Research Inst. of Hygiene, Toxicology and Occupational Pathology, Volgograd (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The importance of addressing the risk of chemical, biological and radiological/nuclear (CBRN) attacks was discussed with particular reference to recent developments in Canadian-led decontamination studies as part of the remediation response to a terrorist attack. Research efforts have been supported by government programs such as the CBRN Research and Technology Initiative of Defence Research and Development Canada and the Global Partnership Program of the Department of Foreign Affairs. In 2005, Environment Canada and Defence Research and Development Canada co-organized an international workshop with the Research Institute of Health, Toxicology and Occupational Pathology of Volgograd, Russia. The workshop brought together researchers from Canada, Russia, United States, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Poland and Bulgaria, with the view to eventually develop longer term collaborations. The theme focused on membrane technology and its application in CBRN decontamination. This paper reviewed these collaborative and international research efforts and identified areas in need of future work, such as bioremediation and radio-nuclear remediation. It addressed issues supporting a collaborative international research agenda in decontamination science; membrane filtration as a feasible approach to decontamination waste treatment; and possible areas of CBRN collaboration. It was suggested that the key to successful decontamination requires the creation of computer systems for the initial identification of chemical substances; complete toxicological characterization of the most dangerous agents; regulatory safety standards; quantitative determination of chemical substances; antidotes for most chemical threat agents; universal decontamination agents; and, validation of criteria for decontaminating buildings. The question of who pays for decontamination, be it the private or public sector, was also discussed.

  15. Task 4 supporting technology. Densification requirements definition and test objectives. Propellant densification requirements definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lak, Tibor; Weeks, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    The primary challenge of the X-33 CAN is to build and test a prototype LO2 and LH2 densification ground support equipment (GSE) unit, and perform tank thermodynamic testing within the 15 month phase 1 period. The LO2 and LH2 propellant densification system will be scaled for the IPTD LO2 and LH2 tank configurations. The IPTD tanks were selected for the propellant technology demonstration because of the potential benefits to the phase 1 plan: tanks will be built in time to support thermodynamic testing; minimum cost; minimum schedule risk; future testing at MSFC will build on phase 1 data base; and densification system will be available to support X-33 and RLV engine test at IPTD. The objective of the task 1 effort is to define the preliminary requirements of the propellant densification GSE and tank recirculation system. The key densification system design parameters to be established in Task 1 are: recirculation flow rate; heat exchanger inlet temperature; heat exchanger outlet temperature; maximum heat rejection rate; vent flow rate (GN2 and GH2); densification time; and tank pressure level.

  16. Decontamination of Soil Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief This technical summary will provide decontamination personnel rapid access to information on which decontamination approaches are most effective for soils contaminated with B anthracis.

  17. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank waste. Organic destruction technology development task annual report -- FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, R.J.; Schmidt, A.J.; Zacher, A.H.

    1993-09-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal processing (HTP) is a thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that can be used to destroy organics and ferrocyanide in Hanford tank waste at temperatures from 250 C to 400 C. With HTP, organics react with oxidants, such as nitrite and nitrate, already present in the waste. Ferrocyanides and free cyanide will hydrolyze at similar temperatures and may also react with nitrates or other oxidants in the waste. No air or oxygen or additional chemicals need to be added to the autogenous HTP system. However, enhanced kinetics may be realized by air addition, and, if desired, chemical reductants can be added to the system to facilitate complete nitrate/nitrate destruction. Tank waste can be processed in a plug-flow, tubular reactor, or a continuous-stirred tank reactor system designed to accommodate the temperature, pressure, gas generation, and heat release associated with decomposition of the reactive species. The work described in this annual report was conducted in FY 1993 for the Organic Destruction Technology Development Task of Hanford's Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). This task is part of an overall program to develop organic destruction technologies originally funded by TWRS to meet tank safety and waste form disposal criteria and condition the feed for further pretreatment. During FY 1993 the project completed seven experimental test plans, a 30-hr pilot-scale continuous run, over 200 hr of continuous bench-scale HTP testing, and 20 batch HTP tests; two contracts were established with commercial vendors, and a commercial laboratory reactor was procured and installed in a glovebox for HTP testing with actual Hanford tank waste

  18. Development of an advanced, continuous mild-gasification process for the production of coproducts. Report for Task 4.8, Decontamination and disassembly of the mild-gasification and char-to-carbon PRUs and disposal of products from testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merriam, N.W. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Jha, Mahesh C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This report contains descriptions of mild-gasification and char-to-carbon process research units (PRUS) used by WRI and AMAX R&D Center to conduct tests under contract AC21-87MC24268. Descriptions of materials produced during those tests are also contained herein. Western Research Institute proposes to dispose of remaining fines and dried coal by combustion and remaining coal liquids by incineration during mid-1992. The mild-gasification PRU will be used for additional tests until 1993, at which time WRI proposes to decontaminate and disassemble the PRU. AMAX R&D Center intends to return the spent char, any remaining feed char, and unusable product carbon to the Eagle Butte Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, from where the coal originally came. The solid products will be added to the mine`s coal product stream. Coal liquids collected from condensers will be concentrated and sent to a local oil and solvent recycling company where the liquids will be burned as fuel. The char-to-carbon PRU will be operated periodically until 1993 when the plant will be decontaminated and disassembled.

  19. Bench scale testing - Phase I, Task 4. Topical progress report, September 1994--January 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment

  20. Bacterial decontamination using ambient pressure nonthermal discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmingham, J.G.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasmas can efficiently deactivate bacteria in gases, liquids, and on surfaces, as well as can decompose hazardous chemicals. This paper focuses on the changes to bacterial spores and toxic biochemical compounds, such as mycotoxins, after their treatment in ambient pressure discharges. The ability of nonthermal plasmas to decompose toxic chemicals and deactivate hazardous biological materials has been applied to sterilizing medical instruments, ozonating water, and purifying air. In addition, the fast lysis of bacterial spores and other cells has led us to include plasma devices within pathogen detection instruments, where nucleic acids must be accessed. Decontaminating chemical and biological warfare materials from large, high value targets such as building surfaces, after a terrorist attack, are especially challenging. A large area plasma decontamination technology is described.

  1. Unit for air decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano H, E.

    1991-02-01

    To fulfill the applicable requirements of safety to the ventilation systems in nuclear facilities, it is necessary to make a cleaning of the air that hurtles to the atmosphere. For that which was designed and it manufactured an unit for decontamination of the air for the Pilot plant of production of Nuclear Fuel that this built one with national parts, uses Hepa national filters and the design can adapt for different dimensions of filters, also can be added a lodging for a prefilter or to adopt two Hepa filters. (Author)

  2. Assessing cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous cost of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, it is not clear what levels of reduction in external radiation exposure are possible in the Special Decontamination Area, the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas and the whole of Fukushima. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture in its entirety. Using a geographic information system, we calculated the costs of removal, storage containers, transport, and temporary and interim storage facilities as well as the reduction in air dose rate for a cumulative external exposure for 9000 1 km × 1 km mesh units incorporating 51 municipalities. The decontamination cost for the basic scenario, for which forested areas within 20 m of habitation areas were decontaminated, was JPY2.53-5.12 trillion; the resulting reduction in annual external dose was about 2500 person-Sv. The transport, storage, and administrative costs of decontamination waste and removed soil reached JPY1.55-2.12 trillion under this scenario. Although implementing decontamination of all forested areas provides some major reductions in the external radiation dose for the average inhabitant, decontamination costs could potentially exceed JPY16 trillion. These results indicate that technologies for reducing the volume of decontamination waste and removed soil should be considered to reduce storage costs and that further discussions about forest decontamination policies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Task 11: Technology development integration. Semi-annual report, April 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musich, M.A.

    1997-05-01

    A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: (1) Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 - issued July 1994, (2) Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 - issued February 1996, and (3) Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study - drafted March 1996. The three studies were commissioned by DOE to be SA studies of environmental management (EM) systems. The purpose of LITCO`s engineering evaluation of the MLLW treatment system alternatives was to help DOE in the prioritization of research, development, and demonstration activities for remediation technologies. The review of these three studies was structured to further aid DOE in its current and future decision-making processes. The methodology in the studies was compared to a sound systems engineering (SE) approach to help DOE determine which tasks still need to be accomplished to complete a thorough design/review.

  4. Task 11: Technology development integration. Semi-annual report, April 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musich, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy ampersand Environmental Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: (1) Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 - issued July 1994, (2) Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 - issued February 1996, and (3) Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study - drafted March 1996. The three studies were commissioned by DOE to be SA studies of environmental management (EM) systems. The purpose of LITCO's engineering evaluation of the MLLW treatment system alternatives was to help DOE in the prioritization of research, development, and demonstration activities for remediation technologies. The review of these three studies was structured to further aid DOE in its current and future decision-making processes. The methodology in the studies was compared to a sound systems engineering (SE) approach to help DOE determine which tasks still need to be accomplished to complete a thorough design/review

  5. Dilute chemical decontamination program review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; Blomgren, J.C.; Pettit, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Dilute Chemical Decontamination Program is to develop and evaluate a process which utilizes reagents in dilute concentrations for the decontamination of BWR primary systems and for the maintenance of dose rates on the out-of-core surfaces at acceptable levels. A discussion is presented of the process concept, solvent development, advantages and disadvantages of reagent systems, and VNC loop tests. Based on the work completed to date it is concluded that (1) rapid decontamination of BWRs using dilute reagents is feasible; (2) reasonable reagent conditions for rapid chemical decontamination are: 0.01M oxalic acid + 0.005M citric acid, pH3.0, 90/degree/C, 0.5 to 1.0 ppm dissolved oxygen; (3) control of dissolved oxygen concentration is important, since high levels suppress the rate of decontamination and low levels allow precipitation of ferrous oxalate. 4 refs

  6. IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment. Subtask 1 Experience with Critical Deployment Issues. Final Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard

    2010-01-01

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. ...

  7. Modification of the Decontamination Facility at the Kruemmel NPP - 13451

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klute, Stefan; Kupke, Peter [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In February 2009, Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH was awarded the contract for the design, manufacture, delivery and construction of a new Decontamination Facility in the controlled area for Kruemmel NPP. The new decontamination equipment has been installed according to the state of art of Kruemmel NPP. The existing space required the following modification, retrofitting and reconstruction works: - Demounting of the existing installation: to create space for the new facility it was necessary to dismantle the old facility. The concrete walls and ceilings were cut into sizes of no more than 400 kg for ease of handling. This enabled decontamination so largest possible amount could be released for recycling. All steel parts were cut into sizes fitting for iron-barred boxes, respecting the requirement to render the parts decontaminable and releasable. - Reconstructing a decontamination facility: Reconstruction of a decontamination box with separate air lock as access area for the decontamination of components and assemblies was conducted using pressurized air with abrasives (glass beads or steel shots). The walls were equipped with sound protection, the inner walls were welded gap-free to prevent the emergence of interstices and were equipped with changeable wear and tear curtains. Abrasive processing unit positioned underneath the dry blasting box adjacent to the two discharge hoppers. A switch has been installed for the separation of the glass beads and the steel shot. The glass beads are directed into a 200 l drum for the disposal. The steel shot was cleaned using a separator. The cleaned steel shot was routed via transportation devices to the storage container, making it available for further blasting operations. A decontamination box with separate air lock as access area for the decontamination of components and assemblies using high pressure water technology was provided by new construction. Water pressures between 160 bar and 800 bar can be selected. The inner

  8. Modification of the Decontamination Facility at the Kruemmel NPP - 13451

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klute, Stefan; Kupke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In February 2009, Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH was awarded the contract for the design, manufacture, delivery and construction of a new Decontamination Facility in the controlled area for Kruemmel NPP. The new decontamination equipment has been installed according to the state of art of Kruemmel NPP. The existing space required the following modification, retrofitting and reconstruction works: - Demounting of the existing installation: to create space for the new facility it was necessary to dismantle the old facility. The concrete walls and ceilings were cut into sizes of no more than 400 kg for ease of handling. This enabled decontamination so largest possible amount could be released for recycling. All steel parts were cut into sizes fitting for iron-barred boxes, respecting the requirement to render the parts decontaminable and releasable. - Reconstructing a decontamination facility: Reconstruction of a decontamination box with separate air lock as access area for the decontamination of components and assemblies was conducted using pressurized air with abrasives (glass beads or steel shots). The walls were equipped with sound protection, the inner walls were welded gap-free to prevent the emergence of interstices and were equipped with changeable wear and tear curtains. Abrasive processing unit positioned underneath the dry blasting box adjacent to the two discharge hoppers. A switch has been installed for the separation of the glass beads and the steel shot. The glass beads are directed into a 200 l drum for the disposal. The steel shot was cleaned using a separator. The cleaned steel shot was routed via transportation devices to the storage container, making it available for further blasting operations. A decontamination box with separate air lock as access area for the decontamination of components and assemblies using high pressure water technology was provided by new construction. Water pressures between 160 bar and 800 bar can be selected. The inner

