WorldWideScience

Sample records for death syndrome caused

  1. Infectious causes of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Khandaker, Gulam

    2014-12-01

    Investigators have long suspected the role of infection in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Evidence of infectious associations with SIDS is accentuated through the presence of markers of infection and inflammation on autopsy of SIDS infants and isolates of some bacteria and viruses. Several observational studies have looked into the relation between seasonality and incidence of SIDS, which often showed a winter peak. These all may suggest an infectious aetiology of SIDS. In this review we have summarised the current literature on infectious aetiologies of SIDS by looking at viral, bacterial, genetic and environmental factors which are believed to be associated with SIDS.

  2. Differentiating cause-of-death terminology for deaths coded as sudden infant death syndrome, accidental suffocation, and unknown cause: an investigation using US death certificates, 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Y; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Chu, Susan Y; Camperlengo, Lena T; Anderson, Robert N

    2012-03-01

    We compared written text on infant death certificates for deaths coded as sudden infant death syndrome (R95), unknown cause (R99), and accidental suffocation (W75). Using US mortality files supplemented with the death certifiers' written text for all infant deaths with International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 assigned codes R95, R99, and W75, we formed cause-of-death subcategories from common themes identified from the written text. Among all infant deaths in 2003-2004, the underlying cause of death was listed as R99 for 2128 deaths, R95 for 4408 deaths, and W75 for 931 deaths. Among the postneonatal deaths, the differences in subcategories varied between assigned ICD-10 codes: for R99-coded deaths, 45.8% were categorized as "Unknown" and 48.6% as "Pending"; for R95-coded deaths, 67.7% were categorized as "sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)"; and for W75-coded deaths, 76.4% were categorized as "Suffocation." Examination of the written text on the death certificates demonstrates variability in the assigned ICD-10 codes which could have an important effect on the estimates of SIDS cases in the United States.

  3. Rare cause of natural death in forensic setting: hemophagocytic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondruschka, B; Habeck, J-O; Hädrich, C; Dreßler, J; Bayer, R

    2016-05-01

    We report about the case of a sudden unexpected death of a 25-year-old male suffering from infectious disease. An autopsy was ordered with no final premortem diagnosis. Microscopic and microbiological examination revealed a pneumococcal bronchopneumonia and hemophagocytic lesions in the bone marrow. After integrating clinical and autopsy reports as well as additional postmortem investigations, the cause of death was found to be infectious-triggered hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) with a final cytokine storm. This seems to be the first reported fatal case of a reactive form of HPS associated to Streptococcus pneumoniae to the best of our knowledge. HPS is a dangerous hyperinflammation with highly characteristic, but nonspecific, laboratory findings and symptoms. Autopsies in such cases must be carefully performed and include systematic tissue sampling done by an experienced pathologist.

  4. Drowning as a Cause of Death in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmael, Holly A.; Begleiter, Michael L.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2002-01-01

    This study reports on a 9-year-old boy previously diagnosed with Angelman syndrome who died unexpectedly by drowning in a shallow backyard wading pool. The case illustrates the fascination with water by individuals with Angelman syndrome and highlights that this fascination may lead to death. The need for supervision is stressed. (Contains 5…

  5. Early repolarization syndrome: A cause of sudden cardiac death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdi; Ali; Nida; Butt; Azeem; S; Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Early repolarization syndrome(ERS), demonstrated as J-point elevation on an electrocardiograph, was formerly thought to be a benign entity, but the recent studies have demonstrated that it can be linked to a considerable risk of life- threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death(SCD). Early repolarization characteristics associated with SCD include high-amplitude J-point elevation, horizontal and/or downslopping ST segments, and inferior and/or lateral leads location. The prevalence of ERS varies between 3% and 24%, depending on age, sex and J-point elevation(0.05 m V vs 0.1 m V) being the main determinants.ERS patients are sporadic and they are at a higher risk of having recurrent cardiac events. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and isoproterenol are the suggested therapies in this set of patients. On the other hand, asymptomatic patients with ERS are common and have a better prognosis. The risk stratification in asymptomatic patients with ERS still remains a grey area. This review provides an outline of the up-to-date evidence associated with ERS and the risk of life- threatening arrhythmias. Further prospective studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmogenesis in patients with ERS.

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome caused by cardiac arrhythmias: only a matter of genes encoding ion channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Campuzano, Oscar; Cesar, Sergi; Iglesias, Anna; Fernandez, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome is the unexpected demise of a child younger than 1 year of age which remains unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Usually, it occurs during sleep, in males, and during the first 12 weeks of life. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the death is unknown, and the lethal episode is considered multifactorial. However, in cases without a conclusive post-mortem diagnosis, suspicious of cardiac arrhythmias may also be considered as a cause of death, especially in families suffering from any cardiac disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review current understanding of sudden infant death, focusing on genetic causes leading to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, considering both genes encoding ion channels as well as structural proteins due to recent association of channelopathies and desmosomal genes. We support a comprehensive analysis of all genes associated with sudden cardiac death in families suffering of infant death. It allows the identification of the most plausible cause of death but also of family members at risk, providing cardiologists with essential data to adopt therapeutic preventive measures in families affected with this lethal entity.

  7. Causes of Death in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) 40-Year Mortality Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G.; Manzardo, Ann M.; Heinemann, Janalee; Loker, Carolyn; Loker, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex neurodevelopmental genetic disorder that is associated with hyperphagia and morbid obesity in humans leading to a shortened life expectancy. This report summarizes the primary causes of death and evaluates mortality trends in a large cohort of individuals with PWS. Methods PWSA (USA) mortality syndrome-specific database of death reports was collected through a cursory bereavement program for PWSA(USA) families using a brief survey created in 1999. Causes of death were descriptively characterized and statistically examined using Cox Proportional Hazards. Results A total of 486 deaths were reported (263 males, 217 females, 6 unknown) between 1973 and 2015 with mean age of 29.5 ± 16 years (2mo–67yrs), 70% occurring in adulthood. Respiratory failure was the most common cause accounting for 31% of all deaths. Males were at increased risk for presumed hyperphagia-related accidents/injuries compared to females and cardiopulmonary factors. PWS maternal disomy 15 genetic subtype showed an increased risk of death from cardiopulmonary factors compared to the deletion subtype. Conclusions These findings highlight the heightened vulnerability towards obesity and hyperphagia-related mortality in PWS. Future research is needed to address critical vulnerabilities such as gender and genetic subtype in the cause of death in PWS. PMID:27854358

  8. Throw caution to the wind: is refeeding syndrome really a cause of death in acute care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K L; Capra, S M; Palmer, M A

    2017-08-16

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS), a life-threatening medical condition, is commonly associated with acute or chronic starvation. While the prevalence of patients at risk of RFS in hospital reportedly ranges from 0 to 80%, the prevalence and types of patients who die as a result of RFS is unknown. We aimed to measure the prevalence rate and examine the case histories of patients who passed away with RFS listed as a cause of death. Patients were eligible for inclusion provided their death occurred within a Queensland hospital. Medical charts were reviewed, for medical, clinical and nutrition histories with results presented using descriptive statistics. Across 18 years (1997-2015) and ~260000 hospital deaths, five individuals (4F, 74 (37-87)yrs) were identified. No patient had a past or present diagnosis, such as anorexia nervosa, that would classify them as at high risk for RFS. RFS was not listed as the primary cause of death for any patient. No individual consumed >3400 kJ per day. Limited consensus was observed in the signs and symptoms used to diagnose RFS, although all patients experienced low levels of potassium, phosphate and/or magnesium. Eighty percent of electrolytes improved before death. RFS was a rare underlying cause of death, despite reported high prevalence rates of risk. Patient groups usually considered to be at high risk were not identified, suggesting a level of imprecision with the interpretation of criteria used to identify RFS risk. More detailed research is warranted to assist in the identification of those distinctly at risk of RFS.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 16 August 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2017.124.

  9. Shaken baby syndrome: re-examination of diffuse axonal injury as cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, Manfred; Schleiss, Daniela; Pedal, Ingo; Saternus, Klaus-Steffen; Gerling, Ivana; Meissner, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    The discussion surrounding shaken baby syndrome (SBS) arose from the lack of evidence implicating diffuse axonal injury (DAI) as a cause of death. It was assumed instead that injury to the cervical cord, medulla, and nerve roots played a causal role. The present pathomorphological study examines 18 selected infants (<1-year-old) whose deaths were highly suspicious for SBS, exhibiting the classical SBS triad of acute subdural hemorrhage (SDH), retinal bleeding, and encephalopathy. Gross autopsy and microscopic findings of these infants were compared with those of 19 victims of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; control group 1) and of 14 infants who died of disease or injuries/violence not involving the head, neck or eyes (control group 2). Symptoms of mechanical impact to the head were evident in seven of the SBS infants, but in none of the control infants. DAI was not detected in either the SBS or control cases. Localized axonal injury (AI) was regularly present in the brains of the SBS infants surviving longer than 1.5-3.0 h, but only occasionally in the craniocervical junction and within the nerve roots of the upper cervical cord; it was never present in the medulla. Epidural hemorrhage of the cervical cord was seen in four of the ten examined SBS cases, but in none of the control cases. Based on the absence of DAI in the brain and of signs of generalized cervical cord or nerve root injuries, we conclude that the cause of death in the SBS victims was a global cerebral ischemia secondary to SDH, focal vasospasm, trauma-induced transitory respiratory and/or circulatory failure.

  10. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2015-08-31

    This report presents final 2012 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2012," the National Center for Health Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2012. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2012, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These causes accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2012 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods.

  11. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2016-02-16

    This report presents final 2013 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements "Deaths: Final Data for 2013," the National Center for Health Statistics’ annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2013. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD–10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2013, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Cerebrovascular diseases; Alzheimer’s disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2013 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Sudden infant death syndrome; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as

  12. Deaths: Leading Causes for 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2015-07-27

    This report presents final 2011 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements ‘‘Deaths: Final Data for 2011,’’ the National Center for Health Statistics’ annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2011. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD–10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2011, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer’s disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). They accounted for 74% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2011 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission

  13. Deaths: leading causes for 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2012-10-26

    This report presents final 2009 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the Division of Vital Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2009. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2009, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Influenza and pneumonia; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These causes accounted for approximately 75% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2009 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Neonatal hemorrhage. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and postneonatal periods.

  14. Deaths: leading causes for 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie

    2013-12-20

    This report presents final 2010 data on the 10 leading causes of death in the United States by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant, neonatal, and postneonatal death are also presented. This report supplements the Division of Vital Statistics' annual report of final mortality statistics. Data in this report are based on information from all death certificates filed in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in 2010. Causes of death classified by the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) are ranked according to the number of deaths assigned to rankable causes. Cause-of-death statistics are based on the underlying cause of death. In 2010, the 10 leading causes of death were, in rank order: Diseases of heart; Malignant neoplasms; Chronic lower respiratory diseases; Cerebrovascular diseases; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Alzheimer's disease; Diabetes mellitus; Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis; Influenza and pneumonia; and Intentional self-harm (suicide). These 10 causes accounted for 75% of all deaths occurring in the United States. Differences in the rankings are evident by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Leading causes of infant death for 2010 were, in rank order: Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities; Disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight, not elsewhere classified; Sudden infant death syndrome; Newborn affected by maternal complications of pregnancy; Accidents (unintentional injuries); Newborn affected by complications of placenta, cord and membranes; Bacterial sepsis of newborn; Respiratory distress of newborn; Diseases of the circulatory system; and Necrotizing enterocolitis of newborn. Important variations in the leading causes of infant death are noted for the neonatal and post-neonatal periods. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source

  15. The Genome Sequence of the Fungal Pathogen Fusarium virguliforme That Causes Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Subodh K.; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Brar, Hargeet K.; Fakhoury, Ahmad M.; Bluhm, Burton H.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium virguliforme causes sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean, a disease of serious concern throughout most of the soybean producing regions of the world. Despite the global importance, little is known about the pathogenesis mechanisms of F. virguliforme. Thus, we applied Next-Generation DNA Sequencing to reveal the draft F. virguliforme genome sequence and identified putative pathogenicity genes to facilitate discovering the mechanisms used by the pathogen to cause this disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated the draft genome sequence of F. virguliforme by conducting whole-genome shotgun sequencing on a 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencer. Initially, single-end reads of a 400-bp shotgun library were assembled using the PCAP program. Paired end sequences from 3 and 20 Kb DNA fragments and approximately 100 Kb inserts of 1,400 BAC clones were used to generate the assembled genome. The assembled genome sequence was 51 Mb. The N50 scaffold number was 11 with an N50 Scaffold length of 1,263 Kb. The AUGUSTUS gene prediction program predicted 14,845 putative genes, which were annotated with Pfam and GO databases. Gene distributions were uniform in all but one of the major scaffolds. Phylogenic analyses revealed that F. virguliforme was closely related to the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca. Of the 14,845 F. virguliforme genes, 11,043 were conserved among five Fusarium species: F. virguliforme, F. graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. oxysporum and N. haematococca; and 1,332 F. virguliforme-specific genes, which may include pathogenicity genes. Additionally, searches for candidate F. virguliforme pathogenicity genes using gene sequences of the pathogen-host interaction database identified 358 genes. Conclusions The F. virguliforme genome sequence and putative pathogenicity genes presented here will facilitate identification of pathogenicity mechanisms involved in SDS development. Together, these resources will expedite our efforts towards discovering

  16. Causes of death in patients ≥75 years of age with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Nuccia; Savonitto, Stefano; Murena, Ernesto; Antonicelli, Roberto; Piovaccari, Giancarlo; Tucci, Daniele; Tamburino, Corrado; Fontanelli, Alessandro; Bolognese, Leonardo; Menozzi, Mila; Cavallini, Claudio; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Piscione, Federico; Steffenino, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano

    2013-07-01

    The causes of death within 1 year of hospital admission in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes are ill defined, particularly in patients aged ≥75 years. From January 2008 through May 2010, we enrolled 645 patients aged ≥75 years with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: 313 in a randomized trial comparing an early aggressive versus an initially conservative approach, and 332, excluded from the trial for specific reasons, in a parallel registry. Each death occurring during 1 year of follow-up was adjudicated by an independent committee. The mean age was 82 years in both study cohorts, and 53% were men. By the end of the follow-up period (median 369 days, interquartile range 345 to 391), 120 patients (18.6%) had died. The mortality was significantly greater in the registry (23.8% vs 13.1%, p = 0.001). The deaths were classified as cardiac in 94% of the cases during the index admission and 68% of the cases during the follow-up period. Eighty-six percent of the cardiac deaths were of ischemic origin. In a multivariate logistic regression model that included the variables present on admission in the whole study population, the ejection fraction (hazard ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 0.97; p segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, most deaths in patients aged ≥75 years have a cardiac origin, mostly owing to myocardial ischemia.

  17. Temporal trends in sudden infant death syndrome in Canada from 1991 to 2005: contribution of changes in cause of death assignment practices and in maternal and infant characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicolas L; Fell, Deshayne B; Joseph, K S; Liu, Shiliang; León, Juan Andrés; Sauve, Reg

    2012-03-01

    The rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) declined significantly in Canada and the US between the late 1980s and the early 2000s. In the US, this decline was shown to be due in part to a shift in diagnosis, as deaths from accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed and from other ill-defined and unspecified cause increased concurrently. This study was undertaken to determine whether there was such a shift in diagnosis from SIDS to other causes of death in Canada, and to quantify the true temporal decrease in SIDS. Cause-specific infant death rates were compared across three periods: 1991-95, 1996-2000 and 2001-05 using the Canadian linked livebirth-infant death file. The temporal decline in SIDS was estimated after adjustment for maternal and infant characteristics such as maternal age and small-for-gestational age using logistic regression. Deaths from SIDS decreased from 78.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 73.4, 83.4] per 100 000 livebirths in 1991-95, to 48.5 [95% CI 44.3, 52.7] in 1996-2000 and to 34.6 [95% CI 31.0, 38.3] in 2001-05. Mortality rates from other ill-defined and unspecified causes and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed remained stable. The temporal decline in SIDS between 1991-95 and 2001-05 did not change substantially after adjustment for maternal and infant factors. It is unlikely that the temporal decline of SIDS in Canada was due to changes in cause-of-death assignment practices or in maternal and infant characteristics.

  18. The frequency of a disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S

    1993-01-01

    syndrome is still a matter of controversy. The present study investigated 120 well-defined cases of sudden infant death syndrome in order to detect the frequency of the most common disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (G985) compared with the frequency...

  19. [The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida's Health, 1976

    1976-01-01

    This collection of articles on the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), drawn from a southeastern regional symposium on the subject, summarizes much of what is known about the occurrence of SIDS, including current information about its causes. The background of state action in Florida is reviewed, with emphasis on the need for increased public and…

  20. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Henry L.; And Others

    There is a growing body of evidence that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) victims are not completely normal and healthy, as was once believed. A variety of new information from several disciplines strongly suggests that the infant who dies suddenly and unexpectedly may do so because of subtle developmental, neurologic, cardiorespiratory, and…

  1. Specific deletion of NaV1.1 sodium channels in inhibitory interneurons causes seizures and premature death in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah, Christine S.; Yu, Frank H.; Westenbroek, Ruth E.; Kalume, Franck K.; Oakley, John C; Potter, Gregory B.; Rubenstein, John L.; Catterall, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the brain sodium channel NaV1.1 cause Dravet syndrome (DS), a pharmacoresistant infantile-onset epilepsy syndrome with comorbidities of cognitive impairment and premature death. Previous studies using a mouse model of DS revealed reduced sodium currents and impaired excitability in GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus, leading to the hypothesis that impaired excitability of GABAergic inhibitory neurons is the cause of epilepsy and premature deat...

  2. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found in their cribs. SIDS is the leading cause of death in children between one month and one year old. Most SIDS deaths occur when babies are between one month and four months old. Premature babies, boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska ...

  3. A case report of a pregnancy-related death caused by primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yingjian Sun,1 Manhua Cui,1 Wanan Zhu,2 Weiling Xu,2 Na Li2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, People's Republic of China Abstract: Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS is a rare clinical event in the People's Republic of China. As APS is easily neglected or misdiagnosed, a delayed treatment can result. The patient reported here was a 32-year-old female who died by systemic venous thrombosis on day 11 after a cesarean section delivery. Luckily, the baby survived. A blood test demonstrated that the patient's platelets were decreased at 19 weeks of gestation. Anti-cardolipin antibody and antiß2GP1 (anti-ß2-glycoprotein-I antibody were positive at 36 weeks and 2 days of gestation. This patient was diagnosed with APS. Unfortunately, as physicians, we could not provide proper treatment as the patient's relatives were concerned that the proposed treatment would have negative effects on the infant's health. This clinical case strongly suggests that physicians need to appreciate that APS is a very serious condition, especially for pregnant women, and that proper treatment should be provided as early as possible to avoid a bad outcome, despite the fact that a cure for this disease is not currently available. Keywords: APS, thrombosis, Hughes syndrome

  4. A case report of a pregnancy-related death caused by primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yingjian; Cui, Manhua; Zhu, Wanan; Xu, Weiling; Li, Na

    2014-01-01

    Primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a rare clinical event in the People's Republic of China. As APS is easily neglected or misdiagnosed, a delayed treatment can result. The patient reported here was a 32-year-old female who died by systemic venous thrombosis on day 11 after a cesarean section delivery. Luckily, the baby survived. A blood test demonstrated that the patient's platelets were decreased at 19 weeks of gestation. Anti-cardolipin antibody and antiβ2GP1 (anti-β2-glycoprotein-I antibody) were positive at 36 weeks and 2 days of gestation. This patient was diagnosed with APS. Unfortunately, as physicians, we could not provide proper treatment as the patient's relatives were concerned that the proposed treatment would have negative effects on the infant's health. This clinical case strongly suggests that physicians need to appreciate that APS is a very serious condition, especially for pregnant women, and that proper treatment should be provided as early as possible to avoid a bad outcome, despite the fact that a cure for this disease is not currently available.

  5. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  6. The role of respiratory failure caused by congenital central nervous system abnormalities and the effect of β-casomorphins in sudden infant death syndrome pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Sumińska-Ziemann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to discuss the role of respiratory failure caused by endogenous (both structural and functional abnormalities in the central nervous system and exogenous food-derived opioid-like peptides in the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. By stimulating μ-opioid receptors, opioid-like peptides may suppress the tonic activity of the respiratory centre in the brain stem.

  7. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases...... ion channel ß-subunits, and 3 genes encode other channel-interacting proteins. All 10 genes have been associated with primary electrical heart diseases. SIDS may hereby be the initial symptom of rare primary electric channelopathies such as long QT, short QT and Brugada syndrome, as well...

  8. Causes of Death and Autopsy Findings in a Large Study Cohort of Individuals with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, Samantha A.; Sherer, Ilana; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Clark, Dinah; Audette, Lynn; Gillis, Lynette; Kline, Antonie D.; Ernst, Linda; Loomes, Kathy; Krantz, Ian D.; Jackson, Laird G.

    2011-01-01

    To identify causes of death (COD) in propositi with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) at various ages, and to develop guidelines to improve management and avoid morbidity and mortality, we retrospectively reviewed a total of 426 propositi with confirmed clinical diagnoses of CdLS in our database who died in a 41-year period between 1966–2007. Of these, 295 had an identifiable COD reported to us. Clinical, laboratory and complete autopsy data were completed on 41, of which 38 were obtainable, an additional 19 had autopsies that only documented the COD, and 45 propositi had surgical, imaging, or terminal event clinical documentation of their COD. Proband ages ranged from fetuses (21 to 40 weeks gestation) to 61 years. A literature review was undertaken to identify all reported causes of death in CdLS individuals. In our cohort of 295 propositi with a known COD, respiratory causes including aspiration/reflux and pneumonias were the most common primary causes (31%), followed by gastrointestinal disease, including obstruction/volvulus (19%). Congenital anomalies accounted for 15% of deaths and included congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital heart defects. Acquired cardiac disease accounted for 3% of deaths. Neurological causes and accidents each accounted for 8%, sepsis for 4%, cancer for 2%, renal disease for 1.7%, and other causes, 9% of deaths. We also present 21 representative clinical cases for illustration. This comprehensive review has identified important etiologies contributing to the morbidity and mortality in this population that will provide for an improved understanding of clinical complications, and management for children and adults with CdLS. PMID:22069164

  9. Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury Recommend on Facebook ... Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments, United States – 2014 Leading Causes of Death Charts Causes of Death by ...

  10. Cardiac Causes of Sudden Infant Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Aygün

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism and causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is still remains its mystery. The pathophysiology of SIDS is not clear. Sleeping in prone position is thought to contribute to pathophysiology. Schwartz was the first physician suggesting that SIDS can be associated with heart and autonomic nervous system. Congenital long QT syndrome may trigger SIDS by causing ventricular tachycardia. Normal cardiac rhythm is regulated by ion channels and specific proteins, but genetical analyses clearly demonstrated that 5 ion channel genes were responsible for rare arrhythmias. The infections, fever and sleeping in prone position can increase the risk of long QT syndrome in babies having mutations in cardiac ion channels. In this review we tried to draw attention to SIDS as an important cause of death in childhood period and association of SIDS with long QT syndrome which is not necessarily noticed by physicians. (The Jo­ur­nal of Cur­rent Pe­di­at­rics 2014;1:37-42

  11. Sudden death syndrome – An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. M. F. Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders affect internal body metabolism and development and are the cause of the large proportion of mortality in both commercial and backyard poultry flocks. One of the main factor affecting these diseases is rapid growth rate. Two of the more important types of metabolic disorders are the “Sudden Death Syndrome” and Ascites. Sudden death syndrome (SDS is a condition in which apparently healthy fast growing broilers chicks die suddenly from no apparent causes. There is usually a short wing beating convulsions prior to death, so that the majority of affected broilers are found dead lying on their backs. As a result, the condition often been referred to as “Flip-Over Disease”. Sudden death syndrome has developed into a major problem to the broiler industry in many parts of the world. Broilers of all ages are affected starting as early as 2 days of age and continuing through to market age. Peak mortality usually occurs between 3 and 4 weeks of age. Males are more affected than the females. Lung edema is a prominent PM lesions.There is no proper treatment and preventive measures for control of SDS, but incidence can be reduced by management techniques. The causes of the Sudden Death Syndrome includes; Managemental factors, Nutritional factors, Diet Composition and Role of Prostaglandins. [Vet World 2009; 2(11.000: 444-447

  12. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome with Harlequin Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The harlequin fetus, a severe variant of ichthyosis, occurs rarely, and these babies die within the first few days of life. Early retinoid therapy may improve the disorder and help increase survival rates. The exact cause of the sudden infant death syndrome of the suckling is not known and the incidence approximately is 0.1-0.3 %. In general, these babies looked well and healthy at the time of the sleeping but were found dead in their bed in the morning. We report a harlequin fetus with sudden infant death syndrome.

  13. FastStats: Leading Causes of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Leading Causes of Death Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Number of deaths for leading causes of death Heart disease: 633,842 • Cancer: ...

  14. Death in CHARGE syndrome after the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. E. H.; Blake, K. D.; Bakker, M. K.; Sarvaas, G. J. du Marchie; Free, R. H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.

    2010-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that can be life-threatening in the neonatal period. Complex heart defects, bilateral choanal atresia, esophageal atresia, severe T-cell deficiency, and brain anomalies can cause neonatal death. As little is known about the causes of death in

  15. Death in CHARGE syndrome after the neonatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. E. H.; Blake, K. D.; Bakker, M. K.; Sarvaas, G. J. du Marchie; Free, R. H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.

    CHARGE syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome that can be life-threatening in the neonatal period. Complex heart defects, bilateral choanal atresia, esophageal atresia, severe T-cell deficiency, and brain anomalies can cause neonatal death. As little is known about the causes of death in

  16. Deaths Due to Choking in Prader-Willli Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, David A.; Heinemann, Janalee; Angulo, Moris; Merlin G. Butler; Loker, Jim; Rupe, Norma; Kendell, Patrick; Clericuzio, Carol L; Scheimann, Ann O

    2007-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is the most common known syndromic cause of life threatening obesity, yet few studies have examined the causes of death in PWS. The objective of this study was to examine the contribution of choking leading to mortality in PWS. In 1999, a brief survey was made available from the Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) bereavement program, which documented demographic data and causes of death. Families were subsequently offered the opportunity to fill out a detailed...

  17. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Facts for Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Child Care, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents risk factors and prevention measures related to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Offers infant sleep recommendations and five discussion questions to test knowledge of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. (DLH)

  18. Sudden unexpected death caused by stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Risgaard, Bjarke; Zachariasardóttir, Sára

    2017-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in young individuals globally. Data on the burden of sudden death by stroke are sparse in the young. Aims The aim of this study was to report mortality rates, cause of death, stroke subtype, and symptoms in children and young adults who suffered...... sudden death by stroke. Methods We conducted a retrospective, nationwide study including all deaths within Danish borders between 2000-2009 and 2007-2009 in persons aged 1-35 years and 36-49 years, respectively. Two physicians identified all sudden death cases through review of all death certificates....... All available autopsy reports and records from hospitals and general practitioners were retrieved and a neurologist identified all sudden death by stroke cases. Results Of the 14,567 deaths in the 10-year period, there were 1,698 sudden death cases, of which 52 (3%) were sudden death by stroke...

  19. Wernicke's encephalopathy: a preventable cause of maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedisinghe, Lilantha; Jayakody, Kaushadh; Arambage, Kirana

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare cause of maternal death. It is a difficult diagnosis to make but prevention and treatment is straightforward. Severe thiamine deficiency causes Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Correct diagnosis and treatment with thiamine will decrease the case fatality rate.

  20. Softness and potential to cause rebreathing: Differences in bedding used by infants at high and low risk for sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, J S; Livne, M; White, D K; Arfken, C L

    1998-02-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether bedding used by infants, who are at either high or low risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), differs in physical properties favoring rebreathing of exhaled gases. We compared softness and limitation of carbon dioxide dispersal by bedding, using a mechanical model. A questionnaire was used to describe sociodemographic risk factors and sleep practices; bedding was studied in homes with a model positioned where each infant was found sleeping that morning. The groups differed with respect to five sociodemographic risk factors (p values all < or = 0.0001). In addition, infants at higher risk were more likely to have been placed to sleep prone (46%, p = 0.02) by parents who were less likely to be aware of the risk associated with the prone position (62% aware, p = 0.005). Infants at higher risk had softer bedding (p < 0.0001, 54.1+/-17.2 cm2 vs 33.7+/-7.7 cm2 in contact with model), which caused more limitation of carbon dioxide dispersal (p = 0.008; CO2 retained, 0.60%+/-0.15% vs 0.34%+/-0.05%). A series of infants who are at high risk for SIDS because of sociodemographic factors more often sleep on bedding that has physical properties favoring rebreathing, and their parents are less often aware of the risk associated with prone sleeping.

  1. The Danish registers of causes of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Helweg-Larsen, K

    1999-01-01

    In 1875 registration of causes of death in Denmark was established by the National Board of Health, and annual statistics of death have since been published. Until 1970 the national statistics were based upon punched cards with data collected from the death certificates. Since then the register h......, and the research based upon the registers, presenting some examples of research activities....

  2. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases have been proposed as being caused by genetic variants in either ion channel or ion channel-associated proteins. Until now, 10 cardiac channelopathy susceptibility genes have been found to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SIDS. Four of the genes encode cardiac ion channel α-subunits, 3 genes encode ion channel β-subunits, and 3 genes encode other channel-interacting proteins. All 10 genes have been associated with primary electrical heart diseases. SIDS may hereby be the initial symptom of rare primary electric channelopathies such as long QT, short QT and Brugada syndrome, as well as catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. In this review we describe the functional role of sodium, potassium and calcium channels in propagation, depolarization and repolarization in the context of the 4 arrhythmogenic diseases reported to be associated with SIDS. Lastly, the possibility of postmortem genetic testing and potential recommendations on how to deal with family members are discussed. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Psychosocial Aspects of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome ("Cot Death").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluglass, Kerry

    1981-01-01

    Reviews literature on reactions of parents and siblings to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The prospects for prolonged, adverse reactions are considered, and professional concerns regarding abnormal adaptation are noted. (Author/DB)

  4. Cause of Death Affects Racial Classification on Death Certificates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noymer, Andrew; Penner, Andrew M.; Saperstein, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    Recent research suggests racial classification is responsive to social stereotypes, but how this affects racial classification in national vital statistics is unknown. This study examines whether cause of death influences racial classification on death certificates. We analyze the racial classifications from a nationally representative sample of death certificates and subsequent interviews with the decedents' next of kin and find notable discrepancies between the two racial classifications by cause of death. Cirrhosis decedents are more likely to be recorded as American Indian on their death certificates, and homicide victims are more likely to be recorded as Black; these results remain net of controls for followback survey racial classification, indicating that the relationship we reveal is not simply a restatement of the fact that these causes of death are more prevalent among certain groups. Our findings suggest that seemingly non-racial characteristics, such as cause of death, affect how people are racially perceived by others and thus shape U.S. official statistics. PMID:21298093

  5. Social class and cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Robert; Torssander, Jenny

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that causes of death differ in their relationship to social class, but we lack a more comprehensive description of this variation. The present study provides a detailed and extensive list of social class differences for a large number of specific causes of death. All deaths between 1991 and 2003 in Sweden were linked with information on household social class from 1990. Relative death risks and excess mortality in groups of causes according to the European shortlist were estimated separately for men and women in eight classes using Cox Regression. A clear mortality gradient among employees was found for the majority of causes, from low-relative death risks among higher managerial and professional occupations to relatively high risks for the unskilled working class. There is considerable variation in the strength of the association, from causes such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer and transport accidents among women, where no clear class differences were found. At the other extreme, mental and behavioural disorders, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases and diseases of the respiratory system all show steep slopes for both men and women. Circulatory diseases and cancer together account for 15-20% of excess mortality. Exceptions to the general pattern--causes of death in which higher social classes are exposed to greater death risks or in which there is no mortality gradient--are practically non-existent. There is nevertheless significant variation in the strength of the class differences in specific causes.

  6. Sudden cardiac death in children and adolescents (excluding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajewski Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden death in the young is rare. About 25% of cases occur during sports. Most young people with sudden cardiac death (SCD have underlying heart disease, with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and coronary artery anomalies being commonest in most series. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and long QT syndrome are the most common primary arrhythmic causes of SCD. It is estimated that early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and widespread availability of automatic external defibrillators could prevent about a quarter of pediatric sudden deaths.

  7. [Causes of the people death from drunkenness and alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Iu A; Paukov, V S; Kirillov, Iu A

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed causes of 1008 people death, who abused by alcohol. Among them 2 groups were separated out: people died due to drunkenness and due to alcoholism. The structure of the death was similar in the both groups, however depended on alcoholism stages. The major cause of the death in group of drunkenness people was acute heart insufficiency, less commonly--lung pathology, and very rarely--brain vessels pathology and liver cirrhosis. In group of people, who died due to alcoholism, lung pathology was the major cause of these deaths, acute heart insufficiency was occurred less commonly, and very rare brain pathology because of delirium tremens or alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as so liver cirrhosis with complications. Hemorrhagic pancreonecrosis after alcoholic excess was found out in both groups, but it was more often in people, who died due to drunkenness. Obtained results show importance of chronic alcoholism identification as a disease with several stages including drunkenness and alcoholism.

  8. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2009. Data are based on...

  9. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2006. These data are...

  10. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979. Data...

  11. Guillain Barre syndrome mimicking cerebral death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajdev S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain Barre Syndrome, an acute diffuse demyelinating disorder, predominantly present with the motor manifestations with few variants. The present report describes an unusual presentation of GBS, which initially suggested brain death. A 14 years old male presented with sudden onset of rapidly progressive weakness of all four limbs which progressively evolved into clinical condition simulating brain death.

  12. Causes of death in familial adenomatous polyposis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, T S; Juel, K; Bülow, S

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has improved over the past decades owing to a reduction in the prevalence of colorectal cancer, resulting from effective early screening. During the same period several polyposis registers have recorded an increasing number of deaths due...... to duodenal/periampullary cancer and desmoid tumours. The aim of this study was to examine the causes of death with special emphasis on duodenal/periampullary cancer....

  13. Potential Central Nervous System Involvement in Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths and the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Bradley T

    2015-07-01

    Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) in infancy which includes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the commonest diagnosed cause of death in the United States for infants 1 month to 1 year of age. Central nervous system mechanisms likely contribute to many of these deaths. We discuss some of these including seizure disorders, prolonged breath holding, arousal from sleep and its habituation, laryngeal reflex apnea potentiated by upper airway infection, and failure of brainstem-mediated autoresuscitation. In the conclusions section, we speculate how lives saved through back sleeping might result in later developmental problems in certain infants who otherwise might have died while sleeping prone.

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome: diagnostic practices and investigative policies, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperlengo, Lena T; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Kim, Shin Y

    2012-09-01

    Using a 2004 population-based survey of all US medical examiner and coroner offices, we examined the characteristics of offices accepting an infant death case and calculated the percentage of offices that had death scene investigation or autopsy policies for the investigation of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID). We also calculated the percentage of offices that used and did not use sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) as a cause of death, and we compared differences in characteristics among those offices.Of medical examiner and coroner offices, 52% did not report an infant death in 2004. Of the 7957 infant deaths reported, 43% occurred in jurisdictions that experienced 1 or 2 infant deaths. Of the offices that used SIDS as a classification, 34% did not have policies for conducting death scene investigations and autopsies for SUID. At least 5% of offices that reported an infant death did not use SIDS as a cause of death classification. These findings have important implications for understanding recent trends in SIDS and SUID. Supporting the implementation of national standards for investigating and certifying infant deaths could provide guidelines for consistent practices in medical examiner and coroner offices.

  15. Assigning cause for sudden unexpected infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Carl E; Darnall, Robert A; McEntire, Betty L; Hyma, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    We have reached a conundrum in assigning cause of death for sudden unexpected infant deaths. We summarize the discordant perspectives and approaches and how they have occurred, and recommend a pathway toward improved consistency. This lack of consistency affects pediatricians and other health care professionals, scientific investigators, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement agencies, families, and support or advocacy groups. We recommend that an interdisciplinary international committee be organized to review current approaches for assigning cause of death, and to identify a consensus strategy for improving consistency. This effort will need to encompass intrinsic risk factors or infant vulnerability in addition to known environmental risk factors including unsafe sleep settings, and must be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a progressively expanding knowledge base.

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  17. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB

    2000-01-01

    . The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia...... in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome...

  18. Detection of sudden death syndrome using a multispectral imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS), caused by the fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines, is a widespread mid- to late-season disease with distinctive foliar symptoms. This paper reported the development of an image analysis based method to detect SDS using a multispectral image sensor. A hue, saturation a...

  19. Loss of MeCP2 Causes Urological Dysfunction and Contributes to Death by Kidney Failure in Mouse Models of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher S; Huang, Teng-Wei; Herrera, José A; Samaco, Rodney C; Pitcher, Meagan R; Herron, Alan; Skinner, Steven A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Percy, Alan K; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by loss of acquired skills during development, autonomic dysfunction, and an increased risk for premature lethality. Clinical experience identified a subset of individuals with RTT that present with urological dysfunction including individuals with frequent urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and urine retention requiring frequent catheterization for bladder voiding. To determine if urologic dysfunction is a feature of RTT, we queried the Rett Syndrome Natural History Study, a repository of clinical data from over 1000 individuals with RTT and found multiple instances of urological dysfunction. We then evaluated urological function in a mouse model of RTT and found an abnormal pattern of micturition. Both male and female mice possessing Mecp2 mutations show a decrease in urine output per micturition event. Furthermore, we identified signs of kidney failure secondary to urethral obstruction. Although genetic strain background significantly affects both survival and penetrance of the urethral obstruction phenotype, survival and penetrance of urethral obstruction do not directly correlate. We have identified an additional phenotype caused by loss of MeCP2, urological dysfunction. Furthermore, we urge caution in the interpretation of survival data as an endpoint in preclinical studies, especially where causes of mortality are poorly characterized.

  20. Loss of MeCP2 Causes Urological Dysfunction and Contributes to Death by Kidney Failure in Mouse Models of Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher S.; Huang, Teng-Wei; Herrera, José A.; Samaco, Rodney C.; Pitcher, Meagan R.; Herron, Alan; Skinner, Steven A.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Percy, Alan K.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by loss of acquired skills during development, autonomic dysfunction, and an increased risk for premature lethality. Clinical experience identified a subset of individuals with RTT that present with urological dysfunction including individuals with frequent urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and urine retention requiring frequent catheterization for bladder voiding. To determine if urologic dysfunction is a feature of RTT, we queried the Rett Syndrome Natural History Study, a repository of clinical data from over 1000 individuals with RTT and found multiple instances of urological dysfunction. We then evaluated urological function in a mouse model of RTT and found an abnormal pattern of micturition. Both male and female mice possessing Mecp2 mutations show a decrease in urine output per micturition event. Furthermore, we identified signs of kidney failure secondary to urethral obstruction. Although genetic strain background significantly affects both survival and penetrance of the urethral obstruction phenotype, survival and penetrance of urethral obstruction do not directly correlate. We have identified an additional phenotype caused by loss of MeCP2, urological dysfunction. Furthermore, we urge caution in the interpretation of survival data as an endpoint in preclinical studies, especially where causes of mortality are poorly characterized. PMID:27828991

  1. Symptoms Before Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinge, Charlotte; Jabbari, Reza; Risgaard, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: No studies in an unselected and nationwide setting have characterized the symptoms and medical history of patients with sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). The aim of this study was to identify and describe the symptoms and medical history of patients before the presentation....... The National Patient Registry was utilized to obtain information on all in- and outpatient activity in Danish hospitals. All medical records from hospitals and general practitioners, including death certificates and autopsy reports were reviewed. Before death, 48 (35%) SADS patients had cardiac symptoms; among...... these, 30 (22%) had contacted the healthcare system. Antecedent symptoms (symptoms >24 hours before death) were present in 34 (25%) patients. Prodromal symptoms (symptoms ≤24 hours before death) were present in 23 (17%) patients. Cardiac symptoms included chest pain (n = 16, 12%), dyspnea (n = 18, 13...

  2. Alcohol Use and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Karen B.; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    2004-01-01

    Despite general evidence of fetal toxicities associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), there has been limited research focusing on the effects of parental alcohol use on SIDS occurrence, either directly or in interaction with other risk conditions. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on parental, especially maternal,…

  3. Sudden death syndrome of soybean in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most common and widely spread root disease affecting soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in Argentina where it is an economically important crop. This disease was first discovered in this country in 1992 in the Pampas Region, and the following year in Northwest...

  4. Febrile convulsions and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Basso, Olga; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and febrile convulsions are related aetiologically. We compared the risk of SIDS in 9877 siblings of children who had had febrile convulsions with that of 20.177 siblings of children who had never had febrile convulsions. We found...

  5. Mechanisms and clinical management of sudden death caused by WPW syndrome%预激综合征发生猝死的机制解析和临床管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琦

    2013-01-01

    Pre - excitation syndrome commonly referred to as WPW ( Wolff - Parkinson - White syndrome) is characterized by presence of an abnormal accessory electrical conduction pathway between the atria and the ventricles that are stimulated to contract prematurely, which mainly leads to supraventricular tachycardia. At present, the risks of sudden death caused by WPW are realized gradually, and the danger of occurrence of sudden death in the patients combined with other cardiac diseases would be increased. Hence insight into potential mechanisms and identifying risk factors is essential to prevent the sudden cardiac death by WPW.%预激综合征又称Wolff-Parkinson-White(WPW)综合征,是心房肌通过异常旁路预先激动心室肌而造成以室上性心动过速为主的心律失常综合征.目前,它引起的猝死所带来的危害已逐渐被认识,当WPW综合征合并其他心脏疾病时,患者发生猝死的危险大大增加.所以深入了解其发生机制并明确危险因素将有效预防猝死发生.

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview & Facts Causes & Symptoms Self-Tests & Diagnosis Treatment Restless Legs Syndrome - Causes & Symptoms Causes What causes of restless legs syndrome varies from person to person. In some cases ...

  7. 38 CFR 3.312 - Cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cause of death. 3.312... Cause of death. (a) General. The death of a veteran will be considered as having been due to a service... contributory cause of death. The issue involved will be determined by exercise of sound judgment,...

  8. Deaths Due to Choking in Prader-Willli Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, David A.; Heinemann, Janalee; Angulo, Moris; Butler, Merlin G.; Loker, Jim; Rupe, Norma; Kendell, Patrick; Clericuzio, Carol L.; Scheimann, Ann O.

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is the most common known syndromic cause of life threatening obesity, yet few studies have examined the causes of death in PWS. The objective of this study was to examine the contribution of choking leading to mortality in PWS. In 1999, a brief survey was made available from the Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) bereavement program, which documented demographic data and causes of death. Families were subsequently offered the opportunity to fill out a detailed questionnaire and additional forms to release medical records. Demographic information was available on 178 deceased individuals with PWS, and cause of death available on 152 individuals. Fifty-four families completed questionnaires. Of the deceased individuals with completed questionnaires, 34% reported a history of choking. Choking was listed by familial report as the cause of death in 12 (7.9%) of 152 subjects with an average age of 24 years (range 3–52y; median 22.5y) at death from choking. Only two of these individuals were less than eight years of age. The data suggest that risks associated with choking are different in the PWS population compared with normal. Potential causes of increased choking in PWS include poor oral/motor coordination, poor gag reflex, hypotonia, hyperphagia, decreased mastication and voracious feeding habits. We recommend implementation of preventive measures and education for families and group home care providers for all individuals with PWS including the Heimlich maneuver, supervised meals, better food preparation and diet modification to avoid high risk choking items. PMID:17036318

  9. [Fear paralysis--still a possible cause of crib death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaada, B

    1995-03-10

    There is overwhelming evidence that prone sleeping entails more risk of sudden infant death than supine sleeping does. However, no generally accepted biological explanation of this phenomenon has been found. In a viewpoint article in Acta Paediatrica in 1994 the author has re-emphasized that the fear paralysis reflex (tonic immobility) could be a cause of sudden infant death. The response consists of immobility, apnea, profound bradycardia and vasoconstriction. The bradycardia may proceed to irreversible asystole and silent death within a few minutes. In infant monkeys, this innate, atavistic reflex, which is prompted by aversive environmental fear-producing events, has the same age distribution as sudden infant death syndrome between the 2nd and 5th month of life. Main triggering stimuli are: restraint of movement (preventing flight) and sudden exposure to unfamiliar environments and persons, events for which the organism appears to be unprepared. Movements of the extremities are more restrained in the prone than in the supine position with greater chance of eliciting fear paralysis responses and death in prone sleepers. This biological mechanism presumably also applies to the winter peak (restraint due to overwrapping), sleeping outdoors (overwrapping) and co-sleeping in the same bed as another (parent).

  10. Postmortem blood ferritin concentrations in sudden infant death syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Worwood, M; Raha-Chowdhury, R; Fagan, D G; Moore, C A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To confirm the observation of extremely high concentrations of ferritin in postmortem serum samples in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS); to examine the factors influencing blood ferritin concentrations postmortem; to determine whether or not these high blood ferritin concentrations are characteristic of SIDS. METHODS--Postmortem samples of cardiac blood were obtained from 58 full term infants who died of SIDS and 14 full-term infants who died of a variety of other causes. Whole blood...

  11. Melatonin concentrations in the sudden infant death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturner, W. Q.; Lynch, H. J.; Deng, M. H.; Gleason, R. E.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The melatonin levels in various body fluids of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants are compared with those of infants of comparable age who died of other causes to examine a possible relationship between pineal function and SIDS. After adjusting for age differences, cerebrospinal fluid melatonin levels are found to be significantly lower in the SIDS infants. It is suggested that diminished melatonin production may be characteristic of SIDS and could represent an impairment in the maturation of physiologic circadian organization.

  12. Sudden infant death syndrome: an unrecognized killer in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndu IK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ikenna Kingsley Ndu Department of Paediatrics, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is defined as the sudden unexpected death of an infant <1 year of age, with onset of the fatal episode apparently occurring during sleep, that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation including performance of a complete autopsy and review of the circumstances of death and the clinical history. SIDS contributes to infant mortality and resulted in ~15,000 deaths globally in 2013. Most of the risk factors of SIDS are common in developing countries; yet, there has been little interest in SIDS by researchers in Africa. This review looks at the extent of the attention given to SIDS in a developing country like Nigeria, and factors responsible for the scarce data concerning this significant cause of mortality. Keywords: SIDS, mortality, Nigeria

  13. Teaching Child Care Providers to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byington, Teresa; Martin, Sally; Reilly, Jackie; Weigel, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Keeping children safe and healthy is one of the main concerns of parents and child care providers. SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 12 months of age. Over 2,000 infants die from SIDS every year in the United States, and almost 15% of these deaths occur in child care settings. A targeted…

  14. Underlying cause of death in Danish patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Stenager, Egon

    1998-01-01

    To determine the underlying causes of death in a large population based register series of patients with multiple sclerosis.......To determine the underlying causes of death in a large population based register series of patients with multiple sclerosis....

  15. Leading Causes of Death in Males United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What’s this? Submit What’s this? Submit Button Leading Causes of Death in Males and Females, United ... links to current and previous listings for the leading causes of death for males and females in ...

  16. Leading Causes of Death in Females United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety and Health Issues at Work Health Equity Leading Causes of Death in Females Recommend on Facebook ... links to current and previous listings for the leading causes of death in females in the United ...

  17. Sjogren's Syndrome: Can It Cause Recurrent UTIs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it cause recurrent UTIs? Since being diagnosed with Sjogren's syndrome last year, I've had three urinary tract infections. Is there any evidence that Sjogren's syndrome causes recurrent UTIs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ...

  18. Causes of death behind low life expectancy of Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune; Keiding, Niels; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2006-01-01

    curvature in parabola patterns for 50 causes of death. RESULTS: A total of 34 causes of death contributed to the relatively high mortality for women born 1915-45. The main contribution came from smoking-related causes of death. CONCLUSION: The results indicate a high smoking prevalence to be the main...

  19. First assumptions and overlooking competing causes of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Andersen, Anh Thao Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Determining the most probable cause of death is important, and it is sometimes tempting to assume an obvious cause of death, when it readily presents itself, and stop looking for other competing causes of death. The case story presented in the article illustrates this dilemma. The first assumptio...

  20. Sudden death due to Eagle syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Rayamane, Anand P; Subbaramaiah, Mouna

    2013-09-01

    Eagle syndrome represents symptoms manifested by compression of regional structures by elongation of the styloid process or ossification of the stylohyoid membrane. Various theories have been put forward toward the development of Eagle syndrome. Depending on the underlying pathogenetic mechanism and the anatomical structures compressed or irritated by the elongated styloid process, symptoms vary greatly, ranging from cervicofacial pain to cerebral ischemia. Because the symptoms are variable and nonspecific, patients land up in different clinics for treatment. In the present case, the victim had previous episode of unconsciousness along with frequent headache for which she visited various clinics on numerous occasions. The elongated styloid process was appreciated during the postmortem examination, and the diagnosis of sudden death due to mechanical irritation of the carotid sinus by elongated styloid process was made as the sign of acute cardiovascular failure was present and upon exclusion of other causes of death.

  1. Sudden infant death syndrome: are we any closer to identifying which infants will be affected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez TL

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tara L Ramirez, Michael H MalloyDepartment of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Sudden infant death syndrome is a complex and multifactoral process. The classification and definition of the syndrome has changed over time. As knowledge in the genetics of this complex syndrome continues to advance, additional causes of vulnerability have been found, but no single cause has yet been discovered. Over the last 40 years there have also been many advances in the identification of risk factors that make a given infant more vulnerable to succumbing to sudden infant death. There have also been great strides made in decreasing the number of infant deaths from this syndrome by modification of these risk factors, most notably with the initiation of the Back to Sleep campaign. With the initiation of the Safe to Sleep campaign there is hope that sudden infant death syndrome as a component of all sudden unexpected infant deaths can be further reduced.Keywords: sudden infant death syndrome, sudden unexpected death of infancy, risk factors, sleep-related infant death, crib death, cot death

  2. Violent death in a rare peroxisomal disease--Zellweger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinescu, Bogdan; Martius, Eliza; Pelin, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Peroxisomal diseases are rare (1:50,000), genetically determined disorders (autosomal recessive), systemic, multiorgan illnesses with prominent involvement of the nervous system, caused either by the failure to form or to maintain the peroxisome, or by a defect in the function of a single or multiple peroxisomal enzymes. Peroxisomes contain approximately 50 enzymes which are responsible for many metabolic reactions, and play an important role in the oxidation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The authors present the case of a Romanian boy, who died at the age of 1.6 of one of the peroxisomal diseases-Zellweger syndrome. Newborn infants with Zellweger syndrome have a typical dysmorphic facies, neonatal seizures, profound hypotonia, and eye abnormalities. Major abnormalities are present in the liver (fibrotic), kidney (cortical cysts), and brain (lipid-laden macrophages and histiocytes in cortical and periventricular areas, demyelination, centrosylvian polymicrogyria and pachygyria)-cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome (CHRS) (Zellweger). Infants with Zellweger syndrome rarely live more than a few months, but in this case the survival was longer, and the cause of death was not directly the peroxisomal disease but a violent cause of death-mechanical asphyxia with tracheo-bronchial food aspiration. The authors present the results of investigations carried out during the child's life, but also data collected at the autopsy and hystopathological postnecroptic investigations. By presenting this case, the authors wish to bring to your attention a rare pathology in forensic practice by the paradox of finding a common violent cause of death, asphyxia with food aspiration, in a rare metabolic-genetic disease, which is usually fatal by itself.

  3. Death caused by heat stroke: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Heat stroke is the most dangerous among numerous disorders caused by elevated environmental temperature. It is characterized by an increased body temperature of over 40°C, the dysfunction of the central nervous system and the development of multiple organ failure. The aim of this paper was to highlight problems in the clinical and post-mortal diagnosis of fatal heat stroke. Case Outline. A 20-year-old male was found unconscious on the street; on admission at the Emergency Center, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, he was in a coma. The body temperature of 40°C was maintained despite the applied therapy, meningeal signs were negative, tachycardia with gallop rhythm, hypotension, bleeding from the nose and mouth, and presence of skin bruises. Laboratory findings: highly elevated LDH and creatine kinase, elevated serum creatinine, AST, and signs of DIC. Lethal outcome occurred 6 hours after admission, and the case remained clinically unsolved. Autopsy showed signs of hemorrhagic diathesis, brain and pulmonary edema, and microscopic examination revealed general congestion, internal bleeding in various organs, cerebral edema, massive blood aspiration and pulmonary edema. Toxicological and bacteriological examinations were negative. Based on these findings and subsequently obtained data on the conditions at the workplace where the young man had a part-time job, it was concluded that the violent death was caused by heat stroke. Conclusion. Since heat stroke is associated with a high mortality rate and high incidence of serious and permanent organ damage in survivors, it is important to make the diagnosis of heat stroke as quickly as possible and apply appropriate treatment. Misdiagnosis of heat stroke, and consequently inadequate treatment, with a potential fatal outcome for the patient, can be the reason for blaming doctors for the legal offense of medical malpractice in failing to administer first aid.

