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Sample records for deboned turkey meat

  1. Detection of irradiated deboned turkey meat using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard; Stevenson, M. Hilary

    Bone fragments were extracted from two blocks of frozen deboned turkey meat (irradiated and non-irradiated) using alcoholic KOH digestion. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to differentiate between the samples. Comparison of an alcoholic KOH digestion procedure with a freeze drying and grinding method showed that the former method gave a signal which was 78% of that obtained using the freeze drying procedure. Regression analysis of the results obtained after subjection of the original non-irradiated sample to irradiation doses of 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 kGy gave a linear relationship between irradiation dose and ESR signal strength over this range. Using this relationship the estimated mean dose received by the irradiated block was 4.72 kGy.

  2. Detection of irradiated deboned turkey meat using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, Richard; Stevenson, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    Bone fragments were extracted from two blocks of frozen deboned turkey meat (irradiated and non-irradiated) using alcoholic KOH digestion. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to differentiate between the samples. Comparison of an alcoholic KOH digestion procedure with a freeze drying and grinding method showed that the former method gave a signal which was 78% of that obtained using the freeze drying procedure. Regression analysis of the results obtained after subjection of the original non-irradiated sample to irradiation doses of 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 kGy gave a linear relationship between irradiation dose and ESR signal strength over this range. Using this relationship the estimated mean dose received by the irradiated block was 4.72 kGy. (author)

  3. Development of Sausages Containing Mechanically Deboned Chicken Meat Hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S K; Choi, J S; Choi, Y J; Lee, S J; Lee, S Y; Hur, S J

    2015-07-01

    Pork meat sausages were prepared using protein hydrolysates from mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM). In terms of the color, compared to the controls before and after storage, the redness (a*) was significantly higher in sausages containing MDCM hydrolysates, ascorbate, and sodium erythorbate. After storage, compared to the other sausage samples, the yellowness (b*) was lower in the sausages containing ascorbate and sodium erythorbate. TBARS was not significantly different among the sausage samples before storage, whereas TBARS and DPPH radical scavenging activities were significantly higher in the sausagescontainingascorbate and sodium erythorbate, compared to the other sausage samples after 4 wk of storage. In terms of sensory evaluation, the color was significantly higher in the sausages containing MDCM hydrolysates, ascorbate, and sodium erythorbate, compared to the other sausage samples after 4 wk of storage. The "off-flavor" and overall acceptability were significantly lower in the sausages containing MDCM hydrolysates than in the other sausage samples. In most of the developed countries, meat from spent laying hens is not consumed, leading toan urgent need for effectively utilization or disposal methods. In this study, sausages were prepared using spent laying hens and protein hydrolysates from mechanically deboned chicken meat. Sausage can be made by spent laying hens hydrolysates, although overall acceptability was lower than those of other sausage samples. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Use of a linear accelerator for decontamination of deboned poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, T.; Vassenaix, M.

    1990-01-01

    We describe the integration of a linear accelerator into an industrial production line for the decontamination of deboned poultry meat and the methods used to accurately obtain the doses delivered to the ionized samples. (author)

  5. The effects of low atmosphere stunning and deboning time on broiler breast meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, M W; Radhakrishnan, V; Vizzier-Thaxton, Y; Christensen, K; Joseph, P; Williams, J B; Schmidt, T B

    2012-12-01

    Research was conducted to determine the effect of stunning method (low atmosphere pressure, LAPS, and electrical stunning, ES) and deboning time (0.75 and 4 h) on breast meat quality (n = 576, 144 birds per treatment) in a commercial processing plant. Breast meat quality was evaluated through determining pH, Commission Internationale d'Eclairage L*a*b*, cooking yield, shear force, and consumer acceptability. The onset of rigor mortis was more rapid (P meat from LAPS-stunned birds compared with ES-stunned birds, but no differences existed (P > 0.05) among stunning methods with respect to final pH at 24 h. As expected, breast meat that was deboned at 4 h required less shear force (P meat from LAPS or ES broilers that were deboned at the same time postmortem. However, when samples were marinated with 2% NaCl and 0.5% phosphate, there was no difference in Allo-Kramer shear force between ES 4 h and LAPS 4-h samples, but the ES 0.75-h samples had lower shear force values (P < 0.05) than the LAPS 0.75-h samples. On average, the LAPS 4-h treatment had greater overall acceptability ratings (P < 0.05) than other treatments, and the ES and LAPS 4-h treatments had more acceptable (P < 0.05) texture than the ES and LAPS 0.75-h treatments. Cluster analysis revealed that the 2 largest consumer groups liked all chicken breast fillet treatments, but a larger proportion of consumers liked the 4-h LAPS and ES treatments compared with the 0.75-h LAPS and ES treatments. In addition, consumers who rated baked chicken breast as at least moderately acceptable preferred (P < 0.05) the 4-h LAPS samples over the 4-h ES samples. The present study revealed that both the LAPS and ES systems can be successfully used in commercial poultry plants without detrimental breast fillet quality problems with respect to color, texture, and consumer acceptance.

  6. Integration of a linear accelerator into a production line of mechanically deboned separated poultry meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Theo; Volle, Christophe

    2000-03-01

    Linear accelerators, commonly called Linacs, are being used for different industrial processes. This kind of machine produces high power electron beams and can treat many products with a high throughput. The main application of a Linac is the sterilization of medical disposable devices, polymerization and decontamination of food products. Salmonella commonly contaminates poultry. Thanks to E-beam treatment, it eradicates the pathogen quickly and permits the use of meat that should have been thrown away because of its infection. The world's first Linac dedicated to treat mechanically deboned poultry meat is located in Brittany at the Société des Protéines Industrielles. It is a Thomson CSF Linac product, the CIRCE II, with an energy of 10 MeV and a power of 10 kW. This Linac has been used for more than 8 years, and its technology is fully proven.

  7. Integration of a linear accelerator into a production line of mechanically deboned separated poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadat, Theo; Volle, Christophe

    2000-01-01

    Linear accelerators, commonly called Linacs, are being used for different industrial processes. This kind of machine produces high power electron beams and can treat many products with a high throughput. The main application of a Linac is the sterilization of medical disposable devices, polymerization and decontamination of food products. Salmonella commonly contaminates poultry. Thanks to E-beam treatment, it eradicates the pathogen quickly and permits the use of meat that should have been thrown away because of its infection. The world's first Linac dedicated to treat mechanically deboned poultry meat is located in Brittany at the Societe des Proteines Industrielles. It is a Thomson CSF Linac product, the CIRCE II, with an energy of 10 MeV and a power of 10 kW. This Linac has been used for more than 8 years, and its technology is fully proven. (author)

  8. Effect of three postmortem electrical stimulation treatments on the quality of early-deboned broiler breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Electrical stimulation (ES) of animal carcasses during postmortem has been commonly used by beef industry to enhance meat tenderness, and has been recently adapted for commercial use with poultry. Majority of published investigations of ES effects on the tenderness of early-deboned poultry breast m...

  9. Edible Packaging Film Derived from Mechanically Deboned Chicken Meat Proteins: Effect of Transglutaminase on Physicochemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayli, Damla; Turhan, Sadettin; Saricaoglu, Furkan Turker

    2017-01-01

    In this study, effect of transglutaminase (TGase) addition on physical, water barrier, optical and mechanical properties of mechanically deboned chicken meat protein (MDCM-P) films was investigated. When TGase was added to the films, the thickness increased, but the solubility decreased. Films treated with TGase exhibited higher water vapor permeability than control film (pfilms decreased, but a* and b* values increased. All films showed very good barrier properties against UV light. The highest tensile strength was obtained in MDCM-P films containing 3% TGase (pfilm matrix. TGase treated films showed smoother and ordered surface structure and homogeneous and compact microstructure. The results indicated that TGase use can be an effective approach in improving the solubility and mechanical properties of MDCM-P films. PMID:29147086

  10. Replacement of mechanically deboned chicken meat with its protein hydrolysate in mortadella-type sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Pasqualin Cavalheiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mortadella-type sausage manufactured using mechanically deboned chicken meat were reformulated replacing MDCM with increasing amounts of MDCM protein hydrolysates (10%, 20%, and 30%, and their physicochemical, microbiological, and sensorial characteristics were evaluated for 60 days of storage at 4 °C. The higher substitutions resulted in sausages more susceptible to lipid oxidation with higher TBARS values during storage; however, these values were lower than the organoleptic perception threshold. The sausages were darker and less red, with lower lightness (L* and redness (a* values than those of the control treatment. They had soft texture, which was evidenced by both the instrumental and sensory analysis. Therefore, the formulation containing 10% of MDCM protein hydrolysates proved to be the most suitable for mortadella-type sausage elaboration.

  11. Effect of Mechanically Deboned Chicken Meat Hydrolysates on the Physicochemical Properties of Imitation Fish Paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Keun Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated on the effects of adding mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM hydrolysates on the quality properties of imitation fish paste (IFP during storage. IFP was prepared from Alaska Pollack, spent laying hens surimi and protein hydrolysates which were enzymatically extracted from MDCM. The study was designed as a 3×4 factorial design with three MDCM hydrolysate content groups (0%, 0.4%, and 0.8% and four storage times (0, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Addition of MDCM hydrolysates increased crude fat content but lowered water content (p<0.05. The breaking force of IFP, an indicator of gel formation, increased in treated groups compared to control (p<0.05. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE activity was inhibited and free radical scavenging activity increased with increasing MDCM hydrolysate content (p<0.05. In conclusion, the addition of MDCM to IFP improves gel characteristics. Additionally, protein hydrolysates from MDCM serve as a potential source of ACE inhibiting peptides.

  12. Quality characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken meat irradiated with different dose rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Gomes, Heliana de Azevedo [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: polibrito@yahoo.com.br; cvroque@cnen.gov.br; htfukuma@cnen.gov.br; hgomes@cnen.gov.br; Cipolli, Katia Maria Vieira Avelar Bittencourt [Sao Paulo Agribusiness Technology Agency (APTA), Monte Alegre do Sul, SP (Brazil). Polo Regional do Leste Paulista]. E-mail: katiacipolli@aptaregional.sp.gov.br; Pereira, Jose Luiz [Campinas State University UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences]. E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br

    2007-07-01

    Mechanically Deboned Chicken Meat (MDCM) is a low cost raw material used in the production of emulsified prepared food, but presents a favorable medium for development of microorganisms. Several studies were carried out with irradiation of edible goods in order to establish a dose that would be capable of decreasing levels of microorganisms without altering the sensorial and nutritional characteristics of the food. Frozen samples of MDCM with skin were irradiated with doses of 0.0 kGy, 3.0 kGy-4.04 kGy.h{sup -1}, and 3.0- 0.32 kGy.h{sup -1}. Individual lots of irradiated and control samples were evaluated during the 11 day refrigeration period for the following parameters: total count of psychotropic bacteria, substances reactive to Thiobarbituric Acid, sensorial evaluation (irradiated odor, oxidized odor, pink and brown colors). The average values in this period were 4.28 log (CFU.g{sup -1}), 2.32 log (CFU.g{sup -1}), and 1.68 log (CFU.g{sup -1}) for control samples, low and high dose rate, respectively. TBARS average values for control samples, low and high dose rate were 0.38 mg.Mal.kg{sup -1}, 2.89 mg.Mal.kg{sup -1}, and 3.64 mg.Mal.kg{sup -}'1, respectively. A difference between irradiated samples and the control sample was observed. The 3.0 kGy-4.04 kGy.h{sup -1} dose rate was verified as the best condition for MDCM processing through the evaluation of all the variables in the conditions of the present study. (author)

  13. Quality characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken meat irradiated with different dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Gomes, Heliana de Azevedo; Cipolli, Katia Maria Vieira Avelar Bittencourt; Pereira, Jose Luiz

    2007-01-01

    Mechanically Deboned Chicken Meat (MDCM) is a low cost raw material used in the production of emulsified prepared food, but presents a favorable medium for development of microorganisms. Several studies were carried out with irradiation of edible goods in order to establish a dose that would be capable of decreasing levels of microorganisms without altering the sensorial and nutritional characteristics of the food. Frozen samples of MDCM with skin were irradiated with doses of 0.0 kGy, 3.0 kGy-4.04 kGy.h -1 , and 3.0- 0.32 kGy.h -1 . Individual lots of irradiated and control samples were evaluated during the 11 day refrigeration period for the following parameters: total count of psychotropic bacteria, substances reactive to Thiobarbituric Acid, sensorial evaluation (irradiated odor, oxidized odor, pink and brown colors). The average values in this period were 4.28 log (CFU.g -1 ), 2.32 log (CFU.g -1 ), and 1.68 log (CFU.g -1 ) for control samples, low and high dose rate, respectively. TBARS average values for control samples, low and high dose rate were 0.38 mg.Mal.kg -1 , 2.89 mg.Mal.kg -1 , and 3.64 mg.Mal.kg - '1, respectively. A difference between irradiated samples and the control sample was observed. The 3.0 kGy-4.04 kGy.h -1 dose rate was verified as the best condition for MDCM processing through the evaluation of all the variables in the conditions of the present study. (author)

  14. Effect of different radiation dose rates on refrigerated mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Gomes, Heliana de Azevedo; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Laboratorios de Pocos de Caldas (COLAB)]. E-mail: polibrito@yahoo.com.br; hgomes@cnen.gov.br; htfukuma@cnen.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    Samples of mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) were irradiated while frozen with doses of 0.0 kGy, 3.0 kGy - 4.04 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 0.32 kGy.h{sup -1}. Individual lots of irradiated and non irradiated samples were evaluated for Substances Reactive to Thiobarbituric Acid (TBARS) and total count of psychotropic bacteria, while in refrigerated storage (2 {+-}1 deg C), for 11 days. The values for percentage of recovery for 1,1,3,3-tetraetoxipropane (TEP) and for conversion of the K value for samples irradiated with 3.0 kGy - 4.35 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 0.3 kGy.h{sup -1} and samples non irradiated were, respectively: 80.3 %, 70.3 % and 80.4 % and 9.1, 11.2 and 9.1. The results showed that there was not a difference for the TBARS values when irradiated and non irradiated samples were compared up to the forth day of refrigerated storage. Between the seventh and eleventh day of storage the TBARS values increased gradually when values obtained for non irradiated and those samples irradiated with doses of 3.0 kGy - 0.3 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 4.35 kGy.h{sup -1} were compared. The average values for psychotropic bacteria obtained for samples non irradiated and those irradiated with doses of 3.0 kGy - 0.32 kGy.h{sup -1} and 3.0 kGy - 4.04 kGy.h{sup -1}, during the second and eleventh day of frozen storage were respectively 6.68 log (UFC.g{sup -1}), 2.87 log (UFC.g{sup -1}) and 2.66 log (UFC.g{sup -1}). When both variables were evaluated, it was verified that samples irradiated with a dose rate of 0.32 kGy.{sup -1} presented the smallest values of TBARS than those samples irradiated with a dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h{sup -1}, from the seventh day of refrigerated storage and bacterial count within the legal limits allowed by the regulation, being considered the best dosage rate for processing MDCM, in the conditions of the present study. (author)

  15. Effect of mechanically deboned poultry meat content on technological properties and sensory characteristics of lamb and mutton sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massingue, Armando Abel; de Almeida Torres Filho, Robledo; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; de Lemos Souza Ramos, Alcinéia; Fontes, Edimar Aparecida Filomeno; Perez, Juan Ramon Olalquiaga; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to develop a value-added product concerning technological and sensory characteristics changes of the use of mechanically deboned poultry meat (MDPM) as meat replacer in lamb and mutton emulsion-type sausages (mortadella). Sausages were produced with lamb and mutton and with different contents of MDPM. Six treatments, using lamb or mutton and 0%, 30%, and 60% of MDPM in relation to the meat batter, were produced and analyzed for pH, proximal composition, calcium and residual nitrite content, water activity, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), instrumental color and texture profile. The sensory profile of the mortadella's was also evaluated by acceptance test and check-all-that-applies (CATA) analysis. The MDPM addition increased (psausage formulations, but mutton sausage had (psausage. The pH, water activity, TBARS index and color was not affected by MDPM additions, while the mutton sausages were significantly redder (higher a *, C *, and lower h °) and darker (lower L *) than lamb sausages. Adding up to 60% of MDPM reduced (psausages hardness and chewiness. Overall, the meat replacement by MDPM increased the sausages acceptance, but the mutton sausage with 30% of MDPM replacer were the most preferred. Consumers related that pink color, glossy appearance, poultry meat-like taste, soft texture, juicy and greasy mouth feel to all sausages contain MDPM according to CATA analysis. Mutton from culled ewes can be utilized for mortadella production with 30% replacement of lean mutton and fat by MDPM.

  16. Microbiology of Fresh Comminuted Turkey Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-04-12

    during processing procedures. equipment and meat Scontrol as well as processing procedures within the become contaminated with the organisms carried by...Since comminuted turkey is a new product. its level of processed turkey products. Further processed products, bacterial contamination is not reflected in... abattoirs and processing plants. be involved in outbreaks of staphylococcal intoxication. Cooked red meat products with their natural enteric However, if

  17. Procedure and Checklist for Water Vaccination of Meat Turkey Flocks

    OpenAIRE

    Frame, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination for certain diseases is an important component of the health management program for commercial meat turkey production. Because of logistical challenges almost all routine vaccination of meat turkey flocks is administered through the drinking water.

  18. Effect of ionizing radiation dose, temperature, and atmosphere on the survival of Salmonella typhimurium in sterile, mechanically deboned chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D W; Boyd, G

    1991-02-01

    The response to gamma radiation (0 to 3.60 kGy; 100 krad = 1 kGy) of Salmonella typhimurium was tested in otherwise sterile, mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) in the absence of competing microflora. Response was determined at temperatures of -20 to +20 C and when the MDCM was packaged in vacuum or in the presence of air. A central composite response-surface design was used to test the response of the pathogen to the treatments in a single experiment. Predictive equations were developed from the analyses of variances of the resulting data. The accuracy of each predictive equation was tested by further studies of the effects of gamma radiation on S. typhimurium in the presence or absence of air at -20, 0, and +20 C. All data were then analyzed to refine the predictive equations further. Both the original and the refined equations adequately predicted the response of S. typhimurium in MDCM to gamma radiation doses up to 3.60 kGy in the presence of air or in vacuo. Gamma irradiation was significantly more lethal for S. typhimurium in the presence of air and at higher temperatures. The final equations predict a reduction in the number of surviving Salmonella in MDCM irradiated to 1.50 kGy at -20 C of 2.53 logs in air or 2.12 logs if irradiated in vacuum. If the contaminated MDCM were to receive a dose of 3.0 kGy at -20 C in air, the number of Salmonella would be decreased by 4.78 logs, and if irradiated in vacuum, by 4.29 logs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effect of ionizing radiation dose, temperature, and atmosphere on the survival of Salmonella typhimurium in sterile, mechanically deboned chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.

    1991-01-01

    The response to gamma radiation (0 to 3.60 kGy; 100 krad = 1 kGy) of Salmonella typhimurium was tested in otherwise sterile, mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) in the absence of competing microflora. Response was determined at temperatures of -20 to +20 C and when the MDCM was packaged in vacuum or in the presence of air. A central composite response-surface design was used to test the response of the pathogen to the treatments in a single experiment. Predictive equations were developed from the analyses of variances of the resulting data. The accuracy of each predictive equation was tested by further studies of the effects of gamma radiation on S. typhimurium in the presence or absence of air at -20, 0, and +20 C. All data were then analyzed to refine the predictive equations further. Both the original and the refined equations adequately predicted the response of S. typhimurium in MDCM to gamma radiation doses up to 3.60 kGy in the presence of air or in vacuo. Gamma irradiation was significantly more lethal for S. typhimurium in the presence of air and at higher temperatures. The final equations predict a reduction in the number of surviving Salmonella in MDCM irradiated to 1.50 kGy at -20 C of 2.53 logs in air or 2.12 logs if irradiated in vacuum. If the contaminated MDCM were to receive a dose of 3.0 kGy at -20 C in air, the number of Salmonella would be decreased by 4.78 logs, and if irradiated in vacuum, by 4.29 logs

  20. The effect on turkey meat shelf life of modified-atmosphere packaging with an argon mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Barreto, A S

    2009-09-01

    There is a lack of knowledge related to the action of Ar on microbial development and prevention of oxidation when applied to raw meat under modified-atmosphere package (MAP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an anaerobic gas mixture with Ar on spoilage flora growth, color, and lipid oxidation stability of turkey meat under MAP stored at 0 degrees C. Breast muscles samples were collected on different working days from turkey carcasses (BUT9 and BIG6), fast-cooled in a tunnel (-2 degrees C, 2 m.s(-1), 90% RH) for 2 h and selected to be deboned according current practices in industrial slaughterhouses. The breasts were cut into slices that were individually packaged under aerobiosis (P0) and in 4 different modified atmospheres containing different gas mixtures as (P1) 100% N2, (P2) 50% Ar-50% N2, (P3) 50% Ar-50% CO2, and (P4) 50% N2-50% CO2. All samples were stored at 0+/-1 degrees C in the dark for between 12 and 25 d. Meat samples packaged in P0 were analyzed for their microbial and physicochemical characteristics on d 0, 5, and 12 of storage and then extended to 19 and 25 d when samples were under MAP. The microbial shelf life period extension of MAP sliced turkey meat compared with aerobic packaging (5-d shelf life) is 1 wk more for P1 and P2 mixtures, 2 wk for P4, and 3 wk for P3. The Ar-CO2 mixture was more efficient in delaying flora development than CO2-N2 with 1 log difference on the 25th day of storage, for total psychrotrophic counts, total anaerobic counts, and Brochothrix thermosphacta. The presence of Ar on gas mixtures did not seem to have any additional protective effect on lipid turkey meat oxidation.

  1. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula

    2012-01-01

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  2. Serotype distribution of Salmonella isolates from turkey ground meat and meat parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Irfan; Goncuoglu, Muammer; Ayaz, Naim Deniz; Ellerbroek, Lüppo; Ormanci, Fatma Seda Bilir; Kangal, Ozlem Iseri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out the serotype distribution of 169 Salmonella colonies recovered from 112 Salmonella positive ground turkey (115 colonies) and 52 turkey meat parts (54 colonies). Out of 15 Salmonella serotypes: S. Corvallis, S. Kentucky, S. Bredeney, S. Virchow, S. Saintpaul and S. Agona were identified as the predominant serovars at the rates of 27%, 13%, 12%, 12%, 11%, and 10%, respectively. Other serotypes were below 6% of the total isolates. All S. Kentucky and S. Virchow and most of the S. Corvallis (39/46) and S. Heidelberg (9/9) serotypes were recovered from ground turkey. The results indicate that turkey ground meat and meat parts were contaminated with quite distinct Salmonella serotypes. This is the first study reporting Salmonella serotype distribution in turkey meat and S. Corvallis as predominant serotype in poultry meat in Turkey.

  3. Serotype Distribution of Salmonella Isolates from Turkey Ground Meat and Meat Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Erol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to find out the serotype distribution of 169 Salmonella colonies recovered from 112 Salmonella positive ground turkey (115 colonies and 52 turkey meat parts (54 colonies. Out of 15 Salmonella serotypes: S. Corvallis, S. Kentucky, S. Bredeney, S. Virchow, S. Saintpaul and S. Agona were identified as the predominant serovars at the rates of 27%, 13%, 12%, 12%, 11%, and 10%, respectively. Other serotypes were below 6% of the total isolates. All S. Kentucky and S. Virchow and most of the S. Corvallis (39/46 and S. Heidelberg (9/9 serotypes were recovered from ground turkey. The results indicate that turkey ground meat and meat parts were contaminated with quite distinct Salmonella serotypes. This is the first study reporting Salmonella serotype distribution in turkey meat and S. Corvallis as predominant serotype in poultry meat in Turkey.

  4. Effect of Sodium Tripolyphosphate (STPP) to Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics of Turkey Nuggets Derived from White and Dark Turkey Meats

    OpenAIRE

    Surjoseputro, Sutarjo; Naryanto, Petrus Sri; Fatoni, Meliawati

    2014-01-01

    Turkey meat is a well-known foodstuff and source of protein in the United States, while in Indonesia turkey meat has not yet optimally processed as a foodstuff. The advantages of turkey meat are: has low calorie, high protein than other poultry meats, and good source of vitamin and mineral. Contrary to chicken meat, turkey meat has low fat content and high collagen, and therefore makes the meat very tough. This research was using two kinds of meat, the white meat (the breast) and the dark mea...

  5. Whole genome QTL mapping for growth, meat quality and breast meat yield traits in turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.L.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Vereijken, J.M.; Groenen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species and is the second largest contributor to the world's poultry meat production. Demand of turkey meat is increasing very rapidly. Genetic markers linked to genes affecting quantitative traits can increase the selection

  6. Turkey breast meat development and maximising the genetic potential

    OpenAIRE

    NOIRAULT JÉRÔME

    2015-01-01

    Breast Meat is the most lucrative part of the turkey carcass contributing to 70% of the profit whilst only representing 23-26% of the liveweight. Thus breast meat is the most sought after genetic trait in the poultry industry with the aim to maximise breast meat per bird in percentage of the carcass. Before assessing Breast meat yield (BMY) and its deposition it is necessary to look at muscle development.

  7. Effect of different ionizing radiation doses and dose rates, using Cobalt-60 and electrons beam sources, on the staphylococcal enterotoxin inoculated in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomarico Neto, Walter; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Kodama, Yasko, E-mail: ykodama@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz, E-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br, E-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of food irradiation is the destruction of present pathogenic microorganisms and the increase of shelf life of foods. To achieve this process, the source of cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator can be used. The mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used for the production of traditional meat products, and it may come to present pathogenic microorganisms such as staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that produces enterotoxin, which causes food poisoning. The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of ionizing irradiation with different doses and dose rates, deriving from different radiation sources, on staphylococcal enterotoxin type B (SEB) in the MDCM. 50 g samples of MDCM were prepared in a batch of 6 kg of MDCM. The samples were contaminated, with the exception of the control, with SEB in amounts of about 100 ng. Then they were conditioned in a transparent bag made of low density polyethylene, frozen at -18{+-}1 deg C overnight and irradiated in these conditions with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy, and with three different dose rates, both in the Cobalt-60 and the electron accelerator. The experiments were conducted in quintuplicate. The SEB extraction from the MDCM was performed according to the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of the kit VIDAS Staph Enterotoxin II (bioMerrieux). The principle of mass balance was used to determine the actual amount of SEB removed by irradiation. The treatment that presented the best results was the one with a dose of 1.5 kGy, high dose rate of the electron accelerator. (author)

  8. Peach skin powder inhibits oxidation in cooked turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Han, I; Bridges, W C; Dawson, P L

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the antioxidant activity of peach skin and test the antioxidant effect of peach skin powder on cooked ground turkey meat during 12 d of refrigerated storage. Antioxidant activity of 3 cultivars of peaches grown in South Carolina was first evaluated by 3 antioxidant assays. The peach variety O'Henry showed the greatest antioxidant effect and therefore was used for further study. Two levels of peach skin powder (0.5%, 1%) and 0.01% butylated hydroxylanisole (BHA) were applied to ground turkey meat. Oxidation of cooked turkey meat was measured by detection of hexanal using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results indicated that all levels of peach skin powder used in this study had an antioxidant effect on ground turkey with a greater effect at the higher concentration. O'Henry peach skin powder was as effective as BHA in preventing oxidation at the levels tested. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Influence of turkey meat on residual nitrite in cured meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, B; Cassens, R G; Borchert, L L

    2001-02-01

    A response surface experimental design was employed to estimate residual nitrite level at various initial nitrite concentrations, percent turkey meat in the formula, and heat quantity (F) values using a typical wiener as the test system. Pork and mechanically separated turkey were used as the meat ingredients. Residual nitrite and pH were measured at day 1, 7 days, 14 days, and 49 days after processing. Protein, fat, salt, moisture, and CIE (L*a*b*) color values were also determined. Results showed that the effect of turkey meat on residual nitrite level was significant (P meat in the formula resulted in lower residual nitrite levels at a fixed pH. The residual nitrite level was initially proportional to initial nitrite concentration, but it became a nonsignificant factor during longer storage time. Differences in heat quantity had a significant effect (P meat products at a fixed pH. However, this effect became nonsignificant during longer storage. Reduction of residual nitrite in wieners because of turkey meat addition at a fixed pH was due to characteristics of the turkey tissue, but the mechanism of action remains unknown. It was also established that commercial wieners had a higher pH if poultry meat was included in the formulation.

  10. Meat Prices and Factors Affecting them in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    CEVGER, Yavuz; SAKARYA, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary data from different sources were used to examine the changes in red meat prices in Turkey between 1976 and 1989 taking account of the impacts of inflation and red meat imports during that period. It is observed that in current prices a higher price increase was realized in red meat prices compared to the fattening feed prices in the period 1976-1999. When the effects of inflation and purchasing power of money are taken into account, it is determined that red meat prices rose at an...

  11. Effect of white striping on turkey breast meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soglia, F; Baldi, G; Laghi, L; Mudalal, S; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2018-01-08

    In the past decades, the intense selection practices carried out in order to develop fast growing and high breast-yield turkey hybrids profoundly modified the muscle physiology leading to the development of growth-related alterations and muscular abnormalities. White striations of variable thickness have been particularly observed on the ventral surface of Pectoralis major muscle belonging from heavy male turkeys since several years. However, although the effects of white striping (WS) have been extensively studied on broilers, this condition was not considered as a main quality issue by both turkey producers and meat industry. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating whether the occurrence of WS in heavy male turkeys affects the quality traits and technological properties of meat to the same extent previously observed for broilers. In two replications, 72 Pectoralis major muscles were classified as: normal (NORM), moderate WS (MOD) and severe WS (SEV) cases. The whole muscle was weighed and cut in order to assess colour, ultimate pH, water holding (drip and cooking losses) and binding (marinade uptake) capacities, NMR relaxation properties, shear force as well as proximate composition of meat. The Pectoralis major muscles affected by WS (both moderate and severe cases) exhibited a one-fifth increased weight in comparison with their NORM counterpart. However, the occurrence of WS only partially affected the proximate composition of the meat. In detail, although moisture, collagen and protein contents did not differ among the groups, if compared with NORM, higher lipid levels were found in SEV muscles, whereas MOD had intermediate values. On the other hand, both MOD and SEV exhibited lower ash content. Despite these variations in proximate composition, both water holding and binding capacities of turkey breast meat were not affected by WS. Indeed, quality traits of raw (pH, colour, cooking losses and shear force) and marinated (uptake, cooking losses and shear force

  12. Survival of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 on the surface of chicken legs or in mechanically deboned chicken meat gamma irradiated in air or vacuum at temperatures of -20 to +20 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.

    1991-01-01

    Response-surface methodology was used to develop predictive equations for the response of Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 on the surface of chicken legs or within mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) to the effects of γ radiation doses of 0 to 3.60 kGy (100 krad = 1 kGy) at temperatures of -20 to +20 C in air or vacuum. A streptomycin-resistant mutant was used in these studies to allow accurate estimations of the surviving salmonellae in the presence of residual normal flora. This strain has been demonstrated to have no significant shift in its biological properties nor in its resistance to ionizing radiation. The response of S. typhimurium to gamma radiation was similar on both chicken legs and MDCM. The radiation was significantly more lethal to the bacterial cells at temperatures above freezing. The response-surface equations developed from the studies predict that the number of viable cells per gram of MDCM or per square centimeter of the surface of chicken legs would be reduced approximately 2.8 to 5.1 log units at 0 C by radiation doses within the range of 1.5 to 3.0 kGy. The results of the present studies are similar to those obtained previously with sterile mechanically deboned chicken meat

  13. DEMAND FOR TURKEY MEAT: PRICE EFFECT OR SPENDING EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Martinez Damian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Turkey meat is a white meat demand in Mexico, however, its consumption is still low. In order to explore the convenience of expanding the market and foresee if the industry should compete in price or expenditure, the aim of this work is to study the demand for turkey meat as part of a protein basket; that consists of beef, chicken, pork and egg. Methodologically an almost ideal demand model was used, in an economic sense, this model allows an optimal assignment representation through budget share equations as a function of prices and real expenditure within the bundle. With statistical information from secondary sources, the results showed that the demand for turkey meat responds inelastically to price, and that the response on spending is almost one. With the estimates of price and expenditure growth rates, in terms of an expansion policy in the turkey market, results conclude that spending is the most relevant factor in demand, followed to a lesser extent by price.

  14. Evaluation of the food safety risk associated with de-boning of Danish sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tanja Østergaard; Bækbo, Anne Kristine; Petersen, Jesper Valentin

    2017-01-01

    reason for condemnation after de-boning. Staphylococcus aureus was assessed to be the only potential food safety hazard. There was no association between presence of bacteria in muscle samples and abscesses from the same animals, neither for bacteria in general (P= 1) nor for Staphylococcus aureus......, specifically (P= 1). Furthermore, no association regarding presence of bacteria was found in the meat from de-boned sows and fully approved sows (P= 0.67). It was concluded that the de-boning procedure is not contributing to food safety. The authors suggest replacing de-boning with a more thorough inspection...... of the predilection sites of septicaemia and local cleansing of lesions. If de-boning is no longer required, it is expected that most abscesses will be found in the rework area, during cutting or routine de-boning because the meat is cut to relatively small sizes mainly without bone before it reaches the consumer....

  15. Biological evaluation of mechanically deboned chicken meat protein hydrolysate Avaliação biológica do hidrolisado de proteína da carne de galinha desossada mecanicamente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Misturini Rossi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the biological properties of a protein hydrolysate obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of mechanically deboned chicken meat. METHODS: Mechanically deboned chicken meat was hydrolysed using Alcalase 2.4 L FG and then dried in a spray-drier. Three groups (n=6 of male Wistar rats received diets containing casein, mechanically deboned chicken meat protein hydrolysate and a protein-free diet. The rats were randomly assigned to individual cages with controlled temperature (22ºC for 12 days. RESULTS: The mechanically deboned chicken meat diet resulted in a good net protein utilization (3.74 and high true digestibility (96%. The amino acid composition of the hydrolysate was relatively well balanced, but the concentrations of methionine and cystine were low, making them the limiting amino acids. The proximate chemical composition of the hydrolysate showed protein content to be as high as 62%. CONCLUSION: The results obtained in this work suggest that mechanically deboned chicken meat hydrolysate can be used as a protein enhancer in food preparations such as enteral formulations, and as an edible protein enhancer in general applications.OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a qualidade biológica da proteína hidrolisada obtida a partir da carne mecanicamente separada de frango. MÉTODOS: A carne mecanicamente separada de frango foi hidrolisada com a enzima Alcalase 2,4 L FG e o hidrolisado obtido foi submetido a secagem em atomizador. Foram utilizados três grupos (n=6 de ratos machos Wistar os quais receberam dietas contendo caseína, proteína hidrolisada de carne mecanicamente separada de frango ou uma dieta com proteína livre. Os animais foram distribuídos aleatoriamente em gaiolas individuais, com temperatura controlada (22ºC, por um período de 12 dias. RESULTADOS: A dieta utilizando carne mecanicamente separada de frango resultou em elevada utilização líquida de proteína (3,74 e

  16. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.L.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Ducro, B.J.; Vereijken, A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both

  17. Serotype Distribution of Salmonella Isolates from Turkey Ground Meat and Meat Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Erol; Muammer Goncuoglu; Naim Deniz Ayaz; Lüppo Ellerbroek; Fatma Seda Bilir Ormanci; Ozlem Iseri Kangal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out the serotype distribution of 169 Salmonella colonies recovered from 112 Salmonella positive ground turkey (115 colonies) and 52 turkey meat parts (54 colonies). Out of 15 Salmonella serotypes: S. Corvallis, S. Kentucky, S. Bredeney, S. Virchow, S. Saintpaul and S. Agona were identified as the predominant serovars at the rates of 27%, 13%, 12%, 12%, 11%, and 10%, respectively. Other serotypes were below 6% of the total isolates. All S. Kentucky and S. V...

  18. Whole genome QTL mapping for growth, meat quality and breast meat yield traits in turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad L; Bastiaansen, John W M; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Vereijken, Addie; Groenen, Martien A M

    2011-07-11

    The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species and is the second largest contributor to the world's poultry meat production. Demand of turkey meat is increasing very rapidly. Genetic markers linked to genes affecting quantitative traits can increase the selection response of animal breeding programs. The use of these molecular markers for the identification of quantitative trait loci, and subsequently fine-mapping of quantitative trait loci regions, allows for pinpointing of genes that underlie such economically important traits. The quantitative trait loci analyses of the growth curve, body weight, breast yield and the meat quality traits showed putative quantitative trait loci on 21 of the 27 turkey chromosomes covered by the linkage map. Forty-five quantitative trait loci were detected across all traits and these were found in 29 different regions on 21 chromosomes. Out of the 45 quantitative trait loci, twelve showed significant (pmeat quality and breast yield traits. A large number of quantitative trait loci were detected across the turkey genome, which affected growth, breast yield and meat quality traits. Pleiotropic effects or close linkages between quantitative trait loci were suggested for several of the chromosomal regions. The comparative analysis regarding the location of quantitative trait loci on different turkey, and on the syntenic chicken chromosomes, along with their phenotypic associations, revealed signs of functional conservation between these species. © 2011 Aslam et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Detection of chicken and turkey meat in meat mixtures by using real-time PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesmen, Zulal; Yetiman, Ahmet E; Sahin, Fikrettin; Yetim, Hasan

    2012-02-01

    In this study, TaqMan-based real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) techniques were developed for the detection of chicken and turkey meat in raw and heat-treated meat mixtures. Primers and TaqMan probe sets were designed to amplify 86 bp and 136 bp fragments for the chicken and turkey species, respectively, on the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene. In the results, it was possible to detect each species at the level of 0.1 pg template DNA with the TaqMan probe technique without any cross-reactivity with nontarget species (bovine, ovine, donkey, pork, and horse) while the detection level was 1 pg template DNA using conventional PCR. The TaqMan probe assays used in this study allowed the detection of as little as 0.001% level of both species in the experimental meat mixtures, prepared by mixing chicken and turkey meat with beef at different levels (0.001% to 10%). In conclusion, TaqMan probe assays developed in this research are promising tools in the specific identification and sensitive quantification of meat species even in the case of heat-treated meat products, and suitable for a rapid, automated, and routine analysis. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Mitochondrial respiratory and antioxidative enzyme activities in turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janisch, S; Wicke, M; Krischek, C

    2012-02-01

    Meat quality and (anti)oxidative metabolism of m. pectoralis superficialis (MPS), m. gastrocnemius (MG) and m. iliotibilialis lateralis (MIL) from turkey toms were analysed. After slaughter, pH of MPS and MG decreased and electrical conductivity of the MPS increased. The MG had generally higher pH values. The meat lightness (L) and redness (a) increased in MG and MPS after slaughter. The MPS always had higher L and lower a values. Mitochondrial respiratory activities (MRA) were higher in the MIL than the MPS. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase, analysed in the MPS, increased and the glutathione reductase activity decreased after slaughter. Meat samples with lower pH24 h p.m. had higher drip loss and L values. The MRA were tendentially lower and the SOD activities higher in these samples. These results indicate a relation between the meat quality, the antioxidative metabolism and mitochondrial respiration.

  1. 9 CFR 146.43 - Terminology and classification; meat-type turkey slaughter plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL POULTRY Special Provisions for Meat-Type Turkey Slaughter Plants § 146.43 Terminology and... program is intended to be the basis from which the meat-type turkey industry may conduct a program to... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terminology and classification; meat...

  2. Prevalence and quantification of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in Italian retail poultry meat: Analysis of influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Simone; Soncini, Gabriella; Ziino, Graziella; Panebianco, Antonio; Pedonese, Francesca; Nuvoloni, Roberta; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Colavita, Giampaolo; Alberghini, Leonardo; Giaccone, Valerio

    2017-04-01

    Retail poultry meat is a crucial vehicle for consumers' exposure to Campylobacters, but no official controls are currently applied in Italy. The aim of this study was the evaluation of Campylobacter contamination of a wide range of poultry meats marketed in Italy. N. 472 chicken and turkey meat samples (sectioned meats, offal, meat preparations and products) were taken from slaughterhouses, deboning plants and different retailers and submitted to detection/enumeration of Campylobacter spp. The isolates were identified by phenotypic and biomolecular techniques. Campylobacter spp. was detected in 34.1% of the samples, with general low counts. Higher values were observed in offal (especially liver) and sectioned meats, with significantly higher rates in skin-on samples (86.8% vs 32.7%). Minced meat preparations showed lower prevalence (22.4% vs 58.3%) and counts than whole pieces. Decreasing rates were observed among slaughterhouses (80%), deboning plants (49%), butcher's shops (37%) and large scale retailers (25%). Sectioned chicken meats were significantly more contaminated than turkey meats. Almost all the isolates were identified as C. jejuni or C. coli, with similar prevalences (18.4% and 20.5%, respectively); C. jejuni was predominant only in samples from slaughterhouses/deboning plants. For setting future control programs, meat typology should be considered the main critical factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigations of some parameters of natural immunity in meat turkeys reared outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Tacconi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The progression of some parameters of natural immunity in meat turkey reared outdoors was investigated. The levels of the haemolytic complement were lower than those obtained in commercial turkeys and in turkeys reared in a controlled environment during one of our previous investigations. The weather conditions could have influenced the trend of the haemolytic complement in turkeys selected for high meat production and kept outside, underlining the possible importance of the rearing system.

  4. Salmonella spp. em carcaças, carne mecanicamente separada, lingüiças e cortes comerciais de frango Salmonella spp. in carcasses, mechanically deboned meat, sausages and chicken meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cleusa de Fátima Banzatto de Carvalho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Alimentos de origem animal representam papel fundamental na epidemiologia das salmoneloses humanas. Apesar dos avanços tecnológicos, a carne de frango ainda é passível de contaminação bacteriana, especialmente por microrganismos do gênero Salmonella, que podem encontrar-se albergados no trato intestinal ou em outra parte do corpo das aves. O presente trabalho objetivou pesquisar a ocorrência de Salmonella em carne de frango e derivados procedentes da região Nordeste do Estado de São Paulo. Foram analisadas, através do método convencional de cultivo, 45 amostras de carcaças, 60 de carne mecanicamente separada (CMS, 25 de lingüiça de frango, 20 de peito, e 15 de coxa e sobre-coxa. Salmonella spp. foi encontrada em 13,3% (6/45 das carcaças, 25% (15/60 das amostras de CMS, 16% (4/25 das lingüiças, 30% (6/20 dos peitos e 13,3% (2/15 das coxas e sobre-coxas analisadas. Do total de 165 amostras analisadas, 33 (20% apresentaram contaminação por Salmonella estando, portanto, impróprias para o consumo conforme legislação brasileira.Food of animal origin represents an important role in the epidemiology of human salmonellosis. In spite of the technological improvement, the chicken meat is subjected to bacterial contamination, mainly by microorganisms of the genus Salmonella that can be found in the intestinal tract or elsewhere on the chicken body. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of Salmonella in chicken meat and cuts from the Northeast region of São Paulo State, Brazil. By conventional cultivation microbiological methods, 45 samples of carcasses, 60 samples of mechanically deboned meat (MDM, 25 samples of chicken sausages, 20 samples of chest, and 15 samples of chicken leg and thigh. Salmonella was found in 13.3% (6/45 of the carcass, 25% (15/60 of the MDM, 16% (4/25 of the sausages, 30% (6/20 of the chests and 13.3% (2/15 of the tight analysed. The results showed that 33 (20% out of 165 samples were

  5. Comparative evaluation of quality and composition of ostrich, turkey and broiler meat

    OpenAIRE

    Jukna V.; Klementavičiūtė J.; Meškinytė-Kaušilienė E.; Pečiulaitienė N.; Samborskytė M.; Ambrasūnas L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article are presented research data on comparative evaluation of meat quality of various poultry species. The study was made on 5 samples of ostrich, turkey and broiler meat. Samples were weighed 500 to 550 grams. Qualitative and nutritional properties of meat from different species of poultry were estimated. The chemical composition, pH, color, firmness, water holding capacity, cooking loss, drip loss of ostrich, turkey and broiler meat were analyz...

  6. Liver pathology associated with increased mortality in turkey breeder and meat turkey flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Christina; Hauck, Rüdiger; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W; Lüschow, Dörte; Kershaw, B Olivia; Hoferer, Marc; Hafez, Hafez M

    2014-09-01

    Between 2006 and 2011 a series of disease conditions characterized by raised mortality and liver disorders occurred in turkey breeder flocks and in meat turkey flocks in Germany. The flocks were between 12 and 23 wk of age, and mostly hens were affected. Clinical signs were nonspecific and accompanied by mortality varying between 1% and 7%. Affected birds displayed swollen livers that were marbled with black and red spots and yellowish areas. The pericardium was filled with an amber fluid, and the coronary groove was extensively filled with fat. Spleens were swollen, and a serous fluid that seemed to leak from the liver was present in the body cavity. Histopathological findings in all but one case included fatty degeneration of hepatocytes with parenchymal collapse and associated hemorrhages. Some animals showed cholangitis and hepatitis with intranuclear inclusion bodies. In three cases with breeders, electron microscopy detected virus particles that were between 23 and 30 nm and similar to parvo- or picornavirus. In addition, picornavirus RNA was detected in the livers of one meat turkey flock. Investigations by PCR for circovirus, polyomavirus parvovirus, and aviadenovirus yielded negative results in all cases, but an aviadenovirus was isolated from livers twice and a reovirus from the intestines once. Supplementation with vitamin E and selenium seemed to improve the situation. The most likely diagnosis is lipidosis, a metabolic disorder with complex etiology, which has rarely been described in turkeys.

  7. Effect of irradiation on the parameters that influence quality characteristics of uncured and cured cooked turkey meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Moon, Sunhee; Lee, Hyunyong; Ahn, Dong U

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on lipid/protein oxidation, color changes, and off-odor volatiles production in uncured and cured cooked turkey meat products. Uncured cooked turkey breast meat and cured commercial turkey breast rolls and ham were prepared and irradiated at 0, 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 kGy using a linear accelerator. The results showed that irradiation had little effects on lipid oxidation of cured cooked turkey products, but accelerated lipid oxidation in uncured cooked turkey breast meat (P meats (P meat by irradiation. The redness of uncured cooked turkey was increased (P turkey meat was faded by irradiation (P turkey meat products produced less off-odor volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide, 3-methyl/2-methyl-butananl, and hexanal) than irradiated uncured cooked meat products due to various additives in the cured meat products. Our results suggested that irradiation resulted in different chemical reactions to pigments in uncured and cured cooked turkey meat products, but cured cooked turkey meat products have a higher tolerance to odor deterioration than uncured cooked turkey meat products. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. High-resolution real-time x-ray and 3D imaging for physical contamination detection in deboned poultry meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Jing, Hansong; Tao, Yang; Cheng, Xuemei

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes a novel approach for detection of foreign materials in deboned poultry patties based on real-time imaging technologies. Uneven thickness of poultry patties could lead to a significant classification error in a typical X-ray imaging system, and we addressed this issue successfully by fusing laser range imaging (3D imaging) into the x-ray inspection system. In order for this synergic technology to work effectively for on-line industrial applications, the vision system should be able to identify various physical contaminations automatically and have viable real-time capabilities. To meet these challenges, a rule-based approach was formulated under a unified framework for detection of diversified subjects, and a multithread scheme was developed for real-time image processing. Algorithms of data fusion, feature extraction and pattern classification of this approach are described in this paper. Detection performance and overall throughput of the system are also discussed.

  9. Detection and molecular typing of Clostridium perfringens isolates from beef, chicken and turkey meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Zeki; Hadimli, Hasan Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Here we describe a study investigating the presence of Clostridium perfringens strains in meat samples and the toxin genes in the isolates by PCR. This study, for the first time, demonstrated the presence of C. perfringens type E in turkey meats, while C. perfringens type C strains isolated from chicken meats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Listeria monocytogenes in retailed raw chicken meat in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriken, Belgin; Ayaz, Naim Deniz; Erol, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were, to find the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of L. monocytogenes from a total of 116 chicken meat samples including 50 carcasses and 66 meat parts marketed in Turkey between 2008 and 2009 using immunomagnetic separation (IMS) based cultivation technique, to detect the hlyA gene for the verification of the isolates by PCR, and to identify the genoserotypes of the L. monocytogenes isolates by multiplex PCR assay. In the study, 51 L. monocytogenes colonies were isolated from 34 (29.3%) chicken meat samples (eleven [22.0%] carcasses and 23 [34.8%] pieces of meat) by IMS based cultivation technique and confirmed by PCR. According to the multiplex PCR results, all the 51 isolates were identified as genoserotype IIa (1/2a or 3a). L. monocytogenes isolates were also tested for their susceptibility to eight antibiotic (gentamicin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, penicillin G, erythromycin) agents using the disk diffusion method. 14 isolates (27.45%) were susceptible to all eight antimicrobials drugs tested and the remaining 37 isolates (72.54%) were resistant to gentamicin (one isolate, 1.96%), vancomycin (four isolates, 7.84%), penicillin G (six isolates, 11.76%), streptomycin (nine isolates, 17.64%; resistant or intermediate), tetracycline (seven isolates, 13.72%) and ampicillin (six isolates, 11.76%). This study showed that antimicrobial resistance is not highly prevalent in L. monocytogenes isolated from chicken carcasses and pieces of meat. The presence of L. monocytogenes in chicken samples suggests an importance of this pathogen in chicken.

  11. Molecular typing of Clostridium perfringens isolated from turkey meat by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, I; Goncuoglu, M; Ayaz, N D; Bilir Ormanci, F S; Hildebrandt, G

    2008-07-01

    To determine the presence of toxin genes in 22 Clostridium perfringens isolated from turkey meat samples by molecular typing. For this purpose, alpha (cpa), beta (cpb), beta 2 (cpb2), epsilon (etx), iota (iA) and enterotoxin (cpe) toxin genes were analysed by multiplex PCR. All 22 turkey meat Cl. perfringens isolates were found to carry the cpa, gene but in none of the isolates cpb, etx, iap or cpe genes were detected. Results showed that all isolates represented type A and were cpe negative. Our results indicate that Cl. perfringens type A is the most common type in turkey meat. Also multiplex PCR is effective and rapid method for typing of Cl. perfringens. It is the first study about molecular typing of Cl. perfringens using multiplex PCR in turkey meat samples in Turkey.

  12. Effect of Meat and Bone Meal Substitutes in Feed Mixes on Quality Indicators of Turkey Breast Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Slepičková

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed turkey breast meat composition in dependence on the presence of proteins of meat and bone meal origin in the feed mixes used. Farmers involved in the research with comparable zoohygienic and technological conditions of poultry management were divided into two groups. The principal difference between the groups was in the feed mixes they used. Poultry in Group 1 was fed feed mixes containing a total of 7.2 - 9.5% of meat and bone meal, fish meal and poultry meal and of 3.4 - 36.8% of soybean according to the age category as the main source of protein. In Group 2 the nutritious portion of meat and bone meal-based protein was substituted with soybean meal. Feed mixes fed to turkeys in Group 2 contained 9.35 - 35.25% soybean meal depending on the age group. Between 2002 and 2003, turkey meat samples were collected at a turkey slaughterhouse. The samples were cooled to + 4 °C and examined for meat binding characteristics, water content, and total fat. The remaining parts of samples were frozen and pooled. Then they were tested for their content of total protein, net muscle protein, collagen and 9 fatty acids (myristic, palmitic, stearic, palmitoleic, oleic, eicosanic, erucic, linoleic and linolenic. Evaluation of the results showed that the absence of meat and bone meal in feed mixes had no effect on the indicators important for technological properties of male turkey breast muscle (meat binding characteristics, water content, content of total protein, net muscle protein and collagen. The results of the study, however, also demonstrated a decrease in total lipids (p p p < 0.01. The change in total lipids and in the composition of fatty acids of male turkey breast muscle might be important with regards to human health (particularly cardiovascular and cancer diseases.

  13. Clostridium perfringens Contamination in Retail Meat and Meat-Based Products in Bursa, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yibar, Artun; Cetin, Ece; Ata, Zafer; Erkose, Evren; Tayar, Mustafa

    2018-01-09

    This study examined the incidence of Clostridium perfringens in raw, ready-to-cook (RTC), and ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and meat-based products (N = 306) collected from restaurants, supermarkets, and butcher shops in Bursa, Turkey. In addition, we investigated the presence of the C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), as well as cpe genes and their source (chromosomal or plasmid borne). In this study, tryptose sulfite cycloserine (TSC) agar for classic culture isolation and API and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques were used to identify C. perfringens and detect cpa and cpe genes from these products, respectively. Seventeen C. perfringens isolates (5.6%) were isolated and identified with API 20A. In addition, 42 of 81 suspicious isolates (51.9%) were identified as C. perfringens using RT-PCR. Of the 81 suspicious isolates tested by RT-PCR, 22 (27.2%) carried the cpe gene either on the plasmid or chromosome. Twenty-one isolates were positive for chromosomal cpe (C-cpe), and one was positive for plasmid-borne cpe (P-cpe). CPE was detected in 31.8% (7/22) of the cpe positive isolates by the PET-RPLA test. In conclusion, C. perfringens and their CPEs were present in raw, RTC, and RTE meat and meat-based foods in this study. It is emphasized that the presence of C. perfringens and the cpe gene in these foods may be a potential risk for human health.

  14. Mixture optimization of beef, turkey, and chicken meat for some of the physical, chemical, and sensory properties of meat patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Ş; Kilinççeker, O

    2011-08-01

    To determine the optimum meat mixture combination, the effects of different meat sources on physical, chemical, and sensory properties of cooked or stored meat patties were investigated using a response surface methodology mixture design. Meat patties were prepared using chicken, turkey, beef, and beef back fat. They were divided 2 groups, with 1 group cooked and 1 group stored. The first part was cooked with a preheated grill, and the second part was stored at -20°C for 2 mo. The effects of the meat mixtures on pH, proximate composition, cooking yield, dimension reduction, thiobarbituric acid, free fatty acid, proteolysis, and sensory properties of patties were studied. The influence of beef, turkey, and chicken meat on patties was found to be significant (P meat on the sensory properties of patties were also found to be significant (P Meat mixtures improved physical, chemical, and sensory qualities of patties. The optimum combination of beef, turkey, and chicken was found to be 34.87, 12.23, and 52.89%, respectively.

  15. Protein hydrolysate from turkey meat and optimization of its antioxidant potential by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoying; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this research was to optimize antioxidant potential of hydrolyzed protein using Flavourzyme assisted hydrolysis of turkey meat and compare the antioxidant activity of hydrolysates from turkey meat, chicken, and beef. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the optimal Flavourzyme hydrolysis conditions for preparation of hydrolysate from turkey meat, which were at a temperature of 50.09°C, pH of 5.42, and processing time of 1.08 hours. For comparison, antioxidant activities of the hydrolysate from turkey meat, chicken, and beef under the optimum conditions were determined using reducing power, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation, hydroxyl radical, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities. The antioxidant activity of turkey meat and chicken meat was significantly higher than that of beef (P turkey meat, indicating the potential use of it as a functional food ingredient with shelf-life extension purposes.

  16. Research developments in pale, soft, and exudative turkey meat in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, C M; Alvarado, C Z; Sams, A R

    2009-07-01

    Pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) refers to meat that is pale in color, forms soft gels, and has poor water-holding ability. Most frequently used in reference to pork, this defective meat is being seen with increasing frequency in turkey and broiler processing plants. It has been estimated that this PSE-type meat represents 5 to 40% of meat that is produced in the poultry industry. With the increased production of further-processed products, this PSE problem has become more apparent in the turkey industry. It has been estimated that due to the high incidence, a single turkey processing plant could be losing $2 to 4 million per year, resulting in a loss in excess of $200 million dollars by the turkey industry alone.

  17. Gas composition in controlled atmosphere stunning affects turkey meat quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylä-Ajos, M; Tuominen, S; Hänninen, L; Ruusunen, M; Puolanne, E; Valros, A

    2012-01-01

    1. Investigations were made into the breast and leg muscle energy metabolism, and the quality of breast meat of turkeys after controlled atmosphere stunning or stun-killing (CAS) with various gas mixtures. In addition, the effect on meat quality of an increase in the chilling rate of turkey breast meat after hypercapnic or anoxic stun-killing was studied. 2. A total of 35 turkey toms within two replicate pens were individually stunned during consecutive weeks using one of 4 CAS methods. The stunning gases tested were high CO(2) concentration (60% CO(2) in air), high N(2) concentration (98% N(2), turkey breast muscle when the chilling speed was rapid (0°C for 4 h, followed by storage at 4°C). When the chilling rate was slowed (20°C for 4 h followed by storage at 4°C), a significant decrease in cooking loss and in Warner-Bratzler shear force was recorded for birds stun-killed with CO(2). 5. This study shows that anoxic stun-killing with N(2) had no adverse effects on meat quality despite the rapid post mortem pH decrease. The CAS with N(2) allows rapid cooling of carcases without the risk of cold shortening, whereas with CO(2)-stun-killing of turkeys, the rate of chilling should be slower. Concerning meat quality, all the CAS methods tested were suitable for stunning turkeys.

  18. Effect of irradiation on the parameters that influence quality characteristics of raw turkey breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Moon, Sun Hee; Lee, Hyun Yong; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the mechanisms of quality changes in raw turkey breast meat by irradiation. Raw turkey breast meat was irradiated at 0 kGy, 1.5 kGy, 3.0 kGy and 4.5 kGy, and changes in quality parameters including color, lipid and protein oxidation, and off-odor volatiles were determined. Irradiation accelerated lipid and protein oxidation, and increased redness in raw turkey breast meat. However, irradiation had less effect on the volatile profiles of salt-soluble muscle extract than water-soluble muscle extract because the primary radiolytic product from water (hydroxyl radical) had higher chances to react with the water-soluble molecules nearby. The radiolytic degradation products from sulfur-containing amino acids and aldehydes from lipid oxidation were two major volatile compounds responsible for the off-odor of irradiated raw turkey breast meat. Dimethyl disulfide was found only in irradiated raw turkey breast meat, and the amount of dimethyl disulfide linearly increased as the irradiation dose increased, indicating that this compound can be used as a marker for irradiate meat.

  19. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducro Bart J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both consumers and industry global turkey stocks increased from 100 million in 1970 to over 276 million in 2004. This rapidly increasing importance of turkeys was a reason to design this study for the estimation of genetic parameters that control body weight, body composition, meat quality traits and parameters that shape the growth curve in turkey birds. Results The average heritability estimate for body weight traits was 0.38, except for early weights that were strongly affected by maternal effects. This study showed that body weight traits, upper asymptote (a growth curve trait, percent breast meat and redness of meat had high heritability whereas heritabilities of breast length, breast width, percent drip loss, ultimate pH, lightness and yellowness of meat were medium to low. We found high positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight, upper asymptote, most breast meat yield traits and percent drip loss but percent drip loss was found strongly negatively correlated with ultimate pH. Percent breast meat, however, showed genetic correlations close to zero with body weight traits and upper asymptote. Conclusion The results of this analysis and the growth curve from the studied population of turkey birds suggest that the turkey birds could be selected for breeding between 60 and 80 days of age in order to improve overall production and the production of desirable cuts of meat. The continuous selection of birds within this age range could promote high growth rates but specific attention to meat quality would be needed to avoid a negative impact on the quality of meat.

  20. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad L; Bastiaansen, John Wm; Crooijmans, Richard Pma; Ducro, Bart J; Vereijken, Addie; Groenen, Martien Am

    2011-01-25

    Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both consumers and industry global turkey stocks increased from 100 million in 1970 to over 276 million in 2004. This rapidly increasing importance of turkeys was a reason to design this study for the estimation of genetic parameters that control body weight, body composition, meat quality traits and parameters that shape the growth curve in turkey birds. The average heritability estimate for body weight traits was 0.38, except for early weights that were strongly affected by maternal effects. This study showed that body weight traits, upper asymptote (a growth curve trait), percent breast meat and redness of meat had high heritability whereas heritabilities of breast length, breast width, percent drip loss, ultimate pH, lightness and yellowness of meat were medium to low. We found high positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight, upper asymptote, most breast meat yield traits and percent drip loss but percent drip loss was found strongly negatively correlated with ultimate pH. Percent breast meat, however, showed genetic correlations close to zero with body weight traits and upper asymptote. The results of this analysis and the growth curve from the studied population of turkey birds suggest that the turkey birds could be selected for breeding between 60 and 80 days of age in order to improve overall production and the production of desirable cuts of meat. The continuous selection of birds within this age range could promote high growth rates but specific attention to meat quality would be needed to avoid a negative impact on the quality of meat.