  9. Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization: Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 8. Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Ness, R.O. Jr.; Nowok, J.W.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.; Hurley, J.P.; Steadman, E.N.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the Environmental Management program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize technologies that address the environmental management needs of contaminated sites, including characterization, sensors, and monitoring; low-level mixed waste processing; material disposition technology; improved waste forms; in situ containment and remediation; and efficient separation technologies for radioactive wastes. Task 2 is the extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 3, pyrolysis of plastics, has as its objectives to develop a commercial process to significantly reduce the volume of mixed-plastics-paper-resin waste contaminated with low-level radioactive material; concentrate contaminants in a collectible form; and determine the distribution and form of contaminants after pyrolysis of the mixed waste. Task 4, stabilization of vitrified wastes, has as its objectives to (1) demonstrate a waste vitrification procedure for enhanced stabilization of waste materials and (2) develop a testing protocol to understand the long-term leaching behavior of the stabilized waste form. The primary objective of Task 8, Management and reporting, is coordination of this project with other programs and opportunities. In addition, management oversight will be maintained to ensure that tasks are completed and coordinated as planned and that deliverables are submitted in a timely manner. Accomplishments to date is each task are described. 62 refs

  10. Implementation of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology: integration of clinical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Dinesen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore how the implementation of the concept ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology influences the integration of clinical tasks across healthcare sectors. Theory: Inter-organisational theory. Methods: The case study approach was applied. Triangulations of data collection techniques were used: documentary materials, participant observation, qualitative and focus group interviews. Results: The clinical decision-making and task solving became multidisciplinary and integrated with the implementation of telehomecare and, therefore, complex in terms of the prescription and adjustment of patient medicine. Workflows between healthcare professionals across sectors changed from sequential to collective client flows. Pre-existing procedures for patient care, treatment, and responsibility were challenged. In addition, the number of tasks for the district nurses increased. Integration in the clinical task-solving area increases fragmentation in the knowledge technologies in a network perspective. Conclusions: Implementing the concept of ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology will result in a more integrated clinical task-solving process that involves healthcare professionals from various sectors. Overall, the integration of clinical tasks between hospital and district nursing will result in a direct benefit for the heart patients.

  11. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D ampersand D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D ampersand D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D ampersand D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D ampersand D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D ampersand D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their

  12. Chemical decontamination of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, J.A.; Lerch, R.E.

    1979-10-01

    A metal decontamination process based upon removal of contamination by treatment with a cerium (IV)-nitric acid solution (or other redox agent in nitric acid) is feasible and highly promising. The technique is effective in dissolving the surface layer of stainless steel. Dissolution rates of approximately 1.5 mils/h were demonstrated with cerium (IV)-nitric acid solutions. Removal of plutonium contamination from stainless steel was demonstrated in laboratory tests, in which activity levels were reduced from greater than 5 x 10 5 counts per minute to nondetectable levels in approximately one hour at 90 0 C. Removal of paint from stainless steel surfaces was also demonstrated. Advantages of this process over other chemical solutions include: (1) The solutions are not high salt systems; therefore, there is potentially less waste generated. (2) Cerium(IV) in nitric acid is a good dissolution agent for plutonium oxide. (3) Regeneration of Ce(IV) during the decontamination is accomplished by electrolysis. (4) The process should be effective for irregularly shaped equipment. (5) It could be effective as a spray or a flow-through system. 13 figures

  13. Assessing cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous cost of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, it is not clear what levels of reduction in external radiation exposure are possible in the Special Decontamination Area, the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas and the whole of Fukushima. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture in its entirety. Using a geographic information system, we calculated the costs of removal, storage containers, transport, and temporary and interim storage facilities as well as the reduction in air dose rate for a cumulative external exposure for 9000 1 km × 1 km mesh units incorporating 51 municipalities. The decontamination cost for the basic scenario, for which forested areas within 20 m of habitation areas were decontaminated, was JPY2.53–5.12 trillion; the resulting reduction in annual external dose was about 2500 person-Sv. The transport, storage, and administrative costs of decontamination waste and removed soil reached JPY1.55–2.12 trillion under this scenario. Although implementing decontamination of all forested areas provides some major reductions in the external radiation dose for the average inhabitant, decontamination costs could potentially exceed JPY16 trillion. These results indicate that technologies for reducing the volume of decontamination waste and removed soil should be considered to reduce storage costs and that further discussions about forest decontamination policies are needed. - Highlights: • Evaluation of cost and effectiveness of decontaminating Fukushima Prefecture. • Reductions in external exposure under various decontamination scenarios were similar. • Decontamination costs for the basic scenario were estimated at JPY2.53–5.12 trillion.

  14. Application of Ultrasonic for Decontamination of Contaminated Soil - 13142

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, A.P.; Lebedev, N.M.; Savkin, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    The trials of soil decontamination were carried out with the help of a pilot ultrasonic installation in different modes. The installation included a decontamination bath equipped with ultrasonic sources, a precipitator for solution purification from small particles (less than 80 micrometer), sorption filter for solution purification from radionuclides washing out from soil, a tank for decontamination solution, a pump for decontamination solution supply. The trials were carried out on artificially contaminated sand with specific activity of 4.5 10 5 Bk/kg and really contaminated soil from Russian Scientific Center 'Kurchatovsky Institute' (RSC'KI') with specific activity of 2.9 10 4 Bk/kg. It was established that application of ultrasonic intensify the process of soil reagent decontamination and increase its efficiency. The decontamination factor for the artificially contaminated soil was ∼200 and for soil from RSC'KI' ∼30. The flow-sheet diagram has been developed for the new installation as well as determined the main technological characteristics of the equipment. (authors)

  15. Application of Ultrasonic for Decontamination of Contaminated Soil - 13142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilyev, A.P. [JRC ' NIKIET' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebedev, N.M. [LLC ' Aleksandra-Plus' , Vologda (Russian Federation); Savkin, A.E. [SUE SIA ' Radon' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The trials of soil decontamination were carried out with the help of a pilot ultrasonic installation in different modes. The installation included a decontamination bath equipped with ultrasonic sources, a precipitator for solution purification from small particles (less than 80 micrometer), sorption filter for solution purification from radionuclides washing out from soil, a tank for decontamination solution, a pump for decontamination solution supply. The trials were carried out on artificially contaminated sand with specific activity of 4.5 10{sup 5} Bk/kg and really contaminated soil from Russian Scientific Center 'Kurchatovsky Institute' (RSC'KI') with specific activity of 2.9 10{sup 4} Bk/kg. It was established that application of ultrasonic intensify the process of soil reagent decontamination and increase its efficiency. The decontamination factor for the artificially contaminated soil was ∼200 and for soil from RSC'KI' ∼30. The flow-sheet diagram has been developed for the new installation as well as determined the main technological characteristics of the equipment. (authors)

  16. Preparations for decontamination and disposition of the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) and other ERDA facilities at AI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, W.F.; Graves, A.W.

    1975-01-01

    The program plan for the decontamination and disposition of facilities at the Sodium Reactor Experiment and other ERDA-owned, AI-operated, radioactive facilities is described. The program objective along with a description of each of the subject facilities is presented. A description of the organizational structure within supporting the program is given. The elements of planning required to prepare for the task are detailed, including the requirements for cost and schedule control. Progress to date and the future plans are presented. The available technology utilized in the program is described

  17. Development of new chemical and electrochemical decontamination methods for selected equipment of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactor primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solcanyi, M.; Majersky, D.

    1998-01-01

    Special devices for in-situ application of decontamination technologies assigned for Steam Generator, Pressurizer and Main Circulating Casing of WWER-1000 type were designed, manufactured and tested in real conditions of their use in above Primary Circuit components. New decontamination technologies like low-concentration process NP-NHN for the decontamination of the Steam Generator, combined chemico-mechanical treatment for the Pressurizer and semi-dry electrolysis for the Main Circulating Pump Casing were developed and approved for their safe plant application from point of view of decontamination efficiency, corrosion influence and processing of secondary wastes. Main technological parameters were defined to achieve high decontamination efficiency and corrosion-safe application of all decontamination technologies. (author)

  18. Chemical decontamination method in nuclear facility system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi; Oka, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    Pumps and valves in a closed recycling loop system incorporating materials to be chemically decontaminated are decomposed, a guide plate having the decomposed parts as an exit/inlet of a decontaminating liquid is formed, and a decontaminating liquid recycling loop comprising a recycling pump and a heater is connected to the guide plate. Decontaminating liquid from a decontaminating liquid storage tank is supplied to the decontaminating liquid recycling loop. With such constitutions, the decontaminating liquid is filled in the recycling closed loop system incorporating materials to be decontaminated, and the materials to be decontaminated are chemically decontaminated. The decontaminating liquid after the decontamination is discharged and flows, if necessary, in a recycling system channel for repeating supply and discharge. After the decontamination, the guide plate is removed and returned to the original recycling loop. When pipelines of a reactor recycling system are decontaminated, the amount of decontaminations can be decreased, and reforming construction for assembling the recycling loop again, which requires cutting for pipelines in the system is no more necessary. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased, and therefore, the decontamination operation is facilitated and radiation dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  19. Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

    1998-05-01

    The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor's task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project

  20. Use of laser ablation in nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier; Damerval, Frederique

    2012-09-01

    The development and the use of clean decontamination process appear to be one of the main priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. This is especially due to the fact of wastes minimization which is one of the principal commitments. One answer would be to use a photonic process such as the LASER process. The principle of this process is based on the absorption, by the contaminant, of the photon's energy. This energy then will propagate into the material and create some mechanical waves responsible of the interfaces embrittlement and de-cohesion. As we can see, this process so called LASER ablation does not use any chemicals and allows us to avoid any production of liquid waste. Since now a couple of years, the Clean-Up Business Unit of AREVA group (BE/CL) investigates this new decontamination technology. Many tests have been done in inactive conditions on various simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides firstly in order to estimate its efficiency but also to fully qualify it. After that, we decided to move on hot tests to fully validate this new process and to show its interest for the nuclear industry. Those hot tests have been done on two kinds of contaminated material (on tank pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and on metallic pieces covered with grease). Some information such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray scattering spectroscopy and decontamination factors (DF) will be provided in this paper. (authors)

  1. Decontamination before dismantling a fast breeder reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, J.R.; Antoine, P.; Gauchon, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The large-scale decontamination of FBR sodium loops is a novel task, as only a limited number of laboratory-scale results are available to date. The principal objective of this work is to develop a suitable decontamination procedure for application to the primary loops of the RAPSODIE fast breeder reactor as part of decommissioning to Stage 2. After disconnecting the piping from the main vessel, the pipes were treated by circulating chemical solutions and the vessels by spraying. The dose rate in the areas to be dismantled was divided by ten. A decontamination factor of about 300 was obtained, and should allow austenitic steel parts to be melted in special furnaces for unrestricted release. (author)

  2. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.; Sack, W.A.; Gabr, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program at West Virginia University consists of research and development associated with hazardous waste remediation problems at the Department of Energy complex and elsewhere. This program seeks to facilitate expedited development and implementation of solutions to the nation's hazardous waste clean-up efforts. By a unique combination of university research and private technology development efforts, new paths toward implementing technology and speeding clean-ups are achievable. Mechanisms include aggressive industrial tie-ins to academic development programs, expedited support of small business technology development efforts, enhanced linkages to existing DOE programs, and facilitated access to hazardous waste sites. The program topically falls into an information component, which includes knowledge acquisition, technology evaluation and outreach activities and an R and D component, which develops and implements new and improved technologies. Projects began in February 1993 due to initiation of a Cooperative Agreement between West Virginia University and the Department of Energy

  3. Decontamination of some urban surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1988-04-01

    The long-term consequences of external radiation dose to the public could be a cause for concern in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant leading to the release of fission products to the atmosphere and subsequent contamination of buildings, roads and other components of the urban environment. This study has concentrated on the decontamination of building materials contaminated under wet conditions with soluble, ionic radiocaesium. Results are given on the decontamination of building materials contaminated without run-off, on the effects of waiting between contamination and decontamination and on the effect of pre-treatment with an ammonium salt solution. (author)

  4. Nova target chamber decontamination study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    An engineering study was performed to determine the most effective method for decontamination of the Nova target chamber. Manual and remote decontamination methods currently being used were surveyed. In addition, a concept that may not require in-situ decontamination was investigated. Based on the presently available information concerning material and system compatibility and particle penetration, it is recommended that a system of removable aluminum shields be considered. It is also recommended that a series of tests be performed to more precisely determine the vacuum compatibility and penetrability of other materials discussed in this report

  5. Skin decontamination: principles and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Heidi P; Zhai, Hongbo; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2013-11-01

    Skin decontamination is the primary intervention needed in chemical, biological and radiological exposures, involving immediate removal of the contaminant from the skin performed in the most efficient way. The most readily available decontamination system on a practical basis is washing with soap and water or water only. Timely use of flushing with copious amounts of water may physically remove the contaminant. However, this traditional method may not be completely effective, and contaminants left on the skin after traditional washing procedures can have toxic consequences. This article focuses on the principles and practices of skin decontamination.