  4. The Interpretation of Cause of Death 53 Among Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson, Magdalena

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies on mortality in 18th and 19th century Sweden have discussed the validity of cause of death information. The fact that the Swedish clergy historically were responsible for the stipulation and reporting of causes of death has initiated a discussion on the medical competence of the clergy. Other issues concern the level of accomplishment in medical science and the effects of instructions and regulations on cause of death registration. This paper argues that cause of death analyses are quite useful for the understanding of mortality transitions if cause of death information is placed in its proper context and are combined with other kinds of mortality analyses. An awareness of 1 the conditions under which causes of death were stipulated, 2 what regulations were in effect at the particular time, and 3 the environmental and epidemiological changes provides good prerequisites for successful use of cause of death information.

  5. Augmented cell death with Bloom syndrome helicase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kasahara, Kimiko; Yamada, Taketo; Kondo, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by lupus-like erythematous telangi-ectasias of the face, sun sensitivity, infertility, stunted growth, upper respiratory infection, and gastrointestinal infections commonly associated with decreased immuno-globulin levels. The syndrome is associated with immuno-deficiency of a generalized type, ranging from mild and essentially asympto-matic to severe. Chromosomal abnormalities are hallmarks of the disorder, and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and quadriradial configurations in lymphocytes and fibroblasts are diagnostic features. BS is caused by mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family. We determined whether BLM deficiency has any effects on cell growth and death in BLM-deficient cells and mice. BLM-deficient EB-virus-transformed cell lines from BS patients and embryonic fibroblasts from BLM-/- mice showed slower growth than wild-type cells. BLM-deficient cells showed abnormal p53 protein expression after irradiation. In BLM-/- mice, small body size, reduced number of fetal liver cells and increased cell death were observed. BLM deficiency causes the up-regulation of p53, double-strand break and apoptosis, which are likely observed in irradiated control cells. Slow cell growth and increased cell death may be one of the causes of the small body size associated with BS patients.

  6. Dummies and the sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E A; Taylor, B J; Ford, R P; Stewart, A W; Becroft, D M; Thompson, J M; Scragg, R; Hassall, I B; Barry, D M; Allen, E M

    1993-01-01

    The association between dummy use and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was investigated in 485 deaths due to SIDS in the postneonatal age group and compared with 1800 control infants. Parental interviews were completed in 87% of subjects. The prevalence of dummy use in New Zealand is low and varies within New Zealand. Dummy use in the two week period before death was less in cases of SIDS than in the last two weeks for controls (odds ratio (OR) 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 1.02). Use of a dummy in the last sleep for cases of SIDS or in the nominated sleep for controls was significantly less in cases than controls (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.73). The OR changed very little after controlling for a wide range of potential confounders. It is concluded that dummy use may protect against SIDS, but this observation needs to be repeated before dummies can be recommended for this purpose. If dummy sucking is protective then it is one of several factors that may explain the higher mortality from SIDS in New Zealand than in other countries, and may also explain in part the regional variation within New Zealand. PMID:8503676

  7. Deaths from heart failure: using coarsened exact matching to correct cause-of-death statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibuya Kenji

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incomplete information on death certificates makes recorded cause-of-death data less useful for public health monitoring and planning. Certifying physicians sometimes list only the mode of death without indicating the underlying disease or diseases that led to the death. Inconsistent cause-of-death assignment among cardiovascular causes of death is of particular concern. This can prevent valid epidemiologic comparisons across countries and over time. Methods We propose that coarsened exact matching be used to infer the underlying causes of death where only the mode of death is known. We focus on the case of heart failure in US, Mexican, and Brazilian death records. Results Redistribution algorithms derived using this method assign the largest proportion of heart failure deaths to ischemic heart disease in all three countries (53%, 26%, and 22% respectively, with larger proportions assigned to hypertensive heart disease and diabetes in Mexico and Brazil (16% and 23% vs. 7% for hypertensive heart disease, and 13% and 9% vs. 6% for diabetes. Reassigning these heart failure deaths increases the US ischemic heart disease mortality rate by 6%. Conclusions The frequency with which physicians list heart failure in the causal chain for various underlying causes of death allows for inference about how physicians use heart failure on the death certificate in different settings. This easy-to-use method has the potential to reduce bias and increase comparability in cause-of-death data, thereby improving the public health utility of death records.

  8. Sudden unexpected infant death: differentiating natural from abusive causes in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Kirsten

    2012-10-01

    Sudden unexpected infant deaths (SUIDs) are deaths in infants younger than 12 months that occur suddenly, unexpectedly, and without obvious cause in the emergency department (ED). Sudden infant death syndrome, the leading cause of SUID in the United States, is much more common, but fatal child abuse and neglect have been sometimes mistaken for sudden infant death syndrome. The distinction between these 2 entities can only be made after a thorough investigation of the scene, interview of caregivers, and a complete forensic autopsy. Development of ED guidelines for the reporting and evaluation of SUID, in collaboration with the local medical examiner and child death review teams, will enable ED practitioners to collect important information in a compassionate manner that will be valuable to the investigating personnel.

  9. Childhood deaths from external causes in Estonia, 2001–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonets Ruth

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2000, the overall rate of injury deaths in children aged 0–14 was 28.7 per 100000 in Estonia, which is more than 5 times higher than the corresponding rate in neighbouring Finland. This paper describes childhood injury mortality in Estonia by cause and age groups, and validates registration of these deaths in the Statistical Office of Estonia against the autopsy data. Methods The data on causes of all child deaths in Estonia in 2001–2005 were abstracted from the autopsy protocols at the Estonian Bureau of Forensic Medicine. Average annual mortality rates per 100,000 were calculated. Coverage (proportion of the reported injury deaths from the total number of injury deaths and accuracy (proportion of correctly classified injury deaths of the registration of causes of death in Statistical Office of Estonia were assessed by comparing the Statistical Office of Estonia data with the data from Estonian Bureau of Forensic Medicine. Results Average annual mortality from external causes in 0–14 years-old children in Estonia was 19.1 per 100,000. Asphyxia and transport accidents were the major killers followed by poisoning and suicides. Relative contribution of these causes varied greatly between age groups. Intent of death was unknown for more than 10% of injury deaths. Coverage and accuracy of registration of injury deaths by Statistical Office of Estonia were 91.5% and 95.3%, respectively. Conclusion Childhood mortality from injuries in Estonia is among the highest in the EU. The number of injury deaths in Statistical Office of Estonia is slightly underestimated mostly due to misclassification for deaths from diseases. Accuracy of the Statistical Office of Estonia data was high with some underestimation of intentional deaths. Moreover, high proportion of death with unknown intent suggests underestimation of intentional deaths. Reduction of injury deaths should be given a high priority in Estonia. More information on

  10. Reliability of cause of death coding: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antini, Carmen; Rajs, Danuta; Muñoz-Quezada, María Teresa; Mondaca, Boris Andrés Lucero; Heiss, Gerardo

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates the agreement of nosologic coding of cardiovascular causes of death between a Chilean coder and one in the United States, in a stratified random sample of death certificates of persons aged ≥ 60, issued in 2008 in the Valparaíso and Metropolitan regions, Chile. All causes of death were converted to ICD-10 codes in parallel by both coders. Concordance was analyzed with inter-coder agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient by level of specification ICD-10 code for the underlying cause and the total causes of death coding. Inter-coder agreement was 76.4% for all causes of death and 80.6% for the underlying cause (agreement at the four-digit level), with differences by the level of specification of the ICD-10 code, by line of the death certificate, and by number of causes of death per certificate. Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.76 (95%CI: 0.68-0.84) for the underlying cause and 0.75 (95%CI: 0.74-0.77) for the total causes of death. In conclusion, causes of death coding and inter-coder agreement for cardiovascular diseases in two regions of Chile are comparable to an external benchmark and with reports from other countries.

  11. Mortality and Causes of Death in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir;

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disease that causes frequent fractures. Little is known about causes of death and length of survival in OI. The objective of this work was to calculate the risk and cause of death, and the median survival time in patients with OI...

  12. NCHS - Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan Areas, United States, 2005-2015. Mortality data for U.S....

  13. Potential misclassification of causes of death from COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henriette Hvide; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Lange, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about causes of death in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the validity of mortality statistics in COPD. The present authors examined causes of death using data from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Of the 12,979 subjects with sufficient data from the baseline...... COPD, CMH and smoking were predictors of COPD as underlying cause of death, ORs 2.3 (1.5-3.7) and 2.2 (1.4-3.6), respectively. It was concluded that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is underreported on death certificates, that biases in the use of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as cause...... of death can be assessed, and that possible "over-diagnosis" of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on death certificates in subjects unlikely to have significant disease should initiate caution when using causes of mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease epidemiology....

  14. Glucose sensor excludes hypoglycaemia as cause of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The cause of death can be difficult to verify post-mortem in unexpected deaths in patients with Type 1 diabetes. This report describes an unexpected death in a 44-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes treated with sensor-augmented pump therapy. Continuous glucose monitoring data proved useful...

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome: methodological and patogenetical types of diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.I. Glukhovets

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents an analysis of literature data on pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS in comparison with author’s experience of infants dead in home. Diagnostic significance of qualified autopsy examinations in analysis of infants’ death is shown. Frequent combination of morphogenetic cardiopathy and early signs of atrial myocarditis can be estimated as pathogenetic basis of SIDS.Key words: sudden infant death syndrome, morphogenetic cardiopathy, atrial myocarditis.

  16. Deaths among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodrag, Nancy; Silverberg, Sophie E.; Urbano, Richard C.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although life expectancies in Down syndrome (DS) have doubled over the past 3-4 decades, there continue to be many early deaths. Yet, most research focuses on infant mortality or later adult deaths. Materials and Methods: In this US study, hospital discharge and death records from the state of Tennessee were linked to examine 2046…

  17. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Left Ventricular Hypertrabeculation-Hidden Arrhythmogenic Entity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Saayman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular noncompaction/hypertrabeculation is a condition which is characterized by a highly trabeculated, “spongy” myocardium. It can present at any age with heart failure, arrhythmia and/or thromboembolic events. A wide variety of mutations have been found to be a cause of hypertrabeculation and it is possible that there is a continuum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. We present a case of left ventricular hypertrabeculation which presented as sudden infant death syndrome and we propose that this entity may be a hidden cause of arrhythmic death in some infants presenting as sudden infant death syndrome.

  18. Top 10 Causes of Death in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes. Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are the world’s biggest killers, accounting for a combined 15 million ... million. HIV/AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death, having killed 1. ...

  19. Local perceptions of causes of death in rural South Africa: a comparison of perceived and verbal autopsy causes of death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith Hussain-Alkhateeb

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding how lay people perceive the causes of mortality and their associated risk factors is important for public health. In resource-limited settings, where verbal autopsy (VA is used as the most expedient method of determining cause of death, it is important to understand how pre-existing concepts of cause of death among VA-informants may influence their VA-responses and the consequential impact on cause of death assessment. This study describes the agreement between VA-derived causes of death and informant-perceived causes and associated influential factors, which also reflects lay health literacy in this setting. Method: Using 20 years of VA data (n=11,228 from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS site in rural South Africa, we explored the agreement between the causes of death perceived by the VA-informants and those assigned by the automated Inter-VA tool. Kappa statistics and concordance correlation coefficients were applied to measure agreement at individual and population levels, respectively. Multivariable regression models were used to explore factors associated with recognised lay perceptions of causes of mortality. Results: Agreement between informant-perceived and VA-derived causes of death at the individual level was limited, but varied substantially by cause of death. However, agreement at the population level, comparing cause-specific mortality fractions was higher, with the notable exception of bewitchment as a cause. More recent deaths, those in adults aged 15–49 years, deaths outside the home, and those associated with external causes showed higher concordance with InterVA. Conclusion: Overall, informant perception of causes of death was limited, but depended on informant characteristics and causes of death, and to some extent involved non-biomedical constructs. Understanding discordance between perceived and recognised causes of death is important for public health planning; low

  20. Local perceptions of causes of death in rural South Africa: a comparison of perceived and verbal autopsy causes of death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Alkhateeb, Laith; Fottrell, Edward; Petzold, Max; Kahn, Kathleen; Byass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding how lay people perceive the causes of mortality and their associated risk factors is important for public health. In resource-limited settings, where verbal autopsy (VA) is used as the most expedient method of determining cause of death, it is important to understand how pre-existing concepts of cause of death among VA-informants may influence their VA-responses and the consequential impact on cause of death assessment. This study describes the agreement between VA-derived causes of death and informant-perceived causes and associated influential factors, which also reflects lay health literacy in this setting. Method Using 20 years of VA data (n=11,228) from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site in rural South Africa, we explored the agreement between the causes of death perceived by the VA-informants and those assigned by the automated Inter-VA tool. Kappa statistics and concordance correlation coefficients were applied to measure agreement at individual and population levels, respectively. Multivariable regression models were used to explore factors associated with recognised lay perceptions of causes of mortality. Results Agreement between informant-perceived and VA-derived causes of death at the individual level was limited, but varied substantially by cause of death. However, agreement at the population level, comparing cause-specific mortality fractions was higher, with the notable exception of bewitchment as a cause. More recent deaths, those in adults aged 15–49 years, deaths outside the home, and those associated with external causes showed higher concordance with InterVA. Conclusion Overall, informant perception of causes of death was limited, but depended on informant characteristics and causes of death, and to some extent involved non-biomedical constructs. Understanding discordance between perceived and recognised causes of death is important for public health planning; low community

  1. Medical examiner and medical toxicologist agreement on cause of death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, Alex F.; Nelson, Lewis S.; Olsen, Dean; Vlahov, David; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Poisoning is a significant public health threat as the second leading cause of injury-related death in the US. Disagreements on cause of death determination may have widespread implications across several realms of public health including policy and prevention efforts, interpretation of the poisoning literature, epidemiologic data analysis, medical-legal case outcomes, and individualized autopsy interpretation. We aimed to test agreement between the cause of death determined by the medical examiner (ME) and a medical toxicologist (MT) adjudication panel (MTAP) in cases of poisoning. This retrospective 7-year study evaluated all deaths attributed to poisoning in one large urban catchment area. Cross-matched data were obtained from Department of Vital Statistics and the Poison Control Center (PCC). Out of >380,000 deaths in the catchment area over the study period, there were 7050 poisonings in the Vital Statistics database and 414 deaths reported to PCC. Cross-matching yielded 321 cases for analysis. The ME and MTAP concurred on cause of death in 66%, which was only fair agreement (κ 0.25, CI 0.14–0.38). Factors associated with the likelihood of agreement were peri-mortem fire exposures, prehospital cardiac arrest, and timing of drug toxicity (chronic versus acute). In conclusion, agreement for poisoning cause of death between specialties was much lower than expected. We recommend an improved formal process of information sharing and consultation between specialties to assure that all existing information is analyzed thoroughly to enhance cause of death certainty. PMID:20655675

  2. Radiation nephritis causing nephrotic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennette, J.C.; Ordonez, N.G.

    1983-12-01

    Clinical symptoms of acute radiation nephritis with nephrotic syndrome developed in a fifty-six-year-old woman after abdominal radiation therapy for an astrocytoma of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of radiation nephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of radiation nephritis associated with nephrotic syndrome.

  3. Potentially Preventable Deaths Among the Five Leading Causes of Death - United States, 2010 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Macarena C; Bastian, Brigham; Rossen, Lauren M; Anderson, Robert; Miniño, Arialdi; Yoon, Paula W; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Iademarco, Michael F

    2016-11-18

    Death rates by specific causes vary across the 50 states and the District of Columbia.* Information on differences in rates for the leading causes of death among states might help state health officials determine prevention goals, priorities, and strategies. CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data to provide national and state-specific estimates of potentially preventable deaths among the five leading causes of death in 2014 and compared these estimates with estimates previously published for 2010. Compared with 2010, the estimated number of potentially preventable deaths changed (supplemental material at https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/42472); cancer deaths decreased 25% (from 84,443 to 63,209), stroke deaths decreased 11% (from 16,973 to 15,175), heart disease deaths decreased 4% (from 91,757 to 87,950), chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) (e.g., asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema) deaths increased 1% (from 28,831 to 29,232), and deaths from unintentional injuries increased 23% (from 36,836 to 45,331). A better understanding of progress made in reducing potentially preventable deaths in the United States might inform state and regional efforts targeting the prevention of premature deaths from the five leading causes in the United States.

  4. Sudden infant death syndrome in Brazil: fact or fancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Maia Woida

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The true incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS in Brazil is unknown. The aim here was to identify SIDS cases in the city of Ribeirão Preto, State of São Paulo, between 2000 and 2005, in order to estimate its incidence. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis of data on live births and infant deaths in Ribeirão Preto and from autopsies of infants performed at the Death Verification Service of the Interior (SVOI between 2000 and 2005. RESULTS: There were 47,356 live births and 537 deaths, with infant mortality rates ranging from 12.9‰ to 10.9‰ of live births. Among the 24 infants who died possibly due to SIDS and who were autopsied at the SVOI, six were from families living in the municipality (0.13‰ of live births: three (50% were diagnosed as SIDS, and one each (16.66% as indeterminate cause, bronchoaspiration and cerebral edema. Two deaths occurred in the first month of life (33.33% and one each (16.66% at two, four, six and eight months. Two deaths each (33.33% occurred in the months of February and December, one each in August and October (16.66%. Four cases (66.7% occurred in the summer and one each (16.66% in winter and spring. There was 5:1 predominance of males over females. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of SIDS was lower than what has been reported worldwide and in the Brazilian literature, thus suggesting underdiagnosis, indicating the lack of any specific postmortem protocol for SIDS identification and showing the need to implement this.

  5. Effect of cause-of-death training on agreement between hospital discharge diagnoses and cause of death reported, inpatient hospital deaths, New York City, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio; Madsen, Ann

    2015-01-15

    Accurate cause-of-death reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City death certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of death following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-death reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which death certificates citing heart disease as cause of death agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. We analyzed 74,373 death certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were linked with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient deaths and calculated the proportion of discordant deaths, that is, death certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient deaths reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Citywide discordance between death certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions should employ similar interventions to improve cause-of-death reporting and use linked discharge data to monitor data quality.

  6. Effect of Cause-of-Death Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of Death Reported, Inpatient Hospital Deaths, New York City, 2008–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accurate cause-of-death reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City death certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of death following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-death reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which death certificates citing heart disease as cause of death agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 death certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were linked with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient deaths and calculated the proportion of discordant deaths, that is, death certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient deaths reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between death certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions should employ similar interventions to improve cause-of-death reporting and use linked discharge data to monitor data quality. PMID:25590598

  7. Cause of death conundrum with methadone use: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsky, Michael C; Zumwalt, Ross E; Seifert, Steven A; Benson, Blaine E

    2011-06-01

    Deaths caused by a methadone intoxication or overdose are becoming more frequent. We report a case involving a patient who had extremely high methadone blood concentrations but whose cause of death may have been unrelated to the drug. A 51-year-old woman was found deceased in bed by her daughter. At the scene were numerous bottles of methadone, with the chronic dosage of 240 mg 3 times a day. There was no history of prior suicide attempts, there were no reports of suicidal ideation having been voiced and there was no suicide note. At autopsy, there were no pills found in the stomach. Microscopic tissue examination revealed lobar pneumonia of the right lower lobe. Postmortem lung cultures grew out Streptococcus pneumoniae. Femoral blood contained methadone, 5.7 mg/L; EDDP, 2.1 mg/L; oxycodone, 0.017 mg/L; doxylamine, 0.022 mg/L; and ethanol, 13.0 mg/dL. The postmortem methadone concentration was consistent with her known dose, plausible pharmacokinetics and conditions of discovery. Various causes of death, such as a methadone-related arrhythmia from QTc prolongation or the contribution of methadone to the development of the pneumonia, cannot be ruled out and may well have caused or contributed to death, but the pneumonia was felt to be a competent cause of death. Ultimately, the most likely cause(s) of death, is a decision left to the individual medical examiner. This case is illustrative of the growing number of similar cases facing forensic pathologists. The cause of death cannot be solely based on drug concentrations and it may not be possible to come to a conclusion as to "the" cause of death and the forensic pathologist must be content with "a" cause of death.

  8. The Causes and Risk Factors of Tuberculosis Deaths in Khuzestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi Seyed Mohammad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the 10 leading cause of deaths in developing countries. Understanding the cause and risk factors of TB death and lowering them can reduce its mortality rate. The aim of this study was to assess the cause and risk factors for death of tuberculosis. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted in Khuzestan province in the south west of Iran, from 2002 to 2006. Medical records of tuberculosis cases over the 5-year period were reviewed and death data were analyzed. Including criteria were documented TB diagnosed based on National Tuberculosis Program (NTP. Extracted data were analyzed in SPSS 11.5 system and by chi squared test. One hundred and twenty five deaths (3.15% with mean age of 48.96±10.03 years were detected. Risk factors for death were: cigarette smoking, diabetes, chronic peritoneal dialysis, MDR-TB, imprisonment, AIDS and injection drug usage. 93 deaths (74.4% were directly attributed to tuberculosis. Overwhelming TB disease, hemoptysis, AIDS/HIV and MDR-TB were the cause of death with the rate of 69.9%, 11.8%, 9.7% and 8.6%, respectively. 32 (25.6% deaths were due to medical problems unrelated to TB, among which were cardiovascular diseases, bacterial super infection and cancers with the rate of 25%, 21.9% and 15.6%, respectively. The deaths of TB not only are directly related to TB, but also are caused due to comorbid conditions. Overwhelming TB disease, hemoptysis, cardiovascular diseases, bacterial super infection and cancers are the main cause of death. MDR-TB, imprisonment, AIDS and injection drug usage are the main risk factors for TB mortality.

  9. The physiological determinants of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alfredo J; Koschnitzky, Jenna E; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2013-11-01

    It is well-established that environmental and biological risk factors contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). There is also growing consensus that SIDS requires the intersection of multiple risk factors that result in the failure of an infant to overcome cardio-respiratory challenges. Thus, the critical next steps in understanding SIDS are to unravel the physiological determinants that actually cause the sudden death, to synthesize how these determinants are affected by the known risk factors, and to develop novel ideas for SIDS prevention. In this review, we will examine current and emerging perspectives related to cardio-respiratory dysfunctions in SIDS. Specifically, we will review: (1) the role of the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) as a multi-functional network that is critically involved in the failure to adequately respond to hypoxic and hypercapnic challenges; (2) the potential involvement of the preBötC in the gender and age distributions that are characteristic for SIDS; (3) the link between SIDS and prematurity; and (4) the potential relationship between SIDS, auditory function, and central chemosensitivity. Each section underscores the importance of marrying the epidemiological and pathological data to experimental data in order to understand the physiological determinants of this syndrome. We hope that a better understanding will lead to novel ways to reduce the risk to succumb to SIDS.

  10. The receptor like kinase at Rhg1-a/Rfs2 caused pleiotropic resistance to sudden death syndrome and soybean cyst nematode as a transgene by altering signaling responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srour Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. resistance to any population of Heterodera glycines (I., or Fusarium virguliforme (Akoi, O’Donnell, Homma & Lattanzi required a functional allele at Rhg1/Rfs2. H. glycines, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN was an ancient, endemic, pest of soybean whereas F. virguliforme causal agent of sudden death syndrome (SDS, was a recent, regional, pest. This study examined the role of a receptor like kinase (RLK GmRLK18-1 (gene model Glyma_18_02680 at 1,071 kbp on chromosome 18 of the genome sequence within the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus in causing resistance to SCN and SDS. Results A BAC (B73p06 encompassing the Rhg1/Rfs2 locus was sequenced from a resistant cultivar and compared to the sequences of two susceptible cultivars from which 800 SNPs were found. Sequence alignments inferred that the resistance allele was an introgressed region of about 59 kbp at the center of which the GmRLK18-1 was the most polymorphic gene and encoded protein. Analyses were made of plants that were either heterozygous at, or transgenic (and so hemizygous at a new location with, the resistance allele of GmRLK18-1. Those plants infested with either H. glycines or F. virguliforme showed that the allele for resistance was dominant. In the absence of Rhg4 the GmRLK18-1 was sufficient to confer nearly complete resistance to both root and leaf symptoms of SDS caused by F. virguliforme and provided partial resistance to three different populations of nematodes (mature female cysts were reduced by 30–50%. In the presence of Rhg4 the plants with the transgene were nearly classed as fully resistant to SCN (females reduced to 11% of the susceptible control as well as SDS. A reduction in the rate of early seedling root development was also shown to be caused by the resistance allele of the GmRLK18-1. Field trials of transgenic plants showed an increase in foliar susceptibility to insect herbivory. Conclusions The inference that soybean has

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or cot death: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This search has resulted in the hypothesis that prolonged sleep apnea is an important ... year of life with peak incidence at 2- 3 months of age'. Death ... SIDS victims have a higher incidence that is at least 5 times that of all live births9.

  12. Acute compartment syndrome caused by uncontrolled hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Anar; Amin, Hari; Salzman, Matthew; Morgan, Farah

    2017-06-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is increased tissue pressure exceeding perfusion pressure in a closed compartment resulting in nerve and muscle ischemia. Common precipitating causes are crush injuries, burns, substance abuse, osseous or vascular limb trauma. This is a case of 42year old female with history of hypothyroidism who presented to emergency room with acute onset of severe pain and swelling in right lower extremity. Physical examination was concerning for acute compartment syndrome of right leg which was confirmed by demonstration of elevated compartmental pressures. No precipitating causes were readily identified. Further laboratory testing revealed uncontrolled hypothyroidism. Management included emergent fasciotomy and initiating thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents a rare association between acute compartment syndrome and uncontrolled hypothyroidism. We also discuss the pathogenesis of compartment syndrome in hypothyroid patients and emphasize the importance of evaluating for less common causes, particularly in setting of non-traumatic compartment syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Statistical and Modeling Techniques for Studying the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Helen L.

    1976-01-01

    The intention of this research is to contribute additional data, hopefully bearing on the solution to some of the problems and indirectly, the cause(s) of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, and to present ideas for consideration for future SIDS research. (Author/RK)

  14. Cause of death in patients awaiting bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, Joshua M; Ellsmere, James; Ransom, Tom

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is associated with increased mortality. Bariatric surgery is becoming an important treatment modality for obesity, with an associated reduction in mortality. There are few data available on the incidence and cause of death in referred patients while they are waiting for bariatric surgery. We retrospectively examined all cases of death in patients who were referred for bariatric surgery assessment but who had not yet undergone bariatric surgery at a tertiary care centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The wait list comprised patients referred for surgery between March 2008 and May 2013. All cases of death were reviewed to determine age, sex, time of referral, time spent on the wait list, cause of death, comorbidities and body mass index (BMI). Of the 1399 patients referred, 22 (1.57%) died before receiving surgery. The mean age of these patients was 62.7 (range of 32-70) years. The average time from referral to death was 21.6 months, and the average BMI was 51.5. The most frequent cause of death was cancer, followed by cardiac and infectious causes. This study provides useful information about mortality and causes of death among patients awaiting bariatric surgery at our centre. Our results will help guide the development of a judicious system for triage in light of long wait times.

  15. Zika May Have Caused Death of Texas Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160325.html Zika May Have Caused Death of Texas Newborn Baby ... birth defect linked to fetal exposure to the Zika virus, state health officials say. According to a ...

  16. CDC WONDER: Detailed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Detailed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2009. Data are...

  17. CDC WONDER: Compressed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979...

  18. Validity of death certificates for injury-related causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, L A; Boyle, C A; Pollock, D A

    1989-11-01

    Exploration of the validity of death certificate information for classifying underlying causes of death has historically focused on "natural" or disease-related causes of death. Current interest in injury-related deaths has emphasized the need for proper certification and coding of these deaths. In this study, the authors compared agreement of the underlying cause of death as determined from death certificate information with that determined from an independent review of all relevant medical and legal documents of death by a panel of physicians. The study sample included all deaths (n = 446) occurring over an approximately 18-year follow-up period (1965-1983) in a randomly selected cohort of 18,313 US Army Veterans of the Vietnam era. Using the physician panel as the "gold standard," sensitivity and specificity were 90% or greater for broad groupings of motor vehicle crash deaths (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9), codes E810-E825), suicides (codes E950-E959), and homicides (codes E960-E969). Agreement for deaths from unintentional poisonings (codes E850-E869), mostly drug- and alcohol-related, was poor (sensitivity, 50 percent); in general, the ICD-9 drug- and alcohol-specific nomenclature is difficult to apply. The specificity and sensitivity for the individual three-digit suicide and homicide codes were all greater than 90%, and although the specificity for three-digit motor vehicle crash deaths was also above 90%, the sensitivity was lower, from 29% to 83%. Agreement on the fourth digit of ICD-9--for example, the role of the decedent in a motor vehicle crash death--was generally poor. The lack of descriptive information on death certificates to allow detailed coding was chiefly responsible for the poor agreement.

  19. Training Emergency Responders: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. An Instructor's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Science Associates, Inc., Reston, VA.

    This manual was developed to help instructors train police and emergency medical technicians, who often are the first persons to arrive at the scene of a death (first responders), to serve families who lose a child to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The manual begins with an introduction that discusses the purpose of the training and…

  20. New Areas for Preventive Programing: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Joseph

    Crisis intervention programs for persons experiencing the sudden death of family members or surviving natural disasters have been advocated as methods of primary prevention, although few have actually been implemented. A program utilizing nurses to deliver grief intervention to parents losing a baby to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) was…

  1. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [

  2. Risk factors and causes of sudden noncardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Wissenberg, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the performance of an autopsy, sudden deaths may be divided into 2 classifications: (1) sudden cardiac deaths and (2) sudden noncardiac deaths (SNCDs). Families of SNCD victims should not be followed up as a means of searching for cardiac disease. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this stu...... of cardiac comorbidities. These data may guide future strategies for the follow-up of family members of nonautopsied sudden death victims, improve risk stratification, and influence public health strategies.......BACKGROUND: On the performance of an autopsy, sudden deaths may be divided into 2 classifications: (1) sudden cardiac deaths and (2) sudden noncardiac deaths (SNCDs). Families of SNCD victims should not be followed up as a means of searching for cardiac disease. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study...... was to report the risk factors and causes of SNCD. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, nationwide study including all deaths between 2000 and 2006 of individuals aged 1-35 years and all deaths between 2007 and 2009 of individuals aged 1-49 years. Two physicians identified all sudden death cases through...

  3. Histological findings in unclassified sudden infant death, including sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrechts-Akkerman, Germaine; Bovée, Judith V M G; Wijnaendts, Liliane C D; Maes, Ann; Nikkels, Peter G J; de Krijger, Ronald R

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to study histological variations and abnormalities in unclassified sudden infant death (USID), including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), in The Netherlands. Two hundred Dutch USID cases between 1984 and 2005 were identified. The histology slides and autopsy reports of 187 cases were available for systematic review, including brain autopsy in 135 cases. An explanation for the cause of death in 19 patients (10.2%) was found. Twelve patients had bronchopneumonia, 3 showed extensive aspiration, 2 had signs of a metabolic disorder, 1 had sepsis, and 1 had meningitis. Frequent nonspecific findings were congestion (66%), edema (47%), small hemorrhages (18%), and lymphoid aggregates (51%) in the lungs; congestion of the liver (23%); and asphyctic bleeding in the kidney (44%), adrenal gland (23%), and thymus (17%). Statistical associations were found for infection with starry sky macrophages in the thymus (P  =  0.004), with calcification (P  =  0.023), or with debris in the Hassal's corpuscles (P  =  0.034). In this study, in 10.2% of cases the histological findings were incompatible with SIDS or USID. Furthermore, several frequent nonspecific histological findings in the thymus that point toward an infection were found.

  4. Causes of accidental childhood deaths in China in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kit Yee; Yu, Xin-Wei; Lu, Jia-Peng

    2015-01-01

    -4 years in China, of which 31 633 (10.1%) were accidental. Accidental deaths contributed 7240 (4.0%) of all deaths in neonatal period, 8838 (10.5%) among all post-neonatal infant deaths, and 15 554 (31.7%) among children with 1-4 years of age. Among four tested models, the most predictive was used......BACKGROUND: Infectious causes of childhood deaths in the world have decreased substantially in the 21st century. This trend has exposed accidental deaths as an increasingly important future challenge. Presently, little is known about the cause structure of accidental childhood deaths in low......- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. In this paper, we aim to establish cause structure for accidental deaths in children aged 0-4 years in China in the year 2010. METHODS: In this paper, we explored the database of 208 multi-cause child mortality studies in Chinese that formed a basis for the first...

  5. Histological Findings in Unclassified Sudden Infant Death, Including Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebrechts-Akkerman, Germaine; Bovee, Judith V. M. G.; Wijnaendts, Liliane C. D.; Maes, Ann; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; de Krijger, Ronald R.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to study histological variations and abnormalities in unclassified sudden infant death (USID), including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), in The Netherlands. Two hundred Dutch USID cases between 1984 and 2005 were identified. The histology slides and autopsy reports of 187 case

  6. Histological findings in unclassified sudden infant death, including sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Liebrechts-Akkerman (Germaine); J.V.M.G. Bovée (Judith V. M. G.); L.C.D. Wijnaendts (Liliane); A. Maes (Ann); P.G.J. Nikkels (Peter); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOur objective was to study histological variations and abnormalities in unclassified sudden infant death (USID), including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), in The Netherlands. Two hundred Dutch USID cases between 1984 and 2005 were identified. The histology slides and autopsy reports

  7. Defining Sudden Infant Death and Sudden Intrauterine Unexpected Death Syndromes with Regard to Anatomo-Pathological Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700–2,000. Yet, despite advances in maternal–infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS) has a sixfold to eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS–SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures. On the basis of these considerations, the new common definition of the SIDS–SIUDS complex is “The sudden death of a fetus after the 25th gestational week or infant under one year of age which is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including examination of the death scene, performance of a general autopsy and examination of the fetal adnexa”. Therefore, given that the general autopsy does not disclose any cause of death, a more in-depth histopathological analysis of the cardiac conduction system and autonomic nervous system by specialized pathologists is necessary. PMID:27709109

  8. Fatty acid oxidation disorders as primary cause of sudden and unexpected death in infants and young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N;

    1997-01-01

    Disorders of fatty acid metabolism are known to be responsible for cases of sudden and unexpected death in infancy. At least 14 disorders are known at present. 120 cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) had been examined for a prevalent mutation (G985) causing medium chain acyl Co...

  9. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  10. Cancer as a cause of death among people with AIDS in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Edgar P.; Engels, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Background People with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), are at increased risk for cancer. Highly active antiretroviral therapy [(HAART), widely available since 1996] has resulted in dramatic declines in AIDS-related deaths. Methods We evaluated cancer as a cause of death in a U.S. registry-based cohort of 83,282 people with AIDS (1980–2006). Causes of death due to AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) and non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) were assessed. We evaluated mortality rates and the fraction of deaths due to cancer. Poisson regression assessed rates according to calendar year of AIDS onset. Results Overall mortality declined from 302 (1980–1989), to 140 (1990–1995), to 29 per 1,000 person-years (1996–2006). ADC mortality declined from 2.95 (1980–1989) to 0.65 per 1,000 person-years (1996–2006) (P<0.01), but the fraction of ADC-deaths increased from 1.05% to 2.47%, due to declines in other AIDS-related deaths. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was the commonest cancer-related cause of death (36% during 1996–2006). Likewise, NADC mortality declined from 2.21 to 0.84 per 1,000 person-years (1980–1989 vs. 1996–2006, P<0.05), but the fraction of NADC-deaths increased to 3.16% during 1996–2006. Lung cancer was the most common NADC cause of death (21% of cancer-related deaths in 1996–2006). Conclusions Cancer mortality declined in the HAART era, but due to declining mortality from AIDS, cancers account for a growing fraction of deaths. Improved cancer prevention and treatment, particularly for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and lung cancer, would reduce mortality among people with AIDS. PMID:20825305

  11. [Investigation of the sudden infant death syndrome: a multidisciplinary approach is required].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limelette, Anne; Boulagnon, Camille; Terrade, Caroline; N'guyen, Yohan; Guillard, Thomas; Andréoletti, Laurent; Garnotel, Roselyne; Digeon, Béatrice; De Champs, Christophe; Fornes, Paul; Lévêque, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The concept of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden, unexpected death of an infant less than a year old which remains unexplained after in-depth investigations comprising a complete autopsy, biological analyses, and a clinical examination of the circumstances surrounding the death. This definition underlines the importance of finding the cause of this disease in order to improve preventative measures to reduce the number of deaths due to sudden infant death syndrome. Among the causes of SIDS, pediatric infectious diseases may be neglected and must be systematically sought after. We report upon a SIDS death case of a four and a half month-old that occurred during his sleep. Following the absence of an evident cause of death a scientific autopsy was performed. The histological examination of pulmonary tissue revealed broncolitic lesions associated with numerous micro-abscesses. The post mortem microbiological analyses revealed evidence of an infection by the respiratory syncytial virus complicated by a bacterial infection due to Haemophilus influenzae. The case underlines the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach to researching SIDS, involving both clinicians and biologists, in order to determine the causes of these deaths.

  12. Reducing Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in the Rural United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Macarena C; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Bauer, Ursula E; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    In 2014, the all-cause age-adjusted death rate in the United States reached a historic low of 724.6 per 100,000 population (1). However, mortality in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas of the United States has decreased at a much slower pace, resulting in a widening gap between rural mortality rates (830.5) and urban mortality rates (704.3) (1). During 1999–2014, annual age-adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD), and stroke) were higher in rural areas than in urban (metropolitan) areas (Figure 1). In most public health regions (Figure 2), the proportion of deaths among persons aged leading causes that were potentially excess deaths was higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (Figure 3). Several factors probably influence the rural-urban gap in potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes, many of which are associated with sociodemographic differences between rural and urban areas. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than their urban counterparts (3). A higher proportion of the rural U.S. population reports limited physical activity because of chronic conditions than urban populations (4). Moreover, social circumstances and behaviors have an impact on mortality and potentially contribute to approximately half of the determining causes of potentially excess deaths (5).

  13. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac) - a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froen, J. Frederik; Pinar, Halit; Flenady, Vicki; Bahrin, Safiah; Charles, Adrian; Chauke, Lawrence; Day, Katie; Duke, Charles W.; Facchinetti, Fabio; Fretts, Ruth C.; Gardener, Glenn; Gilshenan, Kristen; Gordijn, Sanne J.; Gordon, Adrienne; Guyon, Grace; Harrison, Catherine; Koshy, Rachel; Pattinson, Robert C.; Petersson, Karin; Russell, Laurie; Saastad, Eli; Smith, Gordon C. S.; Torabi, Rozbeh

    2009-01-01

    A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose

  14. Death in pediatric Cushing syndrome is uncommon but still occurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Lodish, Maya B.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Keil, Margaret F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is rare. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of CS may be associated with increased morbidity and, unfortunately, mortality. We performed a retrospective review of all patients with CS under the age of 18 referred to the NIH from 1998 to 2013 in order to describe deceased patients among cases of pediatric CS referred to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The deaths of 4 children (3 females and 1 male), aged 7.5–15.5 years (mean age 11.2 years) with length of disease 2–4 years were recorded among 160 (2.5%) children seen at, or referred to the NIH over the last 15 years. All died at different institutions, prior to coming to the NIH (two of them) or after leaving NIH (two of them). Presenting symptoms included increasing weight and decreasing height gain, facial plethora, dorsocervical fat pad (webbed neck), striae, headache, vision disturbances and depression and other mood or behavior changes; there were no differences between how these patients presented and the others in our cohort. The causes of CS in the deceased patients were also not different, in fact, they spanned the entire spectrum of CS: pituitary disease (on of them), ectopic corticotropin production (one of them), and primary adrenal hyperplasia (1). In one patient, the cause of CS could not be verified. Three died of sepsis and one due to residual disease and complications of the primary tumor. Conclusions Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric CS, a 2.5% mortality rate was identified in a large cohort of patients with this condition referred to an experienced, tertiary care referral center (although these deaths occurred elsewhere). Pediatricians need to recognize the possibility of death, primarily due to sepsis, in a patient with pediatric CS and act accordingly. PMID:25241829

  15. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients and in persons with related disorders like fibromyalgia. Cortisol suppresses inflammation and cellular immune activation, and ... 1994 Case Definition Causes Who's at Risk? Symptoms Diagnosis Patient Examination Process Step 1 Step 2 Step ...

  16. Cause-Specific Deaths in Non-Dialysis-Dependent CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Jolly, Stacey E; Nally, Joseph V

    2015-10-01

    CKD is associated with higher risk of death, but details regarding differences in cause-specific death in CKD are unclear. We examined the leading causes of death among a non-dialysis-dependent CKD population using an electronic medical record-based CKD registry in a large healthcare system and the Ohio Department of Health mortality files. We included 33,478 white and 5042 black patients with CKD who resided in Ohio between January 2005 and September 2009 and had two measurements of eGFRCauses of death (before ESRD) were classified into cardiovascular, malignancy, and non-cardiovascular/non-malignancy diseases and non-disease-related causes. During a median follow-up of 2.3 years, 6661 of 38,520 patients (17%) with CKD died. Cardiovascular diseases (34.7%) and malignant neoplasms (31.8%) were the leading causes of death, with malignancy-related deaths more common among those with earlier stages of kidney disease. After adjusting for covariates, each 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) decline in eGFR was associated with higher risk of death due to cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.08 to 1.12) and non-cardiovascular/non-malignancy diseases (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.14) but not to malignancy. In the adjusted models, blacks had overall-mortality hazard ratios similar to those of whites but higher hazard ratios for cardiovascular deaths. Further studies to confirm these findings and explain the mechanisms for differences are warranted. In addition to lowering cardiovascular burden in CKD, efforts to target known risk factors for cancer at the population level are needed.

  17. Mortality and causes of death in first admitted schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, P B; Juel, K

    1993-01-01

    of 9156 first admitted schizophrenic patients. Suicide accounted for 50% of deaths in men and 35% of deaths in women. Suicide risk was particularly increased during the first year of follow-up. Death from natural causes, with the exception of cancer and cerebrovascular diseases, was increased. Suicide...... risk during the first year of follow-up increased by 56%, with a 50% reduction on psychiatric in-patient facilities. The study confirms that mortality in schizophrenia is still markedly elevated, and the finding of an increasing suicide risk may be an indicator of some adverse effects...

  18. Sudden cardiac death in adults: causes, incidence and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Wendy Marina

    Many nurses will be familiar with the unexpected death of an adult patient following a sudden, life-threatening cardiac event. It is a situation that demands sensitive nursing care and skilled interventions to provide a foundation for recovery and promote healthy bereavement. This article examines the causes and incidence of sudden cardiac death in adults. Possible reactions of those who are suddenly bereaved are described and immediate care interventions aimed at dealing with the grief process are discussed. The article concludes by identifying ways in which the incidence of sudden cardiac death may be reduced.

  19. A rare cause of Cushing's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg;

    2014-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoid levels cause Cushing's syndrome (CS) and may be due to pituitary, adrenal or ectopic tumours. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels are useful in identifying adrenal tumours. In rare cases, ACTH-producing phaeochromocytomas are the cause of CS. We present two cases of ACTH...

  20. Death due to fulminant neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by low doses of haloperidol: a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Donghua; Shao, Yu; Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Ningguo; Li, Zhengdong; Huang, Ping; Chen, Yijiu

    2014-05-01

    The paper reports on a rare case of fulminant neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) with several risk factors, typical manifestation and rapid death induced by low doses of haloperidol. The pathological findings, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, risk factors and other features of NMS are discussed. The importance of forensic pathologists being aware of the possibility of NMS as the cause of death in people taking antipsychotic drugs is stressed.

  1. [What are the causes of death of patients with tuberculosis: multiple causes of death in a cohort of cases and a research proposal of presumed causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Marli Souza; Oliveira, Gisele Pinto de; Aguiar, Fernanda Pinheiro; Saraceni, Valéria; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the multiple causes of death in a cohort of patients with tuberculosis (TB) and to introduce an investigation proposal death for TB from a list of presumable causes. We performed a probabilistic record linkage with the databases of the Information System for Notifiable Diseases (SINAN) 2006 and the Mortality Information System (SIM) 2006-2008. There were 825 deaths, of which 23% for death for TB, deaths due to TB with 16% and 61% without mention of TB. Two hundred and fifteen (42.7%) deaths occurred within the period of treatment, whose profile differed from the pattern of causes when TB was an associated cause, with high frequency of respiratory diseases, AIDS and ill-defined causes. We elaborated a proposal for correction of associated causes of death and an investigation proposal death for TB from a list of presumable causes. According to the proposal, 26 deaths could have modified the underlying cause. This study highlights the importance of record linkage to TB surveillance and improvement of information the SIM and SINAN.

  2. Compartment syndrome causes systemic inflammation in a rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawendy, A-R; Bihari, A; Sanders, D W; Badhwar, A; Cepinskas, G

    2016-08-01

    Compartment syndrome results from increased intra-compartmental pressure (ICP) causing local tissue ischaemia and cell death, but the systemic effects are not well described. We hypothesised that compartment syndrome would have a profound effect not only on the affected limb, but also on remote organs. Using a rat model of compartment syndrome, its systemic effects on the viability of hepatocytes and on inflammation and circulation were directly visualised using intravital video microscopy. We found that hepatocellular injury was significantly higher in the compartment syndrome group (192 PI-labelled cells/10(-1) mm(3), standard error of the mean (sem) 51) compared with controls (30 PI-labelled cells/10(-1) mm(3), sem 12, p compartment syndrome group (5 leukocytes/30s/10 000 μm(2), sem 1) than controls (0.2 leukocytes/30 s/10 000 μm(2), sem 0.2, p Compartment syndrome can be accompanied by severe systemic inflammation and end organ damage. This study provides evidence of the relationship between compartment syndrome in a limb and systemic inflammation and dysfunction in a remote organ. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016; 98-B:1132-7. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  3. Suicidal death caused by electrocution: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Slobodan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicides by electrocution are extremly rare in our country. In these cases, specific or characteristic external lesions caused through contact with conductors at the sites of entry and exit of the current, as well as general autopsy findings, and excluding the other possible causes of death, are important to elucidate them. Dilema if death was sucidal, homicidal or accidental in manner, could be solved through good police investigation, and properly explained circumstantial events. Herein, we reported two cases of suicidal deaths, caused by electrocution. In the first case, it was a male, age of 32, who wraped the electrical cord around his rists, and kiled himself by plugging it in. In second case, it was a female, age of 46, abused by her husband, who commited suicide by putting the switched hear-dryer into the water in bathtube.

  4. Cot Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, Shelagh

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the tragedy of crib deaths, giving particular attention to causes, prevention, and medical research on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Gives anecdotal accounts of coping strategies used by parents and families of SIDS infants. (DT)

  5. Long-term prognosis and causes of death after spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Roed, Casper; Dahl, Benny;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term prognosis after spondylodiscitis are scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine long-term mortality and the causes of death after spondylodiscitis. METHODS: A nationwide, population-based cohort study using national registries of patients diagnosed with non.......62), respiratory (MRR = 1.71), gastrointestinal (MRR = 3.35), musculoskeletal (MRR = 5.39) and genitourinary diseases (MRR = 3.37), but also due to trauma, poisoning and external causes (MRR = 2.78), alcohol abuse-related diseases (MRR = 5.59) and drug abuse-related diseases (6 vs 0 deaths, MRR not calculable...

  6. Congenital infantile myofibroma causing intrauterine death in a twin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Christina Yi Ling; Gould, Steve; Akinsola, S Adeyemi

    2011-12-01

    While infantile myofibromatosis is the most common mesenchymal tumour of infancy, only around 300 cases have been reported. The authors report a 33-year-old para 1 with an uncomplicated, dichorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy who was diagnosed with an intrauterine death of one twin at 36+5 weeks gestation. At caesarean section, a macerated male stillborn weighing 2.72 kg was delivered. Postmortem examination revealed a pedunculated lesion attached to the left shoulder and underlying muscle consistent with a congenital myofibroma. The cause of death was postulated to be haemorrhage from the tumour surface causing fetal anaemia.

  7. Greenhouse Inoculation Methods for Evaluating Resistance of Soybean to Sudden Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the soil borne fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG) (syn. Fusarium virguliforme Akoi, O’Donnell, Homma and Lattanzi), is a major disease in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Selection for SDS resistance in the field is difficult because of the impact of ...

  8. Stillbirth and intrauterine fetal death: role of routine histopathological placental findings to determine cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, J; Hutchinson, J C; Heazell, A E; Ashworth, M; Jeffrey, I; Sebire, N J

    2016-11-01

    Placental abnormalities are a common cause of death in stillbirth, ranking second only to unexplained deaths, though there is wide variation in the proportion attributed to placental disease. In clinical practice, interpretation of the significance of placental findings is difficult, since many placental features in stillbirths overlap with those in live births. Our aim was to examine objectively classified placental findings from a series of > 1000 autopsies following intrauterine death in order to evaluate the role of placental histological examination in determining the cause of death. As part of a larger study evaluating several aspects of autopsy findings in intrauterine death, a dedicated database was used to collate antenatal and postmortem examination details for all cases examined between 2005 and 2013 at two tertiary specialist centers in London, UK. Histological findings for placentas were evaluated in relation to the final cause of death. Among 1064 intrauterine deaths, 946 (89%) cases had the placenta submitted for examination as part of the autopsy. Of these, 307 (32%) cases had the cause of death assigned to abnormalities of the placenta, cord or membranes. Around one third of stillbirths (≥ 24 weeks) had some isolated placental histological abnormality identified, many of uncertain significance, a significantly greater proportion than in cases of second-trimester intrauterine fetal demise (P weeks' gestation, with significantly more black mothers having ascending infection compared with other ethnicities (P < 0.0001). Maternal vascular malperfusion was the largest category of placental abnormalities in stillbirth, with peak prevalence in the early third trimester. There were 18 (2%) cases with specific histological abnormalities, including chronic histiocytic intervillositis and massive perivillous fibrin deposition. Placental pathologies represent the largest category of cause of intrauterine death. Placental histological examination is the

  9. Causes and prevention of sudden cardiac death in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Patricia; Albert, Christine M

    2013-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a major cause of mortality in elderly individuals owing to a high prevalence of coronary heart disease, systolic dysfunction, and congestive heart failure (CHF). Although the incidence of SCD increases with age, the proportion of cardiac deaths that are sudden decreases owing to high numbers of other cardiac causes of death in elderly individuals. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy has been demonstrated to improve survival and prevent SCD in selected patients with systolic dysfunction and CHF. However, ICD therapy in elderly patients might not be effective because of a greater rate of pulseless electrical activity underlying SCD and other competing nonarrhythmic causes of death in this population. Although under-represented in randomized trials of ICD use, elderly patients comprise a substantial proportion of the population that qualifies for and receives an ICD for primary prevention under current guidelines. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), which has been demonstrated to reduce mortality in selected populations with heart failure, is also more commonly used in this group of patients than in younger individuals. In this Review, we examine the causes of SCD in elderly individuals, and discuss the existing evidence for effectiveness of ICD therapy and CRT in this growing population.

  10. Early death in active professional athletes: Trends and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemez, S; Wattie, N; Baker, J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to examine mortality trends and causes of death among professional athletes from the four major sports in North America who died during their playing careers. 205 deceased athletes who were registered as active when they died from the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), National Hockey League (NHL), and Major League Baseball (MLB) were examined. Results were compared with the Canadian and U.S. general population. The leading causes of death in players reflected the leading causes of death in the Canadian and U.S. general population (i.e., car accidents). Descriptively, NFL and NBA players had a higher likelihood of dying in a car accident (OR 1.75, 95% CI: 0.91-3.36) compared with NHL and MLB players. In addition, NFL and NBA players had a significantly higher likelihood of dying from a cardiac-related illness (OR 4.44, 95% CI: 1.59-12.43). Mortality trends were disproportionate to team size. Overall, death in active athletes is low. Out of 53 400 athletes who have historically played in the four leagues, only 205 died while active (0.38%). Future examinations into the trends and causes of mortality in elite athlete populations will create a better understanding of health-related risks in elite sport. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Long-term survival and causes of death after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Davidsen, M; Thorvaldsen, P

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish contribution to the World Health Organization (WHO) MONICA (Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease) Project, a register of patients with stroke was established in 1982. The purpose of the present study was to analyze long-term survival and causes of death...... after a first stroke and to compare them with those of the background population....