  1. Structure and age-dependent development of the turkey liver: a comparative study of a highly selected meat-type and a wild-type turkey line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hünigen, Hana; Mainzer, Kathleen; Hirschberg, Ruth M; Custodis, Pia; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Al Masri, Salah; Richardson, Kenneth C; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Plendl, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    In this study the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the liver of a fast growing, meat-type turkey line (British United turkeys BUT Big 6, n=25) and a wild-type turkey line (Wild Canadian turkey, n=48) were compared at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk. Because the growth plates of long bones were still detectable in the 20-week-old wild-type turkeys, indicating immaturity, a group of 8 wild-type turkeys at the age of 24 wk was included in the original scope of the study. Over the term of the study, the body and liver weights of birds from the meat-type turkey line increased at a faster rate than those of the wild-type turkey line. However, the relative liver weight of the meat-type turkeys declined (from 2.7 to 0.9%) to a greater extent than that of the wild-type turkeys (from 2.8 to 1.9%), suggesting a mismatch in development between muscle weights and liver weights of the meat-type turkeys. Signs of high levels of fat storage in the liver were detected in both lines but were greater in the wild-type turkey line, suggesting a better feed conversion by the extreme-genotype birds i.e., meat-type birds. For the first time, this study presents morphologic data on the structure and arrangement of the lymphatic tissue within the healthy turkey liver, describing two different types of lymphatic aggregations within the liver parenchyma, i.e., aggregations with and without fibrous capsules. Despite differences during development, both adult meat-type and adult wild-type turkeys had similar numbers of lymphatic aggregations. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Hygienic and technological value of meat of turkey raw meat originating from flocks with green muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszczak-Frak, M; Uradziński, J

    2009-01-01

    Breeding selection of slaughter poultry aimed at assuring fast body weight gains of birds has resulted in the occurrence of various forms of chronic diseases, including deep pectoral myopathy, also known as green muscle disease. The objective of the study was to determine the hygienic and technological value of meat of turkeys originating from flocks with diagnosed green muscle disease. The experimental material comprised 376 samples of the major and minor pectoral muscle from post-production turkey hens. The samples were subjected to microbiological analyses as well as determinations of pH, water binding capacity, color and chemical composition (fat, protein, water). The results obtained enabled concluding that, in terms of microbiological assessment, the meat originating from turkeys affected by the green muscle disease may be acknowledged as suitable for consumption. In turn, due to negligibly diminished technological value, resulting from deviations in pH value, water binding capacity, color and chemical composition, the authors postulate considering the advisability of stipulating separate qualitative standards for meat originating from post-production turkey hens.

  3. Improving the quality of ready-to-eat meals by gamma irrdiation, Baked de-boned chicken meat with potatoe slices or baked fish and cooked rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, H.M.; Rady, A.H.; Abdel-Daiem, M.H.; Khalaf, H.

    2005-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the possibility of using gamma irradiation for improving the quality of ready-to-eat meals. The prepared meals (included baked chicken meat with potato slices or baked fish and cooked rice) were subjected to gamma irradiation at doses of O, 1.5, 3 and 4.5 KGy followed by cold storage (4 C). The effects of irradiation and cold storage on the microbiological aspects, chemical and organoleptic properties of samples were studied. The results showed that irradiation of the prepared meals decreased the initial total bacterial count, total psychrophilic bacteria and total yeast and molds, proportionally to the applied dose, hence prolonged their refrigerated shelf-life. Moreover, irradiation at dose of 1.5 KGy reduced the counts of Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis, while 3 KGy dose completely eliminated these bacteria in all samples. Salmonella was not detected in all irradiated and non-irradiated meals and Vibrio sp. were absent in irradiated and non-irradiated baked fish. On the other hand, gamma irradiation had no remarkable effects neither on the chemical composition of the main component of meals nor on their ph, while it increased the thiobarbituric acid (TEA) value for baked chicken and fish meat. However, cold storage gradually increased the values of TEA and gradually decreased the ph value for irradiated and non-irradiated samples. Finally, irradiation treatments had no effects on the sensory properties (appearance, odor and taste) of all meals and extended their time of sensory preference

  4. Antimicrobial activity of poultry bone and meat trimmings hydrolyzates in low-sodium turkey food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Pier Paolo; Sforza, Stefano; Dossena, Arnaldo; Lambertini, Francesca; Bottesini, Chiara; Nikolaev, Ilya V; Koroleva, Olga; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2014-02-01

    This research was aimed at the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity exerted by poultry protein hydrolyzates derived from industrial leftovers added to minced turkey meat, intended for the production of burgers for human consumption. Hydrolyzates were obtained through enzymatic hydrolysis from poultry bone and meat trimmings, as by-products from the poultry industry. Colony forming unit assays, under both laboratory and industrial conditions, were performed to assess microbial growth. Poultry protein hydrolyzates inhibited microbial growth occurring in semi-finished turkey meat during the normal retention period because of their water holding capacity resulting in a decreased water activity. Overall, the findings demonstrated that poultry protein hydrolyzates could decrease mesophilic, psychrophilic, and thermophilic bacterial growth for the entire product shelf-life. Bacterial growth inhibition obtained in minced turkey meat by addition of poultry protein hydrolyzates (1.5%), hygroscopic amino acids mixture (1.5%) or sodium chloride (1%) was similar. It is suggested that the use of hydrolyzates could allow the reduction of salt content in poultry meat based products leading to the production of low-sodium turkey food still maintaining acceptable sensory characteristics.

  5. Pectoralis major muscle of turkey displays divergent function as correlated with meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B A; Matarneh, S K; Stufft, K M; England, E M; Scheffler, T L; Preisser, R H; Shi, H; Stewart, E C; Eilert, S; Gerrard, D E

    2017-05-01

    Fresh turkey meat color is determined by many factors that include muscle fiber type composition and heme protein concentrations. These factors either are affected by or influence biochemical events occurring postmortem. Deviations in the processing environment also can result in aberrant fresh meat quality and may ultimately change the quality characteristics of further processed products. Our objective was to describe the underlying cause and significance of the two-toning color defect in fresh turkey breast. In the first experiment, pectoralis major muscles were collected, classified as single- or two-toned, and analyzed using image processing to characterize fresh turkey color. Samples from the large and small lobes of the pectoralis major muscle were collected for pH, glycolytic intermediates, protein abundance, mRNA expression, and quality characteristics. In the second experiment, time from stun to exsanguination was tested as a promoter of fresh turkey color. Results from the first experiment showed that the turkey breast possesses two distinct lobes. The large lobe had greater (P turkey color by mitigating the differences between the two lobes. Our results also showed that birds exsanguinated first had greater (P turkey color. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Multistate outbreak of Listeriosis linked to turkey deli meat and subsequent changes in US regulatory policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Sami L; Newbern, E Claire; Griffin, Patricia M; Graves, Lewis M; Hoekstra, R Michael; Baker, Nicole L; Hunter, Susan B; Holt, Kristin G; Ramsey, Fred; Head, Marcus; Levine, Priscilla; Johnson, Geraldine; Schoonmaker-Bopp, Dianna; Reddy, Vasudha; Kornstein, Laura; Gerwel, Michal; Nsubuga, Johnson; Edwards, Leslie; Stonecipher, Shelley; Hurd, Sharon; Austin, Deri; Jefferson, Michelle A; Young, Suzanne D; Hise, Kelley; Chernak, Esther D; Sobel, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    Listeriosis, a life-threatening foodborne illness caused by Listeria monocytogenes, affects approximately 2500 Americans annually. Between July and October 2002, an uncommon strain of L. monocytogenes caused an outbreak of listeriosis in 9 states. We conducted case finding, a case-control study, and traceback and microbiological investigations to determine the extent and source of the outbreak and to propose control measures. Case patients were infected with the outbreak strain of L. monocytogenes between July and November 2002 in 9 states, and control patients were infected with different L. monocytogenes strains. Outcome measures included food exposure associated with outbreak strain infection and source of the implicated food. Fifty-four case patients were identified; 8 died, and 3 pregnant women had fetal deaths. The case-control study included 38 case patients and 53 control patients. Case patients consumed turkey deli meat much more frequently than did control patients (P = .008, by Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the 4 weeks before illness, 55% of case patients had eaten deli turkey breast more than 1-2 times, compared with 28% of control patients (odds ratio, 4.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-17.1). Investigation of turkey deli meat eaten by case patients led to several turkey processing plants. The outbreak strain was found in the environment of 1 processing plant and in turkey products from a second. Together, the processing plants recalled > 30 million pounds of products. Following the outbreak, the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service issued new regulations outlining a L. monocytogenes control and testing program for ready-to-eat meat and poultry processing plants. Turkey deli meat was the source of a large multistate outbreak of listeriosis. Investigation of this outbreak helped guide policy changes designed to prevent future L. monocytogenes contamination of ready-to-eat meat and poultry products.

  7. Evaluation of quality characteristics and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meats treated with different dose rates of ionizing radiation and use of antioxidants; Avaliacao de caracteristicas de qualidade e propriedades funcionais da carne mecanicamente separada de frango tratada com diferentes taxas de dose de radiacao ionizante e uso de antioxidantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula

    2012-07-01

    The Mechanically Deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is used in traditional meat products, in greater proportion in those emulsified, replacing meat raw materials more expensive. The raw material can have high MDCM the microbial load, as a result of contamination during processing or failure during the evisceration. The irradiation process is accepted as one of the most effective technologies when compared to conventional techniques of preservation, to reduce contamination of pathogens and spoilage. However, little information is available about the use and effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation processing. Irradiation causes chemical changes in food, a major cause of deterioration of quality of raw or cooked meat products during refrigerated storage, frozen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dose rates of ionizing radiation on the production of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), color, microbiological and sensory characteristics of mechanically deboned chicken added or without added antioxidants, during the cold storage and evaluation of functional properties. The results showed that among the tested dose rates using cobalt-60 source, dose rate of 4.04 kGy.h-1 was the best for processing MDCM. Furthermore, the use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to reduce lipid oxidation generated by irradiation of the samples, showed a synergistic effect to the processing with ionizing radiation in reduction of psychrotrophic bacteria count and contributed to a better sensory quality. The use of radiation in the processing FDMI did not adversely affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  8. Differential gene expression between normal and pale, soft, and exudative turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malila, Y; Tempelman, R J; Sporer, K R B; Ernst, C W; Velleman, S G; Reed, K M; Strasburg, G M

    2013-06-01

    In response to high consumer demand, turkeys have been intensively selected for rapid growth rate and breast muscle mass and conformation. The success in breeding selection has coincided with an increasing incidence of pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) meat defect, especially in response to heat stress. We hypothesized that the underlying mechanism responsible for the development of PSE meat arises from differences in expression of several critical genes. The objective of this study was to determine differential gene expression between normal and PSE turkey meat using a 6K turkey skeletal muscle long oligonucleotide microarray. Breast meat samples were collected from Randombred Control Line 2 turkeys at 22 wk of age, and classified as normal or PSE primarily based on marinade uptake (high = normal, low = PSE). Total RNA was isolated from meat samples with the highest (normal, n = 6) and the lowest (PSE, n = 6) marinade uptake. Microarray data confirmation was conducted using quantitative real-time PCR. Selection of differentially expressed genes for pathway analysis was performed using a combination of fold change (FC) ranking (FC 1.66) and false discovery rate (turkey. Dramatic downregulation of fast-twitch myosin heavy chain coupled with upregulation of slow-twitch myosin and troponin C suggested a switch of skeletal muscle isoforms, which may alter muscle fiber arrangement and formation of actin-myosin complexes. Changes in expression of genes in the actin cytoskeleton signaling pathway also suggest altered structures of actin filaments that may affect cell motility as well as strength and flexibility of muscle cells. Substantial downregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 was observed in PSE samples, suggesting altered regulation of the aerobic metabolic pathway in the birds that developed PSE meat defect.

  9. Evaluation of meat quality from 3 turkey genotypes reared with or without outdoor access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarica, M; Ocak, N; Turhan, S; Kop, C; Yamak, U S

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate color [lightness (L*), redness (a*), and yellowness (b*)], water-holding capacity (WHC), and pH values, and for proximate analysis of breast and thigh meats from slow-growing (Bronze; B), fast-growing (Hybrid; H), and medium-growing (crosses; H × B) turkey genotypes raised with or without outdoor access, 36 turkeys (2 females and 2 males from each replicate) per housing system or 12, 16, and 8 turkeys per B, H, and H × B genotype, slaughtered at 17 and 21 wk of age, respectively, were used. Therefore, data were analyzed as a factorial arrangement (2 × 3 × 2 × 2) of treatments. All birds were provided with the same starter, grower, and finisher feeds. Muscle samples were collected at 12 h postmortem for evaluation of meat quality and proximate analysis. Outdoor access increased the a* value and protein content of the breast muscle (P meat than did the H × B genotype, whereas the B genotype had lower a* (P meat or a higher (P meat of the B genotype was more yellow (P meat from the H genotype had a higher L* value and a lower a* value than did thigh meat from the other genotypes (P meat from the H × B genotype was higher in protein and lower in fat than was thigh meat from the B and H genotypes, respectively (P 0.05). These results show that housing system did not affect the main quality parameters (pH, water-holding capacity, and L* values) of either muscle, and that genotype created more differences in terms of these parameters.

  10. Safer and healthier reduced nitrites turkey meat sausages using lyophilized Cystoseira barbata seaweed extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellimi, Sabrine; Benslima, Abdelkarim; Ksouda, Ghada; Montero, Veronique Barragan; Hajji, Mohamed; Nasri, Moncef

    2017-10-21

    Background Nitrite salts are still common additives in the meat industry. The present study provides a first approach on the employment of the lyophilized aqueous extract (WE) of the Tunisian seaweed Cystoseira barbata for the quality enhancement of turkey meat sausage. Methods WE was supplemented as a natural antioxidant agent to investigate its effectiveness in delaying lipid oxidation turkey meat sausages containing reduced amounts of sodium nitrites. Results On storage day 5, all concentrations of WE (0.01-0.4 %) reduced the meat lipid oxidation by approximately 36 %, as compared to the negative control containing only 80 mg/kg of meat of sodium nitrites as antioxidant. It was noted that within 15 days of refrigerated storage, a meat system containing 80 mg/kg of meat of sodium nitrites and 0.02 % and 0.04 % of WE had similar Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) levels (19±1.32 and 17±1.12 µmol/kg of meat, respectively), which were comparable to the positive control containing sodium nitrites (150 mg/kg of meat) and 0.045 % vitamin C (18.46±1.27 µmol/kg of meat). In-depth, the metabolomic profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography-quadripole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) analyses of the Tunisian seaweed C. barbata solvent extracts showed that the main active compounds were phenolic compounds, fatty acids and sterols. Conclusions Overall, the cold medium containing C. barbata lyophilized aqueous extrac, with strong antioxidant activity and antihypertensive properties, may open the way to the development of a natural quality enhancement strategy for new functional and ever healthier reduced nitrites meat sausages based on algae.

  11. Effects of hydrodynamic pressure processing on the marination and meat quality of turkey breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, B C; Callahan, J A; Solomon, M B

    2010-08-01

    The effects of hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) on marination and meat quality characteristics of turkey breasts were investigated. Breast muscles from 45 turkey hens were removed from the carcasses within 30 min postmortem. From each bird, the breast from one side was treated with HDP and the other side served as a nontreated control. Breasts were then marinated in either 15 or 30% brine (water, salt, and phosphate) based on muscle weight with vacuum tumbling for 30 min or nonmarinated. The control and HDP-treated breasts from each bird received the same marination treatment. Brine uptake, processing yield, and cooking loss were measured as processing characteristics and texture, color, and expressible moisture were measured to document changes in meat quality. Hydrodynamic pressure processing increased (P turkey breasts.

  12. Prevalence of Listeria Species in Ground Beef and Chicken Meat Sold in Eastern Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Kalender*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to investigate the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef and chicken samples put into the market during the period of April to September 2011 in the eastern part of Turkey. A total of 360 food samples consisting of 180 ground beef and 180 chicken meat samples were examined in terms of the presence of Listeria species. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 7.2 % ground beef samples and 17.8 % of chicken meat samples. While in 15.5% of the ground beef samples L. innocua was detected, L. welshimeri was detected in 6.1% of them. As for chicken meat samples, L. innocua was detected in 36.7% of them while L. welshimeri was detected in 5.5%, L. seeligeri was detected in 4.4% and L. murrayi was detected in 1.1% of them. Out of 45 L. monocytogenes isolates, 28 were type 1, while 17 of them were type 4. These results indicated that L. monocytogenes and other Listeria species are widely distributed in the ground beef and chicken meat samples in the eastern part of Turkey. Thus, meat products may be a potential food safety concern in Turkey.

  13. Influence of carbon dioxide stunning procedure on quality of turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, S; Guijarro, A; Avilés, C; Peña, F

    2017-08-01

    1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sex and gas stunning on quality attributes of turkey breast meat. 2. One hundred B.U.T. Premium turkeys (50 males and 50 females) were divided into four groups of 25 animals and subjected to one of two CO 2 stunning procedures: G1 stepwise (step 1: 30% CO 2 , 15 s; step 2: 55% CO 2 , 40 s; step 3: 70% CO 2 , 45 s) or G2 fixed concentration (80% CO 2 , 100 s). The pH and meat colour at 20 min post-mortem, and pH, colour (L*, a*, b*), water holding capacity (WHC), drip loss (DL), cooking loss (CL) and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) in breast samples at 24 h and 7 d post-mortem were assessed. 3. There were significant differences between stunning groups for pH, meat colour and CL, whereas no significant differences were found for DL and WBSF. Sex had a significant effect on pH and b* and ageing of meat affected pH, colour coordinates, DL and WBSF. 4. It was concluded that the G2 treatment affected negatively the pH value and colour coordinates. However, G2 stunning affected positively the WHC parameters. Female turkeys had better results than males for pH, and the colour of female turkey breast meat was less yellow than male breast meat.

  14. Influence of modified atmosphere packaging on meat quality parameters of turkey breast muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacha, Ines; Krischek, Carsten; Klein, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Poultry meat is often stored in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) or vacuum packaging to improve consumer acceptance and shelf life. The aim of this study was to determine how different packaging conditions influence meat quality. Therefore, in three independent experiments, turkey breast muscle cutlets were packaged either in vacuum or in different modified atmosphere mixtures (80% O2, 20% CO2 [MAP 1]; 80% N2, 20% CO2 [MAP 2]; and 20% O2, 20% CO2, 60% N2 [MAP 3]) and stored for 12 days at 3°C. Color, pH, electrical conductivity, total viable counts, and Pseudomonas species were determined on days 1, 4, 8, and 12 of storage. On the same days, samples were collected for analysis of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance and total volatile basic nitrogen concentrations. Sensory parameters and liquid loss were determined on days 4, 8, and 12. Vacuum-packaged meat had the highest liquid loss and lowest sensory results. MAP 1-packaged meat showed the highest sensory, redness, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance values. MAP 2-packaged meat had lower sensory values. MAP 3-packaged meat had lower redness and sensory values, especially at the end of storage. The study showed an impact of the packaging condition on different quality parameters, with a small advantage for storage of turkey cutlets in high-oxygen packages.

  15. Policy implications of trends in Turkey's meat sector with respect to 2023 vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Fahri; Bilgic, Abdulbaki; Terin, Mustafa; Guler, Irfan O

    2013-12-01

    Turkey has become one of the leading emerging economies in the world being second after China as the highest economically growing country with 8.9% economic growth rate in 2010. Forecasting impacts of this development in coming 10 years might have very important policy implications for the meat sector in the framework of 2013 vision of Turkey. In this study, annual time series data which contain several key variables of meat sector in last 26 years (1987-2012) are used to forecast the variables of the coming twelve years (2013-2024) to drive policy implications by considering the impacts of high economic growths, crises and major policy changes. Forecasted future values of the variables for 2023 in the sector are assessed and compared with recent national and international values to drive policy implications. The results show that the economic growth results in the increase in per capita income and thus increased demand for meat seemed to foster the meat sector. Therefore, these macroeconomic indicators need to be better in addition to improvements at micro level for establishing competitive meat sector and thus reaching aimed consumption level of meat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fate of gamma-irradiated Listeria monocytogenes during refrigerated storage on raw or cooked turkey breast meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.; Kim, A.; Fox, J.B. Jr.; Farrell, H.M. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The radiation resistance and ability of Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644, 15313, 43256, and 49594 to multiply on irradiated, air-packed, refrigerated raw or cooked turkey breast meat nuggets (ca. 25 g) and ground turkey breast meat was investigated. Gamma-radiation D values for L. monocytogenes were significantly different on raw and cooked nuggets, 0.56 +/- 0.03 kGy and 0.69 +/- 0.03 kGy, respectively; but they were not significantly different (P less than or equal to 0.05) on raw and cooked ground turkey meat. High populations (approximately 10(9) CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes declined during 14 days of storage at 4 degrees C in both irradiated and nonirradiated samples of raw but not of cooked ground turkey breast meat. A moderate inoculum (approximately 10(3) CFU/g) did not survive a radiation dose of 3 kGy. The population increased in cooked but not in raw samples of irradiated ground turkey meat stored at either 2 or 7 degrees C for 21 days. The D value changed significantly from 0.70 +/- 0.04 to 0.60 +/- 0.02 kGy when the product was cooked to an internal temperature of 80 degrees C before irradiation. Growth on either raw or cooked turkey meat did not alter the radiation resistance of L. monocytogenes. Analyses were performed for pH, a(w), moisture, and reducing potential of raw and cooked turkey meat and for pH, amino acid profile, thiamine, and riboflavin contents of aqueous extracts of raw and cooked turkey meats without identifying the factor or factors involved in differences in the survival and multiplication of L. monocytogenes on raw and cooked meat

  17. Chitosan or rosemary oil treatments, singly or combined to increase turkey meat shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilatos, G C; Savvaidis, I N

    2013-08-16

    In this study fresh turkey meat was packaged under vacuum and stored at 2°C. The following lots were used: T (control); stored under vacuum packaging (VP), T-RO; stored under VP, treated with rosemary oil 0.25% v/w, T-CH; stored under VP, treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v, and T-CH-RO; stored under VP, treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v and rosemary oil 0.25% v/w. Of the microbial microflora species examined, irrespective of treatment, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constituted the most abundant group. Interestingly, total plate counts (TPCs) and LAB counts, exceeding the limit value of 7logcfu/g, in T and T-RO turkey samples coincided with low taste scores (5 and 6, respectively) on days 12 and 18 of storage. The shelf-life was approximately 10, 17-18 and >21days for the control (T), T-RO, T-CH and T-CH-RO turkey samples, respectively. Thus, a shelf-life extension of 7-8 and >11days was obtained for T-RO and T-CH, and T-CH-RO turkey samples, respectively. The presence of chitosan in T-CH and T-CH-RO samples did not negatively influence the taste of cooked turkey meat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. INFLUENCE OF THERMAL HEATING ON THE FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF TURKEY MEAT ENRICHED WITH LINSEED OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Gushchin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The paper examines the problem of optimization of the fatty acid composition of lipids in poultry meat, which is widely used in nutrition. The omega-6 content is significantly higher than the omega-3 content in the composition of poultry meat lipids, which is not optimal for assimilation and needs a correction. The possibility of turkey meat enrichment with linseed oil was investigated with the aim of ensuring the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio in the minced meat formulations, which provides for the nutritionally adequate balance not higher than 10 units. The paper also presents the results of the investigation of the fatty acids composition and fatty acid balance of the lipid fraction of minced meat as well as the changes due to thermal heating of meat formulations in the water medium with a temperature of 95±2  °C to a product core temperature of 70±1  °C. According to the data of the investigations, the omega-6 : omega-3 ratio in the minced meat formulations before thermal treatment was 6.5 to 7.7 units compared to the control (42 units; after thermal treatment, it was 6.5 to 8.0 units for the minced meat formulations, which included vegetable oils with linseed oil. The data on the fatty acid composition of the formulations correspond to the indicators of the fatty acid balance which was RL1…3=0.47 – 0.57 and RL1…6 = 0.32 – 0.37 units for enriched minced meat before thermal treatment and 0.48 – 0.57 and 0.31 – 0.38 units after thermal treatment, respectively. The results confirm the possibility to enrich minced meat formulations with linseed oil when producing meat balls, which can be extended to other types of products.

  19. Aplicação de redes neurais para avaliação do teor de carne mecanicamente separada em salsicha de frango Application of neural network for evaluation of the amount of mechanically deboned poultry meat in sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlandsson Anthony de Sousa

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A carne mecanicamente separada (CMS de frango é uma matéria-prima cárnea produzida através de equipamentos próprios do tipo desossadores mecânicos, utilizando partes de frango de baixo valor comercial como o dorso e o pescoço. Para determinação do teor de CMS utilizada na composição de produtos cárneos comerciais construímos uma rede neural artificial do tipo Backpropagation (BP. O objetivo deste trabalho foi treinar, testar e aplicar uma rede do tipo BP, com três camadas de neurônios, para previsão do teor de CMS a partir do teor de minerais de salsichas formuladas com diferentes teores de carne de frango mecanicamente separada. Utilizamos a composição mineral de 29 amostras de salsicha contendo diferentes teores de CMS e 22 amostras de produtos cárneos comerciais. A topologia da rede foi 5-5-1. O erro quadrático médio no conjunto de treinamento foi de 2,4% e na fase de teste foi de apenas 3,8%. No entanto, a aplicação da rede às amostras comerciais foi inadequada devido à diferença de ingredientes das salsichas usadas no treinamento e os ingredientes das amostras comerciais. A rede neural construída para determinação do teor de carne mecanicamente separada mostrou-se eficiente durante a fase de treinamento e teste da rede.Mechanically Deboned Poultry Meat (MDPM is constituted of the neck and back from chicken carcasses that are extracted in machine. An artificial neural network of the Back-Propagation type was built to determine the amount of MDPM in the composition of commercial foods. The objective of this work was to train, evaluate and apply a network of the Back-Propagation type, with three layers of neurons, in predicting the amount of MDPM in relation to the amount of minerals in the sausage. We used the mineral composition of 29 product samples that contained different amounts of MDPM and 23 commercial samples. The topology of the network was a 5-5-1. The average quadratic error in the training group was of

  20. EVALUACIÓN ERGONÓMICA EN EL ÁREA DE DESPOSTE DE UNA EMPRESA VENEZOLANA PRODUCTORA DE CÁRNICOS // ERGONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE DEBONING AREA OF A MEAT PRODUCTS VENEZUELAN COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonieta Riera

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo se realizó en el área de desposte de una empresa de productos cárnicos, ubicada en la ciudad de Barquisimeto estado Lara, Venezuela, con el objetivo de evaluar ergonómicamente los puestos de trabajo, debido a padecimientos de enfermedades de tipo músculo esqueléticas en sus trabajadores. En tal sentido, se aplicaron como técnicas de recolección y análisis de información: Observación directa, entrevistas, diagrama de flujo de procesos, lista de verificación, diagrama causa-efecto. Del mismo modo, se evaluó el nivel de riesgo disergonómico mediante el método Valoración Rápida del Cuerpo Completo (REBA, determinando que las mayores causas asignables a la presencia de estas patologías se deben a los movimientos repetitivos, trabajo netamente manual, adopción de posturas forzadas, falta de tiempos de descanso, altura inadecuada de los puestos de trabajo, ausencia de equipos mecánicos, traduciéndose como exposición a un alto nivel de riesgo. En consecuencia, se recomendó la implementación de mejoras inmediatas para el beneficio de los operadores, que incluyeron: instalación de alfombras antifatiga, pausas y tiempos de descansos, rotación de trabajadores, rediseño de puesto de trabajo acordes a las medidas antropométricas de los trabajadores, formación del personal e implementación de equipo mecánicos. // The present work was developed in the deboning area of a meat products company, located in the city of Barquisimeto, Lara state, Venezuela, with the objective of evaluating the ergonomics of its workstations, due to musculoskeletal illnesses reported in some workers. In this sense, the data collection and analysis techniques used were: Direct observation, interviews, process flow chart, checklist and cause-effect diagrams. The level of dysergonomic risk was assessed using the Rapid Entire Body Assessment method (REBA, determining that the major causes of the mentioned pathologies were repetitive

  1. EFFECT OF CHICKEN BONE-MARROW ADDITION TO BREAST AND LEG MEAT SUBJECTED TO DIFFERENT GRINDING PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    POLLONIO, MAR; ANTUNES, AJ

    1993-01-01

    Mechanical deboning makes chicken meat highly suscetible to lipid oxidation. Tissue disruption and the incorporation of unknown amounts of bone marrow are among the main factors involved. This research was undertaken to evaluate the effect of chicken bone marrow addition to breast and leg meat, ground in a regular meat grinder and passed through a mechanical deboner on lipid stability during frozen storage at -18-degrees-C. Breast and leg meat were manually deboned: a portion was processed th...

  2. Analysis of nifursol residues in turkey and chicken meat using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Martin Vahl

    2005-01-01

    on conversion of nifursol and its metabolites with an intact 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid hydrazide (DNSH) side chain to the 2-nitrophenyl analogue of nifursol (NPDNSH) by treatment with dilute hydrochloric acid and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde. Nifuroxazide (salicylic acid (5-nitrofurfurylidene) hydrazide) added......Nifursol (3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (5-nitrofurfurylidene) hydrazide) is mainly used as a feed additive for the prevention of blackhead disease in turkeys. The objective of the present work was to establish information on nifursol residues in turkey and chicken meat. The analytical method was based...

  3. Antimicrobial resistance in Enterococcus spp. strains isolated from organic chicken, conventional chicken, and turkey meat: a comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J M; Guarddon, M; Mondragon, A; Vázquez, B I; Fente, C A; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2007-04-01

    The mean counts of Enterococcus spp. were determined for 30 samples each of organic chicken meat, conventional chicken meat, and turkey meat, and differences for Enterococcus contamination in meat were determined. Two enterococci strains from each sample were isolated to obtain a total of 180 strains, and resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, and vancomycin was determined by a disk diffusion method. Average counts obtained showed that Enterococcus mean counts from organic chicken meat (3.18 log CFU/g) were significantly higher than those obtained from conventional chicken meat (2.06 log CFU/g) or conventional turkey meat (1.23 log CFU/g). However, the resistance data obtained showed that isolates from organic chicken meat were less resistant than enterococci isolates from conventional chicken meat to ampicillin (P = 0.0067), chloramphenicol (P = 0.0154), doxycycline (P = 0.0277), ciprofloxacin (P = 0.0024), erythromycin (P = 0.0028), and vancomycin (P = 0.0241). In addition, isolates from organic chicken were less resistant than conventional turkey meat isolates to ciprofloxacin (P = 0.001) and erythromycin (P = 0.0137). Multidrug-resistant isolates were found in every group tested, but rates of multidrug-resistant strains were significantly higher in conventional chicken and turkey than those obtained from organic chicken meat. Enterococcus faecalis was the most common species isolated from organic chicken (36.67%), whereas Enterococcus durans was the most common species isolated from conventional chicken (58.33%) and turkey (56.67%). The rates obtained for antimicrobial resistance suggest that although organic chicken meat may have higher numbers of Enterococcus, these bacteria present a lower level of antimicrobial resistance.

  4. In-transit development of color abnormalities in turkey breast meat during winter season

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Rafael H.; Honorato, Danielle C. B.; Guarnieri, Paulo D.; Soares, Adriana L.; Pedrão, Mayka R.; Oba, Alexandre; Paião, Fernanda G.; Ida, Elza I.; Shimokomaki, Massami

    2018-01-01

    Background The poultry industry suffers losses from problems as pale, soft and exudative (PSE), and dark, firm and dry (DFD) meat can develop in meat as a result of short- and long-term stress, respectively. These abnormalities are impacted by pre-slaughter animal welfare. Methods This work evaluated the effects of open vehicle container microclimate, throughout the 38 ± 10 km journey from the farm to the slaughterhouse, on commercially turkey transported during the Brazilian winter season. T...

  5. Physico-chemical and microbiological properties of raw fermented sausages are not influenced by color differences of turkey breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, J; Krischek, C; Janisch, S; Wicke, M; Klein, G

    2013-05-01

    It has been suggested that the color of turkey breast meat influences both physico-chemical and microbiological properties of raw fermented sausages. In this study, raw fermented sausages were produced with turkey breast meat in 3 different colors (pale, normal, or dark), which were obtained from 2 fast-growing-genetic-line toms at 2 slaughterhouses. Prior to the sausage production, the breast muscles were sorted into color groups according to the lightness values determined at 24 h postmortem. This meat was subsequently processed to raw fermented sausages using 1.5 or 2.5% curing salt (CS). The pale meat had higher lightness, electrical conductivity, and drip loss, whereas the dark meat showed a darker color only. The physico-chemical (pH, water activity), visual (lightness, redness), and microbial (total plate count) properties of the sausages were not influenced by the color of the turkey breast meat. The sausage made with 2.5% CS had lower aw and higher ash and hardness values than the sausages produced with 1.5% CS. In conclusion, processing of differently colored turkey meat to raw fermented sausages does not influence the quality characteristics of the products. Based on these findings, there is no reason for the sausage producer to separate turkey breast muscles by color before producing raw fermented sausages.

  6. Development and evaluation of a vision based poultry debone line monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Colin T.; Daley, W. D. R.

    2013-05-01

    Efficient deboning is key to optimizing production yield (maximizing the amount of meat removed from a chicken frame while reducing the presence of bones). Many processors evaluate the efficiency of their deboning lines through manual yield measurements, which involves using a special knife to scrape the chicken frame for any remaining meat after it has been deboned. Researchers with the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have developed an automated vision system for estimating this yield loss by correlating image characteristics with the amount of meat left on a skeleton. The yield loss estimation is accomplished by the system's image processing algorithms, which correlates image intensity with meat thickness and calculates the total volume of meat remaining. The team has established a correlation between transmitted light intensity and meat thickness with an R2 of 0.94. Employing a special illuminated cone and targeted software algorithms, the system can make measurements in under a second and has up to a 90-percent correlation with yield measurements performed manually. This same system is also able to determine the probability of bone chips remaining in the output product. The system is able to determine the presence/absence of clavicle bones with an accuracy of approximately 95 percent and fan bones with an accuracy of approximately 80%. This paper describes in detail the approach and design of the system, results from field testing, and highlights the potential benefits that such a system can provide to the poultry processing industry.

  7. In-transit development of color abnormalities in turkey breast meat during winter season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rafael H; Honorato, Danielle C B; Guarnieri, Paulo D; Soares, Adriana L; Pedrão, Mayka R; Oba, Alexandre; Paião, Fernanda G; Ida, Elza I; Shimokomaki, Massami

    2017-01-01

    The poultry industry suffers losses from problems as pale, soft and exudative (PSE), and dark, firm and dry (DFD) meat can develop in meat as a result of short- and long-term stress, respectively. These abnormalities are impacted by pre-slaughter animal welfare. This work evaluated the effects of open vehicle container microclimate, throughout the 38 ± 10 km journey from the farm to the slaughterhouse, on commercially turkey transported during the Brazilian winter season. The journey was initiated immediately after water bath in truck fitted with portable Kestrel anemometers to measure air ventilation, relative humidity, temperature and ventilation. The inferior compartments of the middle and rear truck regions showed highest temperature and relative humidity, and lower air ventilation. In addition, the superior compartments of the front truck regions presented lower temperature and wind chill, and highest air ventilation. The breast meat samples from animals located at the inferior compartments of the middle and rear truck regions and subjected to with water bath (WiB) treatment presented highest DFD-like and had lowest PSE-like meat incidence than those from animals located at other compartments within the container. Lower incidence of PSE-like meat was observed in birds without water bath (WoB). Assessment on turkeys transported under Brazilian southern winter conditions revealed that breast meat quality can be affected by relative humidity, air ventilation, temperature, and transport under subtropical conditions promoting color abnormalities and the formation of simultaneously PSE-like and DFD-like meat.

  8. Comparative Quantitative Studies on the Microvasculature of the Heart of a Highly Selected Meat-Type and a Wild-Type Turkey Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Masri, Salah; Kattanek, Maria; Richardson, Kenneth C; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Plendl, Johanna; Hünigen, Hana

    2017-01-01

    In this study the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the heart of a fast growing, meat-type turkey line (British United turkeys BUT Big 6) and a wild-type turkey line (Canadian Wild turkey) were compared. At 8 and 16 weeks of age, 10 birds of each genotype and sex were sampled. The body mass and heart mass of the meat-type turkey both increased at a faster rate than those of the wild-type turkey. However in both turkey lines, the relative heart mass decreased slightly with age, the decrease was statistically significant only in the male turkeys. Furthermore meat-type turkeys had a significantly (p turkeys of the same age. The wild-type turkeys showed no significant change in the size of cardiomyocytes (cross sectional area and diameter) from 8 weeks to 16 weeks. In contrast, the size of cardiomyocytes increased significantly (p meat-type turkeys. The number of capillaries in the left ventricular wall increased significantly (p turkeys from 2351 per mm2 at the age of 8 weeks to 2843 per mm2 at 16 weeks. However, in the meat-type turkeys there were no significant changes, capillary numbers being 2989 per mm2 at age 8 weeks and 2915 per mm2 at age 16 weeks. Correspondingly the area occupied by capillaries in the myocardium increased in wild-type turkeys from 8.59% at the age of 8 weeks to 9.15% at 16 weeks, whereas in meat-type turkeys this area decreased from 10.4% at 8 weeks to 9.95% at 16 weeks. Our results indicate a mismatch in development between body mass and heart mass and a compromised cardiac capillary density and architecture in the meat-type turkeys in comparison to the wild-type turkeys.

  9. [Microbiological quality of mechanically deboned beef].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasovská, M; Pleva, J; Gorzová, A

    1991-01-01

    Microbial quality of mechanically deboned beef (MDB), which was obtained by the discontinuous hydraulic horizontal separator, type Inject-Star (firm LASKA, Austria), was analyzed for the presence of indicatory microorganisms (coliforms and enterococci), pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microorganisms. The basic microbial parameters have been determined separately for MDB of 1st, 2nd degrees as well as for average daily samples from one collecting vessel. Apart from it, also a raw material (beef from flesh bones intended for separation) and salt MDB after 24 hrs storing in chiller before working it into meat products were examined by the same way. From our results it follows that the number of all microorganisms observed in MDB of 1st degree was lower than that of 2nd degree. During the separation process the increase of microbial parameters compared with those in initial raw material occurred by 1-2 radices and following subsequent salting and storing in chiller there was a repeated decrease by 1 radix (with exception of the number of Staphylococci remaining unchanged). The change in the amount of microflora present was also influenced by season--in summer there was an increase by about 1 radix. From the view point of food hygiene the finding of salmonellas and the presence of large number of Staphylococci including Staphylococcus aureus on average 10(5).g-1 as well as the presence of wide extent of conditionally pathogenic microorganisms from the family of Enterobacteriaceae, especially from genera Proteus, Providencia, Morganella and Citrobacter are of great importance.

  10. Effects of dietary functional ingredients and packaging methods on sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of irradiated turkey breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H J; Lee, E J; Nam, K C; Min, B R; Ahn, D U

    2006-08-01

    Raw and cooked breast patties from turkeys fed 8 different diets [control; 200 IU/kg of vitamin E (VE); 0.3 mg/kg of Se; 2.5% conjugated linoleic acids (CLA); 200 IU/kg of VE + 0.3 mg/kg of Se; 200 IU/kg of VE + 2.5% CLA; 0.3 mg/kg of Se + 2.5% CLA; and 200 IU/kg of VE + 0.3 mg/kg of Se + 2.5% CLA] were treated with 2 irradiation doses (0 and 1.5 kGy) and 2 packaging methods (vacuum and aerobic). Raw and cooked samples from 32 treatments were tested by 8 trained sensory panelists for turkey aroma and irradiation off-aroma. Based on the sensory scores, the 3 dietary treatments producing the most and the least off-aroma were selected and used for a consumer acceptance study. Sensory results of raw meat showed that turkey aroma was intense in aerobically packaged meat, whereas irradiation off-aroma was intense with vacuum packaging. Raw meats from dietary treatments containing CLA (CLA, VE + CLA, Se + CLA, VE + Se + CLA) had greater turkey aroma scores, whereas those containing VE (VE and VE + Se) had lower scores than the control. Dietary treatments containing VE (VE, VE + Se, VE + Se + CLA) significantly lowered (P turkey breast meat, whereas CLA increased it, especially when the meats were packaged aerobically. In cooked meat, however, irradiation and packaging had no effect on turkey meat aroma and irradiation off-aroma. Cooked meat from turkeys supplemented with VE (VE and VE + Se) had less (P meat, which could not be reduced, even when VE and Se were combined in the diet. Irradiation off-aroma of raw meat was not pleasant for most consumers, and dietary supplementation of VE and VE + Se improved consumer acceptance of irradiated raw meat. For cooked meat samples, consumers preferred both color and flavor of irradiated meat to nonirradiated meat.

  11. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (turkey products became significant.

  12. Biogenic amine formation in turkey meat under modified atmosphere packaging with extended shelf life: Index of freshness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Alfaia, C M; Barreto, A S

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on biogenic amine production in turkey meat according to its shelf life period, determining an index of freshness. Sliced meat samples of different meat quality categories (according to color and pH₂₄) were individually packaged under aerobiosis (aerobic package) and in 6 different modified atmospheres containing different gas mixtures: MAP1, 50% N₂/50% CO₂; MAP2, 0.5% CO/50% CO₂/49.5% N₂; MAP3, 50% Ar/50% N₂; MAP4, 0.5% CO/80% CO₂/19.5% N₂; MAP5, 100% N₂; and MAP6, 50% Ar/50% CO₂. All samples were stored at 0 ± 1°C in the dark for between 12 and 25 d. Meat samples packaged in aerobic packaging were analyzed for their microbial and physicochemical characteristics on d 0, 5, and 12 of storage, and then extended to 19 and 25 d when samples were under MAP. The production of biogenic amines analyzed in turkey meat increased over time. The values of putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine increased significantly (P < 0.05) during storage time in samples packaged under aerobiosis, MAP3, and MAP5. Histamine was not detected in turkey meat packaged under study conditions, or when present, the levels were below the limit of quantification (1.03 mg/kg). Tyramine in turkey meat under MAP was not the best amine indicator of meat deterioration, with cadaverine being suggested instead, or the sum of the amines putrescine, cadaverine, and tyramine, to characterize and quantify meat freshness. After 25 d of storage, the meat packaged under MAP with a mixture containing a higher concentration of CO₂ and with CO was the one with a lower index value (11.36 mg/kg), although not significantly different from the indices provided by the meat packaged with MAP1, 2, and 6.

  13. The food safety value of de-boning finishing pig carcasses with lesions indicative of prior septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækbo, A.K.; Petersen, J.V.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2016-01-01

    procedure concerning carcasses with lesions indicative of a prior septicaemia is not specified. In Denmark, such carcasses are de-boned to avoid the presence of abscesses in the muscles. The aim of this study was to evaluate the food safety value of this specific use of de-boning. Retrospective data from 1...... procedure to ensure food safety. Instead, thorough inspection (requiring deep cuts into the predilection sites for the abscesses) in the rework area could replace de-boning. In addition, if overlooked in the rework area, such abscesses would probably be found during cutting, and dealt with at the abattoir......The primary purpose of meat inspection is to protect the public health by ensuring that no meat unfit for human consumption enters the market. EU Regulation 854/2004 specifies that lesions indicative of a generalised condition should result in the condemnation of the carcass. However, the correct...

  14. Antioxidant status of turkey breast meat and blood after feeding a diet enriched with histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopec, W; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Jamroz, D; Biazik, E; Pudlo, A; Hikawczuk, T; Skiba, T; Korzeniowska, M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 1) spray dried blood cells rich in histidine and 2) pure histidine added to feed on the antioxidant status and concentration of carnosine related components in the blood and breast meat of female turkeys. The experiment was performed on 168 Big7 turkey females randomly assigned to 3 dietary treatments: control; control with the addition of 0.18% L-histidine (His); and control with the addition of spray dried blood cells (SDBC). Birds were raised for 103 d on a floor with sawdust litter, with drinking water and feed ad libitum. The antioxidant status of blood plasma and breast muscle was analyzed by ferric reducing ability (FRAP) and by 2,2-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging ability. The activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was analyzed in the blood and breast meat, with the content of carnosine and anserine quantified by HPLC. Proximate analysis as well as amino acid profiling were carried out for the feed and breast muscles. Growth performance parameters also were calculated. Histidine supplementation of the turkey diet resulted in increased DPPH radical scavenging capacity in the breast muscles and blood, but did not result in higher histidine dipeptide concentrations. The enzymatic antioxidant system of turkey blood was affected by the diet with SDBC. In the plasma, the SDBC addition increased both SOD and GPx activity, and decreased GPx activity in the erythrocytes. Feeding turkeys with an SDBC containing diet increased BW and the content of isoleucine and valine in breast muscles. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  15. Prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Turkey, Pork, and Beef Meat in Poland between 2009 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsak, Dorota; Maćkiw, Elżbieta; Rożynek, Elżbieta; Żyłowska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter in poultry, pork, and beef meat at the retail level and to identify the main categories of meat representing the most significant reservoirs of Campylobacter. A monitoring study was conducted throughout Poland from 2009 to 2013. A total of 1,700 fresh meat samples were collected from supermarkets, large retail outlets, and smaller stores. Thermophilic Campylobacter species were detected in 690 (49.3%) of 1,400 poultry samples collected from retail trade. Strains were isolated from 50.2 and 41.1% of raw chicken and turkey meat samples, respectively, and from 50.1 and 42.6% of raw chicken and turkey giblets. The incidence of Campylobacter spp. on pork (10.6%) and beef (10.1%) was significantly lower than on poultry. Campylobacter jejuni was the most prevalent Campylobacter species in chicken (46.6%), pork (68.6%), and beef (66.7%), and Campylobacter coli was the most frequently isolated Campylobacter species in turkey meat (71.2%). This study revealed that retail raw meats are often contaminated with Campylobacter; however, the prevalence of these pathogens is markedly different in different meats. Raw retail meats are potential vehicles for transmitting foodborne diseases, and our findings stress the need for increased implementation of hazard analysis critical control point programs and consumer food safety education efforts.

  16. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant. - Highlights: • Irradiation had little effects on lipid oxidation of ready-to-eat cured turkey. • 4.5 kGy irradiation increased protein oxidation. • Irradiated samples were isolated due to Strecker/radiolytic degradation products. • 1.5 kGy irradiation had limited effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages. • Dimethyl disulfide can be used as a potential marker for irradiated meat products.

  17. Influence of meat type, sex and storage time on fatty acid profile of free range Dalmatian turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Mauric

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dalmatian turkey is a slow growing breed kept in free range systems. It is a type of “old fashioned poultry” whose meat is present on the market and accepted by consumers. However, no information about its meat quality and fatty acid profile is available. The chemical composition of the meat was influenced by gender and meat type and these differences could be important from the consumer’s point of view. Fatty acid composition was characterized by the predominance of n6 fatty acids, especially C18:2n6 and a high n6/n3 ratio. Increased time of storage strongly reduced the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC PUFA and increased atherogenicity and thrombogenicity indices (AI and TI in thigh tissue. The content of beneficial n3 PUFA was influenced by meat type, with lower values of C18:3n3 and higher values of LC PUFA in the breast compared to the thighs. The potential intake of LC PUFA of comercial turkey in the human diet was lower in comparison to poultry fed with complete feed mixtures. An interesting fact was the higher DHA values in comparison with DPA values in breast tissue, which is characteristic of old poultry breeds. The Dalmatian turkey is a highly valued traditional product and an important archaic breed for gene preservation and biodiversity. Nevertheless, Dalmatian turkey meat could be even further improved by minimal dietary manipulation to become a product with additional health promoting effects.

  18. Gas mixtures approach to improve turkey meat shelf life under modified atmosphere packaging: the effect of carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Barreto, A S

    2011-09-01

    Gas mixtures with CO have been applied to beef and pork meat, but no data have been reported regarding their application to poultry meat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an anaerobic gas mixture with CO on the growth of spoilage flora, color, and lipid oxidation stability of turkey meat under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) stored at 0°C. Sliced meat samples were individually packaged under aerobiosis (aerobic packaging) and in 4 different modified atmospheres containing different gas mixtures: MAP 1, 50% N(2) and 50% CO(2); MAP 2, 0.5% CO, 50% CO(2), and 49.5% N(2); MAP 3, 0.5% CO, 80% CO(2), and 19.5% N(2); and MAP 4, 100% N(2). All the samples were stored at 0 ± 1°C in the dark for 12 to 25 d. Meat samples packaged in aerobic packaging were analyzed for their microbial and physicochemical characteristics on d 0, 5, and 12 of storage, which was extended to 19 and 25 d when samples were under MAP. For meat packaged with MAP 3, the total mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than those observed in condition MAP 1. The introduction of CO, added to a higher concentration of CO(2), inhibited microbial flora in general, with particular action on Brochothrix thermosphacta. In terms of microbial quality, the shelf life of turkey meat under the MAP study conditions was longer than that of meat in aerobic packaging (5 d): 12 d for mixture MAP 4, 19 d for MAP 1 and MAP 2, and 25 d for MAP 3. Only MAP 4 without CO(2) or CO prevented lipid oxidation of the meat. The presence of CO in anoxic gas mixtures with CO(2) for turkey meat under MAP was useful, giving the bright pink color preferred by consumers without leading to the appearance of undercooked meat.

  19. Functional and rheological properties of proteins in frozen turkey breast meat with different ultimate pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J T Y; Omana, D A; Betti, M

    2011-05-01

    Functional and rheological properties of proteins from frozen turkey breast meat with different ultimate pH at 24 h postmortem (pH(24)) have been studied. Sixteen breast fillets from Hybrid Tom turkeys were initially selected based on lightness (L*) values for each color group (pale, normal, and dark), with a total of 48 breast fillets. Further selection of 8 breast samples was made within each class of meat according to the pH(24). The average L* and pH values of the samples were within the following range: pale (L* >52; pH ≤5.7), normal (46 meat, respectively. Ultimate pH did not cause major changes in the emulsifying and foaming properties of the extracted sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins. An SDS-PAGE profile of proteins from low and normal pH meat was similar, which revealed that the extent of protein denaturation was the same. Low pH meat had the lowest water-holding capacity compared with normal and high pH meat as shown by the increase in cooking loss, which can be explained by factors other than protein denaturation. Gel strength analysis and folding test revealed that gel-forming ability was better for high pH meat compared with low and normal pH meat.Dynamic viscoelastic behavior showed that myosin denaturation temperature was independent of pH(24). Normal and high pH meat had similar hardness, springiness, and chewiness values as revealed by texture profile analysis. The results from this study indicate that high pH meat had similar or better functional properties than normal pH meat. Therefore, high pH meat is suitable for further processed products, whereas low pH meat may need additional treatment or ingredient formulations to improve its functionality.

  20. Screening of quinolone antibiotic residues in chicken meat and beef sold in the markets of Ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Buket; Onurdag, Fatma Kaynak; Demirhan, Burak; Ozgacar, Selda Özgen; Oktem, Aysel Bayhan; Abbasoglu, Ufuk

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to find the effects of quinolone antibiotics in chicken and beef used in Ankara, Turkey. Total number of 127 chicken and 104 beef meat samples were collected randomly from local markets for analysis. Extraction and determination of quinolones were made by ELISA procedure. One hundred eighteen of 231 (51.1%) examined chicken meat and beef samples were found to contain quinolone antibiotic residue. Among the chicken meat and beef samples, 58 (45.7%) of chicken meat samples and 60 (57.7%) of beef meat samples were positive for quinolones, respectively. The mean levels (±SE) of quinolones were found to be 30.81 ± 0.45 µg/kg and 6.64 ± 1.11 µg/kg in chicken and beef samples, respectively. This study indicated that some chicken and beef meat sold in Ankara contains residues of quinolone antibiotics.

  1. Meat production traits of local Karayaka sheep in Turkey 1. The meat quality characteristic of lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. AKSOY

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is an investigation into the meat quality parameters of Karayaka lambs at differentslaughter weights (SWs. The single-born Karayaka male lambs (n=30 selected for this study were an average live-weight of 20 kg and weaned at 2.5-3 months of age. The animals with pre-specifiedSWs were divided into slaughter weight (SW groups (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 kg using a fully randomized design. To determine the M. longissimus dorsi et thoracis (LD muscle meat qualitycharacteristics, six lambs from each weight group were slaughtered. Results revealed significant differences among the slaughter groups with regard to pH, color parameters (L*-lightness,a*-redness, b* -yellowness, cooking loss (CL, drip loss (DL, moisture (M, crude protein (CP and intramuscular fat (IF ratios. Increasing water holding capacities (WHCs and hardness valueswere observed with increasing SW. Significant differences were also observed among the slaughter groups with regard to total monounsaturated fatty acid + total polyunsaturated fatty acid/totalsaturated fatty acid ratios and total cholesterol content.

  2. Characterization of vacuum-packed and irradiated frozen turkey meat (Meleagris gallopavo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Fabio C.; Valle, Felipe R.F.A. do; Moulin, Carlos H.S., E-mail: fabiocosta@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Agropecuarias; Silva, Teofilo J.P.; Franco, Robson M.; Freitas, Monica Q., E-mail: mtatjps@vm.uff.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina Veterinaria. Dept. de Tecnologia de Alimentos; Vital, Helio C., E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.b [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear. Secao de Defesa Nuclear; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de, E-mail: edgar@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia

    2011-07-01

    Irradiation is known to enhance the sanitary quality and extend the commercial shelf life of many kinds of food such as meat products. In this work, boned breasts from nine male turkeys, slaughtered according to the surveillance requirements of the Brazilian Federal Inspection Service, were purchased from a registered producer. They were then cut, vacuum packed, frozen at -18 degree C, exposed to gamma radiation at doses of 1 and 3kGy and kept in storage at -18 degree C for up to 540 days. Chemical analyses as well as sensory tests for taste, color and overall impression were performed on days 5, 180, 360 and 540 of storage. Statistical analyses were performed in order to investigate possible significant effects arising from the combination of treatments used (a- freezing, b- freezing and irradiation with 1kGy and c- freezing and irradiation with 3kGy) as functions of time. In the beginning of storage, the levels of lipids in samples irradiated with 3 kGy were about twice those found in unirradiated ones, with TBARS values increasing with storage time in all samples. However, the results from the sensory tests performed have indicated that irradiation with doses of 1 and 3 kGy does not significantly impact the acceptance of taste, flavor, color or the overall sensory impression of frozen turkey breast meat. (author)

  3. Evolution of amino acids and biogenic amines throughout storage in sausages made of horse, beef and turkey meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, Mohamed A; Peres, Cidalia; Malcata, F Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The changes in concentration of free amino acids and biogenic amines, along 28 d of storage at 4°C, were monitored in a wide range of European ripened sausages manufactured from horse, beef and turkey meats. Generally speaking, both chemical families became more concentrated with elapsing time--but rather distinct patterns were followed in each meat type: total free amino acids increased by 13-fold in the case of horse sausages, and 5-fold in the case of beef sausages, but decreased to one third in the case of turkey sausages; and total biogenic amines attained 730 mg/kg in turkey sausages, 500 mg/kg in beef sausages and 130 mg/kg in horse sausages by 28 d of refrigerated storage. For putrescine, maximum levels of 285 mg/kg were attained in turkey and 278 mg/kg in beef sausages; for cadaverine, maximum levels of 6 mg/kg in turkey and 9 mg/kg in beef; and for histamine, maximum levels of 263 mg/kg in turkey and 26 mg/kg in beef. Hence, public safety concerns may be raised in the case of turkey sausages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities, Phage Types, and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis from Chickens and Chicken Meat in Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalender, H.; Sen, S.; Hasman, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from chickens and chicken meat in Turkey were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, phage types, plasmid profiles, and resistance genes. Seven different PFGE patterns were observed...

  5. Immunomagnetic separation and PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes in turkey meat and antibiotic resistance of the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilir Ormanci, F S; Erol, I; Ayaz, N D; Iseri, O; Sariguzel, D

    2008-09-01

    1. Conventional cultivation and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) cultivation methods were compared for the isolation specificity and sensitivity of L. monocytogenes from turkey meat samples. PCR was used to confirm the isolates. Disc diffusion was performed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles. A total of 180 turkey meat samples collected from markets in Turkey were tested. 2. L. monocytogenes was detected in 23 samples (12.7%) by IMS and conventional cultivation. It was isolated from 16.6% (10/60), 11.6% (7/60) and 10.0% (6/60) of the meat cut, breast and leg samples, respectively. PCR assay was performed based on hlyA (LLO-listeriolysin O) gene specific primers. In all 23 (100.0%) isolates of the hlyA gene were determined. The disc diffusion test showed that 19 (82.6%) isolates were resistant to penicillin G and 17 (73.9%) to ampicillin. In addition, 8 isolates were partially resistant to erythromycin and 8 to streptomycin. 3. In conclusion, to safeguard public health turkey meat must be produced under hygienic and suitable technological conditions. Furthermore antimicrobials, as prophylactic or growth promoter agents, must be firmly controlled by governmental agencies.

  6. Slaughter performance of four different turkey strains, with special focus on the muscle fiber structure and the meat quality of the breast muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C; Riegel, J; Wicke, M

    2008-09-01

    The increase in human consumption of turkey meat and the shift in the poultry market from whole birds to further processed meat products increases the visibility of meat alterations (e.g., heterogenic color, drip loss, petechial hemorrhages) at retail. Changes in poultry meat quality have been related to the intensive growth of the current turkey strains. Considering this, the main objective of this investigation was to evaluate the meat quality and muscle structure of commercially available turkey strains with different growth properties but similar breast yields. Toms (n = 120) of 4 different turkey strains (British United Turkeys Big 6, Kelly Broad-Breasted Bronze, Kelly Wrolstad, Kelly Super Mini; n = 30 per strain) were reared in an experimental barn under similar environmental and feeding conditions and were slaughtered at 22 wk of age in a commercial slaughterhouse. The strains Big 6 and Broad-Breasted Bronze belong to the fast-growing (FG) turkey strain and the other 2 to the slow-growing (SG) turkey strain. The carcass weights, as estimated by video imaging, differed significantly (P turkey strains but the creatine kinase activities were greater in the FG turkeys at the time of slaughter. Determination of the different meat quality parameters [pH, electrical conductivity, color (L a b), drip loss, shear force] did not result in clear differences between the SG and FG turkey strains. There were larger muscle fibers in the FG in comparison with the SG strains, but no differences could be determined in the capillary density and incidence of degenerated or giant fibers, except for a higher rate in the Wrolstad strain. The present results are contradictory to the opinion that turkeys with faster growth have worse meat quality.

  7. Development of a polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis method for the detection of chicken or turkey meat in heat-treated pork meat mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Chávez, Juan F; González-Córdova, Aarón F; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Roberto; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda

    2011-12-05

    A polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis (PCR-CGE) method with ultraviolet (UV) or laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF) was established for the detection of chicken or turkey in heat-treated pork meat mixtures. Mitochondrial DNA samples extracted from heat treated meat were amplified with their corresponding specific primers yielding PCR products between 200 and 300 bp. LIF detection was superior than UV detection in terms of precision and sensitivity for the study of DNA fragments. The CGE-LIF method was highly reproducible and accurate for determining DNA fragment size. The PCR-CGE-LIF was sensitive since a significant fluorescent signal was obtained at the minimum admixture level employed of 1% in meat mixtures. Thus, the PCR-CGE-LIF method established was useful for the detection of chicken or turkey in heat treated meat mixtures and may prove to be useful for the detection of poultry meat in pork processed products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spoilage of light (PSE-like) and dark turkey meat under aerobic or modified atmosphere package: microbial indicators and their relationship with total volatile basic nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, M J; Ferreira, M C; Barreto, A S

    2008-01-01

    1. The aim of this work was to evaluate the shelf life of turkey meat from different colour categories (Pale, Soft and Exudative (PSE)-like), intermediate and dark), packaged under aerobic or modified atmosphere (MAP) conditions; also to establish a relationship between microbial quality and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), evaluating its capacity for shelf life determination. 2. Breasts were selected according to luminance (L*) and pH(24): L >/= 51 and pH 5.8 for dark colour. Sliced meat was packaged under aerobic or MAP conditions with 50% N(2) and 50% CO(2), then stored in the dark at 0 +/- 1 degrees C for periods of 12 or 25 d. Meat under aerobic conditions was evaluated for microbiological characteristics and TVB-N on d 0, 5 and 12. This evaluation was extended to include d 19 and 25 when samples were under MAP conditions. 3. The dark meat group after 12 d of storage in aerobiosis presented significantly higher plate counts of aerobic mesophilic, psychrotrophic micro-organisms and higher TVB-N than other meat colour categories. The shelf life of turkey meat under MAP was one week longer for intermediate and light colour meat (20 d) than for dark meat. TVB-N values of 20 to 30 mg NH(3)/100 g turkey meat correspond to advanced spoilage stages. We proposed 14 mg NH(3)/100 g as the limit of freshness acceptability for turkey meat. 4. TVB-N was an indicator of turkey meat microbial spoilage but was not a suitable early predictor for microbial spoilage and in particular for turkey meat stored under MAP conditions because counts of micro-organisms were moderately correlated (Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae) with this index, as they were inhibited by MAP gas mixture and storage temperature used in the present study.