  6. Organic decontamination by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study has successfully identified ion exchanger media suitable for decontaminating the 5500-gallon organic layer in Tank 241-C-103. Decontamination of radionuclides is necessary to meet shipping, incinerator site storage, and incineration feed requirements. The exchanger media were identified through a literature search and experiments at the Russian Institute for Physical Chemistry. The principal radionuclides addressed are Cs-137 and Sr-90. Recommendations for an experimental program plan conclude the discussion. The experimental program would provide the data necessary for plant design specifications for a column and for ion exchange media to be used in decontaminating the organic layer

  7. Decontamination of surfaces (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestre, E.

    1961-01-01

    The continued expansion of atomic Energy has led the S.C.R.G.R. to extend simultaneously the recovery of materials contaminated by use in radio-active media. The importance of this aspect of atomic Energy was not immediately obvious to those concerned but is now fully recognized due to the cost of the materials and installations, and also to the time required for the construction of special equipment for the C.E.A. Another very important reason is the dangers associated with the handling of contaminated material. The S.C.R.G.R. attacked this problem from the point of view of these dangers. It later became apparent to the users, once the decontamination methods had proved their worth, that the process presented advantages from the material and cost-saving point of view. (author) [fr

  8. Ultrasonic decontamination robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic decontamination robot removes radioactive contamination from the internal surface of the inlet and outlet headers, divider plate, tube sheet, and lower portions of tubes of a nuclear power plant steam generator. A programmable microprocessor controller guides the movement of a robotic arm mounted in the header manway. An ultrasonic transducer having a solvent delivery subsystem through which ultrasonic action is achieved is moved by the arm over the surfaces. A solvent recovery suction tube is positioned within the header to remove solvent therefrom while avoiding interference with the main robotic arm. The solvent composition, temperature, pressure, viscosity, and purity are controlled to optimize the ultrasonic scrubbing action. The ultrasonic transducer is controlled at a power density, frequency, and on-off mode cycle such as to optimize scrubbing action within the range of transducer-to-surface distance and solvent layer thickness selected for the particular conditions encountered. Both solvent and transducer control actions are optimized by the programmable microprocessor. (author)

  9. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  10. Granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2007-10-02

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  11. Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, Charles A.; Parker, John J.; Guttadora, Gregory L.; Ciebiera, Lloyd P.

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Tritium Systems Group has developed and fabricated an Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System (OTDS), which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination on various components and items. The system is configured to introduce gaseous ozone into a reaction chamber containing tritiated items that require a reduction in tritium surface contamination. Tritium surface contamination (on components and items in the reaction chamber) is removed by chemically reacting elemental tritium to tritium oxide via oxidation, while purging the reaction chamber effluent to a gas holding tank or negative pressure HVAC system. Implementing specific concentrations of ozone along with catalytic parameters, the system is able to significantly reduce surface tritium contamination on an assortment of expendable and non-expendable items. This paper will present the results of various experimentation involving employment of this system

  12. Decontamination of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Decontamination stands for the sack collecting of wc-waste water of nuclear-medical tracts and especially the collecting of primary urine and primary faeces of patients after application of radio-isotopes (e.g. iodine 131). They are tied up in the sacks, treated with antiseptic and decomposition-preventing agents, and finally stored in a decupation depot over the time constant. The decupation depot can, for example, be a deep-freezor with separations and clocks, which is radiation-isolated. After the time constant a chemical and/or physical destruction (e.g. comminution) takes place, with simultaneous disinfection and thawing (vapour heating) and the transfer to the canalization. (DG) [de

  13. Force-feedback tele operation of industrial robots a cost effective solution for decontamination of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbats, P.; Andriot, C.; Gicquel, P.; Viallesoubranne, J.P.; Souche, C.

    1998-01-01

    Decontamination and maintenance in hot cells are some new emerging applications of industrial robots in the nuclear fuel cycle plants. Industrial robots are low cost, accurate and reliable manipulator arms which are used in manufacturing industries usually. Thanks to the recent evolution of robotics technologies, some industrial robots may be adapted to nuclear environment. These robots are transportable, sealed and can be decontaminated, and they may be 'hardened' up to a level of irradiation dose sufficient for operation in low and medium irradiating/contaminating environments. Although industrial robots are usually programmed to perform specific and repetitive tasks, they may be remotely tele-operated by human operators as well. This allows industrial robots to perform usual tele-manipulation tasks encountered in the nuclear plants and more. The paper presents the computer based tele-operation control system TAO2000 TM , developed by the Tele-operation and Robotics Service of CEA, which has been applied to the RX90 TM industrial robot from ST-UBLI company. This robot has been selected in order to perform various maintenance and decontamination tasks in COGEMA plants. TAO2000 provides the overall tele-robotic and robotic functions necessary to perform any remote tele-operation application in hostile environment: force-feedback master-slave control; computer- assisted tele-operation of mechanical processes; trajectory programming as well as various robotics functions; graphical modelling of working environment and simulation; automatic path planning with obstacle avoidance; man-machine interface for tasks programming and mission execution. Experimental results reported in the paper demonstrate the feasibility of force-feedback master-slave control of standard industrial robots. Finally, the design of new, cost effective. tele-operation systems based on industrial robots may be intended for nuclear plants maintenance. (author)

  14. AREVA NP decontamination concept for decommissioning. A comprehensive approach based on over 30 years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiepani, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    decontamination is tailored to the given boundaries and desired goals to ensure the best results with the lowest waste generation. This includes lower source term by oxide film, thus corrosion product, removal; controlled base metal attack to remove embedded activity; increased gamma/alpha ratios; and alpha contamination removal. This paper will describe the AREVA NP Decontamination Concept for Decommissioning (DCD) and present highlights of previous FSDs performed prior to decommissioning using the CORD/AMDA technology. (author)

  15. Assessment Training Effects on Student Assessment Skills and Task Performance in a Technology-Facilitated Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiongyi; Li, Lan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an assessment training module on student assessment skills and task performance in a technology-facilitated peer assessment. Seventy-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The participants completed an assessment training exercise, prior to engaging in peer-assessment activities. During the…

  16. Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear decontamination: Recent trends and future perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN decontamination is the removal of CBRN material from equipment or humans. The objective of the decontamination is to reduce radiation burden, salvage equipment, and materials, remove loose CBRN contaminants, and fix the remaining in place in preparation for protective storage or permanent disposal work activities. Decontamination may be carried out using chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical means. Like materials, humans may also be contaminated with CBRN contamination. Changes in cellular function can occur at lower radiation doses and exposure to chemicals. At high dose, cell death may take place. Therefore, decontamination of humans at the time of emergency while generating bare minimum waste is an enormous task requiring dedication of large number of personnel and large amount of time. General principles of CBRN decontamination are discussed in this review with emphasis on radiodecontamination.

  17. Preferences for technology versus human assistance and control over technology in the performance of kitchen and personal care tasks in baby boomers and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Scott R; Schulz, Richard; Matthews, Judith T; Courtney, Karen; Dabbs, Annette DeVito

    2014-11-01

    Quality of Life technology (QoLT) stresses humans and technology as mutually dependent and aware, working together to improve task performance and quality of life. This study examines preferences for technology versus human assistance and control in the context of QoLT. Data are from a nationally representative, cross-sectional web-based sample of 416 US baby boomers (45-64) and 114 older adults (65+) on preferences for technology versus human assistance and control in the performance of kitchen and personal care tasks. Multinomial logistic regression and ordinary least squares regression were used to determine predictors of these preferences. Respondents were generally accepting of technology assistance but wanted to maintain control over its' operation. Baby boomers were more likely to prefer technology than older adults, and those with fewer QoLT privacy concerns and who thought they were more likely to need future help were more likely to prefer technology over human assistance and more willing to relinquish control to technology. Results suggest the need for design of person- and context-aware QoLT systems that are responsive to user desires for level of control over operation of the technology. The predictors of these preferences suggest potentially receptive markets for the targeting of QoLT systems.

  18. Decontamination of a canyon crane at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.A.; Moore, D.B.; Bowers, J.W.; Brown, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination of the crane is reviewed in terms of the health physics aspects, controls during decontamination efforts, and the resultant radiation exposure rates for decontamination efforts. 17 figs.,

  19. Decontamination strategies in contaminated settlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Jouve, A.; Tallec, V. Le

    1996-01-01

    Six years after the Chernobyl accident, decontamination actions had been completed in many places, the contamination could be considered as fixed, especially on urban surfaces and the social situation was felt to be stabilized. Under those conditions the efficiency of the 'classical' decontamination techniques was under question, it was worthwhile to look at new specific techniques. Besides it was necessary to discuss the interest of new decontamination actions in settlements. The European Union (EU) sponsored a project ECP 4 in order to look at the opportunities for further dose reduction actions in the contaminated territories of the three republics affected by the accident. The objective was to provide a local decision maker, faced with many alternatives for decontamination, with all the elements for determining what to do according to the various objectives he might pursue. The main results are presented here. (author)

  20. Contamination and decontamination of skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    In external contamination the beta radiation dose is the prevalent component of the total dose absorbed by the skin. There exist four types of radionUclide bonds to the skin: mechanical retention of solid particles or solution on the surface and in the pores, physical adsorption of nondissociated molecules or colloids, the ion exchange effect, and chemisorption. Radionuclides then penetrate the skin by transfollicular transfer. The total amount of radioactive substances absorbed into the skin depends on the condition of the skin. Skin is decontaminated by washing with lukewarm water and soap or with special decontamination solutions. The most widely used components of decontamination solutions are detergents, chelaton, sodium hexametaphosphate, oxalic acid, citric acid. The main principles of the decontamination of persons are given. (M.D.)

  1. BR-5 primary circuit decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, I.A.; Nikulin, M.P.; Smirnov-Averin, A.P.; Tymosh, B.S.; Shereshkov, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results and methodology of steam-water and acid decontamination of the primary coolant circuit SBR-5 reactor in 1971 are discussed. Regeneration process in a cold trap of the primary coolant circuit is discussed

  2. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  3. Actual situation on the field of decontamination in Slovak and Czech NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazska, M.; Rezbarik, J.; Solcanyi, M.; Trtilek, R.

