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Sample records for days pd 4-9

  1. Baryon resonances - a primary ρ→l+l- source in p+p and p+d at 4.9GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winckelmann, L.A.; Sorge, H.; Stoecker, H.; Greiner, W.

    1994-10-01

    Dilepton spectra for p+p and p+d reactions at 4.9 GeV are calculated. We consider electromagnetic bremsstrahlung also in inealstic reactions. N* and Δ* decays present the major contributions to the q and ω meson yields. Pion annihilation yields only ∼1.5% of all ρ's in p+d. The ρ mass spectrum is strongly distorted due to phase space effects, populating dominantly dilepton masses below 770 MeV. It is found that inclusive production cross sections of ρ, ω and η mesons in p+p are 3-4 times higher than the (measured) exclusive cross sections for pp+meson. This prediction could be checked by measuring the decays of ρ, ω and η mesons into photons. (orig.)

  2. 15 CFR 4.9 - Business Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Business Information. 4.9 Section 4.9... of Information Act § 4.9 Business Information. (a) In general. Business information obtained by the... the purposes of this section: (1) Business information means commercial or financial information...

  3. Aquatic Habitats, Level 4-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Margaret

    Designed to acquaint students in grades 4-9 with aquatic plants and animals, this guide provides materials which can be used in preparation for field trips or laboratory work, for individual projects, as supplemental activities for a unit, or for learning center projects. Teacher background notes and an answer key for the student activites are…

  4. 77 FR 45558 - 4.9 GHz Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ..., our rules currently require 4.9 GHz licensees to ``cooperate in the selection and use of channels in... directional and thus can be represented as narrow paths on a coordination map; in contrast, they note, the low-power, less- directional, geographically-dispersed links in a 4.9 GHz network must be represented as a...

  5. Feto-maternal immune regulation by TIM-3/galectin-9 pathway and PD-1 molecule in mice at day 14.5 of pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggyes, Matyas; Lajko, Adrienn; Palkovics, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Immunoregulation implies the activation of negative pathways leading to the modulation of specific immune responses. Co-inhibitory receptors (such as PD-1 and TIM-3) represent possible tools for this purpose. PD-1 and TIM-3 have been demonstrated to be present on immune cells...... suggesting general involvement in immunosuppression such as fetomaternal tolerance. The aim of our study was to investigate the expression pattern of PD-1, TIM-3, and its ligand Gal-9 on different immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood and at the fetomaternal interface in pregnant mice. METHODS: TIM-3...... and PD-1 expression by peripheral and decidual immune cells from pregnant BALB-c mice in 2 weeks of gestational age were measures by flow cytometry. Placental galectin-9 expression was determined by immunohistochemically and RT-PCR. RESULTS: Gal-9 was found to be present in the spongiotrophoblast layer...

  6. PD Lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory

  7. PD Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Bilow

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development.  PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory production, to explore the potential in the field of sustainability, material use, logistics and the interaction of stakeholders within the chain of the building process.

  8. Enterocin F4-9, a Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Bacteriocin

    OpenAIRE

    Maky, Mohamed Abdelfattah; Ishibashi, Naoki; Zendo, Takeshi; Perez, Rodney Honrada; Doud, Jehan Ragab; Karmi, Mohamed; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis F4-9 isolated from Egyptian salted-fermented fish produces a novel bacteriocin, termed enterocin F4-9. Enterocin F4-9 was purified from the culture supernatant by three steps, and its molecular mass was determined to be 5,516.6 Da by mass spectrometry. Amino acid and DNA sequencing showed that the propeptide consists of 67 amino acid residues, with a leader peptide containing a double glycine cleavage site to produce a 47-amino-acid mature peptide. Enterocin F4-9 is modi...

  9. Fusion of 110Pd with 110Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawek, W.

    1991-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis the excitation functions of the systems 110 Pd + 110 Pd and 110 Pd + 104 Ru could be measured. The evaporation-residual-nucleus cross sections is deviating from lighter systems dominated by channels, which arise from evaporation of α particles. In the reaction 110 Pd + 110 Pd no xn channels were observed. In comparison to other reactions qualitatively a strong fusion hindrance of this system is shown. (orig./HSI) [de

  10. Enterocin F4-9, a Novel O-Linked Glycosylated Bacteriocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maky, Mohamed Abdelfattah; Ishibashi, Naoki; Zendo, Takeshi; Perez, Rodney Honrada; Doud, Jehan Ragab; Karmi, Mohamed; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Enterococcus faecalis F4-9 isolated from Egyptian salted-fermented fish produces a novel bacteriocin, termed enterocin F4-9. Enterocin F4-9 was purified from the culture supernatant by three steps, and its molecular mass was determined to be 5,516.6 Da by mass spectrometry. Amino acid and DNA sequencing showed that the propeptide consists of 67 amino acid residues, with a leader peptide containing a double glycine cleavage site to produce a 47-amino-acid mature peptide. Enterocin F4-9 is modified by two molecules of N-acetylglucosamine β-O-linked to Ser37 and Thr46. The O-linked N-acetylglucosamine moieties are essential for the antimicrobial activity of enterocin F4-9. Further analysis of the enterocin F4-9 gene cluster identified enfC, which has high sequence similarity to a glycosyltransferase. The antimicrobial activity of enterocin F4-9 covered a limited range of bacteria, including, interestingly, a Gram-negative strain, Escherichia coli JM109. Enterocin F4-9 is sensitive to protease, active at a wide pH range, and moderately resistant to heat. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Draft of chapters 4-9 as of May 11, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    A revised outline for the final report is given, and the first draft of chapters 4 - 9 are included. The chapters cover enrichment demands according to various fuel cycle strategies, comparison of enrichment demand and availability, assessment and comparison of the proliferation aspects of enrichment, assurance of supply, special needs of developing countries, and general conclusions

  12. Living Day by Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Rachel L.; Khoury, Cynthia El; Field, Emily R. S.; Mokhbat, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We examined the meaning of living with HIV/AIDS among women in Lebanon. Ten women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA) described their experiences via semistructured in-depth interviews. They navigated a process of HIV diagnosis acceptance that incorporated six overlapping elements: receiving the news, accessing care, starting treatment, navigating disclosure decisions, negotiating stigma, and maintaining stability. Through these elements, we provide a framework for understanding three major themes that were constructed during data analysis: Stand by my side: Decisions of disclosure; Being “sick” and feeling “normal”: Interacting with self, others, and society; and Living day by day: focusing on the present. We contribute to the existing literature by providing a theoretical framework for understanding the process of diagnosis and sero-status acceptance among WLWHA. This was the first study of its kind to examine the meaning of living with HIV/AIDS among women in a Middle Eastern country. PMID:28462340

  13. Living Day by Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Kaplan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the meaning of living with HIV/AIDS among women in Lebanon. Ten women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA described their experiences via semistructured in-depth interviews. They navigated a process of HIV diagnosis acceptance that incorporated six overlapping elements: receiving the news, accessing care, starting treatment, navigating disclosure decisions, negotiating stigma, and maintaining stability. Through these elements, we provide a framework for understanding three major themes that were constructed during data analysis: Stand by my side: Decisions of disclosure; Being “sick” and feeling “normal”: Interacting with self, others, and society; and Living day by day: focusing on the present. We contribute to the existing literature by providing a theoretical framework for understanding the process of diagnosis and sero-status acceptance among WLWHA. This was the first study of its kind to examine the meaning of living with HIV/AIDS among women in a Middle Eastern country.

  14. Enhanced mixing characteristics of GaAs/3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride Schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginev, G; Riedl, T; Parashkov, R; Johannes, H-H; Kowalsky, W

    2003-01-01

    The influences on the mixing properties of GaAs Schottky diodes containing an organic 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride layer were investigated. The frequency conversion ability of the devices was determined by considering the I-V characteristics and high frequency reflection parameters by using a mixing technique operated in the microwave range. The results show that an organic layer with 20 nm thickness enhances the diode conversion gain for mixing applications by 3 dB and lowers the device operating bias voltage by 0.1 V. This process is related to the specific properties of the organic semiconductor and resulting organic-inorganic interface

  15. Plot Description (PD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Plot Description (PD) form is used to describe general characteristics of the FIREMON macroplot to provide ecological context for data analyses. The PD data characterize the topographical setting, geographic reference point, general plant composition and cover, ground cover, fuels, and soils information. This method provides the general ecological data that can be...

  16. Hovsgol earthquake 5 December 2014, M W = 4.9: seismic and acoustic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynina, Anna A.; Sankov, Vladimir A.; Tcydypova, Larisa R.; German, Victor I.; Chechelnitsky, Vladimir V.; Ulzibat, Munkhuu

    2018-03-01

    A moderate shallow earthquake occurred on 5 December 2014 ( M W = 4.9) in the north of Lake Hovsgol (northern Mongolia). The infrasonic signal with duration 140 s was recorded for this earthquake by the "Tory" infrasound array (Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Russia). Source parameters of the earthquake (seismic moment, geometrical sizes, displacement amplitudes in the focus) were determined using spectral analysis of direct body P and S waves. The spectral analysis of seismograms and amplitude variations of the surface waves allows to determine the effect of the propagation of the rupture in the earthquake focus, the azimuth of the rupture propagation direction and the velocity of displacement in the earthquake focus. The results of modelling of the surface displacements caused by the Hovsgol earthquake and high effective velocity of propagation of infrasound signal ( 625 m/s) indicate that its occurrence is not caused by the downward movement of the Earth's surface in the epicentral region but by the effect of the secondary source. The position of the secondary source of infrasound signal is defined on the northern slopes of the Khamar-Daban ridge according to the data on the azimuth and time of arrival of acoustic wave at the Tory station. The interaction of surface waves with the regional topography is proposed as the most probable mechanism of formation of the infrasound signal.

  17. OBSERVATIONAL LIMITS ON THE GAS MASS OF A z = 4.9 GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livermore, R. C.; Swinbank, A. M.; Smail, Ian; Bower, R. G.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Edge, A. C.; Geach, J. E.; Richard, J.; Crain, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a search for molecular gas emission from a star-forming galaxy at z = 4.9. The galaxy benefits from magnification of 22 ± 5 × due to strong gravitational lensing by the foreground cluster MS1358+62. We target the CO(5-4) emission at a known position and redshift from existing Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging and Gemini/NIFS [O II]3727 imaging spectroscopy, and obtain a tentative detection at the 4.3σ level with a flux of 0.104 ± 0.024 Jy km s –1 . From the CO line luminosity and assuming a CO-to-H 2 conversion factor α = 2, we derive a gas mass M gas ∼ 1 +1 –0.6 × 10 9 M ☉ . Combined with the existing data, we derive a gas fraction M gas /(M gas + M * ) = 0.59 +0.11 –0.06 . The faint line flux of this galaxy highlights the difficulty of observing molecular gas in representative galaxies at this epoch, and suggests that routine detections of similar galaxies in the absence of gravitational lensing will remain challenging even with ALMA in full science operations.

  18. Phase II study of 4'-(9-acridinylamino) methanesulfon-m- anisidide (AMSA) in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, S S; Hall, S W; Powell, K C; Burgess, M A; Benjamin, R S; Gutterman, J U; Bodey, G P

    1980-01-01

    A phase II study of AMSA in previously treated patients with metastatic malignant melanoma was conducted. The dose schedule of AMSA was 40 mg/m2/day for 3 days repeated at 3-week intervals. Among the 30 evaluable patients, one achieved a complete response, one a partial response, and four had minor responses. Side effects included mild nausea and vomiting and moderate degree of myelosuppression. AMSA has poor activity against previously treated metastatic melanoma.

  19. Influence of tritium aging on kinetics feature of LaNi4.9Al0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Yifu; Luo Deli; Li Rong

    2001-01-01

    Kinetics parameters were measured at different aging time on LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 alloy. The influence of tritium aging on kinetics feature of LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 alloy was assessed. The results show that tritium aging does not change deuterating-dedeuterating reaction order. Reaction rate decrease with aging time. Activation energy (E) increases with aging time

  20. Iron and cobalt complexes of 4,4,9,9-tetramethyl-5,8-diazadodecane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    iron(II), cobalt(II), and zinc(II) ions.18–20 The flexible. N4 ligand is ... X-ray diffraction were isolated after a few days. Yield: .... bands for perchlorate ions are absent in the IR spec- trum of 3 .... ion by acidic work-up reveals the formation of cate-.

  1. Dinosaur Day!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  2. Recombinant human G6PD for quality control and quality assurance of novel point-of-care diagnostics for G6PD deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kahn

    Full Text Available A large gap for the support of point-of-care testing is the availability of reagents to support quality control (QC of diagnostic assays along the supply chain from the manufacturer to the end user. While reagents and systems exist to support QC of laboratory screening tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency, they are not configured appropriately to support point-of-care testing. The feasibility of using lyophilized recombinant human G6PD as a QC reagent in novel point-of-care tests for G6PD deficiency is demonstrated.Human recombinant G6PD (r-G6PD was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Aliquots were stored at -80°C. Prior to lyophilization, aliquots were thawed, and three concentrations of r-G6PD (representing normal, intermediate, and deficient clinical G6PD levels were prepared and mixed with a protective formulation, which protects the enzyme activity against degradation from denaturation during the lyophilization process. Following lyophilization, individual single-use tubes of lyophilized r-G6PD were placed in individual packs with desiccants and stored at five temperatures for one year. An enzyme assay for G6PD activity was used to ascertain the stability of r-G6PD activity while stored at different temperatures.Lyophilized r-G6PD is stable and can be used as a control indicator. Results presented here show that G6PD activity is stable for at least 365 days when stored at -80°C, 4°C, 30°C, and 45°C. When stored at 55°C, enzyme activity was found to be stable only through day 28.Lyophilized r-G6PD enzyme is stable and can be used as a control for point-of-care tests for G6PD deficiency.

  3. Co-administration of the neurotrophic ACTH(4-9) analogue, ORG 2766, may reduce the cochleotoxic effects of cisplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Groot, J.C.M.J. de; Hamers, F.P.T.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    1997-01-01

    In this study the effect of the neurotrophic ACTH(4-9) analogue, ORG 2766, on cisplatin cochleotoxicity was investigated with both light- and transmission electron microscopy. Guinea pigs were treated with either cisplatin+ORG 2766 (n=11) or cisplatin+physiological saline (n=9). All animals treated

  4. 103Pd decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyavenko, V.S.; Borozenets, G.P.; Vishnevskij, I.N.; Zheltonozhskij, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    103 Pd decay in different chemical states has been investigated. The change of the partial half-life period equal to 0.67±0.15% has been detected. The γ-spectrum has been measured to a high precision. The new data have been obtained on population probabilities of 103 Rh excited states and the total energy of decay for 103 Pd has been determined to a high precision (543.0±0.8). The values of log ft have been determined

  5. Radiochemistry days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This document provides the 44 papers (transparencies used during the presentations and posters) presented at the Radiochemistry Days, held September 3-4, 1998 in Nantes, France. The main studied topics were problematic questions concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and in particular the management, storage of radioactive wastes and the environmental impact. (O.M.)

  6. Pamphlet day

    OpenAIRE

    Eastwood, Phil; Dunne, Chris; Fowler, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Pamphlet Day: A Political Protest Pamphlet and Zine Event focused around the occupation of Loughborough Public Library, Granby Street, Loughborough, LE11 3DZ, UK. ABSTRACT “Throughout the 20th Century artists have engaged provocatively with text, images and performance, publishing writings, pamphlets, and manifestos that challenge the status quo.” (1) Loughborough Echo, May 2017 https://www.loughboroughecho.net/whats-on/arts-culture-news/pamphlet-art-feature-events-13038989 A s...

  7. Tritium aging effect of LaNi4.9Al0.1Dx on de-deuterating kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Yifu; Luo Deli; Li Rong

    2002-01-01

    Kinetics parameters are measured at different aging times of LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 alloy. The influence of tritium aging on kinetic feature of LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 alloy is assessed. The results show that reaction rate decreases with aging time, but tritium aging does not change de-deuterating reaction order. De-deuterating reaction orders a (with respect to deuterium pressure) and b (with respect to deuterium content) are 0.5 and 1, respectively. Activation energy (E) increases with aging time. After 1120 d, the reaction rate constant is decreased by two orders of magnitude, activation energy is increased by a factor of 0.3

  8. Tritium aging effect on thermodynamic functions of LaNi4.9Al0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Yifu; Li Rong; Luo Deli

    2001-01-01

    The influence of tritium aging on thermodynamic function of LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 is measured. The results show that plateau pressures and reversible hydrogen capacity decrease with aging time, thermodynamics parameters such as ΔH, ΔS and plateau slopes of the P-T curve increase with aging time, tritium heel formed after 1120 d tritium exposure

  9. Highly active Pd-In/mesoporous alumina catalyst for nitrate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Deyi; Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-04-09

    The catalytic reduction of nitrate is a promising technology for groundwater purification because it transforms nitrate into nitrogen and water. Recent studies have mainly focused on new catalysts with higher activities for the reduction of nitrate. Consequently, metal nanoparticles supported on mesoporous metal oxides have become a major research direction. However, the complex surface chemistry and porous structures of mesoporous metal oxides lead to a non-uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles, thereby resulting in a low catalytic efficiency. In this paper, a method for synthesizing the sustainable nitrate reduction catalyst Pd-In/Al2O3 with a dimensional structure is introduced. The TEM results indicated that Pd and In nanoparticles could efficiently disperse into the mesopores of the alumina. At room temperature in CO2-buffered water and under continuous H2 as the electron donor, the synthesized material (4.9 wt% Pd) was the most active at a Pd-In ratio of 4, with a first-order rate constant (k(obs) = 0.241 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)) that was 1.3× higher than that of conventional Pd-In/Al2O3 (5 wt% Pd; 0.19 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)). The Pd-In/mesoporous alumina is a promising catalyst for improving the catalytic reduction of nitrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Organic-inorganic semiconductor devices and 3, 4, 9, 10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride: an early history of organic electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, S R

    2003-01-01

    The demonstration, over 20 years ago, of an organic-inorganic heterojunction (OI HJ) device along with investigations of the growth and physical properties of the archetypal crystalline molecular organic semiconductor 3, 4, 9, 10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride are discussed. Possible applications of OI HJ devices are introduced and the dramatic change in conductive properties of these materials when exposed to high-energy ion beams is described. The past and future prospects for hybrid organic-on-inorganic semiconductor structures for use in electronic and photonic applications are also presented

  11. 4-(9-Anthryl-1-(2-methoxyphenylspiro[azetidin-3,9′-xanthen]-2-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The stabilized conformation of the title compound, C36H25NO3, 4-(9-anthryl-1-(2-methoxyphenyl-spiro[azetidin-3,9′-xanthen]-2-one, may be compared with that of the isomeric compound 4-(9-anthryl-1-(4-methoxyphenylspiro[azetidin-3,9′-xanthen]-2-one. In the title isomer, the methoxy group is slightly twisted out of the plane of the attached benzene ring, with a C—O—C—C torsion angle of 31.5 (2°. Its β-lactam ring is essentially planar, with a maximum deviation of −0.021 (1 Å. The β-lactam ring makes dihedral angles of 18.815 (9, 83.33 (7 and 53.62 (8° with the mean planes of the benzene, xanthene and anthracene ring systems, respectively. The structure is stabilized by C—H...π, C—H...N and C—H...O interactions.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of the Fe-18%Ni-12%Co-4,9%Mo-1,5%Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, G.C.S.; Biondo, V.; Nunes, M.V.S.; Paesano Junior, A.; Sarvezuk, P.W.C.; Blanco, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The Fe-18%Ni-12%Co-4,9%Mo-1,5%Ti was made by arc-melting and submitted to different heat treatments, for solubilization in the γ - phase (austenite), followed by cooling to the room temperature, and also for further aging. The prepared alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (Rietveld method) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results showed that the cooling induced the system to a martensitic transformation, crystallizing it into a cubic structure (martensite). The crystallographic parameters and the hyperfine parameters obtained by Mössbauer Spectroscopy are consistent with those found in literature for Maraging-350 steels. The aging treatments generates the formation of reversed austenite in relative amounts that vary with the temperature and time of treatment. (author)

  13. 27Al NMR studies of NpPd5Al2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudo, H.; Sakai, H.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kambe, S.; Aoki, D.; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y.; Haga, Y.; Ikeda, S.; Matsuda, T.D.; Onuki, Y.; Yasuoka, H.

    2009-01-01

    We present 27 Al NMR studies for a single crystal of the Np-based superconductor NpPd 5 Al 2 (T c =4.9K). We have observed a five-line 27 Al NMR spectrum with a center line and four satellite lines separated by first-order nuclear quadrupole splittings. The Knight shift clearly drops below T c . The temperature dependence of the 27 Al nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate shows no coherence peak below T c , indicating that NpPd 5 Al 2 is an unconventional superconductor with an anisotropic gap. The analysis of the present NMR data provides evidence for strong-coupling d-wave superconductivity in NpPd 5 Al 2 .

  14. Magnetotransport in Pd-rich PdFe alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Turek, Ilja

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2013), s. 1749-1752 ISSN 1557-1939 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1228 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : galvanomagnetic transport * Pd-rich PdFe * long-range order * effect of temperature * anisotropic magnetoresistance Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.930, year: 2013

  15. Graphene decorated with Pd nanoparticles via electrostatic self-assembly: A highly active alcohol oxidation electrocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shujing; Li, Shuwen; Hu, Tengyue; Gou, Galian; Ren, Ren; Huang, Jingwei; Xie, Miao; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Novel perylene-connected ionic liquids (PTCDI-ILs) have been successfully synthesized in a convenient approach and used as linkers for three-component Pd/PTCDI-ILs/GS heterostructure when non-covalently attached on graphene. The obtained nano-hybrids represented high electrochemical surface area and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for DAFCs in alkaline media. -- Highlights: • A novel preparation of three-component Pd/ionic liquids/graphene heterostructure has been constructed. • The Pd-based nano-catalysts have relatively low price and higher resistance to CO poisoning when compared with Pt-based catalysts. • The nano-catalysts represent high electrochemical surface area and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for DAFCs in alkaline media. -- Abstract: Graphene nanosheets (GS) are non-covalently functionalized with novel N,N-bis-(n-butylimidazolium bromide salt)-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic acid diimide (PTCDI-ILs) via the π–π stacking, and then employed as the support of Pd nanoparticles. The negatively charged Pd precursors are adsorbed on positively charged imidazolium ring moiety of PTCDI-ILs wrapping GS surface via electrostatic self-assembly and then in situ reduced by NaBH 4 . X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope images reveal that Pd nanoparticles with an average size of 2.7 nm are uniformly dispersed on GS surface. The Pd/PTCDI-ILs/GS exhibits unexpectedly high activity toward alcohol oxidation reaction, which can be attributed to the large electrochemical surface area of Pd nanoparticles. It also shows enhanced electrochemical stability due to the structural integrity of PTCDI-ILs/GS. This provides a facile approach to synthesize GS-based nanoelectrocatalysts

  16. Novel Hole Transporting Materials Based on 4-(9H-Carbazol-9-yltriphenylamine Derivatives for OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quynh Pham Bao Nguyen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs have been increasingly studied due to their emerging applicability. However, some of the properties of existing OLEDs could be improved, such as their overall efficiency and durability; these aspects have been addressed in the current study. A series of novel hole-transporting materials (HTMs 3a–c based on 4-(9H-carbazol-9-yltriphenylamine conjugated with different carbazole or triphenylamine derivatives have been readily synthesized by Suzuki coupling reactions. The resulting compounds showed good thermal stabilities with high glass transition temperatures between 148 and 165 °C. The introduction of HTMs 3b and 3c into the standard devices ITO/HATCN/NPB/HTMs 3 (indium tin oxide/dipyrazino(2,3-f:2ꞌ,3ꞌ-hquinoxaline 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexacarbonitrile/N,Nꞌ-bis(naphthalen-1-yl-N,Nꞌ-bis(phenyl-benzidine/HTMs/CBP (4,4ꞌ-Bis(N-carbazolyl-1,1ꞌ-biphenyl: 5% Ir(ppy3/Bphen/LiF/Al (tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline/LiF/Al resulted in significantly enhanced current, power, and external quantum efficiencies (EQE as compared to the reference device without any layers of HTMs 3.

  17. Identification of the principal biliary metabolite of 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoemaker, D.D.; Cysyk, R.L.; Padmanabhan, S.; Bhat, H.B.; Malspeis, L.

    1982-01-01

    m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide] labeled in either the acridine or anilino portion was used to investigate the disposition of this antitumor agent in rats. The principal biliary metabolite, which accounts for approximately 80% of the total biliary radioactivity for 90 min after administration and greater than 50% of the administered dose by 180 min after administration, had both the acridine and the anilino portions intact. Isolation and purification of the principal metabolite was achieved by preparative thin-layer chromatography on silica gel and column chromatography on Amberlite XAD-2 resin. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the CID salt in D 2 O showed that the metabolite is the m-AMSA-glutathione conjugate in which the thioether linkage occurs at the 5'-position of the anilino ring. Synthesis of the metabolite was achieved by oxidizing m-AMSA with active MnO 2 to -methanesulfonyl - - (9-acridinyl)-3'-methoxy - 2',5' - cyclohexadiene-1',4'-diimine (m-AQDI) followed by reaction of m-AQDI with glutathione. The 1 H-NMR spectrum of the synthetic product proved identical with that of the isolated metabolite. The demonstration that the principal biliary metabolite on m-AMSA involves glutathione bound to the 9-anilino ring suggests that m-AMSA may be bioactivated in vivo to the quinoidal diimine, m-AQDI

  18. Electrical conductivity, optical properties and mechanical stability of 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhidride based organic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Mayank; Joshi, Girish M.; Deshmukh, Kalim; Nath Ghosh, Narendra; Nambi Raj, N. Arunai

    2015-05-01

    The 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) doped polymer films were prepared with Polypyrrole (PPy) and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymers by solution-casting. The change in structure and chemical composition of samples was identified by XRD and FTIR respectively. The UV-visible spectroscopy demonstrates the optical characteristics and band gap properties of sample. The homogeneous morphology of sample for higher wt% of PTCDA was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results demonstrate the decrease in melting temperature (Tm) and degree of crystallinity (χc%) of polymeric organic semiconductor. The mechanical property demonstrates the high tensile strength and improved plasticity nature. Impedance spectroscopy was evaluated to determine the conductivity response of polymeric organic semiconductor. The highest DC conductivity (2.08×10-3 S/m) was obtained for 10 wt% of PTCDA at 140 °C. The decrease in activation energy (Ea) represents the non-Debye process and was evaluated from the slope of ln σdc vs. 103/T plot.