  9. Biopreservative Efficacy of Bacteriocin BacFL31 in Raw Ground Turkey Meat in terms of Microbiological, Physicochemical, and Sensory Qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakchouk-Mtibaa, Ahlem; Smaoui, Slim; Ktari, Naourez; Sellem, Imen; Najah, Soumaya; Karray-Rebai, Ines; Mellouli, Lotfi

    2017-01-01

     The effect of the semi purified bacteriocin BacFL31 at 200 and 400 AU/g on the shelf life of refrigerated raw ground turkey meat was investigated. The microbiological, physicochemical, and sensory properties of the meat samples were examined during refrigerated storage. The findings indicated that BacFL31 treatments were effective (pturkey meat samples during refrigerated storage. These results suggest that BacFL31 could be considered a promising candidate for future application as an additive to preserve the raw turkey meat during storage at 4℃.

  10. Deep transcriptome sequencing reveals differences in global gene expression between normal and pale, soft, and exudative turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malila, Y; Carr, K M; Ernst, C W; Velleman, S G; Reed, K M; Strasburg, G M

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that differential expression of genes between normal and pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) turkey is associated with development of the PSE syndrome. However, a detailed understanding of molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of this meat defect remains unclear. The objective of this study was to extend and complement our previous work by using deep transcriptome RNA sequence analysis to compare the respective transcriptome profiles and identify molecular mechanisms responsible for the etiology of PSE turkey meat. Turkey breasts (n = 43) were previously classified as normal or PSE using marinade uptake as an indicator of quality (high = normal; low = PSE). Total RNA from breast muscle samples with the highest (n = 4) and lowest (n = 4) marinade uptake were isolated and sequenced using the Illumina GA(IIX) platform. The results indicated differential expression of 494 loci (false discovery rate turkey was suggested by both dramatic downregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 4 (PDK4) mRNA, the most downregulated gene, and a decrease in the protein product (P = 0.0007) as determined by immunoblot analysis. These results support the hypothesis that differential expression of several genes and their protein products contribute to development of PSE turkey.

  11. Effect of an active packaging with citrus extract on lipid oxidation and sensory quality of cooked turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Claudia; Álvarez, Rocío; O'Sullivan, Michael; Dowling, Denis P; Gargan, Sean Óg; Monahan, Frank J

    2014-03-01

    An antioxidant active packaging was prepared by coating a citrus extract, consisting of a mixture of carboxylic acids and flavanones, on polyethylene terephthalate trays. The effect of the packaging in reducing lipid oxidation in cooked turkey meat and on meat pH, colour characteristics and sensorial parameters was investigated. An untrained sensory panel evaluated the odour, taste, tenderness, juiciness and overall acceptability of the meat, using triangle, paired preference and quantitative response scale tests. A comparison between the antioxidant effects of the different components of the extract was also carried out. The packaging led to a significant reduction in lipid oxidation. After 2 days of refrigerated storage the sensory panel detected differences in odour and, after 4 days, rated the meat stored in the active packaging higher for tenderness and overall acceptability. Citric acid appeared to be the most important component of the extract with regard to its antioxidant potency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clostridium perfringens and its toxins in minced meat from Kars, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, U; Gokce, H I; Elmali, M

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Clostridium perfringens and its toxins in minced meat. A total of 96 minced meat samples were collected from local markets (16) and small butcher's shops (80) in Kars (Turkey). Samples were analysed for the presence of C. perfringens and its toxins using a commercially available ELISA kit. A total of 31 (32%) Clostridium spp. strains were isolated and 17 (55%) of these isolates were identified as C. perfringens. Four (25%) of the samples from local markets and 27 (34%) from small butcher's shops were contaminated with Clostridium spp. Furthermore, C. perfringens was isolated from two (12%) and 15 (19%) samples from local markets and small butcher's shops, respectively. Mean counts of Clostridium spp. were 2.2 +/- 0.83 x 10(2) CFU g(-1) for local markets and 4.35 +/- 8.53 x 10(2) CFU g(-1) for small butcher's shops; mean counts for C. porringers were 2.75 +/- 0.21 x 10(2) and 6.82 +/- 10.96 x 10(2) CFU g(-1) from markets and butcher's shops, respectively. The number of samples contaminated with both Clostridium spp. and C. perfringens was higher in small butcher's shops than in local markets. Moreover, higher numbers of Clostridium spp. and C. perfringens were isolated in samples from small butcher's shops than from local markets. A total of 13 (13%) samples were also positive for toxins produced by the organism, as detected by ELISA. Eleven samples from small butcher's shops and two samples from local markets were positive for the C. perfringens toxins tested. Moreover, two (12%), one (1%), four (4%) and two (2%) samples were contaminated with C. perfringens types A, B, C and D, respectively. In conclusion, some meat samples collected from local markets and small butcher's shops contained C. perfringens and its toxins and, therefore, present a potential risk of food poisoning.

  13. Prevalence of β-Lactamase Producing Escherichia coli from Retail Meat in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivanlar Önen, Sevda; Aslantaş, Özkan; Şebnem Yılmaz, Ebru; Kürekci, Cemil

    2015-09-01

    Extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (pAmpC) producing Escherichia coli have been shown to be present in humans and animals representing a significant problem worldwide. This study aimed to search the presence of ESBL and/or AmpC-producing E. coli in retail meats (chicken and beef) in Turkey. A total of 88 β-lactamase-producing E. coli were isolated from chicken (n = 81/100) and beef meat (n = 7/100) samples and their susceptibility to several antimicrobials were tested using disc diffusion method. E. coli isolates were further characterized for their phylogenetic groups. β-Lactamase encoding (blaTEM , blaSHV , blaOXA , blaCTX-M , and blaAmpC ) and quinolone resistance genes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and acc(6')-Ib-cr) were also secreened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, in regard to β-lactamase genes, 84 of 88 isolates were positive for blaCTX-M-1 (n = 39), blaCTX-M-3 (n = 5), blaCTX-M-15 (n = 4), blaTEM-1b (n = 2), blaSHV-12 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-1 /blaTEM-1b (n = 10), blaCTX-M-1 /blaTEM-1b /blaSHV-5 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-1 /blaCMY-2 (n = 1) and blaTEM-1b /blaCMY-2 (n = 6), blaCTX-M-15 /blaSHV-12 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-15 /blaTEM-1b (n = 1), blaTEM-1b /blaSHV-12 (n = 1), and blaCMY-2 (n = 12) genes. Resistance to cefuroxime (75.6% and 85.7%), nalidixic acid (89% and 85.7%), tetracycline (91.4% and 100%), streptomycin (40.2% and 100%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (36.6% and 85.7%) was observed among strains isolated from chicken and beef, respectively. However, all isolates were found to be susceptible to amikacin, imipenem, and cefepime. Resistance to ampicillin and cefoxitin was significantly linked to blaCMY-2 gene, while there was a significant correlation between CTX-M type ESBL and antimicrobial resistance to cefuroxime and streptomycin (P meats are highly contaminated with ESBL-producing E. coli implementing a great risk to human health in Turkey. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Study of the effects of gamma radiation on the microbiological quality, lipid oxidation and sensory properties of mechanically deboned chicken meat throughout refrigerated and frozen storage; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao gama sobre a qualidade microbiologica, a oxidacao lipidica e as propriedades sensoriais da carne mecanicamente separada de frango, armazenada refrigerada e congelada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Heliana de Azevedo

    2002-07-01

    Mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) is widely used in traditional meat products such as sausages. The proceed of mechanical separation results in grinding of the bones, liberating the marrow and rupturing cells, thus making the MDCM a favorable medium for biochemical reactions and microbiological growth. Irradiation using a Co{sup 60} source is one of the processes which has been developed aimed at reducing contamination by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in foods. The main advantages of food irradiation are the possibilities of treating the already packaged products at refrigerated and frozen temperatures, ideal for a highly perishable product such as MDCM, which, being a ground, easily spoiled product, requires rapid cooling followed by freezing, immediately after processing. Processing with ionizing radiation results in chemical alterations in the food, including the production of volatile compounds and free radicals. Irradiation of meat in the frozen state reduces or eliminates the negative sensory effects of this process. In this context, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of gamma radiation at doses of 3.0 and 4.0 kGy, on the microbiological quality, lipid oxidation and sensory properties of MDCM, at the refrigerated (2 {+-} 1 deg C) and frozen (-18 {+-} 1 deg C) storage, The results showed that irradiation increased the shelf life of this raw material when stored under refrigeration, as compared to non-irradiated samples. Since doses of 3.0 kGy produced increases in the shelf life of refrigerated MDCM equal or greater than those produced by doses of 4.0 kGy, this dose was considered the most adequate for the irradiation of this raw material. According to the results of microbiological, chemical and sensorial testing in irradiated MDCM samples with doses of 3.0 kGy and 4.0 kGy, the material studied presented conditions that were adequate for human consumption during the 90 days of frozen storage, whereas samples of non-irradiated MDCM were

  15. Growth of L. monocytogenes strain F2365 on ready-to-eat turkey meat does not enhance gastrointestinal listeriosis in intragastrically inoculated A/J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Luke D.; Faith, Nancy G.; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    There have been significant outbreaks of listeriosis associated with consumption of contaminated ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products. In this study, we investigated whether growth on RTE deli turkey meat sends environmental signals to listerial cells that makes them more virulent in the gastrointestinal tract of mice. L. Listeria monocytogenes strain F2365 grew from a starting inoculum of 103 CFU/mL to final numbers of 108–109 CFU/mL (within 12 days at 10 °C) when inoculated onto sliced processed, or whole muscle, turkey breast, or into emulsified whole turkey breast. We did not observe any difference in the numbers of CFU recovered from the spleens and livers of A/J mice inoculated intragastrically with L. monocytogenes grown on sliced turkey meat, in emulsified turkey meat, or in brain heart infusion broth. These results suggest that growth on RTE sliced deli turkey, or in RTE emulsified deli turkey, does not enhance the ability of L. monocytogenes F2365 to cause gastrointestinal listeriosis in intragastrically challenged A/J mice. PMID:18559288

  16. Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of Human Norovirus Surrogates and Hepatitis A Virus in Turkey Deli Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-07-01

    Human noroviruses (HNoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) have been implicated in outbreaks linked to the consumption of presliced ready-to-eat deli meats. The objectives of this research were to determine the thermal inactivation kinetics of HNoV surrogates (murine norovirus 1 [MNV-1] and feline calicivirus strain F9 [FCV-F9]) and HAV in turkey deli meat, compare first-order and Weibull models to describe the data, and calculate Arrhenius activation energy values for each model. The D (decimal reduction time) values in the temperature range of 50 to 72°C calculated from the first-order model were 0.1 ± 0.0 to 9.9 ± 3.9 min for FCV-F9, 0.2 ± 0.0 to 21.0 ± 0.8 min for MNV-1, and 1.0 ± 0.1 to 42.0 ± 5.6 min for HAV. Using the Weibull model, the tD = 1 (time to destroy 1 log) values for FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV at the same temperatures ranged from 0.1 ± 0.0 to 11.9 ± 5.1 min, from 0.3 ± 0.1 to 17.8 ± 1.8 min, and from 0.6 ± 0.3 to 25.9 ± 3.7 min, respectively. The z (thermal resistance) values for FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV were 11.3 ± 2.1°C, 11.0 ± 1.6°C, and 13.4 ± 2.6°C, respectively, using the Weibull model. The z values using the first-order model were 11.9 ± 1.0°C, 10.9 ± 1.3°C, and 12.8 ± 1.7°C for FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV, respectively. For the Weibull model, estimated activation energies for FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV were 214 ± 28, 242 ± 36, and 154 ± 19 kJ/mole, respectively, while the calculated activation energies for the first-order model were 181 ± 16, 196 ± 5, and 167 ± 9 kJ/mole, respectively. Precise information on the thermal inactivation of HNoV surrogates and HAV in turkey deli meat was generated. This provided calculations of parameters for more-reliable thermal processes to inactivate viruses in contaminated presliced ready-to-eat deli meats and thus to reduce the risk of foodborne illness outbreaks. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. The Effects of Some Fodder Additives on the Product Performances and Meat Quality of Broiler Turkey Juveniles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Benţea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The researches has been carried out on a number of 250 broiler turkey juveniles, the Big 6 hybrid, distributed in 5 groups of 50 juveniles/group over a period of 56 days. After 56 days, the experiment was carried out on 3 groups over a period of 84 days, recording the production indices; at the end of the experimental period (at the age of 140 days meat quality and chemical composition were determined. In the first 2 stages, the fodders were supplemented with Allzyme SSF complex 0.02%, Bio-Mos 0.1%, organic Selenium 0.03% and Bio-Mos 0.1% and Allzyme SSF 0.02%. The turkeys were weighted at the beginning of the experimental period (at the age of one day and then weekly, recording the evolution of body mass, the daily average weight gain, the daily average consumption and the feed conversion ratio (FCR. The use of Sel-Plex, Bio-Mos + Allzyme SSF, Allzyme SSF and Bio-Mos for 56 days, determined the increase of the body weight, the increase of daily average weight gain, and a decrease FCR value. In the 3rd, 4th and 5th stage, the best results regarding growth and consumption indices were recorded also in experimental groups. At the end of the trial, meat quality and chemical composition of meat were determined. The administration of the Allzyme SSF enzyme complex and the organic mineral Sel-plex led to the improvement of the meat quality due to an increase in meat protein content and a reduction of meat fat content.

  18. Lipolytic Changes in Fermented Sausages Produced with Turkey Meat: Effects of Starter Culture and Heat Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsloğlu, Betül; Çiçek, Ümran Ensoy; Kolsarici, Nuray; Candoğan, Kezban

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of two different commercial starter culture mixes and processing methodologies (traditional and heat process) on the lipolytic changes of fermented sausages manufactured with turkey meat were evaluated during processing stages and storage. Free fatty acid (FFA) value increased with fermentation and during storage over 120 d in all fermented sausage groups produced with both processing methodologies (psausages were between 10.54-13.01% and 6.56-8.49%, respectively. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values of traditionally processed fermented sausages were between 0.220-0.450 mg·kg(-1), and TBA values of heat processed fermented sausages were in a range of 0.405-0.795 mg·kg(-1). Oleic and linoleic acids were predominant fatty acids in all fermented sausages. It was seen that fermented sausage groups produced with starter culture had lower TBA and FFA values in comparison with the control groups, and heat application inhibited the lipase enzyme activity and had an improving effect on lipid oxidation. As a result of these effects, heat processed fermented sausages had lower FFA and higher TBA values than the traditionally processed groups.

  19. Lipolytic Changes in Fermented Sausages Produced with Turkey Meat: Effects of Starter Culture and Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolsarici, Nuray; Candoğan, Kezban

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of two different commercial starter culture mixes and processing methodologies (traditional and heat process) on the lipolytic changes of fermented sausages manufactured with turkey meat were evaluated during processing stages and storage. Free fatty acid (FFA) value increased with fermentation and during storage over 120 d in all fermented sausage groups produced with both processing methodologies (p<0.05). After drying stage, free fatty acid values of traditional style and heat processed fermented sausages were between 10.54-13.01% and 6.56-8.49%, respectively. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values of traditionally processed fermented sausages were between 0.220-0.450 mg·kg-1, and TBA values of heat processed fermented sausages were in a range of 0.405-0.795 mg·kg-1. Oleic and linoleic acids were predominant fatty acids in all fermented sausages. It was seen that fermented sausage groups produced with starter culture had lower TBA and FFA values in comparison with the control groups, and heat application inhibited the lipase enzyme activity and had an improving effect on lipid oxidation. As a result of these effects, heat processed fermented sausages had lower FFA and higher TBA values than the traditionally processed groups. PMID:26760744

  20. Meat science research tendencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Arturo García Macías

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Meat is a high quality food due its higher protein content, besides to provide energy, vitamins particularly B complex, water and minerals, resulting in an appreciated food for humans. Even in same country, consumers search for different stuffs, since north consumers looks for meat cuts with fat and bone, whereas center-south consumers prefers fatless debones meat cuts. Modern consumers demand excellent appearance, color, taste and flavor in foods, microbiologically safe, minimal processed and curing salts, very nutritive and cheap. All these together in one single product are a hard challenge in the meat products area.

  1. Comparison of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA isolated from turkeys at farm, slaughter and from retail meat indicates transmission along the production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenkuhl, Birgit; Brandt, Jörgen; Fetsch, Alexandra; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Kraushaar, Britta; Alt, Katja; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of MRSA in the turkey meat production chain in Germany was estimated within the national monitoring for zoonotic agents in 2010. In total 22/112 (19.6%) dust samples from turkey farms, 235/359 (65.5%) swabs from turkey carcasses after slaughter and 147/460 (32.0%) turkey meat samples at retail were tested positive for MRSA. The specific distributions of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA isolated from these three different origins were compared using chi square statistics and the proportional similarity index (Czekanowski index). No significant differences between spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA from different steps of the German turkey meat production chain were observed using Chi-Square test statistics. The Czekanowski index which can obtain values between 0 (no similarity) and 1 (perfect agreement) was consistently high (0.79-0.86) for the distribution of spa types and SCCmec types between the different processing stages indicating high degrees of similarity. The comparison of antimicrobial resistance profiles between the different process steps revealed the lowest Czekanowski index values (0.42-0.56). However, the Czekanowski index values were substantially higher than the index when isolates from the turkey meat production chain were compared to isolates from wild boar meat (0.13-0.19), an example of a separated population of MRSA used as control group. This result indicates that the proposed statistical method is valid to detect existing differences in the distribution of the tested characteristics of MRSA. The degree of similarity in the distribution of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles between MRSA isolates from different process stages of turkey meat production may reflect MRSA transmission along the chain.

  2. Comparison of spa Types, SCCmec Types and Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of MRSA Isolated from Turkeys at Farm, Slaughter and from Retail Meat Indicates Transmission along the Production Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenkuhl, Birgit; Brandt, Jörgen; Fetsch, Alexandra; Käsbohrer, Annemarie; Kraushaar, Britta; Alt, Katja; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of MRSA in the turkey meat production chain in Germany was estimated within the national monitoring for zoonotic agents in 2010. In total 22/112 (19.6%) dust samples from turkey farms, 235/359 (65.5%) swabs from turkey carcasses after slaughter and 147/460 (32.0%) turkey meat samples at retail were tested positive for MRSA. The specific distributions of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA isolated from these three different origins were compared using chi square statistics and the proportional similarity index (Czekanowski index). No significant differences between spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA from different steps of the German turkey meat production chain were observed using Chi-Square test statistics. The Czekanowski index which can obtain values between 0 (no similarity) and 1 (perfect agreement) was consistently high (0.79–0.86) for the distribution of spa types and SCCmec types between the different processing stages indicating high degrees of similarity. The comparison of antimicrobial resistance profiles between the different process steps revealed the lowest Czekanowski index values (0.42–0.56). However, the Czekanowski index values were substantially higher than the index when isolates from the turkey meat production chain were compared to isolates from wild boar meat (0.13–0.19), an example of a separated population of MRSA used as control group. This result indicates that the proposed statistical method is valid to detect existing differences in the distribution of the tested characteristics of MRSA. The degree of similarity in the distribution of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles between MRSA isolates from different process stages of turkey meat production may reflect MRSA transmission along the chain. PMID:24788143

  3. Comparison of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA isolated from turkeys at farm, slaughter and from retail meat indicates transmission along the production chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Vossenkuhl

    Full Text Available The prevalence of MRSA in the turkey meat production chain in Germany was estimated within the national monitoring for zoonotic agents in 2010. In total 22/112 (19.6% dust samples from turkey farms, 235/359 (65.5% swabs from turkey carcasses after slaughter and 147/460 (32.0% turkey meat samples at retail were tested positive for MRSA. The specific distributions of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA isolated from these three different origins were compared using chi square statistics and the proportional similarity index (Czekanowski index. No significant differences between spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles of MRSA from different steps of the German turkey meat production chain were observed using Chi-Square test statistics. The Czekanowski index which can obtain values between 0 (no similarity and 1 (perfect agreement was consistently high (0.79-0.86 for the distribution of spa types and SCCmec types between the different processing stages indicating high degrees of similarity. The comparison of antimicrobial resistance profiles between the different process steps revealed the lowest Czekanowski index values (0.42-0.56. However, the Czekanowski index values were substantially higher than the index when isolates from the turkey meat production chain were compared to isolates from wild boar meat (0.13-0.19, an example of a separated population of MRSA used as control group. This result indicates that the proposed statistical method is valid to detect existing differences in the distribution of the tested characteristics of MRSA. The degree of similarity in the distribution of spa types, SCCmec types and antimicrobial resistance profiles between MRSA isolates from different process stages of turkey meat production may reflect MRSA transmission along the chain.

  4. Determination of nitrate, nitrite and perchlorate anions in meat, milk and their products consumed in Hatay region in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Şana; Atan, Muhammet Meriç

    2013-01-01

    Nitrates and nitrites added to food can cause formation of cancerous N-nitroso compounds, whereas exposure to perchlorate is especially emphasised as an important risk factor for newborns' health. In this study, nitrate, nitrite and perchlorate concentrations in meat and milk products consumed in the Hatay region of Turkey were determined. Nitrate and nitrite were analysed with a spectrophotometric method, and perchlorate analysed via ion chromatography. The detected sodium nitrate and nitrite amounts in meat consumed in the Hatay region are less than the maximum levels as declared in the Turkish Food Codex. The amount of perchlorate was considered not to pose a threat as well. However, in 50% of the cheese samples, sodium nitrate amounts were found to be more than the maximum acceptable level in the Turkish Food Codex.

  5. Effect of a nano-silver coating on the quality of fresh turkey meat during storage after modified atmosphere or vacuum packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deus, D; Kehrenberg, C; Schaudien, D; Klein, G; Krischek, C

    2017-02-01

    Nano-silver is used in consumer products due to its antibacterial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nano-silver-coated film on the quality of turkey meat during vacuum-sealed and modified atmosphere packaging up to 12 days of storage. In the first part of the experiment, turkey breasts were packaged using either vacuum packaging or modified atmosphere packages (MAPs) and contained films with or without a nano-silver coating (control film). Parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, color (lightness L*, redness a*), myoglobin redox forms, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), biogenic amines (BAs), total viable bacterial counts, Pseudomonas species counts, and Enterobacteriaceae species counts were evaluated on storage days 4, 8, and 12. In the second part of the study, the antimicrobial effect of a nano-silver-coated film on turkey breast was evaluated after inoculation with Escherichia coli (E. coli). Turkey meat packaged with the nano-silver film exhibited lower a* values on days 1 (3.15 ± 0.62), 4 (3.90 ± 0.68), and 8 (4.27 ± 0.76) compared to the packaged meat with the control film (3.41 ± 0.73, 4.35 ± 0.94, 4.85 ± 0.89, respectively), indicating special optical properties of nanoparticles. Concerning the BAs, silver packaged meat showed higher values of tyramine on day 12 (1274 ± 392 ng/g meat) and cadaverine on day 4 (1224 ± 435 ng/g meat) compared to the normal packaged products (647 ± 576 and 508 ± 314 ng/g meat, respectively). MAP meat revealed higher L* and TBARS values and lower microbial counts than the vacuum packaged products on all days. The MAP meat also showed lower a* results on days 4 and 8 and higher metmyoglobin (metMb) values on days 8 and 12 compared to th E: vacuum products. In the inoculation study, the microbial counts of the turkey meat were comparable between the two film types. The study showed that the nano-silver coating did not exhibit any advantageous

  6. Differential expression of calcium-regulating genes in heat-stressed turkey breast muscle is associated with meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, K R B; Zhou, H-R; Linz, J E; Booren, A M; Strasburg, G M

    2012-06-01

    Aberrant postmortem Ca(2+)-regulation in the early postmortem period is associated with the occurrence of inferior meat quality in turkeys, described as pale, soft, and exudative (PSE). The objective of the current study was to quantify expression of 4 candidate genes responsible for maintaining Ca(2+) homeostasis in turkey skeletal muscle as a function of heat stress: α and β ryanodine receptors (RYR; Ca(2+)-release channels), the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (SERCA1), and the sarcoplasmic reticulum, Ca(2+)-storage protein calsequestrin (CASQ1). Two genetic lines of turkeys were used: a growth-selected commercial line and a randombred control line. Market-age birds were subjected to one of 5 heat stress treatments: no heat, 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, or 7 d of heat followed by 7 d of ambient temperature. Breast muscle samples were harvested and classified as normal or PSE using the meat quality parameters percentage of marinade uptake and percentage of cook loss. These parameters differed significantly by line, heat stress treatment, and meat quality status. Expression of candidate genes was measured using TaqMan quantitative PCR. Heat treatment was associated with significantly enhanced expression of αRYR, βRYR, and CASQ1 in normal muscle from both lines. Conversely, mRNA abundance of these genes was reduced in PSE muscle from both lines and recovered or increased by 7 d + 7 d of rest. Genetic line differences were observed at several time points. Expression of SERCA1 in both normal and PSE samples from both lines was unchanged or trended downward with heat stress. Taken together, genetic line and heat-stress treatment affected the expression of important Ca(2+)-regulating genes in association with meat quality status. The data suggest that birds whose meat leads to PSE may fail to respond to heat stress appropriately due to a delay in the upregulation of the important calcium-regulating genes: αRYR, βRYR, and CASQ1.

  7. The effect of plant sterol-enriched turkey meat on cholesterol bio-accessibility during in vitro digestion and Caco-2 cell uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, S; Harrison, S M; Monahan, F J; Brayden, D; Brunton, N P

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a plant sterol-enriched turkey product on cholesterol bio-accessibility during in vitro digestion and cholesterol uptake by Caco-2 monolayers. Turkey products, one plant sterol-enriched (PS) and one plant sterol-free (C), were produced in an industrial pilot plant. Before simulated digestion, matrices were spiked with cholesterol (1:5 weight ratio of cholesterol to plant sterol). Plant sterols were included at a concentration equivalent to the minimum daily intake recommended by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for cholesterol lowering. After simulated digestion, the percentage of cholesterol micellarization and uptake by Caco-2 cells in the presence of PS meat were measured. Compared to C meat, PS meat significantly inhibited cholesterol micellarization on average by 24% and Caco-2 cell accumulation by 10%. This study suggests that plant sterols in meat can reduce cholesterol uptake by intestinal epithelia and it encourages efforts to make new PS-based functional foods.

  8. Study on the microbial status of unseasoned ground turkey meat from an EU producer-a new product with risk potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remm, K; Koch, K; Von Muffling, T; Nowak, B

    2009-07-01

    1. The aim of this study was to point out potential risks associated with a product new to the market in the European Union: unseasoned minced turkey meat. 2. On 6 d of sampling, minced turkey meat from a large-scale EU producer was analysed at 4 processing stages. 3. The packaged minced meat was examined during 10 d of storage, once using the legally recommended conditions (meat chopper. Listeria monocytogenes was the pathogen detected most often, in 7 (14.6%) of 48 samples, followed by Salmonella in one (2.1%). No Campylobacter were found. 5. Initial contamination (APC) of about 4.5 log CfU/g was common in stored minced meat, conforming to European Union Regulations EC 2073/2005 and 1441/2007. Brochothrix thermosphacta and Pseudomonas spp. were the bacteria found most frequently. Under strict maintenance at a storage temperature of +2 degrees C, the maximum microbiological stability of the material was 7 d. Under simulated consumer handling, the microbial counts increased significantly, immediately after transport. 6. Our findings indicate that unseasoned minced turkey meat is a risky, perishable product, especially if the raw material does not have a low APC, is not pathogen-free and is kept under typical consumer handling and storage conditions.

  9. In vitro susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones in current and archived Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae isolates from meat-type turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerchman, Irina; Lysnyansky, Inna; Perk, Shimon; Levisohn, Sharon

    2008-10-15

    Monitoring of susceptibility to antibiotics in field isolates of pathogenic avian mycoplasmas is important for appropriate choice of treatment. Our study compared in vitro susceptibility to enrofloxacin and difloxacin in recent (2005-2006) isolates of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae from meat-type turkey flocks with archived (1997-2003) isolates and reference strains. Comparison of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values determined by microtest, agar dilution and commercial Etest showed good agreement, but underscored the need for standardized methods for testing. Notably, while the commercial Etest was convenient and accurate for determining MICs for enrofloxacin in the range 0.002-0.094microg/ml, the endpoint of inhibition for M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae strains with MIC values > or =1.0microg/ml could not be determined. A decrease in susceptibility to both fluoroquinolones was detected in archived strains but to a greater degree in recent isolates, most of which had MICs above the NCCLS susceptibility breakpoint for these antibiotics (meat-type turkeys suggests that these strains have become established in Israel, necessitating a reevaluation of antibiotic therapy. Periodic survey of MICs in field isolates of avian mycoplasmas to monitor for the possible appearance of resistant strains is recommended.

  10. Effect of Marination with Fruit and Vegetable Juice on the Some Quality Characteristics of Turkey Breast Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Gök

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The effect of marination with antioxidant-rich fruit and vegetable juices, including black carrot juice, black mulberry juice, black grape and pomegranate juice, mixed vegetable juice (yellow carrot, tomato, zucchini, pepper, black carrot, cucumber and lettuce for 24 and 48 hours on chemical, textural and sensorial properties of turkey breast meat was investigated. Moisture content of the samples marinated for 24 hours and cooked varied between 58.85 and 70.51%, with the control sample presenting the moisture highest value. The samples marinated in red grape juice for 48 hours had the highest cooking loss (49.11%, while the lowest cooking loss was recorded in the samples marinated in black carrot juice (40.61%. Moreover, the phenolic content of the samples marinated for 24 hours (250.12-1354.76 mg ga/L was higher than those marinated for 48 hours (210.56-1156.43 mg ga/L. Reduced hardness values were obtained in turkey breast meat marinated in pomegranate (1.36 kg and red grape (0.86 kg juices, suggesting that these juices may potentially to be used as processing ingredients. Marination for 48 hours promoted better sensorial properties than marination for 24 hours.

  11. Effect of different air/steam convection cooking methods on turkey breast meat: physical characterization, water status and sensory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, B; Curti, E; Vittadini, E; Barbanti, D

    2011-07-01

    Turkey breast samples were cooked using a forced convection oven at three relative humidity levels (RH=8, 35 and 88%) at 100°C. Cooking parameters (temperature, cook value, and yield), textural and sensory properties as well as water status of the samples were evaluated. The application of different RH levels resulted in different cooking performances and cooked meat quality. Low steam cooking conditions (RH=35%) significantly increased cooking yield (7% higher than the high steam cooking), moisture content and water-holding capacity and had a positive effect on perceived tenderness, as shown by sensory analysis, where steam cooked samples were perceived as the most tender. The more mobile protons of (1)H T(2) (relaxing at times longer than 1s) in low steam samples were related to the higher perceived tenderness. Low steam cooking allowed for less water consumption, making this process an attractive cooking method as compared to high steam, as it also resulted in higher quality cooked turkey meat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance and class 1 and 2 integrons in Escherichia coli from meat turkeys in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, A; Giovanardi, D; Dotto, G; Grilli, G; Montesissa, C; Boldrin, C; Salata, C; Giacomelli, M

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the presence of class 1 and 2 integrons in 48 avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains isolated from meat turkeys during three sequential production cycles. Thirty avian faecal E. coli (AFEC) strains from the first cycle were also analysed. Strains were tested for AMR against 25 antimicrobials by disk diffusion test and were screened for the presence of integrons and associated gene cassettes by polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing. Genetic relatedness of isolates was established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. High levels of resistance were detected to tetracyclines, penicillins and sulphonamides in APEC and AFEC. Resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins and phenicols was variable, based on the antimicrobial drug and the isolate (APEC vs. AFEC). Full susceptibility to colistin was detected. Multidrug resistance of up to seven antimicrobial classes was exhibited by APEC (93.8%) and AFEC (100%). Nearly 44% of strains tested positive for class 1 and/or class 2 integrons containing the dfrA, aadA and sat2 genes, alone or in combination, coding for streptomycin/spectinomycin, trimethoprim and streptothricin resistance, respectively. The estX and orfF genes of unknown function were also detected. A significant association was found between the presence of integrons and the resistance to aminoglycosides and potentiated sulphonamides. The results of this study showed that AMR, multidrug resistance and class 1 and 2 integrons are widespread among pathogenic and commensal E. coli from Italian turkeys. More attention should be addressed to limit the use of antimicrobials in turkeys and the AMR of turkey E. coli.

  13. Nitarsone, Inorganic Arsenic, and Other Arsenic Species in Turkey Meat: Exposure and Risk Assessment Based on a 2014 U.S. Market Basket Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Keeve E; Love, David C; Baron, Patrick A; Nigra, Anne E; Murko, Manuela; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin A; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Use of nitarsone, an arsenic-based poultry drug, may result in dietary exposures to inorganic arsenic (iAs) and other arsenic species. Nitarsone was withdrawn from the U.S. market in 2015, but its use in other countries may continue. We characterized the impact of nitarsone use on arsenic species in turkey meat and arsenic exposures among turkey consumers, and we estimated cancer risk increases from consuming turkey treated with nitarsone before its 2015 U.S. withdrawal. Turkey from three cities was analyzed for total arsenic, iAs, methylarsonate (MA), dimethylarsinate, and nitarsone, which were compared across label type and month of purchase. Turkey consumption was estimated from NHANES data to estimate daily arsenic exposures for adults and children 4-30 months of age and cancer risks among adult consumers. Turkey meat from conventional producers not prohibiting nitarsone use showed increased mean levels of iAs (0.64 μg/kg) and MA (5.27 μg/kg) compared with antibiotic-free and organic meat (0.39 μg/kg and 1.54 μg/kg, respectively) and meat from conventional producers prohibiting nitarsone use (0.33 μg/kg and 0.28 μg/kg, respectively). Samples with measurable nitarsone had the highest mean iAs and MA (0.92 μg/kg and 10.96 μg/kg, respectively). Nitarsone was higher in October samples than in March samples, possibly resulting from increased summer use. Based on mean iAs concentrations in samples from conventional producers with no known policy versus policies prohibiting nitarsone, estimated lifetime daily consumption by an 80-kg adult, and a recently proposed cancer slope factor, we estimated that use of nitarsone by all turkey producers would result in 3.1 additional cases of bladder or lung cancer per 1,000,000 consumers. Nitarsone use can expose turkey consumers to iAs and MA. The results of our study support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's removal of nitarsone from the U.S. market and further support its removal from the global marketplace

  14. Exudate Protein Composition and Meat Tenderness of Broiler Breast Fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, B; Gamble, G; Zhuang, H

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between meat tenderness and the protein composition of muscle exudates collected from broiler breast fillets deboned at different postmortem times was investigated. A total of 85 broilers were processed and breast fillets from each carcass were deboned at either 2 h (early-deboned, EB) or 24 h (control) postmortem. One fillet per carcass was used for 1 d postmortem meat tenderness measurements and the other fillet was stored at 4°C until 6 d postmortem for the collection of exudate prior to tenderness evaluation. Protein content and composition of muscle exudates were determined by a biuret assay and SDS-PAGE. Fillet pH, color, drip loss, and cook loss were also measured. Early-deboned fillets exhibited greater (P L*a*b*). Control fillets exhibited less drip loss after 6 d of storage (P = 0.005) and less cook loss at 1 and 6 d (P meat due to the combined effects of postmortem deboning time and post-deboning aging. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Effects of cold exposure on physiology, meat quality, and behavior of turkey hens and toms crated at transport density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrikson, Z A; Vermette, C J; Schwean-Lardner, K; Crowe, T G

    2018-02-01

    The impact of cold exposure while crated at a density characteristic of transport (83 kg/m2) was assessed in 12-wk-old turkey hens and 16-wk-old toms. Turkeys (72 toms, 72 hens) were randomly divided into 3 male and 3 female groups: 2 moderate 20°C groups with either 30% or 80% RH and a cold group exposed to -18°C, with uncontrolled, high RH. Groups of 8 birds (one replicate unit) were observed in a climate-controlled chamber for 8 h prior to slaughter. Core body temperature (CBT), live shrink, heterophil-lymphocyte ratio (HLR), and change in blood glucose levels were assessed; meat quality measures included thigh and breast muscle pH and L*, a*, and b* color values. Significance was declared at P ≤ 0.05. Live shrink in hens exposed to -18°C (2.8%) was greater (P = 0.001) than those in the 20°C treatments (1.5%). CBT in hens had a tendency to decrease (P = 0.070); no differences in Δ blood glucose or HLR were detected. Thigh pH was higher in the -18°C treatment (hens: 6.39; toms: 6.08) than in both 20°C groups. Color values (L*, a*, and b*) were measured 27 h postmortem. In the -18°C exposed hens, breast L* values were lower, and thigh a* and breast b* values were higher than in both 20°C treatments. No differences were detected in live shrink, CBT, HLR, or color values among toms. Behavior differences were noted between treatments; more time was spent huddling, shivering, preening, and with feathers ptiloerected in cold-exposed turkeys. Generally, cold exposure resulted in higher live shrink, darker meat with greater redness, and a tendency for CBT and blood glucose to decrease, with larger male turkeys experiencing fewer changes. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. An assessment of the impact of pulsed electric fields processing factors on oxidation, color, texture, and sensory attributes of turkey breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Cristina; Eslami, Sara; Brunton, Nigel P; Arimi, Joshua M; Noci, Francesco; Lyng, James G

    2015-05-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel nonthermal technology that has the potential to cause physical disruption to muscle tissue which in turn could alter the sensorial aspects of meat in both a positive (e.g., enhanced tenderization) and a negative way (e.g., off-flavor development). If there is a risk of off-flavor development it should be identified prior to embarking on an extensive investigation on PEF in meat tenderization and turkey meat was chosen for this purpose as it is particularly prone to oxidation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various PEF treatments on the quality attributes of turkey breast meat. Turkey breast meat obtained 1 d postslaughter was treated in a batch PEF chamber with increasing electric field strength up to 3 kV/cm and analyzed for lipid oxidation by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBARS) with up to 5 d storage at 4°C in aerobic conditions. In a separate experiment, turkey breast meat samples were exposed to PEF under various combinations of pulse number, frequency, and voltage. Following PEF treatments weight loss, cook loss, lipid oxidation, texture, and color were assessed by instrumental methods. A sensory analysis was also performed to determine consumer acceptability for color, texture, and odor of the samples. Lipid oxidation in all PEF-treated samples progressed at the same rate with storage as the untreated samples and was not found to be significantly different to the control. Under the conditions examined PEF treatments did not induce differences in instrumentally measured weight loss, cook loss, lipid oxidation, texture, and color (raw and cooked) either on fresh or frozen samples. However, the sensory evaluation suggested that panelists could detect slight differences between the PEF-treated samples and the controls in terms of texture and odor. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Antioxidant effectiveness of vegetable powders on the lipid and protein oxidative stability of cooked Turkey meat patties: implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Garry; Campbell, Fiona; Bestwick, Charles; Stephen, Sylvia; Russell, Wendy

    2013-04-17

    Lipid and protein oxidation decreases the shelf-life of foods and may result in formation of end-products potentially detrimental for health. Consumer pressure to decrease the use of synthetic phenolic antioxidants has encouraged identification of alternative compounds or extracts from natural sources. We have assessed whether inclusion of dried vegetable powders improves the oxidative stability of turkey meat patties. Such powders are not only potentially-rich sources of phenolic antioxidants, but also may impart additional health benefits, as inadequate vegetable consumption is a risk factor for heart disease and several cancers. In an accelerated oxidation system, six of eleven vegetable powders significantly (p protein carbonyls (r = 0.747, p powders offers an alternative to individual antioxidants for increasing shelf-life of animal-based food products and may also provide additional health benefits associated with increased vegetable intake.

  18. Evaluation of gamma irradiation and frozen storage on microbial load and physico-chemical quality of turkey breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouki, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the effects of gamma irradiation at doses of 0.0, 0.5, 2.0 and 4.0 kGy and frozen storage as a combination process on improvement of turkey breast meat shelf life. The samples were stored at -18 °C and were undergone microbial, chemical and sensory evaluation at 2-month intervals. However, 4 kGy dose reduced the counts of mesophilic bacteria and coliform by more than 5 log units, while Salmonella was not detected. Irradiation of samples significantly increased peroxide value but had no significant effect on total volatile nitrogen contents, while storage significantly increased the peroxide value and total volatile nitrogen.

  19. Effect of cooking method on carnosine and its homologues, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance contents in beef and turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Dal Bello, Federica; Meineri, Giorgia

    2012-05-01

    Commercial samples of beef and turkey meat were prepared by commonly used cooking methods with standard cooking times: (1) broiled at 200°C for 10min, (2) broiled at a medium temperature (140°C) for 10min, (3) cooked by microwave (MW) for 3min and then grilled (MW/grill) for 7min, (4) cooked in a domestic microwave oven for 10min, and (5) boiled in water for 10min. The raw and cooked meats were then analysed to determine the carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) contents. It was observed that boiling beef caused a loss of approximately 50% of the carnosine, probably because of the high water solubility of carnosine and its homologues; cooking by microwave caused a medium loss of the anti-oxidants of approximately 20%; cooking by MW/grill led to a reduction in carnosine of approximately 10%. As far as the anserine and homocarnosine contents were concerned, a greater loss was observed for the boiling method (approximately 70%) while, for the other cooking methods, the value ranged from 30% to 70%. The data oscillate more for the turkey meat: the minimum carnosine decrease was observed in the cases of MW/grill and broiling at high temperature (25%). Analogously, the anserine and homocarnosine contents decreased slightly in the case of MW/grill and broiling at a high temperature (2-7%) and by 10-30% in the other cases. No analysed meat sample showed any traces of pentosidine above the instrumental determination limits. The cooked beef showed an increased TBARS value compared to the raw meat, and the highest values were found when the beef was broiled at a high temperature, cooked by microwave or boiled in water. The TBARS value of the turkey meat decreased for all the cooking methods in comparison to the TBARS value of the fresh meat. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of a phytogenic additive on nutritional composition of turkey meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert HERKEĽ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of a blend of phytogenic additive on nutritional and mineral composition of breast, thigh muscles and liver in fattening turkeys. A total 300 female turkeys were monitored in the trial. 1-day old broad-breasted white turkeys hybrid XL were randomly divided into two groups (150 pcs per each. Turkeys in control group were fed by standard diet for fattening and in experimental group from the 1st to the 12th week by complete feed mixture with supplementation of a blend of essential oils from origanum, anise and citrus fruits as well as a prebiotic rich fructooligosaccharides in dosage 1 kg per 1000 kg of feed mixture. Turkeys were housed in group on deep litter. Experiment lasted 18 weeks. Samples of breast and thigh muscles, and liver for nutritional analysis were collected during turkey’s dissection (10 samples per each group. After the determination of nutrients, there were found significant (P 0.05 content of DM and fat was recorded in liver. After analysis the macro and microelements, significant (P 0.05 concentrate only in content of manganese in experimental group. Occurrence of manganese was not observed in both muscles.

  1. Effects of Different Amounts of Blue Lupine (L. Angustifolius L. in The Diets of Heavy-Type Turkeys on Their Growth Rate, Carcass and Meat Qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Juodka

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A study was carried out to determine the effects of soybean meal replacement with different amounts of blue lupine in the diets of turkeys on the growth rate, anatomic carcass dissection data, chemical indicators of breast and thigh muscles and the content of tryptophan and oxyprolin. In total three hundred and sixty cross BIG-6 turkeys were allotted to two control and ten experimental groups of 30 one-day-old turkeys. The control group of turkeys was fed the diet containing soybean meal, whereas the trial groups were offered different amounts (from 20 to 30% of lupines. Group 4 and 5 were additionally given probiotic mixture Bio Plus 2B and allzyme SSF, respectively. Soybean oil replacement from 20 to 30% lupine in the diet had no influence on the growth rate, dressing percentage, edible parts and abdominal fat content of turkeys. The study indicated that lupines in the diet of turkeys had a different effect on the meat quality of different genders. Lupines did not have any negative effect on the meat quality of female turkeys and 30% lupines even improved the protein value index of breast muscles. However, 20-30 and 25-30% lupines in male turkey diets lowered dry matter and protein contents in breast muscles but had no negative influence on the main quality indicators in thigh muscles. The results of the study showed that the negative effect on the male breast muscle quality might be avoided using Bio Plus 2B or allzyme SSF additives in the male diets containing 30% lupines.

  2. Binary combination of epsilon-poly-L-lysine and isoeugenol affect progression of spoilage microbiota in fresh turkey meat, and delay onset of spoilage in Pseudomonas putida challenged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Meyer, Rikke L; Peng, Min; Hibberd, Ashley A; Fischer, Jana; Sigmundsson, Arnar; Mygind, Tina

    2015-12-23

    Proliferation of microbial population on fresh poultry meat over time elicits spoilage when reaching unacceptable levels, during which process slime production, microorganism colony formation, negative organoleptic impact and meat structure change are observed. Spoilage organisms in raw meat, especially Gram-negative bacteria can be difficult to combat due to their cell wall composition. In this study, the natural antimicrobial agents ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) and isoeugenol were tested individually and in combinations for their activities against a selection of Gram-negative strains in vitro. All combinations resulted in additive interactions between ε-PL and isoeugenol towards the bacteria tested. The killing efficiency of different ratios of the two antimicrobial agents was further evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas putida. Subsequently, the most efficient ratio was applied to a raw turkey meat model system which was incubated for 96 h at spoilage temperature. Half of the samples were challenged with P. putida, and the bacterial load and microbial community composition was followed over time. CFU counts revealed that the antimicrobial blend was able to lower the amount of viable Pseudomonas spp. by one log compared to untreated samples of challenged turkey meat, while the single compounds had no effect on the population. However, the compounds had no effect on Pseudomonas spp. CFU in unchallenged meat. Next-generation sequencing offered culture-independent insight into population diversity and changes in microbial composition of the meat during spoilage and in response to antimicrobial treatment. Spoilage of unchallenged turkey meat resulted in decreasing species diversity over time, regardless of whether the samples received antimicrobial treatment. The microbiota composition of untreated unchallenged meat progressed from a Pseudomonas spp. to a Pseudomonas spp., Photobacterium spp., and Brochothrix thermosphacta dominated food matrix on the expense of low

  3. The chilled storage life and retail display performance of vacuum and carbon dioxide packed hot deboned beef striploins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R G; Penney, N; Gilbert, K V; Moorhead, S M; Scott, S M

    1996-04-01

    Two cooling regimes that complied with the New Zealand meat hygiene requirement that hot deboned meat be chilled to +7 °C or less within 24 hr of leaving the slaughter floor were evaluated for the production of chilled table meats. Electrically stimulated hot deboned bull beef half striploins were either vacuum or carbon dioxide packed before being cooled in accordance with either Regime 1 (cool at +5 °C for 24 hr, transfer to chiller operating at -1.0 ± 0.5 °C) or Regime 2 (cool at +5 °C for 24 hr, hold at 5 °C for 6 days, transfer to chiller operating at -1.0 ± 0.5 °C). Striploins were removed from -1.0 °C storage 8, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84 and 98 days after slaughter and subjected to microbiological, tenderness, sensory and retail display performance evaluations. Both Regimes 1 and 2 produced meat of acceptable mean tenderness, 8 kgF (MIRINZ Tenderometer) in either vacuum or carbon dioxide packs within 28 and 8 days of slaughter, respectively. However, 70 days after slaughter the first signs of over-ageing became apparent. Steaks from Regimes 1 and 2 maintained acceptable visual appearance during retail display at 5 °C for 48 hr and 24 hr, respectively. After these times, the product was judged by the panel to be unacceptable because of its dull dark lean tissue and grey to green discoloration of the fat. Poor colour stability during retail display was mirrored by deterioration of sensory attributes, particularly aroma which is indicative of incipient spoilage. While carbon dioxide packaging in combination with Regime 1 offered an initial microbiological advantage over vacuum packaging, this advantage was not, however, carried over into retail display. Poor colour and sensory stability during retail display suggest that chilled table cuts derived from hot deboned bull beef are more suited to the Hotel-Restaurant-Institutional (HRI) trade than supermarket retailing. To serve the HRI, vacuum packed hot deboned bull beef primal cuts processed by Regime 1

  4. Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Focus in this discussion of Turkey is on the following: geography; the people; history; government and political conditions; the economy; defense; and relations between the US and Turkey. In 1986, Turkey's population was estimated to be 51.8 million with an annual growth rate of 2.5%. The infant mortality rate is 12.3/1000 with a life expectancy of 62.7 years. Turkey is located partly in Europe and partly in Asia. Since 1950, urban areas have experienced tremendous growth, and squatter dwellings are evident around the cities' edges. About half of Turkey's population live in urban areas. Turkish culture is made up of both the modern and traditional, Ottoman and folkloric, elements. The Republic of Turkey was founded by Mustafa Kemal, subsequently named Ataturk, in 1982 after the collapse of the 600-year-old Ottoman empire. The new republic focused on modernizing and Westernizing the empire's Turkish core -- Anatolia and a small part of Thrace. The 1982 constitution preserves a democratic, secular, parliamentary form of government with a strengthened presidence. It provides for an independent judiciary along with the safeguarding of internationally recognized human rights. The legislative functions are carried out by the unicameral, 450-member GNA. The economy is developing structurally, yet the agricultural sector remains significant and produces cotton, tobacco, grains, fruits, and vegetables. Over half of the labor force are farmers, contributing over 1/5 of the gross domestic product. A significant portion of industry also is involved in processing agricultural products. The period from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s was the longest sustained period of economic growth and development in modern Turkish history, with annual growth rates of nearly 7%. Oil price increases after 1973 and the concomitant European recession slowed Turkish growth and also revealed major structural deficiencies. The economic crisis worsened in 1979 as oil prices doubled again. The Demirel

  5. Identification and quantification of turkey meat adulteration in fresh, frozen-thawed and cooked minced beef by FT-NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamprese, Cristina; Amigo, José Manuel; Casiraghi, Ernestina; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2016-11-01

    This work aims at the development of a method based on FT-NIR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the identification and quantification of minced beef meat adulteration with turkey meat. Samples were analyzed as raw, frozen-thawed and cooked. Different multivariate regression and class-modeling strategies were evaluated. PLS regression models with R(2) in prediction higher than 0.884 and RMSEP lower than 10.8% were developed. PLS-DA applied to discriminate each type of sample in two classes (adulteration threshold=20%) showed values of sensitivity and specificity in prediction higher than 0.84 and 0.76, respectively. Thus, the study demonstrates that FT-NIR spectroscopy coupled with suitable chemometric strategies is a reliable tool for the identification and quantification of minced beef adulteration with turkey meat not only in fresh products, but also in frozen-thawed and cooked samples. This achievement is of crucial importance in the meat industry due to the increasing number of processed meat products, in which technological treatments can mask a possible inter-species adulteration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Analysis of the two hypervariable segments within the noncod- ing region of the mitochondrial genome ... Keywords. mtDNA; Anatolian peninsula; sequence variation; hypervariable segments; Turkish population. *For correspondence. ... ous geographical regions of Turkey, which is thus more representative of the Turkish ...

  7. Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burrell, A.M.; Kurzweil, M.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the evolution of Turkey¿s agricultural policies in recent decades, examines the extent to which these policies may have distorted incentives, and attempts an explanation of the underlying forces that have driven the process and conditioned the results. The review

  8. Preparation and characterization of gelatin from collagen biomass obtained through a pH-shifting process of mechanically separated turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, L; Keplová, L; Khiari, Z; Betti, M

    2014-04-01

    Gelatins were extracted from mechanically separated turkey meat following 2 different approaches. The first method was based on a 2-stage batch extraction at 50 and 60°C, respectively, whereas the second method consisted of recovering gelatin from a collagen biomass obtained during a pH-shifting process. The yield of gelatin produced by the latter method was twice that obtained by the former method (13.51 and 6.36%, respectively). The chemical composition, as well as the rheological and the functional properties, of all extracted gelatins were evaluated. Gelatin recovered from the collagen biomass had higher molecular weight components and significantly greater (P turkey meat through precipitation and thermal solubilization of collagen biomass obtained during a pH-shifting process.

  9. Impact of citric acid and calcium ions on acid solubilization of mechanically separated turkey meat: effect on lipid and pigment content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynets, Y; Omana, D A; Xu, Y; Betti, M

    2011-02-01

    Increased demand for poultry products has resulted in an increased availability of by-products, such as the neck, back, and frame, that can be processed into mechanically separated poultry meat. The major problems with mechanically separated poultry meat are its high lipid content, color instability, and high susceptibility to lipid oxidation. The present work was undertaken to determine the effect of different concentrations of citric acid and calcium ions on protein yield, color characteristics, and lipid removal from protein isolates prepared using an acid-aided extraction process. Six levels of citric acid (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol/L) and 2 levels of calcium chloride (0 and 8 mmol/L) were examined. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times, resulting in 36 extractions (3 × 6 × 2). The highest (P turkey meat, ranging from 86.2 to 94.7%. The lowest amount (1.14%) of total lipids obtained was for samples treated with 4 mmol/L of citric acid. Maximum removal of neutral lipids (96.5%) and polar lipids (96.4%) was attained with the addition of 6 and 2 mmol/L of citric acid, respectively. Polar lipid content was found to be significantly (P = 0.0045) affected by the presence of calcium chloride. The isolated proteins were less (P turkey meat. The most efficient removal of total heme pigment was obtained with the addition of 6 or 8 mmol/L of citric acid. Addition of calcium chloride had a negative effect on total pigment content. The study revealed that acid extractions with the addition of citric acid resulted in substantial removal of lipids and pigments from mechanically separated turkey meat, improved stability of the recovered proteins against lipid oxidation, and appreciable protein recovery yields.

  10. Multidisciplinary investigation of a multicountry outbreak of Salmonella Stanley infections associated with turkey meat in the European Union, August 2011 to January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinross, P; van Alphen, L; Martinez Urtaza, J; Struelens, M; Takkinen, J; Coulombier, D; Makela, P; Bertrand, S; Mattheus, W; Schmid, D; Kanitz, E; Rucker, V; Krisztalovics, K; Paszti, J; Szogyenyi, Z; Lancz, Z; Rabsch, W; Pfefferkorn, B; Hiller, P; Mooijman, K; Gossner, C

    2014-05-15

    Between August 2011 and January 2013, an outbreak of Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley (S. Stanley) infections affected 10 European Union (EU) countries, with a total of 710 cases recorded. Following an urgent inquiry in the Epidemic Intelligence Information System for food- and waterborne diseases (EPIS-FWD) on 29 June 2012, an international investigation was initiated including EU and national agencies for public health, veterinary health and food safety. Two of three local outbreak investigations undertaken by affected countries in 2012 identified turkey meat as a vehicle of infection. Furthermore, routine EU monitoring of animal sources showed that over 95% (n=298) of the 311 S. Stanley isolates reported from animal sampling in 2011 originated from the turkey food production chain. In 2004–10, none had this origin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profile analysis of outbreak isolates and historical S. Stanley human isolates revealed that the outbreak isolates had a novel PFGE profile that emerged in Europe in 2011. An indistinguishable PFGE profile was identified in 346 of 464 human, food, feed, environmental and animal isolates from 16 EU countries: 102 of 112 non-human isolates tested were from the turkey production chain. On the basis of epidemiological and microbiological evidence, turkey meat was considered the primary source of human infection, following contamination early in the animal production chain.

  11. Prevalence and characterization of Salmonella isolated from chicken meat in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriken, Belgin; Türk, Haldun; Yildirim, Tuba; Durupinar, Belma; Erol, Irfan

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted in a Turkish province to investigate the presence of Salmonella spp. in 150 chicken meat samples using 2 phenotyping techniques: classic culture technique (CCT) and immunomagnetic separation (IMS). For the confirmation of the isolates at molecular levels, invA gene was detected in these isolates. The presence of invA, class 1 (Cls1) integrons, and integrase (Int1) genes was demonstrated by PCR assay; and the resistance of the isolated Salmonella spp. strains to antibiotics was determined by disk diffusion test. All the cultural and PCR results were evaluated together; Salmonella spp. were detected in a total of 64 (42.66%) chicken meat samples. Contamination rate was higher in carcasses (53.33%, n = 75) than in meat pieces (32%, n = 75). When results of standard culture were compared with IMS technique, IMS (n = 54) showed a clear superiority over the CCT (n = 38). A very high resistance rate (≥ 89.28%) to vancomycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, or nalidixic acid was found. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance was present in 32.14%. Relatively lower incidence of resistance (≤ 8.33%) to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and ceftriaxone was observed. Concurrent resistance to at least 4 antibiotics was detected in 92.85% of the isolates. Cls1 integrons and Int1 were positive in 80.95% and 95.23% of the isolates, respectively. However, Int1 alone was detected in 15.47% (n = 13). In conclusion, the high prevalence of Salmonella spp. in chicken meat may pose a potential public health risk, and the presence of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella spp. isolate together with Cls1 integron and/or integrase might play an important role in horizontal antibiotic gene transfer. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Effect of acid- and alkaline-aided extractions on functional and rheological properties of proteins recovered from mechanically separated turkey meat (MSTM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynets, Yuliya; Omana, Dileep A; Xu, Yan; Betti, Mirko

    2010-09-01

    Functional and rheological characteristics of acid- and alkali-extracted proteins from mechanically separated turkey meat (MSTM) have been investigated. Extractions were carried out at 4 pH values (2.5, 3.5, 10.5, and 11.5). The study demonstrated that alkali and acid extractions resulted in significant (P 0.05) by different extraction pH. The protein extracted at pH 3.5 formed a highly viscoelastic gel network as evidenced by storage modulus (G') values, whereas the gel formed from proteins extracted at pH 10.5 was found to be the weakest. The work also revealed that acid treatments were more effective for removal of total heme pigments from MSTM. Color characteristics of protein isolates were markedly improved compared to the initial material and tended to be better when subjected to acid extractions. Mechanically separated meat is one of the cheapest sources of protein obtained by grinding meat and bones together and forcing the mixture through a perforated drum. The use of mechanically separated turkey meat (MSTM) for the production of further processed poultry products is limited due to its undesirable color and textural properties. Recovery of proteins from MSTM using pH shifting process will help the poultry processors to get better returns and also create opportunity to produce functional food ingredients.

  13. Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 cells to synthetic gastric fluid is greater following growth on ready-to-eat deli turkey meat than in brain heart infusion broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Luke D; Faith, Nancy G; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2007-11-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) deli meats have been categorized as high-risk foods for contraction of foodborne listeriosis. Several recent listeriosis outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of RTE deli turkey meat. In this study, we examined whether the growth of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 on commercially prepared RTE deli turkey meat causes listerial cells to become more resistant to inactivation by synthetic gastric fluid (SGF). Listerial cells grown on turkey meat to late logarithmic-early stationary phase were significantly more resistant to SGF at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.5 than listerial cells grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth. The pH was lower in the fluid in packages of turkey meat than in BHI broth (6.5 versus 7.5). However, listerial cells grown in BHI broth adjusted to a lower pH (6.0) did not exhibit enhanced resistance to SGF. The lesser resistance to SGF of listerial cells grown in BHI broth may be due, in part, to the presence of glucose (0.2%). This study indicates the environment presented by the growth of L. monocytogenes on deli turkey meat affects its ability to survive conditions it encounters in the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Antioxidant Effectiveness of Vegetable Powders on the Lipid and Protein Oxidative Stability of Cooked Turkey Meat Patties: Implications for Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Russell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid and protein oxidation decreases the shelf-life of foods and may result in formation of end-products potentially detrimental for health. Consumer pressure to decrease the use of synthetic phenolic antioxidants has encouraged identification of alternative compounds or extracts from natural sources. We have assessed whether inclusion of dried vegetable powders improves the oxidative stability of turkey meat patties. Such powders are not only potentially-rich sources of phenolic antioxidants, but also may impart additional health benefits, as inadequate vegetable consumption is a risk factor for heart disease and several cancers. In an accelerated oxidation system, six of eleven vegetable powders significantly (p < 0.05 improved oxidative stability of patties by 20%–30% (spinach < yellow pea < onion < red pepper < green pea < tomato. Improved lipid oxidative stability was strongly correlated with the decreased formation of protein carbonyls (r = 0.747, p < 0.01. However, improved lipid stability could not be ascribed to phenolic acids nor recognized antioxidants, such as α- and γ-tocopherol, despite their significant (p < 0.01 contribution to the total antioxidant capacity of the patties. Use of chemically complex vegetable powders offers an alternative to individual antioxidants for increasing shelf-life of animal-based food products and may also provide additional health benefits associated with increased vegetable intake.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibilities, phage types, and molecular characterization of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis from chickens and chicken meat in turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Hakan; Sen, Selahattin; Hasman, Henrik; Hendriksen, Rene S; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2009-04-01

    Thirty-eight Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from chickens and chicken meat in Turkey were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility, XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, phage types, plasmid profiles, and resistance genes. Seven different PFGE patterns were observed, with the most common accounting for 71% (X1). The most common phage type was PT4, followed by PT7, PT16, PT1, PT6, and PT35. Different phage types shared the same PFGE pattern. Twenty-one isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobial agents tested whereas eight were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. Six isolates were resistant to gentamicin, spectinomycin, streptomycin, and sulphamethoxazole and one of these in addition to nalidixic acid. Two isolates were resistant to ampicillin and nalidixic acid. An additional nine isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid only. All six streptomycin-resistant isolates had aadA located in an integron class 1 structure. Both ampicillin-resistant isolates had the bla(TEM) gene. Five different plasmid profiles were found among the isolates. Sixty-five percent of isolates contained a single plasmid with an approximate size of 55-60 kb. Plasmid profiling confirmed the PFGE pattern.