  12. Systems-level perspective of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonis, Nathan

    2014-09-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains one of the primary causes of infant mortality in developed countries. Although the causes of SIDS remain largely inconclusive, some of the most informative associations implicate molecular, genetic, anatomical, physiological, and environmental (i.e., infant sleep) factors. Thus, a comprehensive and evolving systems-level model is required to understand SIDS susceptibility. Such models, by being powerful enough to uncover indirect associations, could be used to expand our list of candidate targets for in-depth analysis. We present an integrated WikiPathways model for SIDS susceptibility that includes associated cell systems, signaling pathways, genetics, and animal phenotypes. Experimental and literature-based gene-regulatory data have been integrated into this model to identify intersecting upstream control elements and associated interactions. To expand this pathway model, we performed a comprehensive analysis of existing proteomics data from brainstem samples of infants with SIDS. From this analysis, we discovered changes in the expression of several proteins linked to known SIDS pathologies, including factors involved in glial cell production, hypoxia regulation, and synaptic vesicle release, in addition to interactions with annotated SIDS markers. Our results highlight new targets for further consideration that further enrich this pathway model, which, over time, can improve as a wiki-based, community curation project.

  13. Determining the Amount, Timing and Causes of Mortality among Infants with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the amount, timing and causes/correlates of infant mortality among newborns with Down syndrome. Methods: Using the Tennessee Department of Health Birth, Hospital Discharge and Death records, infants were identified who were born with Down syndrome from 1990 to 2006. Those who died during the first year were separated into…

  14. Determining the Amount, Timing and Causes of Mortality among Infants with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the amount, timing and causes/correlates of infant mortality among newborns with Down syndrome. Methods: Using the Tennessee Department of Health Birth, Hospital Discharge and Death records, infants were identified who were born with Down syndrome from 1990 to 2006. Those who died during the first year were separated into…

  15. Causes of early childhood deaths in urban Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal K Halder

    Full Text Available Data on causes of early childhood death from low-income urban areas are limited. The nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2007 estimates 65 children died per 1,000 live births. We investigated rates and causes of under-five deaths in an urban community near two large pediatric hospitals in Dhaka, Bangladesh and evaluated the impact of different recall periods. We conducted a survey in 2006 for 6971 households and a follow up survey in 2007 among eligible remaining households or replacement households. The initial survey collected information for all children under five years old who died in the previous year; the follow up survey on child deaths in the preceding five years. We compared mortality rates based on 1-year recall to the 4 years preceding the most recent 1 year. The initial survey identified 58 deaths among children <5 years in the preceding year. The follow up survey identified a mean 53 deaths per year in the preceding five years (SD+/-7.3. Under-five mortality rate was 34 and neonatal mortality was 15 per thousand live births during 2006-2007. The leading cause of under-five death was respiratory infections (22%. The mortality rates among children under 4 years old for the two time periods (most recent 1-year recall and the 4 years preceding the most recent 1 year were similar (36 versus 32. The child mortality in urban Dhaka was substantially lower than the national rate. Mortality rates were not affected by recall periods between 1 and 5 years.

  16. Accidental deaths caused by electricity in Sweden, 1975-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Richard; Bylund, Per-Olof; Eriksson, Anders

    2006-11-01

    This study analyzes accidental fatalities caused by electricity--at work and during leisure time--to evaluate risk factors, the role of alcohol, and to identify possible preventive strategies. In Sweden, data on fatalities by electrocution from 1975 through 2000 were collected from the National Cause-of-Death Register. Additional cases were found in the archives of The Swedish National Electrical Safety Board. Suicides and deaths by lightning were excluded. Two hundred and eighty-five deaths were found, including occupational (n=132), leisure time (n=151), and unknown (n=2). Most deaths were caused by aerial power lines, and the most common place for an electrical injury was a railway area or residential property. Postmortem blood from 20% (n=47) of the tested cases was found positive for alcohol, and these persons were killed mainly during leisure time. During the study period, the overall incidence of electricity-related fatalities has decreased, in spite of increased use of electricity. This indicates that safety improvements have been successful.

  17. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-10-07

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th) century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  18. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Haensch

    Full Text Available From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18(th century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease.

  19. Distinct Clones of Yersinia pestis Caused the Black Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A.; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    From AD 1347 to AD 1353, the Black Death killed tens of millions of people in Europe, leaving misery and devastation in its wake, with successive epidemics ravaging the continent until the 18th century. The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions that it must have been caused by other pathogens. It has also been disputed whether plague had the same etiology in northern and southern Europe. Here we identified DNA and protein signatures specific for Y. pestis in human skeletons from mass graves in northern, central and southern Europe that were associated archaeologically with the Black Death and subsequent resurgences. We confirm that Y. pestis caused the Black Death and later epidemics on the entire European continent over the course of four centuries. Furthermore, on the basis of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms plus the absence of a deletion in glpD gene, our aDNA results identified two previously unknown but related clades of Y. pestis associated with distinct medieval mass graves. These findings suggest that plague was imported to Europe on two or more occasions, each following a distinct route. These two clades are ancestral to modern isolates of Y. pestis biovars Orientalis and Medievalis. Our results clarify the etiology of the Black Death and provide a paradigm for a detailed historical reconstruction of the infection routes followed by this disease. PMID:20949072

  20. Predictors of Death in Contemporary Adult Patients with Eisenmenger Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempny, Aleksander; Hjortshøj, Cristel S; Gu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is no consensus, however, on mortality risk stratification. We aimed to investigate survival and predictors of death in a large, contemporary cohort of ES patients. METHODS: -We identified in a mu...

  1. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, FY 1983. Special Report to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This report describes research programs focusing on the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and indicates some presently available results. Specific attention is given to research on sleep apnea, respiratory control, and hypoxia, as well as to infectious disease processes and immunology. Findings of a large-scale multidisciplinary SIDS project are…

  2. An uncommon cause of anaemia: Sheehan's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchardt, Thomas; Namberger, Konrad; Weiss, Lukas; Egle, Alexander; Faber, Viktoria; Greil, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum haemorrhage called Sheehan's syndrome is a rare cause of hypopituitarism in the western world, but much more common in developing countries. A 45-year-old female patient being a war refugee from Chechnya with severe anaemia and fatigue was diagnosed at our outpatient department with Sheehan's syndrome after severe postpartum haemorrhage and emergency hysterectomy 15 years ago. Panhypopituitarism was adequately treated with substitution of hydrocortisone, thyroxine and transdermal oestrogen which resulted in haemoglobin increase to nearly normal levels and symptoms improved immediately. Severe anaemia caused by panhypopituitarism shows the importance of the hormonal system for erythropoiesis. Clinical and basic scientific evidence indicates thyroidal hormones to be the main cause.

  3. Mortality and Causes of Death in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir;

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disease that causes frequent fractures. Little is known about causes of death and length of survival in OI. The objective of this work was to calculate the risk and cause of death, and the median survival time in patients with OI...... five to one to the OI cohort. We calculated hazard ratios for all-cause mortality and subhazard ratios for cause-specific mortality in a comparison of the OI cohort and the reference population. We also calculated all-cause mortality hazard ratios for males, females, and age groups (0 to 17.99 years......, 18.00 to 34.99 years, 35.00 to 54.99 years, 55.00 to 74.99 years, and >75 years). We identified 687 cases of OI (379 women) and included 3435 reference persons (1895 women). A total of 112 patients with OI and 257 persons in the reference population died during the observation period. The all-cause...

  4. Gender-related traumatic deaths in Transkei: incidence and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel, B L

    2003-07-01

    This study is unique in that it strives to unfold, perhaps for the first time, the problem of female mortality due to trauma in the Transkei region of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. This study was carried out in the Umtata and Ngqeleni magisterial districts which have a combined population of about 400,000. Most of the people have very few resources and have historically relied on money repatriated by migrant workers. The objective was to establish the incidence and the causes of deaths due to gender-related trauma and to formulate recommendations which could probably help prevent or reduce these deaths. The study reviewed cases of female traumatic death during the period January 1993 to December 1999 that were brought to the mortuary in Umtata General Hospital (UGH). There were 1,054 (23%) traumatic deaths recorded in females between 1993 and 1999. Of these 486 (28%) were related to motor vehicle collisions, 219 (18%) due to gunshot injuries, 152 (19%) due to stab wounds and 139 (21%) as a result of blunt trauma. The male to female ratio was 3.3:1 in traumatic deaths. In homicides the male:female ratio was 4.4:1, gunshot 4.5:1, stab 4.2:1 and blunt injuries 3.7:1. In motor vehicle collisions (MVC's) the ratio was 2.5:1. There is an increasing incidence of traumatic deaths in women. Gun shot injuries are the commonest among traumatic deaths in females. This article recommends stricter measures to protect women in the form of legislation. Social uplifting and economic support should be carried out as part of the process of social change. In this case educating the entire community is necessary to safeguard women and their future survival.

  5. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome and abnormal metabolism of thiamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Derrick

    2015-12-01

    Although it has been generally accepted that moving the infant from the prone to the supine position has solved the problem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), it has been hypothesized that this is an insufficient explanation and that a mixture of genetic risk, some form of stressful incident and marginal brain metabolism is proportionately required. It is suggested that each of these three variables, with dominance in one or more of them, act together in the common etiology. Much has been written about the association of thiamin and magnesium but the finding of extremely high concentrations of serum thiamin in SIDs victims has largely caused rejection of thiamin as being involved in the etiology. The publication of abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials strongly suggests that there are electrochemical changes in the brainstem affecting the mechanisms of automatic breathing and the control of cardiac rhythm. The brainstem, cerebellum and limbic system of the brain are known to be highly sensitive to thiamin deficiency (pseudo-hypoxia) and the pathophysiology is similar to a mild continued deprivation of oxygen. Little attention has been paid to the complex metabolism of thiamin. Dietary thiamin requires the cooperation of the SLC19 family of thiamin transporters for its absorption into cells and recent information has shown that transporter SNPs may be relatively common and can be expected to increase genetic risk. Thiamin must be phosphorylated to synthesize thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), well established in its vital action in glucose metabolism. TPP is also a cofactor for the enzyme 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) in the peroxisome, emphasizing its importance in alpha oxidation and plasmalogen synthesis in cell membrane physiology. The importance of thiamine triphosphate (TTP) in energy metabolism is still largely unknown. Thiamin metabolism has been implicated in hyperemesis gravidarum and iatrogenic Wernicke encephalopathy has been reported when the

  7. Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome in Central China (Hubei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenglian; Mu, Jiao; Chen, Xinshan; Dong, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective study was conducted at Tongji Forensic Medical Center in Hubei (TFMCH) from 1999 to 2014. Forty-nine cases of sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) were collected. The SUNDS rate was 1.0% in the total number of cases, in which an incidence was fluctuating over the years. Interestingly, April and January, and 3:00 to 6:00 am were the peak months and times of death. Among the decedents, farmers and migrant workers accounted for 67.3%. The syndrome predominantly attacked males in their 30s. One victim had sinus tachycardia. Thirteen victims (26.5%) were witnessed and had abnormal symptoms near death. Macroscopically, compared to sudden noncardiac deaths, the weights of brain, heart, and lungs had no statistical difference in SUNDS. Microscopically, the incidence of lung edema (45 cases, 91.8%) was significantly higher in SUNDS group than in the control group (27 cases, 55.1%). 82.9% of 35 SUNDS cases examined displayed minor histological anomalies of the cardiac conduction system (CCS), including mild or moderate fatty, fibrous or fibrofatty tissue replacement, insignificant stenosis of node artery, and punctate hemorrhage in the node area. These findings suggested that minor CCS abnormalities might be the substrates for some SUNDS deaths. Therefore, SUNDS victims might suffer ventricular fibrillation and acute cardiopulmonary failure before death. Further in-depth studies are needed to unveil the underlying mechanisms of SUNDS. PMID:26945374

  8. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome causing growth retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil İbrahim Taşcı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and lifethreateningclinical condition caused by the compressionof the third portion of the duodenum between the aortaand the superior mesenteric artery’s proximal part. Thiscompression may lead to chronic intermittent, acute totalor partial obstruction. Sudden weight-loss and the relateddecrease in the fat tissue are considered to be the etiologicalreason of acute stenosis. Weight-loss accompaniedby nausea, vomiting, anorexia, epigastric pain, andbloating are the leading complaints. Barium radiographs,computerized tomography, conventional angiography,tomographic and magnetic resonance angiography areused in the diagnosis. There are medical and surgical approachesto treatment. We hereby present the case ofa patient with superior mesenteric artery syndrome withdelayed diagnosis.Key words: superior mesenteric artery syndrome, nausea-vomiting, anorexia

  9. Muerte súbita en paciente con síndrome LEOPARD / Sudden death in patients with LEOPARD syndrome

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    Eliany Rodríguez Moreno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available LEOPARD or Moynahan syndrome, also called multiple lentigines, is a rare genetic disease which causes multiple visceral abnormalities, including heart abnormalities, and may trigger sudden death. The case of a 26-year-old woman with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy since early childhood is reported. She was referred to consultation due to loss of consciousness, associated with moderate exertion, and a resuscitated sudden death episode. The study revealed the presence of LEOPARD syndrome with subvalvular pulmonary stenosis and left ventricular hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, both of which cause sudden cardiac death.

  10. Dismemberment: cause of death in the Colombian armed conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo-Méndez, Maria Dolores; Campos, Isla Yolima

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate major findings in the recovery and analysis of victims, where dismemberment is the cause of death, but also a manner of torture within the context of the armed conflict in Colombia. It is intended to provide useful analytical information and to contribute to the correct interpretation of forensic analyses in cases of dismemberment and/or in the examination of human remains within the context of the Colombian armed conflict. The importance of including dismemberment as an opinion in the forensic report by correlating the findings on the body, the grave and context of the information available, and the accounts on the facts is encouraged. Otherwise these cases will be recorded as undetermined cause of death, which does not reflect the brutality of the war.

  11. Chlamydia and sudden infant death syndrome. A study of 166 SIDS and 30 control cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Lundemose, A G; Gregersen, M;

    1990-01-01

    Chlamydia inclusions could be demonstrated by an immunofluorescence assay in formalin-fixed lung sections in 32 of 166 cases (19.4%) of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and in the lungs of only 1 of 30 infants with a known cause of death (3.3%). The difference is statistically significant (P = 0.......04). Chlamydia trachomatis is an agent of pneumonia in 1-4 month-old infants who have acquired the disease from an infected cervix during birth, but other chlamydia species are also capable of causing pneumonia. The lung sections of the 32 chlamydia positive SIDS cases did not show typical histological signs...

  12. The most common cause of sudden cardiac death in athletes

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    Topalović Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The positive impact of exercise on cardiovascular health is well known. Athletes, who are constantly physically active, are considered to be the healthiest members of our society. That is why their sudden death, during the training or competition, attracts the attention of the general public. Rarely, tragic events of sudden cardiac death (SCD are the reason for questioning if by many positive there are also negative impact of physical exercise. The first case of SCD is recorded as far back as the year 490 BC, when the Greek soldier Pheidippides died after he conveyed news of the great victory of the Greeks over the Persians. Risk of SCD is recognized in the middle of the twentieth century. In our region, discussion about this issue began after the World Basketball Championship, which was held in Ljubljana in 1970, because of the sudden death of the national team member Trajko Rajkovic. One of the important goals of modern sports medicine is to reduce the risk of SCD in athletes to 'inevitable rarity'. Definition of SCD is considered to be any unexpected death due to sudden cardiac arrest. Pedo (Pedoe has divided all causes of SCD in the sport into three categories: Commotio cordis (agitation of the heart, which results from blunt impact to the athletes chest with consequent fatal disorder of heart rhythm; SCD of athletes under the age of 35 because of structural, congenital and inflammatory heart disease, which includes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as the most important cause of sudden cardiac death, congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, myocarditis and other; SCD of athletes older than 35 years which is most common due coronary artery disease - atherosclerosis (the dominant risk in the marathon and half-marathon. .

  13. Causes of death in dogs in the province of Rome (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleni, Claudia; Scholl, Francesco; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Dogs share with humans several zoonotic diseases as well as some important determinants of degenerative syndromes and tumours. For this reason, systematic surveillance on small animal disease carried out through the collection and analysis of necropsy records could be helpful to public health. To describe the causes of death in dogs from the province of Rome (Italy) submitted to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Lazio e della Toscana for necropsy during 2003-2007, a retrospective study was conducted on diagnostic data of 870 dogs. The final diagnosis was established by anatomo-histopathological examinations and, when needed, by ancillary laboratory tests. The most common causes of death were 'infectious disease' (23%) and 'poisoning' (17%). In 5% of the cases, the cause remained undetermined. The frequency of 'poisoning' was higher (39%) in stray dogs, while 'infectious disease' was more frequent (49%) in dogs from breeding farms. Parvovirosis was the most frequent infectious disease (33%) while anticoagulants accounted for 30% of the cases involving toxicity. Death by neoplastic lesions was quite infrequent (7%). Findings from this study provide veterinarians with an overview of the causes of death in dogs and it could provide public health authorities with new data about both novel and re-emerging threats.

  14. Accuracy of Death Certificates and Assessment of Factors for Misclassification of Underlying Cause of Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Naka Mieno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cause of death (COD information taken from death certificates is often inaccurate and incomplete. However, the accuracy of Underlying CODs (UCODs recorded on death certificates has not been comprehensively described when multiple diseases are present. Methods: A total of 450 consecutive autopsies performed at a geriatric hospital in Japan between February 2000 and August 2002 were studied. We evaluated the concordance rate, sensitivity, and specificity of major UCODs (cancer, heart disease, and pneumonia reported on death certificates compared with a reference standard of pathologist assessment based on autopsy data and clinical records. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of sex, age, comorbidity, and UCODs on misclassification. Results: The concordance rate was relatively high for cancer (81% but low for heart disease (55% and pneumonia (9%. The overall concordance rate was 48%. Sex and comorbidity did not affect UCOD misclassification rates, which tended to increase with patient age, although the association with age was also not significant. The strongest factor for misclassification was UCODs (P < 0.0001. Sensitivity and specificity for cancer were very high (80% and 96%, respectively, but sensitivity for heart disease and pneumonia was 60% and 46%, respectively. Specificity for each UCOD was more than 85%. Conclusions: Researchers should be aware of the accuracy of COD data from death certificates used as research resources, especially for cases of elderly patients with pneumonia.

  15. [On the cause of F. M. Dostoevsky's death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobylianskiĭ, V I

    2014-01-01

    Opinions of F. M. Dostoevsky's death as resulting from "...throat bleeding..." associated with bronchopulmonary pathology differ and have no solid basis. In order to clarify mechanisms behind fatal "...throat bleeding...", we systematized the data pertaining to possible pathology and undertook retrospective differential diagnostic analysis of the case history taking account of the patient's description of his health conditions, notes made by the writer after counseling with doctors, and observations of his relatives. Main attention was given to lung diseases that could possibly provoke "... throat bleeding..." In contrast to the generally accepted view we failed to obtain convincing evidence that this condition was responsible for the lethal outcome. New versions of the cause and mechanism of F. M. Dostoevsky's death are proposed, but none of them has yet been definitely proved.

  16. Can parents adjust to the idea that their child is at risk for a sudden death? : Psychological impact of risk for Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosfeld, FJM; van Tintelen, JP; van Langen, IM; Wilde, AAM; van den Bout, J; ten Kroode, HFJ

    2005-01-01

    Can a parent adjust to the idea that its child is at risk for a sudden death? This question is raised by a diagnostic procedure in which children were tested for an inherited Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). This potentially life-threatening but treatable cardiac arrhythmia syndrome may cause sudden death,

  17. NCHS - Age-adjusted Death Rates for the Top 10 Leading Causes of Death: United States, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Age-adjusted death rates for the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States, including mortality patterns from 1999 through 2013, and by state of residence...

  18. Mortality and causes of death in schizophrenic patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, P B; Juel, K

    1990-01-01

    A cohort consisting of 6178 people that were psychiatric inpatients with a clinical schizophrenia diagnosis in 1957 were followed up from 1957 through 1986, and their cause-specific mortality was determined. Mortality from cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases, gastrointestinal and urogenital...... disorders, accidents and suicide was increased, whereas mortality from cerebrovascular disorders was reduced. In the male patients cancer mortality was reduced whereas cancer mortality in the female patients was increased. Mortality from a number of causes that theoretically could be associated with side...... effects from neuroleptics was increased. Mortality from some causes of death used as a measurement of the quality of medical care was found to be slightly increased. Further studies of the quality of the medical care provided to schizophrenic patients and of the association between neuroleptic medication...

  19. Increased Ubqln2 expression causes neuron death in transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Wu, Qinxue; Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Xia, Xu-Gang

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic mutation of ubiquilin 2 (UBQLN2) causes neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. How UBQLN2 mutations cause the diseases is not clear. While over-expression of UBQLN2 with pathogenic mutation causes neuron death in rodent models, deletion of the Ubqln2 in rats has no effect on neuronal function. Previous findings in animal models suggest that UBQLN2 mutations cause the diseases mainly through a gain rather than a loss of functions. To examine whether the toxic gain in UBQLN2 mutation is related to the enhancement of UBQLN2 functions, we created new transgenic rats over-expressing wild-type human UBQLN2. Considering that human UBQLN2 may not function properly in the rat genome, we also created transgenic rats over-expressing rat's own Ubqln2. When over-expressed in rats, both human and rat wild-type Ubqln2 caused neuronal death and spatial learning deficits, the pathologies that were indistinguishable from those observed in mutant UBQLN2 transgenic rats. Over-expressed wild-type UBQLN2 formed protein inclusions attracting the autophagy substrate sequestosome-1 and the proteasome component 26S proteasome regulatory subunit 7. These findings suggest that excess UBQLN2 is toxic rather than protective to neurons and that the enhancement of UBQLN2 functions is involved in UBQLN2 pathogenesis. Pathogenic mutation in ubiquilin 2 (UBQLN2) causes neurodegeneration in ALS and FTLD. Studies in rodent models suggest a gain of toxic function in mutant UBQLN2. We created new transgenic rats as a relevant model and examined whether enhancing wild-type UBQLN2 expression is implicated in the pathogenesis of mutant UBQLN2. We observed that over-expression of human or rat wild-type Ubqln2 caused protein aggregation and neuronal death in transgenic rats. Our findings suggest that excess UBQLN2 is toxic rather than protective to neurons and that uncontrolled enhancement of UBQLN2 function is involved in UBQLN2 pathogenesis

  20. Attributing death to cancer: cause-specific survival estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survival estimation is an important part of assessing the overall strength of cancer care in a region. Generally, the death of a patient is taken as the end point in estimation of overall survival. When calculating the overall survival, the cause of death is not taken into account. With increasing demand for better survival of cancer patients it is important for clinicians and researchers to know about survival statistics due to disease of interest, i.e. net survival. It is also important to choose the best method for estimating net survival. Increase in the use of computer programmes has made it possible to carry out statistical analysis without guidance from a bio-statistician. This is of prime importance in third- world countries as there are a few trained bio-statisticians to guide clinicians and researchers. The present communication describes current methods used to estimate net survival such as cause-specific survival and relative survival. The limitation of estimation of cause-specific survival particularly in India and the usefulness of relative survival are discussed. The various sources for estimating cancer survival are also discussed. As survival-estimates are to be projected on to the population at large, it becomes important to measure the variation of the estimates, and thus confidence intervals are used. Rothman′s confidence interval gives the most satisfactory result for survival estimate.

  1. A Solitary Plasmocytoma Case Causing Horner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Vayvada

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Solitary plasmacytoma is a rare plasma cell tumour, when seen in the chest wall, it is important to diagnose since the treatment scheme and prognosis will vary, compared to primary malignant tumours of the chest wall. A 60-year-old male presented to our clinic with left shoulder pain radiating to the left axilla. Horner%u2019s syndrome symptoms were present, in further examination a chest wall mass located in the left upper lung lobe region was detected. Histopathologic diagnosis was solitary plasmocytoma via video-assisted thoracoscopy. The primary tumor of the rib malignancy causing Horner%u2019s syndrome is discussed with reference to the relevant literature.

  2. CAUSES OF DEATH IN NEWBORN INFANTS ACCORDING TO AUTOPSY FINDINGS

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    Gh.- R. Walizadeh

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Autopsy findings in 138 newborn infants which died in a university nursery during 3 years are reviewed and discussed. 80 per cent were premature and small- for- date newborns of up to 2500 g birth weight. Most of these cases showed in addition to general prematurely signs, respiratory tract diseases such as atelectasia, amniotic fluid aspiration and hyaline membrane disease. The full term infants died mostly of malformations. In post neonatal period the cause of death was almost entirely infections such as bronchopneumonia, gastroenteritis and septicemia.

  3. Late Maternal Deaths and Deaths from Sequelae of Obstetric Causes in the Americas from 1999 to 2013: A Trend Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cosio, Federico G.; Sanhueza, Antonio; Soliz, Patricia N.; Becerra-Posada, Francisco; Espinal, Marcos A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on maternal deaths occurring after the 42 days postpartum reference time is scarce; the objective of this analysis is to explore the trend and magnitude of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes in the Americas between 1999 and 2013, and to recommend including these deaths in the monitoring of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Methods Exploratory data analysis enabled analyzing the magnitude and trend of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes for seven countries of the Americas: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A Poisson regression model was developed to compare trends of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes between two periods of time: 1999 to 2005 and 2006 to 2013; and to estimate the relative increase of these deaths in the two periods of time. Findings The proportion of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes ranged between 2.40% (CI 0.85% – 5.48%) and 18.68% (CI 17.06% – 20.47%) in the seven countries. The ratio of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes per 100,000 live births has increased by two times in the region of the Americas in the period 2006-2013 compared to the period 1999-2005. The regional relative increase of late maternal death was 2.46 (p<0.0001) times higher in the second period compared to the first. Interpretation Ascertainment of late maternal deaths and deaths from sequelae of obstetric causes has improved in the Americas since the early 2000’s due to improvements in the quality of information and the obstetric transition. Late and obstetric sequelae maternal deaths should be included in the monitoring of the SDGs as well as in the revision of the International Classification of Diseases’ 11th version (ICD-11). PMID:27626277

  4. Drug induced mortality: a multiple cause approach on Italian causes of death Register

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    Francesco Grippo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related mortality is a complex phenomenon that has several health, social and economic effects. In this paper trends of drug-induced mortality in Italy are analysed. Two approaches have been followed: the traditional analysis of the underlying cause of death (UC (data refers to the Istat mortality database from 1980 to 2011, and the multiple cause (MCanalysis, that is the analysis of all conditions reported on the death certificate (data for 2003-2011 period.Methods: Data presented in this paper are based on the Italian mortality register. The selection of Icd codes used for the analysis follows the definition of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. Using different indicators (crude and standardized rates, ratio multiple to underlying, the results obtained from the two approaches (UC and MC have been compared. Moreover, as a measure of association between drug-related causes and specific conditions on the death certificate, an estimation of the age-standardized relative risk (RR has been used.Results: In the years 2009-2011, the total number of certificates whit mention of drug use was 1,293, 60% higher than the number UC based. The groups of conditions more strongly associated with drug-related causes are the mental and behavioral disorders (especially alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and fibrosis of liver, AIDS and endocarditis.Conclusions : The analysis based on multiple cause approach shows, for the first time, a more detailed picture of the drug related death; it allows to better describe the mortality profiles and to re-evaluate  the contribution of a specific cause to death.

  5. CAUSE OF IMMEDIATE DEATH BY LARGE DOSES OF BOTULINUS TOXIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Schlesinger, M J; Orr, P F

    1924-06-30

    Parenteral introduction of amounts of the culture filtrate of Bacillus botulinus greatly in excess of the minimum lethal dose has been observed to cause the practically immediate death of mice. This result is due to the presence in the filtrates of a chemical poison possessing properties distinct from those of the contained botulinus toxin which itself acts only after a well defined period of incubation. This chemical poison is not neutralized by botulinus antitoxin; it is effective only when large amounts of the culture filtrate are given; it is thermostable, not being destroyed when heated in the autoclave in a sealed tube, though when it is heated in an open container its toxicity diminishes with a coincidental volatilization of basic material. The volatile substance can be identified as ammonia. Death resulting from the injection of comparatively large amounts of ammonium salts (0.1 gm.) is easily distinguished from that due to botulism, both through the character of the symptoms and the absence of an incubation period. However, when the amount of toxic salts injected is smaller (0.01 gm.), the symptoms of poisoning are not so characteristic and death may be delayed long enough to suggest a period of incubation similar to that observed in botulism (Table IV). This circumstance is of importance in connection with the examination of partly decomposed food products in which the presence of botulinus toxin is suspected. As a rule such suspected material is injected in massive doses (0.5 to 1 cc.) in mice. It is conceivable that such spoiled foods may be contaminated with common putrefactive bacteria yielding ammonia during their growth and thus may cause death of the test animals. If in such tests mice passively protected by the preliminary injection of an excess of antitoxin be used in addition to normal animals, the chances of an error in the interpretation of the results will be materially reduced, though not ruled out. Unfortunately for such a procedure

  6. Piriformis syndrome: a cause of nondiscogenic sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Shane P

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a nondiscogenic cause of sciatica from compression of the sciatic nerve through or around the piriformis muscle. Patients typically have sciatica, buttocks pain, and worse pain with sitting. They usually have normal neurological examination results and negative straight leg raising test results. Flexion, adduction, and internal rotation of the hip, Freiberg sign, Pace sign, and direct palpation of the piriformis cause pain and may reproduce symptoms. Imaging and neurodiagnostic studies are typically normal and are used to rule out other etiologies for sciatica. Conservative treatment, including medication and physiotherapy, is usually helpful for the majority of patients. For recalcitrant cases, corticosteroid and botulinum toxin injections may be attempted. Ultrasound and other imaging modalities likely improve accuracy of injections. Piriformis tenotomy and decompression of the sciatic nerve can be done for those who do not respond.

  7. Cerebellar mutism syndrome: cause and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E

    2017-04-01

    Mutism of cerebellar origin may occur in the context of various causes but is most frequent in children after resection of a large midline cerebellar tumour. In this review, the endeavour to reach a consensus on name and definition of postoperative mutism of cerebellar origin and associated symptoms is highlighted. In addition, progress in understanding of cause and risk factors for the syndrome is discussed as well as the rehabilitation issues. Consensus on the term cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) has been reached. The exact pathogenesis of CMS remains unclear. Recently, attention was drawn to the hypothesis that thermal injury might be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of CMS. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography was found to visualize the damage to relevant pathways that are associated with persistent impairments after recovery of CMS. There is still no established treatment for CMS to date. By reaching a consensus on terminology and description of CMS, a firm basis has been created for future research. The pathogenesis of CMS seems multifactorial and important risk factors have been found. However, CMS cannot be effectively prevented yet and no established or specific treatment is available, apart from very general rehabilitation and cognitive interventions.

  8. A possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christos, G A; Christos, J A

    1993-09-01

    Research into (lucid) dreaming has shown that the images of a dream are supported by the corresponding body actions, utilizing those muscles which remain active during dreaming. We suggest that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or Cot Death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe in the usual sense, the infant may cease to breathe and die. Our hypothesis is consistent with the known facts about SIDS, including social factors such as sleeping position and climatic variation. We suggest that the risk of SIDS can be reduced by making the environment of the infant, as much as possible, unlike that of the womb.

  9. Ways To Reduce the Risk of SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death Page Content Research shows that there are several ... SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death: The actions listed here and in Safe to ...

  10. Cause-of-death ascertainment for deaths that occur outside hospitals in Thailand: application of verbal autopsy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraarchachai Junya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascertainment of cause for deaths that occur in the absence of medical attention is a significant problem in many countries, including Thailand, where more than 50% of such deaths are registered with ill-defined causes. Routine implementation of standardized, rigorous verbal autopsy methods is a potential solution. This paper reports findings from field research conducted to develop, test, and validate the use of verbal autopsy (VA methods in Thailand. Methods International verbal autopsy methods were first adapted to the Thai context and then implemented to ascertain causes of death for a nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths that occurred in Thailand in 2005. Causes of death were derived from completed VA questionnaires by physicians trained in ICD-based cause-of-death certification. VA diagnoses were validated in the sample of hospital deaths for which reference diagnoses were available from medical record review. Validated study findings were used to adjust VA-based causes of death derived for deaths in the study sample that had occurred outside hospitals. Results were used to estimate cause-specific mortality patterns for deaths outside hospitals in Thailand in 2005. Results VA-based causes of death were derived for 6,328 out of 7,340 deaths in the study sample that had occurred outside hospitals, constituting the verification arm of the study. The use of VA resulted in large-scale reassignment of deaths from ill-defined categories to specific causes of death. The validation study identified that VA tends to overdiagnose important causes such as diabetes, liver cancer, and tuberculosis, while undercounting deaths from HIV/AIDS, liver diseases, genitourinary (essential renal, and digestive system disorders. Conclusions The use of standard VA methods adapted to Thailand enabled a plausible assessment of cause-specific mortality patterns and a substantial reduction of ill-defined diagnoses. Validation studies

  11. Hyperthyroidism caused by acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhou, J-J; Yuan, X-L; Li, C-Y; Sheng, H; Su, B; Sheng, C-J; Qu, S; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immune deficiency disease. The etiology of hyperthyroidism, which can also be immune-related, is usually divided into six classical categories, including hypophyseal, hypothalamic, thyroid, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of highly active antimicrobial therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Hyperthyroidism caused directly by AIDS has not been previously reported. A 29-year-old man who complained of dyspnea and asthenia for 1 month, recurrent fever for more than 20 days, and breathlessness for 1 week was admitted to our hospital. The thyroid function test showed that the level of free thyroxine (FT4) was higher than normal and that the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was below normal. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Additional investigations revealed a low serum albumin level and chest infection, along with diffuse lung fibrosis. Within 1 month, he experienced significant weight loss, no hand tremors, intolerance of heat, and perspiration proneness. We recommended an HIV examination; subsequently, AIDS was diagnosed based on the laboratory parameters. This is the first reported case of hyperthyroidism caused by AIDS. AIDS may cause hyperthyroidism by immunization regulation with complex, atypical, and easily ignored symptoms. Although hyperthyroidism is rare in patients with AIDS, clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and should carefully monitor thyroid function in HIV-positive patients.

  12. Certified causes of death in patients with mesothelioma in South East England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peto Julian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesothelioma is a highly fatal cancer that is caused by exposure to asbestos fibres. In many populations, the occurrence of mesothelioma is monitored with the use of mortality data from death certification. We examine certified causes of death of patients who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, and assess the validity of death certification data as a proxy for mesothelioma incidence. Methods We extracted mesothelioma registrations in the South East of England area between 2000 and 2004 from the Thames Cancer Registry database. We retained for analysis 2200 patients who had died at the time of analysis, after having excluded seven dead cases where the causes of death were not known to the cancer registry. The 2200 deaths were classified hierarchically to identify (1 mesothelioma deaths, (2 deaths certified as lung cancer deaths or (3 deaths from unspecified cancer, and (4 deaths from other causes. Results 87% of the patients had mesothelioma mentioned on the death certificate. 6% had no mention of mesothelioma but included lung cancer as a cause of death. Another 6% had no mention of mesothelioma or lung cancer, but included an unspecified cancer as a cause of death. Lastly, 2% had other causes of death specified on the death certificate. Conclusion This analysis suggests that official mortality data may underestimate the true occurrence of mesothelioma by around 10%.

  13. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Mortality from diabetes mellitus, 2004 to 2008: A multiple-cause-of-death analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungwee; Peters, Paul A

    2014-03-01

    Using multiple-cause-of-death data, this study examines diabetes mellitus as a cause of mortality. During the 2004-to-2008 period, diabetes mellitus was listed as either the underlying cause or a contributing cause of 119,617 deaths. It was more than twice as likely to be a contributing than the underlying cause of death. When it was identified as the underlying cause of death, diabetes mellitus was rarely the only cause. The diabetes mellitus mortality rate was relatively high among males, older individuals, and people living in lower-income neighbourhoods. Provincial/Territorial differences in rates of death from diabetes mellitus were considerable. When diabetes mellitus was the underlying cause of death, cardiovascular diseases were listed as a contributing cause most often, and when diabetes mellitus was a contributing cause, cardiovascular diseases were most likely to be the underlying cause.

  15. Is organ procurement causing the death of patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, James M

    2002-01-01

    This article offers a philosophical foundation for the Uniform Determination of Death Act as it first examines death per se, and then examines brain death and the non-heart beating donor criteria for determining death. The author suggests that many of the debates over death can be bypassed by changing the terms of the debate: what matters is not whether death is a process or an event, but death as a state. Understanding death as a state allows us to determine death in a functional manner that is compatible with the needs of law and medicine. The second part examines objections that arise from ignoring or rejecting the distinction between killing and letting die and the principle of double effect. By clarifying the lines between life and death, on the one hand, and between intentionally killing and unintentionally hastening death, on the other, the author hopes to restore a sense that the proposals to drop the dead donor rule are radical recommendations to cross lines we have never crossed before.

  16. Definition of Sudden Infant Death and Sudden Intrauterine Unexpected Death Syndromes (SIDS and SIUDS with Regard to the Anatomo-Pathological Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ottaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700–2,000. Yet despite advances in maternal-infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS, has a six-eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS-SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures. On the basis of these considerations, the new common definition of the SIDS-SIUDS complex is The sudden death of a fetus after the 25th gestational week or infant under one year of age which is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including examination of the death scene, performance of a general autopsy and examination of the fetal adnexa. Therefore, given that the general autopsy does not disclose any cause of death, a more in-depth histopathological analysis of the cardiac conduction system and autonomic nervous system by specialized pathologists will become necessary.

  17. Trends in the leading causes of death in the United States, 1970-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemal, Ahmedin; Ward, Elizabeth; Hao, Yongping; Thun, Michael

    2005-09-14

    The decrease in overall death rates in the United States may mask changes in death rates from specific conditions. To examine temporal trends in the age-standardized death rates and in the number of deaths from the 6 leading causes of death in the United States. Analyses of vital statistics data on mortality in the United States from 1970 to 2002. The age-standardized death rate and number of deaths (coded as underlying cause) from each of the 6 leading causes of death: heart disease, stroke, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, accidents (ie, related to transportation [motor vehicle, other land vehicles, and water, air, and space] and not related to transportation [falls, fire, and accidental posioning]), and diabetes mellitus. The age-standardized death rate (per 100,000 per year) from all causes combined decreased from 1242 in 1970 to 845 in 2002. The largest percentage decreases were in death rates from stroke (63%), heart disease (52%), and accidents (41%). The largest absolute decreases in death rates were from heart disease (262 deaths per 100,000), stroke (96 deaths per 100,000), and accidents (26 deaths per 100,000).The death rate from all types of cancer combined increased between 1970 and 1990 and then decreased through 2002, yielding a net decline of 2.7%. In contrast, death rates doubled from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease over the entire time interval and increased by 45% for diabetes since 1987. Despite decreases in age-standardized death rates from 4 of the 6 leading causes of death, the absolute number of deaths from these conditions continues to increase, although these deaths occur at older ages. The absolute number of deaths and age at death continue to increase in the United States. These temporal trends have major implications for health care and health care costs in an aging population.

  18. Ischemic syndromes causing dizziness and vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K-D; Lee, H; Kim, J-S

    2016-01-01

    Dizziness/vertigo and imbalance are the most common symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia. Even though dizziness/vertigo usually accompanies other neurologic symptoms and signs in cerebrovascular disorders, a diagnosis of isolated vascular vertigo is increasing markedly by virtue of recent developments in clinical neurotology and neuroimaging. It is important to differentiate isolated vertigo of a vascular cause from more benign disorders involving the inner ear, since therapeutic strategies and prognosis differ between these two conditions. Over the last decade, we have achieved a marked development in the understanding and diagnosis of vascular dizziness/vertigo. Introduction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly enhanced detection of infarctions in patients with vascular dizziness/vertigo, especially in the posterior-circulation territories. However, well-organized bedside neurotologic evaluation is even more sensitive than MRI in detecting acute infarction as a cause of spontaneous prolonged vertigo. Furthermore, detailed evaluation of strategic infarctions has elucidated the function of various vestibular structures of the brainstem and cerebellum. In contrast, diagnosis of isolated labyrinthine infarction still remains a challenge. This diagnostic difficulty also applies to isolated transient dizziness/vertigo of vascular origin. Regarding the common nonlacunar mechanisms in the acute vestibular syndrome from small infarctions, individual strategies may be indicated to prevent recurrences of stroke in patients with vascular vertigo. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The cost of inpatient death associated with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page II RL

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert L Page II,1 Vahram Ghushchyan,2 Jill Van Den Bos,3 Travis J Gray,3 Greta L Hoetzer,4 Durgesh Bhandary,4 Kavita V Nair1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 2College of Business and Economics, American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia; 3Milliman, Inc, Denver, CO, 4AstraZeneca, US Medical Affairs, Wilmington, DE, USA Background: No studies have addressed the cost of inpatient mortality during an acute coronary syndrome (ACS admission. Objective: Compare ACS-related length of stay (LOS, total admission cost, and total admission cost by day of discharge/death for patients who died during an inpatient admission with a matched cohort discharged alive following an ACS-related inpatient stay. Methods: Medical and pharmacy claims (2009–2012 were used to identify admissions with a primary diagnosis of ACS from patients with at least 6 months of continuous enrollment prior to an ACS admission. Patients who died during their ACS admission (deceased cohort were matched (one-to-one to those who survived (survived cohort on age, sex, year of admission, Chronic Condition Index score, and prior revascularization. Mean LOS, total admission cost, and total admission cost by the day of discharge/death for the deceased cohort were compared with the survived cohort. A generalized linear model with log transformation was used to estimate the differences in the total expected incremental cost of an ACS admission and by the day of discharge/death between cohorts. A negative binomial model was used to estimate differences in the LOS between the two cohorts. Costs were inflated to 2013 dollars. Results: A total of 1,320 ACS claims from patients who died (n=1,320 were identified and matched to 1,319 claims from the survived patients (n=1,319. The majority were men (68% and mean age was 56.7±6.4 years. The LOS per claim for the deceased cohort was

  20. Calculating expected years of life lost for assessing local ethnic disparities in causes of premature death

    OpenAIRE

    Aragón, Tomás J; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y.; Katcher, Brian S; Reiter, Randy; Katz, Mitchell H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A core function of local health departments is to conduct health assessments. The analysis of death certificates provides information on diseases, conditions, and injuries that are likely to cause death - an important outcome indicator of population health. The expected years of life lost (YLL) measure is a valid, stand-alone measure for identifying and ranking the underlying causes of premature death. The purpose of this study was to rank the leading causes of premature death amo...

  1. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in a patient with a new minimal deletion in the death domain of the FAS gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gualco, Gabrieta; van den Berg, Anke; Koopmans, Sicco; Bacchi, Livia M.; Carneiro, Siderley S.; Ruiz, Everaldo; Vecchi, Ana Paula; Chan, John K. C.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) caused by a previously undescribed minimal deletion in the death domain of the FAS gene. ALPS is an uncommon disease associated with an impaired Fas-mediated apoptosis. The patient presented with a history of splenomegaly since 4 mo

  2. Sudden infant death syndrome and cardiac channelopathies: from mechanisms to prevention of avoidable tragedies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Schwartz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, with the load of mystery surrounding its causes and with the devastating impact on the affected families, remains the greatest contributor to post-neonatal mortality during the first year of life. Following a succinct review of the non-cardiac genetic factors, which have been associated with SIDS, we focus on the cardiac hypothesis for SIDS and specifically on those diseases produced by cardiac ion channel mutations, the so-called channelopathies. Special attention is devoted to the fact that these causes of SIDS, and especially the long QT syndrome, are preventable if diagnosed in time. This highlights the importance of neonatal ECG screening and carries a number of practical implications, including medico-legal considerations.

  3. Síndrome de muerte súbita del lactante Sudden infant death syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marlen Avalos González

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available En nuestra área de salud se presentó un caso de muerte súbita del lactante, en un paciente de 7 meses de edad, masculino, con antecedentes de salud anterior y antecedentes patológicos familiares negativos. Fue inexplicable su muerte, aun después de realizada una necropsia completa, la investigación de la escena de la muerte y la evaluación de la historia clínica del niño y su familia. El síndrome de muerte súbita del lactante es de causa desconocida, lo más probable es que sea de etiología multifactorial, se debe de estar alerta para evitar los factores que se asocian con mayor frecuencia a estos niños y así prevenir la aparición de este síndrome.In our health area, there was a case of sudden infant death, in a patient aged 7 months, male, with previous health backgrounds and negative family pathologic backgrounds. Its death was inexplicable, even after a complete necropsy, the research of death scene, and the medical record assessment of child and its family. Sudden infant death syndrome is an unknown cause, probably of multifactor origin. We must to be on the alert to avoid the more frequent factors associating with these children, and thus to prevent appearance of this syndrome.

  4. Hydrocephalus and Pressure on Brain Stem Cause Death in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khazaei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurofibromatosis type 2 is an inherited autosomal dominant syndrome, charac-terized by multiple neoplasms of the central and peripheral nervous system associated with ocular abnormalities. The most common tumor associated with the disease is the vestibulo-cochlear and in later stages are meningioma and other brain tumors. Case Report: The patient was a 35 year old woman admitted to the Farshchian hospital in Hamadan due to unconciousness and respiratory distress She had sensorineural hearing loss and inability to see due to decrease visulal acuity. In addition, due to lower extremity paresis she has been unable to walk and wheelchair-dependent for many years. Brain CT scan and MRI showed multiple tumors in the posterior fossa causing obstructive hydrocephalus even-tually caused the patient's death . Conclusion: Brain tumors, especially in the posterior fossa can cause death in Neurofibroma-tosis type 2. Early surgery can be life saving. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:167-170

  5. Excited Delirium and Sudden Death: A Syndromal Disorder at the Extreme End of the Neuropsychiatric Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Carmen Mash

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the excited delirium syndrome (ExDS has raised continuous controversy regarding the cause and manner of death of some highly agitated persons who die in police custody, during physical restraint or incapacitation by electrical devices. At autopsy, medical examiners have difficulty in identifying any anatomic cause of death, but frequently cite psychostimulant intoxication as a contributing factor. The characteristic symptoms of ExDS include bizarre and aggressive behavior, shouting, paranoia, panic, violence toward others, unexpected physical strength, and hyperthermia. Throughout the United States and Canada, these cases are most frequently associated with cocaine, methamphetamine and designer cathinone abuse. Acute exhaustive mania and sudden death presents with behavioral symptoms that are identical to what is described for ExDs in psychostimulant abusers. Bell’s mania or acute exhaustive mania was first described in the 1850’s by American psychiatrist Luther Bell in institutionalized psychiatric patients. This rare disorder of violent mania, elevated body temperature and autonomic collapse continued to be described by others in the psychiatric literature, but with different names until the first cases of ExDS were recognized at the beginning of the cocaine epidemic by medical examiners. The first neurochemical pathology examinations of brain tissues from these cases after death revealed a loss of dopamine transporter regulation together with increases in heat shock protein 70 (hsp70 expression as a biomarker of hyperthermia. The similarity in the behavioral symptoms between extremely agitated psychostimulant abusers and unmedicated psychiatric patients suggests that a genetic disorder that leads to dysregulated central dopamine transporter function could be a precipitating cause of the acute delirium and sudden death. While the precise cause and mechanism of lethality remains controversial, the likely whys and

  6. Excited Delirium and Sudden Death: A Syndromal Disorder at the Extreme End of the Neuropsychiatric Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) has raised continued controversy regarding the cause and manner of death of some highly agitated persons held in police custody, restrained or incapacitated by electrical devices. At autopsy, medical examiners have difficulty in identifying an anatomic cause of death, but frequently cite psychostimulant intoxication as a contributing factor. The characteristic symptoms of ExDS include bizarre and aggressive behavior, shouting, paranoia, panic, violence toward others, unexpected physical strength, and hyperthermia. Throughout the United States and Canada, these cases are most frequently associated with cocaine, methamphetamine, and designer cathinone abuse. Acute exhaustive mania and sudden death presents with behavioral symptoms that are identical to what is described for ExDS in psychostimulant abusers. Bell's mania or acute exhaustive mania was first described in the 1850's by American psychiatrist Luther Bell in institutionalized psychiatric patients. This rare disorder of violent mania, elevated body temperature and autonomic collapse continued to be described by others in the psychiatric literature, but with different names until the first cases of ExDS were seen at the beginning of the cocaine epidemic by medical examiners. The neurochemical pathology examination of brain tissues after death revealed a loss of dopamine transporter regulation together with increases in heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) expression as a biomarker of hyperthermia. The similarity in the behavioral symptoms between extremely agitated psychostimulant abusers and unmedicated psychiatric patients suggests that a genetic disorder that leads to dysregulated central dopamine transporter function could be a precipitating cause of the acute delirium and sudden death. While the precise cause and mechanism of lethality remains controversial, the likely whys and wherefores of sudden death of ExDS victims are seen to be

  7. Brain death causes structural and inflammatory changes in donor intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudstaal, L.G.; 't Hart, Marieke; van den Berg, Anke; Olinga, Peter; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, R.J; Leuvenink, H.G.

    2005-01-01

    Brain death donors are frequently used for transplantation. Previous studies showed that brain death (BD) negatively affects the immunological and inflammatory status of both liver and kidney. Objective. Therefore we studied the inflammatory and morphological changes in donor small intestine after

  8. Blinded and uniform cause of death verification in a lung cancer CT screening trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horeweg, N.; van Klaveren, R. J.; Groen, H. J. M.; Lammers, J. -W. J.; Weenink, C.; Nackaerts, K.; Mali, W.; Oudkerk, M.; de Koning, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Disease-specific mortality is the final outcome of a lung cancer screening trial, therefore cause of death verification is crucial. The use of death certificates for this purpose is debated because of bias, inaccurate completion and incorrect ante mortem diagnoses. A cause of death evaluation proces

  9. 26 CFR 1.4-4 - Short taxable year caused by death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Short taxable year caused by death. 1.4-4 Section... Normal Taxes and Surtaxes § 1.4-4 Short taxable year caused by death. An individual making a return for a... results from the death of the taxpayer. Tax on Corporations...

  10. Causes of death in Tonga: quality of certification and implications for statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Karen; Hufanga, Sione; Rao, Chalapati; Akauola, Sione; Lopez, Alan D; Rampatige, Rasika; Taylor, Richard

    2012-03-05

    Detailed cause of death data by age group and sex are critical to identify key public health issues and target interventions appropriately. In this study the quality of local routinely collected cause of death data from medical certification is reviewed, and a cause of death profile for Tonga based on amended data is presented. Medical certificates of death for all deaths in Tonga for 2001 to 2008 and medical records for all deaths in the main island Tongatapu for 2008 were sought from the national hospital. Cause of death data for 2008 were reviewed for quality through (a) a review of current tabulation procedures and (b) a medical record review. Data from each medical record were extracted and provided to an independent medical doctor to assign cause of death, with underlying cause from the medical record tabulated against underlying cause from the medical certificate. Significant associations in reporting patterns were evaluated and final cause of death for each case in 2008 was assigned based on the best quality information from the medical certificate or medical record. Cause of death data from 2001 to 2007 were revised based on findings from the evaluation of certification of the 2008 data and added to the dataset. Proportional mortality was calculated and applied to age- and sex-specific mortality for all causes from 2001 to 2008. Cause of death was tabulated by age group and sex, and age-standardized (all ages) mortality rates for each sex by cause were calculated. Reported tabulations of cause of death in Tonga are of immediate cause, with ischemic heart disease and diabetes underrepresented. In the majority of cases the reported (immediate) cause fell within the same broad category as the underlying cause of death from the medical certificate. Underlying cause of death from the medical certificate, attributed to neoplasms, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease were assigned to other underlying causes by the medical record review in 70% to 77% of deaths. Of

  11. Causes of death in Tonga: quality of certification and implications for statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Karen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed cause of death data by age group and sex are critical to identify key public health issues and target interventions appropriately. In this study the quality of local routinely collected cause of death data from medical certification is reviewed, and a cause of death profile for Tonga based on amended data is presented. Methods Medical certificates of death for all deaths in Tonga for 2001 to 2008 and medical records for all deaths in the main island Tongatapu for 2008 were sought from the national hospital. Cause of death data for 2008 were reviewed for quality through (a a review of current tabulation procedures and (b a medical record review. Data from each medical record were extracted and provided to an independent medical doctor to assign cause of death, with underlying cause from the medical record tabulated against underlying cause from the medical certificate. Significant associations in reporting patterns were evaluated and final cause of death for each case in 2008 was assigned based on the best quality information from the medical certificate or medical record. Cause of death data from 2001 to 2007 were revised based on findings from the evaluation of certification of the 2008 data and added to the dataset. Proportional mortality was calculated and applied to age- and sex-specific mortality for all causes from 2001 to 2008. Cause of death was tabulated by age group and sex, and age-standardized (all ages mortality rates for each sex by cause were calculated. Results Reported tabulations of cause of death in Tonga are of immediate cause, with ischemic heart disease and diabetes underrepresented. In the majority of cases the reported (immediate cause fell within the same broad category as the underlying cause of death from the medical certificate. Underlying cause of death from the medical certificate, attributed to neoplasms, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease were assigned to other underlying causes by

  12. Mutations in ZBTB20 cause Primrose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Redeker, Bert; Stellacci, Emilia; Jongejan, Aldo; Fragale, Alessandra; Bradley, Ted E J; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Ciolfi, Andrea; Cecchetti, Serena; Muto, Valentina; Bernardini, Laura; Azage, Meron; Carvalho, Daniel R; Espay, Alberto J; Male, Alison; Molin, Anna-Maja; Posmyk, Renata; Battisti, Carla; Casertano, Alberto; Melis, Daniela; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Mannens, Marcel M; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Tartaglia, Marco; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-08-01

    Primrose syndrome and 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome are clinically related disorders characterized by tall stature, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, disturbed behavior and unusual facial features, with diabetes, deafness, progressive muscle wasting and ectopic calcifications specifically occurring in the former. We report that missense mutations in ZBTB20, residing within the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome critical region, underlie Primrose syndrome. This finding establishes a genetic link between these disorders and delineates the impact of ZBTB20 dysregulation on development, growth and metabolism.