  19. Structural and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline 3,4,9,10-Perylene-Tetracarboxylic-Diimide Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. El-Nahhas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of nanocrystalline 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-diimide (PTCDI were prepared on quartz substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The structural properties were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and the X-ray diffraction (XRD. The optical properties for the films were investigated using spectrophotometric measurements of the transmittance and reflectance at normal incidence of light in the wavelength range from 200 to 2500 nm. The optical constants (refractive index n and absorption index k were calculated and found to be independent on the film thickness in the measured film thickness range 117–163 nm. The dispersion energy (Ed, the oscillator energy (Eo, and the high-frequency dielectric constant ε∞ were obtained. The energy band model was applied, and the types of the optical transitions responsible for optical absorption were found to be indirect allowed transition. The onset and optical energy gaps were calculated, and the obtained results were also discussed.

  20. CO-induced Pd segregation and the effect of subsurface Pd on CO adsorption on CuPd surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padama, A A B; Villaos, R A B; Albia, J R; Diño, W A; Nakanishi, H; Kasai, H

    2017-01-01

    We report results of our study on the adsorption of CO on CuPd surfaces with bulk stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric layers using density functional theory (DFT). We found that the presence of Pd atoms in the subsurface layer promotes the adsorption of CO. We also observed CO-induced Pd segregation on the CuPd surface and we attribute this to the strong CO–Pd interaction. Lastly, we showed that the adsorption of CO promotes Pd–Pd interaction as compared to the pristine surface which promotes strong Cu–Pd interaction. These results indicate that CO adsorption on CuPd surfaces can be tuned by taking advantage of the CO-induced segregation and by considering the role of subsurface Pd atoms. (paper)

  1. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  2. KSC-04PD-2211

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. During opening ceremonies for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day at KSC, members of the astronaut corps and KSC employees enjoy the humor of guest speaker Dr. Pamela Peeke. Other speakers included Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic- great Bruce Jenner. Later in the day, employees could visit many vendors exhibits featuring safety and health items. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  3. KSC-04PD-2208

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Employees at KSC take time to look at safety equipment on display during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The day-long event also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  4. KSC-04PD-2207

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Inside a tent, employees at KSC look over an exhibit of safety equipment during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The day-long event also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  5. KSC-04PD-2205

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Inside a tent, employees at KSC look over an exhibit of special equipment during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The day-long event also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  6. KSC-04PD-2213

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Guest speaker Dr. Pamela Peeke talks to KSC employees during opening ceremonies for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day at KSC. Other speakers included Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz , NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic- great Bruce Jenner. Later in the day, employees could visit many vendors exhibits featuring safety and health items. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  7. KSC-04PD-2212

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Col.David Nuckles, chief of Safety with the 45th Space Wing, talks to guests and employees during opening ceremonies for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day at KSC. Guest speakers included Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Later in the day, employees could visit many vendors exhibits featuring safety and health items. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  8. KSC-04PD-2214

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Olympic champion and motivational speaker Bruce Jenner talks to KSC employees during opening ceremonies for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day at KSC. Other speakers included Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz and NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon. Later in the day, employees could visit many vendors exhibits featuring safety and health items. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  9. KSC-04PD-2210

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Center Director Jim Kennedy kicks off Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day with opening ceremonies at the KSC Training Auditorium. Guest speakers included Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Later in the day, employees could visit many vendors exhibits featuring safety and health items. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  10. KSC-04PD-2206

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Employees at KSC walk through a tent filled with vendors exhibits during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The day-long event also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  11. Basal cell carcinoma: PD-L1/PD-1 checkpoint expression and tumor regression after PD-1 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Evan J; Lilo, Mohammed T; Ogurtsova, Aleksandra; Esandrio, Jessica; Xu, Haiying; Brothers, Patricia; Schollenberger, Megan; Sharfman, William H; Taube, Janis M

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that block immune regulatory proteins such as programmed death-1 (PD-1) have demonstrated remarkable efficacy in controlling the growth of multiple tumor types. Unresectable or metastatic basal cell carcinoma, however, has largely gone untested. Because PD-Ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression in other tumor types has been associated with response to anti-PD-1, we investigated the expression of PD-L1 and its association with PD-1 expression in the basal cell carcinoma tumor microenvironment. Among 40 basal cell carcinoma specimens, 9/40 (22%) demonstrated PD-L1 expression on tumor cells, and 33/40 (82%) demonstrated PD-L1 expression on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and associated macrophages. PD-L1 was observed in close geographic association to PD-1+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Additionally, we present, here, the first report of an objective anti-tumor response to pembrolizumab (anti-PD-1) in a patient with metastatic PD-L1 (+) basal cell carcinoma, whose disease had previously progressed through hedgehog pathway-directed therapy. The patient remains in a partial response 14 months after initiation of therapy. Taken together, our findings provide a rationale for testing anti-PD-1 therapy in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma, either as initial treatment or after acquired resistance to hedgehog pathway inhibition.

  12. Molecular mechanism of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade via anti-PD-L1 antibodies atezolizumab and durvalumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Tae; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lim, Heejin; Lee, Sang Hyung; Moon, Yu Jeong; Pyo, Hyo Jeong; Ryu, Seong Eon; Shin, Woori; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2017-07-17

    In 2016 and 2017, monoclonal antibodies targeting PD-L1, including atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab, were approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple advanced cancers. And many other anti-PD-L1 antibodies are under clinical trials. Recently, the crystal structures of PD-L1 in complex with BMS-936559 and avelumab have been determined, revealing details of the antigen-antibody interactions. However, it is still unknown how atezolizumab and durvalumab specifically recognize PD-L1, although this is important for investigating novel binding sites on PD-L1 targeted by other therapeutic antibodies for the design and improvement of anti-PD-L1 agents. Here, we report the crystal structures of PD-L1 in complex with atezolizumab and durvalumab to elucidate the precise epitopes involved and the structural basis for PD-1/PD-L1 blockade by these antibodies. A comprehensive comparison of PD-L1 interactions with anti-PD-L1 antibodies provides a better understanding of the mechanism of PD-L1 blockade as well as new insights into the rational design of improved anti-PD-L1 therapeutics.

  13. Comparing PD results with visual inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, A.; Stone, G.C.

    2005-01-01

    ENEL is the main generation utility in Italy, with more than 200 hydro units and 120 turbine generators, totaling 39,000 MW of capacity. To help identify the maintenance needs of the stator windings in these units, ENEL has been gradually equipping the generators with partial discharge (PD) sensors that facilitate an on-line measurement of the PD. The paper describes results from several machines that have PD. In all cases, the high PD was confirmed by visual inspections. Although PD usually found the units with severe insulation problems, it was not always possible to determine the causes of the deterioration from the PD pattern. (author)

  14. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1...... and flPD-1 upon activation suggests an important interplay between the putative soluble PD-1 and flPD-1 possibly involved in maintenance of peripheral self-tolerance and prevention of autoimmunity....

  15. Microearthquake detection at 2012 M4.9 Qiaojia earthquake source area , the north of the Xiaojiang Fault in Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Yang, H.; Zhou, S.; Yan, C.

    2016-12-01

    We perform a comprehensive analysis in Yunnan area based on continuous seismic data of 38 stations of Qiaojia Network in Xiaojiang Fault from 2012.3 to 2015.2. We use an effective method: Match and Locate (M&L, Zhang&Wen, 2015) to detect and locate microearthquakes to conduct our research. We first study dynamic triggering around the Xiaojiang Fault in Yunnan. The triggered earthquakes are identified as two impulsive seismic arrivals in 2Hz-highpass-filtered velocity seismograms during the passage of surface waves of large teleseismic earthquakes. We only find two earthquakes that may have triggered regional earthquakes through inspecting their spectrograms: Mexico Mw7.4 earthquake in 03/20/2012 and El Salvador Mw7.3 earthquake in 10/14/2014. To confirm the two earthquakes are triggered instead of coincidence, we use M&L to search if there are any repeating earthquakes. The result of the coefficients shows that it is a coincidence during the surface waves of El Salvador earthquake and whether 2012 Mexico have triggered earthquake is under discussion. We then visually inspect the 2-8Hz-bandpass-filterd velocity envelopes of these years to search for non-volcanic tremor. We haven't detected any signals similar to non-volcanic tremors yet. In the following months, we are going to study the 2012 M4.9 Qiaojia earthquake. It occurred only 30km west of the epicenter of the 2014 M6.5 Ludian earthquake. We use Match and Locate (M&L) technique to detect and relocate microearthquakes that occurred 2 days before and 3 days after the mainshock. Through this, we could obtain several times more events than listed in the catalogs provided by NEIC and reduce the magnitude of completeness Mc. We will also detect microearthquakes along Xiaojiang Fault using template earthquakes listed in the catalogs to learn more about fault shape and other properties of Xiaojiang Fault. Analyzing seismicity near Xiaojiang Fault systematically may cast insight on our understanding of the features of

  16. KSC-04PD-2216

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. This panel comprising former and current Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) management talk about identifying and comparing safety challenges of the past, present and future during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day (SS&H) at KSC. Larry Crawford, left, is director of S&MA. SS&H Day included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  17. KSC-04PD-2209

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Lockheed Martin representatives explain some of the activities they are working on for safe Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle. The exhibit was one of many presented to KSC employees during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The day-long event also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  18. KSC-04PD-2221

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. An exhibit of safety glasses, gloves and protective covers is one of many displayed at KSC during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. The event included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  19. KSC-04PD-2219

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. KSC employees learn about a mechanical robot displayed at an exhibit during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. The event included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  20. KSC-04PD-2220

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. KSC Employees stop by the American Red Cross exhibit during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. The event included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  1. KSC-04PD-2223

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Astronaut Mark Polansky (left) visits the Life Sciences Lab at KSC where a demonstration of equipment is underway during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. . The event included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  2. KSC-04PD-2224

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Center Director Jim Kennedy kicks off Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day for second shift employees. The event included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic- great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  3. KSC-04PD-2218

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Gary Grigg, a survivor of the World Trade Center attack on Sept. 11, 2001, relates his experience as part of KSCs Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. The event included other guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  4. KSC-04PD-2217

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Gary Grigg, a survivor of the World Trade Center attack on Sept. 11, 2001, relates his experience as part of KSCs Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. The event included other guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  5. KSC-04PD-2222

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. KSC employees stop at a table with a display of juices during Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day. The event included guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic- great Bruce Jenner. In addition, many vendors exhibits were on display for employees. Super Safety and Health Day was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  6. KSC-03PD-2830

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Capt. Charles Plumb (USNR retired) dramatically describes some of his six years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. Plumb was keynote speaker for the kickoff of Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day at KSC, an annual event dedicated to reinforcing safe and healthful behaviors in the workforce.

  7. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with…

  8. Effect of hydrogenation on the crystal structure of La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomiets, A.V., E-mail: kolomiet@mag.mff.cuni.cz [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera Str., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Maskova, S.; Havela, L.; Matej, Z.; Kuzel, R. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-10

    Research highlights: > La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In hydride is crystalline with 1.5 H atoms per formula unit and amorphous at 4 H atoms/f.u. > Volume expansion of La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In due to hydrogenation reaches 6.0% (or +4.9 A{sup 3}/H atom) and is anisotropic. > Hydrogenation 'softens' the lattice of La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In. - Abstract: The paper is focusing on the modification of the crystal lattice upon the hydrogenation of La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In and hydrogen desorption from La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In hydrides. The synthesis at 1 bar of hydrogen produces a crystalline hydride with 1.5 H atoms per formula unit and the volume expansion of {Delta}V/V = 6.0%. The synthesis at 10 and 100 bar H{sub 2} pressures leads to an amorphous state and with 4 + {delta} H atoms/f.u. The uptake of hydrogen leads to the decrease of the Debye temperature of La{sub 2}Pd{sub 2}In and modification of the optical phonon spectrum.

  9. KSC-04PD-0017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour rolls into the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  10. KSC-03PD-3236

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The orbiter Atlantis rolls toward the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  11. KSC-03PD-3235

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The orbiter Atlantis is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  12. KSC-04PD-0011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour begins rolling out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  13. KSC-04PD-0014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is towed toward the Vehicle Assembly Building for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  14. KSC-04PD-0012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour backs out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  15. KSC-03PD-3233

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The orbiter Atlantis rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer back to the Orbiter Processing Facility. Atlantis spent 10 days in the VAB to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  16. KSC-04PD-0018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour rolls into the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  17. KSC-03PD-3238

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The orbiter Atlantis is back inside the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  18. KSC-04PD-0019

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour settles into place inside the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where it has been moved for temporary storage. It left the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  19. KSC-03PD-3237

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The orbiter Atlantis rolls into the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  20. KSC-04PD-0010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is ready to be rolled out of the Orbiter Processing Facility for temporary transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The move allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  1. KSC-03PD-2829

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Capt. Charles Plumb (USNR retired) begins his dramatic presentation of his six years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. The block of light on the stage represented the size of the cell he was confined in. Plumb was keynote speaker for the kickoff of Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day at KSC, an annual event dedicated to reinforcing safe and healthful behaviors in the workforce.

  2. G6PD: The Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a G6PD deficiency if a male inherits the single X chromosome with an altered gene. Since women have two X sex chromosomes, they inherit two ... deficiency. In addition, a mother may pass the single mutated gene to any male children. Rarely do women have two mutated gene copies ( homozygous ), which could ...

  3. Empowering Patients: PD in Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kensing, Finn; Strand, Dixi Louise; Bansler, Jørgen P.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss PD issues and concerns in the context of a national initiative the purpose of which is to provide IT support for the communication and collaboration within a heterogeneous network of patients/citizens and health care professionals. We present the notion of patient empowe...

  4. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    -specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  5. KSC-03PD-3199

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Workers back the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  6. KSC-04PD-0015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is towed in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where it is going for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  7. KSC-03PD-3198

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is moved into high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  8. KSC-03PD-3234

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Workers accompany the orbiter Atlantis as it is towed back to the Orbiter Processing Facility after spending 10 days in the Vehicle Assembly Building. The hiatus in the VAB allowed work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  9. KSC-03PD-3230

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis is backed out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer back to the Orbiter Processing Facility. Atlantis spent 10 days in the VAB to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  10. KSC-03PD-3197

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis nears the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  11. KSC-03PD-3207

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay 4. It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  12. KSC-03PD-3201

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  13. KSC-03PD-3188

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis awaits a tow from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  14. KSC-03PD-3204

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis arrives in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  15. KSC-03PD-3194

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  16. KSC-03PD-3190

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is moments away from a tow from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  17. KSC-03PD-3231

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The orbiter Atlantis is backed away from the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer back to the Orbiter Processing Facility. Atlantis spent 10 days in the VAB to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  18. KSC-04PD-0016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Endeavour is towed in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where it is going for temporary storage. The orbiter has been moved from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  19. KSC-03PD-3205

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis backs out of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) for its move to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  20. KSC-04PD-0013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After Endeavours rollout from inside the Orbiter Processing Facility, the transporter (foreground) prepares to tow it to the Vehicle Assembly Building for temporary transfer. A protective cover surrounds the nose of Endeavour. The move to the VAB allows work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the OPF includes annual validation of the bays cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Endeavour will remain in the VAB for approximately 12 days, then return to the OPF.

  1. KSC-03PD-3203

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis is almost in position in high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  2. KSC-03PD-3202

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis moves into high bay 4 of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It was towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  3. KSC-03PD-3189

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis awaits transport from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  4. KSC-03PD-3191

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Workers prepare to tow the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to- flight mission, STS-114.

  5. KSC-03PD-3232

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The orbiter Atlantis is backed out of the Vehicle Assembly Building for transfer back to the Orbiter Processing Facility. Atlantis spent 10 days in the VAB to allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work included annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms and jack stands. Work resumes to prepare Atlantis for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  6. KSC-03PD-3196

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis approaches the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). It is being towed from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to allow work to be performed in the bay that can only be accomplished while it is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  7. KSC-03PD-3206

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Workers walk with Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis from the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay 4. The move will allow work to be performed in the OPF that can only be accomplished while the bay is empty. Work scheduled in the processing facility includes annual validation of the bay's cranes, work platforms, lifting mechanisms, and jack stands. Atlantis will remain in the VAB for about 10 days, then return to the OPF as work resumes to prepare it for launch in September 2004 on the first return-to-flight mission, STS-114.

  8. KSC-04PD-2204

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Inside a tent, employees look over an exhibit of safety equipment. The exhibits were part of Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day, which also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The annual event was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  9. KSC-04PD-2203

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Inside a tent, employees look over an exhibit of work shoes. The exhibits were part of Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day, which also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and the O&C Building. The annual event was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  10. NERVE REGENERATION THROUGH A 2-PLY BIODEGRADABLE NERVE GUIDE IN THE RAT AND THE INFLUENCE OF ACTH4-9 NERVE GROWTH-FACTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROBINSON, PH; VANDERLEI, B; HOPPEN, HJ; LEENSLAG, JW; PENNINGS, AJ; NIEUWENHUIS, P

    1991-01-01

    Biodegradable polyurethane-based (PU) nerve guides, instilled with or without ACTH4-9 analog (a melanocortin) were used for bridging an 8 mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve and were evaluated for function and histological appearance after 16 weeks of implantation. Autologous nerve grafts functioned as

  11. INFRARED STUDIES OF HUMAN SALIVA. IDENTIFICATION OF A FACTOR IN HUMAN SALIVA PRODUCING AN INFRARED ABSORBANCE MAXIMUM AT 4.9 MICRONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An absorption maximum was observed at 4.9 microns in infrared spectra of human parotid saliva. The factor causing this absorbance was found to be a...nitrate, and heat stability. Thiocyanate was then determined in 16 parotid saliva samples by a spectrophotometric method, which involved formation of

  12. NaCl islands decorated with 2D or 3D 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    The formation of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) nanostrutures on Au(1 1 1)-(22 x root 3) covered with NaCl islands has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Atomically resolved STM images show that NaCl grows as (1 0 0)-terminated layers on Au(1 1 1)-(22 x

  13. In vivo fate of a behaviorally potent ACTH 4-9 analog; evidence for its specific uptake in the brain septal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhoef, J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of ACTH-like neuropeptides on conditioned avoidance behavior and their tentative central sites of action are reviewed. The in vivo fate of the [ 3 H]-ACTH 4-9 analog after various routes of peripheral administration in mice and rats are described, in particular, the uptake of intact peptide in the brain is emphasized, since ACTH-like neuropeptides elicit their behavioral activities by directly affecting the central nervous system. Subsequently, the metabolic profiles of the ACTH 4-9 analog in plasma and brain tissue are reported. The distribution of the [ 3 H]-ACTH 4-9 analog throughout the rat brain is studied after intraventricular injection to allow detection in small brain areas and nuclei and to limit (peripheral) proteolysis. Finally, the effects of increased and decreased circulating levels of both ACTH-like peptides and structurally non-related but behaviorally active neuropeptides on the central distribution profile of intraventricularly injected [ 3 H]-ACTH 4-9 analog are reviewed

  14. KSC-05PD-1464

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Center Director Jim Kennedy welcomes Mission Commander Eileen Collins to NASAs Kennedy Space Center. She and the rest of the crew for Return to Flight mission STS-114 arrived aboard a Gulf Stream aircraft. The other crew members arriving are Pilot James Kelly and Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence and Charles Camarda. Noguchi is with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA. The crew arrived a day early due to weather concerns associated with Hurricane Dennis. This historic mission is the 114th Space Shuttle flight and the 17th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. STS-114 is scheduled to launch at 3:51 p.m. July 13 and last about 12 days with a planned KSC landing at about 11:01 a.m. EDT on July 25. On mission STS-114, the crew will perform inspections on orbit for the first time of all of the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of the wings and the Thermal Protection System tiles using the new Canadian-built Orbiter Boom Sensor System and the data from 176 impact and temperature sensors. Mission Specialists will also practice repair techniques on RCC and tile samples during a spacewalk in the payload bay. During two additional spacewalks, the crew will install the External Stowage Platform-2, equipped with spare part assemblies, and a replacement Control Moment Gyroscope contained in the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure.

  15. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency in neonates in Bunda Women's and Children's Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risma Kerina Kaban

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most connnon enzyme deficiency in the world. Itis a risk factor for hyperbilirubinemia in neonates, which can cause serious complications such as bilirubininduced encephalopathy or kernicterus. WHO recommends universal neonatal screening for G6PD deficiency when the frequency exceeds 35% of male newborns. Objective To assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among neonates in Bunda Women and C hildren Hospital (Bunda WCH, Jakarta, in order to detennine if there is a need for routine G6PD neonatal screening. Methods This is a cross-sectional and retrospective study; infants' data were obtained from medical records. From January 2009 to May 2010, all neonates in Bunda WCH were screened for G6PD deficiency on the yd day of life. Blood samples were collected using filter papers. We considered a result to be nonnal if it exceeded 3.6 U/g Hb. Results A total 1802 neonates were screened. We found 94 neonates (5.2% with G6PD deficiency. Out of 943 males, 59 (6.26% were G6PD deficient, and out of 859 females, 35 (4.07% were G6PD deficient. We observed that prevalence of G6PD deficiency according to sex distribution was significantly higher in males than females (6.26% vs. 4.07%, P=0.037. There was no significant difference in the risk for severe hyperbilirubinemia between the G6PD deficient infants and the nonnal infants (P=0.804. Conclusions The frequencies of G6PD deficiency were 6.26% of male neonates and 4.07% of female neonates. We recommend universal neonatal screening for G6PD deficiencies in Jakarta since our findings exceed the WHO recommendation for routine testing.

  16. KSC-05PD-0811

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Kennedy Space Centers Shuttle Landing Facility, Center Director Jim Kennedy talks with STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins after her arrival. She and the rest of the crew are at KSC to take part in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) over the next three days. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. It provides the crew of each mission an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The test ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cutoff. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the launch pad. This is Collins fourth space flight and second as commander. STS-114 is the first Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station. The launch window extends July 13 through July 31.

  17. KSC-03PD-1805

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. At Port Canaveral, the Pressurized Module of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) is lifted out of the ships cargo hold. The container transport ship carrying JEM departed May 2 from Yokohama Harbor in Japan for the voyage to the United States. The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) developed the laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center near Tokyo. The Pressurized Module is the first element of the JEM, named 'Kibo' (Hope), to be delivered to KSC. The JEM is Japan's primary contribution to the Station. It will enhance the unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment for astronauts to conduct science experiments. The JEM also includes an exposed facility (platform) for space environment experiments, a robotic manipulator system, and two logistics modules. The various JEM components will be assembled in space over the course of three Shuttle missions. ch day during the launch period that closes on June 19.

  18. KSC-04PD-2201

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Employees at KSC stroll among several tents featuring vendors exhibits of safety- and health-related products. The exhibits were part of Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day, which also featured presentations by guest speakers Dr. Pamela Peeke, Navy Com. Stephen E. Iwanowicz, NASAs Dr. Kristine Calderon and Olympic-great Bruce Jenner. Vendors exhibits were set up in the parking areas outside the Vehicle Assembly Building (seen here) and the O&C Building. The annual event was initiated at KSC in 1998 to increase awareness of the importance of safety and health among the government and contractor workforce. The theme for this years event was Safety and Health: A Winning Combination.

  19. Between Anzac Day and Waitangi Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czerwińska Anna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the historical background and significance of the two most important national holidays in New Zealand: Waitangi Day and Anzac Day. Waitangi Day is celebrated on the 6th February and it commemorates the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi between British representatives and a number of Māori chiefs in 1840. Following the signing of the treaty New Zealand became effectively a British colony. Anzac Day is celebrated on 25th April, i.e., on the anniversary of the landing of soldiers of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey in 1915, during World War One. There are three major differences between these two holidays: the process of those days becoming national holidays, the level of contestation, and the changing messages they have carried. The present study analyzes the national discourse around Anzac Day and Waitangi Day in New Zealand, and attempts to reveal how the official New Zealand government rhetoric about national unity becomes deconstructed. The following analysis is based on a selection of online articles from the New Zealand Herald and Stuff published in Auckland and Wellington, respectively. Both cities are populated by multi-ethnic groups, with Auckland featuring the largest Māori population.

  20. KSC-05PD-0807

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. After arrival at NASAs Kennedy Space Center, the STS-114 crew members are greeted by KSC officials. Seen from left are Deputy Director Woodrow Whitlow Jr., Commander Eileen Collins, Mission Specialists Charles Camarda (behind Collins) and Andrew Thomas, astronaut Jerry Ross, who is chief of the Vehicle Integration Test (VIT) office, VIT Lead for STS-114 Robert Hanley, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach and Center Director Jim Kennedy. Crew members are taking part in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) over the next three days. The TCDT is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. It provides the crew of each mission an opportunity to participate in simulated countdown activities. The test ends with a mock launch countdown culminating in a simulated main engine cutoff. The crew also spends time undergoing emergency egress training exercises at the launch pad. STS-114 is the first Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station. The launch window extends July 13 through July 31.