    2002-01-01

    Many decontamination methods for various applications have proved to provide good results at Slovak and Czech nuclear power plants. A number of mechanical, chemical and electrochemical decontamination methods are available. The selection of a suitable method and decontamination technology is the result of a multicriterial optimization. The plants use the decontamination procedures described in the design documentation. New decontamination procedures aiming to minimize secondary radioactive wastes and corrosion attack on the basic material are being developed. No standardized qualification process, however, exists for such new procedures and large efforts are to be made to introduce them into practice. Methods for decommissioning purposes are based on static or dynamic application of decontamination solutions such as a mixture of formic acid + complexing agent + corrosion inhibitor or dilute HNO 3 . A process consisting in treatment in a solution containing formic acid + complexing agent + corrosion inhibitor (total concentration 3 - 4 mass %, temperature 30 - 35 deg C), whose effect is enhanced by the application of ultrasound (0.4 - 0.5 W per cm 2 decontaminated area) in a specially designed bath, is recommended for segmented metallic parts, which can be then released into the environment and recycled. Electrochemical decontamination in a bath is another efficient decontamination method to achieve unrestricted release of the material into the environment. Efficient decontamination of various highly contaminated materials can be attained by using an electrolyte solution based on citric acid (100 g.dm -3 ) + nitric acid (20 g.dm -3 ) + NH 4 NO 3 (50 g.dm -3 ) and applying a current density of 100 - 200 mA.cm -2 , electrolyte temperature 25 - 50 deg C, with one decontamination cycle period not exceeding 30 minutes. The best results are obtained by electrolysis followed by mechanical treatment using ultrasound. Electrochemical decontamination using a spraying

  4. Evaluation of six decontamination processes on actinide and fission product contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.

    1995-01-01

    In-situ decontamination technologies were evaluated for their ability to: (1) reduce equipment contamination levels to allow either free release of the equipment or land disposal, (2) minimize residues generated by decontamination, and (3) generate residues that are compatible with existing disposal technologies. Six decontamination processes were selected. tested and compared to 4M nitric acid, a traditional decontamination agent: fluoroboric acid (HBF 4 ), nitric plus hydrofluoric acid, alkaline persulfate followed by citric acid plus oxalic acid, silver(II) plus sodium persulfate plus nitric acid, oxalic acid plus hydrogen peroxide plus hydrofluoric acid, and electropolishing using nitric acid electrolyte. The effectiveness of these solutions was tested using prepared 304 stainless steel couponds contaminated with uranium, plutonium, americium, or fission products. The decontamination factor for each of the solutions and tests conditions were determined; the results of these experiments are presented

  5. Decontamination of radioactively contaminated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    By this standard objective conditions to evaluate and test the ease of decontamination of surfaces under laboratory conditions are to be laid down. Ease of decontamination in this context denotes the summed-up effect of two material properties: a) the capacity of the material for retaining radioactive substances at its surface; b) the ease with which these substances are given off again in the course of cleaning processes. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Evaluation of a decontamination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippin, D.W.T.; Hanulik, J.; Schenker, E.; Ullrich, G.

    1981-02-01

    In the scale-up of a laboratory decontamination process difficulties arise due to the limited understanding of the mechanisms controlling the process. This paper contains some initial proposals which may contribute to the quantitative understanding of the chemical and physical factors which influence decontamination operations. General features required in a mathematical model to describe a fluid-solid reaction are discussed, and initial work is presented with a simple model which has had some success in describing the observed laboratory behaviour. (Auth.)

  7. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habayeb, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  8. Development of the complex of nuclear-physical methods of analysis for geology and technology tasks in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodukhin, V.; Silachyov, I.; Poznyak, V.; Gorlachev, I.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the development of nuclear-physical methods of analysis and their applications in Kazakhstan for geological tasks and technology. The basic methods of this complex include instrumental neutron-activation analysis, x-ray fluorescent analysis and instrumental γ-spectrometry. The following aspects are discussed: applications of developed and adopted analytical techniques for assessment and calculations of rare-earth metal reserves at various deposits in Kazakhstan, for technology development of mining and extraction from uranium-phosphorous ore and wastes, for radioactive coal gasification technology, for studies of rare metal contents in chromite, bauxites, black shales and their processing products. (author)

  9. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  10. Random Vibration Analysis of the XM2l Decontaminant Pumper Module of the Modular Decontamination System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colclough, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The XM21 Decontaminant Pumper module of the Modular Decontamination System was analyzed using finite element analysis techniques to show why the first design iteration passed transportation vibration...

  11. Solvent recycle/contaminant reduction testing - Phase I, Task 3. Topical progress report, June 1994--December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. This report describes the solvent recyle test program for EDTA/ammonium carbonate solvent

  12. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, Kristin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  13. Gender involvement in manual material handling (mmh) tasks in agriculture and technology intervention to mitigate the resulting musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman; Sinwal, Neelima; Rathore, Hemu

    2012-01-01

    The lifting and carrying of loads in agriculture on small landholdings are unavoidable. Rural communities often lack access to appropriate technologies which may result in various health hazards. The objective was to study gender participation in agricultural activities involving manual material handling tasks, to assess MSDs experienced in various MMH tasks and to evaluate traditional method and designed technology. The study was conducted on 100 agricultural workers. Data on gender participation in MMH tasks in household, animal husbandry and agriculture and resulting MSDs was gathered. Pre and post assessment of technology intervention was done for NIOSH Lifting Index, QEC, and RPE. The results revealed greater susceptibility of females to musculoskeletal problems in most of the household and animal husbandry tasks. The hand trucks designed were pushing type with power grasp handle. The respondents were advised to carry 5 kg of weight per lift instead of lifting more weight in one lift/minute while filling the hand truck. By decreasing the weight and increasing the number of lifts per minute the respondents were seen falling in green zone indicating significant reduction in NIOSH lifting index. QEC scores concluded that for filling the hand truck 5 kg of weight should be carried to keep the exposure level low.

  14. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B.; Lee, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data

  15. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S. [Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data.

  16. Development of a Toolbox Using Chemical, Physical and Biological Technologies for Decontamination of Sediments to Support Strategic Army Response to Natural Disasters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herbst, D; Niles, P. L; Niles, J; Larson, S; Medina, V; Sheehan, P. L

    2006-01-01

    Environmental technologies, developed by the Department of Defense for life cycle management of energetic materials can be leveraged for use in pollution prevention and remediation of a broad range...

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of the West Valley Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, H.F.; Keel, R.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant through September 1, 1986. The topics addressed are: D and D of areas for reuse by the Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS); D and D of areas for reuse as High Level Waste (HLW) canister storage; and technologies developed in D and D work

  18. Modeling of low temperature plasma for surface and Airborne decontamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; Hagelaar, G.; Belenguer, P.; Guillot, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to study and develop new plasma-based technology for the next generation of molecular decontamination systems. A capacitively coupled plasma is considered for cleaning using the plasma fluxes directed to the walls. The model used for this purpose is the PLASIMO fluid module applied

  19. Decontamination of drug vegetative raw material by relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbanyuk, A.G.; Dikiy, I.L.; Yegorov, A.M.; Linnik, A.F.; Uskov, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    The new technology of decontamination of drug vegetative raw material and medical products is proposed. Advantages of use of relativistic beams in a range of electron energies from 0.5 MeV to 5 MeV for these purposes are shown in comparison with X-radiation of energy from 80 keV to 1 MeV

  20. Decontamination and winter conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenild, C.; Tveten, U.

    1984-12-01

    The report deals with two decontamonation experiments under winter conditions. A snow-covered parking lot was contaminated, and the snow was subsequently removed using standard snow-moving equipment. The snow left behind was collected and the content of contaminant was determined. A non-radioactive contaminant was used. A decontamination factor exceeding 100 was obtained. Although the eksperimental conditions were close to ideal, it is reason to believe that extremely efficient removal of deposited materials on a snow surface is achivable. In another investigation, run-off from agricultural surface, contaminated while covered with snow, was measured A lycimeter was used in this experiment. A stable layer of ice and snow was allowed to form before contamination. The run-off water was collected at each thaw period until all snow and ice was gone. Cs-134 was used as contaminant. Roughly 30% of the Cs-134 with which the area was contaminated ran off with the melt water. Following a reactor accident situation, this would have given a corresponding reduction in the long term doses. Both of these experiments show that consequence calculation assumptions, as they are currently applied to large accident assessment, tend to overestimate the consequences resulting from accidents taking place under winter conditions

  1. Solving decontaminable flooring problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Pennsylvania Power and Light wanted to cover deteriorating concrete in unit 2 of its Susquehanna BWR with a smooth, durable, decontaminable coating. Traditionally, floors in the plant had been coated with epoxy paint, but many of these floors suffered delamination, and failed in three to five years. Painting with epoxy would also interrupt operations for as much as three days while the floor dried, yet critical instruments in some areas had to be monitored at least once per shift. In addition, conventional floor surface preparation produced dust and vibration around sensitive equipment. The solution was a dustless scabbling system for surface preparation, followed by the installation of a high-strength acrylic industrial floor known as Silakal. The work was carried out by Pentek. Silikal bonds to the underlying concrete, so that delamination of the floor will not occur even under severe traffic conditions. Another advantage of this type of flooring is that it cures in one hour, so floor resurfacing has only minimal impact on plant operations. (author)

  2. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of 99 Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying 2 )

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    Since 1973, when the IAEA first introduced the subject of decontamination and decommissioning into its programme, twelve Agency reports reflecting the needs of the Member States on these topics have been published. These reports summarize the work done by various Technical Committees, Advisory Groups, and International Symposia. While the basic technology to accomplish decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) is fairly well developed, the Agency feels that a more rapid exchange of information and co-ordination of work are required to foster technology, reduce duplication of effort, and provide useful results for Member States planning D and D activities. Although the Agency's limited financial resources do not make possible direct support of every research work in this field, the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) creates a forum for outstanding workers from different Member States brought into closer contact with one another to provide for more effective interaction and, perhaps subsequently, closer collaboration. The first IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on decontamination and decommissioning was initiated in 1984. Nineteen experts from 11 Member States and two international organizations (CEC, OECD/NEA) took part in the three Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCM) during 1984-87. The final RCM took place in Pittsburgh, USA, in conjunction with the 1987 International Decommissioning Symposium (sponsored by the US DOE and organized in co-operation with the IAEA and OECD/NEA). The present document summarizes the salient features and achievements of the co-ordinated research work performed during the 1984-87 programme period. The document consists of two parts: Part 1, Summary of the three research co-ordination meetings and Part 2, Final submissions by participants on the research work performed during 1984-1987. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 reports presented. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Decontamination process development for gravels contaminated with uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Park, Uk Ryang; Kim, Seung Su; Kim, Won Suk; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    It is impossible to scrub gravels in a washing tank, because gravels sinks to the bottom of the washing tank. In addition, when electrokinetic decontamination technology is applied to gravels larger than 10 cm, the removal efficiency of uranium from the gravels is reduced, because electro-osmotic flux at the surface of the gravel in electrokinetic cell reduces owing to a reduction of the particle surface area attributable to large-sized gravel. The volume ratio of gravel larger than10 cm in total volume of the soil in KAERI was about 20%. Therefore, it is necessary to study the decontamination process of gravels contaminated with radionuclides. The optimum number of washings for contaminated gravels is considered to be two. In addition, the removal efficiency of contaminated gravel was not related to its weight. For an electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination period of 5 days, 10 days, 15 days, and 20 days, {sup 238}U in gravel was removed by about 42%, 64%, 74%, and 80%, respectively. The more the decontamination time elapsed, the greater the reduction of the removal efficiency ratio of {sup 238}U. The decontamination process for gravels was generated on the basis of the results of washing and electrokinetic electrodialtic experiments.

  5. Results of preliminary experiments on tritium decontamination by UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Shu, Wataru; O'hira, Shigeru; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka

    2000-03-01

    In the point of view of protection of workers from the radiation exposure and the limitation of the contamination with radioactive materials, it is important to decontaminate mobile tritium from plasma facing components of a nuclear fusion reactor at the beginning of their maintenance work. It is considered that the heating is the most effective method for decontamination. However, it is important to develop new decontamination method of adsorbed hydro-carbon based substances from the materials that cannot be heated or the inner pipe of double pipes. This report presents results of preliminary experiments performed for the development of the effective tritium decontamination technique pursuing under US/Japan collaborative program on technology for fusion-fuel processing (Annex IV). In the experiments, the effects of Ultra Violet (UV) irradiation on tritium removal from some kinds of materials, such as poly vinyl chloride -(CH 2 CHCl) n - film, polyethylene film and graphite samples coated by C 2 H 2 plasma were examined. As the result of UV irradiation, it was confined that hydrogen and carbon based compounds could be released from the specimen during UV irradiation. It is concluded that UV irradiation is one of the hopeful candidates for effective tritium decontamination. (author)

  6. Heavy metal decontamination of sludges and soils. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, J.

    1993-06-01

    This research project deals with decontamination technology for contaminated soil and sediments. A pilot plant for the decontamination of soil contaminated with heavy metals has been erected and is operated. The process is arranged in two steps: - heavy metal contaminated solid is decontaminted with acidic extraction. - the heavy metals are separated in a recyclable formation from the process solution you gain in the first process step. Heavy metal contaminated soil, heavy metal contaminated sediments (habour sediments) as well as residue from a soil regeneration plant have been successfully decontaminated in the pilot plan. An adaption of the process is necessary for various materials. High rates of mobilisation of heavy metals (e.g. lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, zinc) were obtained, especially with soil which contains less organic matter. (orig.). 54 figs., 30 tabs., 45 refs [de

  7. Attapulgite, a decontaminating medium, research tool in the radioprotection field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panciatici, G.; Belfiore, A.; Poggianti, M.