  13. Origins of the E. coli strain causing an outbreak of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasko, David A; Webster, Dale R; Sahl, Jason W

    2011-01-01

    A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli have been reported--3167 without...... the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (34 deaths)--indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains......, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli....

  14. Goldenhar syndrome: a cause of secondary immunodeficiency?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Golovine Serge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Goldenhar syndrome (GS results from an aberrant development of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. There is a wide range of clinical manifestations, the most common being microtia, hemifacial microsomia, epibulbar dermoids and vertebral malformations. We present two cases of GS and secondary immunodeficiency due to anatomical defects characteristic of this disorder. Case 1 (3-year-old female averaged 6 episodes of sinusitis and otitis media per year. Case 2 (7-year-old female also had recurrent otitis media, an episode of bacterial pneumonia, and 2 episodes of bacterial meningitis. Their immune evaluation included a complete blood count with differential, serum immunoglobulin levels and specific antibody concentrations, lymphocyte phenotyping, and mitogen and antigen responses, the results of which were all within normal ranges. Both children demonstrated major structural abnormalities of the inner and middle ear structures, retention of fluid in mastoid air cells, and chronic sinusitis by computed tomography. These two cases illustrate how a genetically-associated deviation of the middle ear cleft can cause recurrent infections and chronic inflammation of the middle ear and adjacent sinuses, even meninges, leading to a greatly reduced quality of life for the child and parents.

  15. Leading Causes of Death in Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan Areas- United States, 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ernest; Garcia, Macarena C; Bastian, Brigham; Rossen, Lauren M; Ingram, Deborah D; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta M; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Yoon, Paula W; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    Higher rates of death in nonmetropolitan areas (often referred to as rural areas) compared with metropolitan areas have been described but not systematically assessed. 1999-2014 DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: Mortality data for U.S. residents from the National Vital Statistics System were used to calculate age-adjusted death rates and potentially excess deaths for nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas for the five leading causes of death. Age-adjusted death rates included all ages and were adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population by the direct method. Potentially excess deaths are defined as deaths among persons aged leading causes were higher in nonmetropolitan areas than in metropolitan areas. For example, approximately half of deaths from unintentional injury and chronic lower respiratory disease in nonmetropolitan areas were potentially excess deaths, compared with 39.2% and 30.9%, respectively, in metropolitan areas. Potentially excess deaths also differed among and within public health regions; within regions, nonmetropolitan areas tended to have higher percentages of potentially excess deaths than metropolitan areas. Compared with metropolitan areas, nonmetropolitan areas have higher age-adjusted death rates and greater percentages of potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes of death, nationally and across public health regions. Routine tracking of potentially excess deaths in nonmetropolitan areas might help public health departments identify emerging health problems, monitor known problems, and focus interventions to reduce preventable deaths in these areas.

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome prevention: a model program for NICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Sherri L; Lipke, Bethann; LeMura, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Health care providers' opinions can influence how parents place their infant to sleep. Neonatal nurses can improve how they teach and model safe infant sleep practices to parents. To increase neonatal nurses' knowledge, a sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention program was implemented. Program components included a computerized teaching tool, a crib card, sleep sacks, and discharge instructions. Initial program evaluation showed that 98 percent of infants slept supine and 93 percent slept in sleep sacks in open cribs. However, nurses continued to swaddle some infants with blankets to improve thermoregulation. To increase nursing compliance in modeling safe infant sleep practices, Halo SleepSack Swaddles were provided for nurses to use in place of a blanket to regulate infant temperature. Recent data show that 100 percent of infants in open cribs are now sleeping supine wearing a Halo Swaddle or a traditional Halo SleepSack. This model program can easily be replicated to enhance neonatal nurses' knowledge about SIDS prevention.

  17. The role of breastfeeding in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVea, K L; Turner, P D; Peppler, D K

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this article is to review the literature regarding the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in bottle-fed infants compared to those that are breastfed. A meta-analysis and qualitative literature review were performed. Cohort and case-control studies were included if they met a minimum SIDS definition and presented data allowing calculation of an odds ratio (OR). Twenty-three studies were included in the meta-analysis. The studies were heterogeneous, and a majority (14) were of "fair" or "poor" quality. Crude ORs from 19 individual studies favored breastfeeding as protective against SIDS. The combined analysis indicated that bottle-fed infants were twice as likely to die from SIDS (pooled OR = 2.11; 95% CI 1.66-2.68). The results of the analysis show that there is an association between bottle-feeding and SIDS, but this may be related to confounding variables.

  18. Changes in causes of death among persons with AIDS: San Francisco, California, 1996-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Vu, Annie; Hsu, Ling Chin; Hessol, Nancy A

    2014-10-01

    The increased life expectancy among HIV-infected persons treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), risk behaviors, and co-morbidities associated with ART place HIV-infected persons at risk for non-HIV-related causes of death. We used the San Francisco HIV/AIDS registry to identify deaths that occurred from January 1996 through December 2011. Temporal trends in AIDS- and non-AIDS-related mortality rates, the proportion of underlying and contributory causes of death, and the ratio of observed deaths in the study population to expected number of deaths among California men aged 20-79 (standardized mortality ratio [SMR]) of underlying causes of death were examined. A total of 5338 deaths were identified. The annual AIDS-related death rate (per 100 deaths) declined from 10.8 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (p<0.0001), while the annual death rate from non-AIDS-related causes declined from 2.1 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (p<0.0001). The proportion of deaths due to all types of heart disease combined, all non-AIDS cancers combined, mental disorders resulting from substance abuse, drug overdose, suicide and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased significantly over time. The SMRs for liver diseased decreased significantly over time but remained elevated. Our data highlight the importance of age-related causes of death as well as deaths from causes that are, at least in part, preventable.

  19. Biliary stone causing afferent loop syndrome and pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    André Roncon Dias; Roberto Iglesias Lopes

    2006-01-01

    We report the case of an 84-year-old female who had a partial gastrectomy with Billroth-Ⅱ anastomosis 24years ago for a benign peptic ulcer who now presented an acute pancreatitis secondary to an afferent loop syndrome. The syndrome was caused by a gallstone that migrated through a cholecystoenteric fistula. This is the first description in the literature of a biliary stone causing afferent loop syndrome.

  20. Sports and Marfan Syndrome: Awareness and Early Diagnosis Can Prevent Sudden Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mubadda A.; Alpert, Bruce S.

    2001-01-01

    Physicians who work with athletes play an important role in preventing sudden death related to physical activity in people who have Marfan syndrome. Flagging those who have the physical stigmata and listening for certain cardiac auscultation sounds are early diagnostic keys that can help prevent deaths. People with Marfan syndrome should be…

  1. Postmortem review and genetic analysis in sudden infant death syndrome: an 11-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angharad; Bagnall, Richard D; Duflou, Johan; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the unexpected death of a child younger than 1 year that remains unexplained after thorough evaluation. The possibility of an underlying primary arrhythmogenic disorder has been proposed as a potential cause of SIDS. This study sought to review SIDS deaths and to perform genetic analysis in key genes that may contribute to sudden death. From 2000 to 2010, all postmortem records from the Department of Forensic Medicine in Sydney, Australia, were reviewed. Cases that gave the cause of death as "SIDS" or "undetermined" but consistent with SIDS were included. In a subset of cases, the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN)-gated channel family of genes (HCN2 and HCN4) was analyzed. A total of 226 SIDS cases were identified; 61% were male, 41% occurred while bed sharing, and there was a peak in deaths between 2 and 4 months old. The incidence did not decrease over the study period. In a subgroup of SIDS cases (n = 46), genetic analysis identified 2 likely pathogenic variants (2/46; 4%). A novel nonsynonymous variant, HCN4-Ala195Val, predicted to be pathogenic, was identified in a female infant who died at age 4 months. A female infant aged 5 weeks carried a rare nonsynonymous variant, HCN4-Val759Ile, which is similar to previously described variants associated with cardiac arrhythmias. In conclusion, the incidence of SIDS remains constant, with no apparent decline in the last decade. The underlying cause of SIDS remains largely unknown. Mutations in cardiac ion channel genes including rare nonsynonymous HCN gene variants may play a role in the pathogenesis of some SIDS cases.

  2. The First Cause of Traumatic Death in Children < 1 Year: A Review on Abusive Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Ferrara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT can be defined as an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of a child under the age of 5 due to inflicted blunt impact or violent shaking. Evidence Acquisition AHT is the most common cause of traumatic death in children younger than 1 year, and it is the leading cause of death due to child abuse. Clinical presentation observed in children with AHT depends on the type of AHT and accompanying injuries. History and physical examination are important for diagnosing AHT and for distinguishing it from other conditions that can mimic shaken baby syndrome, such as accidental trauma, cancer, metabolic diseases, and others. Results Progress in research on the medical diagnosis of AHT has been remarkable, while the development of treatment strategies has been limited. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to develop effective treatment strategies for AHT able to improve the outcomes. Conclusions The construction of a nationwide database that supports clinical studies is required in the future.

  3. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac – a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose a classification system that could serve all these needs, and be applicable in both developing and developed countries. It is developed to adhere to basic concepts of underlying cause in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, although gaps in ICD prevent classification of perinatal deaths solely on existing ICD codes. We tested the Causes of Death and Associated Conditions (Codac classification for perinatal deaths in seven populations, including two developing country settings. We identified areas of potential improvements in the ability to retain existing information, ease of use and inter-rater agreement. After revisions to address these issues we propose Version II of Codac with detailed coding instructions. The ten main categories of Codac consist of three key contributors to global perinatal mortality (intrapartum events, infections and congenital anomalies, two crucial aspects of perinatal mortality (unknown causes of death and termination of pregnancy, a clear distinction of conditions relevant only to the neonatal period and the remaining conditions are arranged in the four anatomical compartments (fetal, cord, placental and maternal. For more detail there are 94 subcategories, further specified in 577 categories in the full version. Codac is designed to accommodate both the main cause of death as well as two associated conditions. We suggest reporting not only the main cause of death, but also the associated relevant conditions so that scenarios of combined conditions and events are captured. The appropriately applied Codac system promises to better manage information on causes of perinatal deaths, the conditions

  4. Toxic anterior segment syndrome: common causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler Peck, Carolee M; Brubaker, Jacob; Clouser, Sue; Danford, Chris; Edelhauser, Henry E; Mamalis, Nick

    2010-07-01

    To identify the most common risk factors associated with toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS). Ophthalmic surgical centers in the United States, Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Mexico, Spain, and Romania. A TASS questionnaire on instrument cleaning and reprocessing and extraocular and intraocular products used during cataract surgery was placed on the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery web site. A retrospective analysis of questionnaires submitted by surgical centers reporting cases of TASS was performed between June 1, 2007, and May 31, 2009, to identify commonly held practices that could cause TASS. Members of the TASS Task Force made site visits between October 1, 2005, and May 31, 2009, and the findings were evaluated. Data from 77 questionnaires and 54 site visits were analyzed. The reporting centers performed 50 114 cataract surgeries and reported 909 cases of TASS. From January 1, 2006, to date, the 54 centers reported 367 cases in 143 919 procedures; 61% occurred in early 2006. Common practices associated with TASS included inadequate flushing of phaco and irrigation/aspiration handpieces, use of enzymatic cleansers, detergents at the wrong concentration, ultrasonic bath, antibiotic agents in balanced salt solution, preserved epinephrine, inappropriate agents for skin prep, and powdered gloves. Reuse of single-use products and poor instrument maintenance and processing were other risk factors. The survey identified commonly held practices associated with TASS. Understanding these findings and the safe alternatives will allow surgical center personnel to change their practices as needed to prevent TASS. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Applicability of the analysis by multiple cause of death by cervical cancer: the experience in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante-Montes, Lilia Patricia; Alvarez-Solorza, Isabel; Valencia, Angel Domínguez; Hernández-Valero, María A; Tlachino, Gloria Toxqui; Huidobro, Lino González

    2011-12-01

    Objective. The study explores the applicability of the multiple-cause-of-death analysis for cervical-uterine cancer. Methods. A proportional mortality hazard design and the analysis of all causes of death due to cervical-uterine cancer from 367 death certificates of women older than 18 years of age from the State of Mexico, and 515 age and year adjusted sample of death certificates of women from the same region who died from other causes. Results. A basic multiple cause of death of 2.9 was observed in the death certificates, i.e., for every basic cause there were 2.9 multiple causes. When adjusting the multiple-causes-of-death analysis for cervical-uterine cancer by age, education, marital and insurability status, the most contributing and associated causes of death were malignant tumors from unspecified sites [OR=18.98 (2.28-157.56) and OR=14.25 (1.67-121.0)] respectively; Diabetes Mellitus as a contributing [OR=1.82 (1.02-3.27) and associated cause [OR=7.78 (1.46-41.37], and systemic arterial hypertension as an associated cause [OR=3.00 (1.40-6.47)]. Conclusions. The multiple-cause-of-death analysis is an adequate to observe the diseases that contribute condition and are associated to the cervical-uterine cancer.

  6. [Sudden death secondary to acute aortic syndromes in the North of Portugal: medico-legal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Pedro Costa; Santos, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    An evaluation is presented on the clinical, pathological and sociodemographic characteristics of a sample of sudden death victims secondary to an Acute Aortic Syndrome (AAS) in the north of Portugal, submitted to medico-legal autopsy, during the period between January 2008 and December 2012. Autopsy reports were analyzed in which, through necropsy and histological examination, the confirmed cause of death was an Acute Aortic Syndrome. From the studied cases, 70.3% of the victims were male. The median age was 65,19 ± 14,35 years (minimum of 27 years and maximum of 88 years). Death occurred mainly at home (40,5%) and during the normal activities of daily living (43,1%). There was an history of prodromes in 64,9% of the cases, mainly syncope and pain or respiratory symptoms. In 62,2% of the cases no pain history was reported. In the internal examination three presentation forms were identified: cardiac tamponade (51,4%); hemotorax (16,2%) and intra-abdominal bleeding (32,4%). The occurence of an Acute Aortic Syndrome was related to an aneurysmatic formation in 81% of the cases. Atherosclerotic plaques were identified in 51,4% of the cases and left ventricular hypertrophy was identified in 54,1%. None of the victims had a family history of aortic pathology and 54,1% of them presented a history of arterial hypertension. Necropsy data analysis of sudden death victims allows a better understanding of the AAS presentation, thus complementing the existent clinical studies. This work reveals how forensic medicine can be a privileged medium for articulation with clinical practice.

  7. Morphological and immunohistochemical features of the lung tissue in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Tukhtaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and immunohistochemical features of the lung tissue from 50 corpses of infants aged 1 month to 1 year were studied to determine their place in the structure of causes of death. Immunohistochemistry revealed decreased expression of surfactant protein B in most cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, which is probably due to qualitative changes in pulmonary surfactant. The data obtained suggest that the comprehensive studies of lung tissue of infants may contribute to clarifying the degree of risk and more accurately determining the causes of death in some cases of sudden infant death. This will help reduce the risk of diagnostic errors, i.e., hypo- or over-diagnosis SIDS and is of practical importance for forensic examination. This is especially true for those cases that require the need for differential diagnosis of SIDS with different types of pneumonia or mechanical asphyxia. Further investigations in this area should focus on the study of the molecular and genetic mechanisms of synthesis and transport of surfactant proteins, and to develop simple inexpensive methods for detection of the lungs surfactant deficiency in infants.

  8. Mutations in Genes Encoding Cardiac Ion Channels Previously Associated With Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Are Present With High Frequency in New Exome Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Refsgaard, Lena; Nielsen, Jonas B

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. The genetic contribution to SIDS has been investigated intensively and to date, 14 cardiac channelopathy genes have been associated with SIDS. Newly published data from...

  9. Contact urticaria syndrome caused by haptens

    OpenAIRE

    Gomułka, Krzysztof; Panaszek, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In the group of urticaria, contact urticaria syndrome is a particular variety. In these patients, appearance of typical skin lesions is preceded by contact of the skin and mucous membranes with various inhaled allergens, nutrients or contact details. Furthermore, symptoms connected with contact urticaria syndrome are characterized by gradual, stepwise waveform, which can be easily generalized – patients may develop systemic symptoms similar to those found in the angioedema, asthma or anaphyla...

  10. [Stiff baby syndrome is a rare cause of neonatal hypertonicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønne, Maria Sode; Nielsen, Preben Berg; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2014-02-24

    Stiff baby syndrome (hyperekplexia) is a rare genetic disorder. The condition can easily be misdiagnosed as epilepsy or severe sepsis because of hypertonicity and seizure-like episodes and has an increased risk of severe apnoea and sudden infant death. Tapping of the nasal bridge inducing a startle response is the clinical hallmark. We report cases of two sisters born with stiff baby syndrome with hypertonicity, exaggerated startle reaction and cyanosis. The syndrome has a good prognosis if treated with clonazepam and both cases were developmental normal after one year.

  11. A rare cause of pancytopenia: Sheehan′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Volkan Demir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheehan′s syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of anterior pituitary dysfunction due to postpartum ischemic necrosis of the pituitary gland after massive bleeding. Pancytopenia is rarely observed in patients with Sheehan′s syndrome. We present a patient of Sheehan′s syndrome presenting with pancytopenia. Complete recovery of pancytopenia was observed after the treatment. Clinicians should consider the possibility of hypopituitarism as a cause of pancytopenia and indicate a series of hormonal examinations. A high index of suspicion is required in women with pancytopenia for possible treatable cause like Sheehan′s syndrome.

  12. Death of a female cocaine user due to the serotonin syndrome following moclobemide-venlafaxine overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłys, Małgorzata; Kowalski, Piotr; Rojek, Sebastian; Gross, Adam

    2009-01-30

    To our knowledge, the majority of evidence supporting the relationship between the serotonin syndrome and medications that effect 5HT is based on case reports. The justification for taking up this subject has been a fatal outcome of a 21 year-old female following an administration of toxic doses of moclobemide (MAOI) and venlafaxine (SNRI). As a result of complex toxicological investigations including antemortem and postmortem material, antemortem clinical observations and postmortem examinations, the cause of death was identified as overdose with antidepressants--moclobemide and venlafaxine--in the mechanism of the clinically fully developed severe toxic serotonin syndrome. The analysis of a hair strand collected from the victim documented the use of the above-mentioned drugs simultaneously with cocaine in the period of at least 20 months preceding death. The fact is a matter of considerable interest in view of the employed pharmacotherapy, giving rise to suspicion that the woman had not developed the serotonin syndrome during the almost 2-year antemortem period until she took toxic doses of both medications.

  13. Calculating expected years of life lost for assessing local ethnic disparities in causes of premature death

    OpenAIRE

    Katcher Brian S; Lichtensztajn Daphne Y; Aragón Tomás J; Reiter Randy; Katz Mitchell H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A core function of local health departments is to conduct health assessments. The analysis of death certificates provides information on diseases, conditions, and injuries that are likely to cause death – an important outcome indicator of population health. The expected years of life lost (YLL) measure is a valid, stand-alone measure for identifying and ranking the underlying causes of premature death. The purpose of this study was to rank the leading causes of premature d...

  14. [Fetal death caused by myocarditis and isolated congenital auriculoventricular block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, G; Ferme, I; Morel, S; Batisse, J; Vuon, N P; Meyer, O

    1985-09-07

    A 26-year old woman gave birth, at term, to a child with isolated complete heart block. A second pregnancy was interrupted by foetal death. Among other immunological abnormalities, this young woman had an antibody resembling the anti-SS-B antibody. At pathological examination the foetus' heart was found to be free of malformation but presented with subacute myocarditis associated with microcalcifications of the conductive tissue. Such findings suggest that an incipient myocarditis may either result in foetal death or lead to fibrosis of conduction pathways with isolated complete heart block.

  15. A rare cause of acute coronary syndrome: Kounis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, João; Ferreira, Sara; Malheiro, Joana; Fonseca, Paulo; Caeiro, Daniel; Dias, Adelaide; Ribeiro, José; Gama, Vasco

    2016-12-01

    Kounis syndrome is an acute coronary syndrome in the context of a hypersensitivity reaction. The main pathophysiological mechanism appears to be coronary vasospasm. We report the case of a patient with a history of allergy to quinolones, who was given ciprofloxacin before an elective surgical procedure and during drug administration developed symptoms and electrocardiographic changes suggestive of ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The drug was suspended and coronary angiography excluded epicardial coronary disease. Two hours after withdrawal of the drug the symptoms and ST elevation had resolved completely.

  16. Impact of Acute Coronary Syndrome Complicated by Ventricular Fibrillation on Long-term Incidence of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Álvarez, Belén; Bouzas-Cruz, Noelia; Abu-Assi, Emad; Raposeiras-Roubin, Sergio; López-López, Andrea; González Cambeiro, María Cristina; Peña-Gil, Carlos; García-Acuña, José María; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-10-01

    There is little information on the effect of acute coronary syndrome complicated by ventricular fibrillation on the long-term incidence of sudden cardiac death. We analyzed this effect in a contemporary cohort of patients with acute coronary syndrome. We studied 5302 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome between December 2003 and December 2012. We compared mortality during and after hospitalization according to the presence or absence of ventricular fibrillation. Ventricular fibrillation was observed in 163 (3.1%) patients, and was early onset in 72.4% of these patients. In-hospital mortality was 36.2% in the group with ventricular fibrillation and 4.7% in the group without (p<.001). After a mean follow-up of 4.7 years (standard deviation, 2.6 years), mortality was 30.7% in the ventricular fibrillation group and 24.7% in the other group (P=.23). After adjusting for confounding variables, the presence of ventricular fibrillation was not associated with an increased risk of death in the follow-up period (hazard ratio=1.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-1.87). The cause of death was established in 72% of patients. The incidence of sudden death was 12.9% in the ventricular fibrillation group and 11.9% in the other group (P=.71). Cardiovascular-cause mortality was also similar between the 2 groups (35.5% and 34.4%, respectively. Patients with acute coronary syndrome complicated by ventricular fibrillation who survive the in-hospital phase do not appear to be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death or other cardiovascular-cause death. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Sudden infant death syndrome and the genetics of inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eFerrante

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report signs of slight infection prior to death in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. Based on this, a hypothesis of an altered immunological homeostasis has been postulated. The cytokines are important cellular mediators that are crucial for infant health by regulating cell activity during the inflammatory process. The pro-inflammatory cytokines favor inflammation; the most important of these are IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α and IFN-γ. These cytokines are controlled by the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This is accomplished by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and thus counteracts their biological effect. The major anti-inflammatory cytokines are interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, and IL-13. The last decade there has been focus on genetic studies within genes that are important for the immune system, for SIDS with a special interest of the genes encoding the cytokines. This is because the cytokine genes are considered to be the genes most likely to explain the vulnerability to infection, and several studies have investigated these genes in an attempt to uncover associations between SIDS and different genetic variants. So far the genes encoding IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α are the most investigated within SIDS research, and several studies indicates associations between specific variants of these genes and SIDS. Taken together this may indicate that in at least a subset of SIDS predisposing genetic variants of the immune genes are involved. However, the immune system and the cytokine network are complex, and more studies are needed in order to better understand the interplay between different genetic variations and how this may contribute to an unfavorable immunological response.

  18. Cause of death and potentially avoidable deaths in Australian adults with intellectual disability using retrospective linked data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Xu, Han; Howlett, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate mortality and its causes in adults over the age of 20 years with intellectual disability (ID). Design, setting and participants Retrospective population-based standardised mortality of the ID and Comparison cohorts. The ID cohort comprised 42 204 individuals who registered for disability services with ID as a primary or secondary diagnosis from 2005 to 2011 in New South Wales (NSW). The Comparison cohort was obtained from published deaths in NSW from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) from 2005 to 2011. Main outcome measures We measured and compared Age Standardised Mortality Rate (ASMR), Comparative Mortality Figure (CMF), years of productive life lost (YPLL) and proportion of deaths with potentially avoidable causes in an ID cohort with an NSW general population cohort. Results There were 19 362 adults in the ID cohort which experienced 732 (4%) deaths at a median age of 54 years. Age Standardised Mortality Rates increased with age for both cohorts. Overall comparative mortality figure was 1.3, but was substantially higher for the 20–44 (4.0) and 45–64 (2.3) age groups. YPLL was 137/1000 people in the ID cohort and 49 in the comparison cohort. Cause of death in ID cohort was dominated by respiratory, circulatory, neoplasm and nervous system. After recoding deaths previously attributed to the aetiology of the disability, 38% of deaths in the ID cohort and 17% in the comparison cohort were potentially avoidable. Conclusions Adults with ID experience premature mortality and over-representation of potentially avoidable deaths. A national system of reporting of deaths in adults with ID is required. Inclusion in health policy and services development and in health promotion programmes is urgently required to address premature deaths and health inequalities for adults with ID. PMID:28179413

  19. A rare cause of pancytopenia: Sheehan′s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Volkan Demir; Selçuk Yaylaci; Tuba Öztürk Demir; Tayfun Temiz; Ahmet Bilal Genç

    2015-01-01

    Sheehan′s syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of anterior pituitary dysfunction due to postpartum ischemic necrosis of the pituitary gland after massive bleeding. Pancytopenia is rarely observed in patients with Sheehan′s syndrome. We present a patient of Sheehan′s syndrome presenting with pancytopenia. Complete recovery of pancytopenia was observed after the treatment. Clinicians should consider the possibility of hypopituitarism as a cause of pancytopenia and indicate a series of h...

  20. [Bleeding to death because of hemorrhage into soft tissues as a cause of death in a beaten battered child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukić, Dragana

    2011-12-01

    Bleeding to death is one of the leading causes of death speaking about violent death in general. Bleeding to death mostly happens through hurt organs or blood vessels of thorax, abdomen and neck or because of destruction of extremities or the whole body. Bleeding to death is very often the consequence of blood pouring, rarely of simultaneous pouring and suffusing of blood, and it is extremely rarely the result of blood suffusing solely and especially due to subcutaneous, retoperitoneal and intramediastinal blood suffusing. Fatal bleeding into soft tissues solely is very rare. During a 10-year-period among 3 000 performed autopsies in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Podgorica, the presented case was the unique one. The paper presents a 5-year-old boy who was beaten to death by his mother and step-father and died because of massive bleeding into soft tissues. In order to establish a cause of death in cases of exsanguination in soft tissues, a series of postmortem diagnostic procedures should be performed, like those presented in this paper.

  1. Assessment of Medical Certificate of Cause of Death at a New Teaching Hospital in Vadodara

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    Amul B. Patel, Hitesh Rathod, Himanshu Rana, Viren Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to find out errors in the medical certification of cause of death during July 2011 at a new teaching hospital in Vadodara. All certificates of in-hospital deaths in medical record department, from May 2010 to June 2011, were assessed for major and minor errors. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17 version software. The results revealed that out of 40 death certificates, not a single was free from any error. Major errors occurred in 23(57.5% cases with improper sequencing (55% as most frequent. Most common minor error was the absence of time interval between the onset of disease and death (92.5%. No significant association was found between major errors and factors like age, sex, ward and underlying cause of death. This study concluded that educational intervention is necessary to increase physicians' awareness regarding importance of medical certificate of cause of death and accuracy of death certificates.

  2. Adverse medical complications: an under-reported contributory cause of death in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J R; Ely, S F; Toriello, A; Hirsch, C S

    2014-04-01

    The current death certification system in the USA fails to accurately track deaths due to adverse medical events. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the under-reporting of deaths due to adverse medical events due to limitations in the current death certification/reporting system, and the benefits of using the term 'therapeutic complication' as the manner of death. Retrospective review and comparison of death certificates and vital statistical coding. The manner of death is certified as a therapeutic complication when death is caused by predictable complications of appropriate therapy, and would not have occurred but for the medical intervention. Based on medical examiner records, complications that caused or contributed to deaths over a five-year period were examined retrospectively. These fatalities were compared with deaths coded as medical and surgical complications by the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics. The Medical Examiner's Office certified 2471 deaths as therapeutic complications and 312 deaths as accidents occurring in healthcare facilities. In contrast, the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics reported 188 deaths due to complications of medical and surgical care. Use of the term 'therapeutic complication' as the manner of death identified nearly 14 times more deaths than were reported by the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics. If these therapeutic complications and medical accidents were considered as a 'disease', they would rank as the 10th leading cause of death in New York City, surpassing homicides and suicides in some years. Nationwide policy shifts that use the term 'therapeutic complication' would improve the capture and reporting of these deaths, thus allowing better identification of fatal adverse medical events in order to focus on and assess preventative strategies. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimated causes of death in Thailand, 2005: implications for health policy

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    Vos Theo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost 400,000 deaths are registered each year in Thailand. Their value for public health policy and planning is greatly diminished by incomplete registration of deaths and by concerns about the quality of cause-of-death information. This arises from misclassification of specified causes of death, particularly in hospitals, as well as from extensive use of ill-defined and vague codes to attribute the underlying cause of death. Detailed investigations of a sample of deaths in and out of hospital were carried out to identify misclassification of causes and thus derive a best estimate of national mortality patterns by age, sex, and cause of death. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths in 2005 was selected, and verbal autopsy interviews were conducted for almost 10,000 deaths. Verbal autopsy procedures were validated against 2,558 cases for which medical record review was possible. Misclassification matrices for leading causes of death, including ill-defined causes, were developed separately for deaths inside and outside of hospitals and proportionate mortality distributions constructed. Estimates of mortality undercount were derived from "capture-recapture" methods applied to the 2005-06 Survey of Population Change. Proportionate mortality distributions were applied to this mortality "envelope" and ill-defined causes redistributed according to Global Burden of Disease methods to yield final estimates of mortality levels and patterns in 2005. Results Estimated life expectancy in Thailand in 2005 was 68.5 years for males and 75.6 years for females, two years lower than vital registration data suggest. Upon correction, stroke is the leading cause of death in Thailand (10.7%, followed by ischemic heart disease (7.8% and HIV/AIDS (7.4%. Other leading causes are road traffic accidents (males and diabetes mellitus (females. In many cases, estimated mortality is at least twice what is estimated in vital

  4. Verbal autopsy of 48 000 adult deaths attributable to medical causes in Chennai (formerly Madras, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaka Santhanakrishnan

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the city of Chennai, India, registration of the fact of death is almost complete but the cause of death is often inadequately recorded on the death certificate. A special verbal autopsy (VA study of 48 000 adult deaths in Chennai during 1995–97 was conducted to arrive at the probable underlying cause of death and to measure cause specific mortality rates for Chennai. Methods Trained non-medical graduates with at least 15 years of formal education interviewed the surviving family members or an associate of the deceased to write a report on the complaints, symptoms, signs, duration and treatment details of illness prior to death. Each report was reviewed centrally by two physicians independently. The reliability was assessed by comparing deaths attributed to cancer by VA with records in Vital Statistics Department and Chennai Cancer Registry. Results The VA reduced the proportion of deaths attributed to unspecified medical causes and unknown causes from 37% to 7% in early adult life and middle age (25–69 yrs and has yielded fewer unspecified causes (only 10% than the death certificate. The sensitivity of VA to identify cancer was 94% in the age group 25–69. Conclusion VA is practicable for deaths in early adult life or middle age and is of more limited value in old age. A systematic program of VA of a representative sample of deaths could assign broad causes not only to deaths in childhood (as has previously been established but also to deaths in early adult life and middle age.

  5. Causes of Death in a Contemporary Cohort of Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal; Maddalena Peghin; Carlos Cervera; Carlota Gudiol; Isabel Ruiz-Camps; Asunción Moreno; Cristina Royo-Cebrecos; Eva Roselló; Jordi Puig de la Bellacasa; Josefina Ayats; Jordi Carratalà

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding the processes leading to death in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) is lacking. We sought to determine the causes of death in these patients, the role that IA played in the cause, and the timing of death. The factors associated with IA-related mortality are also analyzed. We conducted a multicenter study (2008-2011) of cases of proven and probable IA. The causes of death and whether mortality was judged to be IA-related or IA-unrelated were determined by consensu...

  6. Evaluation of Underlying Causes of Death in Patients with Dementia to Support Targeted Advance Care Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Vorst, Irene E.; Koek, Huiberdina L.; Bots, Michiel L.; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insight in causes of death in demented patients may help physicians in end-of-life care. Objectives: To investigate underlying causes of death (UCD) in demented patients stratified by age, sex, dementia subtype [Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD)] and to compare them with

  7. Causes of death in intensive care patients with a low APACHE II score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, A. van; Lieshout, J.v.; Hellegering, J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the actual causes of death of patients with a low APACHE II score, but iatrogenic reasons may play a role. The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographics, course of disease, and causes of death in this specific group of ICU patients. Methods: For this retros

  8. Causes of deaths and influencing factors in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauchier, Laurent; Villejoubert, Olivier; Clementy, Nicolas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with a higher mortality, but causes of death of atrial fibrillation patients and their specific predictors have been less well defined. We aimed to identify the causes of death among atrial fibrillation patients and secondly, clinical predictors for t...

  9. Seizure-triggered Takotsubo syndrome rarely causes SUDEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Bersano, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Since almost 20 y it is known that seizures may trigger Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). Since then it has been repeatedly proposed that TTS could be the cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). A review of the so far reported cases of seizure-triggered TTS was carried out to see how often seizure-triggered TTS is fatal. Altogether 59 papers were identified which reported altogether 74 patients with seizure-triggered TTS. Age was reported in 70 patients and ranged from 18 to 82 y. Gender was reported in 70 cases and was female in 60 cases (86%). The type of triggering seizure was reported in 47 cases. In 28 patients (60%) the trigger was a generalized tonic clonic seizure, in 15 cases (32%) a generalized status epilepticus, and in 3 cases a complex partial seizure. The outcome was mentioned in 63 of the 74 patients. Full recovery was reported in 61 cases (97%), incomplete recovery in none of the patients, and a fatal outcome in 2 patients (3%). Fatalities are rare in patients experiencing seizure-triggered TTS. This is why seizure-triggered TTS does not seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of SUDEP. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Causes of neonatal and maternal deaths in Dhaka slums: Implications for service delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatun Fatema

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bangladesh has about 5.7 million people living in urban slums that are characterized by adverse living conditions, poor access to healthcare services and health outcomes. In an attempt to ensure safe maternal, neonatal and child health services in the slums BRAC started a programme, MANOSHI, in 2007. This paper reports the causes of maternal and neonatal deaths in slums and discusses the implications of those deaths for Maternal Neonatal and Child Health service delivery. Methods Slums in three areas of Dhaka city were selected purposively. Data on causes of deaths were collected during 2008-2009 using verbal autopsy form. Two trained physicians independently assigned the cause of deaths. Results A total of 260 newborn and 38 maternal deaths were identified between 2008 and 2009. The majority (75% of neonatal deaths occurred during 0-7 days. The main causes of deaths were birth asphyxia (42%, sepsis (20% and birth trauma (7%. Post partum hemorrhage (37% and eclampsia (16% were the major direct causes and hepatic failure due to viral hepatitis was the most prevalent indirect cause (11% of maternal deaths. Conclusion Delivery at a health facility with child assessment within a day of delivery and appropriate treatment could reduce neonatal deaths. Maternal mortality is unlikely to reduce without delivering at facilities with basic Emergency Obstetric Care (EOC and arrangements for timely referral to EOC. There is a need for a comprehensive package of services that includes control of infectious diseases during pregnancy, EOC and adequate after delivery care.

  11. Trends in Overall Mortality, and Timing and Cause of Death among Extremely Preterm Infants near the Limit of Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sein; Ahn, So Yoon; Park, Won Soon

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the trends in mortality, as well as in the timing and cause of death, among extremely preterm infants at the limit of viability, and thus to identify the clinical factors that contribute to decreased mortality. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 382 infants born at 23–26 weeks’ gestation; 124 of the infants were born between 2001 and 2005 (period I) and 258 were born between 2006 and 2011 (period II). We stratified the infants into two subgroups–“23–24 weeks” and “25–26 weeks”–and retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and mortality in each group, as well as the timing and cause of death. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done to identify the clinical factors associated with mortality. Results The overall mortality rate in period II was 16.7% (43/258), which was significantly lower than that in period I (30.6%; 38/124). For overall cause of death, there were significantly fewer deaths due to sepsis (2.4% [6/258] vs. 8.1% [10/124], respectively) and air-leak syndrome (0.8% [2/258] vs. 4.8% (6/124), respectively) during period II than during period I. Among the clinical factors of time period, 1-and 5-min Apgar score, antenatal steroid identified significant by univariate analyses. 5-min Apgar score and antenatal steroid use were significantly associated with mortality in multivariate analyses. Conclusion Improved mortality rate attributable to fewer deaths due to sepsis and air leak syndrome in the infants with 23–26 weeks’ gestation was associated with higher 5-minute Apgar score and more antenatal steroid use. PMID:28114330

  12. Use of the Coding Causes of Death in HIV in the classification of deaths in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Diana Neves; Bresani-Salvi, Cristiane Campello; Batista, Joanna d'Arc Lyra; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; Melo, Heloísa Ramos Lacerda de; Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão de

    2017-01-01

    Describe the coding process of death causes for people living with HIV/AIDS, and classify deaths as related or unrelated to immunodeficiency by applying the Coding Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe) system. A cross-sectional study that codifies and classifies the causes of deaths occurring in a cohort of 2,372 people living with HIV/AIDS, monitored between 2007 and 2012, in two specialized HIV care services in Pernambuco. The causes of death already codified according to the International Classification of Diseases were recoded and classified as deaths related and unrelated to immunodeficiency by the CoDe system. We calculated the frequencies of the CoDe codes for the causes of death in each classification category. There were 315 (13%) deaths during the study period; 93 (30%) were caused by an AIDS-defining illness on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list. A total of 232 deaths (74%) were related to immunodeficiency after application of the CoDe. Infections were the most common cause, both related (76%) and unrelated (47%) to immunodeficiency, followed by malignancies (5%) in the first group and external causes (16%), malignancies (12 %) and cardiovascular diseases (11%) in the second group. Tuberculosis comprised 70% of the immunodeficiency-defining infections. Opportunistic infections and aging diseases were the most frequent causes of death, adding multiple disease burdens on health services. The CoDe system increases the probability of classifying deaths more accurately in people living with HIV/AIDS. Descrever o processo de codificação das causas de morte em pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids, e classificar os óbitos como relacionados ou não relacionados à imunodeficiência aplicando o sistema Coding Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe). Estudo transversal, que codifica e classifica as causas dos óbitos ocorridos em uma coorte de 2.372 pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids acompanhadas entre 2007 e 2012 em dois serviços de atendimento especializado em HIV em

  13. Short- and Long-Term Cause of Death in Patients Treated With Primary PCI for STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frants; Butrymovich, Vitalij; Kelbæk, Henning

    2014-01-01

    ,804 consecutive patients with STEMI (age 63 ± 13 years, 72% males) treated with primary PCI. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for a median of 4.7 years. During a total of 13,447 patient-years, 717 patients died. Main causes of death within the first 30 days were cardiogenic shock and anoxic brain injury after......BACKGROUND: Short-term mortality has been studied thoroughly in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), whereas long-term cause of death in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study...... was to describe the association between time and cause of death in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. METHODS: A centralized civil registration system, patient files, and public disease and death cause registries with an accurate record linkage were used to trace time and cause of death in 2...

  14. Near-Death Experiences in patients with locked-in syndrome: Not always a blissful journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Lugo, Zulay; Jourdan, Jean-Pierre; Donneau, Anne-Françoise; Laureys, Steven

    2015-07-01

    Memories of Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) most often are recounted as emotionally positive events. At present, no satisfactory explanatory model exists to fully account for the rich phenomenology of NDEs following a severe acute brain injury. The particular population of patients with locked-in syndrome (LIS) provides a unique opportunity to study NDEs following infratentorial brain lesions. We here retrospectively characterized the content of NDEs in 8 patients with LIS caused by an acute brainstem lesion (i.e., "LIS NDEs") and 23 NDE experiencers after coma with supratentorial lesions (i.e., "classical NDEs"). Compared to "classical NDEs", "LIS NDEs" less frequently experienced a feeling of peacefulness or well-being. It could be hypothesized that NDEs containing less positive emotions might have a specific neuroanatomical substrate related to impaired pontine/paralimbic connectivity or alternatively might be related to the emotional distress caused by the presence of conscious awareness in a paralyzed body.

  15. Causes of accidental childhood deaths in China in 2010: A systematic review and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kit Yee Chan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Infectious causes of childhood deaths in the world have decreased substantially in the 21st century. This trend has exposed accidental deaths as an increasingly important future challenge. Presently, little is known about the cause structure of accidental childhood deaths in low– and middle–income country (LMIC settings In this paper, we aim to establish cause structure for accidental deaths in children aged 0–4 years in China in the year 2010. Methods In this paper, we explored the database of 208 multi–cause child mortality studies in Chinese that formed a basis for the first published estimate of the causes of child deaths in China (for the year 2008. Only five of those studies identified specific causes of accidental deaths. Because of this, we searched the Chinese medical literature databases CNKI and WanFang for single–cause mortality studies that were focused on accidental deaths. We identified 71 further studies that provided specific causes for accidental deaths. We used epidemiological modeling to estimate the number of accidental child deaths in China in 2010 and to assign those deaths to specific causes. Results In 2010, we estimated 314 581 deaths in children 0–4 years in China, of which 31 633 (10.1% were accidental. Accidental deaths contributed 7240 (4.0% of all deaths in neonatal period, 8838 (10.5% among all post–neonatal infant deaths, and 15 554 (31.7% among children with 1–4 years of age. Among four tested models, the most predictive was used to establish the likely cause structure of accidental deaths in China. We estimated that asphyxia caused 9490 (95% confidence interval (CI 8224–11 072, drowning 5694 (95% CI 5061–6327, traffic accidents 3796 (95% CI3163–4745, poisoning 3163 (95% CI 2531–3796 and falls 2531 (95% CI 2214–3163 deaths. Based on medians from a few rare studies, we also predict 633 (95% CI 316–1265 deaths to be due to burns and 316 (95% CI 0–633 due to falling objects

  16. Surveillance of deaths caused by arboviruses in Brazil: from dengue to chikungunya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; Freitas, André Ricardo Ribas; Brasil, Patrícia; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio

    2017-01-01

    Did death occur DUE TO dengue, or in a patient WITH dengue virus infection? It seems a matter of semantics, but in fact, it underscores how challenging it is to distinguish whether the disease contributed to death, or was itself the underlying cause of death. Can a death be attributed to chikungunya virus, when some deaths occur after the acute phase? Did the virus decompensate the underlying diseases, leading to death? Did prolonged hospitalisation lead to infection, resulting in the patient’s progression to death? Were there iatrogenic complications during patient care? The dengue question, for which there has not yet been a definitive response, resurfaces prominently under the chikungunya surveillance scenario. We are facing an epidemic of a disease that seems to be more lethal than previously thought. The major challenge ahead is to investigate deaths suspected of occurring due to arbovirus infections and to understand the role of each infection in the unfavourable outcome. PMID:28767985

  17. Trends in survival and cause of death in Danish patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2004-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry contains information about all Danish patients in whom multiple sclerosis has been diagnosed since 1948. The purpose of this study was to analyse trends in survival and causes of death of these patients and to compare them with those of the general population....... The study comprised all patients with onset in the period 1949-1996. All case records were validated and classified according to standardized diagnostic criteria. Data on emigration and death were obtained by record linkage to official registers. The end of follow-up was 1 January 2000 for emigration...... and death, and 1 January 1999 for cause-specific deaths. Standardized mortality ratios and excess death rates were calculated for various causes of death and periods after multiple sclerosis onset, and time trends in survival probability were analysed by Cox regression. The study comprised 9881 patients...

  18. Clostridium difficile Infection: An Emerging Cause of Death in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullatif, Viytta N; Noymer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile is major emerging cause of death in the U.S. Between 1999 and 2012, C. diff. deaths rose by a staggering almost ten-fold amount, to 7,739 from 793. This article has three goals. First, we present a demographic description of C. diff. mortality in the U.S. since 1999. Second, we test a hypothesis that the increase in C. diff. deaths is due to population aging. We find that the emergence of this cause of death follows a proportional hazard pattern above age 40. Thus, population aging is not the only factor responsible for the increase in C. diff. deaths. This, combined with a contributory cause of death analysis, points towards health care-based strategies to combat C. diff. Third, we demonstrate a simple weighted least squares technique for estimating Gompertz models that gives parameter estimates that are closer to full maximum likelihood than conventional approaches.

  19. Increasing RpoS expression causes cell death in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxu Chen

    Full Text Available RpoS, one of the two alternative σ factors in Borrelia burgdorferi, is tightly controlled by multiple regulators and, in turn, determines expression of many critical virulence factors. Here we show that increasing RpoS expression causes cell death. The immediate effect of increasing RpoS expression was to promote bacterial division and as a consequence result in a rapid increase in cell number before causing bacterial death. No DNA fragmentation or degradation was observed during this induced cell death. Cryo-electron microscopy showed induced cells first formed blebs, which were eventually released from dying cells. Apparently blebbing initiated cell disintegration leading to cell death. These findings led us to hypothesize that increasing RpoS expression triggers intracellular programs and/or pathways that cause spirochete death. The potential biological significance of induced cell death may help B. burgdorferi regulate its population to maintain its life cycle in nature.

  20. Mitochondrial abnormalities drive cell death in Wolfram syndrome 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomotake Kanki; Daniel J Klionsky

    2009-01-01

    @@ Wolfram syndrome (WFS; MIM 222300) is an autosomal recessive disorder with highly variable clinical manifestations. It is characterized by di-abetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (thus, known as DIDMOAD syndrome) [1].

  1. Distinct clones of Yersinia pestis caused the black death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haensch, Stephanie; Bianucci, Raffaella; Signoli, Michel; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Schultz, Michael; Kacki, Sacha; Vermunt, Marco; Weston, Darlene A; Hurst, Derek; Achtman, Mark; Carniel, Elisabeth; Bramanti, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    .... The etiology of this disease has remained highly controversial, ranging from claims based on genetics and the historical descriptions of symptoms that it was caused by Yersinia pestis to conclusions...

  2. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Søndergaard, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause...... calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac...

  3. Gastrointestinal diseases of Napoleon in Saint Helena: causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Costanzo, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    The fact that Napoleon Ist died from gastric cancer seems to be well established. Arguments for the hypothesis of chronic arsenic poisoning have recently been developed in the literature. This study, focused on the gastrointestinal diseases of Napoleon in Saint Helena, is based on a confrontation between the clinical semiological anamnesis and the anatomical data in the autopsy report by F. Antommarchi. Napoleon presented several gastrointestinal diseases: gall-bladder lithiasis complicated with angiocholitis, chronic colitis and certainly a gastric cancer. Death was consecutive to perforation of the gastric lesion leading to haemorrhagic vomitis and multiorgan failure. The description of the gastric lesions during autopsy is consistent with the diagnosis of cancer. The course of the clinical events is closely correlated with the anatomic lesions. There is strong evidence that Napoleon died from an acute complication of his gastric disease.

  4. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Søndergaard, Mads

    2012-01-01

    a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe...... dominantly inherited form of CPVT-like arrhythmias, we mapped the disease locus to chromosome 14q31-32. Sequencing CALM1 encoding calmodulin revealed a heterozygous missense mutation (c.161A>T [p.Asn53Ile]) segregating with the disease. A second, de novo, missense mutation (c.293A>G [p.Asn97Ser......]) was subsequently identified in an individual of Iraqi origin; this individual was diagnosed with CPVT from a screening of 61 arrhythmia samples with no identified RYR2 mutations. Both CALM1 substitutions demonstrated compromised calcium binding, and p.Asn97Ser displayed an aberrant interaction with the RYR2...

  5. The importance of microbiological testing for establishing cause of death in 42 forensic autopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    , microorganisms found, histological findings, antemortem information, C-reactive protein measurement and cause of death. Fiftyone different microorganisms were found distributed among 37 cases, bacteria being the most abundant. Nineteen of the cases were classified as having a microbiological related cause...... of death. C-reactive protein levels were raised in 14 cases of the 19 cases, histological findings either supported or were a decisive factor for the classification of microbiologically related cause of death in 14 cases. As a multitude of abundant microorganisms are able to cause infection under the right...

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS - The role of trigemino-cardiac reflex: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyaninder Pal Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is an unexplained death in infants that usually occurs during sleep. The cause of SIDS remains unknown and multifactorial. In this regard, the diving reflex (DR, a peripheral subtype of trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR is also hypothesized as one of the possible mechanisms for this condition. The TCR is a well-established neurogenic reflex which manifests as bradycardia, hypotension, apnea, and gastric hyper motility. The TCR shares many similarities with the DR which is a significant physiological adaptation to withstand hypoxia during apnea in many animal species including humans in clinical manifestation and mechanism of action. The DR is characterized by breath-holding (apnea, bradycardia and vasoconstriction leading to rising in blood pressure. Several studies have described congenital anomalies of autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of SIDS such as hypoplasia, delayed neuronal maturation or decreased neuronal density of arcuate nucleus, hypoplasia and neuronal immaturity of the hypoglossal nucleus. The abnormalities of autonomic nervous system in SIDS may explain the role of TCR in this syndrome involving sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. We reviewed the available literature to identify the role of TCR in the etiopathogenesis of SIDS and the pathways and cellular mechanism involved in it. This synthesis will help to update our knowledge and improve our understanding about this mysterious, yet common condition and will open the door for further research in this field.

  7. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome – Role of Trigeminocardiac Reflex: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gyaninder Pal; Chowdhury, Tumul; Bindu, Barkha; Schaller, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is an unexplained death in infants, which usually occurs during sleep. The cause of SIDS remains unknown and multifactorial. In this regard, the diving reflex (DR), a peripheral subtype of trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR), is also hypothesized as one of the possible mechanisms for this condition. The TCR is a well-established neurogenic reflex that manifests as bradycardia, hypotension, apnea, and gastric hypermotility. The TCR shares many similarities with the DR, which is a significant physiological adaptation to withstand hypoxia during apnea in many animal species including humans in clinical manifestation and mechanism of action. The DR is characterized by breath holding (apnea), bradycardia, and vasoconstriction, leading to increase in blood pressure. Several studies have described congenital anomalies of autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of SIDS such as hypoplasia, delayed neuronal maturation, or decreased neuronal density of arcuate nucleus, hypoplasia, and neuronal immaturity of the hypoglossal nucleus. The abnormalities of autonomic nervous system in SIDS may explain the role of TCR in this syndrome involving sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. We reviewed the available literature to identify the role of TCR in the etiopathogenesis of SIDS and the pathways and cellular mechanism involved in it. This synthesis will help to update our knowledge and improve our understanding about this mysterious, yet common condition and will open the door for further research in this field. PMID:27994573

  8. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Katherine G; Jose, Powell O; Kapphahn, Kristopher I; Frank, Ariel T H; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Thompson, Caroline A; Eggleston, Karen; Cullen, Mark R; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups. We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%). Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs. Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these growing diverse populations.

  9. Causes of death among Danish HIV patients compared with population controls in the period 1995-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, M; Kronborg, G; Larsen, carsten schade;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the mortality and causes of death in human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) patients with the background population. METHODS: All adult HIV patients treated in Danish HIV centers from 1995 to 2008 and 14 controls for each HIV patient were included. Age-adjusted mortality rates...... (MR) and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were estimated using direct standardization and Poisson regression analyses. Up to four contributory causes of death for each person were included in analyses of cause-specific MR. RESULTS: A total of 5,137 HIV patients and 71,918 controls were followed for 37...... did not change substantially from 6.9 (95 % CI 3.8-12.5) to 5.6 (95 % CI 3.6-8.8). The MR of unnatural causes declined from 6.9 (95 % CI 3.8-12.5) to 2.7 (95 % CI 1.4-5.1). The MRR of infections declined from 46.6 (95 % CI 19.6-110.9) to 3.3 (95 % CI 1.6-6.6). The MRR of other natural causes of death...