  1. Geochemical behaviour of palladium in soils and Pd/PdO model substances in the presence of the organic complexing agents L-methionine and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Vang, My; Albers, Peter; Schneider, Wolfgang; Schindl, Roland; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessments of platinum group metal (PGE) emissions, notably those of platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), have been mostly based on data regarding the metallic forms used in vehicular exhaust converters, known to be virtually biologically inert and immobile. To adequately assess the potential impacts of PGE, however, data on the chemical behaviour of these metals under ambient conditions post-emission is needed. Complexing agents with a high affinity for metals in the environment are hypothesized to contribute to an increased bioaccessibility of PGE. The purpose of this study is to examine the modulating effects of the organic complexing agents, L-methionine and citric acid, on the geochemical behavior of Pd in soils and model substances (Pd black and PdO). Batch experimental tests were conducted with soils and model substances to examine the impacts of the concentration of complexing agents, pH and length of extraction period on Pd solubility and its chemical transformation. Particle surface chemistry was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on samples treated with solutions under various conditions, including low and high O2 levels. Pd was observed to be more soluble in the presence of organic complexing agents, compared to Pt and Rh. Pd in soils was more readily solubilized with organic complexing agents compared to the model substances. After 7 days of extraction, L-methionine (0.1 M) treated soil and Pd black samples, for instance, had mean soluble Pd fractions of 12.4 ± 5.9% and 0.554 ± 0.024%, respectively. Surface chemistry analyses (XPS) confirmed the oxidation of metallic Pd surfaces when treated with organic complexing agents. The type of organic complexing agent used for experimental purposes was observed to be the most important factor influencing solubility, followed by solution pH and time of extraction. The results demonstrate that metallic Pd can be transformed into more bioaccessible species in the presence of

  2. CGH Supports World Cancer Day Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    We celebrate World Cancer Day every year on February 4th. This year the theme “We can. I can.” invites us to think not only about how we can work with one another to reduce the global burden of cancer, but how we as individuals can make a difference. Every day the staff at CGH work to establish and build upon programs that are aimed at improving the lives of people affected by cancer.

  3. Peritoneal dialysis technique success during the initial 90 days of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Steven; Hayes, Andrew C; Story, Kenneth; Davis, Ira D

    2012-01-01

    Comparisons of technique success by peritoneal dialysis (PD) modality have typically excluded the initial 90 days of therapy. We analyzed a database of 51,469 new PD starts from 2004 to 2008 in the United States. The analysis concentrated on the initial 90 days of therapy to determine technique success and the impact of the continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) and automated PD (APD) modalities. Overall, 13.3% of patients stopped PD within 90 days. Of patients starting directly on APD, 14.3% stopped PD within 90 days. Of patients starting on CAPD, 12.6% stopped PD within 90 days, and 63.4% changed to APD within 90 days. Only 3.3% of the latter patients failed to reach 90 days of therapy. By comparison, technique failure occurred in 28.8% of those initiating with and remaining on CAPD. We conclude that initial training to perform CAPD, with timely transfer to APD within the first 3 months, was associated with the greatest technique success at 90 days. The reasons for that success are unclear, and further research should be directed to determining factors responsible. It is possible that patients trained initially to CAPD but converted to APD have a greater understanding of the total therapy, which improves confidence. Those converted to APD may be more appreciative of the lifestyle benefits of APD, which translates into improved compliance; alternatively, technical factors associated with APD may be responsible. Those technical factors may include improved catheter function in the recumbent position during APD or the reduced infection risk associated with just 2 connect/disconnect procedures in APD compared with 8 in CAPD.

  4. PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitors for Immuno-oncology: From Antibodies to Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qiaohong; Jiao, Peifu; Jin, Peng; Su, Gaoxing; Dong, Jinlong; Yan, Bing

    2018-02-12

    The recent regulatory approvals of immune checkpoint protein inhibitors, such as ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab ushered a new era in cancer therapy. These inhibitors do not attack tumor cells directly but instead mobilize the immune system to re-recognize and eradicate tumors, which endows them with unique advantages including durable clinical responses and substantial clinical benefits. PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, a pillar of immune checkpoint protein inhibitors, have demonstrated unprecedented clinical efficacy in more than 20 cancer types. Besides monoclonal antibodies, diverse PD- 1/PD-L1 inhibiting candidates, such as peptides, small molecules have formed a powerful collection of weapons to fight cancer. The goal of this review is to summarize and discuss the current PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors including candidates under clinical development, their molecular interactions with PD-1 or PD-L1, the disclosed structureactivity relationships of peptides and small molecules as inhibitors. Current PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors under clinical development are exclusively dominated by antibodies. The molecular interactions of therapeutic antibodies with PD-1 or PD-L1 have been gradually elucidated for the design of novel inhibitors. Various peptides and traditional small molecules have been investigated in preclinical model to discover novel PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. Peptides and small molecules may play an important role in immuno-oncology because they may bind to multiple immune checkpoint proteins via rational design, opening opportunity for a new generation of novel PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. MIS gas sensors based on porous silicon with Pd and WO{sub 3}/Pd electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solntsev, V.S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028, Kiev (Ukraine); Gorbanyuk, T.I., E-mail: tatyanagor@mail.r [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028, Kiev (Ukraine); Litovchenko, V.G.; Evtukh, A.A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2009-09-30

    Pd and WO{sub 3}/Pd gate metal-oxide-semiconductor (MIS) gas sensitive structures based on porous silicon layers are studied by the high frequency C(V) method. The chemical compositions of composite WO{sub 3}/Pd electrodes are characterized by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used for morphologic studies of WO{sub 3}/Pd films. As shown in the experiments, WO{sub 3}/Pd structures are more sensitive and selective to the adsorption of hydrogen sulphide compared to Pd gate. The analyses of kinetic characteristics allow us to determine the response and characteristic times for these structures. The response time of MIS-structures with thin composite WO{sub 3}/Pd electrodes (the thickness of Pd is about 50 nm with WO{sub 3} clusters on its surface) is slower compared to the structures with Pd electrodes. Slower sensor responses of WO{sub 3}-based gas sensors may be associated with different mechanism of gas sensitivity of given structures. The enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to H{sub 2}S action of WO{sub 3}/Pd MIS-structures can also be explained by the chemical reaction that occurs at the catalytic active surface of gate electrodes. The possible mechanisms of enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to H{sub 2}S adsorption of MIS gas sensors with WO{sub 3}/Pd composite gate electrodes compared to pure Pd have been analyzed.

  6. Investigating unexpected magnetism of mesoporous silica-supported Pd and PdO nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2015-01-01

    supported Pd and PdO NPs. The heating rate and the annealing conditions determine the particle size and the phase of the NPs, with a fast heating rate of 30 °C/min producing the largest supported Pd NPs. Unusual magnetic behaviors are observed. (1) Contrary

  7. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulation of 5-fluorouracil for thrombocytopenia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Ito, Yukako; Hayakawa, Taro; Nishimura, Asako; Shibata, Nobuhito; Takada, Kanji; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to develop a simple pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model that could characterize the complete time-course of alterations in platelet counts to predict the onset and degree of thrombocytopenia, which severely limits the use of the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), in rats. 2. Platelet counts were measured in rats following the intravenous administration of various doses of 5-FU for 4 days to obtain data for an analysis of the PK-PD model. Our PK-PD model consisted of a two-compartment PK model, with three compartments for the PD model and 10 structural PK-PD model parameters. 3. After the 5-FU treatment, platelet counts transiently decreased to a nadir level, showed a rebound to above the baseline level before recovering to baseline levels. Nadir platelet counts and rebounds varied with the AUC0-∞ level. The final PK-PD model effectively characterized platelet count data and final PD parameters were estimated with high certainty. 4. This PK-PD model and simulation may represent a valuable tool for quantifying and predicting the complete time-course of alterations in blood cell counts, and could contribute to the development of therapeutic strategies with 5-FU and assessments of various novel anticancer agents that are difficult to examine in humans.

  8. Structural Biology of the Immune Checkpoint Receptor PD-1 and Its Ligands PD-L1/PD-L2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zak, Krzysztof M.; Grudnik, Przemyslaw; Magiera, Katarzyna; Dömling, Alexander; Dubin, Grzegorz; Holak, Tad A.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells can avoid and suppress immune responses through activation of inhibitory immune checkpoint proteins, such as PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4. Blocking the activities of these proteins with monoclonal antibodies, and thus restoring T cell function, has delivered breakthrough therapies against

  9. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  10. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  11. One-pot synthesis of Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Qiang; Huang, Dabing; Wang, Honghui; Zhou, Zhiyou; Wang, Qingxiao

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with a Pd-Pt alloy core and a conformal Pd shell of ~2-3 nm were directly synthesized through a one-pot, aqueous solution approach without any preformed Pd or Pt seeds. These Pd-Pt@Pd core

  12. Day Care: Other Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjartarson, Freida; And Others

    This collection of 5 bilingual papers on day care programs in foreign countries (China, the Soviet Union, and 3 Scandinavian countries) is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Paper I considers day care services in…

  13. Every Day Is Mathematical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  14. Influence of 103Pd radioactive stent on apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yingmei; Wu Wei; Chen Xiaochao; Zhang Xuming; Wang Jingfeng; Wei Yulin; Yang Li

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of 103 Pd radioactive stent on apoptosis and its relative genes bcl-2 and bax in injured vascular media smooth muscle cells of rabbit abdominal arteries and to investigate the mechanism of 103 Pd radioactive stent for preventing restenosis after angioplasty. Methods: Fifty male New Zealand rabbits were randomized into stent group and 103 Pd stent group. Each group was subdivided into 5 sub-groups. Control group was set up. The study arteries were harvested at 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 d after stenting and the pathomorphology, apoptosis analysis and in situ hybridization were performed to evaluate the expression of bcl-2 and bax mRNA. Results: The severity of the restenosis in 103 Pd stent group was less than that of stent group. It was most obvious at the 56th day (P 103 Pd stent group had much more apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells than stent group did and reached the peak at the 7th day, (14.72±0.53)% vs (12.42±1.13)% (P 103 Pd stent group was much lower than that of stent group at 3 to 28 d. The difference was most obvious at the 28th day after stenting, (18.43± 0.67)% vs (21.55±0.93)% (P 103 Pd stent group was higher than that of stent group, the peak was at the 7th day, (11.17±0.94)% vs (9.30±1.01)%. The ratio of bcl-2/bax in 103 Pd stent group was much lower than that of stent group at 3 to 28 d. Linear correlation analysis showed that there was significant negative correlation between bcl-2 mRNA and apoptosis. Between bax mRNA and apoptosis, the positive correlation was found (P 103 Pd radioactive stent induced more significant apoptosis in vascular media smooth muscle cells by promoting the expression of apoptosis related genes and relieved the expanding of restenosis

  15. (G6PD) in stored blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Red blood cell viability in stored blood determines successful transfusion. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity has been shown to maintain red blood cell membrane integrity. This study was, therefore, aimed at estimating the G6PD activity in stored blood bags at the blood bank of the University of Nigeria ...

  16. H-H interactions in Pd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, O. B.; Ditlevsen, Peter; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1989-01-01

    -medium theory to calculate total energies we show the same tendency for the short-range part of the H-H interaction when two H atoms are squeezed into a single site in Pd or PdH. At longer range (of the order a lattice constant) there is an attractive, lattice-mediated H-H interaction. On the basis...

  17. Slimmed May Day Holiday

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinwen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Last November the State Council of China decided to renew its holiday system by reducing the seven-day Mav Dav holiday to three days and introducing three new one-day public holidays,namely the Qingming Festival,Dragon Boat Festival and Moon Festival.BY doing so,the three golden-week holidays that were introduced in 1999,namely the Spring Festival,Mav Dav and National Day,could be better distributed.The New Year's Eve holiday would remain one day.The new holiday plan was supposed to take effect in 2008.

  18. Synthesis of [14α, 15α-3H]-17α-cyanomethyl-17β-hydroxyestra-4.9-diene-3-one - a specifically tritium labelled gestagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roemer, J.; Wagner, H.

    1978-05-01

    Synthesis of [14α, 15α- 3 H 2 ]-17α-cyanomethyl-17β-hydroxyestra-4.9-diene-3-one from quantitativly tritiated [14α, 15α- 3 H 2 ]-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10),8-tetraene-17β-ol is described. The determination of the radiochemical purity and chemical yield was carried out by thin-layer chromatography. Preparative thin-layer chromatography was used for purifying the final product. By-products formed in the course of synthesis could be detected by determining and comparing specific activities of the intermediate products. Radiolytic investigations revealed the instability of the tritium labelled dienone system. (author)

  19. Synthesis, photophysical, structural and electronic properties of novel regioisomerically pure 1,7-disubstituted perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic monoimide dibutylester derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozser, Mustafa E.; Mohiuddin, Obaidullah

    2018-04-01

    Three new isomerically pure 1,7-disubstituted perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic monoimide dibutylester derivatives namely; N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,7-dibromoperylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy monoimide dibutylester (PMD-1), N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,7-di(4-tert-butylphenoxy)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy monoimide dibutylester (PMD-2) and N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,7-di(pyrrolidinyl)perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxy monoimide dibutylester (PMD-3), have been synthesized and their electronic absorption spectra, and steady-state fluorescence were investigated experimentally as well as by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All three compounds show good solubility in toluene and chloroform. Attachment of two tert-butylphenoxy groups at the 1,7-positions in PMD-2 resulted in a red shifted absorption band with an absorption maximum at 518 nm. UV/Vis absorption spectrum of PMD-3 bearing electron donating pyrrolidinyl groups at the 1,7-positions shows a broad absorption band within the visible region, extending to red region. Absorption maximum of lowest energy transition now shifts to 653 nm. In addition to the S0 → S1 absorption bands, bands belonging to S0 → S2 electronic transitions were observed at 378, 386, and 411 nm for PMD-1, PMD-2, and PMD-3 respectively. Compounds PMD-1, PMD-2 and PMD-3 display low fluorescence quantum yields of 0.027, 0.040 and 0.001, respectively in chloroform. DFT calculations revealed that the attachment of electron donating groups at 1,7-positions of perylene core, results in an increase in frontier orbitals energy levels. Observed energy increase in HOMO level is larger in each case, compared to the energy increase in LUMO levels, due to the higher contribution of side groups to HOMO. DFT calculated band gaps for PMD-1, PMD-2 and PMD-3 are 2.68, 2.63 and 2.29 eV respectively.

  20. Interfacial spectroscopic characterization of organic/ferromagnet hetero-junction of 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride-based organic spin valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jhen-Yong; Ou Yang, Kui-Hon; Li, Kai-Shin [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Bo-Yao [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Chan, Yuet-Loy; Wei, Der-Hsin; Chang, Fan-Hsiu; Lin, Hong-Ji [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 30076 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Wen-Chung, E-mail: wchiang@faculty.pccu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Chinese Culture University, 11114 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Minn-Tsong, E-mail: mtlin@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    We report interfacial characterization of 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA)-based organic spin valves (OSV) dusted with a thin layer of partially oxidized alumina at the organic semiconductor (OSC)/ferromagnet (FM) interfaces. Up to 13.5% magnetoresistance is achieved at room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal interfacial electronic interaction between PTCDA and FM while the application of a thin alumina layer at the PTCDA/FM interfaces prevents the electronic hybridization and effectively preserves the spin injection into the OSC spacer. This finding demonstrates the critical effect of interfacial structure on magnetotransport behavior in OSV.

  1. Multiplexed Immunofluorescence Reveals Potential PD-1/PD-L1 Pathway Vulnerabilities in Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, Shannon; Rashid, Rumana; Lin, Jia-Ren; Du, Ziming; Donson, Andrew M; Hankinson, Todd C; Foreman, Nicholas K; Manley, Peter E; Kieran, Mark W; Reardon, David A; Sorger, Peter K; Santagata, Sandro

    2018-03-02

    Craniopharyngiomas are neoplasms of the sellar/parasellar region that are classified into adamantinomatous (ACP) and papillary (PCP) subtypes. Surgical resection of craniopharyngiomas is challenging, and recurrence is common, frequently leading to profound morbidity. BRAF V600E mutations render PCP susceptible to BRAF/MEK inhibitors, but effective targeted therapies are needed for ACP. We explored the feasibility of targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint pathway in ACP and PCP. We mapped and quantified PD-L1 and PD-1 expression in ACP and PCP resections using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and RNA in situ hybridization. We used tissue-based cyclic immunofluorescence (t-CyCIF) to map the spatial distribution of immune cells and characterize cell cycle and signaling pathways in ACP tumor cells which intrinsically express PD-1. All ACP (15±14% of cells, n=23, average±S.D.) and PCP (35±22% of cells, n=18) resections expressed PD-L1. In ACP, PD-L1 was predominantly expressed by tumor cells comprising the cyst-lining. In PCP, PD-L1 was highly-expressed by tumor cells surrounding the stromal fibrovascular cores. ACP also exhibited tumor cell-intrinsic PD-1 expression in whorled epithelial cells with nuclear-localized beta-catenin. These cells exhibited evidence of elevated mTOR and MAPK signaling. Profiling of immune populations in ACP and PCP showed a modest density of CD8+ T-cells. ACP exhibit PD-L1 expression in the tumor cyst-lining and intrinsic PD-1 expression in cells proposed to comprise an oncogenic stem-like population. In PCP, proliferative tumor cells express PD-L1 in a continuous band at the stromal-epithelial interface. Targeting PD-L1 and/or PD-1 in both subtypes of craniopharyngioma might therefore be an effective therapeutic strategy.

  2. Experiences of Everyday Occupation among People with Psychiatric Disabilities - Relationships to social interaction, the worker role and day centre attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Argentzell, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The thesis aims to explore subjective experiences of everyday occupation, social interaction and the view of the worker role among people with psychiatric disabilities(PD), while also addressing the importance of day centre attendance. The thesis consists of one qualitative study, exploring which characteristics in everyday occupation provide meaning to people with PD, and three quantitative studies based on questionnaires to both day centre attendees and non-attendees. Study I showed that fe...

  3. Anti-tumor immunotherapy by blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway with recombinant human PD-1-IgV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Wu, S; Xue, X; Li, M; Qin, X; Li, W; Han, W; Zhang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Blockade of the programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway can delay tumor growth and prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice. The extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig) V domain of PD-1 is important for the interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1, suggesting that PD-1-IgV may be a potential target for anti-tumor immunotherapy. The extracellular sequence of human PD-1-IgV (hPD-1-IgV) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The anti-tumor effect of hPD-1-IgV on tumor-bearing mice was tested. hPD-1-IgV recombinant protein could bind PD-L1 at molecular and cellular levels and enhance Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte (CTL) activity and anti-tumor effect on tumor-bearing mice in vivo. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells in tumor-bearing mice was decreased compared with control mice after administration of the recombinant protein. Our results suggest that inhibition of the interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 by hPD-1-IgV may be a promising strategy for specific tumor immunotherapy.

  4. Experimental study of the preventive effect of 1'03Pd stent on in-stent restenosis in rabbit iliac artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Quanyong; Chen Libo; Yuan Zhibin; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ability of γ-emitting 103 Pd radioactive stent implantation for preventing in-stent restenosis in iliac artery of rabbits. Methods: Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were divided into six groups on the basis of radioactivity loading [2.22 (n=3), 5.55 (n=4), 9.25 (n=4), 14.8 (n=3), 22.2 (n=3), 33.3 MBq (n=3)]. 103 Pd stent was implanted in one of the two iliac arteries of each rabbit and nonradioactive stent in the contralateral artery. The rabbits were fed with high fat diet. Treatment efficiency was assessed by angiography and quantitative histomorphometry of the stented iliac segments 28 d after the implantation. Results: Quantitative histomorphometry analysis indicated that 103 Pd stents induced a significant reduction in neointimal area and the percentage of stenosis within radioactive stents was lower compared with that in the control stents. Nevertheless, the suppression of neointima formation by 103 Pd stent implantation was not in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions: Low-dose intravascular brachytherapy via a γ-particle-emitting 103 Pd radioactive stent potently inhibits neointimal hyperplasia and prevents the in-stent restenosis in rabbit iliac artery. 103 Pd stent implantation probably can be employed as a novel means to prevent in-stent restenosis

  5. Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in infants with G6PD c.563C > TVariant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiz Bushra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a strong correlation between glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia with a rare but potential threat of devastating acute bilirubin encephalopathy. G6PD deficiency was observed in 4–14% of hospitalized icteric neonates in Pakistan. G6PD c.563C > T is the most frequently reported variant in this population. The present study was aimed at evaluating the time to onset of hyperbilirubinemia and the postnatal bilirubin trajectory in infants having G6PD c.563C > T. Methods This was a case–control study conducted at The Aga Khan University, Pakistan during the year 2008. We studied 216 icteric male neonates who were re-admitted for phototherapy during the study period. No selection was exercised. Medical records showed that 32 were G6PD deficient while 184 were G6PD normal. Each infant was studied for birth weight, gestational age, age at the time of presentation, presence of cephalhematoma, sepsis and neurological signs, peak bilirubin level, age at peak bilirubin level, days of hospitalization, whether phototherapy or exchange blood transfusion was initiated, and the outcome. During hospital stay, each baby was tested for complete blood count, reticulocyte count, ABO and Rh blood type, direct antiglobulin test and quantitative G6PD estimation [by kinetic determination of G6PDH]. G6PDgenotype was analyzed in 32 deficient infants through PCR-RFLP analysis and gene sequencing. Results G6PD variants c.563C > T and c.131 C > G were observed in 21 (65% and three (9% of the 32 G6PD deficient infants, respectively. DNA of eight (25% newborns remained uncharacterized. In contrast to G6PD normal neonates, infants with c.563C > T variant had significantly lower enzyme activity (mean ± 1SD; 0.3 ± 0.2 U/gHb vs. 14.0 ± 4.5 U/gHb, p p = 0.008 which peaked earlier after birth (mean ± 1SD 2.9 ± 1.6 vs. 4.3 ± 2.3 days, p = 0.007. No statistically significant

  6. Photo-induced effects of the virgin Ge_2_4_._9Sb_1_1_._6S_6_3_._5 film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotek, P.; Tichy, L.; Kutalek, P.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous Ge_2_4_._9Sb_1_1_._6S_6_3_._5 film was prepared through thermal evaporation. A blue shift of the optical band gap by approximately 100 meV was observed as a result of self-bleaching process of protected film aged for two years. The magnitude of the light induced blue shift of the optical band of the virgin film is primarily dependent on the light penetration depth and on the light intensity. The kinetics of photo-bleaching follows the stretch exponential function with a formal rate of bleaching depending on the light intensity while the saturated state is independent from the light intensity. The far infrared spectra indicate that ageing, illumination by over-band gap-photons and annealing of the virgin film are mainly accompanied by the film network ordering. Illumination by UV light photons led to a blue shift accompanied by the significant oxidation as evidenced by the results of the far infrared spectra and the energy dispersive analysis. - Highlights: • “Giant” photo-induced effects in virgin Ge_2_4_._9Sb_1_1_._6S_6_3_._5 film • The role of the film thickness, the wavelengths and intensity of excitation photons • The changes of the photo-sensitivity due to the self-ageing process • The high-intensity illumination (> 10 W/cm"2) led to the different processes

  7. In vitro degradation and biocompatibility of Fe–Pd and Fe–Pt composites fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, T. [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cheng, J. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Y.F., E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-02-01

    In order to obtain biodegradable Fe-based materials with similar mechanical properties as 316L stainless steel and faster degradation rate than pure iron, Fe-5 wt.%Pd and Fe-5 wt.%Pt composites were prepared by spark plasma sintering with powders of pure Fe and Pd/Pt, respectively. The grain size of Fe-5 wt.%Pd and Fe-5 wt.%Pt composites was much smaller than that of as-cast pure iron. The metallic elements Pd and Pt were uniformly distributed in the matrix and the mechanical properties of these materials were improved. Uniform corrosion of Fe–Pd and Fe–Pt composites was observed in both electrochemical tests and immersion tests, and the degradation rates of Fe–Pd and Fe–Pt composites were much faster than that of pure iron. It was found that viabilities of mouse fibroblast L-929 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304) cultured in extraction mediums of Fe–Pd and Fe–Pt composites were close to that of pure iron. After 4 days' culture, the viabilities of L-929 and ECV304 cells in extraction medium of experimental materials were about 80%. The result of direct contact cytotoxicity also indicated that experimental materials exhibited no inhibition on vascular endothelial process. Meanwhile, iron ions released from experimental materials could inhibit proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which may be beneficial for hindering vascular restenosis. Furthermore, compared with that of as-cast pure iron, the hemolysis rates of Fe–Pd and Fe–Pt composites were slightly higher, but still within the range of 5%, which is the criteria for good blood compatibility. The numbers of platelet adhered on the surface of Fe–Pd and Fe–Pt composites were lower than that of pure iron, and the morphology of platelets kept spherical. To sum up, the Fe-5wt.%Pd and Fe-5wt.%Pt composites exhibited good mechanical properties and degradation behavior, closely approaching the requirements for biodegradable metallic stents. - Highlights:

  8. Investigating unexpected magnetism of mesoporous silica-supported Pd and PdO nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2015-01-13

    The synthesis and magnetic behavior of matrix-supported Pd and PdO nanoparticles (NPs) are described. Mesoporous silica with hexagonal columnal packing is selected as a template, and the impregnation method with thermal annealing is used to obtain supported Pd and PdO NPs. The heating rate and the annealing conditions determine the particle size and the phase of the NPs, with a fast heating rate of 30 °C/min producing the largest supported Pd NPs. Unusual magnetic behaviors are observed. (1) Contrary to the general belief that smaller Pd NPs or cluster size particles have higher magnetization, matrix-supported Pd NPs in this study maintain the highest magnetization with room temperature ferromagnetism when the size is the largest. (2) Twin boundaries along with stacking faults are more pronounced in these large Pd NPs and are believed to be the reason for this high magnetization. Similarly, supported PdO NPs were prepared under air conditions with different heating rates. Their phase is tetragonal (P42/mmc) with cell parameters of a = 3.050 Å and c = 5.344 Å, which are slightly larger than in the bulk phase (a = 3.03 Å, c = 5.33 Å). Faster heating rate of 30 °C/min also produces larger particles and larger magnetic hysteresis loop, although magnetization is smaller and few twin boundaries are observed compared to the supported metallic Pd NPs.