    1993-01-01

    Gels based on attapulgite, obtained by mixing attapulgite, a clay, with water or chemicals have been used as decontaminating agents. The method has been optimized through extensive scale laboratory experiments carried out under standard conditions. A wide variety of materials, used in nuclear technologies, and significant radionuclides have been tested. Gels obtained with water only in some cases allow full decontamination, when acids are added to clay, complete contamination removal, is possible except for extreme pHs radionuclides solution and on non-passivated or porous surfaces. The optimized decontaminating technique has successively been set up and applied on materials contaminated by routine or accident. Laboratory scale results have been confirmed through practical use. Process data are reported. This method is simple to perform and requires no special equipment. No liquid radioactive waste arises from the process and the resulting solid waste can be conditioned with cement

  8. Study of the characterization and formulation of the decontamination gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Youn Bong; Bang, In Bae; Bae, Bong Moon; Oh, Gyu Hwan [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    To develop a chemical gel decontamination technology for a removal of non-fixed contaminants during the maintenance and decommissioning works of high radiation hot cells which have been used for a recycling or treatment of spent fuels we have prepare gels with CAB-O-SIL M-5 or Aerosil 380 as viscosifier and some non-ionic surfactants such as diethylene glycol hexyl ether, triethylene glycol dodecyl ether, polyethylene glycol 600, and triethylene glycol butyl ether. Surfactants are playing important roles in manipulating the properties of decontamination the gels. We have found the CAB-O-SIL with triethylene glycol butyl ether and Aerosil with triethylene glycol dodecyl ether systems promising for the decontamination work

  9. Systems analysis of decontamination options for civilian vehicles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this project, which was supported by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Chemical and Biological Division (CBD), was to investigate options for the decontamination of the exteriors and interiors of vehicles in the civilian setting in order to restore those vehicles to normal use following the release of a highly toxic chemical. The decontamination of vehicles is especially challenging because they often contain sensitive electronic equipment, multiple materials some of which strongly adsorb chemical agents, and in the case of aircraft, have very rigid material compatibility requirements (i.e., they cannot be exposed to reagents that may cause even minor corrosion). A systems analysis approach was taken examine existing and future civilian vehicle decontamination capabilities.

  10. Study of the characterization and formulation of the decontamination gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Youn Bong; Bang, In Bae; Bae, Bong Moon; Oh, Gyu Hwan

    2011-04-01

    To develop a chemical gel decontamination technology for a removal of non-fixed contaminants during the maintenance and decommissioning works of high radiation hot cells which have been used for a recycling or treatment of spent fuels we have prepare gels with CAB-O-SIL M-5 or Aerosil 380 as viscosifier and some non-ionic surfactants such as diethylene glycol hexyl ether, triethylene glycol dodecyl ether, polyethylene glycol 600, and triethylene glycol butyl ether. Surfactants are playing important roles in manipulating the properties of decontamination the gels. We have found the CAB-O-SIL with triethylene glycol butyl ether and Aerosil with triethylene glycol dodecyl ether systems promising for the decontamination work

  11. IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment. Subtask 1 Experience with Critical Deployment Issues. Final Technical Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard

    The final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports: Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). The Subtask 1 report included here provides background...... information and objectives of Task 23. It specifically discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration and offshore wind, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. The Subtask 2 report covers OC3 background information and objectives of the task, OC3 benchmark exercises...... of aero-elastic offshore wind turbine codes, monopile foundation modeling, tripod support structure modeling, and Phase IV results regarding floating wind turbine modeling....

  12. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) Decontamination of a Section of a Boeing 747 Cabin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaffstall, Robert M; Garner, Robert P; Bishop, Joshua; Cameron-Landis, Lora; Eddington, Donald L; Hau, Gwen; Spera, Shawn; Mielnik, Thaddeus; Thomas, James A

    2006-01-01

    The use of STERIS Corporation's Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP)* technology as a potential biocide for aircraft decontamination was demonstrated in a cabin section of the Aircraft Environment Research Facility...

  13. Reuse of waste water from high pressure water jet decontamination for reactor decommissioning scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Hou Huijuan

    2011-01-01

    For recycle and reuse of reactor decommissioning scrap metal by high pressure water jet decontamination, large quantity of radioactive waste water will be generated. To save the cost of radioactive waste water treatment and to reduce the cost of the scrap decontamination, this part of radioactive waste water should be reused. Most of the radioactivities in the decontamination waste water come from the solid particle in the water. Thus to reuse the waste water, the solid particle in the waster should be removed. Different possible treatment technologies have been investigated. By cost benefit analysis the centrifugal separation technology is selected. (authors)

  14. IT-adoption and the interaction of task, technology and individuals: a fit framework and a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iller Carola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors of IT adoption have largely been discussed in the literature. However, existing frameworks (such as TAM or TTF are failing to include one important aspect, the interaction between user and task. Method Based on a literature study and a case study, we developed the FITT framework to help analyse the socio-organisational-technical factors that influence IT adoption in a health care setting. Results Our FITT framework ("Fit between Individuals, Task and Technology" is based on the idea that IT adoption in a clinical environment depends on the fit between the attributes of the individual users (e.g. computer anxiety, motivation, attributes of the technology (e.g. usability, functionality, performance, and attributes of the clinical tasks and processes (e.g. organisation, task complexity. We used this framework in the retrospective analysis of a three-year case study, describing the adoption of a nursing documentation system in various departments in a German University Hospital. We will show how the FITT framework helped analyzing the process of IT adoption during an IT implementation: we were able to describe every found IT adoption problem with regard to the three fit dimensions, and any intervention on the fit can be described with regard to the three objects of the FITT framework (individual, task, technology. We also derive facilitators and barriers to IT adoption of clinical information systems. Conclusion This work should support a better understanding of the reasons for IT adoption failures and therefore enable better prepared and more successful IT introduction projects. We will discuss, however, that from a more epistemological point of view, it may be difficult or even impossible to analyse the complex and interacting factors that predict success or failure of IT projects in a socio-technical environment.

  15. Linkage Technologies Which Enhance the Utility of Task-Based Occupational Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phalen, William

    1999-01-01

    .... It is alleged that traditional task-based occupational analysis is too labor intensive, too costly, too cumbersome, and too static to meet the emerging and rapidly changing needs of a business...

  16. Complex tasks force hand laterality and technological behaviour in naturalistically housed chimpanzees: inferences in hominin evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, M; Geribàs, N; Bargalló, A; Llorente, M; Riba, D

    2012-01-01

    Clear hand laterality patterns in humans are widely accepted. However, humans only elicit a significant hand laterality pattern when performing complementary role differentiation (CRD) tasks. Meanwhile, hand laterality in chimpanzees is weaker and controversial. Here we have reevaluated our results on hand laterality in chimpanzees housed in naturalistic environments at Fundació Mona (Spain) and Chimfunshi Wild Orphanage (Zambia). Our results show that the difference between hand laterality in humans and chimpanzees is not as great as once thought. Furthermore, we found a link between hand laterality and task complexity and also an even more interesting connection: CRD tasks elicited not only the hand laterality but also the use of tools. This paper aims to turn attention to the importance of this threefold connection in human evolution: the link between CRD tasks, hand laterality, and tool use, which has important evolutionary implications that may explain the development of complex behaviour in early hominins.

  17. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  18. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  19. Salt decontamination demonstration test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, E.B.; Heng, C.J.

    1983-06-01

    The Salt Decontamination Demonstration confirmed that the precipitation process could be used for large-scale decontamination of radioactive waste sale solution. Although a number of refinements are necessary to safely process the long-term requirement of 5 million gallons of waste salt solution per year, there were no observations to suggest that any fundamentals of the process require re-evaluation. Major accomplishments were: (1) 518,000 gallons of decontaminated filtrate were produced from 427,000 gallons of waste salt solution from tank 24H. The demonstration goal was to produce a minimum of 200,000 gallons of decontaminated salt solution; (2) cesium activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 43,000 below the cesium activity in the tank 24 solution. This decontamination factor (DF) exceeded the demonstration goal of a DF greater than 10,000; (3) average strontium-90 activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 26 to less than 10 3 d/m/ml versus a goal of less than 10 4 d/m/ml; and (4) the concentrated precipitate was washed to a final sodium ion concentration of 0.15 M, well below the 0.225 M upper limit for DWPF feed. These accomplishments were achieved on schedule and without incident. Total radiation exposure to personnel was less than 350 mrem and resulted primarily from sampling precipitate slurry inside tank 48. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  20. Radioactive Decontamination by Strippable Paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraparprachoom, N.; Mishima, K.

    1998-01-01

    The strippable paint, one of the adhesion method, is to decontaminate solid surface of materials or/and a large area. Two kinds of specimen planchet, SUS 304 stainless steel and polycarbonate plastic, contaminated with radioactive 137 Cs were studied under various conditions. It included surface bottom types, the flat and convex concentric circle type, normal condition at room temperature and overheat condition (∼80 degree celsius). This method used coating paints which contains some elements to have a reaction with radioactive materials selectively. ALARA-Decon clear, Rempack-X200 clear, JD-P5-Mrs.Coat and Pro-Blue-color guard were selected to use as the coating paints. The contaminated surface was coated by the strippable paint under the optimum time, followed by peeling the paint seal. The Rempack-X200 showed the best result, the highest decontamination efficiency which are about 99-100% for all conditions of specimens. The JD-P5 and ALARA-Decon showed good results, which are 98-99% decontamination efficiency for the normal condition set of specimens and about 94-97% for the overheat set of specimens. They can decontaminate polycarbonate specimens better than stainless steel specimens. The Pro-Blue-color guard showed the lowest decontamination efficiency of which 60% for polycarbonate specimens at normal condition and 40%, 30% for stainless steel specimens at normal and overheat conditions respectively. There was no effects of surface bottom types significantly

  1. Lessons learned at West Valley during facility decontamination for re-use (1982--1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tundo, D.; Gessner, R.F.; Lawrence, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    The primary mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to solidify a large volume of high-level liquid waste (2.3 million liters -- 600,000 gallons) produced during reprocessing plant operations and stored in underground tanks. This is to be accomplished through the maximum use of existing facilities. This required a significant effort to remove existing equipment and to decontaminate areas for installation of liquid and cement processing systems in a safe environment while maintaining exposure to workers as low as reasonably achievable. The reprocessing plant occupied a building of about 33,000 m 2 (350,000 ft 2 ). When the WVDP was initiated, approximately 6 percent of the plant area was in a non-contaminated condition where personnel could function without protective clothing or radiological controls. From 1982 to 1988, an additional 64 percent of the plant was cleaned up and much of this converted to low- and high-level waste processing areas. The high-level liquid and resulting low-level liquids are now being treated in these areas using an Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS). The Project has now focused attention on installation, qualification and operation of a vitrification system which will convert the remaining high-level waste into borosilicate glass logs. The stabilized waste will be sent to a Federal Repository for long-term storage. From 1982 to 1988, about 70 technical reports were dealing with specific tasks and cleanup efforts. This report provides an overview of the decontamination and decommissioning work done in that period. The report emphasizes lessons learned during that effort. Significant advances were made in: remote and contact decontamination technology; personnel protection and training; planning and procedures; and radiological controls. 62 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Survey of decontamination and decommissioning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusler, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reports and articles on decommissioning have been reviewed to determine the current technology status and also attempt to identify potential decommissioning problem areas. It is concluded that technological road blocks, which limited decommissioning facilities in the past have been removed. In general, techniques developed by maintenance in maintaining the facility have been used to decommission facilities. Some of the more promising development underway which will further simplify decommissioning activities are: electrolytic decontamination which simplifies some decontaminating operations; arc saw and vacuum furnace which reduce the volume of metallic contaminated material by a factor of 10; remotely operated plasma torch which reduces personnel exposure; and shaped charges, water cannon and rock splitters which simplify concrete removal. Areas in which published data are limited are detailed costs identifying various components included in the total cost and also the quantity of waste generated during the decommissioning activities. With the increased awareness of decommissioning requirements as specified by licensing requirements, design criteria for new facilities are taking into consideration final decommissioning of buildings. Specific building design features will evolve as designs are evaluated and implemented