  16. Effects of Citrox and chitosan on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica in vacuum-packaged turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaka, Vasiliki D; Yehia, Hany M; Savvaidis, Ioannis N

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined the antimicrobial effects of citrus extract (Citrox(®)) and chitosan on lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and the pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on turkey meat during storage under vacuum packaging (VP) at 4 and 10 °C. We also examined the effects of Citrox and chitosan on pathogen contamination in tryptic soy broth (TSB). Chitosan alone or in combination with Citrox inhibited the growth of endogenous LAB in turkey meat, whereas citrus extract did not cause a major reduction in bacterial density. Citrus extract combined with chitosan yielded the lowest mesophilic total viable counts (TVCs), irrespective of temperature, showing major declines in all treated turkey samples from days 0-21 of storage. The shelf-lives of untreated, Citrox-treated, and chitosan and Citrox/chitosan-treated samples (as determined by TVC and sensory data) were 13, 17, and >21 days, respectively, at 4 °C for VP turkey. The addition of Citrox was more effective against S. enterica than E. coli in turkey, causing reductions of >0.5 and 2 log cfu/g at 4 and 10 °C, respectively, after 21 days of storage. Interestingly, the addition of chitosan had a significant inhibitory effect on E. coli at 4 °C and S. enterica at 10 °C as compared with the control (inoculated samples) resulting in dramatic reductions in E. coli (2 log) and S. enterica (5 log) cell counts on day 21. Of all the treatments examined, citrus extract in combination with chitosan showed an additive inhibitory effect against both pathogens, reducing E. coli and S. enterica populations, by approximately 2.7 or 4.5 and 2.2 or 5.6 log cfu/g, respectively, at 4 and 10 °C on day 21 of storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of sodium chloride and pH during acidic marination on water retention and mechanical properties of turkey breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, T; Ricci, J; Bohuon, P; Marchesseau, S; Collignan, A

    2014-03-01

    Turkey breast cubes underwent acidic marination in the presence of salt. The transfer of water, salt and acid was measured, and texture was assessed on the cooked meat. While significant mass gains were observed during marination, from 20 minutes of immersion onwards, only long durations produced an overall matter balance greater than that of non-marinated meat. From the first minutes of immersion, these transfers caused hardening, regardless of the presence of salt in the marinade. For longer durations, only in the absence of salt was significant tenderizing seen in comparison to the non-marinated control. This effect appears to be due on the one hand to passing the isoelectric pH of the meat during acidification, and on the other hand to setting up antagonistic mechanisms breaking down or reinforcing connective tissues by acid and salt respectively. The high degree of tenderization observed in a water-acid solution can be explained partly by dilution of the fiber load per section unit due to protein solubilization. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of The American Meat Science Association. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation and genetic characterization of a novel 2.2.1.2a H5N1 virus from a vaccinated meat-turkeys flock in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaheldin, Ahmed H; Veits, Jutta; Abd El-Hamid, Hatem S; Harder, Timm C; Devrishov, Davud; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Hafez, Hafez M; Abdelwhab, Elsayed M

    2017-03-09

    Vaccination of poultry to control highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 is used in several countries. HPAIV H5N1 of clade 2.2.1 which is endemic in Egypt has diversified into two genetic clades. Clade 2.2.1.1 represents antigenic drift variants in vaccinated commercial poultry while clade 2.2.1.2 variants are detected in humans and backyard poultry. Little is known about H5N1 infection in vaccinated turkeys under field conditions. Here, we describe an HPAI H5N1 outbreak in a vaccinated meat-turkey flock in Egypt. Birds were vaccinated with inactivated H5N2 and H5N1 vaccines at 8 and 34 days of age, respectively. At 72 nd day of age (38 days post last vaccination), turkeys exhibited mild respiratory signs, cyanosis of snood and severe congestion of the internal organs. Survivors had a reduction in feed consumption and body gain. A mortality of ~29% cumulated within 10 days after the onset of clinical signs. Laboratory diagnosis using RT-qPCRs revealed presence of H5N1 but was negative for H7 and H9 subtypes. A substantial antigenic drift against different serum samples from clade 2.2.1.1 and clade 2.3.4.4 was observed. Based on full genome sequence analysis the virus belonged to clade 2.2.1.2 but clustered with recent H5N1 viruses from 2015 in poultry in Israel, Gaza and Egypt in a novel subclade designated here 2.2.1.2a which is distinct from 2014/2015 2.2.1.2 viruses. These viruses possess 2.2.1.2 clade-specific genetic signatures and also mutations in the HA similar to those in clade 2.2.1.1 that enabled evasion from humoral immune response. Taken together, this manuscript describes a recent HPAI H5N1 outbreak in vaccinated meat-turkeys in Egypt after infection with a virus representing novel distinct 2.2.1.2a subclade. Infection with HPAIV H5N1 in commercial turkeys resulted in significant morbidity and mortality despite of vaccination using H5 vaccines. The isolated virus showed antigenic drift and clustered in a novel cluster designated here

  19. Effect of a phytogenic additive on blood serum indicator levels and fatty acids profile in fattening turkeys meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Gálik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effect of a phytogenic additive on blood serum indicator levels and fatty acids profile of breast, leg muscles and liver in fattening turkeys. The experiment was realized in private turkey farm and in the Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology and Food Resources, Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra. A total of 300 clinically healthy female turkeys (broad-breasted white turkey, hybrid XL were used in the experiment. Female turkeys were randomly divided into two groups (150 pcs per each. In the control group, turkey were fed with standard complete feed mixtures for fattening, in the experimental group, standard diets from the beginning to 12th week were supplemented with the a blend of essential oils from origanum, anise and citrus fruits as well as a prebiotic rich fructooligosaccharides in dosage 1kg per 1000 kg of feed mixture. Fattening lasted 18 weeks. Blood serum was collected at the end of the experiment, during the slaughter of birds. Samples of breast and leg muscles, and liver for fatty acids composition evaluation were collected during birds dissection (10 samples per each group. After the 12 weeks of phytoadditive supplementation, a tendency of lower activity of serum alanine aminotransferase (53.963 vs. 3.499 U/L and aspartate aminotransferase (6.238 vs. 1.012 U/L in experimental group of turkeys was found (P0.01 content of cis-8,11,14-eicosadienoic and arachidonic acids. The phytoadditive supplementation significantly (P<0.01 decreased content of some unsaturated fatty acids in turkeys tissues, as well. In experimental group of turkey have been recorded lower level of elaidic and oleic acids in the breast muscle and cis-11,14-eicosadienoic and arachidonic acids in the liver, compare to birds from control group.

  20. Improvement of turkey breast meat quality and cooked gel functionality using hot-boning, quarter sectioning, crust-freeze-air-chilling and cold-batter-mincing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H C; Erasmus, M A; Swanson, J C; Hong, H G; Kang, I

    2016-01-01

    The effect of rapid carcass chilling on breast meat quality was evaluated using commercial (COMM) and random-bred (RB) turkeys. Immediately after slaughter, 48 turkeys from COMM or RB line were randomly subjected to one of four chilling methods: 1) water-immersion chilling (WIC) of the carcasses at 0°C ice slurry, 2) WIC after temperature abuse (TA) of the carcasses at 40°C for 30 min (TA-WIC), 3) hot-boning, quarter sectioning, and crust-freeze-air-chilling (HB-(1)/4CFAC) of breast fillets at -12°C, and 4) HB-(1)/4CFAC of fillets after TA of carcasses (TA-HB-(1)/4CFAC). The TA increased carcass and fillet temperatures by ∼1.3 and ∼4.1°C, respectively, regardless of turkey line, whereas HB-(1)/4CFAC of fillets required 28 and 33% of carcass chilling time for COMM and RB, respectively. During chilling, COMM breast pH rapidly reduced from 6.04 to 5.82, resulting in a significantly lower pH than RB after chilling (P 0.05). Significantly higher L* value and cooking yield (P 0.05). Higher values of hardness, gumminess, and chewiness were found for RB, no TA, and HB-(1)/4CFAC gels than COMM, TA, and WIC, respectively. These results generally indicated that protein quality and textural properties of turkey fillets were improved, regardless of strains or temperature abuse, using HB-(1)/4CFAC technology. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Antimicrobial films and coatings for inactivation of Listeria innocua on ready-to-eat deli turkey meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edible antimicrobial coating solutions incorporating chitosan, lauric arginate (LAE) and nisin were developed to reduce foodborne pathogen contamination on ready-to-eat (RTE) meats. RTE deli meat samples were directly coated with the solutions, or treated with solution-coated polylactic acid (PLA) f...

  2. The Fatty Acid Profile and Oxidative Stability of Meat from Turkeys Fed Diets Enriched with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Dried Fruit Pomaces as a Source of Polyphenols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Juskiewicz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of different dietary fruit pomaces in reducing lipid oxidation in the meat of turkeys fed diets with a high content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Over a period of 4 weeks before slaughter, turkeys were fed diets with the addition of 5% dried apple, blackcurrant, strawberry and seedless strawberry pomaces (groups AP, BP, SP and SSP, respectively and 2.5% linseed oil. Pomaces differed in the content (from 5.5 in AP to 43.1 mg/g in SSP and composition of polyphenols Proanthocyanidins were the main polyphenolic fraction in all pomaces, AP contained flavone glycosides and dihydrochalcones, BP contained anthocyanins, and SP and SSP-ellagitannins. The n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in all diets was comparable and lower than 2:1. In comparison with groups C and AP, the percentage of n-3 PUFAs in the total fatty acid pool of white meat from the breast muscles of turkeys in groups BP, SP and SSP was significantly higher, proportionally to the higher content of α-linolenic acid in berry pomaces. The fatty acid profile of dark meat from thigh muscles, including the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio, was similar and lower than 3:1 in all groups. Vitamin A levels in raw breast muscles were higher in group AP than in groups C and BP (P<0.05. The addition of fruit pomaces to turkey diets lowered vitamin E concentrations (P = 0.001 in raw breast muscles relative to group C. Diets supplemented with fruit pomaces significantly lowered the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS in raw, frozen and cooked meat. Our results indicate that the dietary application of dried fruit pomaces increases the oxidative stability of meat from turkeys fed linseed oil, and strawberry pomace exerted the most desirable effects due to its highest polyphenol content and antioxidant potential.

  3. Freezing and thawing of processed meat in an industrial freezing tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucio Antonio Marini; Eduarda Molardi Bainy; Marcelo Kaminski Lenzi; Marcos Lúcio Corazza

    2014-01-01

    Freezing is a commonly used preservation method in the meat industry. The understanding of the product behavior during the freezing process can assist in a better process management and quality control. This work reports the study of freezing and thawing of three types of processed meat in order to determine process parameters in an industrial forced‑air freezing tunnel at ‑30oC. Chicken sausages (frankfurter type), mortadela (bologna type) and mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) were st...

  4. Ostrich (Struthio camellus carcass yield and meat quality parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Balog

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed at compiling recent studies on the main factors that influence ostrich meat quality and carcass yield. Few articles investigated the effect of subspecies, which generally are not even mentioned. There are important dietary effects, particularly those caused by dietary protein to energy ratio. Rigor mortis follow-up studies showed that there are no losses in meat quality when carcasses are hot-deboned. Age at slaughter influences some meat quality traits, such as tenderness and lipid content. Few effects of gender have been observed, and at the same age at slaughter, both male and female present the same meat quality traits.

  5. Influence of prior growth conditions, pressure treatment parameters, and recovery conditions on the inactivation and recovery of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium in turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juck, Greg; Neetoo, Hudaa; Beswick, Ethan; Chen, Haiqiang

    2012-02-01

    The relatively high prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in various food products is of great concern to the food industry. The objective of this study was to determine the pressure-inactivation of the pathogens in a representative food model as affected by prior growth temperature, physiological age of the culture, pressure level and treatment temperature. The effect of post-treatment conditions (incubation temperature and gas atmosphere) on the bacterial recovery was also determined. The pathogens being studied were inoculated into sterile turkey breast meat to a final level of ca. 3 logCFU/g and then grown to two stages, the early stage (representative of exponential phase) and late stage (representative of stationary phase), at 15, 25, 35, and 40 °C. Turkey meat samples were pressure-treated at 400 and 600 MPa for 2 min at initial sample temperatures of 4, 20 and 40 °C. Following treatment, bacterial counts in the samples were determined aerobically or anaerobically at incubation temperatures of 15, 25, 35, and 40 °C. Pressure inactivation of the bacterial pathogens increased as a function of the pressure levels and treatment temperatures. Generally speaking, early stage cells were more resistant than late stage cells (P<0.05). The incubation gas atmosphere did not affect bacterial recovery. Bacteria grown at 15-35 °C underwent higher population reductions than those grown at 40 °C. With regard to recovery temperatures, low temperatures promoted greater recovery of injured early and late stage cells than higher temperatures (P<0.05). This study indicates the importance of environmental conditions to which bacteria are exposed prior to pressure treatment and recovery conditions of the bacteria after pressure treatment when considering the adequacy of pressure treatments to enhance the microbiological safety of foods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Influence of Probiotic Bacteria (Bacillus Toyoi on Livability and Performance of Young Meat-Type Turkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Batkowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of study was to determine the impact of a probiotic preparation containing live bacteria Bacillus cereus var. toyoi on the performance of turkeys in order to define the effective dose of the preparation and to evaluate its influence on poults' livability in the first month of life. Three hundred and sixty B.U.T. 9 male turkey were divided into three groups. The control group (I was fed a diet with no probiotic additive, and groups II and III were given a probiotic product containing 0.2x109 and 1x109 B. toyoi CFU/kg of feed respectively. Body weight was recorded in weeks 1, 6, and 18. Livability, feed conversion ratio, and European Efficiency Factor (EEF were estimated. In experiment II, the impact of a standardized probiotic dose on livability and performance parameters of B.U.T. 9 turkey poults were evaluated. Two groups were selected within each sex: control (C, feed without probiotic, and experimental (T, which feed contained the probiotic preparation. Mortality and body weight were registered. The better livability and performance of the turkeys fed probiotic justifies the use of bacteria Bacillus cereus var. toyoi to improve performance results and livability during the first weeks of the turkeys' life. The bacterium strain concentration of 1.0x109 CFU/kg of feed can be assumed as optimal.

  7. The Fatty Acid Profile and Oxidative Stability of Meat from Turkeys Fed Diets Enriched with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Dried Fruit Pomaces as a Source of Polyphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juskiewicz, Jerzy; Jankowski, Jan; Zielinski, Henryk; Zdunczyk, Zenon; Mikulski, Dariusz; Antoszkiewicz, Zofia; Kosmala, Monika; Zdunczyk, Przemyslaw

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of different dietary fruit pomaces in reducing lipid oxidation in the meat of turkeys fed diets with a high content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Over a period of 4 weeks before slaughter, turkeys were fed diets with the addition of 5% dried apple, blackcurrant, strawberry and seedless strawberry pomaces (groups AP, BP, SP and SSP, respectively) and 2.5% linseed oil. Pomaces differed in the content (from 5.5 in AP to 43.1 mg/g in SSP) and composition of polyphenols Proanthocyanidins were the main polyphenolic fraction in all pomaces, AP contained flavone glycosides and dihydrochalcones, BP contained anthocyanins, and SP and SSP—ellagitannins. The n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio in all diets was comparable and lower than 2:1. In comparison with groups C and AP, the percentage of n-3 PUFAs in the total fatty acid pool of white meat from the breast muscles of turkeys in groups BP, SP and SSP was significantly higher, proportionally to the higher content of α-linolenic acid in berry pomaces. The fatty acid profile of dark meat from thigh muscles, including the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio, was similar and lower than 3:1 in all groups. Vitamin A levels in raw breast muscles were higher in group AP than in groups C and BP (Pturkey diets lowered vitamin E concentrations (P = 0.001) in raw breast muscles relative to group C. Diets supplemented with fruit pomaces significantly lowered the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in raw, frozen and cooked meat. Our results indicate that the dietary application of dried fruit pomaces increases the oxidative stability of meat from turkeys fed linseed oil, and strawberry pomace exerted the most desirable effects due to its highest polyphenol content and antioxidant potential. PMID:28076425

  8. Enhancing colour and oxidative stabilities of reduced-nitrite turkey meat sausages during refrigerated storage using fucoxanthin purified from the Tunisian seaweed Cystoseira barbata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellimi, Sabrine; Ksouda, Ghada; Benslima, Abdelkarim; Nasri, Rim; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Nasri, Moncef; Hajji, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and the antioxidant properties, in vitro and in cured meat sausages containing reduced levels of sodium nitrite, of fucoxanthin extracted from the Tunisian brown seaweed Cystoseira barbata (CBFX). Results revealed that CBFX exhibited great scavenging activities against DPPH free radicals (EC 50  = 136 μg/ml), peroxyl radicals in the linoleate-β-carotene system (EC 50  = 43 μg/ml) and hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton reaction (DNA nicking assay). A considerable ferric reducing potential was also recorded for CBFX (EC 50  = 34 μg/ml). It is interesting to note that CBFX was found to modulate the ACE activity, which is the key enzyme involved in the blood pressure regulation, with an EC 50 of 5 μg/ml. When fucoxanthin was supplemented, the concentration of sodium nitrite added to cured turkey meat sausages was reduced from 150 to 80 ppm, coupled with the enhancement of colour and oxidative stabilities. Thus, CBFX, with noticeable antioxidant and antihyertensive effects, could be used as a natural additive in functional foods to alleviate potential human health hazards caused by carcinogenic nitrosamines formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of Water Binding Capacity, pH, Chemical Composition and Microstructure of Livestock Meat and Poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Eleonora Okuskhanova; Maksim Rebezov; Zhanibek Yessimbekov; Anuarbek Suychinov; Natalya Semenova; Yaroslav Rebezov; Olga Gorelik; Oksana Zinina

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows the results of analysis of chemical composition, water binding capacity, pH and microstructure of maral meat, goat meat, lamb, and turkey meat. From the analysis, the high content of protein and ash is observed in turkey meat, fat prevails in lamb, and less amount in maral meat and goat meat. pH value lies between 5.7 (turkey white meat) and 6.4 (goat meat). Low value of water binding capacity is detected in turkey meat (58.2% in red meat, 59.2% in white meat) and high value ...

  10. Cold-batter mincing of hot-boned and crust-freezing air-chilled turkey breast improved meat turnover time and product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellin-Lopez, M; Sansawat, T; Strasburg, G; Marks, B P; Kang, I

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the combined effects of turkey hot-boning and cold-batter mincing technology on acceleration of meat turnover and meat quality improvement. For each of 3 replications, 15 turkeys were slaughtered and eviscerated. Three of the eviscerated carcasses were randomly assigned to water-immersion chilling for chill-boning (CB) and the remaining were immediately hot-boned (HB), half of which were used without chilling whereas the remaining were subjected to crust-freezing air chilling (CFAC) in an air-freezing room (1.0 m/s, -12°C) with/without 1/4; sectioning (HB-1/4;CFAC, HB-CFAC). As a result, CB and HB breasts were minced using 1 of 5 treatments: (1) CB and traditional mincing (CB-T), (2) HB and mincing with no chilling (HB-NC), (3) HB and mincing with CO2 (HB-CO2), (4) HB and mincing after CFAC (HB-CFAC), and (5) HB and mincing after quarter sectioning and CFAC (HB-1/4;CFAC). Traditional water-immersion chilling took an average of 5.5 h to reduce the breast temperature to 4°C, whereas HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC took 1.5 and 1 h, respectively. The breast of HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC showed significantly higher pH (6.0-6.1), higher fragmentation index (196-198), and lower R-value (1.0-1.1; P 0.05) in sarcomere length were seen between CB-T and HB-CFAC filets regardless of quarter sectioning. When muscle was minced, the batter pH (5.9) of CB-T was significantly lower (P meat batters were cooked, higher cooking yield (90 - 91%; P < 0.05) was found in HB-CFAC, HB-1/4;CFAC, and HB-CO2, followed by HB-NC (90%) and finally CB-T (86%). Stress values (47-51 kPa) of HB-CFAC gels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of CB-T (30 kPa) and HB-NC (36 kPa). A similar trend was found in strain values.

  11. Effects of Storage Time on the Quality of Local Chicken Meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the proximate composition and effects of aging time on local chicken meat quality. For proximate analysis, 24 male and 24 female breast, thigh and drumstick samples from one half of the carcass were skinned, de-boned and frozen at -20oC. The samples were minced through a ...

  12. Field trials with the use of a live attenuated temperature-sensitive vaccine for the control of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in meat-type turkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Saita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG continues to be an important pathogen of poultry, causing significant production losses in many parts of the world. Eradication is the preferred method of control but it could result impractical after the organism has been introduced in an area with high density of poultry farms. TS-11®, a temperature-sensitive live attenuated MG vaccine, is currently utilized in several countries for the control of MG infections in commercial layers and broiler breeders. In the present field trial, conducted in an industrial meat-turkey farm (belonging to an integrated company, previously affected by severe MG infections, the ability of TS-11® in effectively colonizing the upper respiratory tract in a turkey flock was evaluated (“TS-11®” flock. A second flock grown in an adjacent pen of the same farm was vaccinated with an inactivated MG vaccine (“Inactivated” flock. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis were applied for the detection and differentiation of TS-11® from other MG strains possibly present in the same flocks, such as the field strains and the 6/85 live vaccine strain currently utilized in commercial layers in Italy. PCR-RAPD results achieved in the “TS-11®“ flock were compared with those of a flock of turkey grown in the same farm but vaccinated with an inactivated MG vaccine. Encouraging results were achieved by means of PCR-RAPD detection of TS-11® from all of the samples up to eight weeks post vaccination, whereas it was never detected in the “Inactivated” flock. Moreover, the field strain was never detected in the “TS-11®“ flock but in the “Inactivated” one it was detected either 5 and 8 weeks after the vaccination. The aggregate production data of the two flocks resulted significantly improved when compared to the performance of the previous flocks grown in the same farm and similar to the production standard of the integrated company.

  13. Effect of micellized natural (D-α-tocopherol) vs. synthetic (DL-α-tocopheryl acetate) vitamin E supplementation given to turkeys on oxidative status and breast meat quality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, A I; Segura, J; Olivares, A; Cerisuelo, A; Piñeiro, C; López-Bote, C J

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of vitamin E supplementation source (micellized natural vs. the synthetic form) and dosage (40, 80, or 120 mg/kg) on α-tocopherol concentration in plasma and muscle, antioxidant capacity, and breast meat quality in turkeys. Three hundred female turkeys were randomly selected at an average live weight 63.2 g±0.5 and distributed into 7 groups. One group (control) was fed a standard diet without vitamin E supplementation and the other 6 were given mixed diets supplemented with the natural (d-α-tocopherol) or synthetic (dl-α-tocopheryl acetate) form of vitamin E in 3 dosages (40, 80, or 120 mg/kg). Following 11 wk feeding, results showed that performance parameters were not modified either by source or dosage of vitamin E supplementation to the turkeys. Plasma and muscle α-tocopherol at d 9 of refrigerated storage were higher when turkeys were supplemented with the natural form at higher doses. Losses in the concentration of α-tocopherol in meat between the beginning and the end of the 9 d refrigerated storage were greater in the groups supplemented with the synthetic form of vitamin E compared to those receiving the natural supplementation. The relationship between plasma α-tocopherol and the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity followed a different trend depending on the vitamin E source. Intramuscular fat was not significantly affected by the vitamin E source supplementation; however the slope of the linear regression equation was lower for the natural form than for the synthetic form. Turkeys given the natural form had higher C18:1n-9 but lower C15:1, C17:1, C20:5n-3, and C22:6n-3 in breast muscle. Meat samples from turkeys supplemented with natural vitamin E had higher deoxymyoglobin at d 3, 6, and 9 and lower metmyoglobin at d 9 of refrigerated storage than those receiving the synthetic form. Dietary supplementation with medium doses (80 mg/kg) micellized d-α-tocopherol is an interesting feeding strategy for

  14. CARCASS AND MEAT QUALITY OF AFRICANDER Ar{D TERSEY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rib cut (8th to l0th rib) was taken from the right fore quar- ter for deboning and proximete analysis (Naudd, l97l) in order to determine the muscle : fat : bone ratio in the g0rcast. Meat. Thc left prime rib cut was taken for qtulity testing on the M. longirs;inala thqscis A portion of the M. pertorulis prudnradtts was also disected from ...

  15. Effect of different electrical stunning methods on meat quality of marmara Kivircik breed lamb in Turkey Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Büyükünal S.K.; Nazli B.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of head-only electrical stunning method were compared with the effects of headtoback electrical stunning method. A total of 90 kivircik breed lambs were randomly allocated immediately prior to slaughter to one of three stunning treatments: control group (C), head only group (HO; 1.0 AAC for 3 s at a frequency of 50 Hz), head to back group (HB; 1,0 A- AC for3s ata frequency of 50 Hz) electrical stunning. Meat quality was assessed by examining pH, color as L, a, b values, water hold...

  16. Hydrodynamic shockwave tenderization effects using a cylinder processor on early deboned broiler breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, J R; Schilling, J K; Marriott, N G; Duncan, S E; Solomon, M B; Wang, H

    2001-07-01

    In separate experiments, chicken broiler breasts were deboned (45 min postmortem, 52 min, respectively) and either exposed to high pressure hydrodynamic shockwaves (HSW) 25 min after deboning (77 min postmortem) or after 24 h of storage (4°C) respectively, and compared to companion control breasts. HSW were produced in a cylindrical HSW processor with 40-g explosive. Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) values of the HSW breasts treated at 77 min postmortem were not different than the controls. HSW treatment decreased (PL*a*b*) were not affected by the HSW. HSW treatment at 25 min after deboning (77 min postmortem) may require a higher pressure front or delayed treatment after postmortem aging to improve tenderness.

  17. Effect of different electrical stunning methods on meat quality of marmara Kivircik breed lamb in Turkey Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büyükünal S.K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of head-only electrical stunning method were compared with the effects of headtoback electrical stunning method. A total of 90 kivircik breed lambs were randomly allocated immediately prior to slaughter to one of three stunning treatments: control group (C, head only group (HO; 1.0 AAC for 3 s at a frequency of 50 Hz, head to back group (HB; 1,0 A- AC for3s ata frequency of 50 Hz electrical stunning. Meat quality was assessed by examining pH, color as L, a, b values, water holding capacity (WHC and shear force. The effect on meat quality was assessed in head-only electrically stunned, head to back electrically stunned and non-stunned lambs. Shear forces were not significantly different between treatments. However color (L*,a*,b*, water holding capacity (WHC and muscle ultimate pH were found to be significantly higher (P<0.05 between the groups.

  18. Sheep meat commercialization in the retail market in Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Firetti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper explored the mix market characteristics of sheep meat as a product for sale in different cities in the states of São Paulo and Paraná. For this, 81 products were purchased in 21 outlets sampled in a “non-probabilistic” manner for convenience and then subjected to analysis of yield of meat, bone, and fat. Imported products represented 20% of the total, being marketed in hypermarkets. It was observed that 37% of the total products were obtained in hypermarkets, 31% in supermarkets, 23% in butcher shops, and 8.6% in meat outlets. Almost 9% of the products had not undergone the official slaughter inspection system. The main types of products identified were palettes and legs with bones (33.3 and 24.7%, respectively; however, only 25% were satisfactorily displayed to consumers. The yields obtained in meat and deboned portions were 74% and 59% of the total weight, significantly affecting the average adjusted sales prices of the products, respectively US$13.01/kg sale price; US$17.82/kg deboned; and US$22.52/kg lean meat. The low yield of clean and boned meat observed in the samples can lead to negative experiences of these products by consumers.

  19. 9 CFR 381.171 - Definition and standard for “Turkey Ham.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...” shall be fabricated from boneless, turkey thigh meat with skin and the surface fat attached to the skin... than the original weight of the turkey thigh meat used prior to curing. (d) The product name on the... statement “Cured Turkey Thigh Meat.” The qualifying statement shall be contiguous to the product name...

  20. Measurement of water-holding capacity in raw and freeze-dried broiler breast meat with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (vis/NIR) to segregate broiler breast fillets by water-holding capacity (WHC) was determined. Broiler breast fillets (n = 72) were selected from a commercial deboning line based on visual color assessment. Meat color (L*a*b*), pH (2 and 2...

  1. Breast meat yield, muscle linear measurements and meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast meat yield, chemical composition, mineral profile and linear measurement of the resultant breast meat Supracoracoides and Pectoralis thoracicus of one hundred and eighty (28 days old BUT) male turkeys fed diet containing wheat or sorghum as sole cereal source were studied. One hundred and eighty 28-days old ...

  2. Time's Up, Turkey--Pop-Up Thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Meat thermometers can be awkward to use in terms of placement and avoidance of bones. Because of these problems, each year 30 million Thanksgiving turkeys have a built-in thermometer that pops up when the turkey is properly cooked. Turkey timers are an example of how engineering solved a common, everyday problem. The following 5E learning cycle…

  3. Effect of different ionizing radiation dose rates on the Staphylococcal enterotoxin in mechanically deboned chicken meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Heliana de; Brito, Poliana de Paula; Fukuma, Henrique Takuji; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Custodio, Wilson [Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: wilsonc@cnen.gov.br; Kodama, Yasko [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: ykodama@ipen.br; Miya, Norma Terugo Nago; Pereira, Jose Luiz [Campinas State University (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Food Sciences], e-mail: pereira@fea.unicamp.br, e-mail: miya@fea.unicamp.br

    2009-07-01

    Samples weighing 50g each were prepared from allotments of back with skin MDCM, to the EEB contamination or not (control). Each sample of MDCM contaminated or not with EEB was conditioned in low density polyethylene bag, frozen (-18 {+-} 1 deg C) for one night in a tunnel and irradiated with gamma rays from {sup 60}Co source in this state with doses of 0.0 kGy (control), 1.5 kGy (5.7 kGy.h{sup -1} - higher dose rate, 1.8 kGy.h{sup -1} - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h{sup -1} - lower dose rate) and 3.0 kGy (8.4 kGy.h{sup -}'1 - higher dose rate, 2.4 kGy.h{sup -1} - intermediary dose rate and 0.6 kGy.h{sup -1} - lower dose rate). Irradiated or non irradiated MDCM samples were processed to the EEB extraction, according to the VIDAS Staph enterotoxin II kit (bioMerieux) manufacturer protocol. The calculation to determinate the MDCM EEB recovery after the sample (control or irradiated) processing were carried out applying the principle of mass balance, along the whole process. Described experiment was performed in triplicate. Results showed that the irradiation process was effective to remove the MDCM EEB, to both 1.5 kGy and 3.0 kGy. According to the expected, doses of 3.0 kGy showed the highest values of MDCM EEB removal. Regarding the effect of dose rate of radiation on the removal of EEB of the MDCM, it could be observed only for samples irradiated with 1.5 kGy radiation dose; in these processing conditions, the highest value of EEB removal was obtained for samples processed with low radiation dose rate. (author)

  4. Application and optimization of microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography for sensitive determination of polyamines in turkey breast meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiry, Moein; Mohammadi, Abdorreza; Hosseini, Hedayat; Kamankesh, Marzieh; Aeenehvand, Saeed; Mohammadi, Zaniar

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on microwave-assisted extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MAE-DLLME) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for the determination of three polyamines from turkey breast meat samples. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize the effective factors in DLLME process. The optimum microextraction efficiency was obtained under optimized conditions. The calibration graphs of the proposed method were linear in the range of 20-200 ng g(-1), with the coefficient determination (R(2)) higher than 0.9914. The relative standard deviations were 6.72-7.30% (n = 7). The limits of detection were in the range of 0.8-1.4 ng g(-1). The recoveries of these compounds in spiked turkey breast meat samples were from 95% to 105%. The increased sensitivity in using the MAE-DLLME-HPLC-UV has been demonstrated. Compared with previous methods, the proposed method is an accurate, rapid and reliable sample-pretreatment method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A SNP based linkage map of the turkey genome reveals multiple intrachromosomal rearrangements between the Turkey and Chicken genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.L.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Vereijken, A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species that is the second largest contributor to the world's poultry meat production. The genomic resources of turkey provide turkey breeders with tools needed for the genetic improvement of commercial breeds of turkey for

  6. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in turkey meat production farms in the Czech Republic: national survey reveals widespread isolates with bla(SHV-12) genes on IncFII plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolejska, M; Matulova, M; Kohoutova, L; Literak, I; Bardon, J; Cizek, A

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence and epidemiology of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in the environment of turkey farms in the Czech Republic were studied. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing E. coli isolates were found on 8 (20%) of 40 turkey farms surveyed. A total of 200 environmental smears were examined, and a total of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated. These isolates were analysed using XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and divided into nine pulsotypes. Most of the isolates harboured the gene bla(SHV-12) on a 40-kb plasmid of the IncFII group with an identical EcoRV restriction profile. Indistinguishable or clonally related SHV-12-producing isolates belonging to the same pulsotypes were found at some unrelated farms. Widespread occurrence of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates with bla(SHV-12) carried on IncFII plasmids in meat production flocks in the Czech Republic was demonstrated. Results indicate vertical transmission of ESBL-producing E. coli within the turkey production pyramid. The study shows the risk of multiresistant ESBL-producing bacteria and antibiotic-resistance genes being transmitted to humans via the food chain. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Post-mortem changes in the physical meat quality characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... apparatus) of the muscle generally improved with time. The quadratic equation y = -0.0817x2 + 0.4468x + 10.477 best described (R2 = 0.32) this improvement in tenderness. The implications of this result is that fresh game meat producers can de-bone carcasses after 24 hours post mortem and leave the primal cuts to age ...

  8. Investigation of the best suture pattern to close a stuffed Christmas turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwilghen, D; Busoni, V; van Galen, G; Wilke, M

    Instructions on how to debone and stuff a turkey are available, but what is the best way to close it up? A randomised trial involving 15 turkeys was performed in order to evaluate skin disruption scores and cosmetic outcomes following the use of different suture patterns. Turkeys were deboned, stuffed and cooked according to guidelines of the US Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Services. After stuffing, they were randomly assigned to one of five closure groups: simple continuous Lembert; simple continuous Cushing; simple continuous Utrecht; simple continuous; or staples. Turkeys were cooked at 180 °C for two hours ensuring core temperature reached 75 °C. Suture line integrity was evaluated after removal of the sutures and the cosmetic aspect was graded. Before cooking, the Utrecht pattern and skin staples offered the best cosmetic result. After removal of the sutures, the skin remained intact only in the stapled group. All other suture patterns disrupted the skin after removal of the sutures, rendering the turkey less cosmetically appealing for serving. Closure of a stuffed turkey was best performed using skin staples to achieve the best cosmetic results. Using this technique you will be able to impress family and friends at a Christmas dinner, and finally show them your surgical skills.

  9. Effect of dietary supplementation of sea buckthorn and giloe leaf meal on the body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, biochemical attributes, and meat composition of turkey poults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditya; Shukla, Pankaj Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Amitav; Kumar, Upendra; Roy, Debashis; Yadav, Brijesh; Prakash, Atul

    2018-01-01

    In the recent past, few studies have been carried out about sea buckthorn (SBT) and giloe in chicken as a part of the quest for suitable alternatives to antibiotics. However, studies in turkeys are lacking. Hence, the present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of SBT and giloe leaf meal by dietary feed supplementation in turkey poults. A total of 1-day-old turkey poults (n=84) of small white variety were distributed into four dietary treatments having three replicates each with seven birds. The study was conducted in turkey poults during 0-8 weeks of age. During the experiment, the poults were fed basal ration (28% crude protein [CP], 2800 Kcal/kg ME) T1, T2-basal ration was supplemented with SBT leaf meal powder at 0.5%, T3-basal ration was supplemented with giloe leaf meal powder at 0.5%, and T4-basal ration was fed along with supplementation of both SBT at 0.5% and giloe leaf meal powder at 0.5%. T2 turkey poults had a significantly higher (pturkey poults. Supplementation of 0.5% SBT leaf meal may result in higher levels of zinc and EE in the breast and thigh cuts of turkey poults.

  10. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in pork-meat and other processed products from the Colombian swine industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gamboa Marín

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence of L. monocytogenes in pork carcasses, meat cuts, and meat products (“chorizo”, sausage and ham. Materials and methods. Stratified sampling was implemented in meat-processed products. We analyzed 566 (37% carcasses, 472 (31% meat cuts, and 481, (32% meat-processed products, distributed as follows: 169 (11% sausage, 163 (11% ham, and 149 (10% “chorizo”, for a total of 1519 (100% samples in a period of 18 months. The samples were processed using the ISO-17604, ISO-11290-1 and the USDA/FSIS (MLG-8.03 methods. Genus and species were confirmed by multiplex-PCR. Results. We obtained isolates of L. monocytogenes from 21 carcasses (10%, 160 (76% from meat deboning, 10 (5% from ham, 6 (3% from “chorizo”, and 13 (6% from sausage. The prevalence found was 3.7% and 33.9% in carcasses and meat deboning respectively. The prevalence in the meat-processed products was 4.03% in “chorizo”, 6.13% in ham and 7.69% in sausage. The overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes in the study was 13.82%. Conclusions. We found L. monocytogenes in different products analyzed, with particular interest in ham and sausage since both are consumed without previous heat treatment.

  11. Genetic control and variation in turkey: molecular insights in selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.L.

    2012-01-01


    The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species that is largely used as a meat type bird as egg production of this species is very low. Turkey is the second largest contributor to the world’s poultry meat production after chicken. Understanding the etiology and

  12. Metronidazole resistance in Campylobacter jejuni from poultry meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sigrid Rita; Shukri, Naseer Mahmoud; Boel, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of metronidazole resistance was investigated among Campylobacter jejuni in raw poultry meat collected from supermarkets. MICs were determined by the agar dilution procedure in the testing range of 3 to 60 mu g/ml metronidazole. The MICs showed a bimodal distribution...... with a significant proportion of metronidazole-resistant isolates among C. jejuni from raw broiler and turkey meat. Metronidazole resistance occurred most frequently among turkey meat isolates (P resistance....

  13. Effect of dietary supplementation of sea buckthorn and giloe leaf meal on the body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, biochemical attributes, and meat composition of turkey poults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the recent past, few studies have been carried out about sea buckthorn (SBT and giloe in chicken as a part of the quest for suitable alternatives to antibiotics. However, studies in turkeys are lacking. Hence, the present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of SBT and giloe leaf meal by dietary feed supplementation in turkey poults. Materials and Methods: A total of 1-day-old turkey poults (n=84 of small white variety were distributed into four dietary treatments having three replicates each with seven birds. The study was conducted in turkey poults during 0-8 weeks of age. During the experiment, the poults were fed basal ration (28% crude protein [CP], 2800 Kcal/kg ME T1, T2-basal ration was supplemented with SBT leaf meal powder at 0.5%, T3-basal ration was supplemented with giloe leaf meal powder at 0.5%, and T4-basal ration was fed along with supplementation of both SBT at 0.5% and giloe leaf meal powder at 0.5%. Results: T2 turkey poults had a significantly higher (p<0.01 body weight gain than T3 and T4 at 7th week of age. Weekly body weight gain was significantly higher (p<0.05 in T2 than T3 during 5th-8th week and 0-8th week of the growth phase. Feed conversion ratio (FCR was significantly better (p<0.01 in T2 than other treatment groups during 4th-8th week phase of growth (2.09 vs. 2.36, 2.29 and 2.31. Further, FCR was significantly better (p<0.01 in T2 group as compared to other treatment groups during 0-8th week of growth phase (1.95 vs. 2.21, 2.21 and 2.12. Plasma uric acid was found significantly increased (p<0.05 in T1 than T3 and T4, and alkaline phosphatase value was significantly higher (p<0.05 in T1 and T3 than T2. Zinc content of breast (pectoralis major muscles was significantly higher (p<0.05 in T2 and T4 as compared to T1, while ether extract (EE in thigh (ilio tibialis muscles was significantly higher (p<0.05 in T2 as compared to the other treatment groups. Conclusion: It may be concluded that

  14. Comparison of primary predictive models to study the growth of Listeria monocytogenes at low temperatures in liquid cultures and selection of fastest growing ribotypes in meat and turkey product slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Amit; Labuza, Theodore P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-05-01

    This study compared the performance of four primary mathematical models to study the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes ribotypes grown at low temperature so as to identify the best predictive model. The parameters of the best-fitting model were used to select the fastest growing strains with the shortest lag time and greatest growth rate. Nineteen food, human and animal L. monocytogenes isolates with distinct ribotype were grown at 4, 8, and 12 degrees C in tryptic soy broth and slurries prepared from cooked uncured sliced turkey breasts (with or without potassium lactate and sodium diacetate, PL/SD) and cooked cured frankfurters (with or without PL/SD). Separate regressions were performed on semi-logarithm growth curves to fit linear (based on Monod) and non-linear (Gompertz, Baranyi-Roberts, and Logistic) equations and performance of each model was evaluated using an F-test. No significant differences were found in the performance of linear and non-linear models, but the Baranyi model had the best fit for most growth curves. The maximum growth rate (MGR) of Listeria strains increased with the temperature. Similarly MGR was found significantly greater when no antimicrobials were present in the formulation of turkey or frankfurter products. The variability in lag times and MGRs in all media as determined by the Baranyi model was not consistent among strains. No single strain consistently had the fastest growth (shortest lag time, fastest MGR, or shortest time to increase 100-fold), but nine strains were identified as fastest growing strains under most growth conditions. The lack of association between serotype and fastest strain was also observed in the slurry media study. The fastest growing strains resulting from this study can be recommended for future use in L. monocytogenes challenge studies in delicatessen meat and poultry food matrices, so as to develop conservative pathogen growth predictions.

  15. Anti-rancidity effect of essential oils, application in the lipid stability of cooked turkey meat patties and potential implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica R; Tundis, Rosa; Menichini, Francesco; Duthie, Garry

    2015-02-01

    Twenty-three commercial essential oils were tested for their anti-rancidity effect and potential implications to prolong the induction time of corn oil and extend the shelf life of cooked turkey patties. Moreover, the potential health benefit was investigated through DPPH, ABTS, β-carotene bleaching, FRAP, and α-amylase inhibitory assays. Essential oils' composition was investigated by GC-MS. Cumin, thyme, clove, and cinnamon oils improved oxidative stability and increased the induction time of the corn oil 1.5-3 fold. Clove and cinnamon oils were particularly effective in delaying lipid oxidation of cooked turkey patties (time of induction 11.04 and 9.43 h) compared with the plain burger (5.04 h). Both oils are also characterized by a potent radical scavenging activity in ABTS test (IC(50) values of 1.43 and 2.05 μg/ml for cinnamon and clove, respectively). In the α-amylase inhibitory assay, cumin and grape fruits were the most potent with IC(50) values of 21.88 and 23.95 μg/ml, respectively.

  16. Seasonal variation in the condition index, meat yield and biochemical composition of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis (Linnaeus, 1758 from the Dardanelles, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Yildiz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Dardanelles between October 2007 and August 2009 when condition index, meat yield, biochemical compositions and environmental parameters of seawater were investigated and the study area was found to have available conditions for cultivation. Investigation of the study area showed a positive correlation in particular among condition index, seasonal variation of temperature, protein, fat and chlorophyll-a; a negative correlation was seen between them and carbohydrate value. It was clear from the two years study that the most ideal period for oyster harvest is April and August especially when condition index was maximum followed by a winter with no oyster yield is available in terms of the related processes involving oyster cultivation.

  17. Micro-Raman spectroscopy for meat type detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biasio, M.; Stampfer, P.; Leitner, R.; Huck, C. W.; Wiedemair, V.; Balthasar, D.

    2015-06-01

    The recent horse meat scandal in Europe increased the demand for optical sensors that can identify meat type. Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a promising technique for the discrimination of meat types. Here, we present micro-Raman measurements of chicken, pork, turkey, mutton, beef and horse meat test samples. The data was analyzed with different combinations of data normalization and classification approaches. Our results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between different meat types. Red and white meat are easily discriminated, however a sophisticated chemometric model is required to discriminate species within these groups.

  18. Review: Automation and meat quality-global challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, Shai

    2014-01-01

    The global meat industry has seen significant changes in the methods used to harvest and process fresh meat over the past century. Increased use of automation has led to significant increases in line speed for beef, pork, sheep, poultry and fish operations. For example, currently the fastest line observed has been broilers at 13,500/h. Such developments have required in-depth understanding of the pre and post rigor processes to prevent defects. Procedures such as maturation chilling and electrical stimulation are now common in red meat and poultry processing; allowing shorter time to deboning, while harvesting high quality meat. Robots designed to cut meat are also appearing on the market, and replacing traditional manual operations. This is a challenge, because high speed equipment is not necessarily sensitive to variations in size/quality issues, and requires development of unique sensors and control systems. Also, progress in breeding and genetics is contributing to greater product uniformity and quality; helping in operating automated equipment. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  19. Color variation and characterization of broiler breast meat during processing in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracci, M; Betti, M; Bianchi, M; Cavani, C

    2004-12-01

    The variation in broiler breast meat color (CIE values L*a*b*) that normally occurs during processing was evaluated on 6,997 broiler breast fillets (pectoralis major muscles) from 79 flocks using a Minolta Chroma Meter. The samples were randomly collected at 3 to 6 h postmortem from the deboning line at a single major Italian processing plant. In addition, 216 fillets were selected based on lightness (L*) values as being dark (L* 56), and were analyzed for ultimate pH, intact and ground meat cooking loss, and shear value. The overall range in measured lightness (L*) was considerable and varied from 40 (dark) to 66 (pale), indicating that high breast meat color variation during processing could exist. Broiler breast meat during summer was found to be paler (+1.7 L* unit), less red (-1.0 a* unit), and less yellow (-0.7 b* unit) than breast meat samples collected during the winter, confirming that the incidence of pale meat is greater during summer as indicated by nonscientific observations of plant personnel. It was also determined that paler (L* > 56) breast meat is associated with lower ultimate pH and poorer water-holding capacity, whereas darker (L* meat is associated with higher muscle pH and cooking yield.

  20. Growth performance of three commercial strains of turkey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At 16 weeks of age correlation values for body parts against body weight were mostly negative across the treatment groups. It was evident from the results of this study that any of the turkey strains can be reared for meat without emphasis on plumage except at the discretion of the farmer. Keywords: Turkeys, Strains, Growth ...

  1. Uses of mechanically separated chicken meat for production from protein hydrolysates different proteolytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Silvia Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydrolyzed protein, derived from animal and vegetable sources, in specific formulations, is an area of growing interest. The aim of this study was to develop different powder hydrolysates with high protein value, from the enzymatic hydrolysis of mechanically deboned meat (MDM, a byproduct of the poultry industry, which can be a low-cost source for the production of these hydrolysates. The raw material used was frozen poultry mechanically deboned meat (MDM purchased from an abattoir in southern Brazil, before use it was thawed under refrigeration and homogenized in a processor by 2 minutes. Three commercial enzymes were used, Papain, Protamex® and Flavourzyme®. The hydrolysis occurred in a thermostatized bath with temperature, time and pH controlled. Proximal composition of the raw material and lyophilized hydrolysates, control analysis such as hydrolysis degree of hydrolysis, protein, total solids, ash and amino acid characterization of the hydrolysates were performed. The results were evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey’s averages test. The hydrolyzed obtained from the papain enzyme showed the best behavior, followed by Protamex and Flavourzyme. The hydrolysates from papain enzyme had higher protein content, soluble solids and lower ash content compared to other hydrolysates. The amino acid composition showed that the hydrolyzate from papain has a closer composition to what is recommended by the control organs. It was concluded that the protein hydrolysates obtained from mechanically deboned chicken had high protein content characterizing them as a promising raw material in the formulation of special diets.

  2. Household demand elasticities for meat products in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno A. Lanfranco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzed the demand for meats at household level over the past decade in Uruguay, a country that exhibits a very high per capita consumption of these products. In particular, the consumption of beef is one of the highest in the world and only comparable to Argentina. The analysis involved a two-step estimation of an incomplete system of censored demand equations using household data from the last available national income and expenditure survey (2005/06. Thirteen meat products were included in the analysis: six broad beef products (deboned hindquarter cuts, bone-in hindquarter cuts, ground beef, rib plate, bone-in forequarter cuts, and other beef cuts, four products from other meats (sheep, pork, poultry, and fish, and three generic mixed-meat products. A complete set of short-term income, own-price and cross-price elasticities were computed and reported along with their 90% confidence intervals (CI. The results were consistent with both economic theory and empirical evidence as well as with the expected behavior, considering the relevance of these products, particularly beef, in the diet of Uruguayan consumers. All meat items were necessary goods and evidenced income-inelastic responses, which was expected given their high consumption level. All meats behaved as normal goods although exhibiting different reactions to changes in price. In general, beef cuts were more price elastic than other more broadly defined products. The more specific and disaggregated the meat product the higher its corresponding direct price elasticity. The complement/substitute relationships found in this study were highly depended on the specific product combinations.

  3. Meet meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Gerben A.; Tobi, Hilde; Fischer, Arnout R.H.

    2017-01-01

    In this cross-cultural study we investigated how study participants from China, Ethiopia and the Netherlands operationalize the concept of meat and to what extent cultured meat fits or does not fit into this operationalization. We argue that combining the conceptual approaches symbolic boundaries

  4. living in Kapulukaya Dam Lake (Kirikkale, Turkey)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... Key words: Esox lucius, Northern pike, breeding, Kapulukaya Dam Lake, Turkey. INTRODUCTION. Northern pike (Esox lucius) from Esocidae family is a commonly hunted fish due to its tasty meat. It generally lives in lakes but it is frequently seen in rivers and stream. Although it is known as a freshwater ...

  5. SDS-PAGE in conjunction with match lane statistical analysis for the detection of meat adulteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, R.A.; Nassef, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of seven meat types and two component mixtures of them were made. Banding patterns of resulting denstograms in conjunction with cluster analysi and match lane statistical analysis were used for the detection of meat adulteration. The use of beef as a reference meat have resulted in a clear distinction from goat, pork, chicken, turkey, camel meats and their mixture and camel meat. The use of pork meat as a reference was more assurate because of the low degrees of matching with all meats and their mixtures and consequently high abilities of differentiations. The purpose of identification. the purpose of identification of meat species arises from the desire of human, in general, to confirm what he eat ? for moslems the establisment that meat is free from pork type is most important. Another economic purpose is the detection of adulteration of valuable meat by less valuable types. Several attempts in different laboratories were done to serve this object but most of analytical techniques. Barbieri and formi (1999) were able to detect 5% of meat type in mixtures by isolelectric focusing and 1% of meat type by PCR technique in beef, pork, chicken and turkey meats. By crossover immunoelectrophoresis technique, zanon and vianello (1998) were also to detect a limit of 5% of specific meat in mixuters of beef, pork, mutton/lamb, horse and chicken meats

  6. Meat flavour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosset, R.; Liger, P.; Roussel-Ciquard, N.

    1978-01-01

    For the consumer, meat is characterized by a certain number of organoleptic qualities; among them, flavour -that is to say the association of both odour and taste- plays a leading part. This property is based upon a great number of chemical components: some volatile components are responsible for the aroma and some non-volatile ones for the taste. These substances are either made or released during the heating of the meat on account of components called precursors which are produced during the aging of the meat. The two main reactions which preside over the elaboration of flavour are: the Maillard's reaction and the autooxidation reactions. Meat flavour is associated with the animal characteristics; it is influenced by the ante- and post mortem treatments as well as by the technological treatments for storing it. The use of synthetical flavours is to be considered as possible in the future [fr

  7. Pale, soft, and exudative poultry meat--Reviewing ways to manage at the processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, S

    2009-07-01

    This review focuses on ways the industry can currently deal with pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) poultry meat. Overall, the rapid increase in poultry meat consumption and the move toward selling more cut-up parts have resulted in some complaints associated with meat quality. Because no genetic marker related to PSE in poultry used by breeders has yet been identified, processors can employ several pre- and postrigor strategies to minimize the magnitude of the problem. They include reducing stress before slaughter (e.g., during catching, transportation, waiting period, unloading) and during stunning (gas vs. electrical). Later, there is a need to better understand and adjust processing conditions such as electrical stimulation, chilling rate, and maturation. When dealing with cut-up parts or deboned meat, strategies such as identifying and separating PSE meat, diverting it to no or low moisture-added products, and including additives to compensate for the poor water holding and texture can be beneficial. The potential contribution of ingredients such as starches (regular, modified), carrageenans, and enzymes is discussed. When it comes to formed products (e.g., nuggets), gentle brine addition and the use of low-pressure forming equipment can also help to minimize the effects of using PSE meat.

  8. Monitoring lean meat percentage predictions from optical grading probes by a commercial cutting pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangsei, Lars Erik; Bjerke, Frøydis; Røe, Morten; Alvseike, Ole

    2018-03-01

    The lean meat percentage (LMP) classification in Norwegian slaughterhouses is obtained by Hennessy Grading Probe 7 (HGP7), an optical tool. Even though the HGP7 method is validated frequently, there is industrial and legislative demand to reconsider the applied LMP equation, typically due to the introduction of new breeds. A deboning pilot plant generates precise yield data using cutting and deboning stratified pork carcasses by a specific commercial cutting pattern (CCP) at an annual rate of approximately 250 slaughter pigs. This paper shows how results obtained by CCP can be used to measure LMP in pork and how these results can be used for monitoring the quality of LMP predicted by HGP7. The effect of gender, maternal- and paternal lines on validity of HGP7 predictions was evaluated. The effect of introducing a new maternal line (TN70) seems to be substantial, whereas the effects of the tested paternal lines are small to negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Meat quality of broiler breast fillets with white striping and woody breast muscle myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijare, V V; Yang, F L; Kuttappan, V A; Alvarado, C Z; Coon, C N; Owens, C M

    2016-09-01

    The global poultry industry has been faced with emerging broiler breast meat quality issues including conditions known as white striping (WS, white striations parallel to muscle fibers) and woody breast (WB, hardness of raw fillet). Experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of WS and WB hardness on meat quality traits in broiler breast fillets. In Exp. 1, birds were processed at approximately 9 wk of age and deboned at 4 h postmortem (PM); in Exp. 2, birds were processed at approximately 6 and 9 wk of age and deboned at 2 h PM. Fillets were categorized as: normal for both white striping and woody breast (NORM); moderate for white striping and mild for woody breast (MILD); severe for white striping and mild for woody breast (WS); severe for woody breast and moderate for white striping (WB); or severe for both white striping and woody breast (BOTH). Sarcomere length, gravimetric fragmentation index, marination uptake, cook loss, and Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy (MORSE) values on non-marinated and marinated fillets were assessed. Sarcomeres tended to be longer (P = 0.07) with increasing severity of WS and WB in both experiments and gravimetric fragmentation index did not differ (P > 0.05) among categories. Marinade uptake decreased (P  0.05) in non-marinated fillets, the marinated BOTH fillets had greater MORSE values (P  0.05) among categories of marinated breasts. At 9 wk, WS and BOTH were higher (P white striping and woody breast, individually or in combination, negatively impact meat quality, especially water holding capacity attributes such as marinade uptake and cook loss. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Consumer profile analysis for different types of meat in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriba-Perez, Carmen; Baviera-Puig, Amparo; Buitrago-Vera, Juan; Montero-Vicente, Luis

    2017-07-01

    It is important to analyse the consumer profile of each type of meat to better adapt the marketing mix to each one. To this end, we examined the average consumption frequency of different types of meat based on two methodologies: consumer segmentation using the food-related lifestyle (FRL) framework, giving rise to 4 segments, and analysis of socio-demographic profiles. The variables used were: sex, age, educational level, social class, number of people in the household, presence of children younger than 18 in the home, geographical area and habitual residence. Beef was the only meat type significant in both analyses. Turkey meat only appeared as significant in the FRL analysis. The other meats (chicken, pork, rabbit and lamb) were only significant in the sociodemographic variables analysis. From the outcomes we may conclude that there is no single consumer profile, which rather depends on the type of meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy turkeys and from turkeys with necrotic enteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhs, Ulrike; Perko-Mäkelä, P.; Kallio, H.

    2013-01-01

    ) of a turkey company that produces 99% of domestic turkey meat in Finland were interviewed about background information, management at the farm, and stress factors related to NE outbreaks. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis with SmaI restriction enzyme resulted in 30 PFGE patterns among the 92 C......Clostridium perfringens is an important bacterial pathogen, especially in poultry, where it can lead to both subclinical and clinical disease. The aim of this study was to present data on pathological findings at outbreaks of necrotic enteritis (NE) in turkey production in Finland during the period...... from 1998 to 2012. Furthermore, C. perfringens isolates from healthy and diseased turkeys were characterized and their genetic diversity was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates (n = 212) from birds with necrotic gut lesions and from healthy flocks of 30 commercial...

  12. 9 CFR 381.68 - Maximum inspection rates-New turkey inspection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum inspection rates-New turkey..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION... Procedures § 381.68 Maximum inspection rates—New turkey inspection system. (a) The maximum inspection rates...

  13. The evaluation of ergonomic risk factors among meat cutters working in Jabalpur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prabir; Khan, Amaltas

    2015-01-01

    Manual meat cutters in India are at high risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) for a variety of reasons including holding awkward postures, repetitive forceful exertions, and inadequate rest. This is the first study of its kind to investigate the nature and magnitude of WMSDs among manual meat cutters in India. The aim of this study was to measure the ergonomic risk factors for WMSDs among adult male manual meat cutters working in Jabalpur, India. We used direct observation, activity analysis, questionnaires, interviews, photography, and video to measure the quantitative ergonomic risk factors. Ovako working posture analysis indicated high scores (four for the back in peeling, six for the arms in cutting, and six for the arms during mincing tasks). Rapid entire body assessment method (REBA) scores were also high at 10/10 for deboning and mincing tasks, all associated with repetitive movements of the arms and awkward posture of the upper part of the body. The study indicates that most tasks for meat cutters fall in the high-risk category for occupational injury. Results suggest that ergonomic interventions that address retooling and workstation and process redesign would be useful in reducing the number of injuries.

  14. Modelling Meat Quality Attributes.

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Terence C.

    2001-01-01

    Recent meat demand models incorporate demand functions for cuts of meat rather than whole carcasses. However, parameters for “meat quality” are seldom included in such models. Modelling difficulty arises as meat cuts are heterogeneous in their quality attributes. Meat quality may be assessed by measurement of attributes including tenderness, juiciness and flavour. Cooking method and cooking time are the two primary factors that affect meat-eating quality. The purpose of this paper is to show ...

  15. Effects of initial fattening age on carcass characteristics and meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of initial fattening age on carcass and meat quality of Simmental bulls imported from Austria to Turkey. These animals were allocated to two initial ages of fattening groups, namely young (n = 74) and old group (n = 61) at 5.5 and 7.5 months old, respectively. After reaching ...

  16. Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples: evaluation of two automated enzyme immunoassays and conventional microbiological techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borck, Birgitte; Stryhn, H.; Ersboll, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the sensitivity and specificity of two automated enzyme immunoassays (EIA), EiaFoss and Minividas, and a conventional microbiological culture technique for detecting thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in turkey samples. Methods and Results: A total of 286 samples (faecal, meat......, neckskin and environmental samples) were collected over a period of 4 months at a turkey slaughterhouse and meat-cutting plant in Denmark. Faecal and environmental samples were tested by the conventional culture method and by the two EIAs, whereas meat and neckskin samples were tested by the two EIAs only...