  9. Open Day at SHMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  10. G6PD Deficiency and Antimalarial Efficacy for Uncomplicated Malaria in Bangladesh: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Ley

    Full Text Available The Bangladeshi national treatment guidelines for uncomplicated malaria follow WHO recommendations but without G6PD testing prior to primaquine administration. A prospective observational study was conducted to assess the efficacy of the current antimalarial policy.Patients with uncomplicated malaria, confirmed by microscopy, attending a health care facility in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh, were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (days 0-2 plus single dose primaquine (0.75mg/kg on day2 for P. falciparum infections, or with chloroquine (days 0-2 plus 14 days primaquine (3.5mg/kg total over 14 days for P. vivax infections. Hb was measured on days 0, 2 and 9 in all patients and also on days 16 and 30 in patients with P. vivax infection. Participants were followed for 30 days. The study was registered with the clinical trials website (NCT02389374.Between September 2014 and February 2015 a total of 181 patients were enrolled (64% P. falciparum, 30% P. vivax and 6% mixed infections. Median parasite clearance times were 22.0 (Interquartile Range, IQR: 15.2-27.3 hours for P. falciparum, 20.0 (IQR: 9.5-22.7 hours for P. vivax and 16.6 (IQR: 10.0-46.0 hours for mixed infections. All participants were afebrile within 48 hours, two patients with P. falciparum infection remained parasitemic at 48 hours. No patient had recurrent parasitaemia within 30 days. Adjusted male median G6PD activity was 7.82U/gHb. One male participant (1/174 had severe G6PD deficiency (<10% activity, five participants (5/174 had mild G6PD deficiency (10-60% activity. The Hb nadir occurred on day 2 prior to primaquine treatment in P. falciparum and P. vivax infected patients; mean fractional fall in Hb was -8.8% (95%CI -6.7% to -11.0% and -7.4% (95%CI: -4.5 to -10.4% respectively.The current antimalarial policy remains effective. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency was low. Main contribution to haemolysis in G6PD normal individuals was attributable to acute malaria rather

  11. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    processing of day cases is separate, more efficient and cases of ... anaesthetists, patient records, costing of procedures, drugs to be ... Methods: Patients treated at two day surgical units study with the aid of careful record, as to the selection, ... treatment only. .... Trauma, especially road traffic .... children with cerebral palsy.

  12. NO TOBACCO DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service is joining in with the world no tobacco day, which takes place on 31 May 2002. We encourage you to take this opportunity to stop smoking for good. Nurses and Doctors will be present on that day to give out information on methods to stop smoking and to assist you in your efforts.

  13. The Graduation Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛竹晨

    2004-01-01

    It is one of the hottest summer days that Cambridge has ever had.We wereclad(clothe的过去式和过去分词)in the black gown once more.However thiswill probably be my last time to wear it.I had not been wearing it that much af-ter all.After this day,it will be shipped back to my home and lie in my closet,just to be dug out many years later and the sight of it will bring me back to thisvery day.It is our graduation day,the day wher we can add a hood(头巾;兜帽)

  14. PD-1/PD-L signaling pathway in chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAO Lilin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is one of the major diseases that affect the health of Chinese people, and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection can lead to disease progression. Programmed death-1 (PD-1 discovered in recent years is an important coordinated stimulus molecule which belongs to the B7/CD28 family. After its binding with programmed death ligand (PD-L, it can regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of T lymphocytes. PD-1 and its ligand are differently expressed in different stages of chronic HBV infection. The interaction between PD-1 and its ligand in different immune cells induces immune tolerance in human body and finally leads to the chronicity of HBV infection. Blocking the PD-1/PD-L signaling pathway through different ways can improve T cell exhaustion, suggesting that this might be one of the directions of antiviral therapy in future.

  15. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen chemisorption on Pd(111), Re(0001) and PdML/Re(0001), ReML/Pd(111) pseudomorphic overlayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallassana, Venkataraman; Neurock, Matthew; Hansen, Lars Bruno

    1999-01-01

    not appear to provide an independent parameter for assessing surface reactivity. The weak chemisorption of hydrogen on the Pd-ML/Re(0001) surface relates to substantial lowering of the d-band center of Pd, when it is pseudomorphically deposited as a monolayer on a Re substrate. [S0163-1829(99)00331-2].......Gradient-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-GGA) periodic slab calculations have been used to analyze the binding of atomic hydrogen on monometallic Pd(111), Re(0001), and bimetallic Pd-mL/Re(0001) [pseudomorphic monolayer of Pd(111) on Re(0001)] and Re-ML/Pd(111) surfaces. The computed...

  16. Search for heavy bottom-like quarks in 4.9 inverse femtobarns of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cerny, Karel; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Rurua, Lali; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Fischer, David; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Krajczar, Krisztian; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Nelson, Randy; Pellett, Dave; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lueking, Lee; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Chung, Kwangzoo; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Peterman, Alison; Rossato, Kenneth; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Korjenevski, Sergey; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Richards, Alan; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for heavy bottom-like quarks, pair-produced in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, undertaken with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The b' quarks are assumed to decay exclusively to tW. The b' anti-b' to t W(+) anti-t W(-) process can be identified by its distinctive signatures of three leptons or two leptons of same charge, and at least one b-quark jet. Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns, observed events are compared to the standard model background predictions, and the existence of b' quarks having masses below 611 GeV/$c^2$ is excluded at 95% confidence level.

  17. AC electrical conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies on n-type organic thin films of N, N‧-Dimethyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (DMPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qashou, Saleem I.; Darwish, A. A. A.; Rashad, M.; Khattari, Z.

    2017-11-01

    Both Alternating current (AC) conductivity and dielectric behavior of n-type organic thin films of N, N‧-Dimethyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (DMPDC) have been investigated. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used for identifying both powder and film bonds which confirm that there are no observed changes in the bonds between the DMPDC powder and evaporated films. The dependence of AC conductivity on the temperature for DMPDC evaporated films was explained by the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model. The calculated barrier height using CBH model shows a decreasing behavior with increasing temperature. The mechanism of dielectric relaxation was interpreted on the basis of the modulus of the complex dielectric. The calculated activation energy of the relaxation process was found to be 0.055 eV.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Wavelet-Coded OFDM on a 4.9 Gbps W-Band Radio-over-Fiber Link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalcante, Lucas Costa Pereira; Rommel, Simon; Dinis, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Future generation mobile communications running on mm-wave frequencies will require great robustness against frequency selective channels. In this work we evaluate the transmission performance of 4.9 Gbps Wavelet-Coded OFDM signals on a 10 km fiber plus 58 m wireless Radio-over-Fiber link using...... a mm-wave radio frequency carrier. The results show that a 2×128 Wavelet-Coded OFDM system achieves a bit-error rate of 1e-4 with nearly 2.5 dB less signal-to-noise ratio than a convolutional coded OFDM system with equivalent spectral efficiency for 8 GHz-wide signals with 512 sub-carriers on a carrier...

  19. NaCl islands decorated with 2D or 3D 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaonan; Silly, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    The formation of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) nanostrutures on Au(1 1 1)-(22x√(3)) covered with NaCl islands has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Atomically resolved STM images show that NaCl grows as (1 0 0)-terminated layers on Au(1 1 1)-(22x√(3)). Local atomic hexagonal packing has also been observed in the NaCl(1 0 0) layer. At submonolayer NaCl coverage, PTCDA forms two-dimensional islands on the Au(1 1 1) surface and nucleate preferentially at the NaCl island step edges. When the Au surface is fully covered with NaCl layers, PTCDA molecules form three-dimensional molecular clusters decorating the step edges of NaCl layers.

  20. NaCl islands decorated with 2D or 3D 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiaonan [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); Silly, Fabien, E-mail: Fabien.silly@cea.fr [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands); CEA, IRAMIS, SPCSI, Nanostructures and Organic Semiconductors Laboratory, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UPMC, IPCM, UMR CNRS 7201, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-01-15

    The formation of PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride) nanostrutures on Au(1 1 1)-(22x{radical}(3)) covered with NaCl islands has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Atomically resolved STM images show that NaCl grows as (1 0 0)-terminated layers on Au(1 1 1)-(22x{radical}(3)). Local atomic hexagonal packing has also been observed in the NaCl(1 0 0) layer. At submonolayer NaCl coverage, PTCDA forms two-dimensional islands on the Au(1 1 1) surface and nucleate preferentially at the NaCl island step edges. When the Au surface is fully covered with NaCl layers, PTCDA molecules form three-dimensional molecular clusters decorating the step edges of NaCl layers.

  1. Nanostructure analysis of friction welded Pd-Ni-P/Pd-Cu-Ni-P metallic glass interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, T.; Shoji, S.; Kawamura, Y.; Hono, K.

    2005-01-01

    Friction welded Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 /Pd 40 Cu 30 Ni 10 P 20 metallic glass interface has been characterized by energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. The interface is fully amorphous with a gradual compositional change of Cu and Ni in the range of 30 nm. By annealing above T g , the interdiffusion of Cu and Ni progressed in the supercooled liquid region, and the crystallization occurred from the Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 glass

  2. Cytotoxicity of Pd nanostructures supported on PEN: Influence of sterilization on Pd/PEN interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polívková, M., E-mail: polivkoa@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Siegel, J. [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Rimpelová, S. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Hubáček, T. [Institute of Hydrobiology, Biology Centre of the AS CR, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Kolská, Z. [Materials Centre of Usti n. L., J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-01-01

    Non-conventional antimicrobial agents, such as palladium nanostructures, have been increasingly used in the medicinal technology. However, experiences uncovering their harmful and damaging effects to human health have begun to appear. In this study, we have focused on in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of Pd nanostructures supported on a biocompatible polymer. Pd nanolayers of variable thicknesses (ranging from 1.1 to 22.4 nm) were sputtered on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN). These nanolayers were transformed by low-temperature post-deposition annealing into discrete nanoislands. Samples were characterized by AFM, XPS, ICP-MS and electrokinetic analysis before and after annealing. Sterilization of samples prior to cytotoxicity testing was done by UV irradiation, autoclave and/or ethanol. Among the listed sterilization techniques, we have chosen the gentlest one which had minimal impact on sample morphology, Pd dissolution and overall Pd/PEN interface quality. Cytotoxic response of Pd nanostructures was determined by WST-1 cell viability assay in vitro using three model cell lines: mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) and two types of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (L929 and NIH 3T3). Finally, cell morphology in response to Pd/PEN was evaluated by means of fluorescence microscopy. - Highlights: • Annealing of Pd nanolayers on PEN resulted to Pd aggregation and formation of discrete nanoislands. • UV treatment was found as the gentlest sterilization method in term of physicochemical properties of Pd/PEN interface. • Autoclaving and chemical sterilization by ethanol resulted into remarkable changes of Pd/PEN interface. • Cytotoxicity of Pd samples was insignificant. • Pd nanostructures are potentially applicable as health-unobjectionable antibacterial coatings of medical devices.

  3. Preparation of 103Pd seed-molecular plating of 103Pd onto silver rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunfu; Wang Yongxian; Tian Haibin; Yin Duanzhi

    2002-01-01

    A method for 103 Pd 'molecular plating' onto the surface of a silver rod is reported. The optimal composition of the plating bath is as follows: palladium chloride 0.1 mol/l, formaldehyde 2 mol/l, nitric acid 1 mol/l, and formic acid 0.4 mol/l. The 103 Pd molecular plating procedure will last 25 min at 30 deg. C. This article provides a valuable experience for the preparation of 103 Pd brachytherapy seed

  4. Preparation of 103Pd seeds. Part 2. 'Molecular Plating' of 103Pd onto copper rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chunfu Zhang; Yongxian Wang; Haibin Tian; Duanzhi Yin

    2002-01-01

    A method for 103 Pd 'molecular plating' onto the surface of the copper rod is reported. The optimal composition of the plating bath was: palladium chloride 2 g/l, ammonium hydroxide (28%) 150 ml/l, sodium hypophosphite 12 g/l, and ammonium chloride 37 g/l. The whole procedure of 103 Pd 'molecular plating' will last 50 minutes at 40 deg C. Valuable experience for the preparation of 103 Pd seeds is provided. (author)

  5. PD-1/PD-L blockade in gastrointestinal cancers: lessons learned and the road toward precision immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Long

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI malignancies are the most prevalent tumors worldwide, with increasing incidence and mortality. Although surgical resection, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and molecular targeted therapy have led to significant advances in the treatment of GI cancer patients, overall survival is still low. Therefore, alternative strategies must be identified to improve patient outcomes. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor cells can escape the host immune response through the interaction of PD-1 and PD-L, which inhibits the function of T cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes while increasing the function of immunosuppressive T regulatory cells. The use of an anti-PD-1/PD-L blockade enables reprogramming of the immune system to efficiently identify and kill tumor cells. In recent years, the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L blockade has been demonstrated in many tumors, and this treatment is expected to be a pan-immunotherapy for tumors. Here, we review the signaling pathway underlying the dysregulation of PD-1/PD-L in tumors, summarize the current clinical data for PD-1/PD-L inhibitors in GI malignancies, and discuss road toward precision immunotherapy in relation to PD-1/PD-L blockade. The preliminary data for PD-1/PD-L inhibitors are encouraging, and the precision immunotherapy of PD-1/PD-L inhibitors will be a viable and pivotal clinical strategy for GI cancer therapy.

  6. PD-1/PD-L blockade in gastrointestinal cancers: lessons learned and the road toward precision immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Junyu; Lin, Jianzhen; Wang, Anqiang; Wu, Liangcai; Zheng, Yongchang; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Xu, Haifeng; Chen, Shuguang; Zhao, Haitao

    2017-08-03

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are the most prevalent tumors worldwide, with increasing incidence and mortality. Although surgical resection, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and molecular targeted therapy have led to significant advances in the treatment of GI cancer patients, overall survival is still low. Therefore, alternative strategies must be identified to improve patient outcomes. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor cells can escape the host immune response through the interaction of PD-1 and PD-L, which inhibits the function of T cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes while increasing the function of immunosuppressive T regulatory cells. The use of an anti-PD-1/PD-L blockade enables reprogramming of the immune system to efficiently identify and kill tumor cells. In recent years, the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L blockade has been demonstrated in many tumors, and this treatment is expected to be a pan-immunotherapy for tumors. Here, we review the signaling pathway underlying the dysregulation of PD-1/PD-L in tumors, summarize the current clinical data for PD-1/PD-L inhibitors in GI malignancies, and discuss road toward precision immunotherapy in relation to PD-1/PD-L blockade. The preliminary data for PD-1/PD-L inhibitors are encouraging, and the precision immunotherapy of PD-1/PD-L inhibitors will be a viable and pivotal clinical strategy for GI cancer therapy.

  7. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng; McCalman, Dorrell C.; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R.; Schneider, William F.; Werth, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2013-03-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Pd-nanoparticles cause increased toxicity to kiwifruit pollen compared to soluble Pd(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speranza, Anna; Leopold, Kerstin; Maier, Marina; Taddei, Anna Rita; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, endpoints including in vitro pollen performance (i.e., germination and tube growth) and lethality were used as assessments of nanotoxicity. Pollen was treated with 5-10 nm-sized Pd particles, similar to those released into the environment by catalytic car exhaust converters. Results showed Pd-nanoparticles altered kiwifruit pollen morphology and entered the grains more rapidly and to a greater extent than soluble Pd(II). At particulate Pd concentrations well below those of soluble Pd(II), pollen grains experienced rapid losses in endogenous calcium and pollen plasma membrane damage was induced. This resulted in severe inhibition and subsequent cessation of pollen tube emergence and elongation at particulate Pd concentrations as low as 0.4 mg L -1 . Particulate Pd emissions related to automobile traffic have been increasing and are accumulating in the environment. This could seriously jeopardize in vivo pollen function, with impacts at an ecosystem level. - Nanoparticulate Pd - which resembles emissions from automobile catalysts - affects pollen to a higher extent than soluble Pd.

  10. Pd-nanoparticles cause increased toxicity to kiwifruit pollen compared to soluble Pd(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speranza, Anna, E-mail: anna.speranza@unibo.i [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Bologna, via Irnerio 42, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Leopold, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.leopold@lrz.tu-muenchen.d [Arbeitsgruppe fuer Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Maier, Marina, E-mail: marina.maier@ch.tum.d [Arbeitsgruppe fuer Analytische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Taddei, Anna Rita, E-mail: artaddei@unitus.i [CIME, Universita della Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy); Scoccianti, Valeria, E-mail: valeria.scoccianti@uniurb.i [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Uomo, dell' Ambiente e della Natura, Universita di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , Urbino (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    In the present study, endpoints including in vitro pollen performance (i.e., germination and tube growth) and lethality were used as assessments of nanotoxicity. Pollen was treated with 5-10 nm-sized Pd particles, similar to those released into the environment by catalytic car exhaust converters. Results showed Pd-nanoparticles altered kiwifruit pollen morphology and entered the grains more rapidly and to a greater extent than soluble Pd(II). At particulate Pd concentrations well below those of soluble Pd(II), pollen grains experienced rapid losses in endogenous calcium and pollen plasma membrane damage was induced. This resulted in severe inhibition and subsequent cessation of pollen tube emergence and elongation at particulate Pd concentrations as low as 0.4 mg L{sup -1}. Particulate Pd emissions related to automobile traffic have been increasing and are accumulating in the environment. This could seriously jeopardize in vivo pollen function, with impacts at an ecosystem level. - Nanoparticulate Pd - which resembles emissions from automobile catalysts - affects pollen to a higher extent than soluble Pd.

  11. Recovery of high-purity metallic Pd from Pd(II)-sorbed biosorbents by incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sung Wook; Lim, Areum; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2013-06-01

    This work reports a direct way to recover metallic palladium with high purity from Pd(II)-sorbed polyethylenimine-modified Corynebacterium glutamicum biosorbent using a combined method of biosorption and incineration. This study is focused on the incineration part which affects the purity of recovered Pd. The incineration temperature and the amount of Pd loaded on the biosorbent were considered as major factors in the incineration process, and their effects were examined. The results showed that both factors significantly affected the enhancement of the recovery efficiency and purity of the recovered Pd. SEM-EDX and XRD analyses were used to confirm that Pd phase existed in the ash. As a result, the recovered Pd was changed from PdO to zero-valent Pd as the incineration temperature was increased from 600 to 900°C. Almost 100% pure metallic Pd was recovered with recovery efficiency above 99.0% under the conditions of 900°C and 136.9 mg/g. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. One-pot synthesis of Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with a Pd-Pt alloy core and a conformal Pd shell of ~2-3 nm were directly synthesized through a one-pot, aqueous solution approach without any preformed Pd or Pt seeds. These Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals show an enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation compared with commercial Pd black. This journal is © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Adult Day Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Aide Semi Private Private $25,000 Adult Day Servi Acesssisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes $0 1. General information based on industry views of various members of the National Adult ...

  14. Adult Day Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Center Not all states license and regulate adult day care centers. There may be a ... is not usually covered by Medicare insurance, some financial assistance may be available through a federal or ...

  15. CO oxidation on PdO surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirvi, Janne T.; Kinnunen, Toni-Jani J.; Suvanto, Mika

    2010-01-01

    Density functional calculations were performed in order to investigate CO oxidation on two of the most stable bulk PdO surfaces. The most stable PdO(100) surface, with oxygen excess, is inert against CO adsorption, whereas strong adsorption on the stoichiometric PdO(101) surface leads to favorable...... oxidation via the Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism. The reaction with a surface oxygen atom has an activation energy of 0.66 eV, which is comparable to the lowest activation energies observed on metallic surfaces. However, the reaction rate may be limited by the coverage of molecular oxygen. Actually...... adsorption, following the Eley–Rideal mechanism and taking advantage of the reaction tunnel provided by the adjacent palladium atom, has an activation energy of only 0.24 eV. The reaction mechanism and activation energy for the palladium activated CO oxidation on the most stable PdO(100)–O surface...

  16. Anti-PD-1 Blockade and Stereotactic Radiation Produce Long-Term Survival in Mice With Intracranial Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Jing; See, Alfred P.; Phallen, Jillian; Jackson, Christopher M.; Belcaid, Zineb; Ruzevick, Jacob; Durham, Nicholas; Meyer, Christian; Harris, Timothy J.; Albesiano, Emilia; Pradilla, Gustavo; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Hammers, Hans-Joerg; Mathios, Dimitris; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry; Tran, Phuoc T.; Pardoll, Drew; Drake, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults, and radiation is one of the main treatment modalities. However, cure rates remain low despite best available therapies. Immunotherapy is a promising modality that could work synergistically with radiation, which has been shown to increase antigen presentation and promote a proinflammatory tumor microenvironment. Programmed-death-1 (PD-1) is a surface receptor expressed on activated and exhausted T cells, which mediate T cell inhibition upon binding with its ligand PD-L1, expressed on many tumor types including human GBMs. We tested the combination of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy with stereotactic radiosurgery in a mouse orthotopic GBM model. Methods and Materials: We performed intracranial implantation of mouse glioma cell line GL261 transfected with luciferase into C57BL/6 mice. Mice were stratified into 4 treatment groups: (1) control; (2) radiation only; (3) anti-PD-1 antibody only; and (4) radiation plus anti-PD-1 antibody. Overall survival was quantified. The mice were killed on day 21 after implantation to assess immunologic parameters in the brain/tumor, cervical lymph nodes, and spleen. Results: Improved survival was demonstrated with combination anti-PD-1 therapy plus radiation compared with either modality alone: median survival was 25 days in the control arm, 27 days in the anti-PD-1 antibody arm, 28 days in the radiation arm, and 53 days in the radiation plus anti-PD-1 therapy arm (P<.05 by log-rank Mantle-Cox). Long-term survival was seen only in the combined treatment arm, with a fraction (15%-40%) of animals alive at day 180+ after treatment. Immunologic data on day 21 after implantation showed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic T cells (CD8+/interferon-γ+/tumor necrosis factor-α+) and decreased regulatory T cells (CD4+/FOXP3) in the combined treatment group compared with the single modality arms. Conclusions: The combination of PD-1 blockade and localized

  17. Anti-PD-1 Blockade and Stereotactic Radiation Produce Long-Term Survival in Mice With Intracranial Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); See, Alfred P.; Phallen, Jillian; Jackson, Christopher M.; Belcaid, Zineb; Ruzevick, Jacob [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Durham, Nicholas [Department of Immunology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Meyer, Christian [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Harris, Timothy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Albesiano, Emilia; Pradilla, Gustavo [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hammers, Hans-Joerg [Department of Immunology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mathios, Dimitris; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pardoll, Drew; Drake, Charles G. [Department of Immunology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults, and radiation is one of the main treatment modalities. However, cure rates remain low despite best available therapies. Immunotherapy is a promising modality that could work synergistically with radiation, which has been shown to increase antigen presentation and promote a proinflammatory tumor microenvironment. Programmed-death-1 (PD-1) is a surface receptor expressed on activated and exhausted T cells, which mediate T cell inhibition upon binding with its ligand PD-L1, expressed on many tumor types including human GBMs. We tested the combination of anti-PD-1 immunotherapy with stereotactic radiosurgery in a mouse orthotopic GBM model. Methods and Materials: We performed intracranial implantation of mouse glioma cell line GL261 transfected with luciferase into C57BL/6 mice. Mice were stratified into 4 treatment groups: (1) control; (2) radiation only; (3) anti-PD-1 antibody only; and (4) radiation plus anti-PD-1 antibody. Overall survival was quantified. The mice were killed on day 21 after implantation to assess immunologic parameters in the brain/tumor, cervical lymph nodes, and spleen. Results: Improved survival was demonstrated with combination anti-PD-1 therapy plus radiation compared with either modality alone: median survival was 25 days in the control arm, 27 days in the anti-PD-1 antibody arm, 28 days in the radiation arm, and 53 days in the radiation plus anti-PD-1 therapy arm (P<.05 by log-rank Mantle-Cox). Long-term survival was seen only in the combined treatment arm, with a fraction (15%-40%) of animals alive at day 180+ after treatment. Immunologic data on day 21 after implantation showed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic T cells (CD8+/interferon-γ+/tumor necrosis factor-α+) and decreased regulatory T cells (CD4+/FOXP3) in the combined treatment group compared with the single modality arms. Conclusions: The combination of PD-1 blockade and localized

  18. Open Day: General Information

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ With 50 visit points, including theatre performances, debates and visits to installations that have never before been opened to the public, CERN's 50th anniversary Open Day is set to be a day to remember. Seven hundred volunteers have signed up to help for the day. The Open Day team truly appreciates this wonderful show of support! The Open Day would not be possible without their help. Car parking and Access Cars with a CERN sticker can access all CERN sites as normal. However, to avoid congestion on Meyrin site, we ask you to park in areas that will not be open to the public (see below) and to use the shuttle services wherever possible for your transport during the day. Private cars on the French side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverted to a car park area in the Prévessin site. There is a shuttle service connecting the Meyrin and Prévessin sites via SM18 every 20 minutes. Private cars on the Swiss side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverte...