  3. On the problem of radiation decontamination of the domestic sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzova, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    Soviet and foreign investigations on decontamination of drinking, natural, and waste waters with the use of gamma radiation are surveyed. A comparative analysis of data published on radiation decontamination showed that most experimental investigations were carried out on artificially prepared suspensions of microorganisms. The value of such investigations lies in the fact that they give the representation on the relative radiosensitivity of microorganisms in and aqueous medium and enable one to establish the effect of some physicochemical factors on the efficiency of radiation decontamination. Nevertheless, the results of the investigations carried out in this direction do not fully reflect actual conditions at existing decontamination stations and connot serve as a basis for estimating the technological and economic efficiency of the radiation decontamination method

  4. Irradiation as an alternative environment friendly method for microbiological decontamination of herbal raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, P.; Kedzia, B.; Migdal, W.; Owczarczyk, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of herbal raw materials is a serious problem in the production of therapeutical preparations. A good quality of the product, according to the pharmaceutical requirements may be achieved by applying suitable methods of decontamination. The decontamination treatments should be fast and effective against all microorganisms. It should ensure the decontamination of both packaging and the product in order to act effectively against all the microorganisms present and must not reduce the sensory and technological qualities of the commodities. In the paper, the results of comparative investigations on the microbiological decontamination of herbal raw materials by chemical (ethylene oxide, methyl bromide) and physical method (irradiation) are presented. Decontamination of herbal raw materials by irradiation is a method by choice. It is because chemical methods have been recognized recently as not safe to the consumer. Irradiation, in turn, is technically feasible, very effective and friendly enough to environment process

  5. The reuse of scrap and decontamination waste water from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Xie Xiaolong

    2010-01-01

    Huge amount of radioactive scrap with low activity will be generated from reactor decommissioning; the decontamination is concentrated in the surface layer of the scrap. The decontaminated substance can be removed by high pressure water jet to appear the base metal and to reuse the metal. Big amount of radioactive waste water will be generated by this decontamination technology; the radioactive of the waste water is mainly caused by the solid particle from decontamination. To remove the solid particle as clean as possible, the waste water can be reused. Different possible technology to remove the solid particle from the water had been investigated, such as the gravity deposit separation, the filtration and the centrifugal separation etc. The centrifugal separation technology is selected; it includes the hydraulic vortex, the centrifugal filtration and the centrifugal deposit. After the cost benefit analysis at last the centrifugal deposit used butterfly type separator is selected. To reuse the waste water the fresh water consumption and the cost for waste water treatment can be reduced. To reuse the radioactive scrap and the waste water from decommissioning will minimize the radioactive waste. (authors)

  6. The use of technology as one of the possible means of performing instructor tasks: Putting technology acceptance in context.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonenboom, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    For many instructors in higher education, use of a learning management system (LMS) is de facto mandatory. Nevertheless, instructors often have much freedom in deciding which functionalities of the LMS they use; that is, whether they perform each individual instructor task using the LMS.

  7. Chemical decontaminating method for stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive metal wastes comprising passivated stainless steels are chemically decontaminated to such a radioactivity level as that of usual wastes. The present invention for chemically decontaminating stainless steels comprises a first step of immersing decontaminates into a sulfuric acid solution and a second step of immersing them into an aqueous solution prepared by adding oxidative metal salts to sulfuric acid, in which a portion of the surface of stainless steels as decontaminates are chemically ground to partially expose substrate materials and then the above-mentioned decontamination steps are applied. More than 90% of radioactive materials are removed in this method by the dissolution of the exposed substrate materials and peeling of cruds secured to the surface of the materials upon dissolution. This method is applicable to decontamination of articles having complicate shapes, can reduce the amount of secondary wastes after decontamination and also remarkably shorten the time required for decontamination. (T.M.)

  8. The separation of particulate within PFC decontamination wastewater generated by PFC decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Lee, Sung Yeol; Won, Hui Jun; Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, Won Zin; Park, Jin Ho; Narayan, M.

    2005-01-01

    When PFC(Perfluoro carbonate) decontamination technology is applied to removal of radioactive contaminated particulate adhered at surface during the operation of nuclear research facilities, it is necessary to develop a filtration equipment to reuse of PFC solution due to high price, also to minimize the volume of second wastewater. Contaminated characteristics of hot particulate was investigated and a filtration process was presented to remove suspended radioactive particulate from PFC decontamination wastewater generated on PFC decontamination. The range of size of hot particulate adhered at the surface of research facilities measured by SEM was 0.1∼10μm. Hot particulate of more than 2μm in PFC contamination wastewater was removed by first filter and then hot particulate of more than 0.2μm was removed by second filter. Results of filter experiments showed that filtration efficiency of PVDF(Poly vinylidene fluoride), PP(Polypropylene), Ceramic filter was 95∼97%. A ceramic filter showed a higher filtration efficiency with a little low permeate volume. Also, a ceramic of inorganic compound could be broken easily on experiment and has a high price but was highly stable at radioactivity in comparison of PVDF and PP of a macromolecule which generate H 2 gas in alpha radioactivity environment

  9. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  10. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Heat pump concepts for nZEB Technology developments, design tools and testing of heat pump systems for nZEB in the USA: Country report IEA HPT Annex 40 Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4 of the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Payne, W. Vance [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Ling, Jiazhen [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Radermacher, Reinhard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The IEA HPT Annex 40 "Heat pump concepts for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings" deals with the application of heat pumps as a core component of the HVAC system for Nearly or Net Zero energy buildings (nZEB). This report covers Task 2 on the system comparison and optimisation and Task 3 dedicated to the development of adapted technologies for nZEB and field monitoring results of heat pump systems in nZEB. In the US team three institutions are involved and have worked on the following projects: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will summarize development activities through the field demonstration stage for several integrated heat pump (IHP) systems electric ground-source (GS-IHP) and air-source (AS-IHP) versions and an engine driven AS-IHP version. The first commercial GS-IHP product was just introduced to the market in December 2012. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex. The University of Maryland will contribute a software development project to Task 2 of the Annex. The software ThermCom evaluates occupied space thermal comfort conditions accounting for all radiative and convective heat transfer effects as well as local air properties. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF). This residential building was constructed on the NIST campus and officially opened in summer 2013. During the first year, between July 2013 and June 2014, baseline performance of the NZERTF was monitored under a simulated occupancy protocol. The house was equipped with an air-to-air heat pump which included a dedicated dehumidification operating mode. Outdoor conditions, internal loads and modes of heat pump operation were monitored. Field study results with respect to heat pump operation will be reported and recommendations on heat pump optimization for a net zero energy building will be provided. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex.

  12. New sorption-reagent materials for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Golikov, A.P.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Marinin, D.V.; Sokolnitskaya, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Use of selective sorbents in liquid radioactive waste (LRW) management is widely spread in the field of nuclear power objects liquid waste decontamination, since the main objective there is to remove long-lived radionuclides of the nuclear cycle. The latter include, first of all, cesium-137, strontium-90, cobalt-60 and a number of α-irradiators. In this case LRW composition for most of the nuclear power objects is rather simple, except acidic deactivation solutions. At the same time, liquid radioactive wastes of different research centers have a variable chemical and radiochemical composition depending on objectives and tasks of a given center research activities. As a result, application of sorption technologies in such waste decontamination determines special requirements to these sorbents selectivity: a wide spectrum of radionuclides that can be removed and fairly high selectivity enabling to remove radionuclides from solutions of complex chemical composition (containing surfactants, complexing agents etc.). This paper is concerned with studying properties of new materials selective to different radionuclides. These materials are capable to interact with solution components whether already contained in the waste or deliberately added into resulting solution. Such sorption-reagent materials combine universal character of co-precipitation methods with simplicity of sorption methods. In this work we studied sorption-reagent inorganic ion-exchange materials interacting with sulfate-, carbonate-, oxalate-, sulfide-, and permanganate-ions. Insoluble compounds formed as a result of this interaction increase tens- and hundreds-fold the sorption selectivity of different radionuclides - strontium, cobalt, mercury, iron, and manganese as compared to conventional ion-exchange system. By means of X-ray phase analysis, IR-spectroscopy, chemical and radiochemical analysis, we have studied the mechanism of radionuclide sorption on different sorption

  13. Binding affinity and decontamination of dermal decontamination gel to model chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yachao; Elmahdy, Akram; Zhu, Hanjiang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2018-05-01

    Six chemical warfare agent simulants (trimethyl phosphate, dimethyl adipate, 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide, diethyl adipate, chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and diethyl sebacate) were studied in in vitro human skin to explore relationship between dermal penetration/absorption and the mechanisms of simulant partitioning between stratum corneum (SC) and water as well as between dermal decontamination gel (DDGel) and water. Both binding affinity to and decontamination of simulants using DDGel were studied. Partition coefficients of six simulants between SC and water (Log P SC/w ) and between DDGel and water (Log P DDGel/w ) were determined. Results showed that DDGel has a similar or higher binding affinity to each simulant compared to SC. The relationship between Log P octanol/water and Log P SC/w as well as between Log P octanol/water and Log P DDGel/w demonstrated that partition coefficient of simulants correlated to their lipophilicity or hydrophilicity. Decontamination efficiency results with DDGel for these simulants were consistent with binding affinity results. Amounts of percentage dose of chemicals in DDGel of trimethyl phosphate, dimethyl adipate, 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide, diethyl adipate, chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and diethyl sebacate were determined to be 61.15, 85.67, 75.91, 53.53, 89.89 and 76.58, with corresponding amounts absorbed in skin of 0.96, 0.65, 1.68, 0.72, 0.57 and 1.38, respectively. In vitro skin decontamination experiments coupled with a dermal absorption study demonstrated that DDGel can efficiently remove chemicals from skin surface, back-extract from the SC, and significantly reduced chemical penetration into skin or systemic absorption for all six simulants tested. Therefore, DDGel offers a great potential as a NextGen skin Decon platform technology for both military and civilian use. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues facing the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is the cleanup of the three gaseous diffusion plants. In October 1992, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and established the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund to accomplish this task. This mission is being undertaken in an environmentally and financially responsible way by: devising cost-effective technical solutions; producing realistic life-cycle cost estimates, based on practical assumptions and thorough analysis; generating coherent long-term plans which are based on risk assessments, land use, and input from stakeholders; and, showing near-term progress in the cleanup of the gaseous diffusion facilities at Oak Ridge

  15. MAINTAINING ACCESS TO AMERICA'S INTERMODAL PORTS/TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION OF DREDGED SEDIMENT: NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STERN,E.A.; JONES,K.; DONATO,K.; PAULING,J.D.; SONTAG,J.G.; CLESCERI,N.L.; MENSINGER,M.C.; WILDE,C.L.

    1998-05-01

    One of the greatest drivers for maintaining access to America's Intermodal ports and related infrastructure redevelopment efforts over the next several years will be the control and treatment of contaminated sediments dredged from our nation's waterways. More than 306 million cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (400 million cubic yards [cy]) of sediments are dredged annually from U.S. waterways, and each year close to 46 million m{sup 3} (60 million cy) of this material is disposed of in the ocean (EPA 842-F-96-003). The need to protect our environment against undesirable effects from sediment dredging and disposal practices is gaining increased attention from the public and governmental agencies. Meeting this need is a challenging task not only from the standpoint of solving formidable scientific and engineering problems, but also, and more importantly, from the need to implement complex collaborations among the many different parties concerned with the problem. Some 40 years ago, C.P. Snow pointed out the problems involved in communicating between the two cultures of the sciences and the humanities (Snow, 1993). Today, it is necessary to extend Snow's concept to a multicultural realm with groups that include governmental, industrial, environmental, academic, and the general public communicating in different languages based on widely different fundamental assumptions.