  17. Tracking of Listeria monocytogenes in meat establishment using Whole Genome Sequencing as a food safety management tool: A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasijevic, Ivan; Milanov, Dubravka; Velebit, Branko; Djordjevic, Vesna; Swift, Craig; Painset, Anais; Lakicevic, Brankica

    2017-09-18

    Repeated Listeria outbreaks particularly associated with Ready-To-Eat (RTE) delicatessen meat products have been reported annually at global level. The most frequent scenario that led to foodborne outbreaks was the post-thermal treatment cross-contamination of deli meat products during slicing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). The precondition for such cross contamination is the previous introduction of Listeria into meat processing facilities and subsequent colonization of the production environment, associated with formation of biofilms resilient to common sanitation procedures regularly applied in meat establishments. The use of Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) can facilitate the understanding of contamination and colonization routes of pathogens within the food production environment and enable efficient pathogen tracking among different departments. This study aimed to: a) provide a proof of concept on practical use of WGS in a meat establishment to define the entry routes and spread pattern of L. monocytogenes, and b) to consider the regular use of WGS in meat processing establishments as a strong support of food safety management system. The results revealed that Listeria spp. was present in slaughter line, chilling chambers, deboning, slicing, MAP, as well as in corridors and dispatch (53 positive samples, out of 240). Eight L. monocytogenes isolates (out of 53) were identified from the slaughterhouse, chilling chambers, deboning, MAP and dispatch. L. monocytogenes isolates were of three different serotypes (1/2a, 1/2c, 4b) and correspondingly of three MLST sequence types. Overall, two pairs of L. monocytogenes isolates were genetically identical, i.e. two serotype 4b isolates (ST1), isolated from water drain at dispatch unit and two isolates obtained from slaughterhouse (floorwall junction at the carcass wash point) and MAP (water drain). These findings indicated that L. monocytogenes isolates identified in meat processing units (MAP, chilling chamber

  18. De-boned beef - an example of a commodity for which specific standards could be developed to ensure an appropriate level of protection for international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, G R; Leyland, T J; Donaldson, A I

    2009-03-01

    De-boned beef from which lymph nodes and risk material associated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy have been removed, is a product which can be produced for safe international trade irrespective of whether the locality of production is recognized as free from so-called transboundary diseases or not. Further processing of such beef provides an additional safety factor. However, this approach requires specific control measures being in place, supported by appropriate auditing and certification procedures. This document presents the arguments supporting this concept and details how safety in respect of both animal diseases and human food safety can be achieved using an integrated hazard analysis and critical control points approach.

  19. The effect of holding temperature on live shrink, processing yield, and breast meat quality of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracci, M; Fletcher, D L; Northcutt, J K

    2001-05-01

    The effects of antemortem holding temperatures on live shrink, processing yields, and breast meat quality of broiler chickens were evaluated. A total of 462 broilers was reared to 45 d of age using conventional husbandry practices, removed from feed and water, and cooped 12 h prior to slaughter. During the 12-h feed withdrawal and holding time, the birds were held at 25, 29.5, or 34 C. Birds were individually weighed at cooping, prior to slaughter, and during processing to determine live shrink and processed carcass yields. The breast meat was removed at 2 or 24 h postmortem and was used to determine hot and cold boned meat pH, R-value, sarcomere length, meat color (lightness, redness, and yellowness), cooked yield, and shear value. The birds held at 34 C showed the significantly greatest live shrink, 5.7%, compared to those held at 29.5 or 25 C with 3.9 and 3.2% shrink, respectively. Birds held at 34 C exhibited significantly lower processed carcass yields based on initial catch weight, but when calculated using postshrink weights, there were no significant differences between treatment groups. For breast meat harvested at 2 h postmortem, the birds held at 25 C had higher R-values, redness, and yellowness values and lower cooked meat yield and shear values. For breast meat harvested at 24 h postmortem, the birds held at 25 C had higher pH, R-values, and redness. These results support earlier reports that holding conditions may dramatically effect live bird shrink and apparent yields (based on calculation denominator) but have relatively little effect on subsequent breast meat quality, regardless of postmortem deboning time.

  20. Comparison of different methods for total lipid quantification in meat and meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, T; Ruiz, J; Martín, D; Muriel, E; Antequera, T

    2008-10-15

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficiency of six extraction methods for the quantification of total lipid content in meat and meat products: standard Soxhlet method (with and without previous acid hydrolysis), continuous Soxhlet method (with and without previous acid hydrolysis), and those methods based in the use of a mixture of chloroform and methanol, and described by Folch, Less, and Sloane (1957) and Bligh and Dyer (1959). Lipid content was determined in nine different meat products with different fat contents and physico-chemical features: cooked turkey breast, fresh pork loin, cooked ham, dry-cured ham, mortadella, beef burger, fresh sausage, dry-cured sausage and salami. The most effective methods for determining fat content in the studied meat products were the method described by Folch et al. (1957) and the Soxhlet with previous acid hydrolysis method. The Soxhlet method without previous acid hydrolysis adequately extracted lipids only in those meat products with very high fat content. The use of the method described by Bligh and Dyer (1959) gave rise to the lowest lipid contents in all the studied meat products. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiocaesium contents of meat in Italy after the Chernobyl accident and their changes during the cooking process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, M.; Notaro, M.; Piermattei, S.; Tommasino, L.; Azimi-Garakani, D.

    1990-01-01

    Levels of radioactive contamination in meat have been studied, along with ways of decreasing them. Specifically, radiocaesium concentrations in a range of samples of different types of meat collected throughout Italy since April 1986 are presented here. The samples are of beef, lamb, pork, chicken, turkey and rabbit. It was found that the radiocesium content of lamb is higher than that in any of the other meat types considered here. Studies of the decrease in the radiocaesium content of meat during cooking showed that, when the meat is cooked in salt water (1%), the activity decreases by as much as 80% relative to uncooked samples. (author)

  2. Effect of deboning time on the growth of Salmonella, E. coli, aerobic, and lactic acid bacteria during beef sausage processing and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Anuraj T; Holtcamp, Alexander J; Englishbey, April K; Campbell, Yan L; Kim, Taejo; Schilling, Mark W; Dinh, Thu T N

    2018-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the effects of deboning time, three steps of sausage processing (grinding, salting, and batter formulation), and storage time (of raw materials and cooked sausage) on the growth (log CFU/g) of aerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and inoculated Salmonella and E. coli. Beef deboning time did not influence bacterial counts (P≥0.138). However, salting of raw ground beef resulted in a 0.4-log reduction in both aerobic plate count (APC) and Salmonella (P≤0.001). Lactic acid bacteria were increased from non-detectable concentration (0.54 log) on d 0 to 3.8 log on d 120 of vacuum storage (P≤0.019). Salmonella counts were increased (P<0.001) over storage time (3.2 to 3.3 log CFU/g from d 0 to 10). Results indicated that salting and batter formulation had a greater impact on bacterial counts than rigor state of raw beef. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter jejuni isolated from raw poultry meat at retail level in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. R.; Saadbye, P.; Shukri, Naseer Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    of resistance among C. jejuni were observed for tetracycline, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, whereas macrolide resistance was rarely detected. C. jejuni originating from other poultry meat (mainly duck and turkey meat) exhibited the highest occurrences of antimicrobial resistance monitored; approximately one...... third of the isolates were tetracycline resistant (N=100). Among chicken meat isolates, the occurrence of tetracycline resistance was significantly higher (P ... for chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin (P resistance in the period 1996-2003 among C jejuni isolates from chicken meat indicate a decrease in the occurrence of resistance towards fluoroquinolones. This may be due to reduced application of fluoroquinolones for food animals...

  4. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, psychrotrophic bacteria and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meat irradiated with Cobalto-60 and electron beam sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Pomarico Neto, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 (Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Ascorbate and Antioxidant 2 (Rosemary Extract and α-Tocopherol. The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (C), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (Co), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). The samples was conditioned in a transparent, low density frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 ± 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy/h) and electron beam (7.86 kGy/s). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 ± 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychrotrophic bacteria count and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the analysis of functional properties were performed after the irradiation process. The use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to significantly decrease TBARS values caused by the irradiation of samples in MDCM cobalt-60 sources and electron beam, and show a synergetic effect to processing with ionizing radiation to reduce of psychrotrophic bacteria count. The use of irradiation processing of MDCM did not negatively affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  5. Antioxidant, Liver Protective and Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Old Laying Hen Hydrolysate in Crab Meat Analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Keun Jin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative activities of Crab meat analogue prepared with protein hydrolysates obtained from mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM from spent laying hens. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH radical-scavenging activity was increased by adding MDCM hydrolysates during storage, and activity correlated with the concentration of DPPH added up to 6 weeks of storage. Hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity was increased in all analogues containing MDCM hydrolysates. At 0 days of storage, angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-inhibitory activity was increased by the addition of MDCM hydrolysates. Activity did not correlate after 6 weeks of storage, in which ACE-inhibitory activity was increased with low concentrations of MDCM hydrolysates, but no ACE-inhibitory activity was observed at higher concentrations. The liver-protecting activity of crab meat analogue was shown to be around 60% of the positive control; however, it was not significantly different among the samples during storage. These results support the use of MDCM as a source of health-promoting constituents in crab meat analogue.

  6. Istanbul, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This June 16, 2000 image of Istanbul, Turkey show a full 60 by 60 km ASTER scene in the visible and infrared channels. Vegetation appears red, and urban areas blue-green. Bustling Istanbul, with its magnificent historical heritage, has spanned the divide between Europe and Asia for more than 2,500 years. Originally called Byzantium, the city was founded in the 7th century BC on the Golden Horn, an arm of the narrow Bosporus (also spelled Bosphorus) Strait, which connects the Sea of Marmara to the south, with the Black Sea to the north. Constantine I made it his capital of the Eastern Roman Empire in AD 330. As Constantinople, the strategically located city arose as the preeminent cultural, religious, and political center of the Western world. It reached the height of its wealth and glory in the early 5th century. After centuries of decline, the city entered another period of tremendous growth and prosperity when, as Istanbul, it became the capital of the Turkish Ottoman Empire in 1457. Although Turkey moved its capital to Ankara in 1923, Istanbul remains the nation's largest city with a population of over 8 million, its commercial center, and a major port. Two bridges spanning the Bosporus, and ships in the busy channel can be seen on the enlargement. On the image, the water areas have been replaced with a thermal image: colder waters are displayed in dark blue, warmer areas in light blue. Note the dark lines showing boat wakes, and the cold water entering the Sea of Marmara from deeper waters of the Bosporus.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team

  7. Methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus from retail meat in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Larsen, Jesper; Kjeldgaard, Jette

    2017-01-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) is increasingly related to human infections. Farmers and veterinarians have the highest risk, but infections have also occurred in individuals without prior contact to livestock. Clonal complex (CC) 398 is the predominant LA......-MRSA lineage causing human infections, and although pigs are the major source of CC398 worldwide, poultry and other animals are also reservoirs. This raises concern for transmission of MRSA via meat. In this study, the occurrence and characteristics of S. aureus isolated from Danish retail meat were examined...... with main focus on chicken meat. A total of 145 meat samples from Danish supermarkets were examined, including chicken (Danish, n = 102), turkey (non-Danish origin; n = 23), and pork (Danish, n = 20). S. aureus was detected in 69% of the meat samples. MRSA was detected in 19 meat samples (13%), resulting...

  8. Technological characteristics of meat - viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    DIBĎÁK, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on the technological characteristics of meat, mainly viscosity of meat. At the beginning I dealt with construction of meat and various types of meat: beef, veal, pork, mutton, rabbit, poultry and venison. Then I described basic chemical composition of meat and it?s characteristic. In detail I dealt with viscosity of meat. Viscosity is the ability of meat to bind water both own and added. I mentioned influences, which effects viscosity and I presented the possib...

  9. Frying--effect of coating on crust microstructure, color, and texture of lean meat portions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, Shai

    2013-02-01

    Skinless, deboned chicken breast fillets were deep fat fried (190 °C) with and without a batter and breading coating system for up to 6 min (internal temp 70°C). Non-coated samples show surface muscle fiber splitting as soon as placed in oil. As time progressed, the depth of damage increased. Shear force and work to shear increased significantly as a dense hard crust layer was forming. By the end, fillets lost about 1/3 of their weight and had a dark, dry, brittle crust. Frying with coating protected the meat inside and no major damages to muscle fibers were observed. Shear force also increased but the values were about half of what was observed in non-coated products, meaning that the meat inside was protected. Coated products became progressively golden brown (increased a* and b*, decreased L*) while the crust adhered well to the product. After frying, the products showed a small gain in weight which was the result of no structural shrinkage and absorption of a small amount of oil. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Meat analogues: Health promising sustainable meat substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pavan; Chatli, M K; Mehta, Nitin; Singh, Parminder; Malav, O P; Verma, Akhilesh K

    2017-03-24

    There is a scarcity of protein of high biological value due to rapid increase in the world population and limited natural resources. Meat is a good source of protein of high biological value but converting the vegetable protein into animal protein is not economical. There is a trend of production of healthy and delicious meat free food for satisfaction of vegetarian and personal well beings. This resulted in increasing use of low cost vegetable protein such as textured soy protein, mushroom, wheat gluten, pulses etc as a substitute for animal-protein. These simulated meat-like products, with similar texture, flavor, color, and nutritive value can be substituted directly for meat to all sections of the society.

  11. Detection and subtyping avian metapneumovirus from turkeys in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayahi, Mansour; Momtaz, Hassan; Jafari, Ramezan Ali; Zamani, Pejman

    2017-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes diseases like rhinotracheitis in turkeys, swollen head syndrome in chickens and avian rhinotracheitis in other birds. Causing respiratory problems, aMPV adversely affects production and inflicts immense economic losses and mortalities, especially in turkey flocks. In recent years, several serological and molecular studies have been conducted on this virus, especially in poultry in Asia and Iran. The purpose of the present study was detecting and subtyping aMPV by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from non-vaccinated, commercial turkey flocks in Iran for the first time. Sixty three meat-type unvaccinated turkey flocks from several provinces of Iran were sampled in major turkey abattoirs. Samples were tested by RT-PCR for detecting and subtyping aMPV. The results showed that 26 samples from three flocks (4.10%) were positive for viral RNA and all of the viruses were found to be subtype B of aMPV. As a result, vaccination especially against subtype B of aMPV should be considered in turkey flocks in Iran to control aMPV infections.

  12. Effect of crude malva nut gum and phosphate on yield, texture, color, and microstructure of emulsified chicken meat batter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, S; Somboonpanyakul, P

    2007-07-01

    The effect of crude malva nut gum (CMG) use (0.0, 0.2, 0.6%) and sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) addition (0.0, 0.5%) on the cook loss, texture, color, and microstructure of mechanically deboned chicken meat batters was studied. Increasing the level of CMG (a gum currently not used by the meat industry) in batters without TPP significantly increased yield. The batters with both CMG and TPP showed lower cook and fat losses compared with batters with CMG alone. Using 0.2 or 0.6% CMG and 0.5% TPP provided higher hardness values compared with using 0.6% CMG alone. The batter with 0.5% TPP and the batters with both CMG and TPP showed higher springiness compared with batters with CMG alone. Increasing the CMG level to 0.6% reduced the lightness and redness of the cooked products. Overall, the study demonstrated the beneficial effect of using CMG and TPP in improving the yield, stability, and texture of emulsified meat batters.

  13. Biogenic amines in meat and meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that biogenic amines occur in a wide range of foods, among them meat and meat products. Meat is an important component of the diet in developed countries. The presence of these amines in food is of interest for two reasons: firstly, for toxicological reasons, in the sense that high levels of dietary biogenic amines can be toxic for certain consumers, and secondly, for their role as possible quality indicators. Based on these two premises, the present article offers a new analysis on aspects of toxicology and on the use of biogenic amines as a quality control method, as well as on their presence in meat and meat products. The article focuses particularly on factors affecting the production of biogenic amines, with reference to various parameters relating to microorganisms, meat raw materials, and processing conditions. A better understanding of the factors determining their formation (i.e., microorganisms, raw materials used, and technological processes applied) and their effects could lead to ways of controlling their production, limiting their presence in the end product, and hence, rendering them less toxic.

  14. Meat Managers' Expectations Regarding Marketing of Irradiated Red Meats

    OpenAIRE

    Gaynor, Joe; Jensen, Kimberly L.; Jaenicke, Edward C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess meat managers' expectations about impact of the recent regulatory approval of irradiated raw meat and meat products on marketing decisions and plans by supermarkets and grocery meat retailers. Forty managers of meat departments were interviewed in person to obtain the information for the study. While many of the meat managers believed that irradiation would help increase shelf life and reduce spoilage, they were less optimistic about consumers being wi...

  15. Update on meat irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at ∼2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry

  16. Small ruminant production in Turkey: highlighting in goat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Sezen; Davran, Müge K; Güney, Okan

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the effects of structural, governmental and socio-economic conditions linked to small ruminant production, especially goat production. The number of small ruminants in Turkey fell from almost 51,530 in 1990, to 31,761 in 2007. In 1990, the number of small ruminants started to decrease due to structural, genetic and economic reasons such as a lack of state support policies, high costs of inputs, poor performance of local breeds, socio-economic conditions, and migration. In Turkey, the socio-economic and geographical structure make small ruminant production an important profession; it is also a significant source of income in rural regions. 35% of red meat and 12% of milk production is obtained from small ruminants. Although, Turkey has the highest goat population among its border and EU countries, ranks low with milk production. Reasons for the present situation are well evaluated; changes and tendencies in sheep and goat production as well as milk and meat production that are examined and associated with the population of Turkey are widely discussed. In addition, in order to improve the present situation, some technical and structural suggestions are mentioned.

  17. Consumers’ Determination of Red Meat and Meat Products Purchase Behaviour – City of Ankara Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Arısoy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, meat consuming level is an indicator of development of countries. The reason for this is the importance of animal proteins such as meat, milk and egg in human nutrition. People in Turkey do not get enough animal protein. Increase of meat and meat related product prices is effective on this. The purpose of this study is to bring up the purchase and consume behavior of consumers. Surveys completed in urban areas around city of Ankara are used primarily. Using Main Mass Ratio Based Simple Occurrence Probability Sampling method 338 families were interviewed. Completed surveys were separated into 3 groups; high, middle, low. As a result of the research, expense for food in total income is around %34. This ratio for families with low income is %53, for families with middle income is %35 and for families with high income is %33. It is found that as income levels of consumers raised, food expenses raise as well. But it shows that as income level increases, expense ratio for food decreases. Food reliability is the most effective factor on consumers’ decision of purchase. Studies show doubts of consumers about food reliability. It is understood that legal adjustments are not applied enough. Especially tight food inspections would be positive on consumer behavior.

  18. New Discussion Subject of Meat Industry: “Pink Slime”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Okan Özer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pink slime is a meat source which is obtained by the separation of meat particles on trimmed fats the use of separation techniques. Pink slime is an important source for meat industry to meet the consumer demands about consumption of low-fat and low-cost meat products. Furthermore, processing of low-value trimming products to high-value products provide a tangible advantage for meat industry. The use of ammonia hydroxide in the process of pink slime caused a concern about consumer health. Since meatball and wieners with high level of pink slime are in school daily diet program, this meat source became important debate issue. In USA, use of pink slime up to 15% in ground beef based products is permitted without specify on the label, but is not sold for direct consumption. Production and consumption of pink slime is strictly prohibited in the European Union. There is no legal regulation on this issue in Turkey. In this review, the manufacturing method and historical development, advantages, disadvantages, applications and result of scientific studies about pink slime are presented.

  19. Educational Reform in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    As a country seeking admission to the European Union, this paper explores educational reforms in Turkey that enhance its possible entry into the European Union and changes still needed for it to be an equal partner. An overview of the school system in Turkey is provided including information on teacher training and preparation, special education…

  20. Impact of further processing on dielectric properties of broiler poultry meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently in the U.S. more than 90% of the turkeys and more than 70% of the broilers are processed beyond the normal ready-to-cook stage. Up to 50% of raw poultry meat is marinated with mixtures of water, salts, and phosphates. Physical properties of foods provide essential data to the food industr...

  1. Volatile compounds in meat and meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika KOSOWSKA

    Full Text Available Abstract Meaty flavor is composed of a few hundreds of volatile compounds, only minor part of which are responsible for the characteristic odor. It is developed as a result of multi-directional reactions proceeding between non-volatile precursors contained in raw meat under the influence of temperature. The volatile compounds are generated upon: Maillard reactions, lipid oxidation, interactions between Maillard reaction products and lipid oxidation products as well as upon thiamine degradation. The developed flavor is determined by many factors associated with: raw material (breed, sex, diet and age of animal, conditions and process of slaughter, duration and conditions of meat storage, type of muscle, additives applied and the course of the technological process. The objective of this review article is to draw attention to the issue of volatile compounds characteristic for meat products and factors that affect their synthesis.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter jejuni isolated from raw poultry meat at retail level in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. R.; Saadbye, P.; Shukri, Naseer Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    of resistance among C. jejuni were observed for tetracycline, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, whereas macrolide resistance was rarely detected. C. jejuni originating from other poultry meat (mainly duck and turkey meat) exhibited the highest occurrences of antimicrobial resistance monitored; approximately one....... Monitoring of the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in C. jejuni isolated from raw uncooked poultry has been performed on a yearly basis since 1996, thus providing useful insight into consumer exposure to antimicrobial-resistant C. jejuni.......Campylobacter jejuni isolated from raw poultry meat collected at retail shops in Denmark in the period 1996-2003 were tested for susceptibility to seven antimicrobial agents. The food samples consisted of raw chicken meat and other raw poultry meat of domestic or imported origin. The highest levels...

  3. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bunmi

    Matured leaves of Ocimum gratissimum were harvested and the extracts used to cure. Suya (an intermediate moisture meat). O. gratissimum leaves were collected from. Oyo state south west region of Nigeria, rinsed in distilled water and squeezed to extract the fluid. The meat used was Semi membranosus muscle from beef ...

  4. Whole genome SNP discovery and analysis of genetic diversity in Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.L.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Elferink, M.G.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Blomberg, L.; Fleischer, G.; Groenen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is an important agricultural species and the second largest contributor to the world’s poultry meat production. Genetic improvement is attributed largely to selective breeding programs that rely on highly heritable phenotypic traits, such as body size and

  5. National Meat Case Study 2004: Fresh product types and allocation of retail space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicks, A L; Brooks, J C; Kelly, J M; Kuecker, W G; Boillot, K; Irion, R; Miller, M F

    2008-12-01

    Fresh meat retail cases in 104 supermarkets across 5 regions of the United States were audited for product space allocation, percentage of space allocated to each fresh meat category and frequency of species among all stock keeping units (n = 14,863). The United States was divided into Mountain/Southwest, Midwest, Northeast, Southeast, and West Coast regions. Fresh meat categories for self-service cases included beef muscle cuts, ground beef, pork, veal, lamb, chicken, turkey, fresh sausage, value-added, heat and serve, ham-bone-in, ham-boneless, ham steak, other processed meats, seafood, and nonmeat items. Fresh meat categories for the full-service case included seafood, beef, pork, chicken, and other. Whole muscle beef, pork, and chicken products were available in all stores. Ground beef products and turkey were reported in almost all stores, 94.5 to 100%, respectively. The majority of the self-service meat case was dedicated to beef in all regions except for the Northeast, where chicken occupied the majority of the self-service case. Linear meters of self-service fresh meat case were greatest in the Northeast region, which was similar to Mountain and Midwest regions, but different (P = 0.003) than the Southeast and West Coast regions. However, the West Coast region best utilized the retail meat case by providing consumers with the greatest number of offerings per linear meter. The percentage of stores audited with a full-service meat case was 37.5%, and the percentage with a full-service seafood case was 60.6%. The full-service meat case was the smallest (number of linear meters, P = 0.039) in the Southeast and largest (number of linear meters, P = 0.039) in the Midwest.

  6. Qualitative analysis of meat and meat products by multiplex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... fish, pork and ruminant, respectively. The optimized M-PCR assay was applied to 93 commercial meat products and it showed the presence of poultry meat in red meat analyzed, although, it was not indicated on the label. Key words: Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR), meat products, food, salami, sausage.

  7. Determination of carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine, pentosidine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents in meat from different animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Medana, Claudio; Visentin, Sonja; Giancotti, Valeria; Zunino, Valentina; Meineri, Giorgia

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this research was to determine the content of the histidinic antioxidants, advanced glycation end products (pentosidine) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in the meat from different animal species. Carnosine, anserine, homocarnosine and pentosidine were quantified by HPLC/MS, while TBARS was determined by photometric measurements. The total CRCs (carnosine+anserine+homocarnosine) content was in the increasing order: beefturkey. The analysis showed traces of pentosidine above the instrumental determination limits in all the meat samples, while the susceptibility of these meat to lipid oxidation decreased from beef to chicken, with the exception of turkey meat, which presented a high TBARS content towards even though its total CRCs was the highest. The structure of homocarnosine was elucidated by high resolving power multistage mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Standard Guide for Irradiation of Pre-packaged Processed Meat and Poultry Products to Control Pathogens and Other Microorganisms

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This guide outlines procedures for the irradiation of pre-packaged refrigerated and frozen processed meat and poultry products. Note 1—The Codex Alimentarius Commission defines "meat" (including poultry and game) as "the edible part of any mammal slaughtered in an abattoir," and "poultry meat" as "the edible part of slaughtered domesticated birds, including chicken, turkeys, ducks, geese, guinea-fowls, or pigeons." (CAC/RCP 13-1976) Note 2—Current U.S. regulations limit the definition of livestock species to cattle, sheep, swine, goat, horse, mule, or other equine and poultry species to chicken, turkey, duck, goose, and guinea (2, 3). 1.2 This guide addresses all refrigerated and frozen meat and poultry products NOT covered by Guide F 1356. 1.3 This guide provides information regarding absorbed doses used for inactivation of parasites and reduction of bacterial load. Such doses are typically less than 10 kilogray (kGy).

  9. Nutritional and social aspects of consumption of ostrich meat: the case of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Aguilar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of ostrich meat was introduced into Europe in a relatively short time. Considered even today as an exotic meat, its inclusion in the usual sources of animal protein in our context has been repeatedly assessed, because it converge some of the most interesting nutritional characteristics of poultry and red meat. Over ten years later, the consumption of ostrich meat continues crossing a road that lies increasingly away from the exotic to become very slow, in usual. Although information on their nutritional value is still limited, we have more data showing protein values quite similar to other meats but with a smaller proportion of histidine and serine; fat values close to poultry meat low in fat; cholesterol values, vary according to the court, but similar to beef or chicken, and an improved lipid profile compared to the meat of turkey meat, lamb or beef. The information on its vitamins and minerals throws elevated iron and vitamin B12, higher amounts of vitamin E and Zn than other types of meat and a low concentration of sodium.

  10. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella spp. in meat products, meat preparations and minced meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašeta, M.; Mrdović, B.; Janković, V.; Bečkei, Z.; Lakićević, B.; Vidanović, D.; Polaček, V.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine Salmonella spp. prevalence in meat products, meat preparations and minced meat. Over a period of three years, a total of 300 samples were taken (100 RTE meat products, 100 meat preparations and 100 minced meat) and examined for the presence of Salmonella spp. Sampling was carried out at the warehouses of the food manufacturers. Salmonella spp. were not detected in RTE meat products, while 7% of semi-finished meat products (fresh sausages, grill meat formed and unformed) contained Salmonella, as did 18% of minced meats (minced pork II category, minced beef II category, mixed minced meat). The 25 Salmonella isolates obtained were examined for antibiotic resistance by the disk diffusion test, according to the NCCLS and CLSI guidelines. Isolates showed resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid (80%), tetracycline (72%), cefotaxime/clavulanic acid (48%), but not to gentamicin (8%) or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (0%).

  11. Informatics in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Serhat

    1994-01-01

    In the last twenty years the rapid change in the informatics sector has had economic and social impact on private and government activities. The Supreme Council for Science and Technology of Turkey assigned highest priority to the informatics in its meeting in February 1993. With this advice TUBITAK (The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey) intends to give a strong impulse to development of a research policy in this field.

  12. Energy Diplomacy of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Ozdemir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with current issues of energy diplomacy of Turkey. The authors describe the main positive and negative results of Turkey's foreign energy policy in terms of the implementation of major energy projects. Geopolitical processes in the world, the conflict of interests of various countries in the political arena are important factors that affect the crude oil and natural gas pipeline projects. Particular attention is paid to the problems and prospects of cooperation between the Turkish Republic and the Russian Federation in the fuel and energy complex. The authors describe the interaction betweeen Russia and Turkey in the energy sector, including geo-economic interests of the countries in the Russian-Turkish gas dialogue. Turkey made efforts to position as an alternative gas supply route, taking advantage of concern about increasing Europe's dependence on Russian exports. Last years Turkey has set itself the important task - to turn from transit country into a regional gas hub. Ukrainian crisis increased the geostrategic importance of the Black Sea region to Russia, as well as strengthened the ambition of the Turkish side. The authors also highlight the prospects of the natural gas pipeline project from Russia via the Black Sea to Turkey and to the Turkish-Greek border, which named "Turkish stream". This project was frozen in terms of military and political processes at the end of 2015 in Syria.

  13. The Meat City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelle, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the emergence of the Copenhagen slaughterhouse, called the Meat City, during the late nineteenth century. This slaughterhouse was a product of a number of heterogeneous components: industrialization and new infrastructures were important, but hygiene and the significance...... of Danish bacon exports also played a key role. In the Meat City, this created a distinction between rising production and consumption on the one hand, and the isolation and closure of the slaughtering facility on the other. This friction mirrored an ambivalent attitude towards meat in the urban space: one...... where consumers demanded more meat than ever before, while animals were being removed from the public eye. These contradictions, it is argued, illustrate and underline the change of the city towards a ‘post-domestic’ culture. The article employs a variety of sources, but primarily the Copenhagen...

  14. Meat and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Ursula Nana

    D thesis was to investigate the effects of fiber addition to meatballs and the effects of cooking methods of pork on appetite regulation. The PhD thesis is based on three human meal test studies and one analytical study related to the characteristics of fiber meat products. In paper I, the objective...... pork products are also characterized as high fat products containing more than 10 g fat per 100 g. In this context, the Danish meat industry puts a lot of effort into developing meat products with a healthier nutritional profile. Thus, it is relevant to provide scientific evidence of the satiating...... effects of new formulations of pork products. Different strategies can be applied to potentially enhance the satiating properties of pork. Processed meat products such as meatballs can serve as a matrix for the addition of fiber ingredients. Based on their high protein and fiber contents, high...

  15. The Meat City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelle, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    where consumers demanded more meat than ever before, while animals were being removed from the public eye. These contradictions, it is argued, illustrate and underline the change of the city towards a ‘post-domestic’ culture. The article employs a variety of sources, but primarily the Copenhagen......This article investigates the emergence of the Copenhagen slaughterhouse, called the Meat City, during the late nineteenth century. This slaughterhouse was a product of a number of heterogeneous components: industrialization and new infrastructures were important, but hygiene and the significance...... of Danish bacon exports also played a key role. In the Meat City, this created a distinction between rising production and consumption on the one hand, and the isolation and closure of the slaughtering facility on the other. This friction mirrored an ambivalent attitude towards meat in the urban space: one...

  16. Incidence of broiler breast myopathies at 2 different ages and its impact on selected raw meat quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttappan, V A; Owens, C M; Coon, C; Hargis, B M; Vazquez-Añon, M

    2017-08-01

    White striping (WS) and woody breast (WB) are 2 poultry meat quality defects that affect the acceptance of raw breast fillets as well as properties of cooked and further processed products. The present study was intended to evaluate the incidence of these conditions in broilers at different ages and to compare the properties of fillets with different degrees of WS and WB. For this study, 1,920 birds were processed, at 6 and 9 wk of age, in a standard commercial inline processing system. After chilling, carcasses were deboned and butterfly fillets were collected and weighed. Individual fillets were scored for normal, moderate, severe, and very severe degrees of WS and WB, and for petechial hemorrhagic lesions (PHEM, 0 - no lesion to 2 - severe lesion). Representative fillets with NORM-WS/WB, SEV-WS, SEV-WB, and SEV-WS/WB were selected and stored at 4°C. After 24 h, fillet length, width, cranial height, and caudal height, as well as pH, color, and drip loss were recorded. There was an increase in incidence of severe and very severe WS and WB conditions at 9 wk compared to 6 wk of age. The relationship between fillet weight and the myopathies plateaued at 9 wk of age with more fillets showing a higher score. Mean PHEM scores were higher (P raw meat quality factors, mainly color and water holding capacity. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter species isolated from poultry meat in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter spp. isolated from different species of retail poultry meat in Iran. 2. From August 2012 to April 2013, a total of 540 raw poultry meat samples from chicken (n = 100), turkey (n = 100), quail (n = 100), partridge (n = 80), duck (n = 50), ostrich (n = 60) and geese (n = 50) were purchased from randomly selected retail outlets in Shahrekord, Isfahan, Sari and Rasht, Iran. 3. Using culture techniques, 71 of 540 poultry meat samples (13.1%) were positive for Arcobacter spp. The highest prevalence of Arcobacter spp. was found in chicken meat (28.0%), followed by quail (12.0%), duck (11.4%), turkey (11.0%), geese (8.0%), partridge (7.5%) and ostrich (3.3%) meat. The number of A. butzleri isolated from poultry meat samples (90.1%) was significantly higher than A. cryaerophilus (7.1%) and A. skirrowii (2.8%). Significantly more poultry meat samples were found to contain Arcobacter spp. by the PCR assay than by the culture method. 4. Susceptibilities of Arcobacter isolates were determined for 14 antimicrobial drugs using the disk diffusion method. All of the 71 Arcobacter isolates tested were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to cephalothin and vancomycin (95.8%) was the most common finding, followed by resistance to methicillin, azithromycin and ampicillin. All Arcobacter isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracyclin and kanamycin. 5. The results of this study indicated the importance of poultry meat, especially chicken meat, as potential sources of Arcobacter spp. infection in people. Furthermore, the strains indicated resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics.

  18. Advancements in meat packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Kenneth W

    2017-10-01

    Packaging of meat provides the same or similar benefits for raw chilled and processed meats as other types of food packaging. Although air-permeable packaging is most prevalent for raw chilled red meat, vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging offer longer shelf life. The major advancements in meat packaging have been in the widely used plastic polymers while biobased materials and their integration into composite packaging are receiving much attention for functionality and sustainability. At this time, active and intelligent packaging are not widely used for antioxidant, antimicrobial, and other functions to stabilize and enhance meat properties although many options are being developed and investigated. The advances being made in nanotechnology will be incorporated into food packaging and presumably into meat packaging when appropriate and useful. Intelligent packaging using sensors for transmission of desired information and prompting of subsequent changes in packaging materials, environments or the products to maintain safety and quality are still in developmental stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Energy in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumin, S.

    2005-01-01

    Because of its limited energy resources, Turkey is heavily dependent on imported oil and gas. 73 percent of the world's proven oil reserves and 72 percent of the world's proven gas reserves are located in the surrounding regions of Turkey: Middle East, Caspian Region and Russia. This makes Turkey a crucial bridge between energy rich regions and Europe. There are major oil and gas pipelines going through Turkey and additional pipelines are being constructed or are being planned. There is some production of lignite which is used in power plants and industry. Turkey's natural energy resources are quite diversified; with quite abundant coal reserves. Energy forecasts show that primary energy demand would be 117 million TOE in 2005 and 156 million TOE in 2010. Oil has the biggest share (39 percent) in total primary energy consumption, while natural gas has a share of 21 percent and increasing due to the recent diversification efforts of energy resources. Turkey has about 1percent of the total world hydroelectric potential and a considerable potential for electricity generation from wind. As of early 2004, Turkey had electric power generating capacity of around 32,000 megawatts (MW), and was building 13,000 MW more. Since adoption of Electricity Market Law in February 2001, there were significant changes towards liberalisation of power generation market and distribution in the country. Privatization of generation assets is envisaged to start in 2006. The Electricity Market Law set the stage for new supporting laws and regulations as well as new organization of the market: the Energy Market Regulation Agency (EMRA), that oversees the power, natural gas markets, oil markets and liquefied petroleum gases market, including setting tariffs, issuing licenses, and assuring competition; the Energy Market Regulatory Board, which runs the EMRA; the Energy Market Licensing Regulation and the Electricity Market Tariffs Regulation; 4-phase approach towards electric energy market

  20. Research into poultry meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grashorn, M A

    2010-08-01

    1. Research in the field of poultry meat quality has become more varied during the last 50 years. Besides meat content and microbial condition, animal welfare issues during the slaughter process, muscle morphology, physiology of meat ripening, impact of slaughter process on meat quality, sensory attributes of meat and meat processing have come into focus. 2. The present review summarizes findings and developments in the fields of muscle physiology, meat ripening and meat quality aberrations (like PSE), nutrient composition and sensory qualities, effect of the slaughter process on carcass and meat quality, hygienic conditions and product safety during slaughtering, all based on selected papers published in British Poultry Science during the last 50 years. 3. Some special findings and conclusions are lifted out of the whole results presented in the papers to indicate their importance and to show their contribution to the development of knowledge in the respective field.

  1. A novel laser air puff and shape profile method for predicting tenderness of broiler breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y S; Owens, C M; Meullenet, J F

    2008-07-01

    The potential application of a new laser air puff system to assess poultry meat tenderness was investigated. Ninety broilers were deboned at either 1.25, 4, or 24 h postmortem. The raw breast fillets were scanned on a conveyor belt longitudinally by a laser distance sensor to obtain overall shape profiles and scanned again with a pressurized source of air (206.8 kPa). The 2 resulting profiles were superimposed to quantify the amount of deformation caused by the application of pressurized air. Five parameters including a height and length of each fillet were calculated and used to establish a model to predict tenderness. Tenderness of cooked fillets was determined instrumentally with the Meullenet-Owens razor shear, Blunt-Meullenet-Owens razor shear, and with sensory analysis. Hardness, Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy, and Blunt-Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy were modeled with the parameters extracted from the air puff system. Predicted values obtained from the models and observed values of individual fillets were subjected to logistic regression to classify fillets into tenderness levels. Tender fillets in the air puff predicted tender group represented 82, 81, and 88% based on hardness, Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy, and Blunt-Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy, respectively. The use of this tool resulted in more than a 20% improvement in the number of tender fillets after classification. The results suggested that this new system could potentially be implemented as an online tool for sorting poultry breast fillets by tenderness levels.

  2. Effects of fillet weight on sensory descriptive flavor and texture profiles of broiler breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, H; Savage, E M

    2012-07-01

    Four replications were conducted to compare sensory descriptive profiles of cooked boneless skinless chicken breast categorized by fillet (pectoralis major) weight or size. In each replication, 20 heavy fillets, 20 medium fillets, and 20 light fillets (deboned at 6-8 h postmortem) were obtained from a commercial processing plant. Fillets were trimmed and weighed before chosen for each of 3 size categories based on their weight as follows: light, average weight 112 g; medium, average weight 153 g; and heavy, average weight 204 g. Descriptive sensory texture and flavor attributes were measured after the frozen samples were thawed for 24 h at a refrigerated temperature (2°C) and cooked to an endpoint temperature of 78°C. Sensory evaluations were performed by trained descriptive panelists using 0 to 15 universal intensity scales for 8 texture and 10 flavor attributes. Our results show that there were differences (P sacrifice breast meat quality. However, it remains to be determined if the differences in the sensory descriptive evaluation can be perceived by consumers.

  3. Evaluation of Antifungal Effect of Gaseous Ozone in a Meat Processing Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Lisa; Stella, Simone

    2014-04-17

    Ozone is already known as effective food/environmental disinfection agent, thanks to its oxidative action towards microbial cell components. Bactericidal effect of ozone is well documented, while data concerning its inhibitory activity towards fungi are still ambiguous. Our study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of gaseous ozone towards potentially contaminant fungi in a meat production plant in real working conditions. M 2 and M 5 S 5 plates were inoculated with Aspergillus niger , Penicillium roqueforti , Mucor racemosus , Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and positioned in a deboning room, where gaseous ozone was dispensed throughout the night (until a maximum concentration of 20 ppm). Nine different points were chosen, based on height and distance from the ozone dispenser. After the treatment, the presence of strains growth was evaluated. Gaseous ozone did not show any inhibitory activity against mould strains, as optimum growth during all the trials was observed. An appreciable and constant microbicidal effect against S. cerevisiae was evidenced, with a mean value of 2.8 Log reduction. Our results suggest the importance of the definition of environmental and technical use conditions in order to optimise the antimicrobial efficacy of ozone in real working situations in food industries.

  4. Evaluation of antifungal effect of gaseous ozone in a meat processing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Vallone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is already known as effective food/environmental disinfection agent, thanks to its oxidative action towards microbial cell components. Bactericidal effect of ozone is well documented, while data concerning its inhibitory activity towards fungi are still ambiguous. Our study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of gaseous ozone towards potentially contaminant fungi in a meat production plant in real working conditions. M2 and M5S5 plates were inoculated with Aspergillus niger, Penicillium roqueforti, Mucor racemosus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and positioned in a deboning room, where gaseous ozone was dispensed throughout the night (until a maximum concentration of 20 ppm. Nine different points were chosen, based on height and distance from the ozone dispenser. After the treatment, the presence of strains growth was evaluated. Gaseous ozone did not show any inhibitory activity against mould strains, as optimum growth during all the trials was observed. An appreciable and constant microbicidal effect against S. cerevisiae was evidenced, with a mean value of 2.8 Log reduction. Our results suggest the importance of the definition of environmental and technical use conditions in order to optimise the antimicrobial efficacy of ozone in real working situations in food industries.

  5. Update on the bird-egg syndrome and genuine poultry meat allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Wolfgang; Klug, Christoph; Swoboda, Ines

    Allergy to poultry meat is rare and affects both children and adults. The prevalence of poultry meat allergy is unknown, but presumably is similar to that of red meat allergy. There is no close relationship between allergy to poultry meat and allergy to red meat. Poultry meat allergy may present as primary (genuine) food allergy or as secondary food allergy resulting from cross-reactivity. Secondary poultry meat allergy may arise in the context of bird-egg-syndrome, which is due to sensitization to serum albumins present in many tissues including muscle tissue and egg yolk (Gal d 5). Primary sensitization to serum albumin may happen via the respiratory tract through exposure to pet birds (mainly in adults) or within the context of egg allergy in early childhood. Due to the heat lability of serum albumins, reactions are often limited to the skin upon contact with raw meat. Symptoms from meat ingestion are rare and mostly mild, whereas systemic reactions are common after ingestion of raw or soft-boiled egg yolk. Primary poultry meat allergy is mainly seen in adolescents and young adults, though hypersensitivity may have started already at (pre)school age. Egg allergy is usually absent. Typical symptoms of primary poultry meat allergy include OAS (±dyspnea), gastrointestinal complaints, urticaria and angioedema. Severe anaphylaxis with cardiovascular symptoms is rare. Chicken and turkey meat are highly cross-reactive and responsible for most reactions, while duck and goose meat causes milder or no symptoms. Soups, sausages, and ham represent relevant allergen sources, too. Patients with poultry meat allergy unexpectedly often suffer from concomitant allergy to fish and possibly shrimp. Serum specific IgE against fish and shrimp is found in respectively 60 and 40 % of sera, suggestive of cross-reactive allergens in these foods. The allergens thus far recognized in genuine poultry meat are LMW proteins of 5-25 kDa. One of them has been identified as

  6. Replacement of Pork Meat with Pork Head Meat for Frankfurters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Park, Jong-Dae; Sung, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of reducing pork meat concentrations from 50% to 30% and replacing it with up to 20% pork head meat on chemical composition, cooking characteristics, physicochemical and textural properties, apparent viscosity, and sensory characteristics of frankfurters was determined. The highest moisture content in frankfurters was found in the control and T1 (frankfurter with 45% pork meat + 5% pork head). Protein and fat contents in frankfurters with pork head meat added were significantly (ppork head meat was increased from 0% to 20%, cooking loss, total expressible fluid separation, fat separation, and pH of frankfurters were increased, while the lightness, redness, yellowness, and apparent viscosity of frankfurters were decreased. Ash contents, cohesiveness, color, and tenderness of sensory characteristics of frankfurters added with different amounts of pork meat or pork head meat were not significantly (p>0.05) different from those of the control or there treatments. Frankfurters in T4 (frankfurter with 30% pork meat + 20% pork head) had the lowest (p0.05) from that in the control. Frankfurters with higher pork head meat concentrations had lower flavor, juiciness, and overall acceptability scores. Therefore, replacing pork meat with pork head meat in the formulation could successfully produce results similar to those of control frankfurters. The best results were obtained when 10% pork head meat was used to replace pork meat. PMID:27621683

  7. Cutting and Preserving Whole Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Brennand, Charlotte P.

    1995-01-01

    There are more uses for a turkey than roasting it whole for holiday occasions. The least expensive way to have turkey pieces, especially if the turkey is purchased on sale, is to cut it up yourself. The following is to serve as a butchering and processing guide.

  8. NEW MEAT PRODUCTS WITH IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECT CREATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kaltovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New meat products with immunomodulatory effect creation method reflecting differential characteristics of technological stages of manufacture of those types of meat products, including issues on the selection of primary and secondary raw materials, guidelines for development of formulations and production technologies, legislative requirements towards its labeling, etc, has been developed for the first time. A list of prospective meat raw materials for the manufacture of products with immunomodulatory effect was established: beef, pork, rabbit meat, broiler chicken meat, turkey, veal, ostrich meat, which have high content of protein (14,3– 21,7%, low content of fat (1,2–16,1%, excluding pork (33,3%, high levels of minimum amino-acid score (90,0–104,0%, protein quality indicator(0,91–1,64, essential amino acid index (1,16-1,25, coefficient of utility of amino acid content (0,72–0,86 and close to optimum fatty acid content, and also contain a great number of vitamins and minerals which play a significant role for immunity improvement. It was determined that the following functional ingredients are recommended to use: amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, threonine, arginine, tryptophan, lysine, histidin, phenylalanyl, vitamins and provitamins (C,E, beta-carotene, B vitamins(Bc, B12, PP, etc., P(bioflavonoid complex, H, K, minerals (calcium, magnesium, iron, cuprum, zinc, manganese, selenium, polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6, pseudo-vitamins (L-carnitin, coenzyme Q10, polysaccharides and peptides naturally occurring(squalen, B-Carotene, ginger, shiitake mushrooms, probiotics and prebiotics, glutathione, indole and lycopienes, bioflavonoids, L-arginine, N-acetylcysteine, gel from seaweed «Lamifaren». The use of the developed meat products with immunomodulatory effect creation method by process engineers of meat processing factories will allow them to form a single scientifically grounded approach during the

  9. Meat and meat products as a source of bioactive peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Totosaus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Meat is a high protein content food, with great nutritional and biological value. Meat protein hydrolysis begins with the muscle to meat conversion, during meat ageing. After slaughter, endogen enzymes are responsible of meat softening since myofibrillar anchorage proteins are degraded. Protein hydrolysis continues during food preparation. When meat reaches the stomach, pepsin is the first enzyme to interact. As the food travel trough out gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic enzymes degraded the remained protein and the peptidases made the final proteolysis process. The small proteins or peptides are the absorbed to the circulatory system and distributed to the rest of the body. Bioactive peptides activity of meat and meat products is anti-hypertensive mainly, where histidine, carnosine and anserine are the main peptides identified. Another peptide with anti-oxidant activity is glutathione. The content depends on animal species.

  10. Impact of white striping on functionality attributes of broiler breast meat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, B; Zhuang, H

    2016-08-01

    The influence of white striping (WS) on the water-holding capacity (WHC) and protein functionality attributes of broiler breast meat was investigated. Boneless breast fillets (Pectoralis major) were collected from the deboning line of a commercial processing plant and categorized by WS score (normal, moderate, severe). The physical (weight, pH, CIE-color values), water-holding capacity (salt-induced water uptake, cook loss, final yield), protein functionality (solubility, emulsifying activity), and protein composition (SDS-PAGE) characteristics of the fillets were measured in three experiments. Breast meat with WS exhibited greater fillet weights, higher pH, and similar color values (L*a*b*) to normal fillets. In experiment 1, fillets were frozen-thawed prior to analysis. The WS condition reduced thaw loss, sarcoplasmic protein solubility, and the emulsifying activity of the myofibrillar proteins, but did not significantly affect salt-induced water uptake, cook loss, final yield, or myofibrillar protein solubility. In experiment 2, breast meat was analyzed fresh and after a freeze-thaw cycle. Freezing samples prior to analysis negatively influenced WHC and reduced sarcoplasmic protein solubility in both WS and normal fillets. In fresh and frozen-thawed meat, the WS condition decreased sarcoplasmic protein solubility but did not significantly alter WHC or myofibrillar protein solubility. For experiment 3, fillets were portioned into 3 sections (Location A, cranial end-ventral surface; Location B, cranial end-dorsal surface; Location C, caudal end). The effects of WS on WHC and protein solubility were dependent upon breast fillet sampling location. Fillets with WS exhibited lower salt-induced water uptake, greater cook loss, and lower sarcoplasmic protein solubility than normal fillets when sampled from location A. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that differences in the composition of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein fractions between WS and normal fillets were

  11. Replacement of Pork Meat with Pork Head Meat for Frankfurters

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Park, Jong-Dae; Sung, Jung-Min; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of reducing pork meat concentrations from 50% to 30% and replacing it with up to 20% pork head meat on chemical composition, cooking characteristics, physicochemical and textural properties, apparent viscosity, and sensory characteristics of frankfurters was determined. The highest moisture content in frankfurters was found in the control and T1 (frankfurter with 45% pork meat + 5% pork head). Protein and fat contents in frankfurters with pork head meat added were significantly (p0...

  12. Turkey`s Harmless Tango Between East and West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Mujanovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Turkey got actively involved in world politics and international relations after AKP came to power in early 2000s. Turkey`s foreign policy since AKP came to power, has the theoretical basis in Davutoglu`s Strategic Depth. New doctrines rely on historical right inherited from the Ottoman Empire, which contributed towards Turkish pro-active and multi-dimensional foreign policy. Without forgetting traditional Western allies, Turkey has established itself as a regional power in the Balkans, Middle East and Central Asia with significant success. This paper attempts to analyze how Turkey has been playing a harmless tango between its traditional allies in the West and regions in the near abroad which had made Turkey a global player in the international relations. Then, it is important to analyze Turkey's transformation and its approved role by the Western powers as a strong Islamic country with secular governance in the Middle East and Central Asia.

  13. Qualitative assessment of the commodity risk for spread of foot-and-mouth disease associated with international trade in deboned beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, D J; Sinclair, M; Rodríguez, R

    2010-06-01

    The risk of importing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) restricts trade in livestock and their products from parts of the world where the virus is present. This reduces trade opportunities and investment in the livestock sector of many developing countries and constrains global food supply. This review focuses on the risks associated with trade in deboned beef (DB) from foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)-infected cattle, countries or zones. A definition of DB is provided along with a description of the procedures for its preparation within beef slaughtering operations. Evidence is reviewed for circumstances under which DB can be contaminated with FMDV, and a commodity risk factor approach is used to consider the mitigating efficacy of slaughterhouse procedures. A combination of pre-slaughter and slaughterhouse measures has enabled DB to be safely imported into FMD-free countries from countries that were not nationally or zonally FMD-free. Nevertheless, current evidence does not provide absolute assurance that abattoir procedures for producing DB can result, by themselves, in a commodity with a negligible risk of transmitting FMDV without complementary measures to reduce the likelihood of slaughtering infected cattle. The main areas of uncertainty are the amounts of residual FMDV-harbouring tissues within DB, and our understanding of what constitutes a safe level of contamination. More detailed guidance should be developed to specify the mitigating measures needed in support of the export of DB from regions that are not officially FMD-free. This will help to avoid differences in interpretation of what is needed that give rise to obstacles to trade.

  14. Decarbonising meat : Exploring greenhouse gas emissions in the meat sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aan Den Toorn, S. I.; Van Den Broek, M. A.; Worrell, E.

    Consumption of meat is an important source of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and deep decarbonisation of the whole meat production chain is required to be able to meet global climate change (CC) mitigation goals. Emissions happen in different stages of meat production ranging from agricultural

  15. Rational use of by-products in the processing of turkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Antipova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A man's life, his health and work is impossible without full of food. According to the theory of balanced nutrition in the human diet should contain not only proteins, fats and carbohydrates in the required quantity, but also substances such as essential amino acids, vitamins, minerals in certain, beneficial to human proportions. In the organization of proper nutrition the primary role of the meat products. Turkey is the largest after the ostrich poultry are grown in Russia on an industrial scale. Undoubtedly, the leading positions on the market of poultry meat is chicken products, but in recent years Turkey meat is becoming increasingly popular. The processed by-products include liver, heart, gizzard, neck, feet, head, and corals. The highest mass fraction of Turkey offal is the liver, heart, gizzard. It was established experimentally that the output of the liver is of 1.23%, the output of the heart 0,45%, muscular stomach of 1.87%. The article presents data on the study of the chemical composition of the offal of turkeys, fractional composition of proteins, the assessment of the nutritional and biological value of byproducts. The objects of study are: offal (liver, heart, gizzard broiler turkeys received at home as a result of slaughter and primary processing. Despite the fact that Turkey sufficiently studied in terms of nutritional and biological value, however, information information on evaluation of properties of by-products is not enough. However, according to our estimates, they have considerable potential in the development of innovative products for food, feed and medical purposes on the basis of deep processing of all resources.

  16. Food safety challenges associated with traditional foods of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu CAGRI-MEHMETOGLU

    Full Text Available Abstract Consumer food safety concerns are continually increasing in Turkey, with consumer demand for safer foods becoming an important challenge for the industry. Most traditional foods in Turkey are produced under different requirements, and food safety risk management and risk assessment are conducted primarily by the government. Based on risk assessment, safety regulations and standards for traditional foods (e.g. Turkish white cheese, doner, helva have been established. In this paper, safety concerns surrounding the commercialization of traditional Turkish foods and related studies to identify and minimize potential hazards are discussed along with pathogen contamination in raw meat balls and aflatoxin in helva and white cheese. Based on this review, additional national risk analysis experts and related databases are urgently needed. In addition, the manufacturing processes for traditional foods need to be standardized and harmonized with international standards, such as CODEX.

  17. Direct dynamic kinetic analysis and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey during cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research applied a new one-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model for describing the growth of C. perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using mu...

  18. Color of Meat and Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... The Color of Meat and Poultry I've just opened a package of fresh ... Poultry Hotline concerning the color of meat and poultry. Color is important when meat and poultry are purchased, stored, and cooked. Often ...

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin A Gene Isolated From Raw Red Meat and Poultry in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Sarrafzadeh Zargar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent infectious agent of food materials. Enterotoxin producing types of S. aureus cause well-known food-borne disease. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A (SEA is the most important agent of gastroenteritis. Objectives: The present study aimed to screen the raw meat samples collected from different regions of Tehran for S. aureus infection and type of encoding enterotoxin. Materials and Methods: Hundred and eighty six meat samples were collected randomly from city dealers and transferred to laboratory within screw cap containers. The samples were first cultured according to the standard bacteriological methods and then S. aureus isolates were identified using standard bacteriological tests. The isolates were subjected to Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to detect gene encoding SEA. Results: Staphylococcus aureus isolated from 29 (15.6% meat samples including beef 14.8%, raw lamb 15%, raw chicken 15.7% and raw turkey 16.6%. Using special primer sets proved that the species isolated from five samples (two raw chicken, two raw beef and one raw turkey encoded enterotoxin A. Conclusions: Although staphylococcal contamination within food material is more or less a routine, but detection of enterotoxin encoding species from raw meat samples is alarming for health authorities. These data highlight the importance of periodic surveillance of raw meat distributed among ordinary consumers.

  20. Characterization of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) in retail meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Kanika; Zhang, Yifan

    2014-09-01

    This study was to understand the extent of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCoNS) serving as a mecA reservoir in retail meat. MRCoNS were isolated from retail meat (beef, chicken, and turkey) in Detroit and characterized by sodA gene sequencing for species identification, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Unique MRCoNS isolates recovered from 25 meat samples were comprised of Staphylococcus sciuri (n = 13), Staphylococcus fleuretti (n = 4), Staphylococcus lentus (n = 3), Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 2), Staphylococcus vitulinus (n = 1), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (n = 1) and Staphylococcus pasteuri (n = 1). Heterogeneous and composite SCCmec types, including I, III, IV, V, I + V and III + V were identified in 16 isolates. Same SCCmec types were recovered in different staphylococcal species and meat sources. Indistinguishable PFGE patterns were also observed in S. sciuri isolated from beef, chicken, and turkey, and with different SCCmec types. In conclusion, multiple CoNS species can serve as reservoirs for mecA. In addition to the clonal transmission of MRCoNS in meat, horizontal occurrence of SCCmec is observed in staphylococcal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF HORSE MEAT SCANDAL ON ROMANIAN MEAT MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius STANCIU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable business in the domestic production of meat must meet both the usual Requirements regarding quality, safety for customer and New Challenges in the European meat market. The Romanian food industry must meet the challenge of recent suspicions regarding the substitution of beef meat with horse meat. The modern applicable to meat traceability systems and authentication procedures can be considered as new ways to support fair trade and transparency, THUS, removing suspicions that appeared lately. Lack of safety measures in the field can affect business continuity critically, creating significant losses.

  2. New vision technology for multidimensional quality monitoring of continuous frying of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Søren Blond; Adler-Nissen, Jens; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2010-01-01

    The potential of using multi-spectral vision technology for quality control in a continuous frying process was investigated. canonical discriminant analysis of the multi-spectral images of samples of fried minced meat and diced turkey Could clearly visualise the effect of different heat treatments....... The vision technology can also detect even slight increases in the agglutination of the fried minced meat during the process. This agglutination is undesirable, but very difficult to measure on-line. The results indicate that multi-spectral vision technology may partially or totally Substitute visual...

  3. Distance Education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nursel Selver RUZGAR,

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Turkey Assistant Professor Dr. Nursel Selver RUZGAR Technical Education Faculty Marmara University, TURKEY ABSTRACT Many countries of the world are using distance education with various ways, by internet, by post and by TV. In this work, development of distance education in Turkey has been presented from the beginning. After discussing types and applications for different levels of distance education in Turkey, the distance education was given in the cultural aspect of the view. Then, in order to create the tendencies and thoughts of graduates of Higher Education Institutions and Distance Education Institutions about being competitors in job markets, sufficiency of education level, advantages for education system, continuing education in different Institutions, a face-to-face survey was applied to 1284 graduates, 958 from Higher Education Institutions and 326 from Distance Education Institutions. The results were evaluated and discussed. In the last part of this work, suggestions to become widespread and improve the distance education in the country were made.

  4. Terrorism in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodoplu, Ulkumen; Arnold, Jeffrey; Ersoy, Gurkan

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two decades, terrorism has exacted an enormous toll on the Republic of Turkey, a secular democracy with a 99.8% Muslim population. From 1984 to 2000, an estimated 30,000 to 35,000 Turkish citizens were killed by a nearly continuous stream of terrorism-related events. During this period, the Partiya Karekerren Kurdistan (PKK), a Kurdish separatist group (re-named KADEK in 2002), was responsible for the vast majority of terrorism-related events (and casualties), which disproportionately affected the eastern and southeastern regions of Turkey, in which the PKK has focused its activities. Most terrorist attacks over the past two decades have been bombings or shootings that produced or = 30 casualties (eight shootings, five bombings, and two arsons). The maximum number of casualties produced by any of these events was 93 in the Hotel Madimak arson attack by the Turkish Islamic Movement in 1993. This pattern suggests that terrorist attacks in Turkey rarely required more than local systems of emergency medical response, except in rural areas where Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are routinely provided by regional military resources. The last decade has seen the development of several key systems of local emergency response in Turkey, including the establishment of the medical specialty of Emergency Medicine, the establishment of training programs for EMS providers, the spread of a generic, Turkish hospital emergency plan based on the Hospital Emergency Incident Command System, and the spread of advanced training in trauma care modeled after Advanced Trauma Life Support.

  5. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  6. Insects for turkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niekerk, van T.G.C.M.; Veldkamp, T.

    2017-01-01

    In a trial with 14 pens with in each 20 turkey pullets (males, not treated) research has been conducted to the effect of feeding 12% insect larvae (Black Soldier Fly) on technical results and behaviour. The birds were kept until 5 weeks of age. The larvae fed groups ate less, had a higher growth

  7. Wind energy and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Aynur Aydin; Türker, Yavuz Özhan

    2012-03-01

    The global energy requirement for sustaining economic activities, meeting social needs and social development is increasing daily. Environmentally friendly, renewable energy resources are an alternative to the primary non-renewable energy resources, which devastate ecosystems in order to meet increasing demand. Among renewable energy sources such as hydropower, biopower, geothermal power and solar power, wind power offers distinct advantages to Turkey. There is an increasing tendency toward wind globally and the European Union adjusted its legal regulations in this regard. As a potential EU Member state, Turkey is going through a similar process. The number of institutional and legal regulations concerning wind power has increased in recent years; technical infrastructure studies were completed, and some important steps were taken in this regard. This study examines the way in which Turkey has developed support for wind power, presents a SWOT analysis of the wind power sector in Turkey and a projection was made for the concrete success expected to be accomplished in the future.

  8. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... thereby increasing their animal protein intake, this experiment therefore become imperative. Meat from the semimembranosus (SM), biceps .... most critical eating quality that determines whether consumers are repeat buyer. It is however worthy of note that as a result of the heat treatment and the use of.