  19. Half-life and intensities of photons of 103Pd isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Yu.S.; Zakharova, L.V.; Kupriyanov, V.N.; Andreev, O.I.; Pakhomov, A.N.; Vakhetov, F.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Half-life and intensities of photons forming during 103 Pd isotope decay are determined by the methods of semiconductor x-ray and γ-spectrometry. 103 Pd is applied in nuclear medicine for preparation of 103m Rh isomer (T 1/2 =56 min) being used in irradiation of prostate neoplasms. Half-life of 103 Pd isotope is 16±0.6 days, relative intensities of x-ray and γ-photons are: K α /Kβ=5.1±0.4; 358 keV - 100 rel.units; 295 keV - 12.3±0.4 rel.units; 497 keV - 17.6±0.6 rel.units. Errors are represented for confidence probability 95 % [ru

  20. Characterization of PD-1 upregulation on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human and murine gliomas and preclinical therapeutic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejaegher, Joost; Verschuere, Tina; Vercalsteren, Ellen; Boon, Louis; Cremer, Jonathan; Sciot, Raf; Van Gool, Stefaan W; De Vleeschouwer, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Blockade of the immune checkpoint molecule programmed-cell-death-protein-1 (PD-1) yielded promising results in several cancers. To understand the therapeutic potential in human gliomas, quantitative data describing the expression of PD-1 are essential. Moreover, due the immune-specialized region of the brain in which gliomas arise, differences between tumor-infiltrating and circulating lymphocytes should be acknowledged. In this study we have used flow cytometry to quantify PD-1 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells of 25 freshly resected glioma cell suspensions (10 newly and 5 relapsed glioblastoma, 10 lower grade gliomas) and simultaneously isolated circulating T cells. A strong upregulation of PD-1 expression in the tumor microenvironment compared to the blood circulation was seen in all glioma patients. Additionally, circulating T cells were isolated from 15 age-matched healthy volunteers, but no differences in PD-1 expression were found compared to glioma patients. In the murine GL261 malignant glioma model, there was a similar upregulation of PD-1 on brain-infiltrating lymphocytes. Using a monoclonal PD-1 blocking antibody, we found a marked prolonged survival with 55% of mice reaching long-term survival. Analysis of brain-infiltrating cells 21 days after GL261 tumor implantation showed a shift in infiltrating lymphocyte subgroups with increased CD8+ T cells and decreased regulatory T cells. Together, our results suggest an important role of PD-1 in glioma-induced immune escape, and provide translational evidence for the use of PD-1 blocking antibodies in human malignant gliomas. © 2017 UICC.

  1. 4th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Eberhard, Andrew; Ralph, Daniel; Glover, Barney M

    1999-01-01

    Although the monograph Progress in Optimization I: Contributions from Aus­ tralasia grew from the idea of publishing a proceedings of the Fourth Optimiza­ tion Day, held in July 1997 at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, the focus soon changed to a refereed volume in optimization. The intention is to publish a similar book annually, following each Optimization Day. The idea of having an annual Optimization Day was conceived by Barney Glover; the first of these Optimization Days was held in 1994 at the University of Ballarat. Barney hoped that such a yearly event would bring together the many, but widely dispersed, researchers in Australia who were publishing in optimization and related areas such as control. The first Optimization Day event was followed by similar conferences at The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996), the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), and The University of Western Australia (1998). The 1999 conference will return to Ballarat ...

  2. Development of 103Pd preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Murni

    2003-01-01

    Development of 1 03 P d preparation. Radioisotope of 1 03 P d was prepared for medical purpose patient suffering prostate cancer at early stage for therapeutic treatment. In the form of seed, the 1 03 P d radioisotope as a curing agent for prostate cancer is the most effective form with the least side effect. Radioisotope of 1 03 P d is the radioisotope emitting γ of 357 keV. In this investigation 1 03 P d was prepared from natural Pd powder or 1 02 P d enriched bombarded using thermal neutron in the reactor with 1 02 P d( n, γ) 1 03 P d reaction and 1 03 P d radioisotope was obtained. The target was then added with hydrogen peroxide after a with 1N HCl was added followed by drying . Then 2N NH 4 OH was added until the pH of the solution reached 8-10. In every steps of the process, the analysis were performed using MCA while the radiochemical purity were analyses using paper chromatography. The end result of the dissolution process showed that it is an accord with 1 03 P dCl 2 in NH 4 OH solution specification of Nordion

  3. Jupiter Night and Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Day and night side narrow angle images taken on January 1, 2001 illustrating storms visible on the day side which are the sources of visible lightning when viewed on the night side. The images have been enhanced in contrast. Note the two day-side occurrences of high clouds, in the upper and lower parts of the image, are coincident with lightning storms seen on the darkside. The storms occur at 34.5 degrees and 23.5 degrees North latitude, within one degree of the latitudes at which similar lightning features were detected by the Galileo spacecraft. The images were taken at different times. The storms' longitudinal separation changes from one image to the next because the winds carrying them blow at different speeds at the two latitudes.

  4. Day of Remembrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, John

    2018-01-01

    Every year in late January, NASA holds a Day of Remembrance, honoring the astronauts lost in three major space flight accidents: Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia. In an odd tragic coincidence, all three of the accidents happened in late January or early February, although many years apart: Apollo 1 on January 27, 1967; Challenger on January 28, 1986; and Columbia on February 1, 2003. While the day is a solemn one to commemorate the astronauts who lost their lives, it is also a day to reflect on the errors that led to the accidents and to remind all NASA workers and managers to be ever vigilant so that preventable accidents don't happen again.

  5. CO tolerance of PdPt/C and PdPtRu/C anodes for PEMFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Amanda C.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of H 2 /O 2 proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) fed with CO-contaminated hydrogen was investigated for anodes with PdPt/C and PdPtRu/C electrocatalysts. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and 'in situ' X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Experiments were conducted in electrochemical half and single cells by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and I-V polarization measurements, while DEMS was employed to verify the formation of CO 2 at the PEMFC anode outlet. A quite high performance was achieved for the PEMFC fed with H 2 + 100 ppm CO with the PdPt/C and PdPtRu/C anodes containing 0.4 mg metal cm -2 , with the cell presenting potential losses below 200 mV at 1 A cm -2 , with respect to the system fed with pure H 2 . For the PdPt/C catalysts no CO 2 formation was seen at the PEMFC anode outlet, indicating that the CO tolerance is improved due to the existence of more free surface sites for H 2 electrooxidation, probably due to a lower Pd-CO interaction compared to pure Pd or Pt. For PdPtRu/C the CO tolerance may also have a contribution from the bifunctional mechanism, as shown by the presence of CO 2 in the PEMFC anode outlet

  6. Progress of PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitors in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhansheng JIANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pembrolizumab, an inhibitor target programmed death 1 (PD-1, was approved into the first line therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. It was a milestone that immune checkpoints drugs have played an important role in the treatment system of NSCLC. The results of clinical trials revealed the superiority of PD-1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1 inhibitors compared with chemotherapy in first-line, second-line and multidrug resistance phase therapy. Objective response rate (ORR was up to 80% with pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy, and progression-free survival (PFS with single pembrolizumab in first line was nearly 1 year (10.3 months, the hazard ratio for death fell by 40%. Overall survival (OS was more or less 1 year with single drug pembrolizumab, nivolumab and atezolizumab for second line therapy. PD-L1 expression was a predictor of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. The positive rate of PD-L1 (more than 1% in advanced NSCLC was about 60% with little difference between the tissue types. However, there was no gold standard test of PD-L1 expression.

  7. Measurement of benzenethiol adsorption to nanostructured Pt, Pd, and PtPd films using Raman spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Michael B; Pietron, Jeremy J; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C

    2010-05-04

    Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to study the behavior of the model adsorbate benzenethiol (BT) on nanostructured Pt, Pd, and PtPd electrodes as a function of applied potential. Benzenethiol adsorbs out of ethanolic solutions as the corresponding thiolate, and voltammetric stripping data reveal that BT is oxidatively removed from all of the nanostructured metals upon repeated oxidative and reductive cycling. Oxidative stripping potentials for BT increase in the order Pt oxidizing potentials via cleavage of the Pt-S bond. In contrast, on nanoscale Pd and PtPd, BT is irreversibly lost due to cleavage of BT C-S bonds at oxidizing potentials, which leaves adsorbed sulfur oxides on Pd and PtPd films and effects the desulfurization of BT. While Pd and PtPd films are less sulfur-resistant than Pt films, palladium oxides, which form at higher potentials than Pt oxides, oxidatively desulfurize BT. In situ spectroelectrochemical Raman spectroscopy provides real-time, chemically specific information that complements the cyclic voltammetric data. The combination of these techniques affords a powerful and convenient method for guiding the development of sulfur-tolerant PEMFC catalysts.

  8. Preparation of supported Au–Pd and Cu–Pd by the combined strong ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BOONTIDA PONGTHAWORNSAKUN

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... Bimetallic catalyst; Au–Pd/TiO2; Cu–Pd/TiO2; strong electrostatic adsorption; electroless deposition .... The liquid samples .... composition and gas mixture product at the outlet of reactor ... the TiO2 support (no change in the deposition curve of. TiO2). ..... TrimmDL1980In Design of Industrial Catalysts (Ams-.

  9. Domain structures and magnetization reversal in Co/Pd and CoFeB/Pd multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbiaa, R., E-mail: rachid@squ.edu.om [Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, PC 123 (Oman); Ranjbar, M. [Physics Department, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Åkerman, J. [Physics Department, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Materials Physics, School of ICT, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2015-05-07

    Domain structures and magnetization reversal of (Co/Pd) and (CoFeB/Pd) multilayers with 7 and 14 repeats were investigated. The Co-based multilayers show much larger coercivities, a better squareness, and a sharper magnetization switching than CoFeB-based multilayers. From magnetic force microscopy observations, both structures show strong reduction in domains size as the number of repeats increases but the magnetic domains for Co-based multilayers are more than one order of magnitude larger than for CoFeB-based multilayers. By imaging domains at different times, breaks in the (CoFeB/Pd) multilayer stripes were observed within only few hours, while no change could be seen for (Co/Pd) multilayers. Although CoFeB single layers are suitable for magnetoresistive devices due to their large spin polarization and low damping constants, their lamination with Pd suffers mainly from thermal instability.

  10. Marketing Your Day Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, George

    1997-01-01

    Marketing strategies for day camps include encouraging camp staff to get involved in organizations involving children, families, and communities; holding camp fairs; offering the use of camp facilities to outside groups; hosting sport leagues and local youth outings; planning community fairs; and otherwise involving the camp in the community. (LP)

  11. Fabulous Weather Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  12. Every Child, Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Richard L.; Gabriel, Rachael E.

    2012-01-01

    We know more now than we ever did before about how to make every child a successful reader, write Allington and Gabriel in this research review. Yet, few students regularly receive the best reading instruction we know how to give. The authors present research supporting their recommendation that every child, every day, should (1) read something he…

  13. NATIONAL HEARING DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  14. National hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 12th of June 2003 Is the French National Hearing Day. The Medical Service invites everyone working at CERN to come and have an ear test at the infirmary. Bld. 57, ground floor, between 9h00 and 16h00 Tel. 73802

  15. CERN openlab Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Purcell, Andrew Robert

    2015-01-01

    The CERN openlab Open Day took place on 10 June, 2015. This was the first in a series of annual events at which research and industrial teams from CERN openlab can present their projects, share achievements, and collect feedback from their user communities.

  16. Ten-day rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, E.G.; Stewart, A.M.; Kneale, G.W.; Gilman, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors argue against R.H. Mole's paper (Lancet, Dec. 12 1987), supporting the relaxation of ICRP recommendations and the DHSS decision to withdraw the 10 day rule in relation to diagnostic radiography for menstruating women, and draw attention to the recent refinement of estimates of the enhanced risk of childhood cancers, following diagnostic radiography during pregnancy. (U.K.)

  17. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.

  18. 90-Day Cycle Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sandra; Takahashi, Sola

    2013-01-01

    90-Day Cycles are a disciplined and structured form of inquiry designed to produce and test knowledge syntheses, prototyped processes, or products in support of improvement work. With any type of activity, organizations inevitably encounter roadblocks to improving performance and outcomes. These barriers might include intractable problems at…

  19. World Heart Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    For World Heart Day, learn more about what heart-healthy steps you can take in the workplace.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/9/2009.

  20. Radiochemistry days; Journees radiochimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This document provides the 44 papers (transparencies used during the presentations and posters) presented at the Radiochemistry Days, held September 3-4, 1998 in Nantes, France. The main studied topics were problematic questions concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and in particular the management, storage of radioactive wastes and the environmental impact. (O.M.)

  1. The constitutive activation of the CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene depends on C/EBPbeta in v-src transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagliardi, M; Maynard, S; Bojovic, B

    2001-01-01

    The CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene is expressed constitutively in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). This aberrant induction is controlled at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional activation depends on multiple elements of the CEF....../EBPbeta binds to a second element located in proximity of the TRE. A mutation of this distal CAAT box impaired the activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src) indicating that this element is also part of the SRU. Using the RCASBP retroviral vector, we expressed a dominant negative mutant of C....../EBPbeta (designated Delta184-C/EBPbeta) in RSV-transformed CEF. Delta184-C/EBPbeta decreased the accumulation of the CEF-4 mRNA and activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src). The induction of the Cox-2 gene (CEF-147) was also reduced by Delta184-C/EBPbeta. The effect of the dominant negative mutant was observed...

  2. Solution processed white light photodetector based N, N′-di (2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,9,10-perylene diimide thin film phototransistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozlu, Cem, E-mail: tozlu.cem@gmail.com [Department of Energy System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Karamanoğlu Mehmetbey University, 70100 Karaman (Turkey); Kus, Mahmut [Department of Chemical Engineering, Selcuk University, Konya 42075 (Turkey); Advanced Technology Research and Application Center, Selcuk University, Konya 42075 (Turkey); Can, Mustafa [Department of Engineering Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Izmir Katip Celebi University, Cigli, 35620 Izmir (Turkey); Ersöz, Mustafa [Advanced Technology Research and Application Center, Selcuk University, Konya 42075 (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Selcuk University, Konya 42075 (Turkey)

    2014-10-31

    In this study, a solution-processed n-type photo-sensing organic thin film transistor was investigated using polymeric dielectric under different white light illuminations. N, N′-di (2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,9,10-perylene diimide and divinyl tetramethyl disiloxane-bis (benzo-cyclobutene) were used as a soluble active organic semiconductor and as a dielectric material, respectively. Stable amplification was observed in the visible region without gate bias by the device. The electrical characterization results showed that an n-type phototransistor with a saturated electron mobility of 0.6 × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/V·s and a threshold voltage of 1.8 V was obtained. The charge carrier density of the channel of the device exhibited photo-induced behaviors that strongly affected the electrical properties of the transistor. The photosensitivity and photoresponsivity values of the device were 63.82 and 24 mA/W, respectively. These findings indicate that perylene diimide is a promising material for use on organic based phototransistors. - Highlights: • A solution processed n-type organic phototransistor was fabricated. • The geometry of device allows to be used double sided photo-sensor to detect light. • The accumulation of charge carrier is effected strongly by illumination intensity. • The current amplification was observed clearly under illumination without gate bias.

  3. Determination of the individual atomic site contribution to the electronic structure of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. W., E-mail: dio8027@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ksmith@bu.edu [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Newby, D.; DeMasi, A.; Smith, K. E., E-mail: dio8027@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ksmith@bu.edu [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Piper, L. F. J. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Jones, T. S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-14

    We have studied the element and orbital-specific electronic structure of thin films of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) using a combination of synchrotron radiation-exited resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as density functional theory calculations. Resonant and non-resonant x-ray emission spectroscopies were used to measure the C and O 2p partial densities of state in PTCDA. Furthermore, resonant x-ray emission at the C and O K-edges is shown to be able to measure the partial densities of states associated with individual atomic sites. The flat molecular orientation of PTCDA on various substrates is explained in terms of the carbonyl O atom acting as a hydrogen-bond acceptor leading to multiple in-plane intermolecular C=O···H−C hydrogen bonding between carbonyl groups and the perylene core of the neighboring PTCDA molecules. We support this conclusion by comparison of our calculations to measurements of the electronic structure using element-, site-, and orbital-selective C and O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy.

  4. Fluorescence quenching of N,N-bis(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-3,4:9,10-perylenebis(dicarboximide) (DBPI) by silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Daly, Samy A., E-mail: samyeldaly@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 2173 (Egypt); Rahman, Mohammed M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Alamry, Kahlid A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-04-15

    The interaction of a perylene derivative namely N,N-bis(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-3,4:9,10-perylenebis(dicarboximide) (DBPI) with colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was studied in ethanol and ethylene glycol using steady state fluorescence quenching measurements. The Stern–Volmer quenching rate constant (K{sub sv}) was calculated as 4.03×10{sup 9} and 29.14×10{sup 9} M{sup −1} in ethanol and ethylene glycol, respectively. From fluorescence quenching data, static quenching and energy transfer play a major role in the fluorescence quenching of DBPI by AgNPs. The apparent association constant (k{sub app}) was calculated as 1.26×10{sup 8} M{sup −1} in EtOH and 1.83×10{sup 9} M{sup −1} in ethylene glycol. Due to potential AgNPs interaction with DBPI, the average AgNPs size is increased slightly from ∼37.1 nm (As-prepared) to 48.9 nm. -- Highlights: • Fluorescence quenching of photostable DBPI by AgNPs. • Static quenching mechanism of interaction between DBPI and AgNPs. • Enhancement of fluorescence quenching of DBPI in ethylene glycol.

  5. Magnetic characteristics of CoPd and FePd antidot arrays on nanoperforated Al2O3 templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximenko, A.; Fedotova, J.; Marszałek, M.; Zarzycki, A.; Zabila, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Hard magnetic antidot arrays show promising results in context of designing of percolated perpendicular media. In this work the technology of magnetic FePd and CoPd antidot arrays fabrication is presented and correlation between surface morphology, structure and magnetic properties is discussed. CoPd and FePd antidot arrays were fabricated by deposition of Co/Pd and Fe/Pd multilayers (MLs) on porous anodic aluminum oxide templates with bowl-shape cell structure with inclined intercellular regions. FePd ordered L10 structure was obtained by successive vacuum annealing at elevated temperatures (530 °C) and confirmed by XRD analysis. Systematic analysis of magnetization curves evidenced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoPd antidot arrays, while FePd antidot arrays revealed isotropic magnetic anisotropy with increased out-of-plane magnetic contribution. MFM images of antidots showed more complicated contrast, with alternating magnetic dots oriented parallel and antiparallel to tip magnetization moment.

  6. Generation and oxidation of aerosol deposited PdAg nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, S.; Gustafson, J.; Martin, N. M.; Messing, M. E.; Deppert, K.; Liu, Z.; Chang, R.; Fernandes, V. R.; Borg, A.; Grönbeck, H.; Lundgren, E.

    2013-10-01

    PdAg nanoparticles with a diameter of 10 nm have been generated by an aerosol particle method, and supported on a silica substrate. By using a combination of X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy it is shown that the size distribution of the particles is narrow and that the two metals form an alloy with a mixture of 75% Pd and 25% Ag. Under oxidizing conditions, Pd is found to segregate to the surface and a thin PdO like oxide is formed similar to the surface oxide previously reported on extended PdAg and pure Pd surfaces.

  7. Dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by sodium carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Han, Jian; Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were synthesized and used for 2,4-D removal. ► Particle stability, ζ-potential and IEP of non- and stabilized Pd/Fe were compared. ► Dechlorination of 2,4-D by different Pd/Fe systems was investigated. ► The reaction mechanism has been discussed and presented in the article. ► Effects of CMC/Fe mass ratio and pH were also investigated. - Abstract: This paper describes the synthesis of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles and their applications to the dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) under controlled laboratorial conditions. For this purpose batch mode experiments were conducted to understand the effects of CMC on the surface characteristics of Pd/Fe nanoparticles, optimum removal of 2,4-D and other surface interactions mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated considerable enhancements in particle stability and chemical reactivity with the addition of CMC to Pd/Fe nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were well dispersed, and nanoparticles remained in suspension for days compared to non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles precipitated within minutes. The isoelectric point (IEP) of the nanoparticles shifted from pH 6.5 to 2.5, suggesting that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were negatively charged over a wider pH range. Our batch experiments demonstrated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles (0.6 g Fe L −1 ) were able to remove much higher levels of 2,4-D with only one intermediate 2-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (2-CPA) and the final organic product phenoxyacetic acid (PA), than non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles or microsized Pd/Fe particles. The removal percentage of 2,4-D increased from 10% to nearly 100% as the reaction pH decreased from 11.5 to 2.5. The optimal CMC/Fe mass ratio for the dechlorination of 2,4-D was determined to be 5/1, and the removal of 2,4-D was

  8. Dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by sodium carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hongyi, E-mail: zhouhy@zjut.edu.cn [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Han, Jian [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were synthesized and used for 2,4-D removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle stability, {zeta}-potential and IEP of non- and stabilized Pd/Fe were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dechlorination of 2,4-D by different Pd/Fe systems was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism has been discussed and presented in the article. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of CMC/Fe mass ratio and pH were also investigated. - Abstract: This paper describes the synthesis of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles and their applications to the dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) under controlled laboratorial conditions. For this purpose batch mode experiments were conducted to understand the effects of CMC on the surface characteristics of Pd/Fe nanoparticles, optimum removal of 2,4-D and other surface interactions mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated considerable enhancements in particle stability and chemical reactivity with the addition of CMC to Pd/Fe nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were well dispersed, and nanoparticles remained in suspension for days compared to non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles precipitated within minutes. The isoelectric point (IEP) of the nanoparticles shifted from pH 6.5 to 2.5, suggesting that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were negatively charged over a wider pH range. Our batch experiments demonstrated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles (0.6 g Fe L{sup -1}) were able to remove much higher levels of 2,4-D with only one intermediate 2-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (2-CPA) and the final organic product phenoxyacetic acid (PA), than non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles or microsized Pd/Fe particles. The removal percentage of 2,4-D increased from 10% to nearly 100% as the reaction pH decreased from 11

  9. PD-1 checkpoint inhibition: Toxicities and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andrew W; Gill, David M; Agarwal, Neeraj; Maughan, Benjamin L

    2017-12-01

    With the recent approval of 5 PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for a number of malignancies, PD-1 axis inhibition is drastically changing the treatment landscape of immunotherapy in cancer. As PD-1/PD-L1 are involved in peripheral immune tolerance, inhibition of this immune checkpoint has led to novel immune-related adverse events including colitis, hepatitis, pneumonitis, rash, and endocrinopathies among many others. In this seminar, we will analyze the incidence of immune-related adverse events for nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, durvalumab, and avelumab. Then, we will discuss the specific management of the most common immune-mediated adverse events including colitis, hepatitis, pneumonitis, rash, endocrinopathies, nephritis, and neurologic toxicities. Immune-related adverse events are frequently treated with immunosuppressive medication such as steroids and mycofenolate mofetil. There are specific immune-related adverse events which are frequently seen by the treating oncologist from checkpoint inhibitors. It is essential to understand the recommended treatment options to minimize toxicity and mortality from this important class of anti-neoplastic therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  11. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor No need to book HEALTHY HEART? Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: Blood pressure Cholesterol and sugar levels Body Mass Index ... and more Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12am - Building 65 Please book (limited to 15 people/day) FIRST AID COURSES What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h. duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people/day). To book, e-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  12. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor no need to book HEALTHY HEART? • Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: Blood pressure Cholesterol and sugar levels Body Mass Index ... and more • Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12 am - Building 65 Please book (limited to 15 people/day) FIRST AID COURSES • What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h. duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people/day). To book, e-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  13. Computer Security Day

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

      Viruses, phishing, malware and cyber-criminals can all threaten your computer and your data, even at CERN! Experts will share their experience with you and offer solutions to keep your computer secure. Thursday, 10 June 2010, 9.30, Council Chamber Make a note in your diary! Presentations in French and English: How do hackers break into your computer? Quels sont les enjeux et conséquences des attaques informatiques contre le CERN ? How so criminals steal your money on the Internet? Comment utiliser votre ordinateur de manière sécurisée ? and a quiz: test your knowledge and win one of the many prizes that will be on offer! For more information and to follow the day's events via a live webcast go to: http://cern.ch/SecDay.  

  14. Why National Biomechanics Day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita, Paul

    2018-04-11

    National Biomechanics Day (NBD) seeks to expand the influence and impact of Biomechanics on our society by expanding the awareness of Biomechanics among young people. NBD will manifest this goal through worldwide, synchronized and coordinated celebrations and demonstrations of all things Biomechanics with high school students. NBD invites all Biomechanists to participate in NBD 2018, http://nationalbiomechanicsday.asbweb.org/. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Viva il GIS Day!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Redazione

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Il GIS Day è sponsorizzato oltre che da ESRI, dalla National Geographic Society, dalla Association of American Geographers, dalla UCGIS (University Consortium for Geographic Information Science, dalla United States Geological Survey e dalla Library of Congress. Il tutto nasce nel corso della Geography Awareness Week, terza settimana di novembre che nel 1987 il Presidente degli Stati Uniti Ronald Reagan stabilì dovesse essere dedicata alla diffusione della cultura geografica.

  16. 'EU divertor celebration day'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, M.