  10. The role of the sodium current complex in a nonreferred nationwide cohort of sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Bo Gregers; Yuan, Lei; Olesen, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the most common cause of death in infants between the age of 1 month and 1 year. Rare variants in Nav1.5 encoded by SCN5A are known to play a role in SIDS; however, the combined role of the sodium current complex is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose...... of this study was to investigate the role of the sodium current complex in a nonreferred nationwide cohort of SIDS cases. METHODS: DNA was extracted from dried blood spot samples from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. In total, 66 non-referred SIDS cases born in Denmark in the period of 2000-2006 were...

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome in Canada: trends in rates and risk factors, 1985-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusen, I D; Liu, Shiliang; Sauve, Reg; Joseph, K S; Kramer, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    In Canada, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the leading cause of postneonatal death. However, SIDS rates have been declining in many countries, including Canada. This decline has been largely attributed to recommendations to avoid placing infants to sleep in the prone position. We examined the postneonatal rate of mortality due to SIDS and to other causes in relation to the initial risk reduction campaign. The postneonatal mortality rate due to SIDS decreased from 0.97 to 0.54 per 1,000 neonatal survivors between 1985-1989 and 1994-1998 (relative risk [RR] = 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.62). The rate of postneonatal mortality due to other causes also decreased during the same period, though to a smaller extent, from 1.19 to 0.86 (RR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.66-0.78). With the exception of seasonality, established risk factors for SIDS remained essentially unchanged between the two time periods. The observed reduction in postneonatal SIDS is consistent with a positive impact of the initial recommendations regarding risk reduction. However, the lack of reliable risk factor data limits the extent to which the decline can be attributed directly to the campaign.

  12. Shoulder impingement syndrome : evaluation of the causes with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Song, In Sup; Chung, Hun Young; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Young Hee; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    Various mechanical causes which induce shoulder impingement syndrome have been identified with the help of MRI. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of such causes. A total of 54 patients with clinically confirmed shoulder impingement syndrome and a normal control group(n=20) without symptoms were included. We evaluated the incidence of hook shaped acromion, low lying acromion, downward slope of the acromion, subacromial spur, acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale. Among the 54 patients, the following conditions were present: acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy(n=36), coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy(n=20), subacromial spur(n=18), downward sloping of the acromion(n=16), hook shaped acromion(n=11), relatively high cuff muscle bulk(n=6), low lying acromion relative to the clavicle(n=3), and os acromiale(n=1). In the normal control group there were nine cases of acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, nine of coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, nine of downward sloping acromion, and three of low lying acromion, but hook shaped acromion, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale were not found. Among 54 patients, the syndrome was due to five simultancous causes in one patient, four causes in two, three causes in 12, two causes in 22, and one cause in 17. Hook shaped acromion and subacromial spur are the statistically significant causes of shoulder impingement syndrome. In 69% of patients, the condition was due to more than one cause.

  13. Causes of death of patients with laryngeal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferlito, A.; Haigentz M, J.r.; Bradley, P.J.; Suarez, C.; Strojan, P.; Wolf, G.T.; Olsen, K.D.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Mondin, V.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Boedeker, C.C.; Hamoir, M.; Hartl, D.M.; Hunt, J.L.; Devaney, K.O.; Thompson, L.D.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the care of patients with laryngeal cancer over the past several decades, including a growing awareness of therapeutic complications and attention to quality of life, little is known about the causes of mortality in this population. In addition to the laryngeal

  14. [Cardiac fibroma: A rare cause of sudden child death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Sarah; Gibier, Jean-Baptiste; Recher, Morgan; Leteurtre, Stéphane; Leroy, Xavier; Devisme, Louise

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 3-year-old child who died from the consequences of a cardio-respiratory arrest despite reanimation procedures. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass of the free wall of the left ventricle. Autopsy confirmed the existence of a solitary myocardial tumor, well-circumscribed, firm, with a whitish and trabeculated cut surface. Histologically, the tumor consisted of bundles of spindle-shaped and regular cells mingling with collagen and elastic fibers, insinuating themselves between myocytes in periphery. Calcifications were present. After immunohistochemistry, the cells were highlighted by anti-actin smooth muscle antibody; but they were not highlighted by anti-desmin, anti-β catenin and anti-Ki67 antibodies. The diagnosis of cardiac fibroma was made. The primary cardiac tumors of child are rare and usually benign. They are essentially represented by rhabdomyoma and fibroma. Cardiac fibroma mostly occurs during the first year of life. It can be revealed by cardiac insufficiency, arrhythmia, chest pain or sudden death.

  15. Cause of death among Ghanaian adolescents in Accra using autopsy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tettey Yao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited data on adolescent mortality particularly from developing countries with unreliable death registration systems. This calls for the use of other sources of data to ascertain cause of adolescent mortality. The objective of this study was to describe the causes of death among Ghanaian adolescents 10 to 19 years in Accra, Ghana utilizing data from autopsies conducted in Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH. Findings Out of the 14,034 autopsies carried out from 2001 to 2003 in KBTH, 7% were among adolescents. Of the 882 deaths among adolescents analyzed, 402 (45.6% were females. There were 365 (41.4% deaths from communicable disease, pregnancy related conditions and nutritional disorders. Non-communicable diseases accounted for 362 (41% cases and the rest were attributable to injuries and external causes of morbidity and mortality. Intestinal infectious diseases and lower respiratory tract infections were the most common communicable causes of death collectively accounting for 20.5% of total deaths. Death from blood diseases was the largest (8.5% among the non-communicable conditions followed by neoplasms (7%. Males were more susceptible to injuries than females (χ2 = 13.45, p = .000. At least five out of ten specific causes of death were as a result of infections with pneumonia and typhoid being the most common. Sickle cell disease was among the top three specific causes of death. Among the females, 27 deaths (6.7% were pregnancy related with most of them being as a result of abortion. Conclusions The autopsy data from the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital can serve as a useful source of information on adolescent mortality. Both communicable and non-communicable diseases accounted for most deaths highlighting the need for health care providers to avoid complacency in their management of adolescents presenting with these diseases.

  16. Symptoms and Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sugars or bile acids may cause symptoms. Mental Health Problems Psychological, or mental health, problems such ... Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información de la salud en español Health Statistics Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast ...

  17. Sudden death in a child with Carpenter Syndrome. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jeanette M; Davis, Gregory J; Hunsaker, John C; Balko, M Gregory

    2009-12-01

    Carpenter syndrome (Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type II) is a rare disorder characterized by acrocephaly, mental retardation, congenital heart disease, syndactyly, preaxial polydactyly, obesity, cryptorchidism, hypogenitalism, bony abnormalities, and umbilical hernia. We present a case of unexpected death of a 7-year-old boy with Carpenter Syndrome complicated by twin and premature birth as well as repaired congenital heart disease.

  18. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Kim, Suk Young; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews.

  19. A method for reclassifying cause of death in cases categorized as "event of undetermined intent".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Evgeny; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; Pridemore, William Alex; Nikitina, Svetlana Yu

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for reclassifying external causes of death categorized as "event of undetermined intent" (EUIs) into non-transport accidents, suicides, or homicides. In nations like Russia and the UK the absolute number of EUIs is large, the EUI death rate is high, or EUIs comprise a non-trivial proportion of all deaths due to external causes. Overuse of this category may result in (1) substantially underestimating the mortality rate of deaths due to specific external causes and (2) threats to the validity of studies of the patterns and causes of external deaths and of evaluations of the impact of interventions meant to reduce them. We employ available characteristics about the deceased and the event to estimate the most likely cause of death using multinomial logistic regression. We use the set of known non-transport accidents, suicides, and homicides to calculate an mlogit-based linear score and an estimated classification probability (ECP). This ECP is applied to EUIs, with varying levels of minimal classification probability. We also present an optional second step that employs a population-level adjustment to reclassify deaths that remain undetermined (the proportion of which varies based on the minimal classification probability). We illustrate our method by applying it to Russia. Between 2000 and 2011, 521,000 Russian deaths (15 % percent of all deaths from external causes) were categorized as EUIs. We used data from anonymized micro-data on the ~3 million deaths from external causes. Our reclassification model used 10 decedent and event characteristics from the computerized death records. Results show that during this period about 14 % of non-transport accidents, 13 % of suicides, and 33 % of homicides were officially categorized as EUIs. Our findings also suggest that 2011 levels of non-transport accidents and suicides would have been about 24 % higher and of homicide about 82 % higher than that reported by official vital statistics data. Overuse

  20. A nonsense mutation in FMR1 causing fragile X syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Dedic, Alma

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is a common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by lack of the FMR1 gene product FMRP. The most frequent cause is the expansion of a CGG repeat located in the 5'UTR of FMR1. Alleles with 200 or more repeats become hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent...... mutation p.Ser27X, in a patient with classical clinical symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The mother who carried the mutation in heterozygous form presented with mild intellectual impairment. We conclude that further studies including western blot and DNA sequence analysis of the FMR1 gene should....... Only few patients with intragenic point mutations in FMR1 have been reported and, currently, routine analysis of patients referred for fragile X syndrome includes solely analysis for repeat expansion and methylation status. We identified a substitution in exon 2 of FMR1, c.80C>A, causing a nonsense...

  1. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome and possibly causing cortical cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Heid Rocha Hemerly; Marcelo Berno Mattos; Fábio Petersen Saraiva; Fellipe Berno Mattos

    2014-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. However, the etiology of cataracts often remains unknown. This report describes the development of cortical cataract in a patient after Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  2. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome and possibly causing cortical cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Heid Rocha Hemerly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. However, the etiology of cataracts often remains unknown. This report describes the development of cortical cataract in a patient after Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  3. Gluttony Causes Death in Juvenile Puff Adder Bitis arietans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Haagner

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the predator/prey relationship in reptiles. The puff adder Bitis arietans is known to feed on a variety of food items, their diet consisting mainly of rodents, while birds, lizards and toads may be included (Broadley 1983, FitzSimons' Snakes of Southern Africa, Johannesburg: Delta Books. Pitman (1974, The Snakes of Uganda, Glasgow: Wheldon and Wesley recorded larger prey for puff adders in East Africa, while Robertson, Chapman & Chapman (1965, Puku 3: 149-170 reported on the diet of puff adders in Tanzania and Zambia, respectively. A gravid puff adder was collected in the Manyeleti Game Reserve in the Mhala district (24@38'S, 31@28'E of Gazankulu. On 12 February 1986 she gave birth to 28 young. The average length of the fry was 219,12 mm (S.D. 9,72 mm and their average mass 15, 72 g (S.D. 0,67 g. The young were separated from the mother and placed in another cage. The first ecdysis was com- pleted within 24 hours. After 10 days some newly weaned mice were placed in the cage. On subsequent inspection, it was found that a young snake gorged itself to death. The young puff adder contained three young mice with a total mass of 13,8 g, while the post-mortem mass of the snake was 14,2 g. Having swallowed 97,2 of its own body weight, the snake evidently died of suffocation. The specimen was preserved and is now part of the Transvaal Museum collection in Pretoria (TM 64088.

  4. Dummy (pacifier) use and sudden infant death syndrome: Potential advantages and disadvantages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, R.S.C.; Moon, R.Y; L'Hoir, M.P.; Blair, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    The large decline in deaths due to the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the last 20 years in many countries is largely due to risk-reduction advice resulting from observational studies that examined the relationship between infant care practices and SIDS. Most of this advice remains largely un

  5. Cigarette Smoking as a Risk Factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Bengt; Cnattingius, Sven

    1990-01-01

    Examines risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome based on Swedish births between 1983 and 1985. Results indicate that maternal smoking doubles the risk of infant death, and infants of smokers also died sooner. The more the mother smoked the more likely her infant was to die. (JS)

  6. Sudden infant death syndrome in child care settings in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, G.A. de; Lanting, C.I.; Brand, R.; Ruys, J.H.; Semmekrot, B.A.; Wouwe, J.P. van

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, there is a very low incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) due to effective preventive campaigns. Methods: During the period September 1996 to August 2002, nationwide 161 deaths from SIDS (about 85% of all cases of SIDS during that time) were investigated by

  7. Coping with Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Intervention Strategies and a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadalen, Sharon

    1980-01-01

    Family-centered intervention after the death of a baby due to sudden infant death syndrome facilitates reorganization, growth, and development of the family system. A potentially defeating crisis becomes an opportunity to develop coping skills and strengthen family members. Public health nursing is an essential component of the program.…

  8. Mutations in KCTD1 cause scalp-ear-nipple syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Alexander G; Beck, Anita E; Turner, Emily H; McMillin, Margaret J; Edwards, Matthew J; Field, Michael; de Macena Sobreira, Nara Lygia; Perez, Ana Beatriz A; Fortes, Jose A R; Lampe, Anne K; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Gordon, Christopher T; Plessis, Ghislaine; Le Merrer, Martine; Amiel, Jeanne; Reichenberger, Ernst; Shively, Kathryn M; Cerrato, Felecia; Labow, Brian I; Tabor, Holly K; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2013-04-04

    Scalp-ear-nipple (SEN) syndrome is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by cutis aplasia of the scalp; minor anomalies of the external ears, digits, and nails; and malformations of the breast. We used linkage analysis and exome sequencing of a multiplex family affected by SEN syndrome to identify potassium-channel tetramerization-domain-containing 1 (KCTD1) mutations that cause SEN syndrome. Evaluation of a total of ten families affected by SEN syndrome revealed KCTD1 missense mutations in each family tested. All of the mutations occurred in a KCTD1 region encoding a highly conserved bric-a-brac, tram track, and broad complex (BTB) domain that is required for transcriptional repressor activity. KCTD1 inhibits the transactivation of the transcription factor AP-2α (TFAP2A) via its BTB domain, and mutations in TFAP2A cause cutis aplasia in individuals with branchiooculofacial syndrome (BOFS), suggesting a potential overlap in the pathogenesis of SEN syndrome and BOFS. The identification of KCTD1 mutations in SEN syndrome reveals a role for this BTB-domain-containing transcriptional repressor during ectodermal development.

  9. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  10. Survival and cause of death after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, H; Jørgensen, Torben; Davidsen, M;

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish WHO MONICA study, a register of patients with myocardial infarction was established in 1982, covering 11 municipalities in the western part of Copenhagen County, Denmark. During the period 1982-91, all cases of myocardial infarction among citizens aged 25-74 years were...... registered and validated according to the criteria set up for the WHO MONICA project. Short-term (28 days) and long-term (up to 15 years) survival in three periods were compared. The rate of mortality after a non-fatal myocardial infarction was compared with that of the general population, and causes...

  11. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Kailash; Cheung, Felix; Lee, Wai; Thalappillil, Richard; Florence, F Barry; Kim, Jason

    2016-11-01

    Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue.

  12. Methylene Blue Causing Serotonin Syndrome Following Cystocele Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash Kapadia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Methylene blue is an intravenously administered agent that may potentiate serotonin syndrome. The usage of methylene blue to evaluate ureters for injuries and patency during urological surgeries is recognized as common practice. However, there is no mention of serotonin syndrome caused by methylene blue in urological literature or for urological surgery. We report the first urological case in order to raise awareness of the risk for serotonin toxicity with utilizing methylene blue.

  13. A Rare Cause of Macroscobic Hematuria: Nutcracker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Selçuk Duru

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutcracker syndrome caused by compression of the left renal vein between the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery is a rare anatomo-pathological condition. The patients have symptoms such as hematuria, proteinuria, and left flank pain. In this paper, we report a 13-year-old boy who presented with macroscopic haematuria. Routine laboratory tests for the evaluation of hematuria were normal. Abdominal computed tomography revealed that the left renal vein was compressed between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. A diagnosis of nutcracker syndrome was established. If Nutcracker syndrome is considered in the differential diagnosis of haematuria, it is easily diagnosed by imaging techniques.

  14. An unusual cause of intraoperative acute superior vena cava syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W Amundson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intraoperative superior vena cava (SVC syndrome is an exceedingly rare complication in the cardiac surgical population. We describe the case of a 71-year-old female undergoing multi-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting who developed acute intraoperative SVC syndrome following internal thoracic artery harvest retractor placement. Her symptoms included severe plethora, facial engorgement and scleral edema, which was associated with hypotension and severe elevation of central venous pressure. Transesophageal echocardiography was crucial in the diagnosis, management, and optimal retractor placement ensuring adequate SVC flow. Potential causes of intraoperative SVC syndrome are reviewed as well as management options.

  15. Infraclavicular subpectoral lipoma causing thoracic outlet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Elia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Although benign soft tissue tumors infraclavicular subpectoral lipomas may exert pressure on neurovascular surrounding structures during their progressive expansion and cause TOS. Therefore, a thorough preoperative study by radiological imaging such as MRI or neurophysiological test should always be performed in order to prevent unintentional lesions of the involved axillo-subclavicular plexus and plan correct surgical procedure.

  16. Verifying causes of death in Thailand: rationale and methods for empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polprasert Warangkana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cause-specific mortality statistics by age and sex are primary evidence for epidemiological research and health policy. Annual mortality statistics from vital registration systems in Thailand are of limited utility because about 40% of deaths are registered with unknown or nonspecific causes. This paper reports the rationale, methods, and broad results from a comprehensive study to verify registered causes in Thailand. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths was selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling approach, distributed across 28 districts located in nine provinces of Thailand. Registered causes were verified through medical record review for deaths in hospitals and standard verbal autopsy procedures for deaths outside hospitals, the results of which were used to measure validity and reliability of registration data. Study findings were used to develop descriptive estimates of cause-specific mortality by age and sex in Thailand. Results Causes of death were verified for a total of 9,644 deaths in the study sample, comprised of 3,316 deaths in hospitals and 6,328 deaths outside hospitals. Field studies yielded specific diagnoses in almost all deaths in the sample originally assigned an ill-defined cause of death at registration. Study findings suggest that the leading causes of death in Thailand among males are stroke (9.4%; transport accidents (8.1%; HIV/AIDS (7.9%; ischemic heart diseases (6.4%; and chronic obstructive lung diseases (5.7%. Among females, the leading causes are stroke (11.3%; diabetes (8%; ischemic heart disease (7.5%; HIV/AIDS (5.7%; and renal diseases (4%. Conclusions Empirical investigation of registered causes of death in the study sample yielded adequate information to enable estimation of cause-specific mortality patterns in Thailand. These findings will inform burden of disease estimation and economic evaluation of health policy choices in the country. The

  17. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2015-01-01

    the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa...... disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus......BACKGROUND: Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries...

  18. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa...... disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus......Background Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries...

  19. Calculating expected years of life lost for assessing local ethnic disparities in causes of premature death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, Tomás J; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y; Katcher, Brian S; Reiter, Randy; Katz, Mitchell H

    2008-04-10

    A core function of local health departments is to conduct health assessments. The analysis of death certificates provides information on diseases, conditions, and injuries that are likely to cause death - an important outcome indicator of population health. The expected years of life lost (YLL) measure is a valid, stand-alone measure for identifying and ranking the underlying causes of premature death. The purpose of this study was to rank the leading causes of premature death among San Francisco residents, and to share detailed methods so that these analyses can be used in other local health jurisdictions. Using death registry data and population estimates for San Francisco deaths in 2003-2004, we calculated the number of deaths, YLL, and age-standardized YLL rates (ASYRs). The results were stratified by sex, ethnicity, and underlying cause of death. The YLL values were used to rank the leading causes of premature death for men and women, and by ethnicity. In the years 2003-2004, 6312 men died (73,627 years of life lost), and 5726 women died (51,194 years of life lost). The ASYR for men was 65% higher compared to the ASYR for women (8971.1 vs. 5438.6 per 100,000 persons per year). The leading causes of premature deaths are those with the largest average YLLs and are largely preventable. Among men, these were HIV/AIDS, suicide, drug overdose, homicide, and alcohol use disorder; and among women, these were lung cancer, breast cancer, hypertensive heart disease, colon cancer, and diabetes mellitus. A large health disparity exists between African Americans and other ethnic groups: African American age-adjusted overall and cause-specific YLL rates were higher, especially for homicide among men. Except for homicide among Latino men, Latinos and Asians have comparable or lower YLL rates among the leading causes of death compared to whites. Local death registry data can be used to measure, rank, and monitor the leading causes of premature death, and to measure and monitor

  20. Calculating expected years of life lost for assessing local ethnic disparities in causes of premature death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katcher Brian S

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A core function of local health departments is to conduct health assessments. The analysis of death certificates provides information on diseases, conditions, and injuries that are likely to cause death – an important outcome indicator of population health. The expected years of life lost (YLL measure is a valid, stand-alone measure for identifying and ranking the underlying causes of premature death. The purpose of this study was to rank the leading causes of premature death among San Francisco residents, and to share detailed methods so that these analyses can be used in other local health jurisdictions. Methods Using death registry data and population estimates for San Francisco deaths in 2003–2004, we calculated the number of deaths, YLL, and age-standardized YLL rates (ASYRs. The results were stratified by sex, ethnicity, and underlying cause of death. The YLL values were used to rank the leading causes of premature death for men and women, and by ethnicity. Results In the years 2003–2004, 6312 men died (73,627 years of life lost, and 5726 women died (51,194 years of life lost. The ASYR for men was 65% higher compared to the ASYR for women (8971.1 vs. 5438.6 per 100,000 persons per year. The leading causes of premature deaths are those with the largest average YLLs and are largely preventable. Among men, these were HIV/AIDS, suicide, drug overdose, homicide, and alcohol use disorder; and among women, these were lung cancer, breast cancer, hypertensive heart disease, colon cancer, and diabetes mellitus. A large health disparity exists between African Americans and other ethnic groups: African American age-adjusted overall and cause-specific YLL rates were higher, especially for homicide among men. Except for homicide among Latino men, Latinos and Asians have comparable or lower YLL rates among the leading causes of death compared to whites. Conclusion Local death registry data can be used to measure, rank, and

  1. Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting Glucose, and Risk of Cause-Specific Death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Kaptoge, Stephen; Thompson, Alexander; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Sarwar, Nadeem; Whincup, Peter H.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Gillum, Richard F.; Holme, Ingar; Njolstad, Inger; Fletcher, Astrid; Nilsson, Peter; Lewington, Sarah; Collins, Rory; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Thompson, Simon G.; Sattar, Naveed; Selvin, Elizabeth; Hu, Frank B.; Danesh, John

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain. METHODS We calculated hazard ratios for cause-specific death, according to baseline diabetes status or fasting glucose level, from individual-partic

  2. Diabetes mellitus, fasting glucose, and risk of cause-specific death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain. Methods We calculated hazard ratios for cause-specific death, according to baseline diabetes status or fasting glucose level, from individual-partic

  3. The risk and causes of death in childhoodonset epilepsy: A 4-study collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Anne T.; Nickels, K.; Wirrell, E.C.; Rios, C.; Geerts, A.T.; Callenbach, P.M.; Arts, W.F.; Camfield, P.R.; Camfield, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Young people with epilepsy experience high death rates compared to the general population. Understanding the magnitude of risk and the causes of death (CoD) is essential for counseling and for potential prevention. Methods: We combined the mortality experiences of four cohort studies of

  4. Prevalence of Parental Thrombophilic Defects After Fetal Death and Relation to Cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteweg, F.J.; Erwich, J.J.H.M.; Folkeringa, N.; Timmer, A.; Veeger, N.J.G.M.; Ravise, J.M.; Holm, J.P.; van der Meer, J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate whether parental thrombophilic defects after fetal death, either acquired or inherited, were more prevalent than in the normal population and to estimate associations between these thrombophilic defects and different fetal death causes. METHODS: In a multicenter, prospective c

  5. The risk and causes of death in childhoodonset epilepsy: A 4-study collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Anne T.; Nickels, K.; Wirrell, E.C.; Rios, C.; Geerts, A.T.; Callenbach, P.M.; Arts, W.F.; Camfield, P.R.; Camfield, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Young people with epilepsy experience high death rates compared to the general population. Understanding the magnitude of risk and the causes of death (CoD) is essential for counseling and for potential prevention. Methods: We combined the mortality experiences of four cohort studies of n

  6. Serum 25(OHD is a 2-year predictor of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death in chest pain patients from Northern Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja A Naesgaard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D status is assessed by determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] in serum. METHODS: We assessed the prognostic utility of 25(OHD in 982 chest-pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS from Salta, Northern Argentina. 2-year follow-up data including all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death were analyzed in quartiles of 25(OHD, applying univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: There were statistically significant changes in seasonal 25(OHD levels. At follow-up, 119 patients had died. The mean 25(OHD levels were significantly lower among patients dying than in long-term survivors, both in the total population and in patients with a troponin T (TnT release (n = 388. When comparing 25(OHD in the highest quartile to the lowest quartile in a multivariable Cox regression model for all-cause mortality, the hazard ratio (HR for cardiac death and sudden cardiac death in the total population was 0.37 (95% CI, 0.19-0.73, p = 0.004, 0.23 (95% CI, 0.08-0.67, p = 0.007, and 0.32 (95% CI, 0.11-0.94, p = 0.038, respectively. In patients with TnT release, the respective HR was 0.24 (95% CI, 0.10-0.54, p = 0.001, 0.18 (95% CI, 0.05-0.60, p = 0.006 and 0.25 (95% CI, 0.07-0.89, p = 0.033. 25(OHD had no prognostic value in patients with no TnT release. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D was shown to be a useful biomarker for prediction of mortality when obtained at admission in chest pain patients with suspected ACS. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01377402.

  7. Rates of intentionally caused and road crash deaths of US citizens abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Melissa K; Mossallam, Mahmoud; Mulligan, Matthew; Hyder, Adnan A; Bishai, David

    2015-04-01

    Currently, little is known about rates of death by cause and country among US travellers. Understanding the risk by cause and country is imperative to risk communication and the development of risk reduction strategies. Publicly available data on non-natural deaths of US citizens abroad were gathered from January 2003 to December 2009 from the US Department of State's Department Bureau of Consular Affairs. Traveller information was gathered from the US Department of Commerce Office of Travel and Tourism for the same time period. Rates of death were calculated by dividing the number of non-natural deaths of US citizens abroad by the number of US outbound visits for each country. A total of 5417 non-natural death events were retrieved between 2003 and 2009 from the US State Department. Intentionally caused death rates ranged from 21.44 per 1 000 000 visits in the Philippines to 0 per 1 000 000 visits in several countries; the majority of countries had fewer than five intentionally caused deaths per 1 000 000 visits. Rates of road traffic crashes were higher than rates of intentionally caused deaths in almost every instance. Thailand had the highest rate of deaths due to road traffic crashes (16.49 per 1 000 000), followed by Vietnam, Morocco and South Africa (15.12 per 1 000 000, 11.96 per 1 000 000 and 10.90 per 1 000 000, respectively). Motorcycle deaths account for most of the heightened risk observed in Thailand and Vietnam. The leading cause of non-natural deaths in US travellers abroad was road crashes, which exceeds intentional injury as the leading cause of non-natural deaths in almost every country where US citizens travel. Southeast Asia had the highest unintentional injury death rates for US citizens abroad due to the high rates of deaths from motorcycle crashes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Causes of death in a contemporary cohort of patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal

    Full Text Available Information regarding the processes leading to death in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA is lacking. We sought to determine the causes of death in these patients, the role that IA played in the cause, and the timing of death. The factors associated with IA-related mortality are also analyzed. We conducted a multicenter study (2008-2011 of cases of proven and probable IA. The causes of death and whether mortality was judged to be IA-related or IA-unrelated were determined by consensus using a six-member review panel. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors for IA-related death. Of 152 patients with IA, 92 (60.5% died. Mortality was judged to be IA-related in 62 cases and IA-unrelated in 30. The most common cause of IA-related death was respiratory failure (50/62 patients, caused primarily by Aspergillus infection, although also by concomitant infections or severe comorbidities. Progression of underlying disease and bacteremic shock were the most frequent causes of IA-unrelated death. IA-related mortality accounted for 98% and 87% of deaths within the first 14 and 21 days, respectively. Liver disease (HR 4.54; 95% CI, 1.69-12.23 was independently associated with IA-related mortality, whereas voriconazole treatment was associated with reduced risk of death (HR 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20-0.93. In conclusion, better management of lung injury after IA diagnosis is the main challenge for physicians to improve IA outcomes. There are significant differences in causes and timing between IA-related and IA-unrelated mortality and these should be considered in future research to assess the quality of IA care.

  9. [Brucellosis as a cause of hemophagocytic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Saliha; Günal, Özgür; Taşkın, Mehmet Hakan; Atilla, Aynur; Kılıç, Süleyman Sırrı

    2015-04-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare syndrome of excessive inflammation and tissue destruction due to abnormal immune activation and inflammation. HLH can occur primarily due to genetic etiology, or secondarily associated with malignancies, autoimmmune diseases or infections. There are a number of reports that revealed the relationship of hemophagocytosis with brucellosis. In this report, we described a brucellosis-related HLH case. A 73-year-old male who work as farmer was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever continuing for 10 days, loss of appetite and back pain. Physical examination revealed right upper quadrant tenderness and hepatomegaly. Since the patient exhibited five of the diagnostic criteria for HLH (fever, hepatosplenomegaly, bicytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia and high ferritin level), he was diagnosed as secondary HLH. PCR, microscopic agglutination and indirect fluorescent antibody tests gave negative results for the diagnosis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, leptospirosis and Q fever, respectively. On the other hand, Rose Bengal test for brucellosis was positive, while standard tube agglutination test (STA) was negative. The patient's serum yielded a very high positive (1/1280) result when Coombs' test was performed in terms of the possibility of blocking antibodies or prozone phenomenon. Additionally, B.melitensis was isolated from his blood culture on the sixth day. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampicin, and on the 10th day of antibiotic therapy the patient was discharged and recommended to complete his treatment up to 6 weeks. In conclusion, in patients with secondary HLH symptoms especially in the endemic areas, brucellosis should be considered as a predisposing infection.

  10. Dementia in the National Cause of Death Registry in Norway 1969-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidar Hjellvik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of dementia is expected to increase markedly during the coming decades. Epidemiological studies involving the National Cause of Death Registry (NCDR may be useful for exploring the aetiology of dementia. We therefore wanted to study developments in the reporting of dementia in the NCDR over the last four decades.Methods: We calculated the age- and gender specific proportion of deaths with dementia reported in the NCDR (dementia deaths in the period 1969-2010, and the proportion of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease deaths in 1986-2010. Separate analyses were done for deaths occurring in nursing homes in 1996-2010. The proportion of dementia deaths where dementia was coded as underlying cause of death was also calculated.Results: The proportion of dementia deaths increased more than threefold in the period 1969-2010 among women (from 4% to 15%, and more than doubled among men (from 3% to 7%. In nursing homes the proportion increased from 17% to 26% for women and from 13% to 18% for men. The proportion of dementia deaths with Alzheimer’s disease reported in the NCDR increased from practically zero in 1986 to a maximum of 28% in 2005. The proportion of dementia deaths with dementia as underlying cause of death increased from a minimum of 6% in 1972 to a maximum of 51% in 2009.Conclusion: Although the reporting of dementia in the NCDR increased markedly from 1969 to 2010, dementia is still under-reported for old people and for deaths occurring in nursing homes when compared to prevalence estimates.

  11. Vinculin variant M94I identified in sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome decreases cardiac sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianding; Kyle, John W; Wiedmeyer, Brandi; Lang, Di; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Makielski, Jonathan C

    2017-02-20

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) remains an autopsy negative disorder with unclear etiology. Vinculin (VCL) was linked to sudden arrhythmia death in VCL knockout mice prior to the appearance of cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized VCL mutations underlie risk for SUNDS. A rare heterozygous variant VCL-M94I was found in a SUNDS victim who suffered sudden nocturnal tachypnea and lacked pathogenic variants in known arrhythmia-causing genes. VCL was identified to interact with SCN5A in vitro/vivo. The VCL-M94I was co-expressed with the cardiac sodium channel in HEK293 cells and also overexpressed in induced pluripotent stem cells derived cardiomyocytes (iPSCs-CM). In HEK293 cells with pH 7.4, VCL-M94I caused ~30% decrease in peak sodium current (INa) amplitude compared to WT; under acidotic conditions (pH 7.0) typically found with hypoxia during sleep apnea, M94I resulted in 37% reduction in peak INa compared to WT and the combination of VCL-M94I and pH 7.0 decreased peak INa by ~56% compared to WT at pH 7.4. In iPSCs-CM, similar effects of M94I on reduction of peak INa were observed. This study initially shows both physical and functional interaction between VCL and cardiac sodium channel, and suggests an important role for respiratory acidosis in triggering the fatal arrhythmia underlying SUNDS.

  12. Disability Status, Mortality, and Leading Causes of Death in the United States Community Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman-Hoffman, Valerie L.; Ault, Kimberly L.; Anderson, Wayne L.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Stevens, Alissa; Campbell, Vincent A.; Armour, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined the effect of functional disability on all-cause mortality and cause-specific deaths among community-dwelling US adults. Methods We used data from 142,636 adults who participated in the 1994–1995 National Health Interview Survey-Disability Supplement eligible for linkage to National Death Index records from 1994 to 2006 to estimate the effects of disability on mortality and leading causes of death. Results Adults with any disability were more likely to die than adults without disability (19.92% vs. 10.94%; hazard ratio = 1.51, 95% confidence interval, 1.45–1.57). This association was statistically significant for most causes of death and for most types of disability studied. The leading cause of death for adults with and without disability differed (heart disease and malignant neoplasms, respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that all-cause mortality rates are higher among adults with disabilities than among adults without disabilities and that significant associations exist between several types of disability and cause-specific mortality. Interventions are needed that effectively address the poorer health status of people with disabilities and reduce the risk of death. PMID:25719432

  13. Intrasynovial lipoma causing trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Shinji; Kodama, Narihito; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Triggering of the flexor tendon at the wrist is rare. We report a case of intrasynovial lipoma that caused a trigger wrist. As far as we know it is unique in that the intrasynovial lipoma simultaneously caused carpal tunnel syndrome. The massive tenosynovitis and adhesion of flexors tendons after the locking of the intrasynovial lipoma may have resulted from inflammation caused by attrition within the carpal tunnel.

  14. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2015-01-01

    disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus......BACKGROUND: Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries......, and Russia. We improved statistical models for garbage code redistribution. We used six different modelling strategies across the 240 causes; cause of death ensemble modelling (CODEm) was the dominant strategy for causes with sufficient information. Trends for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias were...

  15. MORTALITY AND CAUSE OF DEATH IN ABUTH, ZARIA: 1999 – 2005

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: From May 1999 to November 2005, all case folders of de- ceased patients were retrieved .... ing workshop for all the medical doctors, nurses and staff of HMI ... The framework for analysis is based on the causes of death classification.

  16. Death by unnatural causes during childhood and early adulthood in offspring of psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, Roger; Pickles, Andrew R.; Appleby, Louis

    2007-01-01

    MEASURES: Deaths from all natural causes and all unnatural causes, specifically, accidents, homicides, suicides, and undetermined causes. RESULTS: The highest observed relative risk (RR) was for homicide in young and older children with affected mothers or fathers. Homicides were between 5 and 10 times......-verdict deaths by poisoning were higher than for such deaths occurring by other means. CONCLUSIONS: Almost 99% of children studied survived to their mid-20s. However, they were more vulnerable to death from unnatural causes, notably, homicide during childhood and suicide in early adulthood. Further research......-fold to 3-fold higher risk of suicide. In almost one fourth of the suicides, there was a history of parental admission. Young adults with 2 previously admitted parents were 6 times more likely to kill themselves than were their peers in the general population. Relative risk of suicide or open...

  17. Impact of haart on causes of death of persons with late-stage AIDS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sansone, Giorgio R; Dermot Frengley, J

    2000-01-01

    ...).The aim of the present study was to investigate causes of deaths in long-term care hospital patients with late-stage AIDS who expired at the Coler-Goldwater Memorial Hospital in New York City in 1995...

  18. Secular trend of the leading causes of death in China from 2003 to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen 518060, China. 3. ... Keywords: Causes of death; China; cancer; cardiovascular disease ..... prevalence of diabetes and obesity was the primary rea-.

  19. Family-based cardiac screening in relatives of victims of sudden arrhythmic death syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGorrian, Catherine

    2013-02-03

    AIMS: Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS) occurs when a person suffers a sudden, unexpected death, with no cause found at postmortem examination. We aimed to describe the cardiac screening outcomes in a population of relatives of SADS victimsMETHODS AND RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective cohort study of consecutive families attending the Family Heart Screening clinic at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, from January 2007 to September 2011. Family members of SADS victims underwent a standard screening protocol. Adjunct clinical and postmortem information was sought on the proband. Families who had an existing diagnosis, or where the proband had epilepsy, were excluded. Of 115 families identified, 73 were found to fit inclusion criteria and were retained for analysis, with data available on 262 relatives. Over half of the screened family members were female, and the mean age was 38.6 years (standard deviation 15.6). In 22 of 73 families (30%), and 36 of 262 family members (13.7%), a potentially inheritable cause of SADS was detected. Of the population screened, 32 patients (12.2%) were treated with medication, and 5 (1.9%) have received implantable cardiac defibrillators. Of the five families with long QT syndrome (LQTS) who had a pathogenic gene mutation identified, three carried two such mutations.CONCLUSION: In keeping with international estimates, 30% of families of SADS victims were found to have a potentially inherited cardiac disease. The most common positive finding was LQTS. Advances in postmortem standards and genetic studies may assist in achieving more diagnoses in these families.

  20. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)--standardised investigations and classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajanowski, Thomas; Vege, Ashild; Byard, Roger W;

    2007-01-01

    criteria and inconsistent use of definitions. An approach to sudden infant death is outlined with discussion of appropriate tissue sampling, ancillary investigations and the use of controls in research projects. Standardisation of infant death investigations with the application of uniform definitions...

  1. Identification of rare variants of DSP gene in sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome in the southern Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianhao; Chen, Yili; Peng, Longlun; Gao, Rui; Liu, Nian; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Chao; Tang, Shuangbo; Quan, Li; Makielski, Jonathan C; Cheng, Jianding

    2016-03-01

    Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) is a perplexing disorder to both forensic pathologists and clinic physicians. Desmoplakin (DSP) gene was the first desmosomal gene linked to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) which was associated with sudden death. To identify the genetic variants of the DSP gene in SUNDS in the southern Chinese Han population, we genetically screened the DSP gene in 40 sporadic SUNDS victims, 16 Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients, and 2 early repolarization syndrome (ERS) patients using next generation sequencing (NSG) and direct Sanger sequencing. A total of 10 genetic variants of the DSP gene were detected in 11 cases, comprised of two novel missense mutations (p.I125F and p.D521A) and eight previously reported rare variants. Of eight reported variants, two were previously considered pathogenic (p.Q90R and p.R2639Q), three were predicted in silico to be pathogenic (p.R315C, p.E1357D and p.D2579H), and the rest three were predicted to be benign (p.N1234S, p.R1308Q, and p.T2267S). This is the first report of DSP genetic screening in Chinese SUNDS and Brugada syndrome. Our results imply that DSP mutations contribute to the genetic cause of some SUNDS victims and maybe a new susceptible gene for Brugada syndrome.

  2. Brugada syndrome and right ventricle morphofunctional abnormalities on echocardiography in young male with family anamnesis of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert; Makarovic, Sandra; Makarovic, Zorin; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2014-03-01

    First presented by Brugada and Brugada in 1992, Brugada Syndrome (BrS) is a primary electrical disease of the heart that causes sudden cardiac death or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This disease is hereditary autosomic dominant transmitted and genetically determined. The syndrome has been linked to mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding for the a-subunit of the sodium channel. Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities indicating Brugada syndrome, include repolarization and depolarization abnormalities in the absence of identifiable structural cardiac abnormalities or other conditions or agents known to lead to ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads (V1-V3). Intravenous administration of sodium channel blocking drugs may modify the ECG pattern. Ajmaline, flecainide, procainamide and propafenone exaggerate the ST-segment elevation or unmask it when it is initially absent. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven effective device treatment for the disease. Although BrS is primary electrical disease, some authors have suggested the presence of morphological and functional abnormalities mainly located in the right ventricle (RV), notably in the outflow tract (RVOT). In this short report we will present a young male, with predisposition and positive family history of sudden cardiac death, with complete diagnostic procedure including propafenon testing unmasking Brugada syndrome. An echosonography revealed dilated apical right ventricle, suggesting BrS is not only electrical disorder, but may include morphofunctional abnormalities, described in previous reports. In addition, we reviewed the possible connection between Brugada syndrome and morphological abnormalities in RV.

  3. Mortality and causes of death of 344 Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Halberg, P; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement.......To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement....

  4. Changes in the Leading Cause of Death: Recent Patterns in Heart Disease and Cancer Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie; Anderson, Robert N

    2016-08-01

    Data from the National Vital Statistics System •Heart disease has consistently been the leading cause of death in the United States and remained so in 2014. •The gap between the number of heart disease and cancer deaths generally widened from 1950 through 1968, narrowed from 1968 through 2012, and then slightly widened again from 2012 through 2014. •The mortality burden of cancer has surpassed that of heart disease in several states. In 2000, there were only 2 states where cancer was the leading cause of death; in 2014, there were 22. •Heart disease remained the leading cause of death for the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations in 2014. •Cancer is now the leading cause of death for the non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic populations. The timing of the leading-cause crossover varied by group. For the total U.S. population, heart disease has been the leading cause of death for decades, with cancer the second leading cause (1). However, the ranking of these causes has varied across demographic group and geographic unit over time. Rankings are based on the number of deaths and reflect mortality burden rather than risk of death (2). This report highlights changes in the mortality burden of heart disease and cancer and presents findings by state, race, and Hispanic origin. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  5. Causes of death among undocumented migrants in Sweden, 1997–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wahlberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undocumented migrants are one of the most vulnerable groups in Swedish society, where they generally suffer from poor health and limited health care access. Due to their irregular status, such migrants are an under-researched group and are not included in the country's Cause of Death Register (CDR. Objective: To determine the causes of death among undocumented migrants in Sweden and to ascertain whether there are patterns in causes of death that differ between residents and undocumented migrants. Design: This is a cross-sectional study of death certificates issued from 1997 to 2010 but never included in the CDR from which we established our study sample of undocumented migrants. As age adjustments could not be performed due to lack of data, comparisons between residents and undocumented migrants were made at specific age intervals, based on the study sample's mean age at death±a half standard deviation. Results: Out of 7,925 individuals surveyed, 860 were classified as likely to have been undocumented migrants. External causes (49.8% were the most frequent cause of death, followed by circulatory system diseases, and then neoplasms. Undocumented migrants had a statistically significant increased risk of dying from external causes (odds ratio [OR] 3.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.83–4.52 and circulatory system diseases (OR 2.20, 95% CI: 1.73–2.82 compared to residents, and a lower risk of dying from neoplasms (OR 0.07, 95% CI: 0.04–0.14. Conclusions: We believe our study is the first to determine national figures on causes of death of undocumented migrants. We found inequity in health as substantial differences in causes of death between undocumented migrants and residents were seen. Legal ambiguities regarding health care provision must be addressed if equity in health is to be achieved in a country otherwise known for its universal health coverage.

  6. The analysis of the structure of causes of violent death in Saratov (from 2011 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efimov А.А.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the establishment changes in the structure of the causes of violent death in Saratov from 2011 till 2015. Material and Methods. The examination was based on analysis of the results of the forensic medical expert researches of corpses in the Saratov city office of forensic medical examination of corpses in the period from 2011 to 2015. Results. The structure of the causes of violent death was identical in Saratov in the last five years. The mechanical trauma was a leader, in second place — poisonings, then — mechanical asphyxia and external factors. There were two trends in the dynamics of components of each type of violent death: positive and negative. Positive trends were expressed as a decrease in the proportion of deaths from poisoning by ethanol and reducing the number of deaths from alcohol intoxication from other causes. Negative trends were expressed as the increase in the number of forensic medical expert examinations in the last two years, an increasing share of violent death of children in 2015, maintaining the leading position of automotive trauma among deaths from injuries by blunt objects. Conclusion. The number of forensic medical examinations of corpses was increased in Saratov for the studied period, but the proportion of fatal poisoning with ethanol was decreased. In 2015, the share of violent death of children aged under 14 was increased.

  7. A Rare Cause of Secondary Hypertension: Conn Syndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Sayilan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, is classified as primary (essential or secondary based on whether there is an identifiable cause. When it is determined a certain underlying cause of hypertension it is categorized as secondary hypertension. Conn%u2019s syndrome (primary hyperaldosteronism, a disorder of adrenal cortex characterized by exces aldosterone secretion, is an endocrine disorder that causes hypertension and it is seen in about 0.1% of all patients with hypertension. It can be caused by either unilateral disease (i.e. adenoma in one adrenal gland or bilateral disease (i.e. hyperplasia in both adrenal glands. Conn%u2019s syndrome secondary to bilateral adrenal adenoma, a cause of secondary hypertension, was presented in this articleas it is rarely reported in the literature.

  8. [Causes of death and the relation between scientific and popular knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero Gil, E

    1993-01-01

    "The framework of this contribution is the nexus between scientific and popular knowledge, and their importance assessing diagnostical expressions when studying death causes in times prior to the setting of a standard for the definition of illness. By means of a particular example, the expression teething, we shall show some nuances concerning the loanwords and equivalences between popular and academic knowledge, and their deep, if sometimes hidden, influence upon the diagnostical expressions informing us about the death causes as shown in the records of life and death statistics." The geographical focus is on Spain. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) excerpt

  9. [Sudden Cardiac Death of Young Persons: Risk Factors, Causes, Morphological Equivalents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, M A; Mamedov, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article contains literature review on the problem of causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among young people as well as results of author's own retrospective study of deaths of persons before 39 years based on forensic autopsies performed during 10 year period. The study of structure and dynamics of causes of death, its risk factors and the role of connective tissue dysplasia in development of terminal symptomocomlexes allowed to establish that main mechanism of SCD in young people was arrhythmogenic developing as a response to provoking factors--physical effort, psychoemotional stress, consumption of light alcoholic beverages.

  10. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20-30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. Copyright© Ferrata Storti

  11. Dumping syndrome, a cause of acquired glycogenic hepatopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Jeffrey M; Zador, Ivan; Fish, Daryl L

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy, having undergone fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease and fed by gastrostomy, presented with recurrent emesis, syncope with hypoglycemia, and persistently elevated serum liver transaminase levels. Liver biopsy revealed hepatocellular glycogenosis by light and electron microscopy. Further evaluation showed no evidence of diabetes mellitus, glycogen storage disease, or corticosteroid use. Since the hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic state of dumping syndrome would provide a mechanism for hepatocellular glycogenosis, the biopsy findings prompted consideration of dumping syndrome. Metabolic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of dumping syndrome, and appropriate dietary management led to sustained resolution of symptomatology and hypertransaminasemia. Dumping syndrome is proposed to be a cause of hepatocellular glycogenosis, the latter representing a form of acquired glycogenic hepatopathy.

  12. Unilateral facial paralysis caused by Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Flávia P; Guskuma, Marcos H; Luvizuto, Eloá R; Faco, Eduardo F S; Magro-Filho, Osvaldo; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    The Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare disease caused by an infection of the geniculate ganglion by the varicella-zoster virus. The main clinical features of the syndrome are as follows: Bell palsy unilateral or bilateral, vesicular eruptions on the ears, ear pain, dizziness, preauricular swelling, tingling, tearing, loss of taste sensation, and nystagmus. We describe a 23-year-old white woman, who presented with facial paralysis on the left side of the face, pain, fever, ear pain, and swelling in the neck and auricular region on the left side. She received appropriate treatment with acyclovir, vitamin B complex, and CMP nucleus. After 30 days after presentation, the patient did not show any signs or symptoms of the syndrome. At follow-up at 1 year, she showed no relapse of the syndrome.

  13. Restraint related deaths and excited delirium syndrome in Ontario (2004-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Restraint related death in individuals in excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is a rare event that has been the subject of controversies for more than 3 decades. The purpose of this retrospective study was to retrieve data on all restraint related deaths (RRD) that occurred in Ontario during an 8-year period and compare them with an earlier study on RRD in ExDS covering the period 1988-1995 in Ontario. The Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario website was consulted under verdicts and recommendations. The Canadian Legal Information Institute website was used to consult verdict explanations and coroner's summary of evidence. During the period 2004-2011, RRD occurred in 14 individuals in ExDS, a 33% reduction. Psychiatric illness as a cause of ExDS decreased from 57% to 14%. Cocaine was the cause of ExDS in 11 (79%) individuals. The number of RRD following a violent encounter in cocaine-induced ExDS (8) was identical in the 2 periods. RRD occurred in 6 individuals without ExDS following a violent encounter. Final restraint position preceding cardiorespiratory arrest was available in 36% of individuals with ExDS and 83% of individuals without ExDS. In both groups, cardiorespiratory arrests could be classified as immediate or delayed. All 4 individuals without ExDS who had immediate cardiorespiratory arrests were restrained in the prone position. Delayed cardiorespiratory arrest occurred in the non-prone position in both groups. Although many hypotheses may be put forward to explain changes in the epidemiology of RRD in ExDS in Ontario, multiple warnings and recommendations from coroners' inquests cannot be ignored. There is probably not a unique pathophysiological pathway leading to cardiorespiratory arrest in RRD. The death rate in RRD in ExDS is so low that drawing any conclusions based on statistical studies or on isolated case report could be hazardous.

  14. Causes of death among people living with HIV/AIDS in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Luiza Lage Fazito Rezende

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The monitoring of the underlying causes of death in people living with HIV/AIDS is important so that actions to reduce morbidity and mortality can be taken. OBJECTIVE: To describe the temporal trends of underlying causes of death among people living with HIV/AIDS between 2000 and 2007 in Brazil and to identify factors associated with it. METHODS: The Mortality Information System data for deaths occurred in Brazil between 2000 and 2007 that contained reference to HIV/AIDS in any of the death certificate fields was analyzed. Temporal trends of the underlying cause of death were studied. Differences in the underlying cause of death according to gender, age, region of residence, level of education, certifying officer, race and year of death were verified. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2007 the percentage of deaths not related to HIV/AIDS among people living with HIV/AIDS increased from 2.5% to 7.0%. People with higher level of formal education, living in the South-East region of Brazil and aged under 13 or over 60 years old were more likely to have their underlying cause of death reported as not related to HIV/AIDS. CONCLUSION: The results suggest the importance of implementing actions aimed at improving the quality of life of PLWHA, and which could include behavioral changes, such as smoking and alcoholism cessation, early screening to detect neoplasms and the monitoring of chronic conditions, such as diabetes. That is to say, the need exists to integrate the actions of HIV/AIDS programs with other public health programs.

  15. Update: Causes and symptoms of sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Irfan M; Yim, Eugene S; Hoffman, Jacob M; Froelicher, Vic

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of death during exercise. While initial reports suggested that the most common cause of SCD in young athletes was due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a critical review of investigations in several populations (athletes, non-athletes, military, national, and international) supports that the most common finding at autopsy of young individuals with SCD is actually a structurally normal heart (SNH). This information is vital for sports medicine clinicians, especially with regard to the pre-participation evaluation (PPE) since cardiac death associated with a SNH is likely attributed to disorders such as arrhythmia or ion channel diseases. This comprehensive review explores the causes of SCD, along with the symptoms preceding death, which ultimately may help refine the PPE and maximize the ability to detect potentially lethal disease prior to competition.

  16. Years of life lost due to external causes of death in the lodz province, poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pikala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is the analysis of years of life lost due to external causes of death, particularly due to traffic accidents and suicides. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study material includes a database containing information gathered from 376,281 death certificates of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2010. The Lodz province is characterized by the highest mortality rates in Poland. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person and the SEYLLd (per death indices were used to determine years of life lost. Joinpoint models were used to analyze time trends. RESULTS: In 2010, deaths due to external causes constituted 6.0% of the total number of deaths. The standardized death rate (SDR due to external causes was 110.0 per 100,000 males and was five times higher than for females (22.0 per 100,000 females. In 2010, the SEYLLp due to external causes was 3746 per 100,000 males and 721 per 100,000 females. Among males, suicides and traffic accidents were the most common causes of death (the values of the SEYLLp were: 1098 years and 887 years per 100,000 people, respectively. Among females, the SEYLLp values were 183 years due to traffic accidents and 143 years due to suicides (per 100,000 people. CONCLUSIONS: A decrease in the number of years of life lost due to external causes is much higher among females. The authors observe that a growing number of suicides contribute to an increase in the value of the SEYLLp index. This directly contributes to over-mortality of males due to external causes. The analysis of the years of life lost focuses on the social and economic aspects of premature mortality due to external causes.