  9. Thermodynamics of meat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the water activity of meat, being a mixture of proteins, salts and water, by the Free-Volume-Flory–Huggins (FVFH) theory augmented with the equation. Earlier, the FVFH theory is successfully applied to describe the thermodynamics to glucose homopolymers like starch, dextrans and

  10. Solar potential in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soezen, Adnan; Arcaklioglu, Erol

    2005-01-01

    Most of the locations in Turkey receive abundant solar-energy, because Turkey lies in a sunny belt between 36 deg. and 42 deg. N latitudes. Average annual temperature is 18 to 20 deg. C on the south coast, falls to 14-16 deg. C on the west coat, and fluctuates between 4 and 18 deg. C in the central parts. The yearly average solar-radiation is 3.6 kW h/m 2 day, and the total yearly radiation period is ∼2610 h. In this study, a new formulation based on meteorological and geographical data was developed to determine the solar-energy potential in Turkey using artificial neural-networks (ANNs). Scaled conjugate gradient (SCG), Pola-Ribiere conjugate gradient (CGP), and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) learning algorithms and logistic sigmoid (logsig) transfer function were used in the networks. Meteorological data for last four years (2000-2003) from 12 cities (Canakkale, Kars, Hakkari, Sakarya, Erzurum, Zonguldak, Balikesir, Artvin, Corum, Konya, Siirt, and Tekirdag) spread over Turkey were used in order to train the neural-network. Meteorological and geographical data (latitude, longitude, altitude, month, mean sunshine-duration, and mean temperature) are used in the input layer of the network. Solar-radiation is in the output layer. The maximum mean absolute percentage error was found to be less than 3.832% and R 2 values to be about 99.9738% for the selected stations. The ANN models show greater accuracy for evaluating solar-resource possibilities in regions where a network of monitoring stations has not been established in Turkey. This study confirms the ability of the ANN to predict solar-radiation values accurately

  11. A longitudinal study of Campylobacter distribution in a turkey production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko-Mäkelä, Päivikki; Isohanni, Pauliina; Katzav, Marianne; Lund, Marianne; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Lyhs, Ulrike

    2009-04-07

    Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial enteritis worldwide. Handling and eating of contaminated poultry meat has considered as one of the risk factors for human campylobacteriosis. Campylobacter contamination can occur at all stages of a poultry production cycle. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of Campylobacter during a complete turkey production cycle which lasts for 1,5 years of time. For detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture method was compared with a PCR method. Campylobacter isolates from different types of samples have been identified to the species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Samples (N = 456) were regularly collected from one turkey parent flock, the hatchery, six different commercial turkey farms and from 11 different stages at the slaughterhouse. For the detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture and a PCR method were used. Campylobacter isolates (n = 143) were identified to species level by a multiplex PCR assay. No Campylobacter were detected in either the samples from the turkey parent flock or from hatchery samples using the culture method. PCR detected Campylobacter DNA in five faecal samples and one fluff and eggshell sample. Six flocks out of 12 commercial turkey flocks where found negative at the farm level but only two were negative at the slaughterhouse. During the brooding period Campylobacter might have contact with the birds without spreading of the contamination within the flock. Contamination of working surfaces and equipment during slaughter of a Campylobacter positive turkey flock can persist and lead to possible contamination of negative flocks even after the end of the day's cleaning and desinfection. Reduction of contamination at farm by a high level of biosecurity control and hygiene may be one of the most efficient ways to reduce the amount of contaminated poultry meat in Finland. Due to the low numbers of Campylobacter in the Finnish turkey production chain

  12. A longitudinal study of Campylobacter distribution in a turkey production chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hänninen Marja-Liisa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial enteritis worldwide. Handling and eating of contaminated poultry meat has considered as one of the risk factors for human campylobacteriosis.Campylobacter contamination can occur at all stages of a poultry production cycle. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of Campylobacter during a complete turkey production cycle which lasts for 1,5 years of time. For detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture method was compared with a PCR method. Campylobacter isolates from different types of samples have been identified to the species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Methods Samples (N = 456 were regularly collected from one turkey parent flock, the hatchery, six different commercial turkey farms and from 11 different stages at the slaughterhouse. For the detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture and a PCR method were used. Campylobacter isolates (n = 143 were identified to species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Results No Campylobacter were detected in either the samples from the turkey parent flock or from hatchery samples using the culture method. PCR detected Campylobacter DNA in five faecal samples and one fluff and eggshell sample. Six flocks out of 12 commercial turkey flocks where found negative at the farm level but only two were negative at the slaughterhouse. Conclusion During the brooding period Campylobacter might have contact with the birds without spreading of the contamination within the flock. Contamination of working surfaces and equipment during slaughter of a Campylobacter positive turkey flock can persist and lead to possible contamination of negative flocks even after the end of the day's cleaning and desinfection. Reduction of contamination at farm by a high level of biosecurity control and hygiene may be one of the most efficient ways to reduce the amount of contaminated poultry meat in Finland. Due to the low numbers of

  13. Destruction of Salmonellae on poultry meat with lysozyme, EDTA, x ray, microwave, and chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teotia, J.S.; Miller, B.F.

    1975-01-01

    Lysozyme, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid, chlorine, x-irradiation and microwaves were used in experimental attempts to eliminate Salmonella senftenberg 775W or Salmonella typhimurium from turkey drumsticks and whole carcasses. Turkey drumsticks or whole carcasses were artificially contaminated with S. senfenberg 775W or S. typhimurium in concentrations ranging between 5 x 10 5 to 8 x 10 5 viable cells per ml. of contaminating fluid. After each treatment, samples were cultured, plated, and tested according to standard methods to determine the susceptibility of Salmonella organisms to the particular treatment. A 0.1 percent solution of lysozyme eliminated the S. senftenberg 775W at 22 0 C within three hours. A 0.5 percent solution of ethylenediaminetetracetic acid failed to destroy the test organism under the same conditions. Eighty thousand rads of X-ray eliminated the test organism on turkey drumsticks but failed to remove it from whole turkey carcasses. Microwaves eliminated the S. senftenberg 775W in 150 seconds from turkey drumsticks and ten minutes from broiler chicken carcasses. Aqueous solutions containing 3400 and 2125 ppM chlorine failed to destroy the test organism on turkey drumsticks at 21 0 C. in 9 and 24 hours. None of the treatments changed the appearance of the skin or meat, except microwaves produced a partially-cooked appearance. Chlorine produced off-color drumsticks

  14. Churchill, Europe and Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Dockter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From the early 1930s until his peace time premiership (1951-1955, Winston Churchill was one of the strongest advocates of the concept of a United Europe. While this is well known among scholars of 20th century British history, Churchill’s actual vision for what a United Europe might look like has received less attention. Still less attention has been paid to Churchill’s opinions of the roles other nations might play within the new Europe. This article will examine Churchill’s view of Turkey in the new European order and will reveal that Churchill saw Turkey as a part of, (or at least an extension of Europe. However, this article will also reveal that Churchill’s conceptualisation of Turkey’s role was largely predicated on 19th century geostrategic thinking.

  15. Water Policies of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Istanbulluoglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Water is one of our most critical resources. Civilization has historically flourished around major waterways. The most important uses of water are; agricultural, industrial and domestic use. This critical resource is under threat around the world. In the next 20 years, the quantity of water available to everyone is predicted to decrease by 30%. 40% of the world\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s inhabitants currently have insufficient fresh water for minimal hygiene. In 2000 more than 2.2 million people died from waterborne diseases. Water politics is politics affected by water and water resources. There are connections between water resources, water systems, and international security and conflict. Today, water is a strategic resource in the globe and an important element in many political conflicts. Turkey can be faced severe water-stress in the near future. Therefore Turkey has to develop realistic and feasible water policy for future generations. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(3.000: 327-338

  16. Epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter spp. isolated from retail meats in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez-Bravo, Claudia; Taboada, Eduardo N; Mutschall, Steven K; Aslam, Mueen

    2017-07-17

    Campylobacter is an important zoonotic pathogen found in livestock and can cause illness in humans following consumption of raw and undercooked meat products. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in retail meat (poultry, turkey, pork and beef) purchased in Alberta, Canada and to assess antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness of recovered Campylobacter strains with previously isolated strains from clinical and environmental sources. A Comparative Genomic Fingerprinting (CGF) method was used for assessing genetic relatedness of isolates. A total of 606 samples comprising 204, 110, 145 and 147 samples of retail chicken, turkey, ground beef and pork, respectively, were obtained. Campylobacter was isolated from 23.5% (48/204) of chicken samples and 14.2% (8/110) of turkey samples. Pork and beef samples were negative for Campylobacter. Campylobacter jejuni was the most common (94.6%) spp. found followed by C. coli (5.4%). Resistance to tetracycline was found in 48.1% of isolates, followed by resistance to ciprofloxacin (5.5%), nalidixic acid (5.5%), azithromycin (1.78%), and erythromycin (1.78%). All isolates were susceptible to clindamycin, florfenicol, gentamicin and telithromycin. Tetracycline resistance was attributable to the presence of the tetO gene. CGF analysis showed that Campylobacter isolated from poultry meat in this study were genetically related to clinical isolates recovered from human infections and to those isolated from animals and the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Credibility of America’s Extended Nuclear Deterrent: The Case of the Republic of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Turkey has a history of contacts with other nations for assistance in nuclear issues. Argentina and Pakistan provided or were suspected of providing...spirits, and agricultural goods (such as meat and poultry), essentially banning these products from Turkish markets . Additionally, the USTR report...suggests that the Turk- ish government could improve intellectual property rights and protections for copyright material and pharmaceutical prod- ucts

  18. Energy Security and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Recently, however, a select group of former "Third World" countries - China and India in particular - have sought to participate in this energy bonanza by...reserves seem to be very low. Like many countries, Turkey has large coal and lignite resources. However, Turkish coal and lignite have low calorific and...supplies of energy. Because of the robust economic growth around the world especially in places like China and India the global demand for energy is

  19. Authoritarianism in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    You deserve a trip to Disney Land! Thanks to my parents, Kathleen and Donald Anderson for continuing advice and support. Thanks also to my parents...PARADIGM? Turkey has long stood as a favored example of modern, secular, and democratic government in the Middle East and the Muslim World . However, recent...ambition and party politics, and its military no longer appears able to act against such ambition. Meanwhile, the rest of the Muslim world observes

  20. Radurization of fowl meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel'fand, S.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of pre-slaughter adrenalization and of treatment with additives of semifinished poultry products were studied with a view to improving the storage quality of irradiated poultry. It was found that pre-slaughter adrenalization, pre-irradiation treatment with phosphates and, particularly, a combination of these two methods considerably delayed the formation of carbonyl compounds, the delay being somewhat greater in white meat. (E.T.)

  1. Elaboração de fiambres com as carnes branca e escura de frango Chicken loaves prepared with broiler light and dark meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Graner

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo específico a obtenção de fiambres com as carnes branca (do peito e escura (das coxas e pernas de frango, separadamente. Os cortes foram desossados manualmente e às carnes, após limpeza e corte, foram adicionados ingredientes não cárneos e aditivos, sendo elas moídas após 12 h. O processamento térmico foi realizado em defumador até a temperatura interna de 71°C. Foram obtidos fiambres curados e defumados com boa qualidade sensorial, adequado nível de proteína e baixo conteúdo calórico, do tipo semi-conserva. O rendimento foi maior na elaboração do fiambre de carne branca, o qual foi preferido na avaliação sensorial, em relação ao produto de carne escura.Chiken loaves were prepared with light and dark meat from broiler and deboned breasts and legs. The meat was cut, cured, ground, smoked and pasteurized (until 71°C. The yield was greater for the loaf prepared with light meat, which was also ranked first in sensory analysis. The light and the dark meat loaves had the following chemical compositions: moisture 70.6 - 71.0%; protein 22.0 - 20.2%; moisture/protein ratio 3.2 - 3.5; fat 4.0 - 4.5%; sodium chloride 2.4 - 2.5%; sodium nitrite 51.5 - 69.0 ppm; pH 6.1 - 6.25, respectively.

  2. Measurement of water-holding capacity in raw and freeze-dried broiler breast meat with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, B; Hawkins, S; Zhuang, H

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy (vis/NIR) to segregate broiler breast fillets by water-holding capacity (WHC) was determined. Broiler breast fillets (n = 72) were selected from a commercial deboning line based on visual color assessment. Meat color (L*a*b*), pH (2 and 24 h), drip loss, and salt-induced water uptake were measured. Reflectance measurements were recorded from 400 to 2,500 nm in both raw and freeze-dried breast meat samples. Raw and freeze-dried samples had similar spectra in the visible region (400-750 nm), but the freeze-dried samples exhibited numerous bands in the NIR region (750-2,500 nm) corresponding to muscle proteins and lipids that were not observed in the NIR spectra of the raw samples. Linear discriminate analyses were used to classify fillets as high-WHC or low-WHC according to predicted meat quality characteristics. Using the visible spectra (400-750 nm), fillets could be correctly classified into high-WHC and low-WHC groups based on drip loss and salt-induced water uptake with 88 to 92% accuracy in raw samples and 79 to 86% accuracy in freeze-dried samples. Using the NIR spectra (750-2,500 nm), fillets could be correctly classified into high-WHC and low-WHC groups with 74 to 76% accuracy in raw samples and 85 to 86% accuracy in freeze-dried samples. Thus, freeze-drying enhanced the accuracy of WHC classification using the NIR portion of the spectra. Data from this study demonstrate the potential for utilizing vis/NIR spectroscopy as a method for classifying broiler breast meat according to WHC. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  3. THE IMPORTANCE OF BACTERIOCINS IN MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem SERDAROĞLU

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing consumer demand for food products which are free of chemical additives, reduced in salt and processed as little as possible. These minimally processed foods require special application to assure their microbiological safety. The use of microorganisms and enzymes for food preservatives is called biopreservation. The most important group of microorganisms with antimicrobial effect used in the production of foods is the lactic acid bacteria. In meats although lactic acid bacteria constitue apart of the initial microflora, they become dominant during the processing of meats. In this research bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria and their usage in meat and meat products for biopreservation are discussed.

  4. Immunoprotectivity of attenuated turkey poxvirus in turkey poults and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Nigeria, fowl pox vaccine is used in all categories of poultry. However there has been reports of outbreak of turkey pox virus in poults previously vaccinated with fowl pox vaccine. Pox Lesion from poults was excised for isolation of virus and viral propagation in chorioallantoid membrane. Turkey pox virus were isolated ...

  5. Refugee movements and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirisci, K

    1991-12-01

    There has been a long tradition in the Ottoman Empire and the Turkish Republic of receiving refugees. There were Jewish refugees from the Spanish Inquisition, Hungarians and Poles fleeing revolts in 1848-9, and those of Turkish descent and usually from the Balkans. Concurrent with this trend is the history of refugees and immigrants leaving Turkey, such as many Armenians, Greeks and Jews leaving at the turn of the century, and after 1923 and the Treaty of Lausanne. Little is currently published on the topic. This article defines a refugee; provides an overview of the refugee problems of the 1980's due to Bulgarian, Kurdish, and Turkish refugees; and the legal and political aspects. As a country of origin, there is discussion of the political and economic aspects of Turkish asylum seekers in Europe. The potential refugee flows to and from Turkey are also examined. I) For this study, refugees are victims of political violence and are persecuted for political or religious beliefs, ethnic or racial background, or war. In Turkey, there are national refugees, international refugees outside the Convention, and UNHCR Convention refugees. During the 1980's all 3 groups were arriving: from eastern Europe, Iranian Kurds, Iraqis, and ethnic Turks from Bulgaria and Afghanistan. The Turkish restricted acceptance of the 1951 Convention on Refugees creates serious humanitarian and security consequences for refugees other than those from eastern Europe and of Turkish ethnicity. Political considerations play an important role in treatment where security threats outweigh humanitarian need. The case is given for Kurdish refugees. II) Asylum seekers from Turkey in Western Europe was determined between 1986-90 to be 185,000 from applications. These figures have risen steadily due to the political instability and military activity of areas bordering Iraq and Syria, the Emergency Region. In addition there are economic and employment problems, and there has been a suspension of human

  6. Levels of polonium-210 in the grapevine leaves in Alasehir district in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurboga, G.; Aytas Oelmez, S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of present work is the estimation of Po-210 (polonium) content in the edible grapevine leaves (Vitis viniferae, L.cv Sultana syn.) collected from Gediz plain in Western Turkey. Alasehir District in Gediz plain is one of the most important wine culture region of Turkey. Grapevine leaves are important food material for Dolma in Turkish cuisine. Dolma is a name applied to such vegetables as grapevine leaves, cabbage leaves and green peppers stuffed ground meat or spiked rice. Levels of Po-210 in the grapevine leaves had not been analyzed before in Turkey. In this study, after wet ashing of grapevine leaves, Po-210 was spontaneously plated onto a copper disc from dilute hydrochloric acid medium and deposited activity was measured. The results for Po-210 in the grapevine leaves are compared with the other foodstuff values in the literature

  7. Use of olive oil-in-water gelled emulsions in model turkey breast emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, M.; Öztürk, B.

    2017-09-01

    Today, gelled emulsion systems offer a novel possibility in lipid modification of meat products. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality characteristics of model turkey emulsions that were prepared with olive oil-in-water gelled emulsion (GE) as partial or total beef fat replacer. The results indicated that while most of the GE treatments showed equivalent emulsion characteristics in terms of emulsion stability, water-holding capacity and cook yield, utilization of 100% GE as the lipid source could increase total expressible fluid of the model turkey emulsion and thus negatively affect the quality. Utilization of GE was effective in total fat reduction, as the model turkey emulsions formulated with more than 50% GE had significantly lower fat content compared to full-beef fat control model emulsion. However, beef fat replacement with GE produced considerable changes in colour parameters. Finally, it was concluded that utilization of GE as a partial beef fat replacer has good potential to enhance stability and reduce total fat in turkey meat emulsion products.

  8. Red meat and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Faruk Aykan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  9. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in US meat and poultry: 2012-13 levels, trends and estimated consumer exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Sara J; Hakk, Heldur

    2017-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of brominated flame retardants whose use has contaminated foods and caused subsequent human exposures. To address the issue of possible human exposure, samples from a 2012-13 US meat and poultry (beef, pork, chicken, turkey) study were analysed for seven PBDEs. The mean summed concentrations of the seven BDE congeners (ΣPBDE) from beef, pork, chicken and turkey were 0.40, 0.36, 0.19, and 0.76 ng g -1 lipid weight (lw). The range of ΣPBDEs for all meat classes was 0.01-15.78 ng g -1 lw. A comparison of this study with a 2007-08 study revealed a decline in the median ΣPBDEs for all four meat classes, a reduction of 25.9% to 70.0%, with pork, chicken and turkey PBDE residues being statistically lower relative to the 2007-08 study. BDEs 47 and 99 contributed the most to the ΣPBDE concentrations, indicating likely animal exposures to the penta-BDE formulation. Based on the reported data an estimate of US consumer daily intake of PBDEs from meat and poultry was 6.42 ng day -1 .

  10. USE OF NEAR INFRARED TECHNOLOGY TO PREDICT FATTY ACID GROUPS IN COMMERCIAL GROUND MEAT PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Ton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Near infrared transmittance (NIT, 850 to 1048 nm spectroscopy was used to predict groups of fatty acids (FA, namely saturated FA (SFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA, in commercial ground meat samples aiming to develope a fast and reliable method for their determination in support of label declaration by the new EC Regulation 1169/2011. Dataset was built using 81 samples of commercial ground meat from different species: beef, pork, chicken and turkey. In some samples, meat was mixtured with different ingredients such as bread, cheese, spices and additives. Samples were first analysed by NIT instrument for spectral information and reference FA values were obtained by gas chromatographic analysis. Prediction models for SFA, MUFA and PUFA expressed on total FA exhibited coefficients of determination of calibration of 0.822, 0.367 and 0.780 on intact samples, and 0.879, 0.726 and 0.908 on minced samples, respectively. Good results were also obtained when FA groups were expressed as g/100g of fresh meat: the coefficient of determination of calibration increased to values larger than 0.915. Moreover, comparing the slightly lower coefficient of determination in crossvalidation of intact compared with minced meat suggested that equations developed for minced samples were more accurate than those built for intact products. Results highlighted the effectiveness of NIT spectroscopy to predict the major FA groups in commercial meat products.

  11. Bacterial spoilage of meat and cured meat products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borch, E.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Blixt, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of environmental factors (product composition and storage conditions) on the selection, growth rate and metabolic activity of the bacterial flora is presented for meat (pork and beef) and cooked, cured meat products. The predominant bacteria associated with spoilage of refrigerated

  12. Qualitative analysis of meat and meat products by multiplex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... acid; BLAST, Basic Local Alignment Search Tool; NCBI,. National Center for Biotechnology Information. ... Several workers have developed PCR methods to control the suitability, with labels of meat products. ..... The test could be useful in controlling and verifying the origin of the meat species, especially in ...

  13. Delayed anaphylaxis to red meat masquerading as idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anubha; Commins, Scott P; Heymann, Peter W; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is traditionally recognized as a rapidly developing combination of symptoms that often includes hives and hypotension or respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, when a specific cause is identified, exposure to this cause is usually noted to have occurred within minutes to 2 hours before the onset of symptoms. This case is of a 79-year-old woman who developed a severe episode of anaphylaxis 3 hours after eating pork. Before 2012, she had not experienced any symptoms after ingestion of meat products. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat has many contrasting features to immediate food-induced anaphylaxis. The relevant IgE antibody is specific for the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, a blood group substance of nonprimate mammals. There is evidence from Australia, Sweden, and the United States that the primary cause of this IgE antibody response is tick bites. These bites characteristically itch for 10 days or more. Diagnosis can be made by the presence of specific IgE to beef, pork, lamb, and milk, and the lack of IgE to chicken, turkey, and fish. Skin prick tests (but not intradermal tests) generally are negative. Management of these cases, now common across the southeastern United States, consists of education combined with avoidance of both ingestion of red meat and further tick bites. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus in commercially available meat over a one-year period in Iowa, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapaliya, Dipendra; Forshey, Brett M; Kadariya, Jhalka; Quick, Megan K; Farina, Sarah; O' Brien, Ashley; Nair, Rajeshwari; Nworie, Amos; Hanson, Blake; Kates, Ashley; Wardyn, Shylo; Smith, Tara C

    2017-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have confirmed the presence of S. aureus, including MRSA, on raw meat products. We investigated the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus and MRSA in commercially-distributed antibiotic-free and conventional raw meat products (n = 3290) purchased in 8 Iowa retail stores weekly for a period of one year. Isolates were characterized using spa typing, and PCR was used to detect the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and mecA genes. Quantitation of S. aureus on meat products was carried out one week per month. The prevalence of S. aureus on meat samples was 27.8% (913/3290). Compared to antibiotic-free meat samples, higher prevalence of both MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were found in conventional meat samples. Among the S. aureus isolates, 18 were PVL-positive (1.9%) and 41 (4.5%) carried mecA. Phenotypic oxacillin resistance was observed for 17.1% (41/239) of the isolates tested, while 23% (55/239) were multi-drug resistant. A total of 132 spa types were detected from 913 contaminated meat samples. Overall, t002 was the most common spa type identified (137; 15.0%). The number of colony-forming units (CFU) per 10 g meat ranged from 2 to 517 (median: 8 CFU per 10 g of meat; mean: 28) with the highest bacterial load observed on turkey samples. These data reinforce the need to consider meat products as potential vehicles of S. aureus transmission from farm into human households, and the potential need for public health intervention programs pre and post-slaughter in meat processing facilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzyme immunoassay and proteomic characterization of troponin I as a marker of mammalian muscle compounds in raw meat and some meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, Elena A; Kovalev, Leonid I; Ivanov, Alexei V; Kovaleva, Marina A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Shishkin, Sergey S; Lisitsyn, Andrey B; Chernukha, Irina M; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2015-07-01

    The skeletal muscle protein troponin I (TnI) has been characterized as a potential thermally stable and species-specific biomarker of mammalian muscle tissues in raw meat and meat products. This study proposed a technique for the quantification of TnI comprising protein extraction and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The technique is characterized by a TnI detection limit of 4.8 ng/ml with quantifiable concentrations ranging from 8.7 to 52 ng/ml. The method was shown to be suitable for detection of TnI in mammalian (beef, pork, lamb, and horse) meat but not in poultry (chicken, turkey, and duck) meat. In particular, the TnI content in beef was 0.40 3 ± 0.058 mg/g of wet tissue. The TnI estimations obtained for the pork and beef samples using ELISA were comparable to the proteomic analysis results. Thus, the quantitative study of TnI can be a convenient way to assess the mammalian muscle tissue content of various meat products. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Turkey; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2012-01-01

    This Selected Issues paper examines the external imbalance situation in Turkey. Turkey’s current account deficit is expected to remain elevated at about 5.5 to 6 percent of GDP through 2019. Reducing the deficit to a more sustainable level about 2.5 to 3 percent of GDP should be a key policy priority. Applying the Global Integrated Monetary and Fiscal Model, the paper quantifies the impact of four different approaches in reducing the current account deficit. The analysis shows that policies t...

  17. Nuclear Medicine in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durak, H.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that uses radionuclides for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and it is one of the most important peaceful applications of nuclear sciences. Nuclear Medicine has a short history both in Turkey and in the world. The first use of I-131 for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis in Turkey was in 1958 at the Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School. In 1962, Radiobiological Institute in Ankara University Medical School was established equipped with well-type counters, radiometers, scalers, external counters and a rectilinear scanner. In 1965, multi-probe external detection systems, color dot scanners and in 1967, anger scintillation camera had arrived. In 1962, wet lab procedures and organ scanning, in 1965 color dot scanning, dynamic studies (blood flow - renograms) and in 1967 analogue scintillation camera and dynamic camera studies have started. In 1974, nuclear medicine was established as independent medical specialty. Nuclear medicine departments have started to get established in 1978. In 1974, The Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine (TSNM) was established with 10 members. The first president of TSNM was Prof. Dr. Yavuz Renda. Now, in the year 2000, TSNM has 349 members. Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine is a member of European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB) and WFNMB Asia-Oceania. Since 1974, TSNM has organized 13 national Nuclear Medicine congresses, 4 international Nuclear Oncology congresses and 13 nuclear medicine symposiums. In 1-5 October 2000, 'The VII th Asia and Oceania Congress of Nuclear Medicine and Biology' was held in Istanbul, Turkey. Since 1992, Turkish Journal of Nuclear Medicine is published quarterly and it is the official publication of TSNM. There are a total of 112 Nuclear Medicine centers in Turkey. There are 146 gamma cameras. (52 Siemens, 35 GE, 16 Elscint, 14 Toshiba, 10 Sopha, 12 MIE, 8 Philips, 9 Others) Two cyclotrons are

  18. Detection of Salmonella in Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Flemming; Mansdal, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Cost-effective and rapid monitoring of Salmonella in the meat production chain can contribute to food safety. The objective of this study was to validate an easy-to-use pre-PCR sample preparation method based on a simple boiling protocol for screening of Salmonella in meat and carcass swab samples...

  19. Cultured Meat in Islamic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Mohammad Naqib; Post, Mark J; Ramli, Mohd Anuar; Mustafa, Amin Rukaini

    2017-04-29

    Cultured meat is a promising product that is derived through biotechnology that partially circumvents animal physiology, thereby being potentially more sustainable, environmentally friendly and animal friendly than traditional livestock meat. Such a novel technology that can impact many consumers evokes ethical, philosophical and religious discussions. For the Islamic community, the crucial question is whether cultured meat is halal, meaning compliant with Islamic laws. Since the culturing of meat is a new discovery, invention and innovation by scientists that has never been discussed by classical jurists (fuqaha'), an ijtihad by contemporary jurists must look for and provide answers for every technology introduced, whether it comply the requirements of Islamic law or not. So, this article will discuss an Islamic perspective on cultured meat based on the original scripture in the Qur'an and interpretations by authoritative Islamic jurists. The halal status of cultured meat can be resolve through identifying the source cell and culture medium used in culturing the meat. The halal cultured meat can be obtained if the stem cell is extracted from a (Halal) slaughtered animal, and no blood or serum is used in the process. The impact of this innovation will give positive results in the environmental and sustain the livestock industry.

  20. Iodine in meat in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, Bogdan; Gonev, Mihajlo; Tadzher, Isak

    2000-01-01

    Iodine deficiency in Macedonia still persists in a mild form. In 1999 the iodination of salt rose to 20 m gr iodine in Kg salt. The consumption of salt diminished after the last war from 20-30 gr salt per day to 10-20 gr salt daily. This shows that the problem of the elimination of iodine deficiency is being vigorously tackled. Since 1956 the iodine in salt in Macedonia rose to 10 m gr KI/Kg salt. The content of iodine in the Macedonian diet seems to be important. The amount of iodine in milk, eggs and bread is low as found by the investigation of MANU. The content of iodine in meat is low, compared to British meat is 10 times lower. The average iodine content in Macedonian meat is 95.15 micro gr per Kg, whereas in British meat it is 850-1510 micro gr iodine per k gr meat. (Original)

  1. Food safety and organic meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loo, Ellen J; Alali, Walid; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    The organic meat industry in the United States has grown substantially in the past decade in response to consumer demand for nonconventionally produced products. Consumers are often not aware that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic standards are based only on the methods used for production and processing of the product and not on the product's safety. Food safety hazards associated with organic meats remain unclear because of the limited research conducted to determine the safety of organic meat from farm-to-fork. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the published results on the microbiological safety of organic meats. In addition, antimicrobial resistance of microbes in organic food animal production is addressed. Determining the food safety risks associated with organic meat production requires systematic longitudinal studies that quantify the risks of microbial and nonmicrobial hazards from farm-to-fork.

  2. Environmental costs of meat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, T Lan T; Hermansen, John Erik; Mogensen, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to address two questions: First, what is the real cost of meat to society if taking into account the environmental costs arising throughout the product life cycle; and second, whether and how the environmental costs related to meat production can be reduced. In addressing the issues......, we use pig meat production in the EU as a case study. The environmental costs of meat are displayed first as characterized results at different midpoint categories e.g. global warming, nature occupation, acidification, eutrophication, ecotoxicity, etc., and then aggregated into a single score using...... conversion factors available from the Stepwise2006 method. Overall, the environmental costs of producing conventional pig meat are estimated to be 1.9 EUR per kg, which are of even larger size than the private costs of 1.4 EUR. In decreasing order of importance, nature occupation has been found...

  3. Internet censorship in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Akgül

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Turkey passed an internet censorship law in 2007 with the declared objective of protecting families and minors (Akdeniz, 2010. It established a unit within the regulator BTK (Information and Communication Technologies Authority responsible for imposing bans and blocks on websites based on nine catalogue crimes defined by other national laws (Akgül 2008, 2009a, 2009b. As of May 2015, 80,000 websites were banned based on civil code related complaints and intellectual property rights violations, reports the independent website Engelliweb. Blocking decisions rendered by penal courts are enforced even when they are based on grounds other that the nine catalogue crimes - such as terrorism, organised crime and crime against the state. Passed in parliament while ignoring the pleas of NGOs and of the internet sector, the Internet Law No. 5651 has since been used to temporarily ban popular platforms such as Blogger, Last.fm, Vimeo, Wordpress and YouTube. At the same time, some blocking decisions by the courts (e.g., Google and Facebook were not enforced by the authorities. Since its introduction, the European Court of Human Rights has ruled that Law No. 5651 (Council of Europe, 2011 is against the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR, 2013. This article provides an overview of internet censorship and its social background in Turkey.

  4. Control of Listeria monocytogenes in turkey deli loaves using organic acids as formulation ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, T; Alvarado, C Z; Brashears, M M; Thompson, L D; McKee, S R; Berrang, M

    2009-10-01

    The growth of Listeria monocytogenes in further-processed meat products has become a major concern and an important food safety issue. The meat and poultry industries have incorporated interventions such as organic acids in marinades to inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes. In this study, organic acids were utilized in the raw product and as a postcook dip to determine their inhibitory effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes in turkey deli loaves. The turkey deli loaves were processed, cooked, cooled, inoculated with streptomycin-resistant L. monocytogenes, and then dipped. Treatments were potassium lactate (PL) in the raw product with sodium lactate (SL), sodium diacetate (SD) dip, PL with SL/PL/SD dip, SL with SL/SD dip, and SL with SL/PL/SD dip. There was also a positive (inoculated) and negative (noninoculated) control, which was dipped in distilled water. Days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 were sampled for L. monocytogenes. There were no differences (P>0.05) among the organic acid treatments in the turkey deli loaves at any time points; therefore, all of the treatments increased the lag phase of L. monocytogenes, extending the shelf-life of the product. However, there was a difference between the treatments and the positive control at d 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56. The growth of L. monocytogenes increased immediately in the positive control, whereas the negative control appeared to have no growth. These organic acids can provide meat processors with a useful method for extending the lag phase of L. monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat and poultry products.

  5. 9 CFR 319.80 - Barbecued meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Cooked Meats § 319.80 Barbecued meats. Barbecued meats, such as product labeled “Beef Barbecue” or “Barbecued Pork,” shall be cooked by the direct... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Barbecued meats. 319.80 Section 319.80...

  6. GAME MEAT MARKET IN EASTERN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tolušić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Republic of Croatia, game meat is consumed far less than meat of domestic animals. Yearly game meat consumption amounts to only 0.55 kg per household member. Consumers prefer meat of domestic animals, because it is cheaper, not paying attention to specific nutritive advantages of game meat. A research on the game meat market and consumers’ preferences was carried out on 101 examinees, chosen among inhabitants of Slavonia and Baranja. The majority of questioned inhabitants did consume game meat (92%, of whom 66% consider game meat to be of better quality than meat of domestic animals. Significant number of examinees considers game meat as healthy food, being also convinced that game was healthier to consume if hunted in their natural environment, than if reared on specialized farms (90%. Irrespective of quality, only 22% of examinees buy game meat, and 51% think such meat is too expensive. This is the main reason why consumers have game meat only once a month (51%. Taking into consideration monthly income of their respective household, 58% of examinees can afford game meat only once a month, and, if having an opportunity, they would opt for meat of roe deer (55% and rabbit (25%. When asked what would stimulate the game meat market in Croatia, 56% of examinees believe this could be achieved by lowering of prices, 27% think the issue could be addressed by opening of specialty stores, and only 17% opted for more aggressive marketing activities.

  7. Turkey Run Landfill Emissions Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — landfill emissions measurements for the Turkey run landfill in Georgia. This dataset is associated with the following publication: De la Cruz, F., R. Green, G....

  8. Irradiation of meats and poultry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbain, W.M.

    1978-01-01

    A number of beneficial effects can be achieved by irradiating meats and poultry under different conditions. It is possible, for example, to extend the market life of both fresh and processed meats by applying radiation doses sufficient to reduce the microbial population, thereby delaying onset of spoilage; higher doses aimed at destroying both spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms can also be applied to meats, packaged to prevent recontamination, resulting in a shelf-stable product; the objective may also be to inactivate pathogenic bacteria, parasites and viruses in order to obtain a product which is acceptable from the point of view of public health. (orig.) [de

  9. How Turkey Meets MPOWER Criteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmi Bilir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2003 World Health Assembly adopted an international treaty on tobacco control; FCTC, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Five year later World Health Organization (WHO declared the six effective approach for tobacco control, under the name of MPOWER. In the following years, WHO evaluated the level of implementation of MPOWER criteria in the countries. In this article, how Turkey implemented these six criteria will be discussed. Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies: Monitoring of tobacco use prevalence has been successfully monitored in Turkey through Global Adult Tobacco Survey, Global Youth Tobacco Survey and Health Professionals Tobacco Use Survey. Nevertheless, monitoring of tobacco industry activities was not successfully implemented. Protect people from tobacco smoke: Smoking was banned in most of the indoor public places in Turkey since 1996, and Turkey became a complete smoke-free country by the exposion of smoke-free places including the hospitality workplaces in 2008. Offer help to quit tobacco use: Although smoking cessation services has been a bit late in Turkey, availability of smoking cessation drugs and the establishment of free quitline services made Turkey successful in this regard. Warn about the dangers of tobacco: Since 1996, all TV channels have a duty of broadcasting programs on harms of tobacco use, not less than 90 minutes in a month and it has been implemented successfully. Additionally written messages indicating harms of tobacco has been printed on the packs since 1988 and pictures was added in 2010. But since the average surface area covered by the messages in less than 50% of the total surface of the pack, Turkey was not regarded as to meet the requirement. Enforce bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship: All kinds of tobacco advertisement and promotion was banned by the Law in 1996. But the tobacco products was not in closed boxes at the sales points. Turkey was not found as successful

  10. FINANCIAL CRISES AND TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MERT URAL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the last three decades, in developed and developing counties the liberalization and openness efforts have been witnessed. However, financial liberalization attempts (both internal and external without having macroeconomic stability lead to financial crises in many developing countries. Macroeconomic instabilities create fragile financial markets paving the way for future economic crises. The Turkish Economy, completed the liberalization process with foreign trade liberalization in 1980 and by removing controls on capital accounts in 1989. However, since 1990’s economy got into ‘growth-instability-crisis’ vicious circle, because of the fluctuations in the financial structure. By employing a factor analysis (principal components analysis, this work, aims to obtain the factors that effect crises in Turkey.

  11. Improving functional value of meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangang; Xiao, Shan; Samaraweera, Himali; Lee, Eun Joo; Ahn, Dong U

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to develop meat and meat products with physiological functions to promote health conditions and prevent the risk of diseases. This review focuses on strategies to improve the functional value of meat and meat products. Value improvement can be realized by adding functional compounds including conjugated linoneleic acid, vitamin E, n3 fatty acids and selenium in animal diets to improve animal production, carcass composition and fresh meat quality. In addition, functional ingredients such as vegetable proteins, dietary fibers, herbs and spices, and lactic acid bacteria can be directly incorporated into meat products during processing to improve their functional value for consumers. Functional compounds, especially peptides, can also be generated from meat and meat products during processing such as fermentation, curing and aging, and enzymatic hydrolysis. This review further discusses the current status, consumer acceptance, and market for functional foods from the global viewpoints. Future prospects for functional meat and meat products are also discussed.

  12. Meat cooking shrinkage: Measurement of a new meat quality parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, S; Tassone, S

    2006-07-01

    A parameter, meat cooking shrinkage (MCS), has been introduced based on investigations carried out on meat shrinkage caused by heat during cooking. MCS is the difference between the raw and cooked areas of the meat sample, expressed as a percentage of the raw area. The method uses a disk of meat (10mm thick and 55mm wide) measured before and after cooking in a hot air oven at 165°C for 10min, the meat having reached an internal temperature of 70°C. Video image analysis was used to measure the meat sample area. The proposed MCS protocol permits us to measure cooking loss and to reduce cost and variability, moreover it could be improved to obtain color and marbling measurements by developing the image analysis software. Analysing two or more parameters on the same sample, the correlations among them should improve analysis efficacy. A detailed description of the measurement protocol of MCS is reported as well as its application to beef and pork.

  13. The microbiological quality and shelf-life of the irradiated chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basbayraktar, V.; Kozat, P.; Halkman, H.B.D.; Cetinkaya, N.

    2002-01-01

    Chicken breast and leg meats were packaged. Immediately after packaging, both sets of breast and legs meat were irradiated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 kGy. All the samples were stored at +8 deg. C and were analyzed for populations of mesophilic, total molds and yeasts, Coliform Bacteria, E. coli, Salmonella every 5 days for 20 days. By using a mesophilic populations of 10 7 cells/g as a criteria for spoilage, fresh breast and leg meats receiving a dose of 0 kGy had shelf a live of 5 days with packaging-Both breast and leg meats that received a dose of 3 kGy had shelf lives that were greater than 10 days at + 8 deg. C using packaging. This study showed that 1.0 kGy irradiation can inactivate 10 4 g /Coliform Bacteria and 10 3 g/E. coli. The shelf life of meat is largely dependent upon the level of microbiological contamination that occurs during processing especially in the slaughterhouse in Turkey. Irradiation has the potential to emerge as one of today's most significant food-preservation technologies

  14. Processed Meat Protein and Heat-Stable Peptide Marker Identification Using Microwave-Assisted Tryptic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Montowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to rapid examination of proteins and peptides in complex food matrices are of great interest to the community of food scientists. The aim of the study is to examine the influence of microwave irradiation on the acceleration of enzymatic cleavage and enzymatic digestion of denatured proteins in cooked meat of five species (cattle, horse, pig, chicken and turkey and processed meat products (coarsely minced, smoked, cooked and semi-dried sausages. Severe protein aggregation occurred not only in heated meat under harsh treatment at 190 °C but also in processed meat products. All the protein aggregates were thoroughly hydrolyzed aft er 1 h of trypsin treatment with short exposure times of 40 and 20 s to microwave irradiation at 138 and 303 W. There were much more missed cleavage sites observed in all microwave-assisted digestions. Despite the incompleteness of microwave-assisted digestion, six unique peptide markers were detected, which allowed unambiguous identification of processed meat derived from the examined species. Although the microwave-assisted tryptic digestion can serve as a tool for rapid and high-throughput protein identification, great caution and pre-evaluation of individual samples is recommended in protein quantitation.

  15. 9 CFR 319.500 - Meat pies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Food Entree Products, Pies, and Turnovers § 319.500 Meat pies. Meat pies such as “Beef Pie,” “Veal Pie,” and “Pork Pie” shall contain meat... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meat pies. 319.500 Section 319.500...

  16. The Ethics of Producing In Vitro Meat

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, G Owen; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-01-01

    The prospect of consumable meat produced in a laboratory setting without the need to raise and slaughter animals is both realistic and exciting. Not only could such in vitro meat become popular due to potential cost savings, but it also avoids many of the ethical and environmental problems with traditional meat productions. However, as with any new technology, in vitro meat is likely to face some detractors. We examine in detail three potential objections: 1) in vitro meat is disrespectful, e...

  17. Changes of meat colour during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Bocian; Hanna Jankowiak; Wojciech Kapelański

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated a relation between objective colour measurement and standard meat quality traits together with changes of meat colour parameters (∆) during the 48 h storage time. Analysed meat derived from 30 market pigs F1 (plw × pl) originated from Kuyavian--Pomeranian voivodeship. In the samples taken from longissimus lumborum muscle at 48 h post mortem the pH48, visual colour intensity and meat heme pigment concentration, as well as meat holding capacity, drip loss and ...

  18. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms What does 'mechanically separated ... Top of Page ] NATURAL: A product containing no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally ...

  19. Meat production perspective in Yucatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Toledo-Lopez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of meat production in Mexico during the last decade is the result of the complex interaction between different areas of livestock production and consumers’ preferences, being the former widely influenced by new tendencies and purchasing capacity. In Yucatan, there are two meat product processing plants. Yucatan’s research projects are basically focused to production, handling and genetics. This research is developed in Research Centers like Universidad Autonoma Yucatan’s Ciencias Biologicas Agropecuarias Campus, INIFAP Mococha, Instituto Tecnologico Conkal and Instituto Tecnologoco Merida. Many projects are inter-institutional and others by Cuerpos Academicos inside the institutions. Grants are provided by state, national or international dependencies. In the Instituto Tecnologico Merida research projects are on different animals’ meat quality and novel meat products.

  20. Meat production perspective in Yucatan

    OpenAIRE

    Victor M. Toledo-Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of meat production in Mexico during the last decade is the result of the complex interaction between different areas of livestock production and consumers’ preferences, being the former widely influenced by new tendencies and purchasing capacity. In Yucatan, there are two meat product processing plants. Yucatan’s research projects are basically focused to production, handling and genetics. This research is developed in Research Centers like Universidad Autonoma Yucatan’s Ciencia...

  1. Assessment of turkey vehicle container microclimate on transit during summer season conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rafael H.; Honorato, Danielle C. B.; Guarnieri, Paulo D.; Soares, Adriana L.; Pedrão, Mayka R.; Oba, Alexandre; Paião, Fernanda G.; Ida, Elza I.; Shimokomaki, Massami

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the formed microclimate commercial truck transport practices effects on the turkeys' welfare by measuring Dead on Arrival (DOA) index and pale, soft, and exudative (PSE-like) meat occurrence. The experimental design was entirely randomized in a 6 × 2 factorial arrangements (two truck container compartments × six water shower groups) with birds positioned at superior front (SF), inferior front (IF), superior middle (SM), inferior middle (IM), superior rear (SR), and inferior rear (IR) and two bath treatments: with water shower (WiS) and without water shower (WoS) with eight replications for each treatment. The animals were transported for 95 min' journey from the farm to the slaughterhouse under hot-humidity conditions. The results shown herein indicated the formation of a thermal core at the inferior middle and rear truck container regions, because the heat produced by the birds and the influence of developed microclimate consisting of temperature, relative humidity, and air ventilation. The IM and IR container compartments under the WoS treatment presented the highest (P meat incidence and DOA index values compared with those located at the front under WiS treatment as the consequence of the altered to birds unbearable conditions within the container microclimate in transit. The formed microclimate during the commercial transport practices under hot-humidity conditions affected the bird's welfare consequently turkey meat qualities.

  2. Effects of heat stress and probiotic supplementation on protein functionality and oxidative stability of ground chicken leg meat during display storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Ji-Han; Yan, Feifei; Cheng, Heng-Wei; Brad Kim, Yuan H

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of heat stress and probiotic supplementation on protein functionality and oxidative stability of ground chicken leg during display storage. Two hundred and forty, 1-day-old male chicks (5 birds per pen) were subjected to four treatments in a 2 (thermoneutral condition at 21 °C and cyclic heat stress at 32-21-32 °C for 10 h day -1 ) × 2 (regular diet with 0 or 0.25 g kg -1 Bacillus subtilis) factorial design. Chickens were harvested at day 46, and pairs of whole legs were collected at 1 day postmortem. The chicken legs were deboned, ground, tray-packaged with oxygen-permeable film, and displayed for 3 days. Heat stress and probiotic supplementation had no impact on pH, water-holding capacity, color, protein functionality, lipid lipolysis and lipid/protein oxidation stability (P > 0.05). Display storage increased the pH and lipid oxidation of ground chicken legs (P chicken leg meat. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. The effects of egg albumin incorporation on quality attributes of pale, soft, exudative (PSE-like) turkey rolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Burcu; Serdaroğlu, Meltem

    2017-05-01

    Pale, soft, exudative (PSE-like) poultry phenomenon has been a growing problem in meat industry in terms of quality and economic losses, thus data is required to evaluate PSE raw material in product formulations. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of egg albumin (EA) utilization on quality characteristics of PSE-like turkey rolls. Turkey Pectoralis major muscles were exposed to either 40 °C to stimulate typical processing causing PSE or 0 °C to reduce PSE and keep the muscles "normal". Turkey rolls were prepared in nine different formulations; using 100% normal (N), 50% normal + 50% PSE (NP) or 100% PSE meat (P). Treatments also included 0, 1 or 2% EA. Addition of EA increased protein content of all samples. L*, a* and b* values were affected by PSE level. Increased levels of PSE caused decreased processing yields, while EA incorporation increased processing yield of the samples. Addition of 1% EA increased water-holding capacity (WHC) of the samples, while higher level of EA (2%) caused decrement in the same. Addition of either 1% or 2% EA was effective in reducing purge loss in P samples. Texture profile analysis showed that EA addition rather had considerable effects on N samples. Sensory scores showed that 1% EA utilization has the potential to increase mostly the mouthfeel of PSE-like products. Results showed that EA could be used as a promising ingredient that improved overall quality of PSE-like turkey rolls.

  4. Significance of authenticity in meat and meat products in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Rezazadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Authenticity of meat products is very important for religious and health reasons in Iran. According to legislation in Iran, the consumption and importation of pork, horse, donkey and cat products should be banned. Therefore, the identification of meat products cannot be judged solely by its appearance. This issue led to the authenticity of bovine, sheep, pig, horse, donkey, chicken and soya (Glycine max in raw and processed meat products.In this study, specific primers were designed for the identification of pig ( base pair, donkey (325 base pair, chicken (391 base pair, sheep (499 base pair, horse (607 base pair, soya (707 base pair and bovine (853 base pair by Polymerase chain reaction. Following PCR, expected,, , 499,,  and  base pair fragments were detectable in pig, donkey, chicken, sheep, horse, soya and bovine, respectively. This protocol can be used for identification of raw and processed meat products in various animal species for replication to regulatory obligations for meat species safety in Iran.

  5. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  6. Snail meat: Significance and consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragićević Olgica

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of snail meat goes back to prehistoric times. Different ancient nations had snails on their menu, but Helices culture as a productive activity was born as a Roman culture. Some of the most economically important edible species are: Helix aspersa (Mtiller Helixpomatia (Linne, Helix iucorum (Linne, Helix aperta (Born, Eobania vermiculata (Miiller. Together with its tasie, snail meat has several advantages over others: quite low lipid rate and calorie values versus rich mineral, essential amino acid and fatty acid content. The composition of snail meat is presented. In addition, the composition of different snail species and the part analyzed (pedal mass and visceral mass is presented. Also, the differences in composition according to the species (snail meat horse/chicken meat, beef, swine meat, fish meat are presented. The French are the world's leading consumers of snails. !n France snails come to market in a variety of ways. Estimated consumption of snails in France is around 40 000 tones/year. Total French imports account for 25% of world imports. France is also the leading exporter of prepared snails, mainly sold as preserved snails and prepared dishes. Snail imports have been much higher than exports (65 tones exported in 2002. vs. 2.700 tones imported. Despite the large consumption, only 3% of snails in France come from production (farming. Italy is in second place in the world consumption of snails, and Spain and Germany are in the third and fourth place. The development of snails consumption in Italy is followed with the same amount of production of snails in the whole biological circle. In 2001, from 24,700 tons, 9,350 tons (37.8% came from production, 6 00 tons (2.4% came from nature, and 14,750 tons (59.70% came from imports (frozen, fresh and prepared snails. In Serbia, at the beginning of 2005, we had over 400 registered farms for snail production.

  7. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on a RTE-meat matrix enhances cell invasiveness to mouse J774A.1 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen-Si; Wang, Chinling; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Chou, Chung-Hsi

    2010-11-15

    It remains unclear whether the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on a ready-to-eat (RTE) meat matrix has an impact on the bacterium's pathogenic abilities. In this study, we investigated the impact of environments on virulence by growing L. monocytogenes (F2365 strain) on brain heart infusion agar (BHI), tryptic soy agar (TSA), and RTE turkey meat matrices. Bacteria cultured from these media were harvested and used to infect mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 with different MOIs to examine their invasion ability. At MOI=10 and 50, the numbers of bacteria recovered from cells infected with turkey-meat-grown Listeria were significantly higher than those from the two nutrient-rich growth media. Additionally, MOI played a role in determining L. monocytogenes recovery rates, since significant differences were found amongst all three groups at low MOI, while no significant differences were found between BHI and TSA groups at high MOI. These results indicate that environmental changes affect the ability of L. monocytogenes to invade and survive intracellularly while grown on RTE-meat matrix. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cold-batter mincing of hot-boned and crust-frozen air-chilled turkey breast allows for reduced sodium content in protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H C; Medellin-Lopez, M; Singh, P; Sansawat, T; Chin, K B; Kang, I

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate sodium reduction in the protein gels that were prepared with turkey breasts after hot boning (HB), quarter (¼) sectioning, crust-frozen air-chilling (CFAC), and cold temperature mincing. For each of 4 replications, 36 turkeys were slaughtered and eviscerated. One-half of the carcasses were randomly assigned to water immersion chilling for chill boning (CB), whereas the remaining carcasses were immediately HB and quarter-sectioned/crust-frozen air-chilled (HB-¼CFAC) in a freezing room (-12°C, 1.0 m/s). After deboning, CB fillets were conventionally minced, whereas HB-¼CFAC fillets were cold minced up to 27 min with 1 or 2% salt. From the beginning of mincing, the batter temperatures of HB-¼CFAC were lower (P batters up to 12 and 21 min for 2 and 1% salts, respectively. Upon mincing, the batter pH of the HB-¼CFAC (P 0.05) from the pH of CB batters, except for the 1% salt HB-¼CFAC batter after 15 min of mincing. The pattern of pH was not changed when the batters were stored overnight. The protein of 2% salt HB-¼CFAC fillets was more extractable (P batter appears to have more open space, less protein aggregation, and more protein-coated fat particles than those of postrigor batters. Based on these results, the combination of HB-¼CFAC and cold-batter-mincing technologies appear to improve protein functionality and sodium reduction capacity. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  9. Pork detection in binary meat mixtures and some commercial food products using conventional and real-time PCR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kahtani, Hassan A; Ismail, Elsayed A; Asif Ahmed, Mohammed

    2017-03-15

    Pork DNA was detected in meat mixtures using both conventional PCR and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Thirty meat mixtures containing beef, chicken, camel, rabbit, goat and sheep with varying percentage of pork (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20%) and 75 commercial food products, were analyzed using conventional and RT-PCR to determine the presence of pork DNA. Pork DNA standard curves and cycle threshold (Ct) values were used for quantification. The detection limits for pork DNA in the mixtures were 0.22, 0.047, 0.048, 0.0000037, 0.015ng/μl respectively. Unlike conventional PCR, RT-PCR detected pork DNA in nine processed food samples [chicken sausages (2), chicken luncheon (2), turkey meat loaf, milk chocolate with soft nougat, jelly, cake, and candies] at pork DNA concentrations of 0.0001ng/μl or less. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PARASITIC MITES IN BACKYARD TURKEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Camacho-Escobar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To describe the parasitic mites in backyard turkeys, was did this work. The mites were obtain by hand for 30 backyard turkeys in Oaxaca’s Coast region, Mexico; the mites were mount in adhesive paper and wash with the 200X lent in a computer optical microscopy, the parasites size were determinate in the pictures obtained by the microscopy software, the images were sized using a specialist software for it, which relate the number of pixels in the picture with the size of the observation field. Were indentified the species Dermanyssus gallinae, Megninia ginglymura and Ornithonyssus sylviarum, the last two described for first time in backyard turkeys in Mexico. Â

  11. Global antioxidant response of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Celia; Barrio, Ángela; Del Mar Cavia, María; Alonso-Torre, Sara

    2017-06-01

    The global antioxidant response (GAR) method uses an enzymatic digestion to release antioxidants from foods. Owing to the importance of digestion for protein breakdown and subsequent release of bioactive compounds, the aim of the present study was to compare the GAR method for meat with the existing methodologies: the extraction-based method and QUENCHER. Seven fresh meats were analyzed using ABTS and FRAP assays. Our results indicated that the GAR of meat was higher than the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) assessed with the traditional extraction-based method. When evaluated with GAR, the thermal treatment led to an increase in the TAC of the soluble fraction, contrasting with a decreased TAC after cooking measured using the extraction-based method. The effect of thermal treatment on the TAC assessed by the QUENCHER method seemed to be dependent on the assay applied, since results from ABTS differed from FRAP. Our results allow us to hypothesize that the activation of latent bioactive peptides along the gastrointestinal tract should be taken into consideration when evaluating the TAC of meat. Therefore, we conclude that the GAR method may be more appropriate for assessing the TAC of meat than the existing, most commonly used methods. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. PHENOTYPIC TRAITS IN ZAGORJE TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Janječić

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Production of turkeys in the region of Hrvatsko zagorje began in second half of 16th century, when there was a little influence of other turkey breeds from other region. Recently, interest for protection and preservation of autochthonous poultry breeds in Croatia is growing and in that sense this investigation was set to determine the phenotypic traits of Zagorje turkey. One hundred 10-month old turkeys (5 males and 20 females of four strains (bronze, black, grey and pale were measured, while egg production data were collected by a poll among the breeders. Average body weight of bronze, black, grey and pale strain males were 7.08, 6.88, 6.10 and 6.09 kg, respectively, while in females the average values were 4.02, 4.07, 3.63, and 3.68 kg. Generally, according to body measures of male birds, other than body weight, of all of the strains of Zagorje turkey, the black one is the biggest, as it had the highest values for body length, length of sternum, length of drumstick, length of shank, depth of chest and head measures. At the same time, the bronze strain had the highest value for carcass width. Body measures mentioned previously were not so different in females. Number of reared chicks was lowest in the pale strain. From the body measures assessed it is possible to conclude that Zagorje turkeys are rather uniform within the strain but differences in most of the breed traits are present between the strains, especially in males of bronze and black strain, when compared to gray and pale strain.

  13. A four-year survey in the farming region of Chile, occurrence and human exposure to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, and dioxin -like polychlorinated biphenyls in different raw meats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Martin, B.V.; Pizarro-Aránguiz, N.; García-Mendoza, D.; Araya-Jordan, C.; Maddaleno, A.; Abad, E.; Galbán-Malagón, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in South America, a four-year survey (2011-2014) was conducted to assess the occurrence of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) in different raw meats (bovine, pork, ovine, chicken, and turkey) sampled from

  14. Quality of deli-style turkey enriched with plant sterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, S; Brunton, N P; Lyng, J G; Harrison, S M; Monahan, F J

    2016-12-01

    Low-fat meat products could be excellent carriers for plant sterols, known for their cholesterol-lowering properties. In this study, we developed a protocol for the manufacture of a deli-style turkey enriched with plant sterols (S) at a level sufficient to deliver the maximum plant sterols amount recommended for cholesterol reduction by the European Food Safety Authority (3 g of plant sterols per day) in a 70 g portion. We investigated the stability of the plant sterols and the effects of their addition on the product quality. Plant sterols remained stable during the seven-day storage period. The addition of plant sterols significantly affected some texture parameters, shear force, lipid oxidation, L values and water-holding capacity compared with control (C). Sensory analysis was carried out by an untrained panel (32) using the difference-from-control test between C and S samples to evaluate first the extent of the overall sensory difference and then the extent of sensory difference on colour, texture and flavour. Results indicated that panellists considered the intensity of the difference between C and S samples to be 'small'. Plant sterols could be used as a potential health-promoting meat ingredient with no effect on plant sterol stability but with some effects on texture and sensory characteristics. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. High pressure processing of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto; Christensen, Mette; Ertbjerg, Per

    Abstract Background: The research of high pressure (HP) processing of meat based foods needs to address how pressure affects protein interactions, aggregation and/or gelation. The understanding of the gel forming properties of myofibrillar components is fundamental for the development of muscle...... based products (Chapleau et al., 2004;Colmenero, 2002). Object: The aim was to study the rheological properties of pork meat emulsion exposed to HP and the effect of HP on the aggregation state of myofibrillar proteins. To address the role of cathepsin in myofibrillar protein degradation the changes...... in the myofibrillar protein pattern and HP-induced change in activity of cathepsin B and L were investigated. Results: In this study we showed that HP treatment of pork meat emulsion, ranging from 0.1 to 800 MPa, induced protein gel formation as shown by the increased Young’s modulus (Fig.1). Analysis of SDS...

  16. Will novel protein foods beat meat? : consumer acceptance of meat substitutes - a multidisciplinary research approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Meat production places a heavy burden on the environment and therefore options are sought to reduce meat consumption. One option is to let new meat substitutes take the place of meat on the plate. This can only succeed when these products are acceptable to consumers. The thesis investigated which

  17. The Efficacy of the clay meat ball as a method of traditional meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: meat ball, protein, mineral content. This work was carried out to determine the effectiveness of the use of clay meat balls (an African traditional method of preserving meat) in extending the shelf life of meat over a period of months against microbial (bacterial and fungal) spoilage and contamination without ...

  18. Meat production in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, M

    1999-05-01

    Developing countries have very diverse food consumption patterns and agricultural production systems. The proportion of meat in national diets varies from negligible in some countries in central Africa to 30-40% in some countries in Latin America and Mongolia. However, the demand for meat in developing countries is increasing rapidly (53%/year from 1982 to 1993), as the result of population growth and the trend for people to move to the cities. Growth rates in consumption are greatest in Asia, with China dominating the statistics, in view of the size of its population. Theoretically, livestock production can be increased to meet this demand, but the multiple roles of livestock in developing countries must be recognized if this is to be achieved in a sustainable manner. Resource-poor farmers who keep livestock may value more highly their contribution to livelihoods and to crop production, through provision of draught power and improvements in soil fertility through the recycling of manure, than the production of more meat. Recognition of the goals of the farmer and the wishes of the consumer regarding meat quality need to be reflected in the way in which opportunities for increasing meat production are identified and communicated to farmers. The impact of the global economy on cereal prices, for example, will also influence which interventions will be economically viable. Interpretation of information in an integral manner, using geographical information systems, mathematical models and/or simple spreadsheet models will be an important ingredient in turning scientific knowledge into increased meat production in developing countries.