    2002-01-01

    The meeting 'EU divertor celebration day' organized on 16 January 2002 at Plansee AG, Reutte, Austria was held on the occasion of the completion of manufacturing activities of a complete set of near full-scale prototypes of divertor components including the vertical target, the dome liner and the cassette body. About 30 participants attended the meeting including Dr. Robert Aymar, ITER Director, representatives from EFDA, CEA, ENEA, IPP and others

  17. World water day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The symposium on world water day for the year 2005 was held on 22nd March by the Pakistan Engineering congress in collaboration with Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA). Six technical papers by engineers/experts presented on the diverse fields from large dams to drinking water and public hygiene. Paper published in this volume are open for written discussion. (orig./A.B.)

  18. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  19. Stunting, Underweight and Overweight in Children Aged 2.0–4.9 Years in Indonesia: Prevalence Trends and Associated Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agho, Kingsley E.; Li, Mu; Baur, Louise Alison

    2016-01-01

    Objective The double burden of malnutrition affects many low and middle-income countries. This study aimed to: a) determine temporal trends in the prevalence of underweight, stunting, and at risk of overweight/ overweight or obesity in Indonesian children aged 2.0–4.9 years; and b) examine associated risk factors. Design A repeated cross-sectional survey. This is a secondary data analysis of waves 1, 2, 3, and 4 (1993, 1997, 2000, and 2007) of the Indonesian Family Life Survey, which includes 13 out of 27 provinces in Indonesia. Height, weight and BMI were expressed as z-scores (2006 WHO Child Growth Standards). Weight-for-age-z-score +1, >+2, >+3 as at-risk, overweight and obese, respectively. Results There are 938, 913, 939, and 1311 separate children in the 4 waves, respectively. The prevalence of stunting decreased significantly from waves 1 to 4 (from 50.8% to 36.7%), as did the prevalence of underweight (from 34.5% to 21.4%). The prevalence of ‘at-risk’/overweight/obesity increased from 10.3% to 16.5% (all Poverweight/obese were closely related to being in the youngest age group (2–2·9 years) or male, having parents who were overweight/obese or having fathers with university education. Conclusions The double burden of malnutrition occurs in Indonesian children. Development of policy to combine the management of chronic under-nutrition and over-nutrition is required. PMID:27167973

  20. Constitutive modeling of two-phase metallic composites with application to tungsten-based composite 93W–4.9Ni–2.1Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.R.; Gao, C.Y.; Ke, Y.L.

    2014-01-01

    The two-phase metallic composites, composed by the metallic particulate reinforcing phase and the metallic matrix phase, have attracted a lot of attention in recent years for their excellent material properties. However, the constitutive modeling of two-phase metallic composites is still lacking currently. Most used models for them are basically oriented for single-phase homogeneous metallic materials, and have not considered the microstructural evolution of the components in the composite. This paper develops a new constitutive model for two-phase metallic composites based on the thermally activated dislocation motion mechanism and the volume fraction evolution. By establishing the relation between microscopic volume fraction and macroscopic state variables (strain, strain rate and temperature), the evolution law of volume fraction during the plastic deformation in two-phase composites is proposed for the first time and introduced into the new model. Then the new model is applied to a typical two-phase tungsten-based composite – 93W–4.9Ni–2.1Fe tungsten heavy alloy. It has been found that our model can effectively describe the plastic deformation behaviors of the tungsten-based composite, because of the introduction of volume fraction evolution and the connecting of macroscopic state variables and micromechanical characteristics in the constitutive model. The model's validation by experimental data indicates that our new model can provide a satisfactory prediction of flow stress for two-phase metallic composites, which is better than conventional single-phase homogeneous constitutive models including the Johnson–Cook (JC), Khan–Huang–Liang (KHL), Nemat-Nasser–Li (NNL), Zerilli–Armstrong (ZA) and Voyiadjis–Abed (VA) models

  1. Exciton dynamics at the heteromolecular interface between N,N′-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide and quaterrylene, studied using time-resolved photoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuya Hiroshiba

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the exciton dynamics at the heteromolecular interface, the temperature dependence of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL spectra of neat-N,N′-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8 and PTCDI-C8/Quaterrylene (QT heteromolecular thin films was investigated. The lifetimes of excitons were evaluated to identify the Frenkel (FE, high energy charge-transfer (CTEhigh, low energy charge-transfer (CTElow, and excimer exciton states. The thermal activation energy (Δact of CTElow in PTCDI-C8 thin film was evaluated as 25 meV, which is 1/5 of that of FE, indicating that CTElow is more thermally sensitive than FE in PTCDI-C8 thin film. We investigated the exciton transport length (l along the vertical direction against the substrate surface in PTCDI-C8/QT thin film at 30 K, and demonstrated that lFE = 9.9 nm, lCTElow = 4.2 nm, lCTEhigh = 4.3 nm, and lexcimer = 11.9 nm. To elucidate the difference in l among these excitons, the activation energies (Ea for quenching at the heteromolecular interface were investigated. Ea values were estimated to be 13.1 meV for CTElow and 18.6 meV for CTEhigh. These values agree with the thermal sensitivity of CTEs as reported in a previous static PL study. This latter situation is different from the case of FE and excimer excitons, which are transported via a resonant process and have no temperature dependence. The small Ea values of CTEs suggest that exciton transport takes place via a thermal hopping process in CTEs. The present experimental study provides information on nano-scaled exciton dynamics in a well-defined PTCDI-C8 (2 ML/QT (2 ML system.

  2. Dynamics diffusion behaviors of Pd small clusters on a Pd(1 1 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fusheng; Hu, Wangyu; Deng, Huiqiu; He, Rensheng; Yang, Xiyuan; Lu, Kuilin; Deng, Lei; Luo, Wenhua

    2010-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics, nudged elastic band and modified analytic embedded atom methods, the self-diffusion dynamics properties of palladium atomic clusters up to seven atoms on the Pd (1 1 1) surface have been studied at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000 K. The simulation time varies from 20 to 75 ns according to the cluster sizes and the temperature ranges. The heptamer and trimer are more stable than the other neighboring clusters. The diffusion coefficients of the clusters are derived from the mean square displacement of the cluster's mass-center, and the diffusion prefactors D 0 and activation energies E a are derived from the Arrhenius relation. The activation energy of the clusters increases with the increasing atom number in the clusters, especially for Pd 6 to Pd 7 . The analysis of trajectories shows the noncompact clusters diffuse by the local diffusion mechanism but the compact clusters diffuse mainly by the whole gliding mechanism, and some static energy barriers of the diffusion modes are calculated. From Pd 2 to Pd 6 , the prefactors are in the range of the standard value 10 −3  cm 2  s −1 , and the prefactor of Pd 7 cluster is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of the single Pd adatom because of a large number of nonequivalent diffusion processes. The heptamer can be the nucleus in the room temperature range according to nucleation theory

  3. Performance of surface on ultrafine grained Ti-0.2Pd in simulated body fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Lai; Zhou, Qing; Yang, Kai; Zou, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Lei

    2018-03-01

    Ti-0.2 wt% Pd (Ti-0.2Pd) which has high crevice corrosion resistance is highlighted for implant applications. In this work, Ti-0.2Pd alloy is subjected to equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) for grain refinement. The effect of the microstructure on the surface performance of Ti-0.2Pd in a simulated body fluid (SBF) adding bovine serum albumin is investigated. Heat-treated specimens including furnace cooled (FC) and water quenched (WQ) specimens are also prepared for comparison. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by the tests of potentiodynamic polarization and the measurement of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The composition and morphology of the surface after exposing to SBF 60 days were examined by X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The results show an ultrafine grained microstructure with average grain size of 3.6 μm is obtained after ECAP. The ultrafine grained Ti-0.2Pd has higher corrosion resistance than AR(as-received), WQ and FC specimens. The quantitative analysis of the surface shows larger numbers of precipitations formed on ECAPed Ti-0.2Pd than those formed on heat-treated. The precipitation contains more oxygen, calcium and phosphorus on ECAPed specimen than those on other specimens. The Ca:P ratio is ranged from 1:0.7 to 1:4.4, no dependent on the specimen type. A larger Warburg resistance is obtained on WQ specimen indicating a denser layer formation on WQ specimen. The precipitation formed on WQ specimens is the least among three kinds of specimens. Palladium is not found on the surfaces after exposure to SBF.

  4. Methods for the field evaluation of quantitative G6PD diagnostics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Benedikt; Bancone, Germana; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Thriemer, Kamala; Richards, Jack S; Domingo, Gonzalo J; Price, Ric N

    2017-09-11

    Individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk of severe haemolysis following the administration of 8-aminoquinoline compounds. Primaquine is the only widely available 8-aminoquinoline for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax. Tafenoquine is under development with the potential to simplify treatment regimens, but point-of-care (PoC) tests will be needed to provide quantitative measurement of G6PD activity prior to its administration. There is currently a lack of appropriate G6PD PoC tests, but a number of new tests are in development and are likely to enter the market in the coming years. As these are implemented, they will need to be validated in field studies. This article outlines the technical details for the field evaluation of novel quantitative G6PD diagnostics such as sample handling, reference testing and statistical analysis. Field evaluation is based on the comparison of paired samples, including one sample tested by the new assay at point of care and one sample tested by the gold-standard reference method, UV spectrophotometry in an established laboratory. Samples can be collected as capillary or venous blood; the existing literature suggests that potential differences in capillary or venous blood are unlikely to affect results substantially. The collection and storage of samples is critical to ensure preservation of enzyme activity, it is recommended that samples are stored at 4 °C and testing occurs within 4 days of collection. Test results can be visually presented as scatter plot, Bland-Altman plot, and a histogram of the G6PD activity distribution of the study population. Calculating the adjusted male median allows categorizing results according to G6PD activity to calculate standard performance indicators and to perform receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

  5. Magnetic characteristics of CoPd and FePd antidot arrays on nanoperforated Al_2O_3 templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximenko, A.; Fedotova, J.; Marszałek, M.; Zarzycki, A.; Zabila, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Hard magnetic antidot arrays show promising results in context of designing of percolated perpendicular media. In this work the technology of magnetic FePd and CoPd antidot arrays fabrication is presented and correlation between surface morphology, structure and magnetic properties is discussed. CoPd and FePd antidot arrays were fabricated by deposition of Co/Pd and Fe/Pd multilayers (MLs) on porous anodic aluminum oxide templates with bowl-shape cell structure with inclined intercellular regions. FePd ordered L1_0 structure was obtained by successive vacuum annealing at elevated temperatures (530 °C) and confirmed by XRD analysis. Systematic analysis of magnetization curves evidenced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoPd antidot arrays, while FePd antidot arrays revealed isotropic magnetic anisotropy with increased out-of-plane magnetic contribution. MFM images of antidots showed more complicated contrast, with alternating magnetic dots oriented parallel and antiparallel to tip magnetization moment. - Highlights: • CoPd and FePd antidots were fabricated on porous anodic aluminum oxide templates. • CoPd antidot arrays have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. • FePd antidot arrays revealed isotropic magnetic behavior. • The complex morphology of nanoporous template resulted in a complex magnetic domains image.

  6. Atomic displacements due to interstitial hydrogen in Cu and Pd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Atomic displacements; density functional theory; Kanzaki method. ... pseudopotentials for H, Cu and Pd are generated self-consistently. ... Both Cu and Pd lattices show lattice expansion due to the presence of hydrogen and ...

  7. Nitrite reduction mechanism on a Pd surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Jung, Sungyoon; Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin; Kim, Hyungjun

    2014-11-04

    Nitrate (NO3-) is one of the most harmful contaminants in the groundwater, and it causes various health problems. Bimetallic catalysts, usually palladium (Pd) coupled with secondary metallic catalyst, are found to properly treat nitrate-containing wastewaters; however, the selectivity toward N2 production over ammonia (NH3) production still requires further improvement. Because the N2 selectivity is determined at the nitrite (NO2-) reduction step on the Pd surface, which occurs after NO3- is decomposed into NO2- on the secondary metallic catalyst, we here performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and experiments to investigate the NO2- reduction pathway on the Pd surface activated by hydrogen. Based on extensive DFT calculations on the relative energetics among ∼100 possible intermediates, we found that NO2- is easily reduced to NO* on the Pd surface, followed by either sequential hydrogenation steps to yield NH3 or a decomposition step to N* and O* (an adsorbate on Pd is denoted using an asterisk). Based on the calculated high migration barrier of N*, we further discussed that the direct combination of two N* to yield N2 is kinetically less favorable than the combination of a highly mobile H* with N* to yield NH3. Instead, the reduction of NO2- in the vicinity of the N* can yield N2O* that can be preferentially transformed into N2 via diverse reaction pathways. Our DFT results suggest that enhancing the likelihood of N* encountering NO2- in the solution phase before combination with surface H* is important for maximizing the N2 selectivity. This is further supported by our experiments on NO2- reduction by Pd/TiO2, showing that both a decreased H2 flow rate and an increased NO2- concentration increased the N2 selectivity (78.6-93.6% and 57.8-90.9%, respectively).

  8. "A Day Without Immigrants"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Benita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This article considers the debates surrounding the "Day Without Immigrants" protests organized in major U.S. cities on 1 May 2006, prompted by H.R. 4437, the Border Protection, Anti-Terrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005, from the multiple perspectives of scholars, pundits...... that the rhetoric used in these discourses pitted various class-based ethnoracial groups against each other not so much to tackle the proposed immigration bill but, rather, to comment on the ramifications of an increasingly multiracial United States. Udgivelsesdato: 01 December 2009...

  9. The women day storm

    OpenAIRE

    Parnowski, Aleksei; Polonska, Anna; Semeniv, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    On behalf of the International Women Day, the Sun gave a hot kiss to our mother Earth in a form of a full halo CME generated by the yesterday's double X-class flare. The resulting geomagnetic storm gives a good opportunity to compare the performance of space weather forecast models operating in near-real-time. We compare the forecasts of most major models and identify some common problems. We also present the results of our own near-real-time forecast models.

  10. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on the CERN site to participate in the NATIONAL HEARING DAY on: Thursday 10th March 2005 From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Ground Floor We will be offering hearing tests (audiograms), as well as information and advice on hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% of the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing problems but PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE. For example, hearing protection devices can prevent 80% of tinnitus cases.

  11. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on CERN premises to participate in the National Hearing Day on: Thursday 10th March From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Gr.Fl. We will be offering hearing tests (audiogram); information, advice on hearing loss, tinnitus and more. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing loss. But PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE AND EFFECTIVE: for example, Hearing protection devices could reduce tinnitus cases by 80%.

  12. CERN hearing day

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss - do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on CERN premises to participate in the National Hearing Day on: Thursday 10th March From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Gr.Fl. We will be offering hearing tests (audiogram); information, advice on hearing loss, tinnitus and more. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing loss. But prevention is possible and effective: for example, Hearing protection devices could reduce tinnitus cases by 80%.

  13. CERN hearing day

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    1 in 10 people suffer from hearing loss ? do you? The Medical Service invites everyone working on the CERN site to participate in the NATIONAL HEARING DAY on: Thursday 10th March 2005 From 9am to 4pm The Infirmary, Blg. 57, Ground Floor We will be offering hearing tests (audiograms), as well as information and advice on hearing loss, tinnitus, etc. Deafness does not just affect the elderly: in Europe, 50% of the hearing-impaired are under the age of 55. Exposure to excessive noise is one of the main reasons for hearing problems but prevention is possible. For example, hearing protection devices can prevent 80% of tinnitus cases.

  14. Hard-hat day

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will be organizing a special information day on Friday, 27th June, designed to promote the wearing of hard hats and ensure that they are worn correctly. A new prevention campaign will also be launched.The event will take place in the hall of the Main Building from 11.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m., when you will be able to come and try on various models of hard hat, including some of the very latest innovative designs, ask questions and pass on any comments and suggestions.

  15. The Future Days

    OpenAIRE

    Cerezo Rodríguez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this memorandum it will be read all the documentation related to the Final Project Degree of Carlos Cerezo Rodríguez, The Future Days. The objective of this project has been to realise a mini-game (in form of interactive animation in Flash). So that, it will rest prepared for his posterior upload to websites that offer these services. As it will be appreciated in the writing, the process of construction of the project has been made through a phase of planning and preproduction, a phase of ...

  16. Gis Day 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esri Italia Esri Italia

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Si è svolto nelle Marche, ad Urbino, città simbolo del legame tra scienza e Rinascimento, il GIS DAY 2005; l’evento ha avuto il patrocinio di DAMAC – INTERREG SECUR SEA ed il supporto di: Regione Marche - Giunta Regionale, Contea di Zara (Croazia, Centro di Geobiologia - Università di Urbino, Forum delle Città dell’Adriatico e dello Ionio e Adriatic Action Plan 2020 ed ha sviluppato il tema dedicato ad “Un GIS interoperabile e internazionale”.

  17. Superdeformation in /sup 104,105/Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macchiavelli, A.O.; Burde, J.; Diamond, R.M.; Beausang, C.W.; Deleplanque, M.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Stephens, F.S.; Draper, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    In the present Rapid Communication, we report the discovery of a rotational band in /sup 105/Pd and possibly one in /sup 104/Pd that can be interpreted as arising from superdeformed shapes. The moments of inertia, J/sup (1)/ and J/sup (2)/, of these bands are similar to those measured in the Ce--Nd region, once the A/sup 5/3/ mass dependence is removed. This implies a deformation ε∼0.35--0.4. If so, this is the third mass region where superdeformed bands have been found at high spins

  18. Higgs Boson Pizza Day

    CERN Document Server

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    CERN celebrated the fourth anniversary of the historical Higgs boson announcement with special pizzas.    400 pizzas were served on Higgs pizza day in Restaurant 1 at CERN to celebrate the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs Boson (Image: Maximilien Brice/ CERN) What do the Higgs boson and a pizza have in common? Pierluigi Paolucci, INFN and CMS collaboration member, together with INFN president Fernando Ferroni found out the answer one day in Naples: the pizza in front of them looked exactly like a Higgs boson event display. A special recipe was then created in collaboration with the chef of the historic “Ettore” pizzeria in the St. Lucia area of Naples, and two pizzas were designed to resemble two Higgs boson decay channel event displays. The “Higgs Boson Pizza Day” was held on Monday, 4 July 2016, on the fourth anniversary of the announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boso...

  19. 2015 Barcelona Asteroid Day

    CERN Document Server

    Gritsevich, Maria; Palme, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of the research presented at the International Asteroid Day workshop which was celebrated at Barcelona on June 30th, 2015. The proceedings discuss the beginning of a new era in the study and exploration of the solar system’s minor bodies. International Asteroid Day commemorates the Tunguska event of June 30th, 1908. The workshop’s goal was to promote the importance of dealing proactively with impact hazards from space. Multidisciplinary experts contributed to this discussion by describing the nature of comets and asteroids along with their offspring, meteoroids. New missions to return material samples of asteroids back to Earth such as Osiris-REx and Hayabusa 2, as well as projects like AIM and DART which will test impact deflection techniques for Potentially Hazardous Asteroids encounters were also covered. The proceedings include both an outreach level to popularize impact hazards and a scientific character which covers the latest knowledge on these topics, as well as offeri...

  20. A day to celebrate

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    After several weeks of preparations and hard work on the part of many people, the events to mark International Women's Day at CERN on 8 March were a genuine success. They were followed with great interest by the outside world, judging by the flurry of activity on twitter, various blogs and the media coverage they generated.   Women on shift in the CERN control rooms. Women were overwhelmingly in the majority at the controls of the experiments and accelerators throughout the day, as well as acting as the guides for all official visits. There was no shortage of enthusiasm! "I'm very happy that CERN has supported the project, and I'm especially encouraged by the enthusiastic response from everyone who's taken part", says Pauline Gagnon, a physicist from the Indiana University group and a member of the ATLAS collaboration, who was behind the idea. "I hope that this kind of initiative will help to show that women have a place in science and that young women thinkin...

  1. 5th Optimization Day

    CERN Document Server

    Mees, Alistair; Fisher, Mike; Jennings, Les

    2000-01-01

    'Optimization Day' (OD) has been a series of annual mini-conferences in Australia since 1994. The purpose of this series of events is to gather researchers in optimization and its related areas from Australia and their collaborators, in order to exchange new developments of optimization theories, methods and their applications. The first four OD mini-conferences were held in The Uni­ versity of Ballarat (1994), The University of New South Wales (1995), The University of Melbourne (1996) and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (1997), respectively. They were all on the eastern coast of Australia. The fifth mini-conference Optimization Days was held at the Centre for Ap­ plied Dynamics and Optimization (CADO), Department of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Perth, from 29 to 30 June 1998. This is the first time the OD mini-conference has been held at the west­ ern coast of Australia. This fifth OD preceded the International Conference on Optimization: Techniques and Applica...

  2. Influence of Day Length and Physical Activity on Sleep Patterns in Older Icelandic Men and Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brychta, Robert J; Arnardóttir, Nanna Ýr; Jóhannsson, Erlingur

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify cross-sectional and seasonal patterns of sleep and physical activity (PA) in community-dwelling, older Icelandic adults using accelerometers. Methods: A seven-day free-living protocol of 244 (110 female) adults aged 79.7 +/- 4.9 years was conducted as part of a larger...

  3. Day of Arts Philanthropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    For the Day of Arts Philanthropy I will reflect on the instrumentalisation of art support in Denmark based on the findings from my thesis work (Jørgensen, 2016) investigating the underlyinglegitimations and institutional logics of two of the most significant foundations supporting visual art......, in Denmark, the private New Carlsberg Foundation and public Danish Arts Foundation.Drawing inspiration from neo-institutional theory (Friedland & Alford, 1991) and French pragmatic sociology (Boltanski & Thévenot, 2006), the thesis identifies the most central logics of legitimationunderlying art support......; the industrial, market, inspired, family, renown, civic, projective, emotional and temporal. The most prominent and consistently invoked instrumentalisations identified are theprofessional (industrial), artistic (inspired) and civic purposes of art support. The thesis shows that the instrumentalisations invoked...

  4. Injector MD Days 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, G

    2017-01-01

    The Injector Machine Development (MD) days 2017 were held on 23-24 March, 2017, at CERN with thefollowing main goals:Give a chance to the MD users to present their results and show the relevant progress made in 2016 onseveral fronts.Provide the MD users and the Operation (OP) crews with a general overview on the outcome and theimpact of all ongoing MD activities.Identify the open questions and consequently define - with priorities - a list of machine studies in theinjectors for 2017 (covering the operational beams, LHC Injectors Upgrade, High Luminosity LHC,Physics Beyond Colliders, other projects).Create the opportunity to collect and document the highlights of the 2016 MDs and define the perspectivesfor 2017.Discuss how to make best use of the MD time, in particular let the main MD user express their wishesand see whether/how OP teams can contribute to their fulfilment.

  5. CERN Heart Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    14 & 15 OCTOBER 2003 The Medical Service and the Fire Brigade invite everyone working at CERN to participate in the above event. INFIRMARY 9 am to 16.30 pm Building 57, ground floor HEALTHY HEART? ♥ Evaluation of personal cardiac risks through the monitoring of: • Blood pressure • Cholesterol and sugar levels • Body Mass Index ... and more ♥ Leaflets, information and advice concerning cardiac issues FIRE BRIGADE 9 to 12am Building 65 FIRST AID COURSES ♥ What to do in a Cardiac Emergency (3 h duration) Places are limited and on reservation only (15 people / day) To book, E-mail the Medical Services on: service.medical@cern.ch

  6. Palladium–zinc catalysts on mesoporous titania prepared by colloid synthesis. II. Synthesis and characterization of PdZn/TiO2 coating on inner surface of fused silica capillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okhlopkova, Lyudmila B.; Kerzhentsev, Michail A.; Tuzikov, Fedor V.; Larichev, Yurii V.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle-doped mesoporous titania coating was synthesized by incorporation of PdZn nanoparticles into TiO 2 sol followed by dip coating of the sol on inner surface of fused silica capillary. Monodispersed PdZn bimetallic colloidal particles with average particle diameters of approximately 2 nm have been prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction of ZnCl 2 and Pd(CH 3 COO) 2 in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone. The textural properties, surface structure, chemical composition, and morphology of the samples were investigated by means of N 2 sorption measurements, TEM, and X-ray diffraction. PdZn/TiO 2 coating has been further analyzed by quantitative analysis of the SAXS data in combination with the density contrast method, providing direct structural-dispersion information about the active component and support. Calcination conditions suitable for surfactant removal have been optimized to obtain PdZn/TiO 2 coatings with required metal particle size and composition. The high dispersion and chemical composition of the nanoparticles embedded in mesoporous titania coating have been retained with no modification after thermal treatment in vacuum at 300 °C. Results suggest how porous structure of the PdZn coating may be fine-tuned to improve the accessibility of the pores to reactants. The control of the pore size in the range of 4.9–6.8 nm of the mesoporous titania was achieved by adding co-surfactants, such as n-butanol.