  17. Social inequalities in causes of death amenable to health care in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Hem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate if there are educational inequalities in causes of death considered amenable to health care in Norway and compare this with non-amenable causes. Methods: The study used the concept of “amenable mortality”, which here includes 34 specific causes of death. A linked data file, with information from the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry and the Educational Registry was analyzed. The study population included the whole Norwegian population in two age groups of interest (25-49 and 50-74 years. Information on deaths was from the period 1990-2001. Education was recorded in 1990 and it was grouped in four categories as: basic, lower secondary, higher secondary and higher. In the study men and women were analysed seperately. The analysis was conducted for all amenable causes pooled with and without ischemic heart disease. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was fitted to estimate hazard rate ratios. Results: The study showed educational differences in mortality from causes of death considered amenable to health care, in both age groups and sexes. This was seen both when including and excluding ischemic heart disease. The effect sizes were comparable for amenable and non-amenable causes in both age groups and sexes. Conclusions: This study revealed systematic higher risk of death in lower educational groups in causes of death considered amenable to health care. This indicates potential weaknesses in equitable provision of health care for the Norwegian population. Additional research is needed to identify domains within the health care system of particular concern.

  18. Positive Apraclonidine Test in Horner Syndrome Caused by Thalamic Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauh, Courtney Y; Bursztyn, Lulu L C D

    2015-09-01

    Reversal of anisocoria following instillation of apraclonidine 0.5% has been reported in Horner syndrome caused by lesions of the central and peripheral nervous system. The shortest documented latency between symptom onset and a positive apraclonidine test is 36 hours, occurring in a patient with a pontomedullary infarct. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with Horner syndrome due to thalamic hemorrhage in whom apraclonidine testing demonstrated reversal of anisocoria 4 days after symptom onset. This is the first reported case of a positive apraclonidine test in a Horner syndrome caused by a lesion at this site. It suggests that apraclonidine testing is useful in confirming the diagnosis within days of onset even in a lesion located at the most proximal portion of the oculosympathetic pathway.

  19. Defining the cause of death in hospitalised patients with acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Selby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high mortality rates that follow the onset of acute kidney injury (AKI are well recognised. However, the mode of death in patients with AKI remains relatively under-studied, particularly in general hospitalised populations who represent the majority of those affected. We sought to describe the primary cause of death in a large group of prospectively identified patients with AKI. METHODS: All patients sustaining AKI at our centre between 1(st October 2010 and 31(st October 2011 were identified by real-time, hospital-wide, electronic AKI reporting based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN diagnostic criteria. Using this system we are able to generate a prospective database of all AKI cases that includes demographic, outcome and hospital coding data. For those patients that died during hospital admission, cause of death was derived from the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death. RESULTS: During the study period there were 3,930 patients who sustained AKI; 62.0% had AKI stage 1, 20.6% had stage 2 and 17.4% stage 3. In-hospital mortality rate was 21.9% (859 patients. Cause of death could be identified in 93.4% of cases. There were three main disease categories accounting for three quarters of all mortality; sepsis (41.1%, cardiovascular disease (19.2% and malignancy (12.9%. The major diagnosis leading to sepsis was pneumonia, whilst cardiovascular death was largely a result of heart failure and ischaemic heart disease. AKI was the primary cause of death in only 3% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality associated with AKI remains high, although cause of death is usually concurrent illness. Specific strategies to improve outcomes may therefore need to target not just the management of AKI but also the most relevant co-existing conditions.

  20. Causes of infertility in men with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, K; Belitsos, P; Fotinos, A; Makris, N; Loutradis, D; Antsaklis, A

    2011-10-01

    Men with Down syndrome are considered as infertile although the causes of infertility are not known in detail yet. Although this constitutes a general rule there are three confirmed cases of parenting by fathers with Down syndrome. Many investigators have addressed the causes of infertility and their studies indicate that the causes may be hormonal deficits, morphological alterations of the gonads, abnormal spermatogenesis, psychological and social factors related to the mental retardation. It is obvious that the extra chromosome 21 has a detrimental direct and indirect effect on the reproductive capacity of the affected male patient. But the definite cause of the insufficient and inadequate spermatogenesis remains to be discovered. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Factors associated with specific causes of death amongst HIV-positive individuals in the D:A:D Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Colette; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens D;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate any emerging trends in causes of death amongst HIV-positive individuals in the current cART era, and to investigate the factors associated with each specific cause of death.......To investigate any emerging trends in causes of death amongst HIV-positive individuals in the current cART era, and to investigate the factors associated with each specific cause of death....

  2. Nasu-Hakola Syndrome: An Unusual Cause of Pathological Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaykar R. Panchmatia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasu-Hakola syndrome is a hereditary cause of pathological fractures. Uniquely, patients also develop neuropsychiatric symptoms and signs. The disease is ultimately fatal. We propose a management strategy for pathological fractures in sufferers based on the stage of the disease.

  3. Kingella kingae causing septic arthritis in Felty's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D A; Settas, L

    1983-08-01

    A case of septic arthritis of the elbow caused by Kingella kingae, a Gram-negative bacillus, is described. The patient had long-standing, severe rheumatoid arthritis and Felty's syndrome. This appears to be the first report from the United Kingdom of Kingella kingae as the aetiological agent of septic arthritis.

  4. Kingella kingae causing septic arthritis in Felty's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, D A; Settas, L

    1983-01-01

    A case of septic arthritis of the elbow caused by Kingella kingae, a Gram-negative bacillus, is described. The patient had long-standing, severe rheumatoid arthritis and Felty's syndrome. This appears to be the first report from the United Kingdom of Kingella kingae as the aetiological agent of septic arthritis.

  5. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome caused by peritendinitis calcarea. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, L; Svartengren, G

    1993-01-01

    Two women presented with similar symptoms of acute pain in the hand that was diagnosed as acute carpal tunnel syndrome caused by peritendinitis calcarea. Radiological examinations in both cases showed calcifications in the carpal tunnel. Both patients were operated on immediately and the median nerve was decompressed. Both were completely relieved of pain after operation and hand function returned to normal.

  6. Death adder envenoming causes neurotoxicity not reversed by antivenom--Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher I Johnston

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Death adders (Acanthophis spp are found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and parts of eastern Indonesia. This study aimed to investigate the clinical syndrome of death adder envenoming and response to antivenom treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Definite death adder bites were recruited from the Australian Snakebite Project (ASP as defined by expert identification or detection of death adder venom in blood. Clinical effects and laboratory results were collected prospectively, including the time course of neurotoxicity and response to treatment. Enzyme immunoassay was used to measure venom concentrations. Twenty nine patients had definite death adder bites; median age 45 yr (5-74 yr; 25 were male. Envenoming occurred in 14 patients. Two further patients had allergic reactions without envenoming, both snake handlers with previous death adder bites. Of 14 envenomed patients, 12 developed neurotoxicity characterised by ptosis (12, diplopia (9, bulbar weakness (7, intercostal muscle weakness (2 and limb weakness (2. Intubation and mechanical ventilation were required for two patients for 17 and 83 hours. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 4 hours (0.5-15.5 hr. One patient bitten by a northern death adder developed myotoxicity and one patient only developed systemic symptoms without neurotoxicity. No patient developed venom induced consumption coagulopathy. Antivenom was administered to 13 patients, all receiving one vial initially. The median time for resolution of neurotoxicity post-antivenom was 21 hours (5-168. The median peak venom concentration in 13 envenomed patients with blood samples was 22 ng/mL (4.4-245 ng/mL. In eight patients where post-antivenom bloods were available, no venom was detected after one vial of antivenom. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Death adder envenoming is characterised by neurotoxicity, which is mild in most cases. One vial of death adder antivenom was sufficient to bind all circulating venom

  7. Death Adder Envenoming Causes Neurotoxicity Not Reversed by Antivenom - Australian Snakebite Project (ASP-16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher I.; O'Leary, Margaret A.; Brown, Simon G. A.; Currie, Bart J.; Halkidis, Lambros; Whitaker, Richard; Close, Benjamin; Isbister, Geoffrey K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Death adders (Acanthophis spp) are found in Australia, Papua New Guinea and parts of eastern Indonesia. This study aimed to investigate the clinical syndrome of death adder envenoming and response to antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Definite death adder bites were recruited from the Australian Snakebite Project (ASP) as defined by expert identification or detection of death adder venom in blood. Clinical effects and laboratory results were collected prospectively, including the time course of neurotoxicity and response to treatment. Enzyme immunoassay was used to measure venom concentrations. Twenty nine patients had definite death adder bites; median age 45 yr (5–74 yr); 25 were male. Envenoming occurred in 14 patients. Two further patients had allergic reactions without envenoming, both snake handlers with previous death adder bites. Of 14 envenomed patients, 12 developed neurotoxicity characterised by ptosis (12), diplopia (9), bulbar weakness (7), intercostal muscle weakness (2) and limb weakness (2). Intubation and mechanical ventilation were required for two patients for 17 and 83 hours. The median time to onset of neurotoxicity was 4 hours (0.5–15.5 hr). One patient bitten by a northern death adder developed myotoxicity and one patient only developed systemic symptoms without neurotoxicity. No patient developed venom induced consumption coagulopathy. Antivenom was administered to 13 patients, all receiving one vial initially. The median time for resolution of neurotoxicity post-antivenom was 21 hours (5–168). The median peak venom concentration in 13 envenomed patients with blood samples was 22 ng/mL (4.4–245 ng/mL). In eight patients where post-antivenom bloods were available, no venom was detected after one vial of antivenom. Conclusions/Significance Death adder envenoming is characterised by neurotoxicity, which is mild in most cases. One vial of death adder antivenom was sufficient to bind all circulating venom. The

  8. Avian influenza A virus H5N1 causes autophagy-mediated cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhui Ma; Qian Sun; Ruifang Mi; Hongbing Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Of the few avian influenza viruses that have crossed the species barrier to infect humans,the highly pathogenic influenza A (H5N1) strain has claimed the lives of more than half of the infected patients.With largely unknown mechanism of lung injury by H5N1 infection,acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the major cause of death among the victims.Here we present the fact that H5N1 caused autophagic cell death through suppression of mTOR signaling.Inhibition of autophagy,either by depletion of autophagy gene Beclinl or by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA),significantly reduced H5N1 mediated cell death.We suggest that autophagic cell death may contribute to the development of ARDS in H5N1 influenza patients and inhibition of autophagy could therefore become a novel strategy for the treatment of H5N1 infection.

  9. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Thompson, C J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  10. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: prevalence, causes and consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2010-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the commonest electrolyte abnormality found in hospital inpatients, and is associated with a greatly increased morbidity and mortality. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) is the most frequent cause of hyponatraemia in hospital inpatients. SIADH is the clinical and biochemical manifestation of a wide range of disease processes, and every case warrants investigation of the underlying cause. In this review, we will examine the prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and clinical consequences of hyponatraemia due to SIADH.

  11. Asphyxia: a rare cause of death for motor vehicle crash occupants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Carol; Stanley, Christina; Eastman, A Brent; Vaughan, Teresa; Vilke, Gary M; Hoyt, David B; Pacyna, Sharon; Smith, Alan

    2008-03-01

    Motor vehicle related trauma is one of the leading causes of traumatic death. Although most of these deaths are because of severe blunt force trauma, there are people without severe injury who die of asphyxia related to the motor vehicle collision. There were 37 deaths because of motor vehicle related asphyxia in San Diego County during 1995-2004. Almost half (48.6%) of these deaths were because of compression asphyxia, 29.7% were positional asphyxia deaths, and 16.2% died of a combination of compression and positional asphyxia. We were unable to classify the mechanism of asphyxia for the remaining 5.4% of asphyxia deaths. Almost all occupants dying from asphyxia were involved in rollover crashes and may have been incapacitated by obesity, drug or alcohol intoxication, or blunt force trauma. Compression asphyxia deaths occurred both from vehicle crush with intrusion into the passenger compartment and from ejection of the occupant and subsequent crushing by the vehicle. Positional asphyxia occurred in positions interfering with normal respiration, including inversion. None of the occupants had injury severe enough to result in death at the scene if they had not first died of asphyxia. This study suggests classifying the mechanism of asphyxia for these fatalities may be a challenge to forensic pathologists who seldom see these rare deaths.

  12. Validation of verbal autopsy: determination of cause of deaths in Malaysia 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Shubash Shander; Yi Yi, Khoo; Omar, Mohd Azahadi; Anuar, Mohamad Fuad Mohamad; Jeevananthan, Chandrika; Rao, Chalapati

    2017-08-11

    Mortality statistics by age, sex and cause are the foundation of basic health data required for health status assessment, epidemiological research and formation of health policy. Close to half the deaths in Malaysia occur outside a health facility, are not attended by medical personnel, and are given a lay opinion as to the cause of death, leading to poor quality of data from vital registration. Verbal autopsy (VA) is a very useful tool in diagnosing broad causes of deaths for events that occur outside health facilities. This article reports the development of the VA methods and our principal finding from a validation study. A cross sectional study on nationally representative sample deaths that occurred in Malaysia during 2013 was used. A VA questionnaire suitable for local use was developed. Trained field interviewers visited the family members of the deceased at their homes and conducted face to face interviews with the next of kin. Completed questionnaires were reviewed by trained physicians who assigned multiple and underlying causes. Reference diagnoses for validation were obtained from review of medical records (MR) available for a sample of the overall study deaths. Corresponding MR diagnosis with matched sample of the VA diagnosis were available in 2172 cases for the validation study. Sensitivity scores were good (>75%) for transport accidents and certain cancers. Moderate sensitivity (50% - 75%) was obtained for ischaemic heart disease (64%) and cerebrovascular disease (72%). The validation sample for deaths due to major causes such as ischaemic heart disease, pneumonia, breast cancer and transport accidents show low cause-specific mortality fraction (CSMF) changes. The scores obtained for the top 10 leading site-specific cancers ranged from average to good. We can conclude that VA is suitable for implementation for deaths outside the health facilities in Malaysia. This would reduce ill-defined mortality causes in vital registration data, and yield more

  13. Animal models for assessment of infection and inflammation: contributions to elucidating the pathophysiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane eBlood-Siegfried

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is still not well understood. It is a diagnosis of exclusion following the sudden and unexpected death of an infant. There are numerous theories about the etiology of SIDS but the exact cause or causes have never been pinpointed.Examination of theoretical pathologies might only be possible in animal models. Development of these models requires consideration of the genetic, developmental and environmental risk factors associated with SIDS, as they need to explain how the risk factors could contribute to the cause of death. These models were initially developed in common laboratory animals to test various hypotheses to explain these infant deaths - guinea pig, piglet, mouse, neonatal rabbit and neonatal rat. Currently there are growing numbers of researchers using genetically altered animals to examine specific areas of interest. This review describes the different systems and models developed to examine the diverse hypotheses for the cause of SIDS and their potential for defining a causal mechanism or mechanisms.

  14. Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands (1999-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelo, Manuel; Los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa de; Herráez, Pedro; Andrada, Marisa; Sierra, Eva; Rodríguez, Francisco; Jepson, Paul D; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-26

    Between 1999 and 2005, 233 stranded cetaceans (comprising 19 species) were reported in the waters of the Canary Islands. Of these, 138/233 (59.2%) were subjected to a complete or partial standardized necropsy, including 4 Balaenopteridae, 9 Physeteridae, 8 Kogiidae, 27 Ziphiidae and 90 Delphinidae. Of these, 46/138 (33.3%) cetaceans were diagnosed with anthropogenic pathological categories (i.e. the cause of death was anthropogenic). These included fishing interaction (bycatch) (19 individuals), 'atypical' mass stranding events linked to naval exercises (13), ship collisions (8) and other anthropogenic-related pathology (6). 'Natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) causes of death accounted for another 82/138 (59.4%) cases, including infectious and non-infectious diseases (63), neonatal pathology (8), intra- and interspecific interactions (6) and mass strandings (5). The cause(s) of death could not be determined in 10/138 (7.3%) necropsied animals. The most common causes of death were ship collisions in 6/9 (66.6%) Physeteridae, 'atypical' mass stranding linked to naval exercises in 13/27 (48.1%) Ziphiidae, and 'natural' infectious and non-infectious diseases in 55/90 (61.1%) Delphinidae. Interaction with fishing activities was established as cause of death in 15/90 (16.7%) Delphinidae. These data show that a range of anthropogenic and natural single and mass mortality events occur in multiple cetacean species stranded in the Canary Islands.

  15. Developmental alterations of the auditory brainstem centers--pathogenetic implications in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-10-15

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), despite the success of campaigns to reduce its risks, is the leading cause of infant death in the Western world. Even though the pathogenesis remains unexplained, brainstem abnormalities of the neuronal network that mediates breathing and protective responses to asphyxia, particularly in the arousal phase from sleep, are believed to play a fundamental role. This is the first study to identify, in SIDS, developmental defects of specific brainstem centers involved in hearing pathways, particularly in the cochlear and vestibular nuclei, in the superior olivary complex and in the inferior colliculus, suggesting a possible influence of the acoustic system on respiratory activity. In 49 SIDS cases and 20 controls an in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system was performed, with the main aim of detecting developmental alterations of brainstem structures controlling both the respiratory and auditory activities. Overall, a significantly higher incidence of cytoarchitectural alterations of both the auditory and respiratory network components were observed in SIDS victims compared with matched controls. Even if there is not sufficient evidence to presume that developmental defects of brainstem auditory structures can affect breathing, our findings, showing that developmental deficit in the control respiratory areas are frequently accompanied by alterations of auditory structures, highlight an additional important element for the understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of SIDS.

  16. Cause-Specific Mortality and Death Certificate Reporting in Adults with Moderate to Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrer, F.; McGrother, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The study of premature deaths in people with intellectual disability (ID) has become the focus of recent policy initiatives in England. This is the first UK population-based study to explore cause-specific mortality in adults with ID compared with the general population. Methods: Cause-specific standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and…

  17. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease : Are national registries reliable for cause of death?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A. Carla; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Mariman, Edwin C. M.; Verheugt, Carianne L.; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Pieper, Petronella G.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Statistics on cause-specific mortality are important for prognostic research. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of the national mortality registry in research on causes of death in adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: The CONCOR registry of over

  18. Mortality and causes of death in children referred to a tertiary epilepsy center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Uldall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with epilepsy, including children, have an increased mortality rate when compared to the general population. Only few studies on causes of mortality in childhood epilepsy exist and pediatric SUDEP rate is under continuous discussion. AIM: To describe general mortality......, incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), causes of death and age distribution in a pediatric epilepsy patient population. METHODS: The study retrospectively examined the mortality and causes of death in 1974 patients with childhood-onset epilepsy at a tertiary epilepsy center in Denmark...... (8 SUDEP cases per 10,000 patient years). 9 patients died in the course of neurodegenerative disease and 28 children died of various causes. Epilepsy was considered drug resistant in more than 95% of the deceased patients, 90% were diagnosed with intellectual disability. Mortality of patients...

  19. Malignant histiocytosis and other causes of death in Bernese mountain dogs in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Andreasen, S N; Andersen, S D; Kristensen, A T

    2010-02-13

    To determine the causes of death in Bernese mountain dogs, to assess the prevalence of malignant histiocytosis in the Danish Bernese mountain dog population, and to assess whether a hereditary pattern for this disease exists, 756 questionnaires were sent to members of the Danish Bernese Mountain Dog Club requesting information regarding the life span and causes of death of their dogs. A response rate of 57.7 per cent was achieved, giving information for 812 dogs, of which 290 had died. The average life span was 7.1 years. The most prevalent causes of death were neoplasia (42.1 per cent), old age (10.3 per cent), kidney disease (6.9 per cent), infection (5.9 per cent), skeletal problems (5.2 per cent), heart disease (3.8 per cent) and behavioural causes (3.5 per cent). Thirteen dogs were diagnosed with malignant histiocytosis, 11 of which were genealogically related.

  20. Cause of death--so-called designed event acclimaxing timed happenings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cause-of-death as an established global medical institution faces its greatest challenge in the commonplace observation that the healthy do not necessarily survive and the diseased do not necessarily die. A logical analysis of the assumed relationships between disease and death provides some insights that allow questioning the taken-for-granted relationship between defined disease/s and the final common parameter of death. Causalism as a paradigm has taken leave of all advanced sciences. In medicine, it is lingering on for anthropocentric reasons. Natural death does not come to pass because of some (replaceable missing element, but because the evolution of the individual from womb to tomb has arrived at its final destination. To accept death as a physiologic event is to advance thanatology and to disburden medical colleges and hospitals of a lot of avoidable thinking and doing.

  1. Maternal mortality in Bahrain 1987-2004: an audit of causes of avoidable death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, A K; Mustafa, F E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this report was to establish the national maternal mortality rate in Bahrain over the period 1987-2004, to identify preventable factors in maternal deaths and to make recommendations for safe motherhood. There were 60 maternal deaths out of 243 232 deliveries giving an average maternal mortality rate of 24.7 per 100 000 total births. The main causes of death were sickle-cell disease (25.0%), hypertension (18.3%), embolism (13.3%), haemorrhage (13.3%), heart disease (11.7%), infection (8.3%) and other (10.0%). In an audit of care, 17 (28.3%) out of 60 deaths were judged to be avoidable, nearly half of which were due to a shortage of intensive care beds. We recommend that a confidential enquiry of maternal deaths be conducted at the national level every 3 to 5 years.

  2. A Diagnostic Supportive Sign for the Cause of Death Diagonal Ear Lobe Crease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birol Demirel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease is a major cause of natural death. The high incidence and mortality of these diseases arised a need to investigate possible risk factors beyond well known. Diagonal ear lobe crease (DEC, was the physical sign, described in 1973. We investigated the possibility of DEC as a helpful predictive sign in the postmortem examination of forensic sudden death cases. The angiographic results revealed that whenever the percentages of the stenosis in left descending coronary artery, circumflex artery and right coronary artery increased, the incidence of the DEC did so accordingly. These results were correlated with the previous studies reporting significant correlation between coronary artery disease and the DEC. Particularly, in the absence of supportive medical history and without a physical sign of trauma, the presence of DEC could well be a supportive sign for the physician to consider the coronary artery disease as a cause of death. Key words: Diagonal ear lobe crease, coronary artery disease, death investigation

  3. Algorithms for enhancing public health utility of national causes-of-death data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmalek Farshad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coverage and quality of cause-of-death (CoD data varies across countries and time. Valid, reliable, and comparable assessments of trends in causes of death from even the best systems are limited by three problems: a changes in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD over time; b the use of tabulation lists where substantial detail on causes of death is lost; and c many deaths assigned to causes that cannot or should not be considered underlying causes of death, often called garbage codes (GCs. The Global Burden of Disease Study and the World Health Organization have developed various methods to enhance comparability of CoD data. In this study, we attempt to build on these approaches to enhance the utility of national cause-of-death data for public health analysis. Methods Based on careful consideration of 4,434 country-years of CoD data from 145 countries from 1901 to 2008, encompassing 743 million deaths in ICD versions 1 to 10 as well as country-specific cause lists, we have developed a public health-oriented cause-of-death list. These 56 causes are organized hierarchically and encompass all deaths. Each cause has been mapped from ICD-6 to ICD-10 and, where possible, they have also been mapped to the International List of Causes of Death 1-5. We developed a typology of different classes of GCs. In each ICD revision, GCs have been identified. Target causes to which these GCs should be redistributed have been identified based on certification practice and/or pathophysiology. Proportionate redistribution, statistical models, and expert algorithms have been developed to redistribute GCs to target codes for each age-sex group. Results The fraction of all deaths assigned to GCs varies tremendously across countries and revisions of the ICD. In general, across all country-years of data available, GCs have declined from more than 43% in ICD-7 to 24% in ICD-10. In some regions, such

  4. Trismus Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome: A Sporadic Cause of Trismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathima Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trismus pseudocamptodactyly syndrome is a very rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the inability to completely open the mouth (trismus and the presence of abnormally short tendon units causing the fingers to curve (camptodactyly. Early diagnosis and management of this condition is important to prevent facial deformities in the patient. Reporting such a case is important as case reports are one of the sources of data for calculating the prevalence of rare diseases. Here, we report a case of trismus pseudocamptodactyly syndrome in an eight-year-old boy with a brief review of the literature.

  5. Gluteal compartment syndrome after prostatectomy caused by incorrect positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyn, Jens; Ladurner, R; Ozimek, A; Vogel, T; Hallfeldt, K K; Mussack, T

    2006-04-28

    Gluteal compartment syndrome is an uncommon and rare disease. Most reasonable causes for the development of this disease are trauma, drug induced coma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, sickle cell associated muscle infarction, incorrect positioning during surgical procedures and prolonged pressure in patients with altered consciousness levels. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, especially in postoperative patient where sedation or peridural anaesthesia can confound the neurological examination. Early signs include gluteal tenderness, decrease in vibratory sensation during clinical examination and increasing CK in laboratory findings. We present a case of a 52 year-old patient, who developed gluteal compartment syndrome after radical prostatectomy in lithotomic position. After operation, diuresis decreased [pain in the gluteal region and both thighs. His thighs and the gluteal region were swollen. Passive stretch of the thighs caused enormous pain. The compartment pressure was 92 mmHg. Therefore, emergency fasciotomy was performed successfully. The gluteal compartment syndrome was most likely caused by elevated pressure on the gluteal muscle during operation. We suggest heightened awareness of positioning the patient on the operating table is important especially in obese patients with lengthy operating procedures.

  6. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell death as a possible mechanism for tissue limited mosaicism in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wozhan; Wenger, Sharon L

    2005-01-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome is a chromosomal mosaic syndrome with a normal and an isochromosome 12p cell line, the latter rarely seen in peripheral blood. The isochromosome 12p cell line decreases with serial passages of fibroblasts in vitro and with age of patient in vivo. To evaluate cell death as a possible mechanism for loss of the abnormal cell line, amniocytes from a fetus with Pallister-Killian syndrome were identified as normal or aneuploid using a chromosome 12 alpha-satellite DNA probe by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and then subsequently stained with Annexin V, which stains the cytoplasm of cells that are dying. Although not conclusive, our preliminary results suggest that the abnormal cell line is going through apoptosis or necrosis at a higher rate than normal cells. Cell death may be a possible mechanism for decrease of the aneuploid cell line in patients with Pallister-Killian syndrome.

  9. Infant dreaming and fetal memory: a possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christos, G A

    1995-04-01

    During rapid-eye-movement sleep, when we dream, the brain is thought to be processing stored memory. The memory of a newborn infant is dominated by its fetal experience, and the infant is likely to dream about its life in the womb. Research with lucid (or conscious) dreaming has shown that dream images are supported by the corresponding body actions, using those muscles which remain active during rapid-eye-movement sleep. We suggest that sudden infant death syndrome or cot death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life (or memory) as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe (in the usual sense) the infant may cease to breathe and may die. This simple hypothesis is consistent with all of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome (pathological and epidemiological), such as the age at death curve (the observed exponential decay and possibly the peak at 2-3 months), the higher risk with the prone sleeping position (but not excluding the supine position), and the observed climatic variation (seasonal and regional) in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome. Many of these well-established facts have no other known explanation and other theories can generally only account for a few of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome. Our hypothesis is also supported by recent findings that, as a group, sudden infant death syndrome infants have a higher proportion of rapid-eye-movement sleep, and also that they have an average higher heart rate (corresponding to possible fetal dreams) but only during rapid-eye-movement sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Cause of Death in "John Doe & Jane Doe": A 5 year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Dasari, Harish; Singh, Amandeep

    2014-08-01

    Sometimes the opinion regarding the cause of death in "John Doe or Jane Doe" i.e. on unknown dead bodies is a test of ability of the forensic expert and on many occasions it yields little or no results. Here the identification of the body as such poses problems; rest aside the opinion regarding the cause/ manner of death. The present 5yr study was undertaken in the Department of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh to find the patterns of cause of death in unknown dead bodies, as very little literature is available with regard to John Doe or Jane Doe cases as a group, in India. Unidentified bodies comprised 4 % of the total 3165 cases brought for post-mortem examination to the department. Maximum cases belonged to the age group 41 - 50 years, 30 %. Majority of the opinions regarding the cause of death were given as "no definite opinion" (31%), followed by "cranio-cerebral damage" (30 %) and coronary insufficiency/ Cardiac disease/ aortic aneurysm rupture, (8.9%). Following measures should be undertaken to increase the chances of getting these unknown bodies identified and thereby increasing the chances of arriving at a definite cause of death: drafting of additional legislation for the management of unidentified dead bodies along with streamlining of work on the part of police, use of active investigation and modern investigative techniques, fixing the accountability of the police. Internet based sites of the police like ZIPNET (Zonal Integrated Police Networking) in Northern India, should also be used.

  11. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background

    Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188

  12. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background

    Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countrie

  13. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus...

  14. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus...

  15. Underlying cause of death as recorded for multiple sclerosis patients: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, R M; Valdiviezo, N L; Visscher, B R; Clark, V A; Detels, R; Fukumoto, M; Dudley, J P

    1983-01-01

    The coding of multiple sclerosis (MS) as underlying cause of death (UCD) on the death certificate provides an important epidemiologic resource for both descriptive and analytic studies. However, not all deaths among MS patients will be so coded. We investigated the effect on estimated occurrence of MS and on characteristics of MS patients when only UCD codes are used to identify cases. Of 2329 MS patients living in Los Angeles County (California) or King/Pierce Counties (Washington) in 1970, 438 had died by 1980. Only 53% of the deaths were coded to MS; 47% were attributed to other causes. Based on our comparisons, the use of only MS-coded deaths to describe decedents would: underestimate the age at MS onset; overestimate the female:male ratio; underestimate age at death; and underestimate duration of MS. Also, the percentage of MS-coded deaths decreased with lengthening duration of follow-up of these prevalent cases. The effect of using only UCD codes to report characteristics of decedents with other chronic diseases may well be similar.

  16. The importance of a forensics investigation of sudden infant death syndrome: recommendations for developing, low and middle income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Koehler

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sudden infant deaths syndrome (SIDS, the sudden and unexpected death of a normal and healthy infant, has remained a medical and forensic mystery. Despite years of research all attempts to ascertain the exact cause and manner of death have failed. The information collected during the course of the comprehensive investigation by the various investigation agencies and analysis of the data has not been in vain. The epidemiological, demographic, and pathological data have identified distinctive features and risk factors associated with infants that died from SIDS. Epidemiological data has provided the unique characteristics of infants that died of SIDS that differentiates them from non-SIDS infants. Analysis of information from the death scene investigation has identified key risk factor behaviour associated with SIDS, namely the prone sleeping position. Pathological examination of the internal organs, specifically the brain, has shown some differences between SIDS and non-SIDS infants. However, to gain a complete picture of SIDS data, all countries around the world must provide information, even basic information, to understand this syndrome better. Developing countries must understand their role and importance in developing plans to investigate, collect, and disseminate SIDS data to the rest of the world. This paper provides general guidelines for the investigation of SIDS in developing countries.

  17. Case-control study of sudden infant death syndrome in Lithuania, 1997–2000

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    Kėvalas Rimantas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome relevant in Lithuania. Methods A nationwide case-control study surveying parents of 35 infants who died from sudden infant death syndrome during the period of 1997–2000 and parents of 145 control infants matched with SIDS infants for date of birth and for region of birth was carried out. Results Deaths incidence was greater in the warm period (60% vs. cold period (40%. Prone and side sleeping positions both carried no increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome compared with supine because of a rare prone sleeping (4.1% of controls vs. 0% of dead infants and more prevalent side than supine sleeping (84.8% of controls vs. 94.3% of dead infants in the controls as well as the cases. Bed sharing for the whole night as a risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome has not been confirmed, either, as bed sharing was common only for the controls (13.8% of controls vs. 0% of dead infants. Routine sleeping environment factors such as heavy wrapping (≥4 togs of an infant (odds ratio 8.49; 95% confidence interval 2.38 to 30.32, sleeping in a bassinet (4.22; 1.16 to 15.38 and maternal factors such as maternal education ≤12 years (4.48; 1.34 to 14.94, unplanned pregnancy (5.22; 1.49 to 18.18 and ≥2 previous live births (3.90; 1.00 to 15.10 were significantly associated with sudden infant death syndrome on multivariate analysis. Conclusion The results of this first population-based case-control study have shed some light on the epidemiology of the syndrome in Lithuania. Although the mortality of sudden infant death syndrome in Lithuania is not high, it might be lowered moreover by public informing about sudden infant death syndrome and related risk factors. Special attention must be paid to mothers with low education on potentially modifiable risk factors such as routine heavy wrapping of an infant during sleep, routine sleeping in a bassinet and unplanned pregnancy.

  18. A missed penalty kick triggered coronary death in the husband and broken heart syndrome in the wife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Feldt, Kari; Stålberg, Marcus

    2015-11-15

    Events that induce emotional stress and frustration in a large number of subjects under specific circumstances, such as earthquakes, war conditions, and sporting occasions, may increase the incidence of cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. This report describes a married couple who expressed an apparently passionate interest in football with hazardous consequences after a tense football match during the FIFA 2014 World Championships. A series of emotional stressors initiated by defeat in this football game lead to cardiac arrest in a 58-year-old man caused by a thrombotic occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and ending in the death of the patient. An hour and 15 minutes after the onset of cardiac arrest of the patient, his 64-year-old wife also had chest pain caused by an acute midventricular takotsubo syndrome. She survived the acute stage of the disease, and there was complete resolution of the left ventricular dysfunction.

  19. Infant pacifiers for reduction in risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaila, Kim; Foster, Jann P; Pulbrook, Neil; Jeffery, Heather E

    2017-04-05

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been most recently defined as the sudden unexpected death of an infant less than one year of age, with onset of the fatal episode apparently occurring during sleep, that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation, including the performance of a complete autopsy and a review of the circumstances of death and clinical history. Despite the success of several prevention campaigns, SIDS remains a leading cause of infant mortality. In 1994, a 'triple risk model' for SIDS was proposed that described SIDS as an event that results from the intersection of three factors: a vulnerable infant; a critical development period in homeostatic control (age related); and an exogenous stressor. The association between pacifier (dummy) use and reduced incidence of SIDS has been shown in epidemiological studies since the early 1990s. Pacifier use, given its low cost, might be a cost-effective intervention for SIDS prevention if it is confirmed effective in randomised controlled trials. To determine whether the use of pacifiers during sleep versus no pacifier during sleep reduces the risk of SIDS. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 2), MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL to 16 March 2016. We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Published and unpublished controlled trials using random and quasi-random allocations of infants born at term and at preterm (less than 37 weeks' gestation) or with low birth weight (searches. We found no eligible studies. We identified no randomised controlled trials examining infant pacifiers for reduction in risk of SIDS. We found no randomised control trial evidence on which to support or refute the use of pacifiers for the prevention of SIDS.

  20. Suicide deaths in rural Andhra Pradesh--a cause for global health action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohina; Guggilla, Rama; Praveen, Devarsetty; Maulik, Pallab K

    2015-02-01

    To determine the proportion of deaths attributable to suicides in rural Andhra Pradesh, India over a 4-year period using a verbal autopsy method. Deaths occurring in 45 villages (population 185,629) were documented over a 4-year period from 2003 to 2007 by non-physician healthcare workers trained in the use of a verbal autopsy tool. Causes of death were assigned by physicians trained in the International Classification of Diseases, version 10. All data were entered and processed electronically using a secure study website. Verbal autopsies were completed for 98.2% (5786) of the deaths (5895) recorded. The crude death rate was 8.0/1000. 4.8% (95% CI 4.3-5.4) of all deaths were suicides, giving a suicide rate of 37.5/100,000 population. Forty-three percent of suicides occurred in the age group 15-29 years, and 62% were in men. In the younger age groups (10-29 years), suicides by women (56%) were more common than by men (44%). Poisoning (40%) was the most common method of self-harm followed by hanging (12%). The suicide rate in this part of rural Andhra Pradesh is three times higher than the national average of 11.2/100,000, but is in line with that reported in the Million Death Study. There is an urgent need to develop strategies targeted at young individuals to prevent deaths by suicide in India. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Gastro-intestinal complications as one of causes of death in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V N Sorotskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency of gastro-intestinal (Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation as direct cause of death in pts with rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Statistical analysis of Tula region patient care institutions documentation was performed to assess frequency and character of severe GI complications leading to death of pts. 300 cases of death which took place during 5 years (1996-2000 in 3 rheumatologic (105 cases and 10 therapeutic (195 cases departments of Tula region patient care institutions were studied. Results. Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation were the direct causes of death in 15 pts with rheumatic diseases i.e. in 5% from the whole number of died. GI complications caused death in 4 pts with chronic rheumatic heart disease (HRHD (1,7%, in 7 (15,2%with rheumatoid arthritis -, in 2 with ankylosing spondylitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (8,0 and 22,2% respectively. Pts with systemic sclerosis did not die because of GI damage. GI changes most frequently localized in duodenum (8 pts. 4 pts had complications connected with gastric ulcer and in 2 diffuse erosive damage of Gl mucosa was the source of bleeding. Conclusion. Severe Gl complications quite often lead to death of pts with rheumatic diseases in Tula region.

  2. Polytrauma in the elderly: predictors of the cause and time of death

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    Muwanga Cyrus

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing age and significant pre-existing medical conditions (PMCs are independent risk factors associated with increased mortality after trauma. Our aim was to review all trauma deaths, identifying the cause and the relation to time from injury, ISS, age and PMCs. Methods A retrospective analysis of trauma deaths over a 6-year period at the study centre was conducted. Information was obtained from the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN dataset, hospital records, death certificates and post-mortem reports. The time and cause of death, ISS, PMCs were analysed for two age groups ( Results Patients ≥ 65 years old were at an increased risk of death (OR 6.4, 95% CI 5.2-7.8, p 15 and died within the first 24 hours of admission, irrespective of age, from causes directly related to their injuries. Twelve patients with an ISS of Conclusion Elderly patients with minor injuries and PMCs have an increased risk of death relative to their younger counterparts and are more likely to die of medical complications late in their hospital admission.

  3. Maternal Mortality Ratio and Causes of Death in IRI Between 2009 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahiddastjerdy, Marzieh; Changizi, Nasrin; Habibollahi, Abas; Janani, Leila; Farahani, Zahra; Babaee, Farah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Maternal Mortality Ratio is an important health indicator. We presented the distribution and causes of maternal mortality in Islamic Republic of Iran. Materials and methods: After provision of an electronic Registry system for date entry, a descriptive-retrospective data collection had been performed for all maternal Deaths in March 2009- March 2012. All maternal deaths and their demographic characteristic were identified by using medical registries, death certificates, and relevant codes according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) during pregnancy, labor, and 42 days after parturition. Results: During 3 years, there were 5094317 deliveries and 941 maternal deaths (MMR of 18.5 per 1000000 live births). We had access to pertained data of 896 cases (95.2%) for review in our study. Of 896 reported deaths, 549 were classified as direct, 302 as indirect and 45 as unknown. Hemorrhage was the most common cause of maternal mortality, followed by Preeclampsia, Eclampsia and sepsis. Among all indirect causes, cardio -vascular diseases were responsible for 10% of maternal deaths, followed by thromboembolism, HTN and renal diseases. Conclusion: Although maternal mortality ratio in IRI could be comparable with the developed countries but its pattern is following developing countries and with this study we had provided reliable data for other prospective studies. PMID:28101117

  4. Variants in TSPYL1 are not associated with sudden infant death syndrome in a cohort of deceased infants from Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Stephanie; Haas, Cordula; Bartsch, Christine; Mirshekarnejad, Mandana; Kohrs, Sarah; Roettinger, Irene; Grosshennig, Anika; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Scholz, Caroline; Schmidtke, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is currently the major cause of an unexpected and unexplained death of infants in the first year of lifetime in industrialized countries. Besides environmental factors also genetic factors have been identified as risk factors for SIDS. Notably, the mutation c.457dupG (p.Glu153Glyfs*17) in the TSPYL1 gene has been reported to cause autosomal recessive sudden infant death with dysgenesis of the testes syndrome (SIDDT) in an Old Order Amish community in Pennsylvania. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether variants of TSPYL1 are associated with the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the area of Europe from which the Amish descended. Mutation analysis of the entire TSPYL1 gene was performed in a cohort of 165 SIDS cases with mostly Swiss ethnic origin, in comparison to 163 German controls. Eight known polymorphisms were detected, none of which was significantly associated with SIDS. One deceased girl was heterozygous for the hitherto unreported TSPYL1 variant c.106C>G (p.Leu36Val), and two affected girls were heterozygous for the rare known TSPYL1 variant rs140756663 (c.1098C>A, p.Phe366Leu). In addition, one deceased boy was heterozygous for the rare common silent nucleotide substitution c.718C>T (p.Leu240Leu, rs150144081), while one control was heterozygous for the rare silent nucleotide substitution rs56190632 (c.760C>T; p.Leu254Leu). In silico analyses predicted a likely non-pathogenic effect for p.Leu36Val and p.Phe366Leu, respectively, although protein features might be affected. The Amish founder mutation was not detected in the analyzed SIDS cases and controls. Mutations and polymorphisms in the TSPYL1 gene were not associated with SIDS in a cohort of 165 deceased Swiss infants.

  5. Cubital tunnel syndrome caused by hypertrophic burn scarring: Sonographic envisage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alparslan Bayram Carli

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In nerve entrapment syndromes, an electrodiagnostic study during physical examination would usually suffice to assess localization of injury. However, in daily clinical practice, sometimes it may be necessary to depict the insight; in other words to use an imaging tool. From this point of view, with its manifold advantages, ultrasound (US is superior to other imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. According to a study, US increased the sensitivity of electrodiagnostic studies from 78% to 98%. By presenting a patient with cubital tunnel syndrome caused by hypertrophic scarring, we wanted to highlight the complementary role of US in nerve entrapment syndromes in confirming the entrapment, as well as the usefulness of it in the follow-up period of burn patients. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(2.000: 44-46

  6. Prevalence and causes of back pain syndromes in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Smirnova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of literature devoted to epidemiology, and the nosological and syndromal structure of back pain in children. The data of our own study of school-aged children with back pain are presented. The structure of back pain syndromes in 105 children has been analyzed using the medical aid appealability data. The results of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental study demonstrated that the children mostly had lumbosacral pain (52.4% of cases; neck pain was observed in 29.5% of cases; while thoracic pain syndromes were observed in 18.1% of cases. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was diagnosed in 16.19% of children; congenital abnormalities of the spine, in 15.2%; scoliosis (idiopathic and secondary, in 8.6%; and Scheuermann-Mau's disease, in 5.71%. The conclusion has been made about the high prevalence of back pain in schoolchildren. Muscular tonic syndromes were prevailing in the clinical structure in children; radicular syndromes were less frequent. Musculoskeletal disorders were the main causes of back pain. Congenital defect of the connective tissue was often observed, which was revealed as functional instability of the vertebral motor segment, spondylolisthesis due to weak ligaments, and disc protrusions. Congenital abnormalities of the spine, scoliosis, and Scheuermann-Mau' disease were observed less often. 

  7. Growing burden of sepsis-related mortality in northeastern Italy: a multiple causes of death analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Ugo; Piccinni, Pasquale; Schievano, Elena; Saugo, Mario; Pellizzer, Giampietro

    2016-07-13

    Few population-based data are available on mortality due to sepsis. The aim of the study was to estimate sepsis-related mortality rates and to assess the associated comorbidities. From multiple causes of death data (MCOD) of the Veneto Region (northeastern Italy), all deaths with sepsis mentioned anywhere in the death certificate were retrieved for the period 2008-2013. Among these deaths the prevalence of common chronic comorbidities was investigated, as well as the distribution of the underlying cause of death (UCOD), the single disease selected from all condition mentioned in the certificate and usually tabulated in mortality statistics. Age-standardized mortality rates were computed for sepsis selected as the UCOD, and for sepsis mentioned anywhere in the certificate. Overall 16,906 sepsis-related deaths were tracked. Sepsis was mentioned in 6.3 % of all regional deaths, increasing from 4.9 in 2008 to 7.7 % in 2013. Sepsis was the UCOD in 0.6 % of total deaths in 2008, and in 1.6 % in 2013. Age-standardized mortality rates increased by 45 % for all sepsis-related deaths, and by 140 % for sepsis as the UCOD. Sepsis was often reported in the presence of chronic comorbidities, especially neoplasms, diabetes, circulatory diseases, and dementia. Respiratory tract and intra-abdominal infections were the most frequently associated sites of infection. MCOD analyses provide an estimate of the burden of sepsis-related mortality. MCOD data suggest an increasing importance attributed to sepsis by certifying physicians, but also a real increase in mortality rates, thus confirming trends reported in some other countries by analyses of hospital discharge records.

  8. Causes of death in the human immunodeficiency virus population in Western Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikkiah Forbes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monitoring the causes of death in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in the era of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings has implications as more deaths are reported for reasons other than AIDS. Aims: To determine the causes of mortality in HIV-infected adults in Western Jamaica. Materials and Methods: Patients with HIV infection with a death certificate with a known cause of death between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Results: There were 189 patients. Co-morbidities were present in 25.3%. The mean age at death was 42.4 years. Early disease (World Health Organization [WHO] stages 1 or 2 was the presentation in 21.5% while 78.6% presented with advanced disease (WHO stages 3 or 4. The mean CD4 count at diagnosis was 95 cells/mm 3 . In patients presenting with early disease, 14.2% presented with sexually transmitted infections, 22.8% skin manifestations, and 14.2% lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting with late disease, 41.7% had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP, 18.9% central nervous system (CNS toxoplasmosis, 11.3% HIV-associated nephropathy, and 5% cryptococcal meningitis. At death, 72.6% were in WHO class 4, and 21.2% class 3. The average CD4 count at death was 75.5 cells/mm 3 . Overall, 55.2% of the patients had received highly active antiretroviral therapy. PCP accounted for 42.9% of deaths, 27.3% had CNS opportunistic infections, HIV nephropathy 16.4%, and 4.6% had malignancies. About 52.3% of patients died within 1 year of diagnosis with HIV, while 68.3% died within 2 years. Conclusion: Patients with HIV are presenting with late disease and dying of conditions that are AIDS-related. Efforts to improve early diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed in Jamaica.

  9. Impact of a hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on leading causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-05-16

    The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals reporting excessive heart disease deaths. We compared crude, age-adjusted, and race/ethnicity-adjusted proportions of leading, underlying causes of death reported during death certification by intervention and nonintervention hospitals during preintervention (January-June 2009) and postintervention (January-June 2010) periods. We also examined trends in leading causes of death for 2000 through 2010. At intervention hospitals, heart disease deaths declined by 54% postintervention; other leading causes of death (ie, malignant neoplasms, influenza and pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases) increased by 48% to 232%. Leading causes of death at nonintervention hospitals changed by 6% or less. In the preintervention period, differences in leading causes of death between intervention and nonintervention hospitals persisted after controlling for race/ethnicity and age; in the postintervention period, age accounted for most differences observed between intervention and nonintervention hospitals. Postintervention, malignant neoplasms became the leading cause of premature death (ie, deaths among patients aged 35-74 y) at intervention hospitals. A hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting led to substantial changes to other leading causes of death, changing the leading cause of premature death. Heart disease overreporting is likely obscuring the true levels of cause-specific mortality.

  10. Clinical and Pathologic Characteristics of Myocarditis as a Cause of Sudden Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Clinical and Pathologic Characteristics of  Myocarditis  as a Cause of Sudden Death Lena Avedissian, Jennifer A. McNear, David A. Appel, Laudino M...00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Clinical and Pathologic Characteristics of Myocarditis as a Cause of Sudden Death 5a. CONTRACT...unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18  Myocarditis  as a

  11. Causes of maternal deaths at Tezpur medical college AND hospital, Tezpur, Assam, India: a retrospective study

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    Rumen Chandra Boro

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: In our study it is observed that anaemia, haemorrhage and toxaemia are the three major causes of maternal deaths in TMCH, Tezpur. Obstructed labour, sepsis, unsafe abortions, etc. are the causes of the rest of the maternal deaths. It is seen from the study that illiteracy, ignorance, unawareness, poor socioeconomic conditions, lack of antenatal checkups, non-availability of quality care set ups, and drawbacks in referral systems were the major causative factors. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(4.000: 1006-1009

  12. [Opinionating on the cause of poisoning and death in fire victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Teresa; Nowicka, Joanna; Kabiesz-Neniczka, Stanisława

    2007-01-01

    In the years 1995-2005, 273 cases of fatalities resulting from a fire were investigated in the Chair of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice. To explain the circumstances and determine the cause of death, in each case, autopsies, as well as toxicological determinations of toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen cyanide, were carried out. Alcohol intoxication status of the victims was also determined. Based on the obtained results, comprehensive toxicological and medico-legal opinions on the cause of death of all the examined fire-associated fatalities were done.

  13. An international delphi study of the causes of death and the criteria used to assign cause of death in bovine perinatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, J F; Sanchez-Miguel, C; Doherty, M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to elicit opinion from two groups of veterinarians [subject matter experts and non-subject matter experts] about the causes of bovine perinatal mortality and the criteria used to assign such causes. The subject matter experts were selected on the basis of their scientific publications or experience of working in a veterinary diagnostic or research laboratory in the area of bovine perinatal mortality. The non-subject matter experts were self-selected as cattle veterinarians without particular expertise in bovine perinatology. A total of 74 veterinarians (46 subject matter experts and 28 non-subject matter experts) from 23 countries responded. The study was conducted using Delphi methodology over seven rounds. Respondents were asked to agree the causes of bovine perinatal mortality and for each cause to agree the supporting diagnostic criteria. There was a close agreement between groups on 16 causes of death apart from intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR) and micronutrient imbalances which were accepted by fewer subject matter experts. There was inter-group consensus on the criteria to diagnose accidents, congenital defects, dystocia, hyperthermia, infections, premature placental separation, prematurity and prolonged calving. There was inter-group consensus on the criteria to diagnose anoxia, apart from gingival cyanosis; on haemorrhage, apart from haemorrhagic anaemia; on IUGR, apart from organ weights; and on iodine imbalance, apart from goitre and thyroid iodine content. The results from this study highlighted the current lack of standardization of the criteria used to define the cause of death for bovine perinatal mortality and the need for such standardization.

  14. Causes of death in patients with long outliving period injured in traffic accidents

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    Micić Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As long as a direct chain of events can be traced from the injury to the death, then the initial injury must be considered to be the basic cause of death, and this fact may have profound legal implications for both civil compensation and criminal responsibility. Some of the most difficult problems in forensic pathology concern deaths from which posttraumatic complications are disputed as being fatal causative factors. The agony and dying are irreversible dynamic patho-physiological processes. By autopsy only the morphological consequences of these processes could be noted by dissector. The dynamics of dying, direct correlation between initial injury and death, as well as appearance and development of complications provoked by trauma could be established only by clinical medical data. Therefore medical clinical data are critical for forensic pathologists and for solving the problems about the mode and manner of death in cases with long outliving period. Microscopical findings have only academic and scientific importance and are less useful in daily practice. The authors suggest that all complications of injury must be generally involved in autopsy reports, and all severe injuries should separately be registrated both in medical data and autopsy reports. The finding of cause of death must include all observed severe injuries and not only one of the most severe injuries and its complications.

  15. Lipoma causing Guyon's canal syndrome: a case report and review

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    Narayanathu Chellappantilla Sreekumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal leads to Guyon's canal syndrome. Lipoma is a rare cause of such compressions with only 12 cases reported previously. We report a 55-year-old man who presented with swelling in the left hand with decreased sensation in the ring and little fingers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signals in T1-weighted and T2-weighted images with suppression of the short T1 inversion recovery signal, suggestive of lipoma. On exploration a well-encapsulated, dumbbell-shaped, fatty tumor was seen in the hypothenar space and Guyon's canal. The tumor was enucleated in toto. At 6-month follow-up, the patient had fully regained sensation. A review of the literature is presented for similar cases where a lipoma was the cause of Guyon's canal syndrome.

  16. Therapeutic Management of Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome Causing Ulnar Nerve Entrapment

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    Emanuele Cigna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The hypothenar hammer syndrome is a rare traumatic vascular disease of the hand. Method and Materials. We report the case of a 43-years-old man with a painful tumefaction of the left hypothenar region. The ulnar artery appeared thrombosed clinically and radiologically. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the ulnar nerve compression and revascularise the artery. Results. The symptoms disappeared immediately after surgery. The arterial flow was reestablished. Postoperatively on day 20, a new thrombosis of the ulnar artery occurred. Conclusion. Hypothenar hammer syndrome is caused by repetitive trauma to the heel of the hand. The alterations of the vessel due to its chronic inflammation caused an acute compression of the ulnar nerve at the Guyon's canal and, in our case, do not allow a permanent revascularisation of the ulnar artery.