  19. Petroleum Gases Market in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumin, S.; Ozyoruk, B.

    2007-01-01

    We are at the beginning of a new millennium. At this stage, we are observing economic and social liberalization efforts and regional alliance projects throughout the world. In this very same process, we are also experiencing a more holistic concept called globalization, which covers rapid and simultaneous dissemination and integration of capital, labor, information and technology, world-wide. This globalization opened a new era where national market economies and local companies went into competition in the international arena. In this era, it became a necessity for the non-liberal economies to catch up with the developments in the international markets and be open to economic and political changes. These developments have brought along many radical economic and social changes throughout the world. Policies adopted in Turkey, with respect to the energy reform process, display a general tendency towards putting in place a legal framework that will support the implementation of good governance principles, and providing conformity with the relevant legislative infrastructure of both OECD and EU countries. Turkey has only limited reserves of oil and natural gas, but substantial reserves of coal, particularly lignite. Energy demand has grown at 4-5 % per annum over the past three decades and will continue to grow rapidly, which will require enormous investments in 2000 and 2020, with the most significant increase being that of natural gas. Because of its limited energy resources, Turkey is heavily dependent on imported oil and gas. There are major oil and gas pipelines going through Turkey and additional pipelines are being constructed or are being planned. There is some production of lignite which is used in power plants and industry. 73 % of the world's proven oil reserves and 72 % of the world's proven gas reserves are located in the surrounding regions of Turkey: Middle East, Caspian Region and Russia. This makes Turkey a crucial bridge between energy rich regions

  20. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of Campylobacter spp. contamination of turkey cecal contents and carcasses during and following the slaughtering process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bily, Lise; Petton, Julie; Lalande, Françoise; Rouxel, Sandra; Denis, Martine; Chemaly, Marianne; Salvat, Gilles; Fravalo, Philippe

    2010-07-01

    The present study aimed to document quantitatively and qualitatively the contamination by thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. of turkey samples during slaughtering. Four Campylobacter-positive turkey flocks were investigated at the slaughterhouse at three different stages: evisceration (cecal content), after carcass rinses but before chilling (neck skin), and after breast meat cut (meat). In each case, the studied flock was slaughtered first thing in the morning any given day of the week. The efficiency of cleaning and disinfecting operations was examined in the facility prior to processing the studied flock. For each flock, 90 samples were collected from cecal contents, neck skins, and meat pieces and checked quantitatively and qualitatively for Campylobacter. Identification of Campylobacter species was determined by PCR, and genetic patterns were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Campylobacter contamination levels of ceca range from 2 to more than 7 Log CFU/g, while those of neck skin range from 0.5 to 3.5 Log CFU/g and those of meat range from 0.1 to 1.9 Log CFU/g. These differences in Campylobacter counts were not associated with a modification of Campylobacter species ratio; however, in the Campylobacter jejuni population, four genetic groups identified from the ceca were not recovered during slaughtering operations and two other genetic groups were only detected after chilling at the cutting stage of the breast meat. The present study suggests that the slaughtering process did not affect Campylobacter species populations; however, it might have influenced the strain population. Finally, the Campylobacter populations found on breast meat were similar to those isolated from the digestive tract of the birds.

  1. In the elderly, meat protein assimilation from rare meat is lower than that from meat that is well done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffière, Caroline; Gaudichon, Claire; Hafnaoui, Noureddine; Migné, Carole; Scislowsky, Valérie; Khodorova, Nadezda; Mosoni, Laurent; Blot, Adeline; Boirie, Yves; Dardevet, Dominique; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Rémond, Didier

    2017-11-01

    Background: Meat cooking conditions in in vitro and in vivo models have been shown to influence the rate of protein digestion, which is known to affect postprandial protein metabolism in the elderly. Objective: The present study was conducted to demonstrate the effect of cooking conditions on meat protein assimilation in the elderly. We used a single-meal protocol to assess the meat protein absorption rate and estimate postprandial meat protein utilization in elderly subjects. Design: The study recruited 10 elderly volunteers aged 70-82 y. Each received, on 2 separate occasions, a test meal exclusively composed of intrinsically 15 N-labeled bovine meat (30 g protein), cooked at 55°C for 5 min [rare meat (RM)] or at 90°C for 30 min [fully cooked meat (FCM)], and minced. Whole-body fluxes of leucine, before and after the meal, were determined with the use of a [1- 13 C]leucine intravenous infusion. Meat protein absorption was recorded with the use of 15 N enrichment of amino acids. Results: Postprandial time course observations showed a lower concentration in the plasma of indispensable amino acids ( P meat leucine in the plasma ( P meat nitrogen to plasma amino acid nitrogen ( P meat amino acids with RM than with FCM. This was associated with decreased postprandial whole-body protein synthesis with RM than with FCM (40% compared with 56% of leucine intake, respectively; P meat cooking conditions have little effect on postprandial protein utilization in young adults, the present work showed that the bioavailability and assimilation of meat amino acids in the elderly is lower when meat is poorly cooked. In view to preventing sarcopenia, elderly subjects should be advised to favor the consumption of well-cooked meat. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02157805. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. MRSA and multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. retail meats, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Beilei; Mukherjee, Sampa; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Davis, Johnnie A; Tran, Thu Thuy T; Yang, Qianru; Abbott, Jason W; Ayers, Sherry L; Young, Shenia R; Crarey, Emily T; Womack, Niketta A; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been detected in retail meats, although large-scale studies are scarce. We conducted a one-year survey in 2010-2011 within the framework of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Among 3520 retail meats collected from eight U.S. states, 982 (27.9%) contained S. aureus and 66 (1.9%) were positive for MRSA. Approximately 10.4% (107/1032) of S. aureus isolates, including 37.2% (29/78) of MRSA, were multidrug-resistant (MDRSA). Turkey had the highest MRSA prevalence (3.5%), followed by pork (1.9%), beef (1.7%), and chicken (0.3%). Whole-genome sequencing was performed for all 66 non-redundant MRSA. Among five multilocus sequence types identified, ST8 (72.7%) and ST5 (22.7%) were most common and livestock-associated MRSA ST398 was assigned to one pork isolate. Eleven spa types were represented, predominately t008 (43.9%) and t2031 (22.7%). All four types of meats harbored t008, whereas t2031 was recovered from turkey only. The majority of MRSA (84.8%) possessed SCCmec IV and 62.1% harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that all ST8 MRSA belonged to the predominant human epidemic clone USA300, and others included USA100 and USA200. We conclude that a diverse MRSA population was present in U.S. retail meats, albeit at low prevalence. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Meat consumption, diabetes and its complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feskens, E.J.M.; Sluik, D.; Woudenbergh, van G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Several prospective studies have reported that risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is elevated in meat consumers, especially when processed meats are consumed. Elevated risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in meat consumers have also been reported. In this overview, the evidence regarding

  4. 9 CFR 319.260 - Luncheon meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Luncheon meat. 319.260 Section 319.260... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Luncheon Meat, Loaves and Jellied Products...

  5. 9 CFR 319.261 - Meat loaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meat loaf. 319.261 Section 319.261... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Luncheon Meat, Loaves and Jellied Products...

  6. Variations in land requirements for meat production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, E. V.; Nonhebel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Production of meat requires substantial amounts of feed grains which in turn require vast amounts of land. Future population growth and increase in consumption will raise the demand for meat and with it the land required for meat production. This paper analyses the various factors that affect land

  7. Breeding for meat quality in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, R.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of improving pig meat quality by selection. Therefore, literature is reviewed to determine the meat quality traits to be used and genetic parameters of those meat quality traits are calculated. A method is described to obtain

  8. 9 CFR 319.304 - Meat stews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Products § 319.304 Meat stews. Meat stews such as “Beef Stew” or “Lamb Stew” shall contain not less than 25... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meat stews. 319.304 Section 319.304 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY...

  9. Characterizing fiber formation in meat analogs using an anisotropic photon migration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghesagara, J.; Hsieh, F.; Yao, G.

    2006-10-01

    Animal meat products may not be the best choice for many people in the world due to various reasons such as cost, health problems, or religious restrictions. High moisture (40-80%) extrusion technology shows a great promise for texturizing vegetable proteins into fibrous meat alternatives. Soy protein which is healthy, highly nutritious, low in both fat and carbohydrate has been used in high moisture extrusion process to produce meat analogs with well formed fiber that resemble chicken or turkey breast meat. Assessing fiber formation in extruded products is important for controlling extrusion quality in manufacturing process. Although several methods have been studied for quantifying fiber formation in extrudates, their applications for real time quality control in manufacturing process have been challenging. We explored the possibility of applying a nondestructive method based on backscattered reflectance to measure the fiber formation of extruded soy proteins. An image processing method was developed to extract the light reflectance profile at the extrudates' surface. We applied the anisotropic continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory to quantitatively describe the fiber formation in extrudates based on extracted surface reflectance profiles. This method has a potential to be used as a non-destructive, fast, real time quality control tool for products with fibrous structures.

  10. Bacteriophage application on red meats and poultry: Effects on Salmonella population in final ground products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y; Purushothaman, P; Gupta, N; Ragnone, M; Verma, S C; de Mello, A S

    2017-05-01

    This research was conducted to study the effects of bacteriophage application during tumbling on Salmonella populations in ground meat and poultry. Red meat trim and poultry were inoculated with a Salmonella cocktail to result in a contamination level of 7logCFU/g in ground products. A commercial preparation containing bacteriophages S16 and Felix-O1a (FO1a) was applied during tumbling at 10 7 and 10 8 PFU/ml. Samples were held at 4°C for 6h and 18h (red meat) and 30min and 6h (poultry). Overall, bacteriophage application on trim reduced 1 and 0.8logCFU/g of Salmonella in ground beef and ground pork, respectively. For ground chicken and ground turkey, Salmonella was reduced by 1.1 and 0.9logCFU/g, respectively. This study shows that bacteriophage application during tumbling of red meat trim and poultry can provide additional Salmonella control in ground products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Early Childhood Inclusion in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diken, Ibrahim H.; Rakap, Salih; Diken, Ozlem; Tomris, Gozde; Celik, Secil

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of young children with disabilities into regular preschool classrooms is a common practice that has been implemented for several decades in industrialized nations around the world, and many developing countries including Turkey have been developing and implementing laws, regulation, and services to support inclusion and teaching in…

  12. Thalassemia mutations in Gaziantep, Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... spectrum of beta-thalassemia genes in Spain by use of dot-blot analysis of amplified beta-globin DNA. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 43: 95-. 100. Basak AN (2008). The molecular pathology of β-Thalassemia in Turkey: The Bogazici University Experience. Hemoglobin 31: 233-241. Baysal E, Indrak K, Bozkurt G, ...

  13. Thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canatan, Duran

    2014-01-01

    Thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies are a serious health problem in Turkey. There is a 70-year history of thalassemia in Turkey. The first patient with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) was reported in 1941. The first clinical and hematological studies were published by Aksoy in 1958. The overall incidence of β-thalassemia (β-thal) was reported by Çavdar and Arcasoy to be 2.1% in 1971. Important steps such as written regulations, education and prevention campaigns, have been taken to prevent thalassemia in Turkey by the Ministry of Health (MOH), the Turkish National Hemoglobinopathy Council (TNHC) and the Thalassemia Federation of Turkey (TFT) since 2000. A national hemoglobinopathy prevention program was started in provinces with a high prevalence by the MOH in 2003. While the percentage of premarital screening test was 30.0% of all couples in 2003, it reached 86.0% in 2013. While the number of newborn with thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies was 272 in 2002, it had dropped to 25 in 2010. There has been a 90.0% reduction of affected births in the last 10 years.

  14. Highlights of Science for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Abdus

    It is an honour and a privilege for me to have been invited to speak on Physics in the Year 2000, in Turkey and in the Islamic world, at this gathering convened by the prestigious journal, the Insan ve Kainat and in the presence of those who run this great country…

  15. Human Metapneumovirus in Turkey Poults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayudhan, Binu T.; Nagaraja, Kakambi V.; Thachil, Anil J.; Shaw, Daniel P.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to reexamine the hypothesis that human metapneumovirus (hMPV) will not infect turkeys. Six groups of 2-week-old turkeys (20 per group) were inoculated oculonasally with 1 of the following: noninfected cell suspension; hMPV genotype A1, A2, B1, or B2; or avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype C. Poults inoculated with hMPV showed nasal discharge days 4–9 postexposure. Specific viral RNA and antigen were detected by reverse-transcription PCR and immunohistochemical evaluation, respectively, in nasal turbinates of birds exposed to hMPV. Nasal turbinates of hMPV-infected turkeys showed inflammatory changes and mucus accumulation. Each of the 4 hMPV genotypes caused a transient infection in turkeys as evidenced by clinical signs, detection of hMPV in turbinates, and histopathologic examination. Detailed investigation of cross-species pathogenicity of hMPV and aMPV and its importance for human and animal health is needed. PMID:17235379

  16. Suicide in Batman, Southeastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altindag, Abdurrahman; Ozkan, Mustafa; Oto, Remzi

    2005-01-01

    The southeastern part of Turkey has comparatively high female suicide rates. We aimed to research social, economic, cultural, and psychiatric reasons of suicides in Batman in a case-controlled psychological autopsy study comparing suicides with matched community controls. The female suicide rate was 9.3 per 100.000 and the female/male ratio was…

  17. September 1975 Lice, Turkey Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Eastern Turkey. A magnitude 6.7 earthquake that struck the Turkish district of Lice at 12:20 local time (09:20 UTC) on September 6, 1975, killing 2,311 people. The...

  18. Mobility in Turkey. Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazgan, M. [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Turan Gunes Bulvari, Hollanda Caddesi, No.5,06550 Yildiz-Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide information about electric vehicles (EVs) and e-mobility as an emerging market in Turkey. EVs receive attention from the Turkish government for a number of reasons: Turkey has a strong automotive industry and needs to follow the technological developments taking place regarding intelligent vehicles and intelligent transport systems, as well as electric transportation technologies. Secondly, a considerable amount of carbon emissions from motor vehicles is of great concern in relation to climate change. EVs might be an alternative which can break the dependence of Turkey on imported fuel that has a negative influence on its current account deficit (CAD). On top of these factors, the Prime Minister of Turkey has a desire to have a 'Local Brand Vehicle' before the 100th year of the establishment of the Republic in 2023 and preferably an 'EV'. EVs are included in the strategy documents and action plans of almost all ministries and public institutions. Among all ministries, the Ministry of Science, Industry and Technology (MoSI and T) takes a leading position. It holds bi-annual meetings with stakeholders to monitor and evaluate progress about the level of actualization of the identified policies on e-mobility. MoSI and T's related institution of the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) co-ordinates the R and D activities and provides generous R and D incentives. EVs have been put on sale in Turkey in 2012 and are still very limited in number. Public institutions are taking the lead by converting their vehicle fleet to EVs. EVs are also more suitable for businesses/ duties with a fixed/short route; therefore it is expected that the growth of the sector will mainly come from the vehicle fleet of the public organisations and institutions, followed by the private vehicle fleet of companies, e.g. freight companies. Although there are some on-going test drives, it is not yet proven

  19. Genotypic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from chickens and turkeys in the midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Kassem, Issmat I; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Goyal, Sagar M; Lauer, Dale; Voss, Shauna; Nagaraja, Kakambi V

    2017-05-01

    Salmonella is one of the most common causes of foodborne illnesses in humans in the United States, and domestic poultry is considered an important source of this pathogen. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Heidelberg is the fourth most commonly reported Salmonella from retail meats and food animals in the United States. We assessed the genotypes and antimicrobial resistance phenotypes of Salmonella Heidelberg isolated from various chicken and turkey hatcheries and breeder farms in the Midwest. The genotypes of 33 S. Heidelberg isolates from chickens ( n = 19) and turkeys ( n = 14) were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Cluster analysis of the fingerprints showed that the majority of the chicken isolates grouped together with 87% similarity; those from turkeys clustered with 88% similarity. Similarity between chicken and turkey isolates was also high (86%). Isolates from turkeys were generally more genetically diverse than those from chickens. Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis detected resistance to sulfisoxazole (36% of the isolates), streptomycin (33%), gentamicin (27%), tetracycline (24%), ampicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (15%), cefoxitin (12%), ceftriaxone and ceftiofur (12%), and chloramphenicol (9%). None of the isolates was resistant to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or nalidixic acid. Although the number of the isolates was limited in our study, we conclude that S. Heidelberg isolates from the same host generally clustered together and that a considerable number of the isolates were resistant to a number of antimicrobial agents.

  20. Effectiveness of inactivation of foodborne pathogens during simulated home pan frying of steak, hamburger or meat strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahou, Evy; Wang, Xiang; De Boeck, Elien; Verguldt, Elien; Geeraerd, Annemie; Devlieghere, Frank; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-08-03

    In order to evaluate the effect of simulated home pan frying of raw meat and meat preparations of different animal species on the thermal inactivation of pathogens, the heat resistance (D-value) of three strains of Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes and two strains of generic E. coli was validated in BHI and adjusted BHI (i.e. pH5.6 and 1.5% NaCl) at 60°C. The D-values were obtained of the linear phase of the survivor curves created in GInaFiT, a freeware tool to fit models to experimental data. The obtained D-values corresponded to those previously published in literature and confirmed L. monocytogenes to be the most heat resistant pathogen among them. Heat treatment in adjusted BHI significantly increased heat-resistance of E. coli O157:H7 and generic E. coli. Subsequently, the thermal inactivation of L. monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., C. jejuni and E. coli O157:H7 was evaluated using a standardized procedure simulating commonly used home pan frying of various types of meat including steaks or filets, hamburgers and meat strips from various animal species such as pork, beef, chicken, lamb and some turkey, horse, kangaroo and crocodile meat. Corresponding F70-values were calculated based upon measured core time/temperature profiles. It was noted that a core temperature of 70 °C was not always achieved and, moreover, a heat treatment equivalent to 2 min at 70 °C was also not always obtained. This was in particular noted in hamburgers although the meat was visually judged well done. On several occasions, residual survivors of the initial inoculated (4 logCFU/g) food borne pathogens could be recovered either by enumeration (limit of detection 1 logCFU/g) or by the presence/absence testing per 25 g. Pan frying of hamburgers yielded the highest number of surviving pathogenic bacteria (46%), followed by well-done filets and steaks (13%) and meat strips (12%). Taking only steaks (beef, horse, kangaroo, crocodile and

  1. Turkey's status in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aykol, F.; Oezkan, R.; Atila, B.; Hanguel, G.; Aksu, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Turkey is a country with dynamic economic development and rapid population growth and nuclear energy is an integral part of these dynamics. Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) is in charge of regulation and control of all activities related to nuclear field, including safety inspections and licensing. The TAEA is also responsible for the sensitive task of improving public awareness of nuclear technology which includes the use of nuclear power. Turkey's experience with nuclear power dates back to the 1960's, as the first nuclear research reactor started to operate in Istanbul in 1962. There were various plans for the introduction of nuclear power to the country. However the plans for the construction of the first nuclear power in the country were postponed for an indefinite period in 2000. In the wake of this decision TAEA initiated the activities to establish a nuclear policy in the country which includes creating the technical know-how and establishing new generation nuclear power plants in Turkey. The Authority is also responsible for the safe use of nuclear energy in medicine, agriculture, animal health, industry, food irradiation and in all kinds of research activities. The authority has carried or is currently continuing 12 National Technical Cooperation, 30 Research Contract, 21 Regional Europe ongoing IAEA projects and 31 State Planning Organization projects. There were 7571 radiological, 208 radiotherapy, 3792 industrial and 214 instruments licensed and registered by the Radiation Health and Safety Department of the Authority. We are in the opinion that developing a nuclear technology substructure in both Turkey and Turkish Countries will be of great benefit for the Euro-Asia region. We must emphasize that Turkey is the partner of all nonproliferation treaties and has no intention of using nuclear power for non peaceful purposes whatsoever

  2. Meat, dairy, and cancer1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Zaynah; Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) report judged that the evidence for an association between red and processed meat consumption and colorectal cancer was convincing. In addition, the effect of other animal products on cancer risk has been studied, and the WCRF/AICR report concluded that milk probably decreases the risk of colorectal cancer but diets high in calcium probably increase the risk of prostate cancer, whereas there was limited evidence for an association between milk and bladder cancer and insufficient evidence for other cancers. There are several potential mechanisms relating meat to cancer, including heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, and heme iron. Although the evidence in favor of a link between red and processed meat and colorectal cancer is convincing, the relations with other cancers are unclear. In this review, we summarize cohort studies conducted by the National Cancer Institute on meat and dairy intake in relation to cancer since the 2007 WCRF/AICR report. We also report the findings of meta-analyses published since 2007. PMID:24847855

  3. Fetal programming in meat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Wang, Bo; Fu, Xing; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Nutrient fluctuations during the fetal stage affects fetal development, which has long-term impacts on the production efficiency and quality of meat. During the early development, a pool of mesenchymal progenitor cells proliferate and then diverge into either myogenic or adipogenic/fibrogenic lineages. Myogenic progenitor cells further develop into muscle fibers and satellite cells, while adipogenic/fibrogenic lineage cells develop into adipocytes, fibroblasts and resident fibro-adipogenic progenitor cells. Enhancing the proliferation and myogenic commitment of progenitor cells during fetal development enhances muscle growth and lean production in offspring. On the other hand, promoting the adipogenic differentiation of adipogenic/fibrogenic progenitor cells inside the muscle increases intramuscular adipocytes and reduces connective tissue, which improves meat marbling and tenderness. Available studies in mammalian livestock, including cattle, sheep and pigs, clearly show the link between maternal nutrition and the quantity and quality of meat production. Similarly, chicken muscle fibers develop before hatching and, thus, egg and yolk sizes and hatching temperature affect long-term growth performance and meat production of chicken. On the contrary, because fishes are able to generate new muscle fibers lifelong, the impact of early nutrition on fish growth performance is expected to be minor, which requires further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental footprints in the meat chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Đekić, I.; Tomašević, I.

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper was to present environmental performance of the meat chain and highlight main environmental footprints. The meat sector is recognized as one of the leading polluting sectors in the food industry. The meat chain was analyzed from a five-link perspective introducing the following actors: farm(er)s, slaughterhouses, meat processors, customers and consumers. Meat production needs natural resources (water and energy) resulting in waste and waste water discharge. As an outcome it has a high influence on climate change in respect to global warming, acidification and eutrophication potentials and ozone depletion substances.

  5. Regulations on Meat Hygiene in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Robert (Skip) A.

    Regulations on meat hygiene in the United States of America (US) stem from the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA, 21 USC §§ 601 et. seq.), promulgated in 1906, that gives the US Secretary of Agriculture (the Secretary) the power to oversee the conversion of livestock into meat products. The FMIA is reviewed herein to provide a background for discussion on how the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its departments, particularly the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), control and regulate the meat industry. This chapter discusses regulations that pertain to meat, herein meant to mean beef, veal, and pork, and does not specifically address poultry, although the regulations for poultry slaughter and processing are in many ways similar to those for meat and meat food products.

  6. Main Concerns of Pathogenic Microorganisms in Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørrung, Birgit; Andersen, Jens Kirk; Buncic, Sava

    Although various foods can serve as sources of foodborne illness, meat and meat products are important sources of human infections with a variety of foodborne pathogens, i.e. Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Verotoxigenic E. coli and, to some extent, Listeria monocytogenes. All these may be harboured in the gastrointestinal tract of food-producing animals. The most frequent chain of events leading to meat-borne illness involves food animals, which are healthy carriers of the pathogens that are subsequently transferred to humans through production, handling and consumption of meat and meat products. Occurrences of Salmonella spp., C. jejuni/coli, Y. enterocolitica and Verotoxigenic E. coli in fresh red meat vary relatively widely, although most often are between 1 and 10%, depending on a range of factors including the organism, geographical factors, farming and/or meat production practices.

  7. POSSIBILITIES OF USING MEAT PRODUCTS OF INDUSTRIALLY MANUFACTURED BEIKOST FOR ALLERGY PREVENTION IN CHILDREN OF 0–1 YEARS OF AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Turti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical periods of atopic status formation in children of 0-1 years of age dictate the need in search and introduction to practice of effective allergy prevention methods. The aim of this study is to substantiate efficacy of using hypoallergenic beikost products on the basis of turkey or rabbit meat for prevention of atopic disease and polyvalent allergy development. The study participants are children over 6 months of age with compromised family allergology anamnesis and mild skin manifestation of allergy. The results have confirmed low sensitizing potential of the studied beikost products, good tolerability and efficacy of use for the prevention of atopic process development. The obtained results allow recommending the studied turkey or rabbit meat purees to the risk group children and children with allergy as primary/secondary allergy preventive means and within therapeutic diets.

  8. Identification of species origin of meat and meat products on the DNA basis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Rajiv Ranjan; Sharma, Brahm Deo; Gokulakrishnan, Palanisamy; Mendiratta, Sanjod Kumar; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The adulteration/substitution of meat has always been a concern for various reasons such as public health, religious factors, wholesomeness, and unhealthy competition in meat market. Consumer should be protected from these malicious practices of meat adulterations by quick, precise, and specific identification of meat animal species. Several analytical methodologies have been employed for meat speciation based on anatomical, histological, microscopic, organoleptic, chemical, electrophoretic, chromatographic, or immunological principles. However, by virtue of their inherent limitations, most of these techniques have been replaced by the recent DNA-based molecular techniques. In the last decades, several methods based on polymerase chain reaction have been proposed as useful means for identifying the species origin in meat and meat products, due to their high specificity and sensitivity, as well as rapid processing time and low cost. This review intends to provide an updated and extensive overview on the DNA-based methods for species identification in meat and meat products.

  9. Effect of Various Inoculum Levels of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg (2011 Ground Turkey Outbreak Isolate on Cecal Colonization, Dissemination to Internal Organs, and Deposition in Skeletal Muscles of Commercial Turkeys after Experimental Oral Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divek V. T. Nair

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg (S. Heidelberg is a major foodborne pathogen colonizing poultry. The pathogen is associated with a significant number of foodborne outbreaks through contaminated poultry meat, including turkeys. Recently, multidrug-resistant (MDR strains of S. Heidelberg have emerged as a threat to human public health in the United States. The objective of this study was to determine the cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and the potential for skeletal muscle deposition of an MDR S. Heidelberg isolate from the 2011 ground turkey outbreak in the United States after the experimental oral challenge of poults (young turkeys and adult turkey hens. In the poult study, two separate experiments using day-old, straight-run, commercial hybrid converter poults were randomly assigned to five challenge groups (0, 10∧2, 10∧4, 10∧6, 10∧8 CFU groups; 12 poults/group; N = 60/experiment and a week after, treatment groups were challenged separately with 0-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8- log10 CFU of S. Heidelberg orally. After 14 days post-challenge, the poults were euthanized, and samples were collected to determine MDR S. Heidelberg colonization in the cecum, dissemination to liver and spleen, and deposition in the thigh, drumstick, and breast muscles. A similar experimental design was followed for the adult turkey hens. In two separate experiments, 11-week-old commercial Hybrid Converter turkey hens (4 hens/group; N = 20/experiment were challenged with MDR S. Heidelberg and on day 16 post-challenge, birds were euthanized and samples were collected to determine Salmonella populations in the samples. The results indicated that, in turkey poults, the recovery of MDR S. Heidelberg was highest in the cecum followed by spleen, liver, thigh, drumstick, and breast. All tested inoculum levels resulted in more than 3.5 log10 CFU/g colonization in the poult cecum. The cecal colonization, dissemination to internal organs, and tissue

  10. Control of salmonella in meat and meat products by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempster, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights the importance of food irradiation in the protection of the public against food poisoning from eating meat or meat products contaminated with salmonella. Salmonella infections are increasing at an alarming rate (2000 in 1952 to 12000 reported cases in 1982 in England and Wales alone). Dr. Dempster reports that 50% of the chicken carcasses examined by workers in America were found to be salmonella contaminated. Use of irradiation in conjunction with mild refrigeration can extend the shelf-life of vacuum packed chicken by a factor of three. Important legislation now under discussion in the U.S.A. is likely to extend the applicability of food irradiation rapidly in the near future

  11. Meat quality traits and proteome profile of woody broiler breast (pectoralis major) meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, K; Shao, W; Chen, X; Campbell, Y L; Nair, M N; Suman, S P; Beach, C M; Guyton, M C; Schilling, M W

    2018-01-01

    Woody breast meat has recently become prevalent in the broiler industry in both the United States and European Union. Recent publications have described the meat quality characteristics of woody breast meat as having hardened areas and pale ridge-like bulges at both the caudal and cranial regions of the breast. The present study investigated the meat quality (pH, color, cooking loss, and shear force) and protein quality characteristics (protein and salt-soluble protein content) in woody breast meat as compared to normal breast meat. In addition, the differences in the muscle proteome profiles of woody and normal breast meat were characterized. Results indicated that woody breast meat had a greater average pH (P 0.05) in comparison to normal breast meat samples. The L*, a*, and b* values of woody breast fillets were greater than normal breast fillets (P < 0.0001 to L*; P = 0.002 to a*; P = 0.016 to b*). The woody breast meat had more fat (P < 0.0001) and moisture (P < 0.021) and less protein (P < 0.0001) and salt-soluble protein (P < 0.0001) when compared with normal breast fillets. Whole muscle proteome analysis indicated 8 proteins that were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) between normal and woody breast meat samples. The differences in muscle proteome between normal and woody breast meat indicated an increased oxidative stress in woody breast meat when compared to normal meat. In addition, the abundance of some glycolytic enzymes, which are critical to the regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in postmortem muscles, was lower in woody breast meat than in normal breast meat. Proteomic differences provide additional information on the biochemical pathways and genetic variations that lead to woody breast meat. Further research should be conducted to elucidate the genetic and nutritional contributions to the proliferation of woody breast meat in the United States. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. Post-deportation risks under the EU-Turkey statement: what happens after readmission to Turkey?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpes, M.J.; Tunaboylu, Sevda; Ulusoy, Orcun; Hassan, Saima

    2017-01-01

    This policy brief examines whether asylum seekers readmitted from Greece to Turkey after the EU-Turkey Statement as of April 2016 were able to access effective protection in Turkey thereafter (see graph, return trend, p. 2). The EU has long collaborated with countries of origin and transit in the

  13. CONCENTRATION OF CADMIUM IN MEAT AND SELECTED MEATS PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anetta Lukáčová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The cadmium concentrations depend on the environmental conditions and food production methods. The monitoring of cadmium concentration in meat is important for human health. The concentrations of cadmium in meat and meat products collected from central Slovakia, in the central Europe region and from different countries of West Europe were assessed using by AA spectrometer with graphite furnace (PerkinElmer AAnalyst 80, MA, USA. Within starting materials we detected the highest values of cadmium in beef from foreign production (0.1101 ppm, followed by pork from foreign production (0.0901 ppm in Lovecka salama and pork thigh (0.0523 ppm in selected ham. In Lovecka salami we were found the highest concentration of cadmium in final samples from foreign starting materials, followed by homogenized samples from foreign starting materials, final samples from domestic starting materials and homogenized samples from domestic starting materials (0.3728, 0.3549, 0.2387, 0.2112 ppm, respectively. The highest concentration of cadmium in selected ham were found in final products from foreign starting materials, homogenized samples from foreign starting materials, final products from domestic starting materials and homogenized samples from domestic starting materials (0.1453, 0.1382,0.0810, 0.0734 ppm, respectively. The obtained results suggested that the concentrations of cadmium are higher in homogenized samples and final products in Lovecka salami and selected ham in comparison with to starting materials. Technological process of meat processing can create a potential source of heavy metals in final products.

  14. Microbiological characteristics of poultry meats - Results of inspections carried out in the province of Milano, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Grilli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Examinations were conducted in terms of microbiological quality/quantity (TMC, Coliforms, E. coli, S. aureus, Sulphate-reducing Clostridia, B. cereus, Salmonella spp. and Lysteria spp. and Campylobacter spp. on 240 poultry meat samples (chicken, turkey and quail acquired pursuant to the standards set by the Regional Plan of programming and coordination in the field of operations concerning official inspections of Lombardia animal origin and by a few private companies for self-inspection. The TMC was consistently low and in line with reports in the literature, as was the case with coliforms, E. coli, S. aureus, sulphatereducing Clostrides and B. cereus. In the case of Salmonella spp., only 5 samples tested positive: one for S. typhimurium and one for S. enteritidis (chicken; only one sample from turkey tested positive for S. blokley, and two out of five samples analysed from quail tested positive result for S. typhimurium. About 3% of the samples analyzed tested positive for Listeria monocitogenes, but they were within the legal limits. Research on Campylobacter thermophiles has involved only 50 samples, of which only 5 have tested positive. These results confirm the high quality of hygiene and cleanliness of poultry meat, in accordance with that reported in the national literature and with respect to EU norms.

  15. Susceptibility of convalescent turkeys to pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, R A; Sacco, R E

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary lesions resulting from Aspergillus fumigatus inoculation were assessed in convalescent turkeys and compared with those in previously noninoculated (control) turkeys. In addition, lesions observed in small Beltsville white (SBW) turkeys were compared with those in broad-breasted white (BBW) turkeys challenged with the same inoculum. Turkeys were challenged by unilateral posterior thoracic air sac (PTAS) inoculation, rechallenged via the contralateral air sac after 5 wk, and then necropsied 1 wk later. Pulmonary lesions induced by the initial challenge had resolved in 6 of 10 SBW and 9 of 10 BBW turkeys. However, convalescence did not protect against pulmonary aspergillosis subsequent to rechallenge; 10 of 10 SBW and 9 of 10 BBW developed granulomatous pulmonary lesions on the side of reexposure. A greater proportion of control SBW turkeys developed pneumonia and airsacculitis following challenge as compared with the BBW breed. Lesions were limited to the lower respiratory tract in all turkeys and were confined to the ipsilateral lung and PTAS in the singly inoculated control turkeys. This study demonstrates that convalescence from pulmonary aspergillosis does not confer protection against rechallenge but may, instead, decrease resistance to subsequent infection.

  16. Handmade guns in Trabzon, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Riza; Birincioğlu, Ismail; Uner, H Bulent; Erkol, Zerrin; Butun, Celal; Acikgoz, Dinc; Bulut, Erkut R

    2009-07-01

    A wide variety of handmade firearms have been involved in criminal cases in the city of Trabzon, Turkey. Although they are often very similar to commercially manufactured firearms in terms of design, loading and locking mechanisms, and cocking and firing arrangements, these guns are constructed from cheap materials and are not safe for firing. Handmade firearms manufactured in the Black Sea region of Turkey, particularly in the city of Trabzon, are similar to pistols manufactured by Browning, Luger, Star, Smith and Wesson, Berretta, and MAB. A total of 201 handmade guns referred to the Criminal Police Laboratories for examination from 2003 to 2005 were evaluated with respect to type, number of barrels, size and caliber, rifling, design, mechanism, operability, legality, and similarity to commercial models. We found that most of these handmade guns resembled commercial models in several aspects.

  17. Renewable energy education in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acikgoz, Caglayan [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Bilecik University, P.O.11030, Bilecik (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    Utilization of renewable energy sources and the application of environmentally sound energy technologies are essential to sustainable development and will help to secure the quality of living and the well-being of the future generations. Turkey presently has considerable renewable energy sources. The most important renewable sources are hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass. The use of renewable energy as a topic to study energy and its forms permits a novel way to motivate students, particularly those who energy topics taking conscience with the environment. This paper presents the analysis and classification of renewable energy sources and how to find out their origin and a way to motivate students in energy topics related to renewable sources and also, the development of didactic competencies in special blended learning arrangements for educationalists, trainers and lecturers in adult education in the field of renewable energies in Turkey. (author)

  18. Parasitic zoonotic diseases in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmiye Altintas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Zoonoses and zoonotic diseases are becoming more common and they are now receiving increased attention across the world. Zoonotic parasites are found in a wide variety of protozoa, cestodes, nematodes, trematodes and arthropods worldwide and many zoonotic parasites have assumed an important role. The importance of some parasitic zoonoses has increased in recent years due to the fact that they can be agents of opportunistic infections. Although a number of zoonotic parasites are often found and do cause serious illnesses in Turkey, some are more common and these diseases are more important as they cause serious public health problems, such as leishmaniasis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, echinococcosis, trichinellosis and toxocariasis. Information on these zoonotic diseases is provided here as these are the most important zoonotic parasitic diseases in Turkey.

  19. Geothermal energy development in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, S.; Okandan, E.

    1990-01-01

    Geothermal fields in Turkey are related to rather complex zones of collision between the Eurasian and African continents, and penetration of the Arabian plate into the Anatolian continental mass. These processes gave rise to fracturing of the lithosphere and eruption of magmas. Geothermal regional assessment studies have proven several low enthalpy sources and some high enthalpy fields suitable for electricity generation. This paper summarizes developments in exploration-drilling and give examples of direct utilization implemented in recent years

  20. Endangered Lilium Species of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Demir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Turkey, which is among the major gene centers of the world and has a special place in plant genetic diversity. However, many plant genetic resources, including geophytes, are under genetic erosion because of the environmental and other problems and therefore face with the danger of extinction. Lilium ciliatum is endemic to North East Anatolia. IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Natural Resources Red List Category of this species is Endangered (EN. Lilium ciliatum naturally grown in Zigana pass, Bayburt, Trabzon, Bulancak, Giresun and Gümüşhane is endangered and major threats of L. ciliatum are road construction and human disturbance related to ecotourism and recreation. It was reported that Lilium carniolicum naturally grown in Turkey is endangered although it isn’t in the IUCN Red List. Distribution areas of L. carniolicum are Trabzon, Rize, Artvin and it is also endemic to North East Anatolia. These species have high potential for use as ornamental plants with their colorful big flowers. In addition, the bulbs of these species are also used in the cosmetic industry and medicine. These are the main properties that increase the importance of L. ciliatum and L. carniolicum species. Therefore it is very important to protect the habitats of these species, ensure the continuity of their generations. The disappearance of these endemic species from our country means to disappear from the world. This review has been given in order to give some information about the endangered Lilium species of Turkey and conservation actions on these species in Turkey flora and take attention to the issue.

  1. Turkey and European Security Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    another Enlargement?.” Hughes’s work, for the Friends of Europe Foundation, details the economic and demographic drivers of Turkish integration to...history of Turkish cinema : “Valley of the Wolves Iraq.” The United States military deemed the film and its viewers potentially dangerous enough that...culture and even in the demographic makeup of modern Turkey. The Ottoman Empire’s retreat from the Balkans changed the ethnic composition both of

  2. Standard Practice for Irradiation of Fresh and Frozen Red Meat and Poultry to Control Pathogens and Other Microorganisms

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice outlines procedures for the irradiation of fresh or frozen meat and poultry. Note 1—The Codex Alimentarius Commission defines meat as “the edible part of any mammal” and poultry as “any domesticated bird, including chicken, turkeys, ducks, geese, guinea-fowls, or pigeons” (CAC/MISC 5). Note 2—Current U.S. regulations limit the definition of livestock species to cattle, sheep, swine, goat, horse, mule, or other equine and poultry species to chicken, turkey, duck, goose, and guinea (2, 3). 1.2 This practice covers absorbed doses used for inactivation of parasites and reduction of bacterial load in fresh and frozen red meat and poultry. Such doses are typically less than 10 kGy. 1.3 This practice addresses irradiation of pre-packaged product for retail sale or for use as an ingredient in other products. It also addresses the in-line irradiation of unpackaged product. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It i...

  3. Prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in poultry meat and meat products imported in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostova Sandra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp. is leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in human population in all parts of the world. In most of the cases infection with Campylobacter spp. in humans originate from contaminated poultry meat and poultry meat products. This study was designed to estimate prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in meat and meat products imported in Republic of Macedonia. During the period of 8 months (January-August 2008 we tested 56 samples of meat and meat products (poultry meat, MDM, pork meat, beef meat and smoked beef. Samples were submitted to analysis for detection of thermo-tolerant Campylobacter spp. according to ISO 10272:1995. We determined among the analyzed samples highest prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in MDM with 84% positive samples, poultry meat with 81,8%, pork meat with 10%. We didn.t detect any positive samples in beef meat and smoked beef. Overall prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in all tested samples was 55,36%. This study shows that the high prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in tested samples and in correlation with severe symptoms in humans are reasons good enough for the producing and processing poultry meat industry and food business operators so they should take in consideration Campylobacter spp. in their risk assessment and preparation of HACCP plan.

  4. Impact of Selected Factors on the Occurrence of Contact Dermatitis in Turkeys on Commercial Farms in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bartels

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In a long term research project in Germany the influence of husbandry on the health of fattening turkeys (Study 1 as well as the influence of practiced rearing conditions on the health of turkey poults (Study 2 was examined in 24 farms and at the meat processing plant. In all examined rearing farms, litter samples for the determination of litter moisture were taken. This paper summarizes the results obtained by our working group from 2007 until 2012. The results elucidate the universal problem of foot pad dermatitis (FPD. Nearly 100% of the observed turkeys showed a clinically apparent FPD at the meat processing plant. Furthermore, skin lesions of the breast, especially breast buttons were diagnosed, particularly at the slaughterhouse. FPD was detected in the first week of the rearing phase. Prevalence and degree showed a progressive development up to the age of 22–35 days, whereas 63.3% of the poults had foot pad alterations. As even mild alterations in the foot pad condition can be indicators for suboptimal design of the rearing environment, especially high litter moisture, it is important to focus on the early rearing phase.

  5. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  6. Assessment of turkey vehicle container microclimate on transit during summer season conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Rafael H; Honorato, Danielle C B; Guarnieri, Paulo D; Soares, Adriana L; Pedrão, Mayka R; Oba, Alexandre; Paião, Fernanda G; Ida, Elza I; Shimokomaki, Massami

    2018-01-23

    This study evaluated the formed microclimate commercial truck transport practices effects on the turkeys' welfare by measuring Dead on Arrival (DOA) index and pale, soft, and exudative (PSE-like) meat occurrence. The experimental design was entirely randomized in a 6 × 2 factorial arrangements (two truck container compartments × six water shower groups) with birds positioned at superior front (SF), inferior front (IF), superior middle (SM), inferior middle (IM), superior rear (SR), and inferior rear (IR) and two bath treatments: with water shower (WiS) and without water shower (WoS) with eight replications for each treatment. The animals were transported for 95 min' journey from the farm to the slaughterhouse under hot-humidity conditions. The results shown herein indicated the formation of a thermal core at the inferior middle and rear truck container regions, because the heat produced by the birds and the influence of developed microclimate consisting of temperature, relative humidity, and air ventilation. The IM and IR container compartments under the WoS treatment presented the highest (P container microclimate in transit. The formed microclimate during the commercial transport practices under hot-humidity conditions affected the bird's welfare consequently turkey meat qualities.

  7. Characterization and evaluation of the spoilage potential of Lactococcus piscium isolates from modified atmosphere packaged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkila, Riitta; Nieminen, Timo; Johansson, Per; Säde, Elina; Björkroth, Johanna

    2012-05-01

    A total of 222 psychrotrophic lactococci isolated from use-by day, modified atmosphere packaged (MAP) meat were identified to the species level by numerical analyses of EcoRI and ClaI ribopatterns and phylogenetic sequence analyses of 16S, rpoA and pheS genes. In addition, their meat spoilage potential was studied. The majority of the isolates (n=215) were identified as Lactococcus piscium, while seven isolates belonged to Lactococcus raffinolactis. L. piscium was shown to be adapted to growing in a variety of MAP meat products including broiler, turkey, pork, and minced meat from beef and pork, where they belonged to the predominating microbiota at the end of the storage. Numerical analyses of EcoRI and ClaI ribopatterns, and phylogenetic sequence analyses of rpoA and pheS genes were shown to be reliable tools in species level identification of meat lactococci. The spoilage potential of L. piscium was evaluated by inoculating representative isolates to MAP pork stored at 6 °C for 22 days. Development of spoilage population was monitored using a culture-independent T-RFLP approach. The sensory shelf life of pork inoculated with L. piscium was shortened compared to the uninoculated control. Alongside with the inoculated L. piscium isolates, Leuconostoc spp. present as initial contaminants in the samples thrived. This shows that even though lactococci were inoculated at higher levels compared to the natural microbiota, they did not occupy the niche and prevent the growth of other lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro antimicrobial effect of Satureja wiedemanniana against Bacillus species isolated from raw meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Nihal; Aslim, Belma; Ozdoğan, Hakan

    2009-08-01

    In this study a total of 30 raw meat samples obtained from Ankara, Turkey were screened for the presence of Bacillus species. Among the meat samples analyzed, the predominant species isolated was Bacillus circulans; other Bacillus species were identified as Bacillus firmus, Bacillus lentus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus sphaericus, and Bacillus cereus. Minced meat samples were more contaminated with Bacillus species than sliced beef sample. From these samples, 242 Bacillus species isolates were obtained, which were investigated for proteolytic and lipolytic activity, associated with meat spoilage. Interestingly, some Bacillus strains produced the highest values of proteolytic/lipolytic activities. Nineteen Bacillus strains were selected among the 242 isolates according to their proteolytic/lipolytic activity with a clear zone diameter of > or =6 mm. The essential oil of Satureja wiedemanniana (Lalem) Velen was also tested against these 19 Bacillus species that had proteolytic and lipolytic activity. The essential oil yield obtained from the aerial parts of the plant was 0.35% (vol/wt). The inhibition zones of the essential oil obtained against all the Bacillus species were in the range of 5.0-12.0 mm. The oil showed high antimicrobial activities against B. licheniformis M 6(26), M 11(16), and M 12(1) strains. B. licheniformis 12(1) showed high lipolytic activity (18.0 mm). Also, B. licheniformis M 6(26) and M 11(16) showed high proteolytic activity (16.0 and 14.0 mm). These results may suggest that an essential oil of S. wiedemanniana can be used as a natural preservative in meat against spoilage bacteria.

  9. The Ethics of Producing In Vitro Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, G Owen; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-05-01

    The prospect of consumable meat produced in a laboratory setting without the need to raise and slaughter animals is both realistic and exciting. Not only could such in vitro meat become popular due to potential cost savings, but it also avoids many of the ethical and environmental problems with traditional meat productions. However, as with any new technology, in vitro meat is likely to face some detractors. We examine in detail three potential objections: 1) in vitro meat is disrespectful, either to nature or to animals; 2) it will reduce the number of happy animals in the world; and 3) it will open the door to cannibalism. While each objection has some attraction, we ultimately find that all can be overcome. The upshot is that in vitro meat production is generally permissible and, especially for ethical vegetarians, worth promoting.

  10. Chinese ethnic meat products: Continuity and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weicai; Wen, Wenting; Deng, Yue; Tian, Yuanyuan; Sun, Honghu; Sun, Qun

    2016-10-01

    With their distinctive sensory characterizations and unique processing technologies, Chinese ethnic meat products possess great potential for development and continuity in modern China's meat industry. Due to the greater demand for meat products and higher quality and safety concerns in economically fast growing China, the development and continuity of ethnic meat products face its own unique challenges. In this review, the classification of typical ethnic products and their characteristics, and the research progress on their quality and processing technologies are discussed. The application of innovative and green technologies to improve the safety and quality of ethnic meat products for greater industrialization and sustainable development is highlighted. Furthermore, the strategy for promoting the production of Chinese ethnic meat products during the next five years is presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Introducing the new meat. Problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellan Welin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cultured meat, or in vitro meat, is one of the ideas that are being proposed to help solve the problems associated with the ever-growing global meat consumption. The prospect may bring benefit for the environment, climate, and animal ethics, but has also generated doubts and criticism. A discussion of the possible environmental benefit and of animal ethics issues in relation to cultured meat production will be given. A perceived 'unnaturalness' of cultured meat may be one of the strongest barriers for public acceptance. This will be discussed and rejected. As to our relations with nature and animals, it is plausible that cultured meat will lead to improvement rather than to deterioration. The issue of public acceptance and some of the problems of introducing this new product on the market will also be discussed.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v7i1.1788

  12. Of the importance of a leaf: the ethnobotany of sarma in Turkey and the Balkans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Yunus; Nedelcheva, Anely; Łuczaj, Łukasz; Drăgulescu, Constantin; Stefkov, Gjoshe; Maglajlić, Aida; Ferrier, Jonathan; Papp, Nora; Hajdari, Avni; Mustafa, Behxhet; Dajić-Stevanović, Zora; Pieroni, Andrea

    2015-04-03

    Sarma - cooked leaves rolled around a filling made from rice and/or minced meat, possibly vegetables and seasoning plants - represents one of the most widespread feasting dishes of the Middle Eastern and South-Eastern European cuisines. Although cabbage and grape vine sarma is well-known worldwide, the use of alternative plant leaves remains largely unexplored. The aim of this research was to document all of the botanical taxa whose leaves are used for preparing sarma in the folk cuisines of Turkey and the Balkans. Field studies were conducted during broader ethnobotanical surveys, as well as during ad-hoc investigations between the years 2011 and 2014 that included diverse rural communities in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Kosovo, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey. Primary ethnobotanical and folkloric literatures in each country were also considered. Eighty-seven botanical taxa, mainly wild, belonging to 50 genera and 27 families, were found to represent the bio-cultural heritage of sarma in Turkey and the Balkans. The greatest plant biodiversity in sarma was found in Turkey and, to less extent, in Bulgaria and Romania. The most commonly used leaves for preparing sarma were those of cabbage (both fresh and lacto-fermented), grape vine, beet, dock, sorrel, horseradish, lime tree, bean, and spinach. In a few cases, the leaves of endemic species (Centaurea haradjianii, Rumex gracilescens, and R. olympicus in Turkey) were recorded. Other uncommon sarma preparations were based on lightly toxic taxa, such as potato leaves in NE Albania, leaves of Arum, Convolvulus, and Smilax species in Turkey, of Phytolacca americana in Macedonia, and of Tussilago farfara in diverse countries. Moreover, the use of leaves of the introduced species Reynoutria japonica in Romania, Colocasia esculenta in Turkey, and Phytolacca americana in Macedonia shows the dynamic nature of folk cuisines. The rich ethnobotanical diversity of sarma confirms the urgent need to

  13. Benevolent technotopias and hitherto unimaginable meats: Tracing the promises of in vitro meat

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Today, in vitro (Latin: in glass) meat researchers strive to overhaul meat production technologies by producing meat outside animal bodies, primarily by culturing cells. In the process, meat should become healthier, more environmentally friendly and kinder to animals. In this article, I scrutinize (and problematize) this promissory discourse by examining the world that proponents envision alongside the world from which promises emerge. First, I trace the increasing number of publications stri...

  14. 9 CFR 311.38 - Meat and meat byproducts from livestock which have been exposed to radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meat and meat byproducts from... MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.38 Meat and meat byproducts from livestock which have been...

  15. Environmental impacts of cultured meat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomisto, Hanna L; de Mattos, M Joost Teixeira

    2011-07-15

    Cultured meat (i.e., meat produced in vitro using tissue engineering techniques) is being developed as a potentially healthier and more efficient alternative to conventional meat. Life cycle assessment (LCA) research method was used for assessing environmental impacts of large-scale cultured meat production. Cyanobacteria hydrolysate was assumed to be used as the nutrient and energy source for muscle cell growth. The results showed that production of 1000 kg cultured meat requires 26-33 GJ energy, 367-521 m(3) water, 190-230 m(2) land, and emits 1900-2240 kg CO(2)-eq GHG emissions. In comparison to conventionally produced European meat, cultured meat involves approximately 7-45% lower energy use (only poultry has lower energy use), 78-96% lower GHG emissions, 99% lower land use, and 82-96% lower water use depending on the product compared. Despite high uncertainty, it is concluded that the overall environmental impacts of cultured meat production are substantially lower than those of conventionally produced meat.

  16. Turkey and Iran Transcaucasia Policy: Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А V Suleimanov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Turkey and Iran Transcaucasia modern foreign policy is analyzed. As is known, Turkey and Iran historically were the competing parties for spheres of influence in Transcaucasia, as well as Russia, the USA and the Great Britain. Regional relations between Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia are discussed in context of Nagorno-Karabakh and Georgia-South Ossetia conflicts and Caspian problem.

  17. Enteric parvovirus infections of chickens and turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken and turkey parvoviruses are members of the Parvovirus family. Comparative sequence analysis of their genome structure revealed that they should form a new genus within the vertebrate Parvovirinae subfamily. The first chicken and turkey parvoviruses were identified by electron microscopy duri...

  18. Contributions to lichen biota of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Sezer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 175 lichenized and 12 lichenicolous fungi taxa are reported from 65 localities in 30 different provinces of Turkey. Some of these taxa are new record for one or more provinces from Turkey. Localities in which studied lichen taxa were collected, were given by stating its subtrate characteristics.

  19. New Records of Aphid Fauna in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Kaygin, Azize Toper; Gorur, Gazi; Cota, Figen

    2010-01-01

    Three aphid species were identified as new records for Turkey aphid fauna from Bartin province. These species are Ceruraphis viburnicola (Gillette) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Dysaphis apiifolia (Theobald) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Macrosiphum mordvilkoi Miyazaki (Hemiptera: Aphididae). These records increase the recorded aphid-fauna of Turkey to 433 species.

  20. Higher Education Policies and Overeducation in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Nader

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades Turkey has experienced a rapid increase in higher education student enrollment. This sharp increase in access to higher education has satisfied a strong social demand for university education but it has led to a growing surplus of university graduates who cannot find adequate jobs. As a result Turkey has entered an…

  1. Turkey: energy consuming and intermediary country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccaroni, G.

    1999-01-01

    Turkey's fast-growing economy and favourable geographical situation will make it a first-level player in the Mediterranean energy market, both as an energy consuming and intermediary country. Its very good relations with the United States may probably support and reinforce Turkey in the role of intermediary [it

  2. Rights of the Child in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Yasmin

    This report to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child contains observations of the World Organisation Against Torture (OMCT) concerning the application of the Convention by Turkey and observations regarding violence against girls in Turkey. The report is presented in three major parts. Part 1 asserts that despite the considerable…

  3. Citizenship Education in Turkey: Inclusive or Exclusive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Basak

    2012-01-01

    This paper scrutinises citizenship education in Turkey from the foundation of the Turkish Republic (1923) to the present and explores the extent to which it encourages inclusive or exclusive concepts of national identity and citizenship. In Turkey, where there are citizens belonging to ethnic and religious minorities, civic education plays a…

  4. 9 CFR 319.311 - Chow mein vegetables with meat, and chop suey vegetables with meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chow mein vegetables with meat, and chop suey vegetables with meat. 319.311 Section 319.311 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY...

  5. Consumers' motivational associations favoring free-range meat or less meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Boersema, J.J.; Aiking, H.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper analyzed the motivational orientations of consumers who choose to eat (1) small portions of meat or (2) ethically distinctive meat, such as free-range meat, in relation to the motivational orientations of their opposites. Going beyond the conventional approach to consumer behavior,

  6. Longissimus muscle transcriptome profiles related to carcass and meat quality traits in fresh meat Pietrain carcasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, te M.F.W.; Keuning, E.; Hulsegge, B.; Hoving-Bolink, A.H.; Evans, G.; Mulder, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    High quality pork is consumed as fresh meat while other carcasses are used in the processing industry. Meat quality is determined measuring technical muscle parameters. The objective of this research was to investigate the molecular regulatory mechanisms underlying meat quality differences of pork

  7. An Insight of Meat Industry in Pakistan with Special Reference to Halal Meat: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Jamil, Faraz

    2017-01-01

    Livestock is considered central component in agricultural sector of Pakistan, provides employment to more than 8 million families. Meat and meat products holds pivotal significance in meeting dietary requirements serving as major protein source and provide essential vitamins and minerals. Globally, consumer demand is increasing for healthy, hygienic and safe meat and meat products due to growing population, income level and food choices. As, food choices are mainly influenced by region, religion and economic level. However, religion is one of the major factor to influence the food choices. In this context, halal foods a growing trend, trade estimated to cross USD $ 3 trillion and among this, meat sector contribute about US$ 600 billion. Halal meat and allied products is requirement from Muslims but it is also accepted by non-Muslims due to safe and hygienic nature, nutritious value and superior quality. Pakistan meat industry is vibrant and has seen rigorous developments during last decade as government also showed interest to boost livestock production and processing facilities to meet increasing local and global demand. The industry has potential to grow owing to its natural animal rearing capability, muslim majority country (96% of total population), improvisation of market and consumer preference towards halal meat. Current review debates Pakistan meat industry scenario, production trend, global trade as well as future potential with respect to modernization, processing, distribution and trade. The data presented here is useful for meat producers, processors and people involved in export of Pakistani meat and meat based products.

  8. Testing problem solving in turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) using the string-pulling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Anne Margaret; Watson, Jane; Demers, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To examine problem solving in turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), six captive vultures were presented with a string-pulling task, which involved drawing a string up to access food. This test has been used to assess cognition in many bird species. A small piece of meat suspended by a string was attached to a perch. Two birds solved the problem without apparent trial-and-error learning; a third bird solved the problem after observing a successful bird, suggesting that this individual learned from the other vulture. The remaining birds failed to complete the task. The successful birds significantly reduced the time needed to solve the task from early trials compared to late trials, suggesting that they had learned to solve the problem and improved their technique. The successful vultures solved the problem in a novel way: they pulled the string through their beak with their tongue, and may have gathered the string in their crop until the food was in reach. In contrast, ravens, parrots and finches use a stepwise process; they pull the string up, tuck it under foot, and reach down to pull up another length. As scavengers, turkey vultures use their beak for tearing and ripping at carcasses, but possess large, flat, webbed feet that are ill-suited to pulling or grasping. The ability to solve this problem and the novel approach used by the turkey vultures in this study may be a result of the unique evolutionary pressures imposed on this scavenging species.

  9. Transmission of Pasteurella multocida on California turkey premises in 1988-89.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, K H; Carpenter, T E; Snipes, K P; Hird, D W

    1992-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of whole-cell DNA was used to determine possible sources of Pasteurella multocida for each outbreak of fowl cholera occurring in turkey flocks in eight commercial poultry companies in California from October 1988 to September 1989. Over this period, 179 isolates of P. multocida were obtained from dead turkeys in 80 meat and breeder flocks on 43 premises. P. multocida was isolated from wildlife on five premises. Isolates were characterized by subspecies, serotype, presence of plasmid DNA, and REA type. In 52 (65%) flocks, all isolates of P. multocida had the same REA pattern as the M9 live vaccine strain following digestion of DNA with the restriction enzyme SmaI. Field strains of P. multocida were obtained from 27 (34%) flocks, and one flock (1%) yielded both M9 and a field strain of the organism. REA of field strains of P. multocida revealed 17 different SmaI REA types. Based on matching SmaI REA types, potential sources of P. multocida were identified for 15 of the 28 flocks infected with field strains of the organism, and transmission between turkey premises was a possibility in only seven flocks.

  10. Serologic evidence of avian metapneumovirus infection among adults occupationally exposed to Turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Ghazi; Ortiz, Ernesto J; Chorazy, Margaret L; Nagaraja, Kakambi V; DeBeauchamp, Jennifer; Webby, Richard J; Gray, Gregory C

    2011-11-01

    Genetically similar, the avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) and the human MPV (hMPV) are the only viruses in the Metapneumovirus genus. Previous research demonstrated the ability of hMPV to cause clinical disease in turkeys. In this controlled, cross-sectional, seroepidemiological study, we examined the hypothesis that aMPV might infect humans. We enrolled 95 adults occupationally exposed to turkeys and 82 nonexposed controls. Sera from study participants were examined for antibodies against aMPV and hMPV. Both in bivariate (OR=3.2; 95% CI: 1.1-9.2) and in multivariate modelling adjusting for antibody to hMPV (OR=4.1; 95% CI: 1.3-13.1), meat-processing workers were found to have an increased odds of previous infection with aMPV compared to controls. While hMPV antibody cross-reactivity is evident, these data suggest that occupational exposure to turkeys is a risk factor for human infection with aMPV. More studies are needed to validate these findings, to identify modes of aMPV transmission, and to determine risk factors associated with infection.

  11. Trends in meat and meat products packaging – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kurek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of any packaging system for fresh muscle foods is to prevent or delay undesirable changes to the appearance, flavour, odour, and texture. Deterioration in these qualities can result in economic losses due to consumer rejection of the product. Therefore, a preservative packaging should ideally inhibit undesirable enzyme activities, but not interfere with, or inhibit, activities that are beneficial. The non-enzimatic reactions that affect the organoleptic qualities of raw meats are invariably undesirable, so these should preferably be slowed or prevented by a preservative packaging.

  12. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in cured deli-style Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen A; McDonnell, Lindsey M; Von Tayson, Roxanne; Wanless, Brandon; Badvela, Mani

    2013-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes growth can be controlled on ready-to-eat meats through the incorporation of antimicrobial ingredients into the formulation or by postlethality kill steps. However, alternate approaches are needed to provide options that reduce sodium content but maintain protection against pathogen growth in meats after slicing. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibition of L. monocytogenes by propionic acid-based ingredients in high-moisture, cured turkey stored at 4 or 7°C. Six formulations of sliced, cured (120 ppm of NaNO2 ), deli-style turkey were tested, including control without antimicrobials, 3.2% lactate-diacetate blend (LD), 0.4% of a liquid propionate-benzoate-containing ingredient, or 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5% of a liquid propionate-containing ingredient. Products were inoculated with 5 log CFU L. monocytogenes per 100-g package (3 log CFU/ml rinsate), vacuum-sealed, and stored at 4 or 7°C for up to 12 weeks; and populations were enumerated by plating on modified Oxford agar. As expected, the control without antimicrobials supported rapid growth, with >2 log average per ml rinsate increase within 4 weeks of storage at 4°C, whereas growth was observed at 6 weeks for the LD treatment. For both replicate trials, all treatments that contained liquid propionate or propionate-benzoate limited L. monocytogenes growth to an increase of 1-log increase) was observed in individual samples for all propionate-containing treatments at weeks 10, 11, and 12. As expected, L. monocytogenes grew more rapidly when products were stored at 7°C, but trends in relative inhibition were similar to those observed at 4°C. These results verify that propionate-based ingredients inhibit growth of L. monocytogenes on sliced, high-moisture, cured turkey and can be considered as an alternative to reduce sodium-based salts while maintaining food safety.