  7. Safety and Activity of Anti–PD-L1 Antibody in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmer, Julie R.; Tykodi, Scott S.; Chow, Laura Q.M.; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Hwu, Patrick; Drake, Charles G.; Camacho, Luis H.; Kauh, John; Odunsi, Kunle; Pitot, Henry C.; Hamid, Omid; Bhatia, Shailender; Martins, Renato; Eaton, Keith; Chen, Shuming; Salay, Theresa M.; Alaparthy, Suresh; Grosso, Joseph F.; Korman, Alan J.; Parker, Susan M.; Agrawal, Shruti; Goldberg, Stacie M.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Gupta, Ashok; Wigginton, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Programmed death 1 (PD-1) protein, a T-cell coinhibitory receptor, and one of its ligands, PD-L1, play a pivotal role in the ability of tumor cells to evade the host’s immune system. Blockade of interactions between PD-1 and PD-L1 enhances immune function in vitro and mediates antitumor activity in preclinical models. METHODS In this multicenter phase 1 trial, we administered intravenous anti–PD-L1 antibody (at escalating doses ranging from 0.3 to 10 mg per kilogram of body weight) to patients with selected advanced cancers. Anti–PD-L1 antibody was administered every 14 days in 6-week cycles for up to 16 cycles or until the patient had a complete response or confirmed disease progression. RESULTS As of February 24, 2012, a total of 207 patients — 75 with non–small-cell lung cancer, 55 with melanoma, 18 with colorectal cancer, 17 with renal-cell cancer, 17 with ovarian cancer, 14 with pancreatic cancer, 7 with gastric cancer, and 4 with breast cancer — had received anti–PD-L1 antibody. The median duration of therapy was 12 weeks (range, 2 to 111). Grade 3 or 4 toxic effects that investigators considered to be related to treatment occurred in 9% of patients. Among patients with a response that could be evaluated, an objective response (a complete or partial response) was observed in 9 of 52 patients with melanoma, 2 of 17 with renal-cell cancer, 5 of 49 with non–small-cell lung cancer, and 1 of 17 with ovarian cancer. Responses lasted for 1 year or more in 8 of 16 patients with at least 1 year of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Antibody-mediated blockade of PD-L1 induced durable tumor regression (objective response rate of 6 to 17%) and prolonged stabilization of disease (rates of 12 to 41% at 24 weeks) in patients with advanced cancers, including non–small-cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal-cell cancer. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00729664.) PMID:22658128

  8. One-day compared with 7-day nitrofurantoin for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbiganon, Pisake; Villar, Jose; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Widmer, Mariana; Thinkhamrop, Jadsada; Carroli, Guillermo; Duc Vy, Nguyen; Mignini, Luciano; Festin, Mario; Prasertcharoensuk, Witoon; Limpongsanurak, Sompop; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Sirivatanapa, Pannee

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate whether a 1-day nitrofurantoin regimen is as effective as a 7-day regimen in eradicating asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled noninferiority trial was conducted in antenatal clinics in Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Argentina. Pregnant women seeking antenatal care between March 2004 and March 2007 who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study. Those who consented were randomly allocated to receive either a 1-day or a 7-day course of 100 mg capsules of nitrofurantoin, which was taken twice daily. The primary outcome was bacteriologic cure on day 14 of treatment. : A total of 1,248 of 24,430 eligible women had asymptomatic bacteriuria, making the overall prevalence of 5.1%. Of these 1,248 women, 778 women were successfully recruited, and 386 and 392 women were randomly allocated to 1-day and 7-day regimens, respectively. Escherichia coli was the most common potentially pathogenic bacteria detected, its prevalence approaching 50%. Bacteriologic cure rates at treatment day 14 were 75.7% and 86.2% for 1-day and 7-day regimens, respectively. The cure rate difference was -10.5% (95% confidence interval -16.1% to -4.9%). Mean birth weight and mean gestational age at delivery were significantly lower in the 1-day regimen group. There were fewer adverse effects in the 1-day regimen group, but the differences were not statistically significant. A 1-day regimen of nitrofurantoin is significantly less effective than a 7-day regimen. Women with asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy should receive the standard 7-day regimen. ISRCTN, isrctn.org, ISRCTN11966080 I.

  9. Expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 in poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas of the digestive system: a potential target for anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jordan A; Gonzalez, Raul S; Das, Satya; Berlin, Jordan; Shi, Chanjuan

    2017-12-01

    Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the digestive system has a dismal prognosis with limited treatment options. This study aimed to investigate expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in these tumors. Thirty-seven patients with a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the digestive system were identified. Their electronic medical records, pathology reports, and pathology slides were reviewed for demographics, clinical history, and pathologic features. Tumor sections were immunohistochemically labeled for PD-1 and PD-L1, and expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 on tumor and tumor-associated immune cells was analyzed and compared between small cell and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. The mean age of patients was 61 years old with 18 men and 19 women. The colorectum (n=20) was the most common primary site; other primary sites included the pancreaticobiliary system, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and ampulla. Expression of PD-1 was detected on tumor cells (n=6, 16%) as well as on tumor-associated immune cells (n=23, 63%). The 6 cases with PD-1 expression on tumor cells also had the expression on immune cells. Expression of PD-L1 was visualized on tumor cells in 5 cases (14%) and on tumor-associated immune cells in 10 cases (27%). There was no difference in PD-1 and PD-L1 expression between small cell and large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. In conclusion, PD-1/PD-L1 expression is a frequent occurrence in poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas of the digestive system. Checkpoint blockade targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may have a potential role in treating patients with this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PD-1 Checkpoint Inhibitor Associated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schneider

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report first-hand narrative experience of autoimmune encephalitis and to briefly review currently available evidence of autoimmune encephalitis in cancer patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Setting: A case study is presented on the management of a patient who developed autoimmune encephalitis during nivolumab monotherapy occurring after 28 weeks on anti-PD-1 monotherapy (nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks for non-small cell lung cancer. Results: No substantial improvement was observed by antiepileptic treatment. After administration of 80 mg methylprednisolone, neurologic symptoms disappeared within 24 h and the patient fully recovered. Conclusions: Immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment can lead to autoimmune encephalitis. Clinical trial data indicate a frequency of autoimmune encephalitis of ≥0.1 to <1% with a higher probability during combined or sequential anti-CTLA-4/anti-PD-1 therapy than during anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 monotherapy. Further collection of evidence and translational research is warranted.

  11. Investigation of antimagnetic rotation in 100Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, S.; Garg, U.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Frauendorf, S.; Kharraja, B.; Ghugre, S. S.; Chintalapudi, S. N.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Kondev, F. G.

    2001-01-01

    High spin states have been studied in the nucleus 100 Pd with the aim of investigating the novel phenomenon of ''antimagnetic rotation.'' A cascade of four ''rotational-band-like'' transitions is proposed as corresponding to antimagnetic rotation, based on the observed spectroscopic properties and a comparison with calculations in the configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky formalism

  12. Ferromagnetism of Pd-Fe (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, G.; Carnegie, D. W., Jr.; Claus, H.

    1984-03-01

    We present new low field ac susceptibility measurements on Pd1-xFex alloys (0.002≤X<0.01). The Curie temperature TC, determined from these measurements, are significantly lower than those previously obtained in higher magnetic fields [G. J. Nieuwenhuys, Adv. Phys. 24, 515 (1975)]. We also found that for a given sample, TC depends very sensitively on its heat treatment. As an example, for an alloy with 0.4 at. % Fe, TC can be varied between 4 and 10 K. In other alloys, like PdNi or RhNi similar changes in TC are due to changes in the degree of atomic short-range order [S. Crane, D. W. Carnegie, Jr., and H. Claus, J. Appl. Phys. 53, 2179 (1982)]. However, for PdFe we show evidence that the changes in TC are due to absorption of small amounts of oxygen, the samples with the highest amount of oxygen having the highest TC. It thus seems that oxygen has the opposite effect from hydrogen on the exchange enhanced susceptibility of Pd [J. A. Mydosh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 1562 (1974)].

  13. GCR flux 9-day variations with LISA Pathfinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimani, C; Benella, S; Fabi, M; Finetti, N; Telloni, D

    2017-01-01

    Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) energy spectra in the heliosphere vary on the basis of the level of solar activity, the status of solar polarity and interplanetary transient magnetic structures of solar origin. A high counting rate particle detector (PD) aboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) allows for the measurement of galactic cosmic-ray and solar energetic particle (SEP) integral fluxes at energies > 70 MeV n −1 up to 6500 counts s −1 . Data are gathered with a sampling time of 15 s. A study of GCR flux depressions associated with the third harmonic of the Sun rotation period (∼ 9 days) is presented here. (paper)

  14. Methanol steam reforming over Pd/ZnO and Pd/CeO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, Easwar S.; Bej, Shyamal K.; Thompson, Levi T. [University of Michigan, Department of Chemical Engineering, 3026 H.H. Dow Building, 2300 Hayward Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2005-08-10

    The goal of work described in this paper was to better understand the methanol steam reforming (MSR) activity and selectivity patterns of ZnO and CeO{sub 2} supported Pd catalysts. This reaction is being used to produce H{sub 2}-rich gas for a number of applications including hydrogen fuel cells. The Pd/ZnO catalysts had lower MSR rates but were more selective for the production of CO{sub 2} than the Pd/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. The CH{sub 3}OH conversion rates were proportional to the H{sub 2} chemisorption uptake suggesting that the rate determining step was catalyzed by Pd. The corresponding turnover frequencies averaged 0.8+/-0.3s{sup -1} and 0.4+/-0.2s{sup -1} at 230{sup o}C for the Pd/ZnO and Pd/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, respectively. The selectivities are explained based on the reaction pathways, and characteristics of the support. The key surface intermediate appeared to be a formate. The ZnO supported catalysts had a higher density of acidic sites and favored pathways where the intermediate was converted to CO{sub 2} while the CeO{sub 2} supported catalysts had a higher density of basic sites and favored the production of CO.

  15. Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S., E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Program, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface.

  16. Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S.; Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V.; Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface

  17. Plasma and blood volume in the calf from birth till 90 days of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellerberg, L.; Ekman, L.; Jacobsson, S.-O.

    1975-01-01

    Determinations of plasma volume were made of 9 clinically healthy Swedish Red and White calves from birth to 90 days of age by means of the isotop dilution technique. Commercially available 131 I labelled human serum albumin was used. Calculation of the total blood volume was based on the plasma volume and packed cell volume. The plasma and blood volumes increased per kg body weight in average 17 and 14 percent respectively from directly after birth to 24 hrs. old. From 1 to 90 days of age the plasma and blood volume fell steadily per kg body weight. Plasma volume expressed as a percentage of body weight was 5.3 percent at birth, 6.5 percent at 1 day old, and 4.9 percent at 90 days old. Corresponding values for blood were 8.4, 9.3 and 7.0 percent. (author)

  18. Printshop open days

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    With new machines, new services and new opening hours, the CERN Printshop has turned over many new leaves at the start of 2013. Come and find out more from 25 to 27 March at the Printshop open days!   The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black and white printer. The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black-and-white printer is a technical marvel. It can produce 160 pages per minute (it prints on both sides in one pass) and can also staple, punch holes, do thermal binding and make A4 or A5 brochures. The new colour printer is more discreet but no less efficient: it churns out 70 A4 or A3 pages per minute. Once they are printed, colour documents can be inserted into the black and white machine to be hole-punched, made into brochures or bound. They can even be mixed in with black-and-white pages and, as if by magic, come out in the right order! Having recently acquired a state-of-the-art large-format printer, the CERN Printshop can now print posters in A2, A1 or A0 format. ...

  19. Seven remarkable days

    CERN Document Server

    This has been a truly remarkable seven days for CERN. Things have moved so fast that it has sometimes been hard to separate fact from fiction – all the more so since facts have often seemed too good to be true. It’s been a week of many firsts. Monday was the first time we’ve had two captured beams in the LHC. It’s the first time the LHC has functioned as a particle accelerator, boosting particles to the highest beam energy so far achieved at CERN. And it’s been a week in which we’ve seen the highest energy proton-proton collisions ever produced at CERN: our last hadron collider, the SPS was a proton-antiproton collider, a technically simpler machine than the LHC. This week’s successes are all the more remarkable precisely because of the complexity of the LHC. Unlike the SPS collider, it is two accelerators not one, making the job of commissioning nearly twice as difficult. I’d like to express my heartfelt thanks and congra...

  20. Two days of films

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The Chinese community at CERN and the CERN CineClub, on the occasion of the Chinese New Year, invite everyone to two days of films Thursday 3 February 2011 at 20:30 - CERN Council Chamber Eat drink man woman Directed by Ang LEE (Taiwan, 1994) 122 min. With Sihung Lung, Yu-Wen Wang, Chien-Lien Wu, Kuei-Mei Yang Senior Master Chef Chu lives in a large house in Taipei with his three unmarried daughters, Jia-Jen, a chemistry teacher converted to Christianity, Jia-Chien, an airline executive, and Jia-Ning, a student who also works in a fast food restaurant. Life in the house revolves around the ritual of an elaborate dinner each Sunday, and the love lives of all the family members. Original version Mandarin with English subtitles Friday 4 February 2011 at 19:30 - CERN Council Chamber Adieu, ma concubine Directed by Chen KAIGE (China / Hong Kong, 1993) 171 min. With Leslie Cheung, Fengyi Zhang, Li Gong "Farewell, My Concubine" is a movie with two parallel, intertwined stories. It is the story of two performers in t...

  1. CERN Diabetes Awareness Days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness and of heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if it is diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences...

  2. CERN diabetes awareness days

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Do you have diabetes without knowing it? Following last year's successful campaign, the CERN Infirmary has organised two further diabetes prevention and screening days on 10th & 11th October 2005 from 9am to 4pm (INFIRMARY, Bldg 57, ground floor) open to everyone working on the CERN site who was unable to participate in 2004. Testing of blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels, Body Mass Index, etc. Information - documentation - personal and individual advice. Presence of a dietician from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In cooperation with the NOVAE, DSR & AVENANCE restaurants. Diabetes is reaching epidemic proportions in many countries and, if not diagnosed sufficiently early, can be a major cause of blindness, heart and kidney disease, etc. Prevention is possible through screening and life-style changes such as improved dietary habits and regular physical exercise. Diabetes is not a serious condition in itself if diagnosed and treated early enough but it can have very serious consequences if und...

  3. [Promotion effects of vitamin B12 on the degradation of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl by Nostoc PD-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Wen-Feng; Lu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hang-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are typical persistent chlorinated organic compounds in the environment. Bioremediation of PCB-contaminated environment has become one of the hot issues. In this study, vitamin B12 (VB12) and chlorine-free culture medium were applied to study the effects of VB12 on the degradation of 2,4,4'-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB28) by Nostoc PD-2 and the gene expression during the PCB-degradation process. Results showed that addition of different concentrations of vitamin B12 could improve the PCB-biodegradation rates by Nostoc PD-2. Compared with the control group, the 7-day degradation rate in 10 microg x L(-1), 100 microg x L(-1), and 1 000 microg x L(-1) VB12-treated groups increased by 11.0%, 19.7%, and 21.9% , respectively. The degradation half-time decreased from 5.53 days (treated with 10 microg x L(-1) VB12) to 3.08 days (treated with 100 microg x L(-1) VB12). The expression of cytochrome b6f complex iron-sulfur protein gene and dioxygenase gene showed significant correlation with PCB28-degradation by Nostoc PD-2. While the expression of iron-sulfur protein gene showed more significant correlation with PCB28-degradation. Results in this study indicated that adding VB12 could promote PCB28-degradation by Nostoc PD-2. Moreover, VB12 addition improved the PCB-degradation activity of Nostoc PD-2 at the gene level. The above conclusions could provide a new choice for developing efficient bioremediation technology for PCB-contaminated environment and a new insight into the PCB-biodegradation mechanism by Nostoc PD-2.

  4. AAS 227: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  5. Home iv Antibiotic Therapy through a Medical Day Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Gourdeau

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%. The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days. Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days. Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

  6. An investigation of the Pd-Ag-Ru-Gd quaternary system phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kanghou; Xu Yun

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the Ag-Pd-Gd, Ag-Ru-Gd and Pd-Ru-Gd ternary systems, the partial phase diagram of Pd-Ag-Ru-Gd (Gd 3 Gd and Ag 51 Gd 14 ; five two-phase regions: Pd(Ag) + (Ru), Pd(Ag) + Ag 51 Gd 14 (Ru) + Ag 51 Gd 14 , Pd(Ag) + Pd 3 Gd and (Ru) + Pd 3 Gd; three three-phase regions: Pd(Ag) + Pd 3 Gd + (Ru), Pd(Ag) + Ag 51 Gd 14 + (Ru) and (Ru) + Ag 51 Gd 14 + Pd 3 Gd; one four-phase region Pd(Ag) + (Ru) + Ag 51 Gd 14 + Pd 3 Gd. No new quaternary intermetallic phase has been found

  7. Astrophysics days and MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falgarone, Edith; Rieutord, Michel; Richard, Denis; Zahn, Jean-Paul; Dauchot, Olivier; Daviaud, Francois; Dubrulle, Berengere; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Noullez, Alain; Bourgoin, Mickael; Odier, Philippe; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Leveque, Emmanuel; Chainais, Pierre; Abry, Patrice; Mordant, Nicolas; Michel, Olivier; Marie, Louis; Chiffaudel, Arnaud; Daviaud, Francois; Petrelis, Francois; Fauve, Stephan; Nore, C.; Brachet, M.-E.; Politano, H.; Pouquet, A.; Leorat, Jacques; Grapin, Roland; Brun, Sacha; Delour, Jean; Arneodo, Alain; Muzy, Jean-Francois; Magnaudet, Jacques; Braza, Marianna; Boree, Jacques; Maurel, S.; Ben, L.; Moreau, J.; Bazile, R.; Charnay, G.; Lewandowski, Roger; Laveder, Dimitri; Bouchet, Freddy; Sommeria, Joel; Le Gal, P.; Eloy, C.; Le Dizes, S.; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Bottausci, Frederic; Petitjeans, Philippe; Maurel, Agnes; Carlier, Johan; Anselmet, Fabien

    2001-05-01

    This publication gathers extended summaries of presentations proposed during two days on astrophysics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The first session addressed astrophysics and MHD: The cold interstellar medium, a low ionized turbulent plasma; Turbulent convection in stars; Turbulence in differential rotation; Protoplanetary disks and washing machines; gravitational instability and large structures; MHD turbulence in the sodium von Karman flow; Numerical study of the dynamo effect in the Taylor-Green eddy geometry; Solar turbulent convection under the influence of rotation and of the magnetic field. The second session addressed the description of turbulence: Should we give up cascade models to describe the spatial complexity of the velocity field in a developed turbulence?; What do we learn with RDT about the turbulence at the vicinity of a plane surface?; Qualitative explanation of intermittency; Reduced model of Navier-Stokes equations: quickly extinguished energy cascade; Some mathematical properties of turbulent closure models. The third session addressed turbulence and coherent structures: Alfven wave filamentation and formation of coherent structures in dispersive MHD; Statistical mechanics for quasi-geo-strophic turbulence: applications to Jupiter's coherent structures; Elliptic instabilities; Physics and modelling of turbulent detached unsteady flows in aerodynamics and fluid-structure interaction; Intermittency and coherent structures in a washing machine: a wavelet analysis of joint pressure/velocity measurements; CVS filtering of 3D turbulent mixing layer using orthogonal wavelets. The last session addressed experimental methods: Lagrangian velocity measurements; Energy dissipation and instabilities within a locally stretched vortex; Study by laser imagery of the generation and breakage of a compressed eddy flow; Study of coherent structures of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

  8. International Women's Day speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts.

  9. Tritium conference days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Sene, M.; Devin, P.; Chretien, V.; Le Guen, B.; Guetat, Ph.; Baglan, N.; Ansoborlo, E.; Boyer, C.; Masson, M.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P.; Jenkinson, St.; Wakeford, R.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Thompson, P.; Leterq, D.; Chastagner, F.; Cortes, P.; Philippe, M.; Paquet, F.; Fournier, M.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Twenty presentations out of 21 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - tritium in the environment (J. Garnier-Laplace); 2 - status of knowledge about tritium impact on health (L. Lebaron-Jacobs); 3 - tritium, discrete but present everywhere (M. Sene); 4 - management of tritium effluents from Areva NC La Hague site - related impact and monitoring (P. Devin); 5 - tritium effluents and impact in the vicinity of EDF's power plants (V. Chretien and B. Le Guen); 6 - contribution of CEA-Valduc centre monitoring to the knowledge of atmospheric tritiated water transfers to the different compartments of the environment (P. Guetat); 7 - tritium analysis in environment samples: constraints and means (N. Baglan); 8 - organically-linked tritium: the analyst view (E. Ansoborlo); 9 - study of tritium transfers to plants via OBT/HTO air and OBT/HTO free (C. Boyer); 10 - tritium in the British Channel (M. Masson and P. Bailly-Du-Bois); 11 - tritium in British coastal waters (S. Jenkinson); 12 - recent results from epidemiology (R. Wakeford); 13 - effects of tritiated thymidine on hematopoietic stem cells (P.H. Romeo); 14 - tritium management issue in Canada: the point of view from authorities (P. Thompson); 15 - experience feedback of the detritiation process of Valduc centre (D. Leterq); 16 - difficulties linked with tritiated wastes confinement (F. Chastagner); 17 - optimisation of tritium management in the ITER project (P. Cortes); 18 - elements of thought about the management of tritium generated by nuclear facilities (M. Philippe); 19 - CIPR's position about the calculation of doses and risks linked with tritium exposure (F. Paquet); 20 - tritium think tanks (M. Fournier). (J.S.)

  10. AAS 227: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  11. Women in Guam consume more calories during feast days than during non-feast days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Yvette C; Leon Guerrero, Rachael T; Novotny, Rachel

    2011-03-01

    Parties (feast days) have become increasingly frequent and abundant, in terms of food, on the island of Guam. Considering the potential impact of this frequency and abundance on food intake, this study compared food intake during feast days and non-feast days of women in Guam (25 Chamorros; 24 Filipinas). The women (≥40 yr) recalled foods they usually consumed during feast days. Subsequently, a 24-hour dietary recall for a non-feast day was completed by a subsample (n=25). Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured to assess obesity status. Statistical analyses (paired t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square test) were performed with SPSS. Compared to a non-feast day, the women reported higher intakes of dietary energy (2645.0 ± 1125.8 versus 1654.0 ± 718.8 kcal/day), carbohydrates (43.8 ± 11.5% versus 51.8 ± 10.2% of kcal), total fat (34.1 ± 7.8% versus 27.5 ± 9.6% of kcal), saturated fat (11.4 ± 4.7% versus 7.9 ± 3.4% of kcal), and sugar (89.5 ± 62.8 versus 47.3 ± 42.2 g/day) on feast days. Chamorros, compared to Filipinas, reported higher dietary energy density (1.7 ± 0.4 versus 1.4 ± 0.3 kcal/g), total fat (35.3 ± 8.9% versus 30.7 ± 6.8% of kcal), and saturated fat (12.4 ± 4.9% versus 9.4 ± 3.3% of kcal); and lower servings of fruit (0.5 ± 1.0 versus 2.7 ± 1.8) on feast days. Fourteen Chamorros (56.0%) and one Filipina (4.1%) were classified as obese. Current feasting behaviors of women in Guam may contribute to obesity if continued for a long period. The women would benefit by choosing more fruit and vegetable dishes in place of high-energy dishes. Chamorro women would particularly benefit by reducing saturated fat intake. Traditional foods, such as taro, breadfruit, seafood, fruits, and vegetables, would help accomplish this and thus should be promoted at parties on Guam.

  12. Day-to-day and within-day variation in urinary iodine excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Ovesen, L.; Christiansen, E.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine the day-to-day and within-day variation in urinary iodine excretion and the day-to-day variation in iodine intake. Design: Collection of consecutive 24-h urine samples and casual urine samples over 24 h. Setting: The study population consisted of highly motivated subjects fr...

  13. Atomic Structure of Au−Pd Bimetallic Alloyed Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong

    2010-09-08

    Using a two-step seed-mediated growth method, we synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) having a gold octahedron core and a palladium epitaxial shell with controlled Pd-shell thickness. The mismatch-release mechanism between the Au core and Pd shell of the NPs was systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the NPs coated with a single atomic layer of Pd, the strain between the surface Pd layer and the Au core is released by Shockley partial dislocations (SPDs) accompanied by the formation of stacking faults. For NPs coated with more Pd (>2 nm), the stacking faults still exist, but no SPDs are found. This may be due to the diffusion of Au atoms into the Pd shell layers to eliminate the SPDs. At the same time, a long-range ordered L11 AuPd alloy phase has been identified in the interface area, supporting the assumption of the diffusion of Au into Pd to release the interface mismatch. With increasing numbers of Pd shell layers, the shape of the Au-Pd NP changes, step by step, from truncated-octahedral to cubic. After the bimetallic NPs were annealed at 523 K for 10 min, the SPDs at the surface of the NPs coated with a single atomic layer of Pd disappeared due to diffusion of the Au atoms into the surface layer, while the stacking faults and the L11 Au-Pd alloyed structure remained. When the annealing temperature was increased to 800 K, electron diffraction patterns and diffraction contrast images revealed that the NPs became a uniform Au-Pd alloy, and most of the stacking faults disappeared as a result of the annealing. Even so, some clues still support the existence of the L11 phase, which suggests that the L11 phase is a stable, long-range ordered structure in Au-Pd bimetallic NPs. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. AAS 227: Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  15. 2016 SPD: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors note: This week were in Boulder, Colorado at the 47th meeting of the AAS Solar Physics Division (SPD). Follow along to catch some of the latest news from the field of solar physics!The 2016 SPD meeting was launched this morning from the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Two of the hot topics at this years meeting include celebration of the recent move of the National Solar Observatorys headquarters to Boulder, and discussion of the future Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST). DKIST, planned for a 2019 completion in Hawaii, is the next big telescope on the horizon for solar physics.Todays press conference had an interesting focus: instruments providing new high-energy observations of the Sun. Representatives from four different instruments were here to talk about some of the latest X-ray solar observations.GRIPSThe GRIPS payload flew at 130,000 ft over Antarctica on a giant balloon in January 2016. [NASA/Albert Shih]First up, Albert Shih (NASA Goddard) described the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares, or GRIPS. GRIPS is a balloon-borne instrument designed to detect X-rays and gamma rays emitted during solar flares. Up to tens of a percent of the energy in solar flares is emitted in the form of accelerated particles, but the physics behind this process is not well understood. GRIPS observes where the highest-energy particles are accelerated, in an effort to learn more about the process.GRIPS was launched on 19 January, 2016 and flew for roughly 12 days gathering ~1 million seconds of data! The logistics of this instruments flight are especially interesting, since it was launched from Antarctica and carried by a balloon at a whopping elevation of 130,000 ft (to get high enough that the atmosphere doesnt absorb all the photons GRIPS is trying to observe). Though the data from the mission has been retrieved, the bulk of the hardware remains where it landed at the end of January. It must

  16. Aqueous phase hydrogenation of phenol catalyzed by Pd and PdAg on ZrO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende, Karen A.; Hori, Carla E.; Noronha, Fabio B.; Shi, Hui; Gutierrez, Oliver Y.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogenation of phenol in aqueous phase was studied over a series of ZrO2-supported Pd catalysts in order to explore the effects of particle size and of Ag addition on the activity of Pd. Kinetic assessments were performed in a batch reactor, on monometallic Pd/ZrO2 samples with different Pd loadings (0.5%, 1% and 2%), as well as on a 1% PdAg/ZrO2 sample. The turnover frequency (TOF) increases with the Pd particle size. The reaction orders in phenol and H2 indicate that the surface coverages by phenol, H2 and their derived intermediates are higher on 0.5% Pd/ZrO2 than on other samples. The activation energy was the lowest on the least active sample (0.5% Pd/ZrO2), while being identical on 1% and 2% Pd/ZrO2 catalysts. Thus, the significantly lower activity of the small Pd particles (1-2 nm on average) in 0.5%Pd/ZrO2 is explained by the unfavorable activation entropies for the strongly bound species. The presence of Ag increases considerably the TOF of the reaction by decreasing the Ea and increasing the coverages of phenol and H2.