  16. Introducing IoT and Wearable Technologies into Task-Based Language Learning for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Guia, Elena; Camacho, Vincent Lopez; Orozco-Barbosa, Luis; Brea Lujan, Victor M.; Penichet, Victor M. R.; Perez, Maria Lozano

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, in an attempt to further motivate students to learn a foreign language, there has been an increasing interest in task-based teaching techniques, which emphasize communication and the practical use of language, thus moving away from the repetitive grammar-translation methods. Within this approach, the significance of…

  17. Ondersteuning van de rijtaak door nieuwe technologie [Supporting the driving task by means of new technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    After giving a description of the way in which the driving task can be supported by (partial) automation this paper considers the behavioural and motivational responses that automation will induce in users. It is concluded that it is at present impossible to estimate what the safety consequences of

  18. Radiation decontamination of dry food ingredients and processing aids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, J

    1984-01-01

    Radiation decontamination of dry ingredients, herbs and enzyme preparations is a technically feasible, economically viable and safe physical process. The procedure is direct, simple, requires no additives and is highly efficient. Its dose requirement is moderate. Radiation doses of 3-10 kGy (0.3-1 mrad) have proved sufficient to reduce the viable counts to a satisfactory level. Ionising radiations do not cause any significant rise in temperature. The flavour, texture or other important technological or sensory properties of most ingredients are not influenced at radiation doses necessary for satisfactory decontamination, and radiation obviates the chemical residue problem. The microflora surviving radiation decontamination of dry ingredients are more susceptible to subsequent antimicrobial treatments. Recontamination can be prevented as the product can be irradiated in its final packaging. Irradiation could be carried out in commercial containers and would result in considerable savings of energy and labour as compared to alternative decontamination techniques. Radiation processing of these commodities is an established technology in several countries and more clearances on irradiated foods are expected to be granted in the near future.

  19. Dilute chemical decontamination resins and the mixed waste issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; Hallman, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    The decontamination of reactor primary systems, sub-systems and components is an important method used to reduce the occupational radiation exposure of nuclear plant personnel. The waste produced by the application of this technology is mainly solid in the form of ion exchange resins. As a result of a recent agreement between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), all radioactive waste must meet EPA burial criteria. The chemicals used in a decontamination and certain metals dissolved during the process, primarily chromium, could render the waste hazardous as well as radioactive or more commonly called a mixed waste. This paper defines mixed waste as described in the EPA directive 9432.00-2, and examine the criteria by which waste is categorized as hazardous. The decontamination waste resin generated by two processes, the CAN-DEREM and the LOMI process, is described in detail. Waste data obtained from decontaminations performed by LN Technologies Corporation including chemical, metal and radionuclide loadings on resins from both PWR and BWR applications are presented

  20. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Ph. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Ramzaev, V. [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Karchovka, Bryandk (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G. [Chernobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, (Belarus); Sobotovich, E. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L. [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors). 23 refs.

  1. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Ph [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Karchovka, Bryandk (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors). 23 refs.

  2. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Ph.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1995-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors)

  3. Soil decontamination at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.L.; Hayden, J.A.; Alford, C.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Stevens, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    A soils decontamination project was initiated, to remove actinides from soils at Rocky Flats. Wet screening, attrition scrubbing with Calgon at high pH, attrition scrubbing at low pH, and cationic flotation were investigated. Pilot plant studies were carried out. Conceptual designs have been generated for mounting the process in semi-trailers

  4. ORNL decontamination and decommissioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    A program has been initiated at ORNL to decontaminate and decommission surplus or abandoned nuclear facilities. Program planning and technical studies have been performed by UCC-ND Engineering. A feasibility study for decommissioning the Metal Recovery Facility, a fuel reprocessing pilot plant, has been completed

  5. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertake...

  6. Decontaminating reagents for radioactive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A decontaminating reagent composition has been developed comprising EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid, and formic acid. Formic acid inhibits the decomposition of both EDTA and citric acid, and yields oxalic acid as a result of its own radiolysis. The invention includes the improvement of initially incorporating formic acid in the mixture and maintaining the presence of formic acid by at least one further addition

  7. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  8. Radioactive decontamination through UV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Gastaud, M.; Sentis, M.; Uteza, O.; Marine, W.; Thouvenot, P.; Alcaraz, J.L.; Le Samedy, J.M.; Blin, D.

    2003-01-01

    A device allowing the radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces through the use of a pulsed UV laser has been designed and tested. This device is composed of a 1 kW excimer laser linked to a bundle of optic fibers and of a system to recover particles and can operate in active zones. Metal surfaces have the peculiarities to trap radio-elements in a superficial layer of oxide that can be eaten away by laser radiation. Different contaminated metals (stainless steels, INCONEL and aluminium) issued from the nuclear industry have been used for the testing. The most important contaminants were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 154-155 Eu and 125 Sb. The ratio of decontamination was generally of 10 and the volume of secondary wastes generating during the process was very low compared with other decontamination techniques. A decontamination speed of 1 m 2 /h has been reached for aluminium. The state of the surface is an important parameter because radio-elements trapped in micro-cracks are very difficult to remove. (A.C.)

  9. Pipe and hose decontamination apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A pipe and hose decontamination apparatus is disclosed using freshly filtered high pressure Freon solvent in an integrated closed loop to remove radioactive particles or other contaminants from items having a long cylindrical geometry such as hoses, pipes, cables and the like. The pipe and hose decontamination apparatus comprises a chamber capable of accomodating a long cylindrical work piece to be decontaminated. The chamber has a downward sloped bottom draining to a solvent holding tank. An entrance zone, a cleaning zone and an exit drying zone are defined within the chamber by removable partitions having slotted rubber gaskets in their centers. The entrance and exit drying zones contain a horizontally mounted cylindrical housing which supports in combination a plurality of slotted rubber gaskets and circular brushes to initiate mechanical decontamination. Solvent is delivered at high pressure to a spray ring located in the cleaning zone having a plurality of nozzles surrounding the work piece. The solvent drains into a solvent holding tank located below the nozzles and means are provided for circulating the solvent to and from a solvent cleaning, distilling and filter unit

  10. Using Information Systems to Leverage Knowledge Management Processes: The Role of Work Context, Job Characteristics and Task-Technology Fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çev.: Nazlı Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focus on how an individual's particular work context, job characteristics and knowledge-related job requirements affect the relationship between task-technology fit (TTF and the use of information systems (IS in knowledge management activities. The literature on Knowledge Management (KM and Knowledge Management Systems (KMS is reviewed to identify relevant constructs and their dimensions. Based on this analysis, a model is proposed and tested. Our findings suggest that providing appropriate IT tools that fit tasks alone is no guarantee that they will be employed to leverage the acquisition, transfer and reuse of knowledge. Certain characteristics of jobs, driven by particular work contexts, generate greater need and opportunity for knowledge use. These latter factors moderate the relationship between TTF and actual use of IS for KM purposes: the greater the need and opportunity to conduct knowledgerelated activities, the stronger the relationship between TTF and actual IS use.

  11. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-06-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  12. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsipov, G.V.; Matveenko, S.A.; Mirkhaidarov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m 2 . The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  13. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  14. Task 10 - technology development integration. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrikson, J.G.; Daly, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), in conjunction with the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), will identify and integrate new technologies to meet site-specific environmental management (EM) requirements at contaminated sites appropriate to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) interests. This paper briefly reports overall progress for three activities: technology management, project management, and technology integration. Work performed over the reporting period has focused on providing logistical and administrative support. In addition, six monthly WPI reports to the EERC are included as appendices. The WPI reports contained detailed information for progress in each activity

  15. Low corrosive chemical decontamination method using pH control. 1. Basic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Ishida, Kazushige; Uetake, Naohito; Anazawa, Kazumi; Nakamura, Fumito; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Tamagawa, Tadashi; Furukawa, Kiyoharu

    2001-01-01

    A new low corrosive decontamination method was developed which uses both oxalic acid and hydrazine as the reducing agent and potassium permanganate as the oxidizing agent. Less corrosion of structural materials during the decontamination is realized by pH control of the reducing agent. The pH of 2.5, attained by adding hydrazine to oxalic acid, was the optimum pH for maintaining a high decontamination effect and lowering the corrosion at the same time. As this reducing agent can be decomposed into carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water by using a catalyst column with hydrogen peroxide, the amount of secondary radioactive waste is small. These good features were demonstrated through actual plant decontamination tasks. (author)

  16. The pharmacological activity of medical herbs after microbiological decontamination by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owczarczyk, H.B.; Migdal, W.; Kedzia, B.

    2000-01-01

    In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology research on microbiological decontamination of medicinal herbs by irradiation has been carried out since 1996. It was shown that using ionizing radiation (a dose of 10 kGy) can obtain satisfactory results of microbiological decontamination of these products. The content of essential biologically active substances such as essential oils, flavonoids, glycosides, anthocyans, antra-compounds, poliphenoloacids, triterpene saponins, oleanosides and plants mucus did not change significantly after irradiation. Pharmacological activity of medicinal herbs has been found satisfactory after microbiological decontamination by irradiation

  17. The pharmacological activity of medical herbs after microbiological decontamination by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarczyk, H. B.; Migdał, W.; K ȩdzia, B.

    2000-03-01

    In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology research on microbiological decontamination of medicinal herbs by irradiation has been carried out since 1996. It was shown that using ionizing radiation (a dose of 10 kGy) can obtain satisfactory results of microbiological decontamination of these products. The content of essential biologically active substances such as essential oils, flavonoids, glycosides, anthocyans, antra-compounds, poliphenoloacids, triterpene saponins, oleanosides and plants mucus did not change significantly after irradiation. Pharmacological activity of medicinal herbs has been found satisfactory after microbiological decontamination by irradiation.

  18. Decontamination Systems Information and Reseach Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Echol E

    1998-04-01

    The following paragraphs comprise the research efforts during the first quarter of 1998 (January 1 - March 31). These tasks have been granted a continuation from the 1997 work and will all end in June 1998. This report represents the last technical quarterly report deliverable for the WVU Cooperative Agreement - Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Final reports for all of the 1997 projects will be submitted afterwards as one document. During this period, groundwater extraction operations were completed on Task 1.6 - Pilot Scale Demonstration of TCE Flushing Through PVDs at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant. The data have been evaluated and graphs are presented. The plot of TCE Concentration versus Time shows that the up-gradient groundwater monitoring well produced consistent levels of TCE contamination. A similar trend was observed for the down-gradient wells via grab samples tested. Groundwater samples from the PVD test pad Zone of Influence showed consistent reductions in TCE concentrations with respect to time. In addition, a natural pulse frequency is evident which will have a significant impact on the efficiency of the contaminant removal under natural groundwater advection/diffusion processes. The relationships between the PVD Extraction Flow Rate versus Cumulative Time shows a clear trend in flow rate. Consistent values between 20 to 30 g.p.m. at the beginning of the extraction duration, to less than 10 g.p.m. by the end of the extraction cycle are observed. As evidenced by the aquifer's diminishing recharge levels, the PVD extraction is affecting the response of the aquifer's natural attenuation capability. Progress was also marked on the Injection and Circulation of Potable Water Through PVDs task. Data reduction from this sequence of testing is ongoing. Work planned for next quarter includes completing the Injection / Extraction of potable water task and beginning the Surfactant Injection and removal task.

  19. On the Task of Information Systems Constructed with Use of Technologies of Cloud Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Sergeevna Simonenkova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research is consideration of the information system constructed with use of technologies of cloud calculations, on an example of one of the most popular cloud platforms — Amazon Web Services.

  20. Issues Related to Experience & Automated Agent Technology in Synthetic Task Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coovert, Michael D; Riddle, Dawn L; Gordon, Thomas; Miles, Donald; Hoffman, Kimberly; King, Thomas; Elliott, Linda; Dalrymple, Mathieu; Schiflett, Samual; Chaiken, Scott

    2001-01-01

    .... Elliott, Stoyen and Chaiken (2000) note the limits of human cognitive processing relative to this demand and suggest agent technology has the potential to offer effective information and decision support the human operator...