  13. British American Tobacco's failure in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S

    2009-02-01

    Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) considered Turkey an important, potential investment market because of its high consumption rates and domestic commitment to tobacco. This paper outlines how British American Tobacco (BAT) attempted to establish a joint venture with the government monopoly TEKEL, while waiting for privatisation and a private tender. Analysis of tobacco industry documents from the Guildford Depository and online tobacco document sources. BAT failed to establish a market share in Turkey until 2000 despite repeated attempts to form a joint venture with Turkey's tobacco monopoly, TEKEL, once the market liberalised in the mid 1980s. BAT's failure in the Turkish market was due to a misguided investment strategy focused solely on acquiring TEKEL and is contrasted with Philip Morris success in Turkey despite both TTCs working within Turkey's unstable and corrupt investing climate.

  14. Energy production for environmental issues in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Ibrahim; Arman, Hasan; Halil Demirel, Ibrahim

    2017-11-01

    Due to the diversification efforts of energy sources, use of natural gas that was newly introduced into Turkish economy, has been growing rapidly. Turkey has large reserves of coal, particularly of lignite. The proven lignite reserves are 8.0 billion tons. The estimated total possible reserves are 30 billion tons. Turkey, with its young population and growing energy demand per person, its fast growing urbanization, and its economic development, has been one of the fast growing power markets of the world for the last two decades. It is expected that the demand for electric energy in Turkey will be 580 billion kWh by the year 2020. Turkey's electric energy demand is growing about 6-8% yearly due to fast economic growing. This paper deals with energy demand and consumption for environmental issues in Turkey.

  15. Radappertization of chicken and pork meat by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna C, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    In this report the benefits that presents the irradiation process in the conservation of meat products, as the chicken, head meat and pig meat are analysed, also the implications that it brings in health and economical aspects. (Author)

  16. Wildlife of southern forests habitat & management (Chapter 9): Wild Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    James G. Dickson

    2003-01-01

    A traditional and very important game species of southern forests is the wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). The wild turkey is a truly wild creature and inspires an amazing level of admiration and devotion among turkey hunters. Wild turkeys have stout legs that support the heavy bird and are used to scratch for food, and short powerful wings...

  17. The history of liver transplantation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Gökhan; Arslan, Gülnaz; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for end-stage liver diseases. The first successful liver transplant was performed in the United States by Thomas Starzl in 1967. The first successful solid organ transplant in Turkey was a living-related kidney transplant performed by Dr. Haberal in 1975. After much effort by Dr. Haberal, the Turkish parliament enacted a law about organ transplantation in 1979. After clinical and experimental studies, the first liver transplant in Turkey was performed by Dr. Haberal in 1988. The first successful partial living-donor liver transplant in children in Turkey was performed by the same team on March 15, 1990. On April 24, 1990, the first living-donor liver transplant was performed on a child in Turkey using a left lateral segment by Dr. Haberal and coworkers. On May 16, 1992, Dr. Haberal performed a simultaneous living-donor liver and kidney transplantation to an adult from the same donor. There currently are 30 liver transplantation centers in Turkey. According to data from the Ministry of Health, there presently are 2065 patients in Turkey who are waiting for a liver transplantation. From January 2002 to June 2013, there were 6091 liver transplants performed in Turkey (4020 living-donor [66% ] and 2071 deceased donor liver transplants [34% ]). From January 2011 to June 2013, there were 2514 patients who had liver transplants in Turkey, and 437 patients (17%) died. The number of liver transplants per year in Turkey reached 1000 transplants in 2012 and more than 1150 transplants in 2013 (15.1/million/y). Therefore, Turkey has one of the highest volumes of liver transplantation per population worldwide, with 90% survival within 1 year after transplantation.

  18. A dark, firm dry-like condition in turkeys condemned for cyanosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, J G; Barbut, S; Vaillancourt, J P; Martin, S W; McEwen, S A

    2000-02-01

    A case-control study (n = 130) was conducted on toms condemned for cyanosis. Color (CIE L*a*b*), pH, and physical characteristics were measured on the Pectoralis major at slaughter and after 24 h. Meat from carcasses condemned for cyanosis had dark, firm, dry-like traits. It was darker and redder and showed higher water-holding capacity, lower cooking loss, and higher gel strength than did controls. Perimortem pH was negatively correlated with the lightness (L*) of meat at the time of slaughter (r = -0.58) and at 24 h postmortem (r = -0.64), positively correlated with water-holding capacity (r = 0.73) and gel strength (r = 0.43) and negatively correlated with cooking loss (r = -0.50). Ultimate pH was negatively correlated with lightness (L*) of meat at slaughter time (r = -0.62) and at 24 h postmortem (r = 0.79) was positively correlated with water-holding capacity (r = 0.87) and gel strength (r = 0.61) and negatively correlated with cooking loss (r = -0.52). Tests based on pH and L* of the P. major were also assessed; tests based on pH had a sensitivity in the range of 0.79 to 0.89 and specificity (Sp) of 0.60 to 0.94. Tests based on L* showed sensitivity of 0.75 to 0.92, and specificity of 0.79 to 0.97. The repeatability of measurements varied from good (L*: rho = 0.6) to excellent (pH: rho = 0.92). Overall, turkey breast condemned for cyanosis showed dark, firm, dry-like traits. Tests based on color and pH are described as a means of identifying turkeys condemned for cyanosis.

  19. Meet meat: An explorative study on meat and cultured meat as seen by Chinese, Ethiopians and Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, G.A.; Tobi, H.; Fischer, A.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this cross-cultural study we investigated how study participants from China, Ethiopia and the Netherlands operationalize the concept of meat and to what extent cultured meat fits or does not fit into this operationalization. We argue that combining the conceptual approaches symbolic boundaries

  20. Genotype, production system and sex effects on fatty acid composition of meat from goat kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mustafa; Demirel, Gulcan; Yakan, Akın; Ekiz, Bülent; Tölü, Cemil; Savaş, Türker

    2015-02-01

    Two trials were performed to assess the meat fatty acid profile of goat kids from different genotypes, production systems and sex. In the first trial, genotype effect was determined in 24 suckling male kids from Turkish Saanen, Maltese and Gokceada breeds. In the second trial, male and female Gokceada Goat kids were used to compare the effect of extensive and semi-intensive production systems on fatty acid composition of meat. Significant genotype effect was observed in the percentages of myristic acid (C14:0), palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1 n-9), linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3), despite no differences on the ratios of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids (PUFA/SFA) and n-6/n-3 (P > 0.05). The effect of production system had also significant effects on fatty acids, but sex only influenced significantly stearic acid (C18:0), C18:1 n-9 and C18:3 n-3 fatty acids and total PUFA level and PUFA/SFA ratio. This study confirms that dairy breeds are prone to produce higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in their muscle. Meanwhile, meat from Gokceada goat kids, which is one of the indigenous breeds in Turkey, had similar PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 ratios to Turkish Saanen and Maltase. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Multimedia and children in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, A M; Yalçin, S S

    1999-01-01

    Multimedia will be regarded as essential tools for children to create their new world. The effects of television on young children's life have been well studied. Television differs, however, from other media, including the movies, in its pervasive impact on children. Children spend more time watching television than any other activity except sleeping. Overall 31% of children spent at least 4 hours a day watching television during weekday and 71.7% during weekend in Turkey. Television's influence on children is a function of the length of time they spend watching and the cumulative effect of what they see. Television may be a cause as well as a solution for many serious childhood problems. Excessive viewing of television has also been linked to aggressive behavior, violence, childhood obesity. On the other hand, television may act as a socializing agent and as a learning tool if the recommendations of American Academy of Pediatrics is learned by pediatricians, parents and broadcasters. The use of home personal computers in urban residence increased from 3.2% in 1993 to 6.5% by January 1998 in Turkey. Around 20% of computer households reported owing a modem. Internet has been using only for 5 years in Turkey. Nearly 40% of computer households also used CD-ROM equipment. The percentage of schools that have a computer laboratory is only 2.64%. On the other hand, multimedia allows students to move away from a uniform education for everyone to assert individual identity, liberalize education and management. It seems likely that, within the next few years, most of the countries with substantial internet infrastructure will use the internet as the major medium for disseminating information, including information on children. To prepare students for such a world demands that educational systems make the best possible use of all knowledge and technologies currently available.

  2. ACTIVE PACKAGING SYSTEM FOR MEAT AND MEAT PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Pavelková

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, food packaging was used to enable marketing of products and to provide passive protection against environmental contaminations or influences that affect the shelf life of the products. However, unlike traditional packaging, which must be totally inert, active packaging is designed to interact with the contents and/or the surrounding environment. Interest in the use of active packaging systems for meat and meat products has increased in recent years. Active packaging systems are developed with the goal of extending shelf life for foods and increasing the period of time that the food is high quality. Developments in active packaging have led to advances in many areas, including delayed oxidation and controlled respiration rate, microbial growth, and moisture migration. Active packaging technologies include some physical, chemical, or biological action which changes interactions between a package, product, and/or headspace of the package in order to get a desired outcome. Active packaging systems discussed include oxygen scavengers, carbon dioxide scavengers and emitters, moisture control agents, flavour/odour absorbers and releasers  and antimicrobial packaging technologies. Active packaging is typically found in two types of systems; sachets and pads which are placed inside of packages, and active ingredients that are incorporated directly into packaging materials.  Recognition of the benefits of active packaging technologies by the food industry, development of economically viable packaging systems and increased consumer acceptance is necessary for commercial realisation of these packaging technologies.doi:10.5219/205

  3. Clostridium difficile in Retail Meats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-16

    Clostridium difficile is a common cause of diarrhea in healthcare settings but little is known about what causes cases in the community. In this podcast, CDC's Dr. L. Clifford McDonald discusses two papers in the May 2009 edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases that explore whether the organism could be found in meat samples purchased in grocery stores in Arizona and Canada.  Created: 4/16/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/16/2009.

  4. Comparison of conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Listeria spp. in ground beef, turkey, and chicken breast fillets in İzmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of Listeria species in refrigerated fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef was evaluated, comparing the conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH uses hybridization of a nucleic acid sequence target of a microorganism with a specific DNA probe labeled with a fluorochrome and imaging by a fluorescence microscope. First, Listeria was inoculated in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, or ground beef, and the applicability of the FISH method was evaluated. Second, Listeria was detected in fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef by culture and FISH methods. Listeria was isolated from 27 (37.4%) of 216 samples by the standard culture method, whereas FISH detected 25 (24.7%) preenriched samples. Of these isolates, 17 (63%) were L. innocua, 6 (22%) L. welshimeri, and 4 (14.8%) L. seeligeri. Overall, the prevalences of Listeria spp. found with the conventional culture method in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef were 9.7, 6.9, and 20.8%, whereas with the FISH technique these values were 11.1, 6.9, and 16.7%, respectively. The molecular FISH technique appears to be a cheap, sensitive, and time-efficient procedure that could be used for routine detection of Listeria spp. in meat. This study showed that retail raw meats are potentially contaminated with Listeria spp. and are, thus, vehicles for transmitting diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, underlining the need for increased precautions, such as implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points and consumer food safety education.

  5. Impact of EU Enlargement on the Romanian Meat Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Nistor

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With over twenty years ago, Romania was a big producer of meat, with breeding pigs steers and lambs farms, throughout the country. At present, the meat industry has declined considerably. For many years, however, Romania from the exporter of meat has become a fresh meat and meat products importer. Meat consumption per capita in Romania is about half the EU average (92 kg. Romanians show a strong preference for pork, although chicken meat consumption is increasing. The current financial crisis will trigger a decline in terms of meat consumption in EU countries including in Romania.

  6. Beneficial effects of enrichment of chicken meat with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin E and selenium on health parameters: a study on male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczka, P; Rozbicka-Wieczorek, A J; Czauderna, M; Smulikowska, S

    2017-08-01

    Consumption of chicken meat enriched with bioactive compounds such as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAn-3), vitamin E (vE) and selenium (Se) can help prevent many diseases and can be used to deliver those substances to humans. This might be of importance as chicken meat consumption is increasing worldwide. The effects of enriching chicken meat with PUFAn-3, vE and Se through dietary interventions were studied in rats. Four groups of Ross 308 female broilers from day 22 to day 35 of age were fed control diet (L) that contained lard and 80 mg vE and 0.3 mg Se/kg, or diets that contained rape seeds and fish oil with the same level of Se and vE as in the control diet, the same level of Se as in the control and 150 mg vE/kg, or 150 mg of vE and 0.7 mg Se/kg. Broiler carcasses were boiled, deboned, lyophilized and pooled by group. Boiled edible components of chicken carcass (BECC) were included (240 g/kg) in the diets fed to four groups of ten 10-week-old Wistar male rats for 8 weeks. Inclusion of BECCs modulated dietary fatty acid profile in the rat diets. Feeding these diets did not influence parameters related to growth or relative weights of internal organs in the rats. Feeding BECCs with lower PUFAn-6/n-3 decreased the n-6/n-3 ratio in the rat brain and liver, and increased the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid in the brain lipids. Liver cholesterol level was similar among the experimental groups, whereas the concentration of vE in the liver of rats fed BECC with increased vE levels was higher than that in the rats fed BECC with the basal vE level. Haematological and biochemical parameters in blood were within the normal range for rats, but a few rats showed a tendency towards increased levels because of the higher vE and Se level. The health-promoting effect of feeding rats PUFAn-3 enriched BECC was more pronounced when an increased dietary level of vE was used, but the increased level of Se did not provide the rats with additional benefits. Thus, the

  7. The effect of salt replacers and flavor enhancer on the processing characteristics and consumer acceptance of turkey sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrasik, Zeb; Gaudette, Nicole J

    2015-07-01

    Producing high-quality processed meats that contain reduced amounts of sodium chloride is a major challenge facing industry owing to the importance of sodium chloride toward the functional, microbial stability and sensory properties of these products. In order to create reduced sodium alternatives, a number of commercial salt replacers and flavor enhancers have entered the market; however, their ability to be applied in processed meats requires investigation. In this study, two salt replacers (Ocean's Flavor - OF45, OF60) and one flavor enhancer (Fonterra™ Savoury Powder - SP) were evaluated for their ability to effectively reduce sodium while maintaining the functional and sensory properties of turkey sausages. Functionality via instrumental measures (yield, purge loss, pH, expressible moisture, proximate composition, sodium content, color, texture), safety (microbiological assessment) and consumer acceptability were obtained on all samples. All non-control treatments resulted in products with sodium chloride contents below Canada's Health Check™ Program target for processed meats. There was no detrimental effect on water binding and texture in treatments when NaCl was substituted with OF60 sea salt replacers. Sodium reduction had no negative effect on the shelf life of the turkey sausages with up to 60 days of refrigerated storage. Consumer acceptability for all attributes did not differ significantly, except for aftertaste, which scored lowest for OF45 compared with the control (regular NaCl content). This work demonstrated that salt replacers could potentially substitute for NaCl in smoked turkey sausages; however, further flavor optimization may be required to suppress undesirable levels of bitterness elicited by some of these ingredients. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Production of crispy bread snacks containing chicken meat and chicken meat powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HULYA CAKMAK

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chicken meat in two different forms (chicken meat and chicken meat powder were added into white flour and whole wheat blend baguette bread formulations for protein enrichment and finally developing new and healthy snacks. The chicken meat and powder levels were 10% for white flour baguette, and 15% for whole wheat blend. The dried baguette samples were packaged under 100% N2, and physical, chemical, microbiological and sensorial properties were evaluated during 3 months of storage. Protein content of chicken meat powder added samples were found statistically higher than chicken meat added samples. Hardness of the snacks was significantly affected from type of chicken meat, such as values were higher for chicken meat added samples than chicken meat powder added samples. Lipid oxidation of the snacks was determined by TBA analysis, and TBA value for whole wheat mixture snack with 15% of chicken meat was the highest among all during storage. The highest overall acceptance score was obtained from white flour snack with 10% chicken meat. There was no coliform bacteria detected during storage and the results of yeast-mold count and aerobic plate count of snacks remained between the quantitative ranges.

  9. Changes in meat quality characteristics of bovine meat during the first 6 days post mortem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Huidobro, F; Miguel, E; Onega, E; Blázquez, B

    2003-12-01

    The development of some quality parameters in bovine meat during the first 6 days of post mortem ageing was studied in two commercial groups (heifer and bull). In the first day bull meat is harder and springier. Meat pH falls during the first 24 h post mortem in both groups, reaching values around 5.5, and it did not change during the next 5 days. Water-holding capacity (expressed as percentage of expelled water) increased in heifer meat. Instrumental texture measures (texture profile analysis, TPA) showed a decrease in hardness, springiness and chewiness in bull raw meat. Sensory analysis showed that assessors perceived a decrease in hardness and in springiness in bull meat and a decrease in juiciness and in chewiness (number of chewings before swallowing) in heifer meat. Ageing showed no effect on assessors' pleasantness either in heifers' or in bulls' meat. During the first 3 days, heifer meat was juicier. Heifers' meat produced a greater pleasantness on the sixth day. Both meats were not very different for most quality parameters studied in this work.

  10. Prospects and challenges of radiation processing of meats and meat products in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    In India goat, lamb and chicken meat are widely preferred, while, bovine meat and pork are consumed only by a small segment of the population. Meats in the country are mainly marketed fresh or in frozen state. Recently chilled poultry has been introduced in Indian market. In addition to fresh meats, several other ready to eat or ready to cook meat products like chicken chilly, chicken tikka, mutton shammi kababs, mutton seekh kababs etc are available in urban Indian market. These products are marketed only in the frozen state and have limited market due to expensive and inadequate freezing facilities. Major share of domestic fresh meat and poultry market is by unorganized sector and only a few corporate houses like Godrej and Venkey's are marketing poultry products. The time has come to benefit from radiation processing for safe, chilled meat and poultry in India. Shelf-stable, nutritious meat and meat products can also be produced by the process. Radiation processing of these foods will be of great economic and health significance and give boost to exports. This radiation processing can meet the needs of services of convenient and ready-to-eat meat and meat products

  11. Production of crispy bread snacks containing chicken meat and chicken meat powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Hulya; Altinel, Burak; Kumcuoglu, Seher; Kisla, Duygu; Tavman, Sebnem

    2016-01-01

    Chicken meat in two different forms (chicken meat and chicken meat powder) were added into white flour and whole wheat blend baguette bread formulations for protein enrichment and finally developing new and healthy snacks. The chicken meat and powder levels were 10% for white flour baguette, and 15% for whole wheat blend. The dried baguette samples were packaged under 100% N2, and physical, chemical, microbiological and sensorial properties were evaluated during 3 months of storage. Protein content of chicken meat powder added samples were found statistically higher than chicken meat added samples. Hardness of the snacks was significantly affected from type of chicken meat, such as values were higher for chicken meat added samples than chicken meat powder added samples. Lipid oxidation of the snacks was determined by TBA analysis, and TBA value for whole wheat mixture snack with 15% of chicken meat was the highest among all during storage. The highest overall acceptance score was obtained from white flour snack with 10% chicken meat. There was no coliform bacteria detected during storage and the results of yeast-mold count and aerobic plate count of snacks remained between the quantitative ranges.

  12. STRUCTURAL VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF MASONRY BUILDINGS IN TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    KORKMAZ, Kasım Armagan; CARHOGLU, Asuman Isıl

    2011-01-01

    Turkey is located in an active seismic zone. Mid to high rise R/C building and low rise masonry buildings are very common construction type in Turkey. In recent earthquakes, lots of existing buildings got damage including masonry buildings. Masonry building history in Turkey goes long years back. For sure, it is an important structure type for Turkey. Therefore, earthquake behavior and structural vulnerability of masonry buildings are crucial issues for Turkey as a earthquake prone country. I...

  13. Cultured meat: every village its own factory?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weele, van der C.; Tramper, J.

    2014-01-01

    Rising global demand for meat will result in increased environmental pollution, energy consumption, and animal suffering. Cultured meat, produced in an animal-cell cultivation process, is a technically feasible alternative lacking these disadvantages, provided that an animal-component-free growth

  14. Transport of live animals versus meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, Willy; Nuhoff-Isakhanyan, Gohar; Wagenberg, van Coen

    2017-01-01

    These study responses to two main research questions: What model can we use to measure or estimate the sustainability of long-distance transport of meat/carcass vs. transport of meat? What is the outcome of the model if applied in two cases: transport of spent hens for slaughter from the Netherlands

  15. Meat and Poultry Processing. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains instructional materials for a program that provides students with job skills in meat and poultry processing. The curriculum consists of 10 units that cover the following material: orientation to meat and poultry processing; maintaining plant facilities; equipment and equipment maintenance; purchasing livestock for…

  16. Competitiveness of the EU poultry meat sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, van P.L.M.; Bondt, N.

    2013-01-01

    EU poultry meat producers have to comply with legislation on environmental protection, animal welfare and food safety. This legislation has increased the production costs of poultry meat. At the same time the EU is negotiating with other countries or groups of countries to liberalise trade in

  17. Wholesomeness of gamma-radicidated poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tencheva, S.; Katsareva, Ts.

    1987-01-01

    Wholesomeness of radicidated with 6 kGy poultry meat was studied on mice. Evaluation of two consecutive generations was performed on the base of the following medicobiological parameters: generative function, anatomical studies and hemathological analysis. The results obtained do not show any deviation from the normal values for both investigated groups fed with irradiated and non-irradiated poultry meat

  18. Poultry breast meat attributes and marination performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between intrinsic meat attributes (pH, color, weight, and postmortem age) and marination performance (marinade uptake and retention, and final product yield) were investigated in poultry meat using broiler breast fillets (pectoralis major) as a model. Results showed that marinade up...

  19. Tenderness charactherization of ostrich meat commercial cuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Conte Hadlich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ostrich meat has become an interesting source of protein as well as being an alternative to red meat, because of its healthy fatty acid profile, with a high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low content of intramuscular fat, which arouses the interest of people who want a low animal fat diet. Ostrich meat is also appreciated by the tenderness, since it is one of the larger impact characteristics on the acceptance of a meat product for consumers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tenderness of different ostrich meat commercial cuts and certificate that all studied cuts present tenderness acceptable by consumers. The laboratory tests were performed at the Laboratory of Biochemistry of Proteins (FMVZ, being measured shear force of seven commercial cuts of ostrich meat. The cuts were: internal thigh, external thigh, filet plan, filet out, filet small, rump and filet fan. The samples were boiled in water bath controlled by time and temperature. After chilling, fragments of 1.0 x 1.0 x 3.0 cm were removed from samples. Shear force measurements were performed using a mechanical Warner-Bratzler Shear Force equipment. The shear force means were: internal thigh (3.5 kg, external thigh (2.8 kg, filet plan (2.4 kg, filet out (1.6 kg, filet small (3.5 kg, rump (3.3 kg and filet fan (2.0 kg. All the commercial cuts evaluated had very low values of shear force, denoting meat extremely tender. The classification of meat tenderness is based on shear force values, being values below 4.6 kg considered meat with desirable tenderness. All ostrich meat commercial cuts analyzed had shear force values lower than 4.6 kg, being classified as meat of extreme tenderness. The results found in this work allow concluding that ostrich meat can be considered tender. These findings lead us to consider the ostrich meat as an interesting alternative to red meat, in relation to tenderness and healthy fatty acid profile, being favorable for people suffering from

  20. Metabolomics of meat exudate: Its potential to evaluate beef meat conservation and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castejón, David [Centro de Asistencia a la Investigación de Resonancia Magnética Nuclear y de Espín Electrónico, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García-Segura, Juan Manuel [Centro de Asistencia a la Investigación de Resonancia Magnética Nuclear y de Espín Electrónico, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular I, Facultad de Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Escudero, Rosa [Departamento de Nutrición, Bromatología y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria. Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Herrera, Antonio [Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cambero, María Isabel, E-mail: icambero@vet.ucm.es [Departamento de Nutrición, Bromatología y Tecnología de los Alimentos, Facultad de Veterinaria. Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-11

    In this study we analyzed the exudate of beef to evaluate its potential as non invasive sampling for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabolomic analysis of meat samples. Exudate, as the natural juice from raw meat, is an easy to obtain matrix that it is usually collected in small amounts in commercial meat packages. Although meat exudate could provide complete and homogeneous metabolic information about the whole meat piece, this sample has been poorly studied. Exudates from 48 beef samples of different breeds, cattle and storage times have been studied by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The liquid exudate spectra were compared with those obtained by High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS) of the original meat pieces. The close correlation found between both spectra (>95% of coincident peaks in both registers; Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.945) lead us to propose the exudate as an excellent alternative analytical matrix with a view to apply meat metabolomics. 60 metabolites could be identified through the analysis of mono and bidimensional exudate spectra, 23 of them for the first time in NMR meat studies. The application of chemometric tools to analyze exudate dataset has revealed significant metabolite variations associated with meat aging. Hence, NMR based metabolomics have made it possible both to classify meat samples according to their storage time through Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and to predict that storage time through Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression. - Highlights: • NMR spectra from beef samples and their exudates are very strongly correlated. • 23 metabolites not reported in previous NMR meat studies have been identified. • Meat exudate NMR spectra allow monitoring of biochemical changes related to aging. • PCA of exudate NMR spectra classified meat samples by their storage time. • The aging of a meat sample can be predicted by PLS analysis of its exudate.

  1. Bioactive Compounds in Functional Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Pogorzelska-Nowicka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Meat and meat products are a good source of bioactive compounds with positive effect on human health such as vitamins, minerals, peptides or fatty acids. Growing food consumer awareness and intensified global meat producers competition puts pressure on creating new healthier meat products. In order to meet these expectations, producers use supplements with functional properties for animal diet and as direct additives for meat products. In the presented work seven groups of key functional constituents were chosen: (i fatty acids; (ii minerals; (iii vitamins; (iv plant antioxidants; (v dietary fibers; (vi probiotics and (vii bioactive peptides. Each of them is discussed in term of their impact on human health as well as some quality attributes of the final products.

  2. Sociological aspects of meat in meals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katherine O'Doherty

    2009-01-01

    Health professionals and environmental experts advocate reduced consumption of meat in industrialized regions. On this background, and in light of a number of sociological studies of food practices and meal formats among consumers, this paper examines some aspects of the cultural entrenchment...... and vulnerability of meat consumption. Tacit meanings of meat products are seen as arising from the human tendency to rank and grade objects relative to each other, a process that is intrinsic to consumption practices. Examples of the ways in which gradient meanings of meat products are entrenched in food practices...... and of ways in which this consumption is vulnerable to change, are presented. On this basis, the likelihood that current levels of meat consumption in industrialized societies will remain relatively stable or tend to decrease are briefly discussed....

  3. Assuring eating quality of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalen, G A

    1996-01-01

    The way of assuring quality has changed over the years, from inspection of end product to quality management systems and on-line process control. The latter concepts have had a great impact in many industries during the last decades. But the concept of Total Quality is continuos improvement so it is time to take advantage of the next generation of quality assurance tools: Quality by Design. This is the most powerful instrument in quality assurance today. Quality by design has been used with outstanding results in many industries as the automobile and the electronics industry. Maybe the meat industry will be the next? To succeed, the "eating quality attributes" that are most important to the customer must be brought into focus. The challenge to the meat research scientist is to design products and processes that take care of customer needs despite variation in the raw material and the consumer's rough handling. The Quality Management Standards are helpful in conducting the design and production process, but to focus on the right aspects, there also are need for suitable methods as Quality Function Deployment. Customer needs change and new research changes old 'truths'. This require an organisation, a quality system and a culture which can handle rapid changes and a diversity of customer needs.

  4. Understanding Urban Regeneration in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candas, E.; Flacke, J.; Yomralioglu, T.

    2016-06-01

    In Turkey, rapid population growth, informal settlements, and buildings and infrastructures vulnerable to natural hazards are seen as the most important problems of cities. Particularly disaster risk cannot be disregarded, as large parts of various cities are facing risks from earthquakes, floods and landslides and have experienced loss of lives in the recent past. Urban regeneration is an important planning tool implemented by local and central governments in order to reduce to disaster risk and to design livable environments for the citizens. The Law on the Regeneration of Areas under Disaster Risk, commonly known as the Urban Regeneration Law, was enacted in 2012 (Law No.6306, May 2012). The regulation on Implementation of Law No. 6306 explains the fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process. The relevant institutions furnished with various authorities such as expropriation, confiscation and changing the type and place of your property which makes urban regeneration projects very important in terms of property rights. Therefore, urban regeneration projects have to be transparent, comprehensible and acceptable for all actors in the projects. In order to understand the urban regeneration process, the legislation and projects of different municipalities in Istanbul have been analyzed. While some steps of it are spatial data demanding, others relate to land values. In this paper an overview of the urban regeneration history and activities in Turkey is given. Fundamental steps of the urban regeneration process are defined, and particularly spatial-data demanding steps are identified.

  5. A Macroanatomic Study on Larynx Cranialis of Turkeys in Thrace Region, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan GUNDEMİR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the differences and similarities between larynx cranialis of turkey and other species of poultry. For this purpose, 8 female and 8 male adult turkeys were used for the anatomical measurements. Furthermore, histological examinations were performed on larynx cranialis of 2 turkeys. Cartilago thyroidea and epiglottis were not observed in the larynx cranialis, in our study. Besides, larynx cranialis were found to constitute from paired cartilago arytneoidea and unpaired cartilago cricoidea and cartilago procricoidea. Crista ventralis was detected on larynx cranialis of turkeys. According to our results, it has been determined that in turkey; the width of glottis in female turkeys were larger than males. Cartilago procricoidea were observed bigger than cartilago arytenoidea and crista ventralis were found to be more prominent than in other birds.

  6. Transfer of surface-dried Listeria monocytogenes from stainless steel knife blades to roast turkey breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, Lindsey A; Todd, Ewen C D; Ryser, Elliot T

    2008-01-01

    Listeria contamination of food contact surfaces can lead to cross-contamination of ready-to-eat foods in delicatessens. Recognizing that variations in Listeria biofilm-forming ability exist, the goal of this study was to determine whether these differences in biofilm formation would affect the Listeria transfer rate during slicing of delicatessen turkey meat. In this study, six previously identified strong and weak biofilm-forming strains of Listeria monocytogenes were grown at 22 degrees C for 48 h on Trypticase soy agar containing 0.6% yeast extract and harvested in 0.1% peptone. Thereafter, the strains were combined to obtain two 3-strain cocktails, resuspended in turkey slurry, and inoculated onto flame-sterilized AISI grade 304 stainless steel knife blades that were subjected to 6 and 24 h of ambient storage at approximately 78% relative humidity. After mounting on an Instron Universal Testing Machine, these blades were used to obtain 16 slices of retail roast turkey breast. Based on an analysis of the slices by direct plating, Listeria populations decreased 3 to 5 log CFU per slice after 16 slices. Overall, total transfer to turkey was significantly greater for strong (4.4 log CFU total) as opposed to weak (3.5 log CFU total; P < 0.05) biofilm formers. In addition, significantly more cells were transferred at 6 (4.6 log CFU total) than at 24 h (3.3 log CFU total; P < 0.05) with Listeria quantifiable to the 16th slice, regardless of the inoculation level. Increased survival by the strong biofilm formers, as evidenced by viability staining, suggests that these strains are better adapted to survive stressful conditions than their weak biofilm-forming counterparts.

  7. Infectivity of H7 LP and HP influenza viruses at different temperatures and pH and persistence of H7 HP virus in poultry meat at refrigeration temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, Maria Serena; Mancin, Marzia; Bertoli, Elena; Buratin, Alessandra; Terregino, Calogero; Capua, Ilaria

    2012-11-25

    The aims of this study were to assess the infectivity of highly pathogenic (HP) and low pathogenicity (LP) H7 AI viruses at different temperatures and pH values and to investigate the persistance of HP H7 virus in chicken, turkey and duck meat. The H7 viruses tested remained infectious at +4°C and +20°C for 200 and >50 days, respectively. At pH 5, H7 viruses retained their infectivity for a shorter period of time compared to pH 7. The infectivity of HP H7 was detected >2 months in meat maintained at +4°C and was higher in chicken meat compared to turkey and duck meat. Results of this study show that higher temperatures and lower pH values both reduce virus infectivity and demonstrate that HP H7 virus can remain infectious in meat for extended periods of time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Investing in Turkey's Next Generation : The School-to-Work Transition and Turkey's Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This report assesses the prospects for Turkey's youth by examining the 'school-to-work transition'. Turkey needs to invest in its young people to capture the potentially substantial dividend of today's large youth cohort. Because of the sheer number of young people, Turkey's working-age population will expand by over 800,000 every year during the next decade. This so-called 'productive pop...

  9. Salmonella in meats, water, fruit and vegetables as disclosed from testing undertaken by Food Business Operators in Ireland from 2005 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duggan Sharon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Food Business Operators (FBO are responsible for the safety of the food they produce and in Ireland those under the regulatory control of the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine are required to provide summary data on microbiological tests undertaken as part of their food safety controls. These data are provided to the National Reference Laboratory through the 25 private laboratories undertaking the testing. Results Over the five-year period Salmonella sp. was isolated from 0.7% of the 254,000 raw meat or raw meat products tested with the annual prevalence ranging from 0.5 to 1.1%. Poultry meats were consistently more contaminated than other meats with higher recovery rates in turkey (3.3%, duck (3.3%, and chicken (2.5% compared with meats of porcine (1.6%, ovine (0.2% and bovine origin (0.1%. Salmonella sp. was also isolated from 58 (0.06% of the 96,115 cooked or partially cooked meat and meat products tested during the reporting period with the annual percentage positive samples ranging from 0.01 to 0.16%. A total of 50 different serotypes were recovered from raw meats over this period with the greatest diversity found in poultry samples (n = 36. Four serotypes, Kentucky, Typhimurium, Agona and Derby accounted for over 70% of all isolates detected on FBO testing over the period 2005 to 2009. Conclusions Capturing microbiological data generated by Food Business Operators allows the regulatory sector access to a substantial amount of valuable data with the minimum financial outlay.

  10. Secular and Religious Environmentalism in Contemporary Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Wickström

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkish environmentalism is gaining ground but has not yet become a serious source of influence in society. The environmental movements have long been held as left wing politics and less religious, but today environmental awreness is also reaching the religious establishment. This article presents some of the secular and religious environmental currents in contemporary Turkey based on fieldwork mainly conducted in 2011. The main research questions are: who are the central environmental actors in Turkey, are there differences ragarding ideology and way of working between the secular and reigious field, and why there is no strong environmental scene in Turkey?

  11. Mycoplasma gallopavonis in eastern wild turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, M P; Eleazer, T H; Kleven, S H

    1992-04-01

    Serum samples and tracheal cultures were collected from eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo sylvestris) trapped for relocation in South Carolina (USA) during 1985 to 1990. Sera were tested for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae by the rapid plate agglutination and hemagglutination inhibition tests and were found to be negative. Tracheal cultures were negative for all pathogenic Mycoplasma spp., including M. gallisepticum, M. synoviae, M. meleagridis, and M. iowae. However, M. gallopavonis was isolated from every group of wild turkeys tested in 1986 to 1990. These data suggest that M. gallopavonis, which is generally considered nonpathogenic, may be a common microorganism in eastern wild turkeys.

  12. Practical application of food irradiation in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetinkaya, N.; Erhan, I.C.

    2002-01-01

    Turkey is the world's leading producer and exporter of dried fruits (dried figs, raisins,and dried apricots etc.) and nuts (hazelnuts, wall nuts, pistachios, peanuts etc.) all of which have to be fumigated by methyl bromide a few times prior to export. Last fumigation is obligatory before shipment according to current quarantine treatment. Methyl Bromide (MeBr) fumigation is the most commonly used insect quarantine treatment for dried fruits and nuts in Turkey to protect from potential infestations. In accordance with the Montreal Protocol, Turkey as an Article 5(1) country will take actions to regulate and take measures to phase-out MeBr use. So, Turkey has to total phase-out in 2015 but according to Turkey MeBr Phase-out Action Plan prepared and published by The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural affairs in 2001, using MeBr should be reduced for stored commodities by 50 % by 2002 and phased-out totally by 2004. Irradiation technology is ready as an alternative to MeBr fumigation under the Action Plan of Turkey. Intensive research studies on food irradiation in Turkey have started in early 1970's and have still been continued. After careful and intensive works of all related authorities and specialists for a long period and with the help of ICGFI, the food irradiation regulation of Turkey was published in Official Newspaper on November 6, 1999. Having the Food Irradiation Regulation has supported to initiate commercialization study in Turkey in Co-operation with IAEA (TUR 5022). Feasibility study of a commercial food irradiation facility for the potential application of food irradiation in Turkey was prepared by IAEA experts Dr.M.Ahmed and Ir. J.P.Lacroix and together with TUR 5022 Research Team in April 2001 in Izmir, Turkey. Gamma-Pak Irradiation Facility in Cerkeskoy-Tekirdag got the commercial food irradiation licence and registration certificate in Feb. 2002. Practical application of food irradiation is getting more attraction in Turkey in parallel with other

  13. Meet meat: An explorative study on meat and cultured meat as seen by Chinese, Ethiopians and Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Gerben A; Tobi, Hilde; Fischer, Arnout R H

    2017-07-01

    In this cross-cultural study we investigated how study participants from China, Ethiopia and the Netherlands operationalize the concept of meat and to what extent cultured meat fits or does not fit into this operationalization. We argue that combining the conceptual approaches symbolic boundaries and theory of social practices helps to better understand the possibly culturally dependent operationalization of the concept meat. Ten visiting graduate students from China, 10 from Ethiopia and 10 native Dutch graduate students completed freelist tasks, a pile sort task, interview and essay task, during a single session. We found that butchered animals are at the center of the concept of meat, although depending on culture not all animals are a source of meat. Symbolic boundaries were restricted or stretched depending on social practices within countries. Ethiopian participants applied strictly defined symbolic boundaries, where Chinese and Dutch participants used more broadly defined symbolic boundaries. Cultured meat was seen as a technology for the future and was positioned across the symbolic boundaries of meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Types of fraud in meat and meat products: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinoza T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Affects the food control. The globalization, increased imports and exports and free trade agreements have led to greater sharing and access to food worldwide; along with it, the problems associated with fraud such as adulteration, substitution, intentionality, and counterfeiting have been increased. Therefore, there are various tasks associated with food fraud, which in most reviews published only new identification techniques have been discussed. However, a discussion about the types of fraud and its impact on society, bioterrorism and religion, has been little commented. This review focuses primarily on describing the types of fraud that has as objective to obtain economic benefit or cause terrorism. Also, latest techniques available for detecting meat adulteration are mentioned.

  15. Quantitative risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in selected categories of deli meats: impact of lactate and diacetate on listeriosis cases and deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Abani K; Ivanek, Renata; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Sofos, John N; Wiedmann, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Foodborne disease associated with consumption of ready-to-eat foods contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes represents a considerable pubic health concern. In a risk assessment published in 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service estimated that about 90% of human listeriosis cases in the United States are caused by consumption of contaminated deli meats. In this risk assessment, all deli meats were grouped into one of 23 categories of ready-to-eat foods, and only the postretail growth of L. monocytogenes was considered. To provide an improved risk assessment for L. monocytogenes in deli meats, we developed a revised risk assessment that (i) models risk for three subcategories of deli meats (i.e., ham, turkey, and roast beef) and (ii) models L. monocytogenes contamination and growth from production to consumption while considering subcategory-specific growth kinetics parameters (i.e., lag phase and exponential growth rate). This model also was used to assess how reformulation of the chosen deli meat subcategories with L. monocytogenes growth inhibitors (i.e., lactate and diacetate) would impact the number of human listeriosis cases. Use of product-specific growth parameters demonstrated how certain deli meat categories differ in the relative risk of causing listeriosis; products that support more rapid growth and have reduced lag phases (e.g., turkey) represent a higher risk. Although reformulation of deli meats with growth inhibitors was estimated to reduce by about 2.5- to 7.8-fold the number of human listeriosis cases linked to a given deli meat subcategory and thus would reduce the overall risk of human listeriosis, even with reformulation deli meats would still cause a considerable number of human listeriosis cases. A combination of strategies is thus needed to provide continued reduction of these cases. Risk assessment models such as that described here will be critical for evaluation of different control

  16. Potential health hazards of eating red meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, A

    2017-02-01

    Red meat (beef, veal, pork, lamb and mutton) consumption contributes several important nutrients to the diet, for example essential amino acids, vitamins (including B12) and minerals (including iron and zinc). Processed red meat (ham, sausages, bacon, frankfurters, salami, etc.) undergoes treatment (curing, smoking, salting or the use of chemical preservatives and additives) to improve its shelf life and/or taste. During recent decades, consumption of red meat has been increasing globally, especially in developing countries. At the same time, there has been growing evidence that high consumption of red meat, especially of processed meat, may be associated with an increased risk of several major chronic diseases. Here, a comprehensive summary is provided of the accumulated evidence based on prospective cohort studies regarding the potential adverse health effects of red meat consumption on major chronic diseases, such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke and cancer at several sites, and mortality. Risk estimates from pooled analyses and meta-analyses are presented together with recently published findings. Based on at least six cohorts, summary results for the consumption of unprocessed red meat of 100 g day -1 varied from nonsignificant to statistically significantly increased risk (11% for stroke and for breast cancer, 15% for cardiovascular mortality, 17% for colorectal and 19% for advanced prostate cancer); for the consumption of 50 g day -1 processed meat, the risks were statistically significantly increased for most of the studied diseases (4% for total prostate cancer, 8% for cancer mortality, 9% for breast, 18% for colorectal and 19% for pancreatic cancer, 13% for stroke, 22% for total and 24% for cardiovascular mortality and 32% for diabetes). Potential biological mechanisms underlying the observed risks and the environmental impact of red meat production are also discussed. The evidence-based integrated message is that it is plausible

  17. A next generation semiconductor based sequencing approach for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Ghionda, Marco Ciro; D'Alessandro, Enrico; Geraci, Claudia; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the species of origin of meat and meat products is an important issue to prevent and detect frauds that might have economic, ethical and health implications. In this paper we evaluated the potential of the next generation semiconductor based sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine) for the identification of DNA from meat species (pig, horse, cattle, sheep, rabbit, chicken, turkey, pheasant, duck, goose and pigeon) as well as from human and rat in DNA mixtures through the sequencing of PCR products obtained from different couples of universal primers that amplify 12S and 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA genes. Six libraries were produced including PCR products obtained separately from 13 species or from DNA mixtures containing DNA from all species or only avian or only mammalian species at equimolar concentration or at 1:10 or 1:50 ratios for pig and horse DNA. Sequencing obtained a total of 33,294,511 called nucleotides of which 29,109,688 with Q20 (87.43%) in a total of 215,944 reads. Different alignment algorithms were used to assign the species based on sequence data. Error rate calculated after confirmation of the obtained sequences by Sanger sequencing ranged from 0.0003 to 0.02 for the different species. Correlation about the number of reads per species between different libraries was high for mammalian species (0.97) and lower for avian species (0.70). PCR competition limited the efficiency of amplification and sequencing for avian species for some primer pairs. Detection of low level of pig and horse DNA was possible with reads obtained from different primer pairs. The sequencing of the products obtained from different universal PCR primers could be a useful strategy to overcome potential problems of amplification. Based on these results, the Ion Torrent technology can be applied for the identification of meat species in DNA mixtures.

  18. Counseling in Turkey: An Evolving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Guneri, Oya Yerin

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of counseling and addresses the current issues and future trends of counseling in Turkey. Special emphasis is placed on the factors that impede the development of school counseling as a discipline.

  19. COAL CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Aslan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This aim of this paper is to use asymmetric causality tests to examine the coal consumption and Gross Domestic Product (GDP relationship in Turkey based on data from 1980 to 2006. To investigate this relationship, a multivariate system is employed by including fixed capital formation and labor force variables into the model. The empirical results obtained from asymmetric causality tests show no causality for coal consumption and GDP relationship in Turkey. The results indicate that coal consumption does not affect growth; hence, energy conservation policies may be pursued without adversely affecting growth in Turkey. Thus, neutrality hypothesis is confirmed for Turkey. This means that a decrease in coal consumption does not affect economic growth and vice versa. In this case, policymakers should explore the feasibility of either decreasing the coal consumption or increasing the efficiency of coal consumption.

  20. 9 CFR 319.307 - Spaghetti sauce with meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spaghetti sauce with meat. 319.307... AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY... Dehydrated Meat Food Products § 319.307 Spaghetti sauce with meat. “Spaghetti Sauce with Meat” shall contain...

  1. RESEARCH ON CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR ON BUCHAREST MEAT MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha POPESCU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to analyze consumer behavior for meat on Bucharest market, using a sample of 100 individuals, representatives as age, sex and profession, who were interviewed within a structured questionaire based survey on their preference to buy and consume meat. The answers were processed using the semantic differential and Likert Scale. The obtained results pointed out that white meat is the top preference, because it is healthier and its price is more acceptable compared to red meat. However, men prefer red meat, no matter its price. The most prefered meat sorts in order of their importance are chicken meat, pork and beef. Consumers prefer to buy 1-2 kg fresh meat from supermarket every 2-3 days. Income/family and meat pice are the major factors limiting the amount of consumed meat and buying frequence. The term of availability and meat origin have become more and more important criteria on which buying decision is based, besides meat quality. All consumers prefer to consume Romanian meat which is tasty and has a pleasant flavor. As a conclusion, consumers expectations from meat producers are related to a large variety of meat of a higher quality. Also, presentation form in packed portionated meat parts on the shelf as wellas hygiene come on the next positions from consumers side in order to satisfy their needs better.

  2. Geothermal Field Investigations of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayın, N.; Özer, N.

    2017-12-01

    Geothermal energy is a type of energy that are found in the accessible depth of the crust, in the reservoirs by way of the permeable rocks, specially in heated fluid. Geothermal system is made of 3 main components; heat source, reservoir, and fluid bearing heat. Geothermal system mechanism is comprise of fluid transmission. Convection current (heat transmission) is caused by heating and causes the fluid in the system to expand. Heated fluid with low density show tendency to rise in system. Geothermal system occurs with variable geophysics and geochemical properties. Geophysical methods can determine structural properties of shallow and deep reservoirs with temperature, mineralization, gas amount, fluid movement, faulting, and sudden change in lithostratigraphic strata. This study revealed possible reservoir structures and showed examples of geophysics and gas measuring results in Turkey which is wealthy in regard to Geothermal sources.

  3. WOMEN MANAGERS IN PRINTED MEDIA AND TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    Senem Besler; Ilke Oruc

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we first offer the recent statistics about the women workforce and women managers in Turkey. Then we focus on the major factors that deprive many working women of the managerial positions and consider the problems that the women managers face in companies. Finally the news texts, including the female managers in the mass media of Turkey will be interpreted through content analysis and textual analysis. The universe of the research consists of the daily newspapers. Through purpo...

  4. Voluntary emission trading potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari, İzzet

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is likely to cause serious market failures, and carbon trading as a market instrument can help correct its negative impacts. The global carbon markets established to combat climate change include regulatory and voluntary markets. Turkey cannot utilise regulatory carbon markets under the Kyoto Protocol. As a result of her unique position in the UNFCCC, some offsetting projects in Turkey have benefitted only voluntary emission trading for the reduction of GHG emissions. Due to on-going climate change negotiation under the UNFCCC, it seems that Turkey will not use the current regulatory carbon markets. Thus, Turkey should promote the use of and participation in voluntary carbon markets. In this article, emission reduction potential via energy efficiency, renewable energy and solid waste management, and corresponding offsetting of credits with their estimated prices is investigated for the period between 2013 and 2020. The emission reduction potential for energy efficiency, renewable energy and solid waste management projects are estimated at 403, 312 and 356 million tons of CO 2 equivalent emissions respectively, totalling 1,071 million tons of CO 2 equivalent. The total revenue of the carbon certificates are estimated in the range of 19,775–33,386 million US Dollars for the same period. -- Highlights: •Turkey has 1,071 million tons GHG emission reduction in three sectors for 2013–2020. •Turkey can only use voluntary emission trading for reduction of GHGs. •Total revenue estimation could be between 19,775 and 33,386 million US Dollars. •Turkey's economy and emissions have been rapidly growing. •Turkey can more easily reduce its emission by using voluntary emission trading

  5. GERMANY & TURKEY – A PARTNERSHIP PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestenigar KARA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article shortly deals with economic and commercial relations between Turkey, that keeps close regulary economic, political and cultural relationship and Germany, which is one of six founding fathers of the European Union. The subject of article has been searched within the following framework: Measurement of commercial relations between export and import between, investment relations between Germany and Turkey, mutual distribution sector.

  6. A METHOD OF FRYING MINCED MEAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    A method of frying minced meat comprising the steps of providing a heated frying surface, providing a flow of discrete and separate particles of minced meat in a condition wherein the mean temperature of the flow of particles is less than 5 degrees centigrade, preferably less than 2 degrees...... centigrade and most preferably less than 0.5 degrees centigrade, and heating the discrete particles to the onset of frying conditions defined as a discernible change of the colour of the particle from the original red meat colour to a grey and brownish colour by bringing the discrete particles into contact...

  7. In vitro meat: Zombies on the menu?

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, NS

    2010-01-01

    In April 2008 the In Vitro Meat Consortium held its first meeting at the Norwegian Food Research Institute. They are a group of scientists and advocates who seek to turn the techniques of tissue engineering to the production of food, producing meat in laboratories that has at no point been part of a living animal. This is a fascinating technology, and one that fits well with the topic of this SCRIPTed analysis section: the ‘zombification’ of meat products. I have been conducting interviews wi...

  8. Microbiological Spoilage of Meat and Poultry Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveny, John; Meyer, Joseph D.; Hall, Paul A.

    Humankind has consumed animal protein since the dawn of its existence. The archaeological record shows evidence of animal protein consumption as early as 12,500 BC (Mann, 2005). Raw meat and poultry are highly perishable commodities subject to various types of spoilage depending on handling and storage conditions. Because of this high potential for spoilage, the historical record reveals that early civilizations used techniques such as salting, smoking, and drying to preserve meat (Mack, 2001; Bailey, 1986). Today, more than ever, because of the globalization of the food supply, and increasing demands from exacting consumers, the control of meat and poultry spoilage is essential.

  9. Radiological maps for Trabzon, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnaz, A., E-mail: asliy@ktu.edu.t [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kucukomeroglu, B. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Damla, N. [Batman University, Department of Physics, 72060 Batman (Turkey); Cevik, U. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Physics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    The activity concentrations and absorbed gamma dose rates due to primordial radionuclides and {sup 137}Cs have been ascertained in 222 soil samples in 18 counties of the Trabzon province of Turkey using a HPGe detector. The mean activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs in soil samples were 41, 35, 437 and 21 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. Based on the measured concentrations of these radionuclides, the mean absorbed gamma dose in air was calculated as 59 nGy h{sup -1} and hence, the mean annual effective dose due to terrestrial gamma radiation was calculated as 72 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}. In addition, outdoor in situ gamma dose rate (D) measurements were performed in the same 222 locations using a portable NaI detector and the annual effective dose was calculated to be 66 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} from these results. The results presented in this study are compared with other parts of Turkey. Radiological maps of the Trabzon province were composed using the results obtained from the study. - Highlights: {yields} {yields}The study highlights activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs in soil. {yields} The absorbed gamma dose in air and the mean annual effective dose were calculated. {yields} The calculated results compared with outdoor in situ gamma dose measurements. {yields} Radiological maps of the Trabzon province were created using ArcGIS applications. {yields} The results will be valuable data for future estimations of radioactive pollution.

  10. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT MEAT SHOP ON MEAT PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND BACTERIA POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H.C. Dewi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the effect of different meat shops on meat physicalcharacteristics and bacteria population. Sixteen PO carcasses were used in the experiment which wasarranged in a completely randomized design with 4 treatments of different meat shops (traditionalmarket, meat shop, supermarket and slaughter house. Parameters measured were meat pH, waterholding capacity, cooking loss and bacterial total count. The result showed that the average of pH was5.25- 6.03; water holding capacity was 17.07-38.87%; cooking loss was 33.15-48.20 and bacterial totalcount was 1.48x106-10.75x106 CFU/g. It was concluded that bacterial total count in slaughter house andspecial market (meat shop and supermarket were less than those in traditional market.

  11. Development and assessment of healthy properties of meat and meat products designed as functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2013-12-01

    This review deals with the two major aspects to be considered in the context of meat-based functional foods and human health. One involves the different strategies used to improve (increase or reduce) the presence of bioactive (healthy and unhealthy) compounds in meat and meat products in order to develop potential meat-based functional foods; these strategies are basically concerned with animal production practices, meat processing and storage, distribution and consumption conditions. Since the link between the consumption of those foods and their potentially beneficial effects (improving health and/or reducing the risk of several chronic diseases) needs to be demonstrated scientifically, the second aspect considered is related to intervention studies to examine the functional capacity of meat-based potentially functional foods in humans, discussing how the functionality of a food can be assessed in terms of its effects on health in relation to both target body functions and risk factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The future of meat: a qualitative analysis of cultured meat media coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, J N; Shoulders, C W

    2013-11-01

    This study sought to explore the informational themes and information sources cited by the media to cover stories of cultured meat in both the United States and the European Union. The results indicated that cultured meat news articles in both the United States and the European Union commonly discuss cultured meat in terms of benefits, history, process, time, livestock production problems, and skepticism. Additionally, the information sources commonly cited in the articles included cultured meat researchers, sources from academia, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), New Harvest, Winston Churchill, restaurant owners/chefs, and sources from the opposing countries (e.g. US use some EU sources and vice versa). The implications of this study will allow meat scientists to understand how the media is influencing consumers' perceptions about the topic, and also allow them to strategize how to shape future communication about cultured meat. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Investigation for possible source(s) of contamination of ready-to-eat meat products with Listeria spp. and other pathogens in a meat processing plant in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, I-Sanna; Adesiyun, Abiodun; Seepersadsingh, Nadira; Rahaman, Saed

    2006-06-01

    In 2003, there was a recall of three processed (chicken franks, spice ham and turkey ham ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products by a large processing plant in Trinidad as a result of contamination by Listeria monocytogenes. The study was conducted to investigate the possible source(s) of Listeria contamination of recalled RTE meat products and to determine the prevalence of Listeria spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter spp. in the products and air within the plant. Raw and processed meat products, as well as food contact surfaces were also tested for Salmonella spp., Listeria spp. and Campylobacter spp. initially after thorough clean-up and close-down of the plant. Faecal and effluent samples from the piggery, in close proximity to the plant, were tested for the presence of Salmonella spp., Listeria spp. and Campylobacter spp. Air samples and food contact surfaces were negative for the tested organisms. Ten (58.8%) of the 17 effluent samples and 4 (11.8%) of the 34 faecal samples were positive for Campylobacter coli. Of the 11 raw meat products tested, 10 (90.9%) were positive for E. coli and Listeria spp. either singly or in combination. Of the 32 processed RTE products tested, 11 (34.4%) were positive for E. coli, Salmonella spp., Listeria spp. and Campylobacter spp. in combination or singly. Eleven (61.1%) of 18 processed products contained unacceptable levels of aerobic bacteria using international standards. Four months later, following the implementation of recommended cleaning, sanitizing and hygienic practices at the plant, pre- and post-processed products were sampled and Listeria spp. were identified in 4 (80.0%) of the 5 raw products and in 1 of the 5 (20.0%) finished products. Two (40.0%) of the finished products contained unacceptable microbial levels. It was concluded that the close proximity of the piggery to the processing plant was not the probable source of Listeria contamination of the recalled meat products. The data suggested

  14. Recent incentives for renewable energy in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, Hayal Ayca; Simsek, Nevzat

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the importance of renewable energy sources has increased significantly as climate change has become an important long term threat to global ecosystems and the world economy. In the face of increased concern about climate change and high fossil fuel costs together with a reduction in the primary energy sources such as oil, natural gas and coal, alternative energy sources (renewables) are increasingly needed to respond to the threat of climate change and growing energy demand in the world. Recent developments in Turkey, such as the liberalization of the electricity market and improvements in the renewable legislations, have accelerated the growth process and investment opportunities in the field of renewable energy. Turkey′s naturally endowed potential for renewables, such as solar, geothermal and wind, also accompanied these developments and attracted world attention to this market. In Turkey, renewable energy sources have gained great importance in the last decades due to growing energy demand and incentive policies which foster the utilization of renewable energy sources. This study aims to explore the availability and potential of renewable energy sources in Turkey and discuss the government policies and economic aspects. - highlights: • Turkey′s potential for renewable energy has attracted world attention. • Turkey has specific energy objectives in promoting renewable energy. • This paper evaluates recent incentives for renewable energy in Turkey. • Incentives in Turkey have led to more investment in renewable energy generation

  15. Genetics of Poultry Meat Production in Organic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    Organic Meat Production and Processing describes the challenges of production, processing and food safety of organic meat. The editors and international collection of authors explore the trends in organic meats and how the meat industry is impacted. Commencing with chapters on the economics, market...... and regulatory aspects of organic meats, coverage then extends to management issues for organically raised and processed meat animals. Processing, sensory and human health aspects are covered in detail, as are the incidences of foodborne pathogens in organic beef, swine, poultry and other organic meat species....... The book concludes by describing pre-harvest control measures for assuring the safety of organic meats. Organic Meat Production and Processing serves as a unique resource for fully understanding the current and potential issues associated with organic meats...

  16. Retort pouch processing of Chettinad style goat meat curry — a heritage meat product

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, V.; Dushyanthan, K.; Das, Arun K.

    2010-01-01

    Chettinad style goat meat curry, a heritage meat product, was thermal processed in retort pouches having 4 layer configurations. Physical properties of retort pouches indicated that they are suitable for processing. Pouches filled with 150 g of goat meat and 100 g of curry medium were retorted to a FO value of 12.1 min. Retort cooked products were tested for sterility and quality characteristics. Retorting decreased the product pH, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and shear force value...

  17. Can we cut out the meat of the dish? Constructing consumer-oriented pathways toward meat substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schösler, H.; de Boer, J.; Boersema, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    The shift towards a more sustainable diet necessitates less reliance on foods of animal origin. This study presents data from a representative survey of Dutch consumers on their practices related to meat, meat substitution and meat reduction. The practices reflected a cultural gradient of meat

  18. Preparation of salted meat products, e.g. cured bacon - by injecting liquid comprising meat proteins hydrolysed with enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Preparation of salted meat products comprises the following:(1) meat is chopped into fine pieces and mixed with water to form a slurry; (2) enzymes hydrolyse proteins in the meat; (3) adding a culture to the resulting medium, which comprises short peptide chains or amino acids; (4) forming...... flavourings as the culture is growing, and (5) injecting the liquid into pieces of meat....

  19. Molecular diagnosis and characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in turkeys and chickens in Germany reveals evidence for previously undetected parasite species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra A Helmy

    Full Text Available A total of 256 fecal specimens were randomly collected from farmed poultry in Germany and screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR and further characterized by direct automated DNA sequencing. Using a nested PCR amplifying approximately 830 bp 18S rDNA fragment, 7.03% (n = 18 of the samples were Cryptosporidium-positive. In detail, Cryptosporidium was detected in 9.3% (8/86 of turkeys, 5.7% (9/158 of broilers and 8.3% (1/12 of layers. After DNA sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum the most frequently observed species was identified in 5.1% (13/256 of all poultry species, including 8.1% (7/86 of turkeys, 3.2% (5/158 of broilers and 8.3% (1/12 of layers. Cryptosporidium baileyi was detected in 1.3% (2/256 of the broilers only. Three novel unclassified Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 1.2% (1/86 of turkeys and 1.3% (2/158 of broilers. The infection rate was high in 13-20 week old turkeys, 1-6 weeks old broilers and >20 weeks old layers but differences between age groups were not significant. This is the first study in Germany uses molecular methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in poultry. The results indicate that Cryptosporidium parasites are common among broilers and turkeys in Germany. Considering the large size of the poultry industry, the large amount of poultry meat that is consumed and the fact that C. parvum is also the most common Cryptosporidium parasite in humans, poultry might also be a source of human infections.

  20. Reduction of radioactive caesium in meat and fish by soaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petaejae, E.; Puolanne, E. (Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Meat Technology); Rantavaara, A.; Paakkola, O. (Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland))

    1992-01-01

    The removal of radioactive caesium from meat by soaking in brine or water and the effect of injection curing, temperature, size of meat piece and cooking on this removal were studied. The availability of the brined meat for the manufacture of cured, smoked and cooked meat, oven-cooked meat and cooked sausages was also investigated. The soaking method was also tested on fish. (Author).