  17. US County-Level Trends in Mortality Rates for Major Causes of Death, 1980–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer-Lindgren, Laura; Bertozzi-Villa, Amelia; Stubbs, Rebecca W.; Morozoff, Chloe; Kutz, Michael J.; Huynh, Chantal; Barber, Ryan M.; Shackelford, Katya A.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; van Lenthe, Frank J.; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Naghavi, Mohsen; Mokdad, Ali H.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE County-level patterns in mortality rates by cause have not been systematically described but are potentially useful for public health officials, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve health and reduce geographic disparities. OBJECTIVES To demonstrate the use of a novel method for county-level estimation and to estimate annual mortality rates by US county for 21 mutually exclusive causes of death from 1980 through 2014. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Redistribution methods for garbage codes (implausible or insufficiently specific cause of death codes) and small area estimation methods (statistical methods for estimating rates in small subpopulations) were applied to death registration data from the National Vital Statistics System to estimate annual county-level mortality rates for 21 causes of death. These estimates were raked (scaled along multiple dimensions) to ensure consistency between causes and with existing national-level estimates. Geographic patterns in the age-standardized mortality rates in 2014 and in the change in the age-standardized mortality rates between 1980 and 2014 for the 10 highest-burden causes were determined. EXPOSURE County of residence. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cause-specific age-standardized mortality rates. RESULTS A total of 80 412 524 deaths were recorded from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2014, in the United States. Of these, 19.4 million deaths were assigned garbage codes. Mortality rates were analyzed for 3110 counties or groups of counties. Large between-county disparities were evident for every cause, with the gap in age-standardized mortality rates between counties in the 90th and 10th percentiles varying from 14.0 deaths per 100 000 population (cirrhosis and chronic liver diseases) to 147.0 deaths per 100 000 population (cardiovascular diseases). Geographic regions with elevated mortality rates differed among causes: for example, cardiovascular disease mortality tended to be highest along the

  18. Trismus Pseudocamptodactyly Syndrome: A Sporadic Cause of Trismus

    OpenAIRE

    Prathima Sreenivasan; Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Sumal V. Raj; Manasa Anand Meundi

    2013-01-01

    Trismus pseudocamptodactyly syndrome is a very rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by the inability to completely open the mouth (trismus) and the presence of abnormally short tendon units causing the fingers to curve (camptodactyly). Early diagnosis and management of this condition is important to prevent facial deformities in the patient. Reporting such a case is important as case reports are one of the sources of data for calculating the prevalence of rare diseases. He...

  19. Validity of a minimally invasive autopsy tool for cause of death determination in pediatric deaths in Mozambique: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassat, Quique; Castillo, Paola; Martínez, Miguel J; Jordao, Dercio; Lovane, Lucilia; Hurtado, Juan Carlos; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Santos Ritchie, Paula; Bandeira, Sónia; Sambo, Calvino; Chicamba, Valeria; Ismail, Mamudo R; Carrilho, Carla; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Fernandes, Fabiola; Cisteró, Pau; Mayor, Alfredo; Cossa, Anelsio; Mandomando, Inacio; Navarro, Mireia; Casas, Isaac; Vila, Jordi; Munguambe, Khátia; Maixenchs, Maria; Sanz, Ariadna; Quintó, Llorenç; Macete, Eusebio; Alonso, Pedro; Menéndez, Clara; Ordi, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, the world has witnessed unprecedented progress in child survival. However, our knowledge of what is killing nearly 6 million children annually in low- and middle-income countries remains poor, partly because of the inadequacy and reduced precision of the methods currently utilized in these settings to investigate causes of death (CoDs). The study objective was to validate the use of a minimally invasive autopsy (MIA) approach as an adequate and more acceptable substitute for the complete diagnostic autopsy (CDA) for pediatric CoD investigation in a poor setting. In this observational study, the validity of the MIA approach in determining the CoD was assessed in 54 post-neonatal pediatric deaths (age range: ≥1 mo to 15 y) in a referral hospital of Mozambique by comparing the results of the MIA with those of the CDA. Concordance in the category of disease obtained by the two methods was evaluated by the Kappa statistic, and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the MIA diagnoses were calculated. A CoD was identified in all cases in the CDA and in 52/54 (96%) of the cases in the MIA, with infections and malignant tumors accounting for the majority of diagnoses. The MIA categorization of disease showed a substantial concordance with the CDA categorization (Kappa = 0.70, 95% CI 0.49-0.92), and sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were high. The ICD-10 diagnoses were coincident in up to 75% (36/48) of the cases. The MIA allowed the identification of the specific pathogen deemed responsible for the death in two-thirds (21/32; 66%) of all deaths of infectious origin. Discrepancies between the MIA and the CDA in individual diagnoses could be minimized with the addition of some basic clinical information such as those ascertainable through a verbal autopsy or clinical record. The main limitation of the analysis is that both the MIA and the CDA include some degree of expert subjective interpretation. The

  20. Malnutrition is associated with increased mortality in older adults regardless of the cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Lisa; Rosenblad, Andreas; Thors Adolfsson, Eva; Bergkvist, Leif

    2017-02-01

    Malnutrition predicts preterm death, but whether this is valid irrespective of the cause of death is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether malnutrition is associated with cause-specific mortality in older adults. This cohort study was conducted in Sweden and included 1767 individuals aged ≥65 years admitted to hospital in 2008-2009. On the basis of the Mini Nutritional Assessment instrument, nutritional risk was assessed as well nourished (score 24-30), at risk of malnutrition (score 17-23·5) or malnourished (score malnutrition, and 9·4 % of the participants were malnourished. During a median follow-up of 5·1 years, 839 participants (47·5 %) died. The multiple Cox regression model identified significant associations (hazard ratio (HR)) between malnutrition and risk of malnutrition, respectively, and death due to neoplasms (HR 2·43 and 1·32); mental or behavioural disorders (HR 5·73 and 5·44); diseases of the nervous (HR 4·39 and 2·08), circulatory (HR 1·95 and 1·57) or respiratory system (HR 2·19 and 1·49); and symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (HR 2·23 and 1·43). Malnutrition and risk of malnutrition are associated with increased mortality regardless of the cause of death, which emphasises the need for nutritional screening to identify older adults who may require nutritional support in order to avoid preterm death.

  1. Evaluating the Cause of Death in Obese Individuals: A Ten-Year Medical Autopsy Study

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    Jad Saab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity is a growing public health problem associated with increased morbidity and rate of death. Postmortem examination is imperative to determine the cause of death, to detect clinically unsuspected disease entities, and consequently to determine the actual impact of obesity on patient mortality. Methods. A total of 849 adult autopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and nonobese patients were separately studied. The primary cause of death in each group was categorized into malignancy, infection, stroke, ischemic and nonischemic heart disease, pulmonary embolism, hemorrhage, and primary nonneoplastic diseases of different organ systems. Results. Of 849 autopsies, 32.3% were obese. The leading causes of death in the obese population were malignancy (31.4%, infection (25.9%, ischemic heart disease (12.8%, and pulmonary embolism (6.2%. Obese individuals were statistically more likely to die from pulmonary embolism and liver disease and less likely to die from neurologic diseases and nonischemic heart disease. Conclusion. Autopsies on obese individuals constitute a third of all adult medical autopsies in our center. Increased death rates in the obese due to pulmonary embolism and liver disease should receive special clinical attention. Autopsy findings in the obese population should contribute to overall premortem disease detection, prevention, and management.

  2. Intronic splicing mutations in PTCH1 cause Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bholah, Zaynab; Smith, Miriam J; Byers, Helen J; Miles, Emma K; Evans, D Gareth; Newman, William G

    2014-09-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the tumour suppressor PTCH1. Routine clinical genetic testing, by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, identifies a mutation in 60-90 % of cases. We undertook RNA analysis on lymphocytes from ten individuals diagnosed with Gorlin syndrome, but without known PTCH1 mutations by exonic sequencing or MLPA. Two altered PTCH1 transcripts were identified. Genomic DNA sequence analysis identified an intron 7 mutation c.1068-10T>A, which created a strong cryptic splice acceptor site, leading to an intronic insertion of eight bases; this is predicted to create a frameshift p.(His358Alafs*12). Secondly, a deep intronic mutation c.2561-2057A>G caused an inframe insertion of 78 intronic bases in the cDNA transcript, leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gly854fs*3). The mutations are predicted to cause loss of function of PTCH1, consistent with its tumour suppressor function. The findings indicate the importance of RNA analysis to detect intronic mutations in PTCH1 not identified by routine screening techniques.

  3. Risk Factors of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Risk Factors for Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Relationship between major risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep disorders in the infants is the subject of review and discussion. Improper micro-environmental characteristics (especially poor environmental organisation and lack of developmental stimulation), pre-term delivery and/or infant low birth weight, prone sleep…

  4. "What to Say" and "What Not to Say" to the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzenried, John

    The responses of friends and acquaintances of parents whose child has died as the result of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome can be helpful and supportive or they can be guilt-producing, painful, and destructive. Some destructive responses experienced by parents in those circumstances include questioning such as, "Did you...?" which implies that…

  5. Infant Temperament Characteristics Related to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Its Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2006-01-01

    Three major components have been repeatedly implicated for the origin(s) of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): system, minor sickness and surroundings. All these factors also frame infant temperament, and therefore it seems logical to suppose that the babies who either succumb to or are at risk of SIDS may present with certain behavioral…

  6. Leptomeningeal neurons are a common finding in infants and are increased in sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rickert, Christian H.; Gross, Oliver; Nolte, Kay W.; Vennemann, Mechtild; Bajanowski, Thomas; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Developmental abnormalities of the brain, in particular, the brainstem potentially affecting centers for breathing, circulation and sleep regulation, are thought to be involved in the etiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In order to investigate whether leptomeningeal neurons could serve

  7. SIDS Family Adjustment Scale: A Method of Assessing Family Adjustment to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Harold J.; Breme, Frederick J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and the family's resultant grief process. Explores SIDS as a family crisis, and by identifying the psychological factors or tasks pertinent to family adjustment, proposes a SIDS Family Adjustment Scale which assists in recognizing adaptive and maladaptive grief responses. (Author)

  8. Leptomeningeal neurons are a common finding in infants and are increased in sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rickert, Christian H.; Gross, Oliver; Nolte, Kay W.; Vennemann, Mechtild; Bajanowski, Thomas; Brinkmann, Bernd

    Developmental abnormalities of the brain, in particular, the brainstem potentially affecting centers for breathing, circulation and sleep regulation, are thought to be involved in the etiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In order to investigate whether leptomeningeal neurons could serve

  9. Does β-APP staining of the brain in infant bed-sharing deaths differentiate these cases from sudden infant death syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Byard, Roger W

    2014-01-01

    Archival cerebral tissue from infants whose deaths were attributed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) from South Australia and Western Denmark were stained for β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) and graded according to a simple scoring chart. The resulting APP scores were correlated...

  10. Age-related differences in mechanism, cause, and location of trauma deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Rikke; Thomsen, Annemarie Bondegaard; Theilade, Peter

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trauma death has traditionally been described as primarily occurring in young men exposed to penetrating trauma or road traffic accidents. The epidemiology of trauma fatalities in Europe may change as a result of the increasing proportion of elderly patients. The goal of this study...... was to describe age-related differences in trauma type, mechanism, cause and location of death in a well-defined European region. METHODS: We prospectively registered all trauma patients and severe burn patients in eastern Denmark over 12 consecutive months. We analyzed all trauma fatalities in our region...... regarding the trauma type, mechanism, cause and location of death. RESULTS: A total of 2923 patients were registered, of which 292 (9.9%) died within 30 days. Mortality increased with age, with a mortality of 46.1% in patients older than 80 years old. Blunt trauma was the most frequent trauma type at all...

  11. Validating hierarchical verbal autopsy expert algorithms in a large data set with known causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, Henry D; Perin, Jamie; Black, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Physician assessment historically has been the most common method of analyzing verbal autopsy (VA) data. Recently, the World Health Organization endorsed two automated methods, Tariff 2.0 and InterVA-4, which promise greater objectivity and lower cost. A disadvantage of the Tariff method is that it requires a training data set from a prior validation study, while InterVA relies on clinically specified conditional probabilities. We undertook to validate the hierarchical expert algorithm analysis of VA data, an automated, intuitive, deterministic method that does not require a training data set. Using Population Health Metrics Research Consortium study hospital source data, we compared the primary causes of 1629 neonatal and 1456 1-59 month-old child deaths from VA expert algorithms arranged in a hierarchy to their reference standard causes. The expert algorithms were held constant, while five prior and one new "compromise" neonatal hierarchy, and three former child hierarchies were tested. For each comparison, the reference standard data were resampled 1000 times within the range of cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMF) for one of three approximated community scenarios in the 2013 WHO global causes of death, plus one random mortality cause proportions scenario. We utilized CSMF accuracy to assess overall population-level validity, and the absolute difference between VA and reference standard CSMFs to examine particular causes. Chance-corrected concordance (CCC) and Cohen's kappa were used to evaluate individual-level cause assignment. Overall CSMF accuracy for the best-performing expert algorithm hierarchy was 0.80 (range 0.57-0.96) for neonatal deaths and 0.76 (0.50-0.97) for child deaths. Performance for particular causes of death varied, with fairly flat estimated CSMF over a range of reference values for several causes. Performance at the individual diagnosis level was also less favorable than that for overall CSMF (neonatal: best CCC = 0.23, range 0

  12. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L

    2016-07-28

    BACKGROUND This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. CASE REPORT A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. CONCLUSIONS We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby.

  13. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepsch, Lucilia B; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Scavone, Critoforo

    2015-01-01

    To study cocaine's toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN) staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

  14. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilia B. Lepsch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study cocaine’s toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2 and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

  15. A “wear and tear” hypothesis to explain Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Elhaik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is the leading cause of death in USA infants under one year of age accounting for approximately 2,700 deaths per year. Although formally SIDS dates back at least 2,000 years and was even mentioned in the Hebrew Bible (Kings 3:19 its etiology remains unexplained prompting the CDC to initiate a sudden unexpected infant death case registry in 2010. Due to their total dependence, the ability of the infant to allostatically regulate stressors and stress responses shaped by genetic and environmental factors is severely constrained. We propose that SIDS is the result of cumulative painful, stressful, or traumatic exposures that begin in utero and tax neonatal regulatory systems incompatible with allostasis. We also identify several putative biochemical mechanisms involved in SIDS. We argue that the important characteristics of SIDS, namely male predominance (60:40, the significantly different SIDS rate in USA Hispanics (80% lower compared to whites, 50% of cases occurring between 7.6 and 17.6 weeks after birth with only 10% after 24.7 weeks, and seasonal variation with most cases occurring during winter, are all associated with common environmental stressors, such as neonatal circumcision and seasonal illnesses. We predict that neonatal circumcision is associated with hypersensitive to pain and decreased heart rate variability which increase the risk for SIDS. We also predict that neonatal male circumcision will account for the SIDS gender bias and that cultures that practice high male circumcision rates, like USA whites, will have higher SIDS rates compared to cultures with lower circumcision rates. SIDS rates will also be higher in USA states where Medicaid covers circumcision and lower among cultures that do not practice neonatal circumcision and/or cannot afford to pay for circumcision. We last predict that winter-born premature infants who are circumcised will be at higher risk of SIDS compared to infants who

  16. A “Wear and Tear” Hypothesis to Explain Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhaik, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death among USA infants under 1 year of age accounting for ~2,700 deaths per year. Although formally SIDS dates back at least 2,000 years and was even mentioned in the Hebrew Bible (Kings 3:19), its etiology remains unexplained prompting the CDC to initiate a sudden unexpected infant death case registry in 2010. Due to their total dependence, the ability of the infant to allostatically regulate stressors and stress responses shaped by genetic and environmental factors is severely constrained. We propose that SIDS is the result of cumulative painful, stressful, or traumatic exposures that begin in utero and tax neonatal regulatory systems incompatible with allostasis. We also identify several putative biochemical mechanisms involved in SIDS. We argue that the important characteristics of SIDS, namely male predominance (60:40), the significantly different SIDS rate among USA Hispanics (80% lower) compared to whites, 50% of cases occurring between 7.6 and 17.6 weeks after birth with only 10% after 24.7 weeks, and seasonal variation with most cases occurring during winter, are all associated with common environmental stressors, such as neonatal circumcision and seasonal illnesses. We predict that neonatal circumcision is associated with hypersensitivity to pain and decreased heart rate variability, which increase the risk for SIDS. We also predict that neonatal male circumcision will account for the SIDS gender bias and that groups that practice high male circumcision rates, such as USA whites, will have higher SIDS rates compared to groups with lower circumcision rates. SIDS rates will also be higher in USA states where Medicaid covers circumcision and lower among people that do not practice neonatal circumcision and/or cannot afford to pay for circumcision. We last predict that winter-born premature infants who are circumcised will be at higher risk of SIDS compared to infants who experienced fewer

  17. Coding ill-defined and unknown cause of death is 13 times more frequent in Denmark than in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylijoki-Sørensen, Seija; Sajantila, Antti; Lalu, Kaisa; Bøggild, Henrik; Boldsen, Jesper Lier; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2014-11-01

    Exact cause and manner of death determination improves legislative safety for the individual and for society and guides aspects of national public health. In the International Classification of Diseases, codes R00-R99 are used for "symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified" designated as "ill-defined" or "with unknown etiology". The World Health Organisation recommends avoiding the use of ill-defined and unknown causes of death in the death certificate as this terminology does not give any information concerning the possible conditions that led to the death. Thus, the aim of the study was, firstly, to analyse the frequencies of R00-R99-coded deaths in mortality statistics in Finland and in Denmark and, secondly, to compare these and the methods used to investigate the cause of death. To do so, we extracted a random 90% sample of the Finnish death certificates and 100% of the Danish certificates from the national mortality registries for 2000, 2005 and 2010. Subsequently, we analysed the frequencies of forensic and medical autopsies and external clinical examinations of the bodies in R00-R99-coded deaths. The use of R00-R99 codes was significantly higher in Denmark than in Finland; OR 18.6 (95% CI 15.3-22.4; pFinland, all of these deaths were investigated with a forensic autopsy. Our study suggests that if all deaths in all age groups with unclear cause of death were systematically investigated with a forensic autopsy, only 2-3/1000 deaths per year would be coded as an ill-defined and unknown cause of death in national mortality statistics. At the same time the risk to overlook unnatural deaths is decreased to a minimum. To achieve this in Denmark requires that the existing legislation on cause of death investigation would need to be changed to ensure that all deaths with unknown cause of death are investigated with a forensic autopsy.

  18. Trends in the leading causes of death in Korea, 1983-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daroh; Ha, Mina; Song, Inmyung

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze trends in the 10 leading causes of death in Korea from 1983 to 2012. Death rates were derived from the Korean Statistics Information Service database and age-adjusted to the 2010 population. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to identify the points when statistically significant changes occurred in the trends. Between 1983 and 2012, the age-standardized death rate (ASR) from all causes decreased by 61.6% for men and 51.2% for women. ASRs from malignant neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, and transport accidents increased initially before decreasing. ASRs from hypertensive diseases, heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases and diseases of the liver showed favorable trends (ASR % change: -94.4%, -53.8%, -76.0%, and -78.9% for men, and -77.1%, -36.5%, -67.8%, and -79.9% for women, respectively). ASRs from pneumonia decreased until the mid-1990s and thereafter increased. ASRs from intentional self-harm increased persistently since around 1990 (ASR % change: 122.0% for men and 217.4% for women). In conclusion, death rates from all causes in Korea decreased significantly in the last three decades except in the late 1990s. Despite the great strides made in the overall mortality, temporal trends varied widely by cause. Mortality trends for malignant neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, pneumonia and intentional self-harm were unfavorable.

  19. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke mortality estimates in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study are based on routine mortality statistics and redistribution of ill-defined codes that cannot be a cause of death, the so-called 'garbage codes' (GCs). This study describes the contribution of these codes to stroke...

  20. Medical causes of death in a teaching hospital in South‑Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-25

    Apr 25, 2014 ... Other important causes of death in order of prevalence were cerebrovascular accident (10.5%) ... chronic liver disease (7.0%), septicemia (6.5%), respiratory failure ... Key words: Chronic kidney disease, infections, medical wards, mortality, Nigeria .... others were anemia's, lymphomas, and acute pulmonary.

  1. Unexpected death caused by rupture of a dilated aorta in an adult male with aortic coarctation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Knudsen, Peter Juel Thiis

    2015-01-01

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is a congenital aortic narrowing. We describe for the first time the findings obtained by unenhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in a case where the death was caused by cardiac tamponade from a ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic...

  2. Long-term mortality and causes of death associated with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotland, N; Uhre, M L; Mejer, N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data describing long-term mortality in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is scarce. This study investigated risk factors, causes of death and temporal trends in long-term mortality associated with SAB. METHODS: Nationwide population-based matched cohort study...

  3. Gitelman's syndrome as a cause of poorly controlled hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Z; Salinger-Martinovic, S; Mitic, B; Nikolic, V

    2015-01-01

    Gitelman's syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive tubulopathy caused by a defect of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride co-transporter at the distal tubule, leading to hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, hypocalciuria and low-to-normal blood pressure. Clinical features include transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, dizziness, abdominal pains and constipation. Patients can also present with convulsions due to severe metabolic alkalosis or hypomagnesemia. Therefore, early recognition and treatment are important. Diagnosis of Gitelman's syndrome is usually made incidentally during adolescence or early adulthood based on clinical and biochemical findings. In this paper we present the case of a 23-year-old female patient referred to our nephrology department for severe hypokalemia. Complementary evaluation revealed hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis, increased chloride and sodium urinary excretion and reduced urinary calcium excretion with normal renal function. A diagnosis of Gitelman syndrome was established. Treatment included magnesium and potassium salts and potassium saving diuretics. In general, the long-term prognosis of Gitelman's syndrome is good if the patient adhere with the treatment.

  4. Histopathological changes in lungs of the mountain snow avalanche victims and its potential usefulness in determination of cause and mechanism of death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kobek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available On 28 January 2003 snow avalanche in the Polish Tatras happened, in which 8 people died and 5 were injured. We tried to determine cause and manner of death in 6 fatal victims instead of advanced late post mortem changes in internal organs. Taking into consideration the circumstances of death, we paid special attention to histopathological examination of lungs, extended by Gomori’s and AZAN staining. Pattern of the changes was similar to those observed in forensic medicine in cases of asphyxia due to airway obstruction and/or immobilization of chest and abdomen (Perthes’ syndrome. Histopathological study with the use of more specific staining methods has a significant diagnostic value during establishing the cause and mechanism of death of the deceased snow avalanche victims with advanced post mortem changes.

  5. Histopathological changes in lungs of the mountain snow avalanche victims and its potential usefulness in determination of cause and mechanism of death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kobek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available On 28 January 2003 snow avalanche in the Polish Tatras happened, in which 8 people died and 5 were injured. We tried to determine cause and manner of death in 6 fatal victims instead of advanced late post mortem changes in internal organs. Taking into consideration the circumstances of death, we paid special attention to histopathological examination of lungs, extended by Gomori’s and AZAN staining. Pattern of the changes was similar to those observed in forensic medicine in cases of asphyxia due to airway obstruction and/or immobilization of chest and abdomen (Perthes’ syndrome. Histopathological study with the use of more specific staining methods has a significant diagnostic value during establishing the cause and mechanism of death of the deceased snow avalanche victims with advanced post mortem changes.

  6. [Histopathological changes in lungs of the mountain snow avalanche victims and its potential usefulness in determination of cause and mechanism of death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobek, Mariusz; Skowronek, Rafał; Jabłoński, Christian; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Pałasz, Artur

    On 28 January 2003 snow avalanche in the Polish Tatras happened, in which 8 people died and 5 were injured. We tried to determine cause and manner of death in 6 fatal victims instead of advanced late post mortem changes in internal organs. Taking into consideration the circumstances of death, we paid special attention to histopathological examination of lungs, extended by Gomori's and AZAN staining. Pattern of the changes was similar to those observed in forensic medicine in cases of asphyxia due to airway obstruction and/or immobilization of chest and abdomen (Perthes' syndrome). Histopathological study with the use of more specific staining methods has a significant diagnostic value during establishing the cause and mechanism of death of the deceased snow avalanche victims with advanced post mortem changes.

  7. Impact of a Hospital-Level Intervention to Reduce Heart Disease Overreporting on Leading Causes of Death

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. Methods A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals rep...

  8. Longevity in Slovenia: Past and potential gains in life expectancy by age and causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrič Dolinar, Aleša; Došenović Bonča, Petra; Sambt, Jože

    2017-06-01

    In Slovenia, longevity is increasing rapidly. From 1997 to 2014, life expectancy at birth increased by 7 and 5 years for men and women, respectively. This paper explores how this gain in life expectancy at birth can be attributed to reduced mortality from five major groups of causes of death by 5-year age groups. It also estimates potential future gains in life expectancy at birth. The importance of the five major causes of death was analysed by cause-elimination life tables. The total elimination of individual causes of death and a partial hypothetical adjustment of mortality to Spanish levels were analysed, along with age and cause decomposition (Pollard). During the 1997-2014 period, the increase in life expectancy at birth was due to lower mortality from circulatory diseases (ages above 60, both genders), as well as from lower mortality from neoplasms (ages above 50 years) and external causes (between 20 and 50 years) for men. However, considering the potential future gains in life expectancy at birth, by far the strongest effect can be attributed to lower mortality due to circulatory diseases for both genders. If Spanish mortality rates were reached, life expectancy at birth would increase by more than 2 years, again mainly because of lower mortality from circulatory diseases in very old ages. Life expectancy analyses can improve evidence-based decision-making and allocation of resources among different prevention programmes and measures for more effective disease management that can also reduce the economic burden of chronic diseases.

  9. Cause of Sudden Cardiac Deaths on Autopsy Findings; a Four-Year Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Rao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD has been steadily increasing all over the world. While knowing the cause of SCD is one of the favorites of the physicians involved with these cases, it is very difficult and challenging task for the forensic physician. The present report is a prospective study regarding cause of SCDs on autopsy examination in four-year period, Bangalore, India. Methods: The present prospective study is based on autopsy observations, carried out for four-year period from 2008 to 2011, and analyzed for cause of SCDs. The cases were chosen as per the definition of sudden death and autopsied. The material was divided into natural and unnatural groups. Finally, on histopathology, gross examination, hospital details, circumstantial, and police reports the cause of death was inferred. Results: A total of 2449 autopsy was conducted of which 204 cases were due to SCD. The highest SCDs were reported in 50-60 years age group (62.24%; n-127, followed closely by the age group 60-69 (28.43%; n-58. Male to female ratio was around 10:1. The maximum number of deaths (n=78 was within few hours (6 hours after the onset of signs and symptoms. In 24 (11.8% cases major narrowing was noted in both the main coronaries, in 87 (42.6% cases in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD, and in 18 (51.5% cases in the right coronary artery (RCA. The major cardiac pathology resulting in sudden death was coronary artery disease (n-116; 56.86% and myocardial infarction (n-104; 50.9%. most of the SCDs occurred in the place of residence (n-80; 39.2% followed closely by death in hospital (n-49; 24.01%. Conclusion: Coronary occlusion was the major contributory cause of sudden death with cardiac origin and the highest number of deaths were reported in the age 50-59 years with male to female ratio of 10:1. 

  10. Nationwide population-based study of cause-specific death rates in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salahadeen, E; Torp-Pedersen, C; Gislason, G;

    2015-01-01

    with severe psoriasis. The age at time of death varied by psoriasis status, i.e. 76.5 ± 14.0, 74.4 ± 12.8 and 72.0 ± 13.4 years, for the general population, mild psoriasis and severe psoriasis respectively. In general, the highest death rates were observed in patients with severe psoriasis. Overall death...... and nationwide data have not been presented previously. METHODS: In a nationwide population-based cohort we evaluated all-cause and cause-specific death rates in patients with psoriasis as compared to the general population. RESULTS: The entire Danish population aged 18 and above, corresponding to a total of 5......,458,627 individuals (50.7% female, 40.9 years ± 19.7), including 94,069 with mild psoriasis (53% female, 42.0 ± 17.0 years) and 28,253 with severe psoriasis (53.4% female, 43.0 ± 16.5 years), was included. A total of 884,661 deaths were recorded, including 10 916 in patients with mild psoriasis and 3699 in patients...

  11. Subvalvular aortic stenosis as a cause of sudden death: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Arzu Akcay; Guven, Taner; Karayel, Ferah; Pakis, Isil; Gurpinar, Kagan; Ozaslan, Abdi

    2006-03-01

    Sudden death is defined as a death that occurs suddenly, develops during an unpredictable course, and is due to natural or unnatural causes. Although there is no universally standardized definition on how "sudden" a sudden death is, WHO defines sudden death as a death that occurs within 24 hours after the onset of symptoms. The aim of this study is to present 2 rarely reported autopsy cases and to emphasize the importance of systemic autopsy at sudden death. On macroscopic examination, crescent-shaped, thick, fibrous membranes, located 5 mm and 3 mm away from the aortic valves, were detected. Fibrous membranes extended from the ventricular septum to the left ventricular outflow tract, thus apparently narrowing this region. Left ventricular wall and septum were slightly thickened, and there were scattered grayish-white areas of a small diameter. These became more intense in the septum and myocardium of the left ventricle on the anterior plane of the myocardial sections. In both cases, the aortic valves of were thickened and also markedly narrowed on one of them. In this case, the fibrous membrane adhered to the aortic valve and extended to the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve at one side. Both aortic valves comprised 3 leaflets. Other valves and coronary arteries showed no macroscopic pathologic findings. Microscopic examination of both cases demonstrated that the fibrous membrane comprising abundant collagen fibers was situated on the ventricular septum. Hypertrophy, moderate to severe interstitial fibrosis, and focal areas of scarring were observed in the specimens taken from the septal and ventricular myocardium. No abnormality was found on the conduction system examinations. Toxicologic analysis results in blood were negative. Based on the findings, membranous-type (discrete type) subvalvular aortic stenosis, diagnosed during the autopsy, was considered as the cause of sudden death in both cases.

  12. Mortality and causes of death among asylum seekers in the Netherlands, 2002-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostrum, I E A; Goosen, S; Uitenbroek, D G; Koppenaal, H; Stronks, K

    2011-04-01

    The world's growing population of asylum seekers faces different health risks from the populations of their host countries because of risk factors before and after migration. There is a current lack of insight into their health status. A unique notification system was designed to monitor mortality in Dutch asylum seeker centres (2002-2005). Standardised for age and sex, overall mortality among asylum seekers shows no difference from the Dutch population. However, it differs between subpopulations by sex, age and region of origin and by cause of death. Mortality among asylum seekers is higher than among the Dutch reference population at younger ages and lower at ages above 40. The most common causes of death among asylum seekers are cancer, cardiovascular diseases and external causes. Increased mortality was found from infectious diseases (males, standardised mortality ratio (SMR)=5.44 (95% CI 3.22 to 8.59); females, SMR=7.53 (95% CI 4.22 to 12.43)), external causes (males, SMR=1.95 (95% CI 0.52 to 2.46); females SMR=1.60 (95% CI 0.87 to 2.68)) and congenital anomalies in females (SMR 2.42; 95% CI 1.16 to 4.45). Considerable differences were found between regions of origin. Maternal mortality was increased (rate ratio 10.08; 95% CI 8.02 to 12.83) as a result of deaths among African women. Certain subgroups of asylum seekers (classified by age, sex and region of origin) are at increased risk of certain causes of death compared with the host population. Policies and services for asylum seekers should address both causes for which asylum seekers are at increased risk and causes with large absolute mortality, taking into account differences between subgroups.

  13. Causas de óbito em pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida, necropsiados na Fundação de Medicina Tropical do Amazonas Causes of death among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome autopsied at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Leopoldina Santos de Souza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar em 129 pacientes com AIDS, necropsiados na Fundação de Medicina Tropical do Amazonas de 1996 a 2003, as causas do óbito, observando o grau de concordância entre os diagnósticos necroscópicos com os diagnósticos clínicos. A doença mais freqüente que causou o óbito foi tuberculose 28%, seguida de pneumonia bacteriana 17%, histoplasmose 13%, toxoplasmose 10%, pneumocistose 8%, criptococose 5%, sepse bacteriana 4% e 15% outras causas. A concordância entre o diagnóstico clínico antemortem e a necropsia foi de 51,9%. O principal órgão acometido foi o pulmão 82,2%. O tempo de sobrevivência após o diagnóstico laboratorial até o óbito variou entre um mês e 120 meses. A média de sobrevivência foi 15 dias e 56% morreram menos de um mês após o diagnóstico, 15 pacientes morreram na mesma data do diagnóstico. Esses resultados demonstram a importância da necropsia na causa mortis em pacientes com AIDS.The aim of this study was to investigate the causes of death among 129 AIDS patients that were autopsied at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas between 1996 and 2003. The degree of concordance between the autopsy diagnoses and the clinical diagnoses was observed. The disease that most frequently caused death was tuberculosis (28%, followed by bacterial pneumonia (17%, histoplasmosis (13%, toxoplasmosis (10%, pneumocystosis (8%, cryptococcosis (5%, bacterial sepsis (4% and other causes (15%. The concordance between the clinical diagnosis before death and the autopsy was 51.9%. The main organ involved was the lungs (82.2%. The length of survival from the time of the laboratory diagnosis to death ranged from one month to 120 months. The mean length of survival was 15 days and 56% died less than one month after the diagnosis, while 15 patients died on the same day that they were diagnosed. These results show the importance of autopsies in elucidating the causes of death among AIDS patients.

  14. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Toshiki; Tsurumi, Yuko; Tsurumi, Arihito

    2017-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1). No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury.

  15. Cerebral Salt-Wasting Syndrome Caused by Minor Head Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Fukuoka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old woman was admitted to hospital after sustaining a head injury in a motor vehicle accident (day 1. No signs of neurological deficit, skull fracture, brain contusion, or intracranial bleeding were evident. She was discharged without symptoms on day 4. However, headache and nausea worsened on day 8, at which time serum sodium level was noted to be 121 mEq/L. Treatment with sodium chloride was initiated, but serum sodium decreased to 116 mEq/L on day 9. Body weight decreased in proportion to the decrease in serum sodium. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was diagnosed. This case represents the first illustration of severe hyponatremia related to cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by a minor head injury.

  16. Origins of the E. coli Strain Causing an Outbreak of Hemolytic–Uremic Syndrome in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasko, David A.; Webster, Dale R.; Sahl, Jason W.; Bashir, Ali; Boisen, Nadia; Scheutz, Flemming; Paxinos, Ellen E.; Sebra, Robert; Chin, Chen-Shan; Iliopoulos, Dimitris; Klammer, Aaron; Peluso, Paul; Lee, Lawrence; Kislyuk, Andrey O.; Bullard, James; Kasarskis, Andrew; Wang, Susanna; Eid, John; Rank, David; Redman, Julia C.; Steyert, Susan R.; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Struve, Carsten; Petersen, Andreas M.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Nataro, James P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND A large outbreak of diarrhea and the hemolytic–uremic syndrome caused by an unusual serotype of Shiga-toxin–producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4) began in Germany in May 2011. As of July 22, a large number of cases of diarrhea caused by Shiga-toxin–producing E. coli have been reported — 3167 without the hemolytic–uremic syndrome (16 deaths) and 908 with the hemolytic–uremic syndrome (34 deaths) — indicating that this strain is notably more virulent than most of the Shiga-toxin–producing E. coli strains. Preliminary genetic characterization of the outbreak strain suggested that, unlike most of these strains, it should be classified within the enteroaggregative pathotype of E. coli. METHODS We used third-generation, single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing to determine the complete genome sequence of the German outbreak strain, as well as the genome sequences of seven diarrhea-associated enteroaggregative E. coli serotype O104:H4 strains from Africa and four enteroaggregative E. coli reference strains belonging to other serotypes. Genomewide comparisons were performed with the use of these enteroaggregative E. coli genomes, as well as those of 40 previously sequenced E. coli isolates. RESULTS The enteroaggregative E. coli O104:H4 strains are closely related and form a distinct clade among E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli strains. However, the genome of the German outbreak strain can be distinguished from those of other O104:H4 strains because it contains a prophage encoding Shiga toxin 2 and a distinct set of additional virulence and antibiotic-resistance factors. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that horizontal genetic exchange allowed for the emergence of the highly virulent Shiga-toxin–producing enteroaggregative E. coli O104:H4 strain that caused the German outbreak. More broadly, these findings highlight the way in which the plasticity of bacterial genomes facilitates the emergence of new pathogens. PMID:21793740

  17. Frontal mucocele with intracranial extension causing frontal lobe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmayer, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Mucoceles are mucus-containing cysts that form in paranasal sinuses; although mucoceles themselves are benign, this case report highlights the extensive damage they can cause as their expansion may lead to bony erosion and extension of the mucocele into the orbit and cranium; it also presents a rarely reported instance of frontal sinus mucocele leading to frontal lobe syndrome. A thorough discussion and review of mucoceles is included. A 68-year-old white man presented with intermittent diplopia and a pressure sensation in the right eye. He had a history of chronic sinusitis and had had endoscopic sinus surgery 5 years prior. A maxillofacial computed tomography scan revealed a large right frontal sinus mucocele, which had caused erosion along the medial wall of the right orbit and the outer and inner tables of the right frontal sinus. The mucocele had protruded both into the right orbit and intracranially, causing mass effect on the frontal lobe, which led to frontal lobe syndrome. The patient was successfully treated with endoscopic right ethmoidectomy, radial frontal sinusotomy, marsupialization of the mucocele, and transcutaneous irrigation. Paranasal sinus mucoceles may expand and lead to bony erosion and can become very invasive in surrounding structures such as the orbit and cranium. This case not only exhibits a very rare presentation of frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial extension and frontal lobe mass effect causing a frontal lobe syndrome but also demonstrates many of the ocular and visual complications commonly associated with paranasal sinus mucoceles. Early identification and surgical intervention is vital for preventing and reducing morbidity associated with invasive mucoceles, and the patient must be followed regularly to monitor for recurrence.

  18. The "Annie hypothesis": did the death of his daughter cause Darwin to "give up Christianity"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyhe, John; Pallen, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    This article examines one of the most widely believed episodes in the life of Charles Darwin, that the death of his daughter Annie in 1851 caused the end of Darwin's belief in Christianity, and according to some versions, ended his attendance of church on Sundays. This hypothesis, it is argued, is commonly treated as a straightforward true account of Darwin's life, yet there is little or no supporting evidence. Furthermore, we argue, there is sufficient evidence that Darwin's loss of faith occurred before Annie's death.

  19. Case report of death from falling: Did heart tumor cause syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takuma; Takasu, Kosho; Emoto, Yuko; Shikata, Nobuaki; Matoba, Ryoji

    2012-07-01

    A healthy man in his 30s was working on the balustrade of stairs on the second floor. He suddenly fell downstairs without saying anything. On emergency hospitalization, chest echogram showed left hemothorax. Cardiac echogram showed a floating mass from the mitral valve in the left ventricle and severe mitral regurgitation. Surgery for hemothorax and pulmonary contusion was immediately undertaken. However, bleeding from pulmonary contusion could not be controlled and he underwent cardiopulmonary arrest. Autopsy showed a white, elastic, pendulous mass in the left atrium and a white mass in the lower lobe of the left lung. Tumor histology showed a reticular pattern, Schiller-Duval bodies, eosinophilic hyaline globules, and positive staining for α-fetoprotein. We diagnosed primary lung yolk sac tumor with metastatic intracardiac yolk sac tumor, a rare and highly malignant germ cell tumor. It usually arises in the ovaries and testes, and intracardiac yolk sac tumor is rare. Intracavitary tumors induce obstruction of inflow into and outflow from the ventricular cavity. The most common clinical presentation is dyspnea and syncope. In the present case, metastatic cardiac yolk sac tumor might have disturbed cardiac outflow and affected hemodynamics, probably causing syncope. Unfortunately, he was in a high place at that time and fell to receive pulmonary contusion that led to death. Autopsy may sometimes reveal latent diseases which might be related to the cause of death. We should perform autopsy thoroughly to diagnose not only the cause of death but also the factors leading to death.

  20. Comparing verbal autopsy cause of death findings as determined by physician coding and probabilistic modelling: a public health analysis of 54 000 deaths in Africa and Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Byass

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coverage of civil registration and vital statistics varies globally, with most deaths in Africa and Asia remaining either unregistered or registered without cause of death. One important constraint has been a lack of fit–for–purpose tools for registering deaths and assigning causes in situations where no doctor is involved. Verbal autopsy (interviewing care–givers and witnesses to deaths and interpreting their information into causes of death is the only available solution. Automated interpretation of verbal autopsy data into cause of death information is essential for rapid, consistent and affordable processing. Methods: Verbal autopsy archives covering 54182 deaths from five African and Asian countries were sourced on the basis of their geographical, epidemiological and methodological diversity, with existing physician–coded causes of death attributed. These data were unified into the WHO 2012 verbal autopsy standard format, and processed using the InterVA–4 model. Cause–specific mortality fractions from InterVA–4 and physician codes were calculated for each of 60 WHO 2012 cause categories, by age group, sex and source. Results from the two approaches were assessed for concordance and ratios of fractions by cause category. As an alternative metric, the Wilcoxon matched–pairs signed ranks test with two one–sided tests for stochastic equivalence was used. Findings: The overall concordance correlation coefficient between InterVA–4 and physician codes was 0.83 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.91 and this increased to 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99 when HIV/AIDS and pulmonary TB deaths were combined into a single category. Over half (53% of the cause category ratios between InterVA–4 and physician codes by source were not significantly different from unity at the 99% level, increasing to 62% by age group. Wilcoxon tests for stochastic equivalence also demonstrated equivalence. Conclusions: These findings show strong concordance

  1. Psychosocial therapy and causes of death after deliberate self-harm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, J; Stuart, E A; Lind, B D;

    2016-01-01

    .9%) of 5678 patients in the psychosocial therapy group had died, compared with 1736 (10.2%) of 17 034 patients in the matched comparison group. Lower odds ratios of dying by mental or behavioural disorders [0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37-0.79], alcohol-related causes (0.63, 95% CI 0.......5-448.4) for mental or behavioural disorders as a cause of death, 111.1 (95% CI 79.2-210.5) for alcohol-related causes and 96.8 (95% CI 69.1-161.8) for other diseases and medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that psychosocial therapy after deliberate self-harm might reduce long-term risk of death...

  2. Gut microbiome and immunity: possible role in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul N Goldwater

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiome influences the development of the immune system of young mammals; the establishment of a normal gut microbiome is thought to be important for the health of the infant during its early development. As the role of bacteria in the causation of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is backed by strong evidence, the balance between host immunity and potential bacterial pathogens is likely to be pivotal. Bacterial colonisation of the infant colon is influenced by age, mode of delivery, diet, environment, and antibiotic exposure. The gut microbiome influences several systems including gut integrity and development of the immune system; therefore, gut microflora could be important in protection against bacteria and/or their toxins identified in SIDS infants. The aims of the review are to explore 1 the role of the gut microbiome in relation to the developmentally critical period in which most SIDS cases occur; 2 the concept of an abnormal gut microbiome causing inflammation resulting in transit of bacteria from the lumen into the bloodstream; and 3 clinical, physiological, pathological and microbiological evidence for bacteraemia leading to the final events in SIDS pathogenesis.

  3. An analysis of the cause and countermeasure of death of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome%重症阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征患者死亡原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆泉; 王强; 蔡晓岚; 李海燕; 刘洪英

    2010-01-01

    Objective To discuss the causes and countermeasures of death of severe obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients undergoing tests or treatment. Methods A retrospective study of the data of six patients with severe OSAHS who died undergoing tests or treatment in 6 hospitals was conducted. Results Among the 6 patients, overly fat were found in 2 cases, hypertension in 2 cases, cardiac diseases in 2 cases, abnormal pulmonary function or chest X-ray in 2 cases, diabetes in 2 cases, while 2 cases had no above positive finding. Three patients did not have polysomnography (PSC). One patient died during PSG test. Two patients' apnea hypopnea index (AHI) were 56 times/h and 82 times/h respectively. The causes of death were as follows, two patients died of airway obstruction and unsuccessful tracheal intubation before uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) operation. One died of encephaledema in long-term coma due to airway obstruction, long time poor oxygenation and unsuccessful tracheal intubation with muscle relaxants before hemostasis procedure for treating postoperative hemorrhage. One patient whose preoperative pulmonary function showed increased airway resistence died of cardiac and respiratory arrest after tracheal extubation when UPPP surgery finished. One who was found to have potential cardiac and pulmonary disorder died of cardiac arrest when doctors were replacing his tracheal intubation with a cannula, before the tube replacing procedure the patient was conscious. One who had hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus and adiposis suffering from respiratory acidosis with his electrocardiogram showing a level-three heart function died of cardiac arrest with repeated apnea during PSG monitoring. Conclusions OSAHS patients with severe complications should be treated extremely carefully. The indication of surgery should be strictly observed. OSAHS patients can not undergo surgery until their cardiopulmonary functions and general conditions

  4. A defect in dystrophin causes a novel porcine stress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonneman Dan J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Losses of slaughter-weight pigs due to transport stress are both welfare and economic concerns to pork producers. Historically, the HAL-1843 mutation in ryanodine receptor 1 was considered responsible for most of the losses; however, DNA testing has effectively eliminated this mutation from commercial herds. We identified two sibling barrows in the USMARC swine herd that died from apparent symptoms of a stress syndrome after transport at 12 weeks of age. The symptoms included open-mouth breathing, skin discoloration, vocalization and loss of mobility. Results We repeated the original mating along with sire-daughter matings to produce additional offspring. At 8 weeks of age, heart rate and electrocardiographs (ECG were monitored during isoflurane anesthesia challenge (3% for 3 min. Four males from the original sire-dam mating and two males from a sire-daughter mating died after one minute of anesthesia. Animals from additional litters were identified as having a stress response, sometimes resulting in death, during regular processing and weighing. Affected animals had elevated plasma creatine phosphokinase (CPK levels before and immediately after isoflurane challenge and cardiac arrhythmias. A pedigree containing 250 pigs, including 49 affected animals, was genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and only one chromosomal region, SSCX at 25.1-27.7 Mb over the dystrophin gene (DMD, was significantly associated with the syndrome. An arginine to tryptophan (R1958W polymorphism in exon 41 of DMD was the most significant marker associated with stress susceptibility. Immunoblots of affected heart and skeletal muscle showed a dramatic reduction of dystrophin protein and histopathology of affected hearts indicated muscle fiber degeneration. Conclusions A novel stress syndrome was characterized in pigs and the causative genetic factor most likely resides within DMD that results in less dystrophin protein and cardiac

  5. Life Expectancy and Cause of Death in Popular Musicians: Is the Popular Musician Lifestyle the Road to Ruin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Dianna T; Asher, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Does a combination of lifestyle pressures and personality, as reflected in genre, lead to the early death of popular musicians? We explored overall mortality, cause of death, and changes in patterns of death over time and by music genre membership in popular musicians who died between 1950 and 2014. The death records of 13,195 popular musicians were coded for age and year of death, cause of death, gender, and music genre. Musician death statistics were compared with age-matched deaths in the US population using actuarial methods. Although the common perception is of a glamorous, free-wheeling lifestyle for this occupational group, the figures tell a very different story. Results showed that popular musicians have shortened life expectancy compared with comparable general populations. Results showed excess mortality from violent deaths (suicide, homicide, accidental death, including vehicular deaths and drug overdoses) and liver disease for each age group studied compared with population mortality patterns. These excess deaths were highest for the under-25-year age group and reduced chronologically thereafter. Overall mortality rates were twice as high compared with the population when averaged over the whole age range. Mortality impacts differed by music genre. In particular, excess suicides and liver-related disease were observed in country, metal, and rock musicians; excess homicides were observed in 6 of the 14 genres, in particular hip hop and rap musicians. For accidental death, actual deaths significantly exceeded expected deaths for country, folk, jazz, metal, pop, punk, and rock.

  6. Heart Rate Distribution and Cause-specific Death in General Population of South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoqing; Rao Xuxu; Mai Jinzhuang; Wu Yong; Guo Chenye; Shi Meiling; Gao Xiangmin; Deng Mulan; Lian Zibing

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To analyses heart rate (HR) distribution of healthy adults in the south China community and evaluate relative risk of HR to total cause of death and cardiac cerebral vascular death. Methods Analytical data come from the baseline survey and follow-up visits in the PRC-USA Collaborative Study of Cardiovascular Epidemiology in urban and rural samples of Guangzhou. The baseline survey was initiated in 1983 and 1984, and rescanned in 1987 and 1988. Since 1991 Follow-up visits for endpoint events were carried once every two years.Average follow-up year was 16.2 from baseline to 2000.People excluded from cardiac cerebral vascular disease, diabetes and other various chronic diseases were regarded as "healthy adults". Heart rates of these subjects were measured on resting electrocardiogram.Endpoint evens include: total cause of death, first attack of coronary disease and cerebral vascular events.SAS software was used for analysis. Cox Proportional Hazards model was used to evaluate the impact of HR on total death and cardiac cerebral vascular disease.Results A total of 4570 men and women aged 35-55years from urban and rural Guangzhou were investigated. 3493 healthy subjects were enrolled in the analysis, including 1694 men and 1799 women. Mean of theHRis (67.9±10.6) beats/min (bpm) in the whole population, ( 66.3 ± 10.7 ) bpm in men and (69.3 ±10.4) in women. The 5th percentile of the HR was 51 in men and 54 in women. The 95th percentile of the HR was 85 in men and 88 in women. Single correlation analysis showed there was negative relationship between age and HR, but it was only statistical significant in female. Analysis with Cox Proportional Hazards model show that HR < 50 bpm tops the risk of total causes of death (1.725)and HR 50-59 bpm decreased the risk of total causes of death (0.843).Relative risk of cardiac cerebral vascular events exceeds 1 when HR < 50 and >90 bpm (1.486 and 7.008 respectively). It was less than 1 in other groups but there was

  7. Sudden Cardiac Death and Post Cardiac Arrest Syndrome. An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Endre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A satisfactory neurologic outcome is the key factor for survival in patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD, however this is highly dependent on the haemodynamic status. Short term cardiopulmonary resuscitation and regained consciousness on the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC is indicative of a better prognosis. The evaluation and treatment of SCD triggering factors and of underlying acute and chronic diseases will facilitate prevention and lower the risk of cardiac arrest. Long term CPR and a prolonged unconscious status after ROSC, in the Intensive Care Units or Coronary Care Units, indicates the need for specific treatment and supportive therapy including efforts to prevent hyperthermia. The prognosis of these patients is unpredictable within the first seventy two hours, due to unknown responses to therapeutic management and the lack of specific prognostic factors. Patients in these circumstances require the highest level of intensive care and aetiology driven treatment without any delay, independently of their coma state. Current guidelines sugest the use of multiple procedures in arriving at a diagnosis and prognosis of these critical cases.

  8. Oxygen metabolism and reactive oxygen species cause chromosomal rearrangements and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The absence of Tsa1, a key peroxiredoxin that functions to scavenge H2O2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causes the accumulation of a broad spectrum of mutations including gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs). Deletion of TSA1 also causes synthetic lethality in combination with mutations in RAD6 and several key genes involved in DNA double-strand break repair. In the present study we investigated the causes of GCRs and cell death in these mutants. tsa1-associated GCRs were independent of the ...

  9. Mortality and causes of death in autism spectrum disorders - An update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, S.E.; Hansen, H.B.; Rich, B.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared mortality among Danish citizens with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with that of the general population. A clinical cohort of 341 Danish individuals with variants of ASD, previously followed over the period 1960-93, now on average 43 years of age, were updated with respect...... to mortality and causes of death. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for various times after diagnosis. In all, 26 persons with ASD had died, whereas the expected number of deaths was 13.5. Thus the mortality risk among those with ASD was nearly twice that of the general population. The SMR...... was particularly high in females. The excess mortality risk has remained unchanged since our first study in 1993. Eight of the 26 deaths were associated with epilepsy and four died from epilepsy. Future staff education should focus on better managing of the complex relationships between ASD and physical illness...

  10. Mortality and causes of death in autism spectrum disorders: An update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rich, Bente

    2008-01-01

    This study compared mortality among Danish citizens with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with that of the general population. A clinical cohort of 341 Danish individuals with variants of ASD, previously followed over the period 1960-93, now on average 43 years of age, were updated with respect...... to mortality and causes of death. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for various times after diagnosis. In all, 26 persons with ASD had died, whereas the expected number of deaths was 13.5. Thus the mortality risk among those with ASD was nearly twice that of the general population. The SMR...... was particularly high in females. The excess mortality risk has remained unchanged since our first study in 1993. Eight of the 26 deaths were associated with epilepsy and four died from epilepsy. Future staff education should focus on better managing of the complex relationships between ASD and physical illness...