  1. Information seeking stopping behavior in online scenarios the impact of task, technology and individual characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmer, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The growing amount of information provided via web-based information technologies forces the users of these technologies to stop seeking for information before having acquired all available information. This stopping decision is either made actively following clear guidelines or subconsciously based on the seeker's intuition. This book analyzes the aforementioned duality by developing and testing a multi-theoretical research model dealing with information seeking stopping behavior in online scenarios. Thus, by delivering insights into the mechanisms that influence information seeking activitie

  2. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

    2002-06-01

    Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. The technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. Using these results, the carbon sequestration potential of the three technologies was then evaluated. The results of these evaluations are given in this final report.

  3. TASK-TECHNOLOGY FIT AND PERSON-JOB FIT: A BEAUTY CONTEST TO IMPROVE THE SUCCESS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Suryani, Woro Dwi; Sumiyana, Sumiyana

    2015-01-01

    This study raises the issue that information system success could be enhanced by complementingother factors. This study investigates the success of information systems by inducing2the task-technology fit (TTF) and person-job fit (PJF) into the DeLone and McLean model. Thisstudy aims to examine, among the two induced factors, which one is able to explain andimprove the success of the information systems implementation.The results of this study indicate that the TTF explains the models’ goodnes...

  4. Transportation cask decontamination and maintenance at the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D.; Hill, R.R.

    1992-04-01

    This study investigates spent fuel cask handling experience at existing nuclear facilities to determine appropriate cask decontamination and maintenance operations at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These operations are categorized as either routine or nonroutine. Routine cask decontamination and maintenance tasks are performed in the cask preparation area at the repository. Casks are taken offline to a separate cask maintenance area for major nonroutine tasks. The study develops conceptual designs of the cask preparation area and cask maintenance area. The functions, layouts, and major features of these areas are also described

  5. Professional development in statistics, technology, and cognitively demanding tasks: classroom implementation and obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Gregory D.; Bakr Khoshaim, Heba; Alsaeed, Maha; Nihan Er, S.

    2012-03-01

    Attending professional development programmes can support teachers in applying new strategies for teaching mathematics and statistics. This study investigated (a) the extent to which the participants in a professional development programme subsequently used the techniques they had learned when teaching mathematics and statistics and (b) the obstacles they encountered in enacting cognitively demanding instructional tasks in their classrooms. The programme created an intellectual learning community among the participants and helped them gain confidence as teachers of statistics, and the students of participating teachers became actively engaged in deep mathematical thinking. The participants indicated, however, that time, availability of resources and students' prior achievement critically affected the implementation of cognitively demanding instructional activities.

  6. The restoration project : decontamination of facilities from chemical, biological and radiological contamination after terrorist action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Volchek, K.; Thouin, G.; Harrison, S.; Kuang, W. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div; Velicogna, D.; Hornof, M.; Punt, M. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Payette, P.; Duncan, L.; Best, M.; Krishnan; Wagener, S.; Bernard, K.; Majcher, M. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Cousins, T.; Jones, T. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Bioterrorism poses a real threat to the public health and national security, and the restoration of affected facilities after a chemical, biological or radiological attack is a major concern. This paper reviewed aspects of a project conducted to collect information, test and validate procedures for site restoration after a terrorist attack. The project began with a review of existing technology and then examined new technologies. Restoration included pickup, neutralization, decontamination, removal and final destruction and deposition of contaminants as well as cleaning and neutralization of material and contaminated waste from decontamination. The project was also intended to test existing concepts and develop new ideas. Laboratory scale experiments consisted of testing, using standard laboratory techniques. Radiation decontamination consisted of removal and concentration of the radioisotopes from removal fluid. General restoration guidelines were provided, as well as details of factors considered important in specific applications, including growth conditions and phases of microorganisms in biological decontamination, or the presence of inhibitors or scavengers in chemical decontamination. Various agents were proposed that were considered to have broad spectrum capability. Test surrogates for anthrax were discussed. The feasibility of enhanced oxidation processes was examined in relation to the destruction of organophosphorus, organochlorine and carbamate pesticides. The goal was to identify a process for the treatment of surfaces contaminated with pesticides. Tests included removal from carpet, porous ceiling tile, steel plates, and floor tiles. General radiation contamination procedures and techniques were reviewed, as well as radiological decontamination waste treatment. It was concluded that there is no single decontamination technique applicable for all contaminants, and decontamination methods depend on economic, social and health factors. The amount of

  7. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  8. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES TASK 4, BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martha L. Rollins; Les Reardon; David Nichols; Patrick Lee; Millicent Moore; Mike Crim; Robert Luttrell; Evan Hughes

    2002-04-01

    Biomass derived energy currently accounts for about 3 quads of total primary energy use in the United States. Of this amount, about 0.8 quads are used for power generation. Several biomass energy production technologies exist today which contribute to this energy mix. Biomass combustion technologies have been the dominant source of biomass energy production, both historically and during the past two decades of expansion of modern biomass energy in the U. S. and Europe. As a research and development activity, biomass gasification has usually been the major emphasis as a method of more efficiently utilizing the energy potential of biomass, particularly wood. Numerous biomass gasification technologies exist today in various stages of development. Some are simple systems, while others employ a high degree of integration for maximum energy utilization. The purpose of this study is to conduct a technical and economic comparison of up to three biomass gasification technologies, including the carbon dioxide emissions reduction potential of each. To accomplish this, a literature search was first conducted to determine which technologies were most promising based on a specific set of criteria. During this reporting period, the technical and economic performances of the selected processes were evaluated using computer models and available literature. The results of these evaluations are summarized in this report.

  9. Is the Use of Information and Communication Technology Related to Performance in Working Memory Tasks? Evidence from Seventh-Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lucy; Nussbaum, Miguel; Preiss, David D.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess whether seventh-grade students use of information and communication technology (ICT) was related to performance on working memory tasks. In addition, the study tested whether the relationship between ICT use and performance on working memory tasks interacted with seventh-grade students' socioeconomic…

  10. Performance and touch characteristics of disabled and non-disabled participants during a reciprocal tapping task using touch screen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Curt B; Sesto, Mary E

    2012-11-01

    Touch screens are becoming more prevalent in everyday environments. Therefore, it is important that this technology is accessible to those with varying disabilities. The objective of the current study was to evaluate performance and touch characteristics (forces, impulses, and dwell times) of individuals with and without a movement disorder during a reciprocal tapping touch screen task. Thirty-seven participants with a motor control disability and 15 non-disabled participants participated. Outcome measures include number of correct taps, dwell time, exerted force, and impulse. Results indicate non-disabled participants had 1.8 more taps than participants with fine motor control disabilities and 2.8 times more than those with gross motor impairments (ptouch characteristics exist between those with and without motor control disabilities. Understanding how people (including those with disabilities) interact with touch screens may allow designers and engineers to ultimately improve usability of touch screen technology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  11. An experience of cleaning and decontamination of the BN-350 reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, K.T.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Arkhipov, V.M.; Baklushin, R.P.; Gorlov, A.I.; Kiselev, G.V.; Rezinkin, P.S.; Samarkin, A.A.; Tverdovsky, N.D.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of start-up, adjustment and operation of the BN-350 reactor there arose a need for cleaning from sodium and decontamination of primary and secondary equipment components. Design schemes of the systems provided for this purpose as well as those specially designed for cleaning of steam generator evaporators are considered. Technological processes of cleaning and decontamination for some reactor components (removable parts of circulating pumps, evaporators, valves) are described, the results are presented. (author)

  12. Laser decontamination of metallic - Metallic surfaces decontamination by using Laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, F.; Objois, L.; Toulemonde, V.

    2014-01-01

    Within the next years, the volume of metallic contaminated with radionuclides will get higher. In that way, the development of new efficient decontamination methods appears to be a promising challenge for industrials as AREVA. Today, even if a few methods already exist, some of them point out a lack of efficiency and for the others, a production of secondary waste not compatible with the actual requirements. Based on this observation, we started the study of a new process based on the Laser technology. This technology is very promising in terms of effectiveness and waste minimization. Since a couple of years we went through an intensive experimental program (including active and non active tests, metallographic observations...) to fully describe this technology and also to prove its interest for our industry. (authors)

  13. Non-destructive decontamination of building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Josef; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    For nondestructive radiation decontamination of surfaces it is necessary to use varnishes, such as ARGONNE, DG1101, DG1108, etc. This text evaluates the use of manufactured strippable coatings for radiation decontamination. To evaluate decontamination capability of such coatings the following varnishes were selected and subsequently used: AZ 1-700 and AXAL 1807S. The varnishes were tested on different building materials surfaces contaminated by short-term radioisotopes of Na-24 or La-140, in water soluble or water insoluble forms. Decontamination quality was assessed by the decontamination efficiency value, defined as the proportion of removed activity to the applied activity. It was found that decontamination efficiency of both used varnishes depends not only on the form of contaminant, but in the case of application of AXAL 1807S varnish it also depends on the method of its application on the contaminated surface. The values of the decontamination efficiency for AZ1-700 varnish range from 46% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 98% for the decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. The decontamination efficiency values determined for AXAL 1807S varnish range from 48% for decontamination of a soluble form of the radioisotope from concrete surface to 96% for decontamination of an insoluble form of the radioisotope from ceramic tile surface. Comparing these values to the values given for the decontaminating varnishes we can conclude that AXAL 1807S varnish is possible to use on all materials, except highly porous materials, such as plasterboard or breeze blocks, or plastic materials. AZ 1-700 varnish can be used for all dry materials except plasterboard.

  14. Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorial issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2008-07-15

    The focus of the July-August issue is on Decontamination, decommissioning, and vendor advertorials. Articles and reports in this issue include: D and D technical paper summaries; The role of nuclear power in turbulent times, by Tom Chrisopher, AREVA, NP, Inc.; Enthusiastic about new technologies, by Jack Fuller, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; It's important to be good citizens, by Steve Rus, Black and Veatch Corporation; Creating Jobs in the U.S., by Guy E. Chardon, ALSTOM Power; and, and, An enviroment and a community champion, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovations article is titled Best of the best TIP achievement 2008, by Edward Conaway, STP Nuclear Operating Company.

  15. Multimodal Learning Analytics and Education Data Mining: Using Computational Technologies to Measure Complex Learning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Worsley, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    New high-frequency multimodal data collection technologies and machine learning analysis techniques could offer new insights into learning, especially when students have the opportunity to generate unique, personalized artifacts, such as computer programs, robots, and solutions engineering challenges. To date most of the work on learning analytics…

  16. Evaluating Progression in Students' Relational Thinking While Working on Tasks with Geospatial Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Favier, Tim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33811534X; van der Schee, Joop|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072719575

    2014-01-01

    One of the facets of geographic literacy is the ability to think in a structured way about geographic relationships. Geospatial technologies offer many opportunities to stimulate students’ geographic relational thinking. The question is: How can these opportunities be effectuated? This paper

  17. Aero-Propulsion Technology (APT) Task V Low Noise ADP Engine Definition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, V.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify and evaluate noise reduction technologies for advanced ducted prop propulsion systems that would allow increased capacity operation and result in an economically competitive commercial transport. The study investigated the aero/acoustic/structural advancements in fan and nacelle technology required to match or exceed the fuel burned and economic benefits of a constrained diameter large Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) compared to an unconstrained ADP propulsion system with a noise goal of 5 to 10 EPNDB reduction relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 at each of the three measuring stations namely, takeoff (cutback), approach and sideline. A second generation ADP was selected to operate within the maximum nacelle diameter constrain of 160 deg to allow installation under the wing. The impact of fan and nacelle technologies of the second generation ADP on fuel burn and direct operating costs for a typical 3000 nm mission was evaluated through use of a large, twin engine commercial airplane simulation model. The major emphasis of this study focused on fan blade aero/acoustic and structural technology evaluations and advanced nacelle designs. Results of this study have identified the testing required to verify the interactive performance of these components, along with noise characteristics, by wind tunnel testing utilizing and advanced interaction rig.

  18. Learners' Perceptions of the Use of Mobile Technology in a Task-Based Language Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrich, Simone L.

    2016-01-01

    This research explored perceptions of learners studying English in private language schools regarding the use of mobile technology to support language learning. Learners were first exposed to both a mobile assisted and a mobile unassisted language learning experience, and then asked to express their thoughts on the incorporation of mobile devices…

  19. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, E.; Fajardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m 2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  20. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)