  11. Alcohol-induced Cushing syndrome. Hypercortisolism caused by alcohol abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, F; Pereira, A M; Smit, J W A

    2011-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS), a rare syndrome caused by overexposure to glucocorticoids, is difficult to diagnose. The underlying causes of CS include pituitary and ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) producing tumours and adrenal adenomas or hyperplasia. Alcoholism, however, can cause similar symptoms, giving rise to a so-called pseudo-Cushing state, which aggravates the differential diagnostic dilemmas of CS. To document any specific clinical or biochemical features of alcohol-induced CS. A Medline computer-aided search was performed to identify studies that have attempted to differentiate between alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing and CS. Only original articles, not reviews, written in English were included. A total of 62 articles were included. Clinical and biochemical abnormalities mimicking increased hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity were found in the majority of the patients, although the severity of the changes varied widely. The most frequently occurring abnormalities were: insufficient suppression after low-dose dexamethasone or increased 24-hour urinary free cortisol (UFC). After alcohol withdrawal, cortisol decreased and dexamethasone-induced suppression of cortisol increased. No differences were noted between alcoholic and control subjects after an ACTH stimulation test, insulin tolerance test or metyrapone test. Differences were found after a naloxone test and hexarelin test. Studies using corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation and tests after ethanol ingestion revealed inconclusive results. There is no clear definition for the alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing state, and hitherto studies fail to provide clues to differentiate between pseudo-Cushing and Cushing's syndrome. Only cessation of alcohol can normalise biochemical abnormalities and regress hypercortisolic symptoms.

  12. Pathomorphological cardial changes in the sudden infant death syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozumny D.V.

    2014-03-01

    disturbances and may be important in the development of sudden death in children.

  13. [Cyriax's syndrome. A cause of diagnostic error in abdominal pains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, J L; Pierrugues, R; Bories, P; Michel, H

    The slipping rib syndrome is characterized by upper abdominal pain due to irritation of the intercostal nerve by incomplete dislocation of the costal cartilage of the 8th, 9th, or 10th ribs. Twenty-three new cases are reported and the literature is reviewed. Diagnosis is only clinical. The pain is precipitated by movement and certain postures; it is faithfully reproduced by pressure on one particular point of the costal margin and is relieved by local injection of an anaesthetic. Pain from a slipping rib is usually attributed to visceral causes, which is a source of diagnostic errors.

  14. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Chakrabarti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome.

  15. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Cristina; Goldstein, Jorge; Silberstein, Claudia; Zotta, Elsa; Belardo, Marcela; Repetto, Horacio A

    2008-10-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, plaquetopenia and kidney damage. It is the leading cause of acute renal failure in pediatric age and the second for chronic renal failure. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the first etiologic agent of HUS being its main reservoir cattle and transmitted via contaminated food. At present, there is no specific treatment to reduce the progression of HUS. The study of the mechanisms by which STEC infects and Shiga toxin induces HUS can help to find new strategies to prevent this disease.

  16. Unusual cause of childhood anemia: Imerslund grasbeck syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishan Prasad Hosapatna Laxminarayana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imerslund Grasbeck syndrome (IGS is a rare autosomal recessive childhood disorder characterized by selective Vitamin (vit B 12 malabsorption with asymptomatic proteinuria without any structural renal pathology. The patients stay healthy for decades with life-long parenteral vit B12. We report a case of young female who presented with pancytopenia and proteinuria, evaluated in local hospitals as chronic hemolytic anemia (autoimmune cause, finally diagnosed as IGS on complete evaluation. She was treated with injectable vit B12 (1000 μg cyanocobalalmin and showed drastic recovery. IGS should be considered in patients with megaloblastic anemia not responding to oral vit B12 and associated proteinuria.

  17. The importance of microbiological testing for establishing cause of death in 42 forensic autopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, S

    2015-05-01

    Microorganisms have always been one of the great challenges of humankind, being responsible for both high morbidity and mortality throughout history. In a forensic setting microbiological information will always be difficult to interpret due to lack of antemortem information and changes in flora postmortem. With this study we aim to review the use of microbiological procedures at our forensic institute. In a retrospective study including 42 autopsies performed at our Institute, where microbiological test had been applied, analyses were made with regard to: type of microbiological tests performed, microorganisms found, histological findings, antemortem information, C-reactive protein measurement and cause of death. Fiftyone different microorganisms were found distributed among 37 cases, bacteria being the most abundant. Nineteen of the cases were classified as having a microbiological related cause of death. C-reactive protein levels were raised in 14 cases of the 19 cases, histological findings either supported or were a decisive factor for the classification of microbiologically related cause of death in 14 cases. As a multitude of abundant microorganisms are able to cause infection under the right circumstances, all findings should be compared to anamnestic antemortem information, before conclusions are drawn. A definite list of true pathogens is nearly impossible to compile.

  18. Prehospital Dextrose Extravasation Causing Forearm Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Matthew; Colella, M Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman was found at home by paramedics to be hypoglycemic with altered mental status. She had multiple attempts at IV access and eventually a 22G IV was established and D50 was infused into her right forearm. Extravasation of the dextrose was noted after approximately 12 g of the medication was infused. She was given a dose of glucagon intramuscularly and her mental status improved. Shortly after her arrival to the emergency department, she was noted to have findings of compartment syndrome of her forearm at the site of the dextrose extravasation. She was evaluated by plastic surgery and taken to the operating room for emergent fasciotomy. She recovered well from the operation. D50 is well known to cause phlebitis and local skin necrosis as a complication. This case illustrates the danger of compartment syndrome after D50 extravasation. It is the first documented case of prehospital dextrose extravasation leading to compartment syndrome. There may be safer alternatives to D50 administration and providers must be acutely aware to monitor for D50 infusion complications.

  19. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  20. Who died of what in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: a cause of death analysis using InterVA-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Mossong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: For public health purposes, it is important to see whether men and women in different age groups die of the same causes in South Africa. Objective: We explored sex- and age-specific patterns of causes of deaths in a rural demographic surveillance site in northern KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa over the period 2000–2011. Design: Deaths reported through the demographic surveillance were followed up by a verbal autopsy (VA interview using a standardised questionnaire. Causes of death were assigned likelihoods using the publicly available tool InterVA-4. Cause-specific mortality fractions were determined by age and sex. Results: Over the study period, a total of 5,416 (47% and 6,081 (53% deaths were recorded in men and women, respectively. Major causes of death proportionally affecting more women than men were (all p<0.0001: human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS (20.1% vs. 13.6%, other and unspecified cardiac disease (5.9% vs. 3.2%, stroke (4.5% vs. 2.7%, reproductive neoplasms (1.7% vs. 0.4%, diabetes (2.4% vs. 1.2%, and breast neoplasms (0.4% vs. 0%. Major causes of deaths proportionally affecting more men than women were (all p<0.0001 assault (6.1% vs. 1.7%, pulmonary tuberculosis (34.5% vs. 30.2%, road traffic accidents (3.0% vs. 1.0%, intentional self-harm (1.3% vs. 0.3%, and respiratory neoplasms (2.5% vs. 1.5%. Causes of death due to communicable diseases predominated in all age groups except in older persons. Conclusions: While mortality during the 2000s was dominated by tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we found substantial sex-specific differences both for communicable and non-communicable causes of death, some which can be explained by a differing sex-specific age structure. InterVA-4 is likely to be a valuable tool for investigating causes of death patterns in other similar Southern African settings.

  1. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Tamara C; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C

    2016-01-01

    Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis.

  2. Causes of death due to hematological and non-hematological cancers in 57 US patients with type 1 Gaucher Disease who were never treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, Neal J; Lee, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) have increased risk of developing myeloma, other hematological cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma, and other solid tumors. Patient awareness of the GD1-cancer association causes anxiety and fear. Little is known about cancer as a cause of death in GD1, especially in patients never treated with GD1-specific therapies. Consequently, the effect of treatment on cancer mortality in GD1 patients is difficult to evaluate. In this review, starting with a population of 184 GD1 cases never treated, we annotate and analyze the causes of death of 57 GD1 patients who died of cancer. The proportional mortality ratio (PMR) for all malignancies in patients with GD1 is 1.57 (p = 0.0002), but it is much higher for myeloma (PMR = 9.66) and other hematological cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma, and kidney cancer (PMR = ≍4). However, deaths from colorectal and pancreatic cancers were not more frequent than expected, and deaths from lung, breast, gynecological, and prostate cancer occurred less than anticipated. Herein, we discuss whether GD1 is truly a hereditary cancer syndrome and the problem of comorbidities and cancer risk assessment, and we speculate as to whether the variability in death by cancer type might be attributable to biochemical sequelae of tumor cell and macrophage/stromal cell GBA1 mutation affecting signals for metastasis, the process most closely associated with cancer mortality.

  3. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  4. CtIP Mutations Cause Seckel and Jawad Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Qvist

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome is a recessively inherited dwarfism disorder characterized by microcephaly and a unique head profile. Genetically, it constitutes a heterogeneous condition, with several loci mapped (SCKL1-5 but only three disease genes identified: the ATR, CENPJ, and CEP152 genes that control cellular responses to DNA damage. We previously mapped a Seckel syndrome locus to chromosome 18p11.31-q11.2 (SCKL2. Here, we report two mutations in the CtIP (RBBP8 gene within this locus that result in expression of C-terminally truncated forms of CtIP. We propose that these mutations are the molecular cause of the disease observed in the previously described SCKL2 family and in an additional unrelated family diagnosed with a similar form of congenital microcephaly termed Jawad syndrome. While an exonic frameshift mutation was found in the Jawad family, the SCKL2 family carries a splicing mutation that yields a dominant-negative form of CtIP. Further characterization of cell lines derived from the SCKL2 family revealed defective DNA damage induced formation of single-stranded DNA, a critical co-factor for ATR activation. Accordingly, SCKL2 cells present a lowered apoptopic threshold and hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Notably, over-expression of a comparable truncated CtIP variant in non-Seckel cells recapitulates SCKL2 cellular phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. This work thus identifies CtIP as a disease gene for Seckel and Jawad syndromes and defines a new type of genetic disease mechanism in which a dominant negative mutation yields a recessively inherited disorder.

  5. An approach to adjust standardized mortality ratios for competing cause of death in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhner, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The calculation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) is a standard tool for the estimation of health risks in occupational epidemiology. An increasing number of studies deal with the analysis of the mortality in employees suffering from an occupational disease like silicosis or coal-worker pneumoconiosis (CWP). Their focus lies not on the mortality risk due to the occupational disease itself, but on other diseases such as lung cancer or heart diseases. Using population-based reference rates in these studies can cause misleading results because mortality rates of the general population do not reflect the elevated mortality due to the occupational disease investigated. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to develop an approach to adjust the risk estimates for other causes of death with respect to the effect of an occupational disease as a competing cause of death in occupational mortality cohort studies. To overcome the problems associated with SMRs, the paper makes use of proportional mortality ratios (PMR), which are a further approach for the estimation of health risks in occupational epidemiology. The cause-specific SMR can be rewritten as a product of PMR times the overall SMR. The PMR can be adjusted by ignoring the competing cause of death. Hence, an adjusted cause-specific SMR can be derived by multiplying this adjusted PMR with the overall SMR. This approach is applied to studies concerning lung cancer risk in coal miners suffering from CWP. The usual approach for calculating SMRs leads to an underestimation of the real lung cancer risk in subgroups of miners suffering from CWP. The same effect can be observed in workers exposed to respirable silica already suffering from silicosis. The presented approach results in more realistic risk estimation in mortality cohort studies of employees suffering from an occupational disease. It is easily calculable on the basis of usually published values of observed cases and the corresponding cause-specific SMR.

  6. Persistent and extreme outliers in causes of death by state, 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscoe, Francis P

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, state-specific mortality rates that are high relative to national rates can result from legitimate reasons or from variability in coding practices. This paper identifies instances of state-specific mortality rates that were at least twice the national rate in each of three consecutive five-year periods (termed persistent outliers), along with rates that were at least five times the national rate in at least one five-year period (termed extreme outliers). The resulting set of 71 outliers, 12 of which appear on both lists, illuminates mortality variations within the country, including some that are amenable to improvement either because they represent preventable causes of death or highlight weaknesses in coding techniques. Because the approach used here is based on relative rather than absolute mortality, it is not dominated by the most common causes of death such as heart disease and cancer.

  7. Morbidity and Causes of Death in Patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Väkevä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL, especially mycosis fungoides, can be considered as a state of longstanding low-grade systemic inflammation. Many studies have focused on secondary cancers with CTCL, but information about comorbidities is limited. A total of 144 patients with CTCL at Helsinki University Central Hospital during 2005 to 2015 were studied to determine associated comorbidities and causes of death in this cohort. Compared with an age-standardized control population, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was increased among patients with CTCL with no link to obesity. Patients with CTCL had a lower prevalence of hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke than the control group. The 3 most common causes of death were CTCL, coronary artery disease and lung cancer. The increased risk of myocardial infarction or stroke reported previously was not detected in this patient group.

  8. A mechanism for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): Stress-induced leak via ryanodine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, David J.; Dura, Miroslav; Carturan, Elisa; Reiken, Steven; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of postneonatal mortality in the United States. Mutations in the RyR2-encoded cardiac ryanodine receptor cause the highly lethal catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT1) in the young. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum and prevalence of RyR2 mutations in a large cohort of SIDS cases. METHODS Using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, and direct DNA sequencing, a targeted mutational analysis of RyR2 was performed on genomic DNA isolated from frozen necropsy tissue on 134 unrelated cases of SIDS (57 females, 77 males; 83 white, 50 black, 1 Hispanic; average age = 2.7 months). RyR2 mutations were engineered by site-directed mutagenesis, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, and functionally characterized using single-channel recordings in planar lipid bilayers. RESULTS Overall, two distinct and novel RyR2 mutations were identified in two cases of SIDS. A 6-month-old black female hosted an R2267H missense mutation, and a 4-week-old white female infant harbored a S4565R mutation. Both nonconservative amino acid substitutions were absent in 400 reference alleles, involved conserved residues, and were localized to key functionally significant domains. Under conditions that simulate stress [Protein Kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation] during diastole (low activating [Ca2+]), SIDS-associated RyR2 mutant channels displayed a significant gain-of-function phenotype consistent with the functional effect of previously characterized CPVT-associated RyR2 mutations. CONCLUSIONS Here we report a novel pathogenic mechanism for SIDS, whereby SIDS-linked RyR2 mutations alter the response of the channels to sympathetic nervous system stimulation such that during stress the channels become “leaky” and thus potentially trigger fatal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:17556193

  9. Cause-specific neonatal deaths in rural Bangladesh, 1987-2005: Levels, trends and determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, U.R.; van Soest, A.H.O.; Bijwaard, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an analysis of neonatal mortality from communicable and non-communicable diseases in Bangladesh. The competing-risks model employed incorporated both observed and unobserved heterogeneity and allowed the two heterogeneity terms to be correlated. The data used came from the Health and Demographic Surveillance System, Matlab. The results confirm the conclusions of previous studies about the levels, trends, and causes of neonatal death in the Matlab area: the education of t...

  10. Cancer in Machado-Joseph disease patients-low frequency as a cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Kersting, Nathália; Gonçalves, Thomaz Abramsson; Pacheco, Daphne Louise Oliveira; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria-Luiza; Camey, Suzi Alves; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2017-04-01

    Since polyglutamine diseases have been related to a reduced risk of cancer, we aimed to study the 15 years cumulative incidence of cancer (CIC) (arm 1) and the proportion of cancer as a cause of death (arm 2) in symptomatic carriers of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD). SCA3/MJD and control individuals from our state were invited to participate. A structured interview was performed. CIC as published by the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, was used as populational control. Causes of death were obtained from the Public Information System on Mortality. We interviewed 154 SCA3/MJD patients and 80 unrelated controls: CIC was 7/154 (4.5%) and 5/80 (6.3%), respectively. The interim analysis for futility showed that the number of individuals required to detect a significant difference between groups (1938) would be three times larger than the existing local SCA3/MJD population (625), for an absolute risk reduction of 1.8%. Then this study arm was discontinued due to lack of power. In the same period, cancer was a cause of death in 9/101 (8.9%) SCA3/MJD and in 52/202 (26.2%) controls, with an absolute reduction risk of 17.3% (OR 0.27, 95%CI 0.13 to 0.58, p = 0.01). A significant reduction of cancer as cause of death was observed in SCA3/MJD, suggesting a common effect to all polyglutamine diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Pallister-Killian syndrome: an unusual cause of epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Carpintero, Rocio; McLellan, Ailsa; Parmeggiani, Lucio; Cockwell, Annette E; Ellis, Richard J; Cross, J Helen; Eckhardt, Susan; Guerrini, Renzo

    2005-11-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a rare, sporadic, genetic disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, learning disability, and epilepsy. It is caused by a mosaic supernumerary isochromosome 12p (i[12p]). The i(12p) is rarely found in peripheral blood but it is present in skin fibroblasts. Recognition is essential for cytogenetic diagnosis. We describe a male aged 2 years 6 months and a female aged 11 years with PKS and epileptic spasms (ES). This type of seizure is not unusual in patients with brain malformations and with severe developmental delay, but it is sometimes difficult to recognize without video-electroencephalogram studies and could be mistaken for other types of seizure or behavioural manifestations. In these two patients with PKS, spasms had late onset, persisted beyond infancy, and were drug resistant. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility in PKS, which appears to be a rare cause of ES.

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage revealing pseudohypoparathyroidism as a cause of fahr syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Abhijit; Kar, Giridhari

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT(4), low FT(3), and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  13. Leg Weakness Caused by Bilateral Piriformis Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee Bong; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kwon, Bum Sun; Park, Jin Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Lee, Ho Jun; Kim, Chang Jae

    2015-12-01

    Piriformis syndrome (PS) is an uncommon neuromuscular disorder caused by the piriformis muscle (PM) compressing the sciatic nerve (SN). The main symptom of PS is sciatica, which worsens with certain triggering conditions. Because the pathophysiology is poorly understood, there are no definite diagnostic and therapeutic choices for PS. This case report presents a young woman who mainly complained of bilateral leg weakness. Electromyography revealed bilateral sciatic neuropathy and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed structural lesions causing entrapment of the bilateral SNs. After a laborious diagnosis of bilateral PS, she underwent PM releasing surgery. Few PS cases present with bilateral symptoms and leg weakness. Therefore, in such cases, a high level of suspicion is necessary for accurate and prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  14. [Neuroleptic malignant syndrome : Rare cause of fever of unknown origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackupurakal, R; Wild, U; Kamm, M; Wappler, F; Reske, D; Sakka, S G

    2015-07-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a possible cause of fever of unknown origin (FUO) and is a potentially fatal adverse effect of various drugs, especially of neuroleptics. First generation antipsychotics, such as received by the patient described in this article, are more likely to cause NMS than second generation antipsychotics. The key symptoms are the development of severe muscle rigidity and elevated temperature associated with the use of neuroleptic medication. Malignant catatonia (MC) is an important differential diagnosis of NMS. While neuroleptics can trigger NMS and must be immediately discontinued if NMS occurs, neuroleptic therapy represents the first line treatment for MC. This article describes the case of a patient with schizoaffective disorder where initially the diagnosis of NMS was not clear. Eventually, fever and a markedly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) led to the correct diagnosis and the appropriate therapy with dantrolene, bromocriptine and amantadine. Furthermore, a thorough review of the currently available literature on NMS is provided.

  15. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  16. Establishing cause of maternal death in Malawi via facility-based review and application of the ICD-MM classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, H; Ameh, C A; Bar-Zeev, S; Adaji, S; Kachale, F; van den Broek, N

    2014-09-01

    Maternal death review (MDR) is an accepted process that is implemented across Malawi and 'underlying cause of death' is assigned by healthcare providers using a standard MDR form. Mixed-methods approach. Key informant interviews with eight stakeholders involved in MDR. Secondary analysis of MDR forms for 54 maternal deaths. Comparison of assigned cause of death by healthcare providers conducting MDR at health facility level with cause assigned by researchers using the International Classification of Diseases Maternal Mortality (ICD-MM) classification. MDR teams, analysts and policymakers reported facing challenges in completing the forms, analysing and using information. The concepts of underlying (primary) and contributing (secondary) causes of death are often misunderstood. Healthcare providers using only MDR forms reported cause of death as non-obstetric complications in 39.6% and pregnancy-related infection in 11.3% of cases. For 30.2% of cases, no clear clinical cause of death was recorded. The most commonly assigned underlying cause of death using ICD-MM was obstetric haemorrhage (32.1%), non-obstetric complications (24.5%) and pregnancy-related infection (22.6%). There was poor agreement between cause(s) of maternal death assigned by healthcare providers in the field and trained researchers using the new ICD-MM classification (κ statistic; 0.219). The majority of cases could be reclassified using the ICD-MM and this provided a more specific cause of death. A more structured and user-friendly MDR form is required. Accurate classification of cause of death is important. Dissemination of, and training in the use of the new ICD-MM classification system will be helpful to healthcare providers conducting MDR in Malawi.

  17. Disruption of PTPRO Causes Childhood-Onset Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaltin, Fatih; Ibsirlioglu, Tulin; Taskiran, Ekim Z.; Baydar, Dilek Ertoy; Kaymaz, Figen; Buyukcelik, Mithat; Kilic, Beltinge Demircioglu; Balat, Ayse; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Asan, Esin; Akarsu, Nurten A.; Schaefer, Franz; Yilmaz, Engin; Bakkaloglu, Ayşin

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. Because it typically results in end-stage kidney disease, the steroid-resistant subtype (SRNS) of INS is especially important when it occurs in children. The present study included 29 affected and 22 normal individuals from 17 SRNS families; genome-wide analysis was performed with Affymetrix 250K SNP arrays followed by homozygosity mapping. A large homozygous stretch on chromosomal region 12p12 was identified in one consanguineous family with two affected siblings. Direct sequencing of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O (PTPRO; also known as glomerular epithelial protein-1 [GLEPP1]) showed homozygous c.2627+1G>T donor splice-site mutation. This mutation causes skipping of the evolutionarily conserved exon 16 (p.Glu854_Trp876del) at the RNA level. Immunohistochemistry with GLEPP1 antibody showed a similar staining pattern in the podocytes of the diseased and control kidney tissues. We used a highly polymorphic intragenic DNA marker—D12S1303—to search for homozygosity in 120 Turkish and 13 non-Turkish individuals in the PodoNet registry. This analysis yielded 17 candidate families, and a distinct homozygous c.2745+1G>A donor splice-site mutation in PTPRO was further identified via DNA sequencing in a second Turkish family. This mutation causes skipping of exon 19, and this introduces a premature stop codon at the very beginning of exon 20 (p.Asn888Lysfs∗3) and causes degradation of mRNA via nonsense-mediated decay. Immunohistochemical analysis showed complete absence of immunoreactive PTPRO. Ultrastructural alterations, such as diffuse foot process fusion and extensive microvillus transformation of podocytes, were observed via electron microscopy in both families. The present study introduces mutations in PTPRO as another cause of autosomal-recessive nephrotic syndrome. PMID:21722858

  18. Does withdrawing life-sustaining treatment cause death or allow the patient to die?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses recent arguments of Franklin Miller and Robert Truog about withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and causation. The authors argue that traditional medical ethics, and the law, are mistaken to take the view that withdrawal merely allows the patient to die, rather than causing the patient's death, describing such a view as 'patently false'. They argue that the law's continued position to the contrary stems from a moral bias, resulting in the moral and legal fiction that withdrawal does not cause death but lets the patient die. In so arguing, Miller and Truog join a long line of academic criticism of the law that extends back to the seminal decision of Airedale NHS Trust v Bland [1993] AC 789 (HL) and beyond. In this article, I take issue with these claims. I argue that there are reasonable grounds upon which traditional medical ethics and the law can regard withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment as allowing the patient to die rather than causing death, and so the authors' claims that such a view is patently false cannot be sustained. I then tease out the implications of my conclusions for the authors' claim that there is not such a great distinction between withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, euthanasia, and assisted dying. I conclude by discussing some possible objections to my own view.

  19. 47. A cardiac center experience with Brugada syndrome who survived sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Suliman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is a heritable arrhythmia syndrome that is characterized by an electrocardiographic pattern consisting of coved-type ST-segment elevation (2 mm followed by a negative T wave in the right precordial leads, V1 through V3 (often referred to as type 1 Brugada electrocardiographic pattern, here we describe 3 cases of Brugada who survived sudden cardiac death (SCD cardiac center experience with survived Brugada syndrome patients – case series. First Case: The Father 45 years old male, presented in 2005 after involvement in unprovoked motor vehicle accident, the patient was the driver who lost consciousness and rushed to the hospital. On arrival to our ER and putting the patient on the bed, the ER doctor observed a brief episode of VF on the monitor. The patient was taken to the catheterization Lab , his coronaries were normal. The diagnosis of Brugada was established and the patient received a defibrillator. At That Time all family members were screened and were negative. Second Case: The Son of the first patient 5 years later his 23 years old male rushed to our ER after he lost consciousness, he was passenger in the car of his friend. Third Case: The pilot A military pilot aged a male 35 years old was in very good health when he lost consciousness and brought to the hospital after resuscitation in 2005. He had full invasive cardiac evaluation, subsequently he received a defibrillator in the same admission period, till 2015 he is doing fine. Brugada syndrome is associated with high tendency for sudden cardiac death. In our three cases the first clinical presentation was survived sudden cardiac death (SCD and all three male patients survived. We did not encounter a female patient who survived sudden cardiac death.

  20. Two modes of cell death caused by exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga N Pakhomova

    Full Text Available High-amplitude electric pulses of nanosecond duration, also known as nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF, are a novel modality with promising applications for cell stimulation and tissue ablation. However, key mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxicity of nsPEF have not been established. We show that the principal cause of cell death induced by 60- or 300-ns pulses in U937 cells is the loss of the plasma membrane integrity ("nanoelectroporation", leading to water uptake, cell swelling, and eventual membrane rupture. Most of this early necrotic death occurs within 1-2 hr after nsPEF exposure. The uptake of water is driven by the presence of pore-impermeable solutes inside the cell, and can be counterbalanced by the presence of a pore-impermeable solute such as sucrose in the medium. Sucrose blocks swelling and prevents the early necrotic death; however the long-term cell survival (24 and 48 hr does not significantly change. Cells protected with sucrose demonstrate higher incidence of the delayed death (6-24 hr post nsPEF. These cells are more often positive for the uptake of an early apoptotic marker dye YO-PRO-1 while remaining impermeable to propidium iodide. Instead of swelling, these cells often develop apoptotic fragmentation of the cytoplasm. Caspase 3/7 activity increases already in 1 hr after nsPEF and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage is detected in 2 hr. Staurosporin-treated positive control cells develop these apoptotic signs only in 3 and 4 hr, respectively. We conclude that nsPEF exposure triggers both necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The early necrotic death prevails under standard cell culture conditions, but cells rescued from the necrosis nonetheless die later on by apoptosis. The balance between the two modes of cell death can be controlled by enabling or blocking cell swelling.

  1. Two modes of cell death caused by exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Olga N; Gregory, Betsy W; Semenov, Iurii; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2013-01-01

    High-amplitude electric pulses of nanosecond duration, also known as nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF), are a novel modality with promising applications for cell stimulation and tissue ablation. However, key mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxicity of nsPEF have not been established. We show that the principal cause of cell death induced by 60- or 300-ns pulses in U937 cells is the loss of the plasma membrane integrity ("nanoelectroporation"), leading to water uptake, cell swelling, and eventual membrane rupture. Most of this early necrotic death occurs within 1-2 hr after nsPEF exposure. The uptake of water is driven by the presence of pore-impermeable solutes inside the cell, and can be counterbalanced by the presence of a pore-impermeable solute such as sucrose in the medium. Sucrose blocks swelling and prevents the early necrotic death; however the long-term cell survival (24 and 48 hr) does not significantly change. Cells protected with sucrose demonstrate higher incidence of the delayed death (6-24 hr post nsPEF). These cells are more often positive for the uptake of an early apoptotic marker dye YO-PRO-1 while remaining impermeable to propidium iodide. Instead of swelling, these cells often develop apoptotic fragmentation of the cytoplasm. Caspase 3/7 activity increases already in 1 hr after nsPEF and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage is detected in 2 hr. Staurosporin-treated positive control cells develop these apoptotic signs only in 3 and 4 hr, respectively. We conclude that nsPEF exposure triggers both necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The early necrotic death prevails under standard cell culture conditions, but cells rescued from the necrosis nonetheless die later on by apoptosis. The balance between the two modes of cell death can be controlled by enabling or blocking cell swelling.

  2. Necroptosis-like Neuronal Cell Death Caused by Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Takeshi; Aki, Toshihiko; Tajiri, Masateru; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-11-25

    Aberrant cellular accumulation of cholesterol is associated with neuronal lysosomal storage disorders such as Niemann-Pick disease Type C (NPC). We have shown previously that l-norephedrine (l-Nor), a sympathomimetic amine, induces necrotic cell death associated with massive cytoplasmic vacuolation in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. To reveal the molecular mechanism underling necrotic neuronal cell death caused by l-Nor, we examined alterations in the gene expression profile of cells during l-Nor exposure. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the gene levels for cholesterol transport (LDL receptor and NPC2) as well as cholesterol biosynthesis (mevalonate pathway enzymes) are increased after exposure to 3 mm l-Nor for ∼6 h. Concomitant with this observation, the master transcriptional regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, SREBP-2, is activated by l-Nor. The increase in cholesterol uptake as well as biosynthesis is not accompanied by an increase in cholesterol in the plasma membrane, but rather by aberrant accumulation in cytoplasmic compartments. We also found that cell death by l-Nor can be suppressed by nec-1s, an inhibitor of a regulated form of necrosis, necroptosis. Abrogation of SREBP-2 activation by the small molecule inhibitor betulin or by overexpression of dominant-negative SREBP-2 efficiently reduces cell death by l-Nor. The mobilization of cellular cholesterol in the presence of cyclodextrin also suppresses cell death. These results were also observed in primary culture of striatum neurons. Taken together, our results indicate that the excessive uptake as well as synthesis of cholesterol should underlie neuronal cell death by l-Nor exposure, and suggest a possible link between lysosomal cholesterol storage disorders and the regulated form of necrosis in neuronal cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Mortality and cause-of-death reporting and analysis systems in seven pacific island countries

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    Carter Karen L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality statistics are essential for population health assessment. Despite limitations in data availability, Pacific Island Countries are considered to be in epidemiological transition, with non-communicable diseases increasingly contributing to premature adult mortality. To address rapidly changing health profiles, countries would require mortality statistics from routine death registration given their relatively small population sizes. Methods This paper uses a standard analytical framework to examine death registration systems in Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. Results In all countries, legislation on death registration exists but does not necessarily reflect current practices. Health departments carry the bulk of responsibility for civil registration functions. Medical cause-of-death certificates are completed for at least hospital deaths in all countries. Overall, significantly more information is available than perceived or used. Use is primarily limited by poor understanding, lack of coordination, limited analytical skills, and insufficient technical resources. Conclusion Across the region, both registration and statistics systems need strengthening to improve the availability, completeness, and quality of data. Close interaction between health staff and local communities provides a good foundation for further improvements in death reporting. System strengthening activities must include a focus on clear assignment of responsibility, provision of appropriate authority to perform assigned tasks, and fostering ownership of processes and data to ensure sustained improvements. These human elements need to be embedded in a culture of data sharing and use. Lessons from this multi-country exercise would be applicable in other regions afflicted with similar issues of availability and quality of vital statistics.

  4. Deaths of obstructive lung disease in the Yangpu district of Shanghai from 2003 through 2011: a multiple cause analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Yi; Han Xue; Luo Yong; Xu Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive lung disease (OLD,chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma) is an important cause of death in older people.There has been no exhaustive population-based mortality study of this subject in Shanghai.The objective of this study was to use a multiple cause of death methodology in the analysis of OLD mortality trends in the Yangpu district of Shanghai,from 2003 through 2011.Methods We analyzed death data from the Shanghai Yangpu District Center for Disease Control and Prevention for Medical Cause of Death database,selecting all death certificates for individuals 40 years or older on which OLD was listed as a cause of death.Results From 2003 to 2011,there were 8 775 deaths with OLD listed,of which 6 005 (68%) were identified as the underlying cause of death.For the entire period,a significantly decreasing trend of age standardized rates of death from OLD was observed in men (-6.2% per year) and in women (-5.7% per year),similar trends were observed in deaths with OLD.The mean annual rates of deaths from OLD per 100 000 were 161.2 for men and 80.8 for women from 2003 to 2011.While,as the underlying cause of death,the main associated causes of death were as follows:cardiovascular diseases (70.7%),cerebrovascular diseases (13.3%),diabetes (8.6%),and cancer (4.3%).The associated causes and the principal overall underlying causes of death were cardiovascular diseases (37.0%),cancer (30.3%),and cerebrovascular disease (15.3%).A significant seasonal variation,with the highest frequency in winter,occurred in deaths identified with underlying causes of chronic bronchitis,other obstructive pulmonary diseases,and asthma.Conclusions Multiple cause mortality analysis provides a more accurate picture than underlying cause of total mortality attributed on death certificates to OLD.The major comorbidities associated with OLD were cardiovascular disease,cancer,and cerebrovascular disease.From 2003 to 2011,the mortality rate from OLD

  5. RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION OF CAUSES AND SOCIAL CORRELATES OF MATERNAL DEATHS AT ASSAM MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, DIBRUGARH, ASSAM, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of maternal death to achieve MDG – 5 Target - 6 is a challenge for most of the developing countries of the world in spite of steady decline in maternal death. There is a great difference in MMR of developing and developed countries as well as within the countries, states, districts depending upon the socioeconomic and educational status. This study was conducted to estimate the MMR, evaluate the causes of maternal death and to formulate strategies for reduction of maternal death at Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh, Assam. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective study of causes of maternal deaths from 1st January 2012 to 31st August 2015 at Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh, Assam, India. The records were collected from Maternal Death Register and analysis were made to find out the MMR, causes of maternal deaths and its contributing factors. OBSERVATIONS There were 279 maternal deaths out of 33833 live births giving MMR of 824.64. Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (37.63% was the leading direct cause followed by infections (14.69% and hemorrhage (12.90% and the anaemia (24.73% was the commonest indirect cause of maternal death. Contributory factors like age, locality, booking visit play a major rule in maternal death in our study.

  6. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garayoa, Santiago Amillo; Romero-Muñoz, Luis M; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm requires immediate treatment to avoid damage of the soft tissues and a poor functional outcome for the forearm. Muscular and bone lesions are the main causes of acute compartment syndromes. We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by a calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

  7. Using the new ICD-MM classification system for attribution of cause of maternal death--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, C A; Adegoke, A; Pattinson, R C; van den Broek, N

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the causes of and factors contributing to maternal deaths is critically important for development of interventions that reduce the global burden of maternal mortality and morbidity. The International Classification of Diseases-Maternal Mortality (ICD-MM) classification of cause of death during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium was applied to data obtained from maternal death reviews (MDR) for 4558 maternal deaths from five countries in sub-Saharan Africa. None of the data sets identified type of maternal death. Information obtained via MDR is generally sufficient to agree on classification of cause of death to the levels of type and group. The terms 'underlying cause of death' and 'contributing conditions' were used differently in different settings and a specific underlying cause of death was frequently not recorded. Application of ICD-MM resulted in the reclassification of 3.1% (9/285) of cases to the group 'unanticipated complications of management', previously recorded as obstetric haemorrhage or unknown. An increased number of cases were assigned to the groups pregnancy-related infection (5.6-10.2%) and pregnancies with abortive outcome (3.4-4.9%) when a clear distinction was made between women who died 'with' HIV/AIDS of obstetric causes (direct maternal death) and AIDS-related indirect maternal deaths (group 'non-obstetric complications'). Similarly, anaemia and obstructed labour were more frequently identified as contributing factors than underlying cause of death. It would be helpful if MDR forms could have explicitly stated variables called: type, group and underlying cause of death as well as a dedicated section to the most frequently occurring contributing conditions recognised in that setting.

  8. Discrepant comorbidity between minority and white suicides: a national multiple cause-of-death analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stack Steven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinician training deficits and a low and declining autopsy rate adversely impact the quality of death certificates in the United States. Self-report and records data for the general population indicate that proximate mental and physical health of minority suicides was at least as poor as that of white suicides. Methods This cross-sectional mortality study uses data from Multiple Cause-of-Death (MCOD public use files for 1999–2003 to describe and evaluate comorbidity among black, Hispanic, and white suicides. Unintentional injury decedents are the referent for multivariate analyses. Results One or more mentions of comorbid psychopathology are documented on the death certificates of 8% of white male suicides compared to 4% and 3% of black and Hispanic counterparts, respectively. Corresponding female figures are 10%, 8%, and 6%. Racial-ethnic discrepancies in the prevalence of comorbid physical disease are more attenuated. Cross-validation with National Violent Death Reporting System data reveals high relative underenumeration of comorbid depression/mood disorders and high relative overenumeration of schizophrenia on the death certificates of both minorities. In all three racial-ethnic groups, suicide is positively associated with depression/mood disorders [whites: adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 31.9, 95% CI = 29.80–34.13; blacks: AOR = 60.9, 95% CI = 42.80–86.63; Hispanics: AOR = 34.7, 95% CI = 23.36–51.62] and schizophrenia [whites: AOR = 2.4, 95% CI = 2.07–2.86; blacks: AOR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.73–6.37; Hispanics: AOR = 4.1, 95% CI = 2.01–8.22]. Suicide is positively associated with cancer in whites [AOR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.69–1.93] and blacks [AOR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.36–2.48], but not with HIV or alcohol and other substance use disorders in any group under review. Conclusion The multivariate analyses indicate high consistency in predicting suicide-associated comorbidities across racial-ethnic groups using MCOD data

  9. Common underlying diseases do not contribute in determining the causes of sudden unexplained death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhao-xing; L(U) Yan-yu; Chetan Rai Nugessur; YAN Wei; ZHAO Wen-kui; KONG Li-li; ZHENG Ya-an

    2013-01-01

    Background Underlying diseases have a statistically significant positive correlation to sudden death.However,sudden unexplained death (SUD) is different from sudden death,as there is no clinical evidence to support the sudden death due to the original underlying disease,nor a lethal pathological basis to be found during autopsy.In addition,SUD are more common in young,previously healthy individuals,usually without any signs of disease,with no positive lesions found after autopsy.Therefore,a causal relationship between SUD and the underlying disease needs to be further explored.This study aimed to explore the role that common underlying diseases play in patients with SUD and to reveal the correlation between them.Methods The medical records,history and case information of 208 patients with SUD were collected for the survey.All these SUD occurred in the emergency room of Peking University Third Hospital from January 2006 to December 2009.The patients were stratified by with and without common underlying diseases.To examine possible associations between the underlying diseases and the cause of unexplained sudden death,the chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used.Results Among the 208 patients,65 were diagnosed with common underlying diseases while 143 were not.Within these two groups,there were 45 patients for whom the clear cause of death was determined.However,there were no statistically significant differences or strong associations (x2=1.238,P >0.05) between the 11 patients with (16.90%) and 34 without (23.78%) common underlying disease among these 45 patients.We also found that occurrence of the common underlying diseases,such as neurological system,cardiovascular and pulmonary system diseases,are not statistically significant (P >0.05) in the diagnosis of the SUD.Conclusion Common underlying diseases make no obvious contributions to SUD and are not useful in diagnosing the underlying reasons for death.

  10. Firearm homicide and other causes of death in delinquents: a 16-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplin, Linda A; Jakubowski, Jessica A; Abram, Karen M; Olson, Nichole D; Stokes, Marquita L; Welty, Leah J

    2014-07-01

    Delinquent youth are at risk for early violent death after release from detention. However, few studies have examined risk factors for mortality. Previous investigations studied only serious offenders (a fraction of the juvenile justice population) and provided little data on females. The Northwestern Juvenile Project is a prospective longitudinal study of health needs and outcomes of a stratified random sample of 1829 youth (657 females, 1172 males; 524 Hispanic, 1005 African American, 296 non-Hispanic white, 4 other race/ethnicity) detained between 1995 and 1998. Data on risk factors were drawn from interviews; death records were obtained up to 16 years after detention. We compared all-cause mortality rates and causes of death with those of the general population. Survival analyses were used to examine risk factors for mortality after youth leave detention. Delinquent youth have higher mortality rates than the general population to age 29 years (P < .05), irrespective of gender or race/ethnicity. Females died at nearly 5 times the general population rate (P < .05); Hispanic males and females died at 5 and 9 times the general population rates, respectively (P < .05). Compared with the general population, significantly more delinquent youth died of homicide and its subcategory, homicide by firearm (P < .05). Among delinquent youth, racial/ethnic minorities were at increased risk of homicide compared with non-Hispanic whites (P < .05). Significant risk factors for external-cause mortality and homicide included drug dealing (up to 9 years later), alcohol use disorder, and gang membership (up to a decade later). Delinquent youth are an identifiable target population to reduce disparities in early violent death. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Cause of the Scion Death in Green Pepper Grafting System by a Tobamovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gug-Seoun Choi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was attempted to investigate a cause of the scion death in green pepper grafting system. A tobamovirus particle examined in the rootstock of the sample but not in the scion showing necrosis. The virus isolated from the rootstock was identified as Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV, pepper tobamovirus pathotype P1.2. (PMMoV-2, by nucleotide sequence analysis and host plant reaction. The virus isolate infected systematically in 6 commercial rootstock varieties using for green pepper grafting seedling production. Green pepper varieties ``Long green mart`` and ``Daechan`` represented resistance to the virus showing local lesions only on the inoculated leaves and ``Manitda`` was systematically infected. In the experiment with grafting ``Long green mart`` or ``Daechan`` onto the those rootstocks, the upper leaves of the scions first showed vein necrosis and wilt symptoms 7 days after inoculation with PMMoV-2 on the cotyledon of the rootstock, following to the scion stem necrosis and then only the scion death. The virus was detected in the rootstock but not in the scion. However, ``Manitda`` of susceptible variety in the grafting system showed mottle symptom on the leaves of the scion but not necrosis on the plant. PMMoV-3 isolate, pepper tobamovirus pathotype P1.2.3, did not cause the scion death in the grafting system. All of the varieties were susceptible to PMMoV-3. These results suggest that the scion death is caused by infecting with pepper tobamovirus pathotype P1.2. in the green pepper grafting system combined with the susceptible rootstock and the resistance scion to the virus pathotype.

  12. Firearm Homicide and Other Causes of Death in Delinquents: A 16-Year Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Jessica A.; Abram, Karen M.; Olson, Nichole D.; Stokes, Marquita L.; Welty, Leah J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delinquent youth are at risk for early violent death after release from detention. However, few studies have examined risk factors for mortality. Previous investigations studied only serious offenders (a fraction of the juvenile justice population) and provided little data on females. METHODS: The Northwestern Juvenile Project is a prospective longitudinal study of health needs and outcomes of a stratified random sample of 1829 youth (657 females, 1172 males; 524 Hispanic, 1005 African American, 296 non-Hispanic white, 4 other race/ethnicity) detained between 1995 and 1998. Data on risk factors were drawn from interviews; death records were obtained up to 16 years after detention. We compared all-cause mortality rates and causes of death with those of the general population. Survival analyses were used to examine risk factors for mortality after youth leave detention. RESULTS: Delinquent youth have higher mortality rates than the general population to age 29 years (P < .05), irrespective of gender or race/ethnicity. Females died at nearly 5 times the general population rate (P < .05); Hispanic males and females died at 5 and 9 times the general population rates, respectively (P < .05). Compared with the general population, significantly more delinquent youth died of homicide and its subcategory, homicide by firearm (P < .05). Among delinquent youth, racial/ethnic minorities were at increased risk of homicide compared with non-Hispanic whites (P < .05). Significant risk factors for external-cause mortality and homicide included drug dealing (up to 9 years later), alcohol use disorder, and gang membership (up to a decade later). CONCLUSIONS: Delinquent youth are an identifiable target population to reduce disparities in early violent death. PMID:24936005

  13. A placental cause of intra-uterine fetal death depends on the perinatal mortality classification system used

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteweg, F.J.; Gordijn, S.J.; Timmer, A.; Holm, J.P.; Ravise, J.M.; Erwich, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Different classification systems for the cause of intra-uterine fetal death (IUFD) are used internationally. About two thirds of these deaths are reported as unexplained and placental causes are often not addressed. Differences between systems could have consequences for the validity of vital statis

  14. [Death caused by acute diarrhea in children: a study of prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, P; Reyes, H; Rodríguez, L; Guiscafré, H; Gutiérrez, G

    1996-01-01

    To identify prognostic factors of death due to acute diarrhea related to the process disease-health care-death in the State of Tlaxcala, Mexico. A case-control design was used. Cases were defined as children who died between the ages of seventy-two hours and five years between 1992 and 1994. An event of acute diarrhea was the main cause of death stated in the death certificate. Case ascertainment was done through the verbal autopsy method. Controls were children who had suffered acute diarrhea with at least one sign of dehydration or alarm and had overcome the diarrheal episode. Controls were randomly selected from the population at large and were matched by age with cases. One hundred and six cases and the same number of controls were taken. Using a logistic regression procedure in which severity of illness and days of evolution were controlled for, the prognosis-worsening predictors were: visit provided by private physician (OR 8.9); inappropriate treatment (OR 10.4); a working mother (OR 8.7); mother's lack of knowledge to identify dehydration signs (OR 8.1); siblings' malnutrition (OR 28.2); and malnutrition prior to the diarrheal event (OR 7.5). These findings suggest that factors worsening the outcome of the diarrheal episode are: malnutrition, the inappropriate treatment provided by private physicians, and the deficient household care of the diarrheal episode.

  15. Survival and Cause of Death among a Cohort of Confirmed Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Paulukonis

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Estimates of survival from disease onset range from 20 to 48 months and have been generated using clinical populations or death records alone.Data on a cohort of ALS cases diagnosed between 2009-2011 were collected as part of the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay Area Metropolitan ALS Surveillance projects; death records 2009-2013 were linked to these confirmed cases to determine survival post diagnosis and factors associated with survival time.There were 618 cases identified and 283 of these died during the follow up time period. Median age at death was 64.3 years, and median survival time post-diagnosis was 2.6 years. Age at diagnosis and year of diagnosis were predictors of survival time in adjusted models; those diagnosed at age 80 or older had shorter survival than those diagnosed at age 50 or younger. Most (92% had ALS noted as a cause of death.Survival post-diagnosis may be improved compared with previous reports. Age at diagnosis continues to be the strongest predictor of prognosis; recall case reporting bias may play a role in estimates of survival time.

  16. Heart rate turbulence predicts all-cause mortality and sudden death in congestive heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Zareba, Wojciech; Vazquez, Rafael; Vallverdu, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R; Valdes, Mariano; Almendral, Jesus; Cinca, Juan; Caminal, Pere; de Luna, Antoni Bayes

    2008-08-01

    Abnormal heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been documented as a strong predictor of total mortality and sudden death in postinfarction patients, but data in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of HRT for predicting mortality in CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-III. In 651 CHF patients with sinus rhythm enrolled into the MUSIC (Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiaca) study, the standard HRT parameters turbulence onset (TO) and slope (TS), as well as HRT categories, were assessed for predicting total mortality and sudden death. HRT was analyzable in 607 patients, mean age 63 years (434 male), 50% of ischemic etiology. During a median follow up of 44 months, 129 patients died, 52 from sudden death. Abnormal TS and HRT category 2 (HRT2) were independently associated with increased all-cause mortality (HR: 2.10, CI: 1.41 to 3.12, P 120 ms. HRT is a potent risk predictor for both heart failure and arrhythmic death in patients with class II and III CHF.

  17. Patterns of unexpected in-hospital deaths: a root cause analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curry J Paul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory alarm monitoring and rapid response team alerts on hospital general floors are based on detection of simple numeric threshold breaches. Although some uncontrolled observation trials in select patient populations have been encouraging, randomized controlled trials suggest that this simplistic approach may not reduce the unexpected death rate in this complex environment. The purpose of this review is to examine the history and scientific basis for threshold alarms and to compare thresholds with the actual pathophysiologic patterns of evolving death which must be timely detected. Methods The Pubmed database was searched for articles relating to methods for triggering rapid response teams and respiratory alarms and these were contrasted with the fundamental timed pathophysiologic patterns of death which evolve due to sepsis, congestive heart failure, pulmonary embolism, hypoventilation, narcotic overdose, and sleep apnea. Results In contrast to the simplicity of the numeric threshold breach method of generating alerts, the actual patterns of evolving death are complex and do not share common features until near death. On hospital general floors, unexpected clinical instability leading to death often progresses along three distinct patterns which can be designated as Types I, II and III. Type I is a pattern comprised of hyperventilation compensated respiratory failure typical of congestive heart failure and sepsis. Here, early hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis can conceal the onset of instability. Type II is the pattern of classic CO2 narcosis. Type III occurs only during sleep and is a pattern of ventilation and SPO2 cycling caused by instability of ventilation and/or upper airway control followed by precipitous and fatal oxygen desaturation if arousal failure is induced by narcotics and/or sedation. Conclusion The traditional threshold breach method of detecting instability on hospital wards was not

  18. Homozygous Nonsense Mutations in TWIST2 Cause Setleis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukel, Turgut; Šošić, Dražen; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Erazo, Mónica; Casasnovas, Jose; Franco, Hector L.; Richardson, James A.; Olson, Eric N.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The focal facial dermal dysplasias (FFDDs) are a group of inherited developmental disorders in which the characteristic diagnostic feature is bitemporal scar-like lesions that resemble forceps marks. To date, the genetic defects underlying these ectodermal dysplasias have not been determined. To identify the gene defect causing autosomal-recessive Setleis syndrome (type III FFDD), homozygosity mapping was performed with genomic DNAs from five affected individuals and 26 members of the consanguineous Puerto Rican (PR) family originally described by Setleis and colleagues. Microsatellites D2S1397 and D2S2968 were homozygous in all affected individuals, mapping the disease locus to 2q37.3. Haplotype analyses of additional markers in the PR family and a consanguineous Arab family further limited the disease locus to ∼3 Mb between D2S2949 and D2S2253. Of the 29 candidate genes in this region, the bHLH transcription factor, TWIST2, was initially sequenced on the basis of its known involvement in murine facial development. Homozygous TWIST2 nonsense mutations, c.324C>T and c.486C>T, were identified in the affected members of the Arab and PR families, respectively. Characterization of the expressed mutant proteins, p.Q65X and p.Q119X, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and immunoblot analyses indicated that they were truncated and unstable. Notably, Setleis syndrome patients and Twist2 knockout mice have similar facial features, indicating the gene's conserved role in mammalian development. Although human TWIST2 and TWIST1 encode highly homologous bHLH transcription factors, the finding that TWIST2 recessive mutations cause an FFDD and dominant TWIST1 mutations cause Saethre-Chotzen craniocynostosis suggests that they function independently in skin and bone development. PMID:20691403

  19. [Stevens-Johnson syndrome plus intrahepatic cholestasis caused by clindamycin or chlorpheniramine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagún Flores, J E; Soto Ortiz, J A; Tovar Méndez, C E; Cárdenas Ochoa, E C; Hernández Flores, G

    2009-05-15

    A 48-year-old woman was hospitalized with the diagnosis of hepatitis. She presented with symptoms of jaundice, headache, elevated bilirubin, and elevated hepatic enzymes. She related a recent episode of a bronchial infection that was treated during the previous eight days with paracetamol (500mg, 2 doses only), chlorpheniramine, betamethasone and clindamycin. After an initial clinical and laboratorial improvement, she began to complain of pruritus of the palms and soles. Thereafter, vesicles evolving to blisters developed and a deterioration of her general health ensued. Serologies for hepatitis A, B, and C viruses were negative. Intrahepatic cholestasis and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) were the final diagnosis. The association of the Stevens Johnson Syndrome and intrahepatic cholestasis simultaneously, related to adverse drug reactions, is very rare. The drugs reportedly involved are mainly antibiotics, such as ampicillin, vancomycin, amoxicillin/clavulinic acid and erythromycin. Other drugs involved are non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drugs, such as mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and sulindac. The reactions can be minor or severe and can even cause death, an outcome that has been reported in patients of all races and ethnic groups, but appears to be more rare in patients of Latin origin. We present a discussion of this case and review the main characteristics of the Stevens Johnson Syndrome.

  20. A novel ICK mutation causes ciliary disruption and lethal endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Oud, M.M.; Bonnard, C.; Mans, D.A.; Altunoğlu, U.; Tohari, S.; Ng, A.Y.J.; Eskin, A.; Lee, H.; Rupar, C.A.; Wagenaar, N.P.; Wu, K.M.; Lahiry, P.; Pazour, G.J.; Nelson, S.F.; Hegele, R.A.; Roepman, R; Venkatesh, B.; Siu, V.M.; Reversade, B.; Arts, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endocrine-cerebro-osteodysplasia (ECO) syndrome [MIM:612651] caused by a recessive mutation (p.R272Q) in Intestinal cell kinase (ICK) shows significant clinical overlap with ciliary disorders. Similarities are strongest between ECO syndrome, the Majewski and Mohr-Majewski short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with polydactyly syndromes, and hydrolethalus syndrome. In this study, we present a novel homozygous ICK mutation in a fetus with ECO syndrome and compare the effect of this mu...