  17. High-temperature stability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(P)/Cu surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. E.; Hsieh, W. Z.; Lee, P. T.; Huang, Y. H.; Kuo, T. T.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal reliability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(4-6 wt.% P)/Cu trilayers in the isothermal annealing at 180 °C were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The pure Pd film possessed a nanocrystalline structure with numerous grain boundaries, thereby facilitating the interdiffusion between Au and Cu. Out-diffusion of Cu through Pd and Au grain boundaries yielded a significant amount of Cu oxides (CuO and Cu2O) over the Au surface and gave rise to void formation in the Cu film. By contrast, the Pd(P) film was amorphous and served as a good diffusion barrier against Cu diffusion. The results of this study indicated that amorphous Pd(P) possessed better oxidation resistance and thermal reliability than crystalline Pd.

  18. THE CHALLENGE OF PD PATIENTS: GLUCOSE AND GLUCOSE DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN PD SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Lim Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The main osmotic agent found in the peritoneal dialysis (PD solution is glucose. It has been of a wide use for great crystalloid osmotic power at a low concentration, simple metabolism, and excellent safety. On the other hand, anywhere between 60 to 80% of the glucose in the PD solution is absorbed - a 100 to 300 mg of daily glucose absorption. Once into the systemic circulation, glucose can be a cause for metabolic complications including obesity. Indeed, the diabetiform change observed in the peritoneal membrane in the long-term PD patients is believed attributable to the high-concentration glucose in the PD solution. The glucose absorbed from peritoneal cavity raises the risk of ‘glucose toxicity’, leading to insulin resistance and beta cell failure. Clinical similarity can be found in postprandial hyperglycemia, which is known to be associated with oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, NF-κb, and inflammation, affecting myocardial blood flow. Moreover, it is a proven independent risk factor of coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes, particularly of female gender. Though speculative yet, glucose toxicity might explain a higher mortality of PD patients after the first year compared with those on hemodialysis (more so in female, advanced-age patients with diabetes. Also included in the picture are glucose degradation products (GDPs generated along the course of heat sterilization or storage of the PD solution. They have been shown to induce apoptosis of peritoneal mesothelial cells, renal tubular epithelial cells, and endothelial cells, while spurring production of TGF-β and VEGF and facilitating epithelial mesenchymal transition. GDPs provide a stronger reactivity than glucose in the formation of AGEs, a known cause for microvascular complications and arteriosclerosis. Unfortunately, clinical studies using a low-GDP PD solution have provided mixed results on the residual renal function, peritonitis, peritoneal

  19. The PD1:PD-L1/2 Pathway from Discovery to Clinical Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Anagnostou, Theodora; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-01-01

    The immune system maintains a critically organized network to defend against foreign particles, while evading self-reactivity simultaneously. T lymphocytes function as effectors and play an important regulatory role to orchestrate the immune signals. Although central tolerance mechanism results in the removal of the most of the autoreactive T cells during thymic selection, a fraction of self-reactive lymphocytes escapes to the periphery and pose a threat to cause autoimmunity. The immune system evolved various mechanisms to constrain such autoreactive T cells and maintain peripheral tolerance, including T cell anergy, deletion, and suppression by regulatory T cells (T Regs ). These effects are regulated by a complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory receptors expressed on T cells and their ligands, which deliver cell-to-cell signals that dictate the outcome of T cell encountering with cognate antigens. Among the inhibitory immune mediators, the pathway consisting of the programed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor (CD279) and its ligands PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274) and PD-L2 (B7-DC, CD273) plays an important role in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance and for the maintenance of the stability and the integrity of T cells. However, the PD-1:PD-L1/L2 pathway also mediates potent inhibitory signals to hinder the proliferation and function of T effector cells and have inimical effects on antiviral and antitumor immunity. Therapeutic targeting of this pathway has resulted in successful enhancement of T cell immunity against viral pathogens and tumors. Here, we will provide a brief overview on the properties of the components of the PD-1 pathway, the signaling events regulated by PD-1 engagement, and their consequences on the function of T effector cells.

  20. The PD1: PD-L1/2 pathway from discovery to clinical implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankana Bardhan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has the difficult challenge of discerning and defending against a diversity of microbial pathogens, while simultaneously avoiding self-reactivity. T lymphocytes function as effectors and regulators of the immune system. While central tolerance mechanism results in deletion of the majority of self-reactive T lymphocytes during thymic selection, a fraction of self reactive lymphocytes escapes to the periphery and retains the potential to inflict destructive autoimmune pathology. The immune system evolved various mechanisms to restrain such auto-reactive T cells and maintain peripheral tolerance, including T cell anergy, deletion, and suppression by regulatory T cells (TRegs. These effects are regulated by a complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory receptors expressed on T cells and their ligands, which deliver cell-to-cell signals that dictate the outcome of T cell encountering with cognate antigens. Among the inhibitory immune mediators, the pathway consisting of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 receptor (CD279 and its ligands PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274 and PD-L2 (B7-DC; CD273 plays a vital role in the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance and for the maintenance of T cell homeostasis. In contrast to its beneficial role in self-tolerance, the PD-1: PD-L1/L2 pathway mediates potent inhibitory signals that prevent the expansion and function of T effector cells and have detrimental effects on antiviral and antitumor immunity. Therapeutic targeting of this pathway has resulted in successful enhancement of T cell immunity against viral pathogens and tumors. Here, we will provide a brief overview on the properties of the components of the PD-1 pathway, the signaling events that are regulated by PD-1 triggering, and their consequences on the function of T effector cells.

  1. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene in a novel NaOH/2-propanol/methanol/water system on ceria-supported Pd and Rh catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Martha; Becerra, Jorge; Castelblanco, Miguel; Cifuentes, Bernay; Conesa, Juan A

    2015-08-01

    The catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of high concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) (4.9 mol%, 11.6 vol%) was studied over 1%Pd, 1%Rh and 0.5%Pd-0.5%Rh catalysts supported on CeO2 under conditions of room temperature and pressure. For this, a one-phase system of NaOH/2-propanol/methanol/water was designed with molar percentages of 13.2/17.5/36.9/27.6, respectively. In this system, the alcohols delivered the hydrogen required for the reaction through in-situ dehydrogenation reactions. PdRh/CeO2 was the most active catalyst for the degradation of TCE among the evaluated materials, degrading 85% of the trichloroethylene, with alcohol dehydrogenation rates of 89% for 2-propanol and 83% for methanol after 1 h of reaction. Fresh and used catalysts were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These results showed important differences of the active phase in each catalyst sample. Rh/CeO2 had particle sizes smaller than 1 nm and the active metal was partially oxidized (Rh(0)/Rh(+δ) ratio of 0.43). This configuration showed to be suitable for alcohols dehydrogenation. On the contrary, Pd/CeO2 showed a Pd completed oxidized and with a mean particle size of 1.7 nm, which seemed to be unfavorable for both, alcohols dehydrogenation and TCE HDC. On PdRh/CeO2, active metals presented a mean particle size of 2.7 nm and more reduced metallic species, with ratios of Rh(0)/Rh(+δ) = 0.67 and Pd(0)/Pd(+δ) = 0.28, which showed to be suitable features for the TCE HDC. On the other hand, TGA results suggested some deposition of NaCl residues over the catalyst surfaces. Thus, the new reaction system using PdRh/CeO2 allowed for the degradation of high concentrations of the chlorinated compound by using in situ hydrogen liquid donors in a reaction at room temperature and pressure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. AAS 228: Day 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  3. 2016 SPD: Day 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    last the longest 2 minutes and 40 seconds is the small town of Hopkinsville, KY. WKU is located a little over an hour away, and both locations are prepared for a large influx of people on eclipse day!Partial solar eclipse as viewed by the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]WKU is located just off the centerline of eclipse path, which has some advantages: this provides better viewing of some of the chromospheric features of the Sun during the eclipse, like priminences and solar loops. WKU is setting up a variety of educational and public outreach activities at their football stadium and the WKU farm, and they encourage you to come visit for the eclipse!In addition, they are participating in a nationwide experiment called Citizen CATE, short for the Continental American Telescopic Eclipse. This project will use 60 telescopes spanning the 2500 mile path of totality to record continuous data of the eclipse as it travels across the US. The result will be data of a remarkable 90 minutes of totality, revealing the activity of the solar corona and providing an extended view of the eclipse as has never been seen before.Science During the EclipseNext up was Shadia Habbal (University of Hawaii), who is a co-leader of the AAS 2017 Eclipse Task Force. In addition to her education and outreach efforts associated with the eclipse, however, Habbal is a solar eclipse researcher. She and her collaborators are known as the Solar Wind Sherpas, due to the fact that they hand-carry their science equipment around the world for solar eclipses!Solar corona during a 2008 eclipse, with color overlay indicating emission from highly ionized iron lines. [Habbal et al. 2010]The primary science done during solar eclipses is the study of the solar corona, the region that extends from the solar surface out to several solar radii. This region is too faint to observe normally, but when the light from the Suns disk is blocked out, we can examine it.Unfortunately, the space telescopes that

  4. Hydrodeoxygenation of phenol over Pd catalysts by in-situ generated hydrogen from aqueous reforming of formic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Ying; Wang, Ze; Lin, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation of phenol, as model compound of bio-oil, was investigated over Pd catalysts, using formic acid as a hydrogen donor. The order of activity for deoxygenation of phenol with Pd catalysts was found to be: Pd/SiO2 > Pd/MCM-41 > Pd/CA > Pd/Al2O3 > Pd/HY approximate to Pd/ZrO2 ≈ Pd...

  5. Methodology of Day-To-Day Ship Costs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojka Počuča

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a methodology of assessing the day-to-day fixed costs of maritime cargo ships. The authoress refersthe reader to factors that affect the amount affixed daily costsand the day-to-day voyage costs of ships. In the last chapter thepaper presents an estimation of the average daily fixed costsand day-to-day voyage costs of ships per type and size for theyear 2003. Besides particular explanations, the reader is refe"ed to data bases that authentically impart data on the structureof maritime fleets and their technical characteristics, aswell as databases on prices and costs in maritime transport.

  6. Day-to-day changes in ionospheric electron content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    Large day-to-day variations have been observed in the ionospheric electron content or the so-called Faraday content derived from ATS-6 measurements at Gauhati (26.15 deg N, 91.75 deg E) for the period November 1975 to July 1976. The changes occur in the form of single-day abnormality, alternate day-to-day fluctuations and long-term periodic fluctuations with a periodicity of about 45 days. In all the cases the fluctuations are as large as plus or minus 40% from the average level. These changes are not correlated with solar or magnetic activity

  7. More active and sulfur resistant bimetallic Pd-Ni catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betti, Carolina; Carrara, Nicolás; Badano, Juan; Lederhos, Cecilia; Vera, Carlos; Quiroga, Mónica, E-mail: mquiroga@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catálisis y Petroquímica, INCAPE (FIQ-UNL, CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2018-02-15

    The influence of the kind of metal precursor and the sequence of impregnation on the properties of Pd-Ni catalysts was evaluated during the test reaction of selective hydrogenation of styrene to ethylbenzene by means of physicochemical characterization. The focus was put on the final hydrogenating activity and the resistance to deactivation by sulfide compounds (thiophene). The used techniques of characterization were ICP, XPS, XDR, TPR, CO chemisorption and TEM. XPS results indicated the presence of different Pd species: Pd{sup δ-}, Pd{sup 0} and Pd{sup δ+}. In the case of the Ni containing catalysts, Ni{sup 0} and NiO species were also detected. These palladium and nickel species would be responsible of the variation of activity and sulfur resistance of the catalysts. NiClPd catalysts had a higher resistance to deactivation by sulfur poisoning. This was associated to a higher concentration of Pd{sup η+}Cl{sub x}O{sub y} species that would prevent the adsorption of thiophene by both steric and electronic effects. It could also be due to the lower concentration of Pd{sup 0} and Ni{sup 0} on these catalysts, as compared to those shown by the PdNiCl catalysts. Both the Pd{sup 0} and Ni{sup 0} species are more prone to poisoning because of their higher electronic availability. (author)

  8. Interfacial processes in the Pd/a-Ge:H system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, F.; Cytermann, C.; Brener, R.; Eizenberg, M.; Weil, R.; Beyer, W.

    1993-06-01

    The kinetics of phase transformation has been studied in a two-layer structure of Pd/a-Ge:H after vacuum annealing at temperatures from 180 to 500°C. The a-Ge:H was deposited at 250°C on both c-Si and cleaved NaCl substrates in an RF glow discharge from a GeH 4/H 2 mixture. It was found that, similarly to the Pd/c-Ge and the Pd/a-Ge (e-gun deposited) systems, in the case of 0.15-0.2 μm Pd/0.6-1.0 μm a-Ge:H interfacial germanides formed first through the production of Pd 2Ge (plus a small amount of PdGe), and then PdGe was produced. The growth of both compounds was found to be diffusion-controlled. The nonreacted a-Ge:H layer beneath the germanide overlayer crystallized at 400-500°C. A reverse sequence of germanides formation was revealed in the case of 50 nm Pd/30 nm a-Ge:H, studied by in situ heat treatment in the TEM utilizing non-supported samples. The first germanide detected was PdGe and then, as a result of PdGe and Ge reaction or the PdGe decomposition, Pd 2Ge formed. The temperature dependence of the incubation time before the first ˜ 10 nm PdGe grains formed, followed an Arrhenius curve with an activation energy of 1.45 eV.

  9. Carbon-Supported Pd and PdFe Alloy Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Rivera Gavidia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs are electrochemical devices that efficiently produce electricity and are characterized by a large flexibility for portable applications and high energy density. Methanol crossover is one of the main obstacles for DMFC commercialization, forcing the search for highly electro-active and methanol tolerant cathodes. In the present work, carbon-supported Pd and PdFe catalysts were synthesized using a sodium borohydride reduction method and physico-chemically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. The catalysts were investigated as DMFC cathodes operating at different methanol concentrations (up to 10 M and temperatures (60 °C and 90 °C. The cell based on PdFe/C cathode presented the best performance, achieving a maximum power density of 37.5 mW·cm−2 at 90 °C with 10 M methanol, higher than supported Pd and Pt commercial catalysts, demonstrating that Fe addition yields structural changes to Pd crystal lattice that reduce the crossover effects in DMFC operation.

  10. AAS 227: Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or at astrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the @astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Things kicked off last night at our undergraduate reception booth. Thanks to all of you who stopped by we were delightedto have so many people tell us that they already know about and useastrobites, and we were excited to introduce a new cohort of students at AAS to astrobites for the first time.Tuesday morning was the official start of the meeting. Here are just a few of the talks and workshops astrobiters attended today.Opening Address (by Becky Smethurst)The President of the AAS, aka our fearless leader Meg Urry kicked off the meeting this morning at the purely coffee powered hour of 8am this morning. She spoke about the importance of young astronomers at the meeting (heres looking at you reader!) and also the importance of the new Working Group for Accessibility and Disabilities (aka WGAD pronounced like wicked) at the AAS. The Society has made extra effort this year to make the conference accessible to all,a message which was very well received by everyone in attendance.Kavli Lecture: New Horizons Alan Stern (by Becky Smethurst)We were definitely spoilt with the first Plenary lecture at this years conference Alan Stern gave us a a review of the New Horizons mission of the Pluto Fly By (astrobites covered the mission back in July with this post). We were treated to beautiful images, wonderful results and a foray into geology.Before (Hubble) and after #NewHorizons. #thatisall #science #astro alanstern #aas227 pic.twitter.com/kkMt6RsSIR Science News (@topsciencething) January 5, 2016Some awesome facts from the lecture that blew my mind:New Horizons is now 2AU (!) beyond Pluto

  11. A Combination of PD Controller and PIAFC for Stabilization of “x” Configuration Quadcopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni’am Tamami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a stabilization control method for “x” configuration quadcopter. The control method used the combination of PD (Proportional Derivative controller and PIAFC (Proportional Integral Active Force Control. PD is used to stabilize quadcopter, and PIAFC is used to reject uncertainty disturbance (e.g. wind by estimating disturbance torque value of quadcopter. The PD with PIAFC provided better result where PIAFC could minimize uncertain disturbance effect. The simulation has successfully give comparation about controller performance (PD, PD-AFC, PD-PIAFC by calculate RMS (Root Mean Square value. PD with AFC gives better result than PD. AFC optimization using PI (PD-PIAFC give best result if compared with PD or PD-AFC. PD-PIAFC has lowest RMS value of result control signal, 0.0389 for constant disturbance and 0.1008 for fluctuated disturbance. Keywords:“x” configuration quadcopter, stability, PD, PIAFC.

  12. PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer : Correlations with genetic alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheel, Andreas H.; Ansen, Sascha; Schultheis, Anne M.; Scheffler, Matthias; Fischer, Rieke N.; Michels, Sebastian; Hellmich, Martin; George, Julie; Zander, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Stoelben, Erich; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Perner, Sven; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may induce anticancer immune responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays have been approved as companion diagnostic tests for therapeutic anti-PD-1 antibodies. However, many aspects of PD-L1 prevalence and

  13. Alloying Au surface with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Kun; Luo, Liangfeng; Jiang, Zhiquan; Huang, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    were evaluated. The formation of Au-Pd alloy particles was identified. The Au-Pd alloy particles exhibit enhanced dispersions on SiO2 than Au particles. Charge transfer from Pd to Au within Au-Pd alloy particles. Isolated Pd atoms dominate the surface

  14. Influence of Pd-precursor on the acetoxylation activity of Pd-Sb/TiO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-homeid, A. [Benghazi Univ. (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Chemistry Dept.; Kalevaru, V.N.; Radnik, J.; Luecke, B.; Martin, A. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Katalyse e.V. an der Universitaet Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The impact of palladium precursors (e.g. chloride-PdCl{sub 2}; acetate-Pd(OAc){sub 2}; nitrate-Pd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the catalytic properties of Pd-Sb/TiO{sub 2} catalysts used for acetoxylation of toluene has been investigated. The catalysts were characterized by different techniques such as N{sub 2}-adsorption (BET-surface area and pore volume), XRD, TEM, CO-Chemisorption and XPS for better understanding of the catalytic properties of the catalysts. The acetate and nitrate-type precursors exhibited higher surface areas, pore volumes and higher dispersion of Pd, but displayed poor performance compared to chloride precursor. TEM analysis indicated that the size of Pd particles depended upon the nature of Pd-precursor. Among the three, chloride precursor exhibited bigger Pd particles. XPS results revealed that all the fresh catalysts irrespective of Pd-precursor contained Pd in oxidized state (i.e. Pd{sup +2}), while in the spent catalysts such oxidized Pd species were reduced. The catalytic performance was found to depend strongly on the nature of precursor used. Among the three, the catalysts prepared from chloride-type precursor showed much higher overall catalytic activity (68%) than those of nitrate and/or acetate type precursors. Moreover, these two precursors (acetate and nitrate) gave higher total oxidation products due to oxidative decomposition of mainly acetic acid. Furthermore, the catalyst prepared from Cl-precursor revealed easy deactivation due to coke deposition and also due to loss of Pd in the near-surface-region. (orig.)

  15. Oxadiazole-substituted naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene-4,9-diones as potent inhibitors of keratinocyte hyperproliferation. Structure-activity relationships of the tricyclic quinone skeleton and the oxadiazole substituent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basoglu, Atila; Dirkmann, Simone; Zahedi Golpayegani, Nader

    2017-01-01

    Novel analogues of oxadiazole-substituted naphtho[2,3-b]thiophene-4,9-diones were synthesized in which the tricyclic quinone skeleton was systematically replaced with simpler moieties, such as structures with fewer rings and open-chain forms, while the oxadiazole ring was maintained. In addition...

  16. Crystal clear: visualizing the intervention mechanism of the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction by two cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuguang Tan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antibody-based PD-1/PD-L1 blockade therapies have taken center stage in immunotherapies for cancer, with multiple clinical successes. PD-1 signaling plays pivotal roles in tumor-driven T-cell dysfunction. In contrast to prior approaches to generate or boost tumor-specific T-cell responses, antibody-based PD-1/PD-L1 blockade targets tumor-induced T-cell defects and restores pre-existing T-cell function to modulate antitumor immunity. In this review, the fundamental knowledge on the expression regulations and inhibitory functions of PD-1 and the present understanding of antibody-based PD-1/PD-L1 blockade therapies are briefly summarized. We then focus on the recent breakthrough work concerning the structural basis of the PD-1/PD-Ls interaction and how therapeutic antibodies, pembrolizumab targeting PD-1 and avelumab targeting PD-L1, compete with the binding of PD-1/PD-L1 to interrupt the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction. We believe that this structural information will benefit the design and improvement of therapeutic antibodies targeting PD-1 signaling.

  17. Electric-field effects on magnetic anisotropy in Pd/Fe/Pd(0 0 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraguchi, Shinya; Tsujikawa, Masahito; Gotou, Junpei; Oda, Tatsuki

    2011-01-01

    Electric-field (EF) effects have been studied on magnetic anisotropy in the metallic surfaces Pt/Fe/Pt(0 0 1) and Pd/Fe/Pd(0 0 1) by means of the first-principles electronic structure calculation which employs the generalized gradient approximation. The variation of anisotropy energy with respect to the EF is found to be opposite to each other. The modulus rate of the variation is larger by a few factors in the Pt substrate than in the Pd one. These results agree qualitatively well with the available experimental data. The electronic structures are presented and the origins in EF effects are discussed along a line of the second perturbative fashion.

  18. Kawasaki disease with G6PD deficiency--report of one case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Li-Yan; Yang, Kuender D; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2014-06-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis primarily affecting children who are younger than 5 years. The most serious complications are coronary artery aneurysms and sequelae of vasculitis with the subsequent development of coronary artery aneurysm. According to the literature, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) plus high-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) were standard treatment for KD, whereas low-dose aspirin (3-5 mg/kg/day) was used for thrombocytosis in KD via antiplatelet effect. However, aspirin has been reported to have hemolytic potential in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We report a child with G6PD-deficiency who has KD, and review the literature. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Hydrogen evolution on Au(111) covered with submonolayers of Pd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten; Karlberg, Gustav; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of electrochemical hydrogen evolution on Au(111) covered with submonolayers of Pd is presented. The size and shape of monoatomically high Pd islands formed on the Au(111) surface are determined using Monte Carlo simulations, for Pd coverages varying from 0.02 to 0.95 ML....... The energetics of adsorption and desorption of hydrogen on/from different types of sites on the Pd-Au(111) surface are assessed by means of density functional theory calculations combined with thermodynamic modeling. Based on the density functional and Monte Carlo data, the hydrogen evolution activity...... is evaluated with a micro-kinetic model. The analysis reproduces measured Pd-coverage-dependent activities for Pd submonolayers exceeding similar to 0.15 ML and enables the relative contributions from different types of electrocatalytically active sites to be determined. Finally, the implications of surface...

  20. Synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals via controlled overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byungkwon; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yu, Taekyung; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Rycenga, Matthew; Xia, Younan

    2010-03-03

    This paper describes the synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled morphologies via a one-step seeded-growth method. Two different reducing agents, namely, L-ascorbic acid and citric acid, were utilized for the reduction of HAuCl(4) in an aqueous solution to control the overgrowth of Au on cubic Pd seeds. When L-ascorbic acid was used as the reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of Au on the Pd nanocubes led to the formation of Pd-Au nanocrystals with a core-shell structure. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Au was observed when citric acid was used as the reducing agent, producing Pd-Au bimetallic dimers. Through this morphological control, we were able to tune the localized surface plasmon resonance peaks of Pd-Au bimetallic nanostructures in the visible region.

  1. Properties of Pd nanograins in C-Pd composite films obtained by PVD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozłowski M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Properties of palladium nanograins obtained by sedimentation of a soluted C-Pd film prepared by PVD method are presented. These properties were studied using SEM and TEM methods. Dissolved films were prepared by PVD method and after dissolving, they were fractionated to obtain different parts classified with palladium nanograins diameters. Several classes of diameters were determined: below 20 nm, between 20 and 100 nm and above 100 nm. The defects and triple junction were observed. Multishell carbonaceous structures were found in the big and medium size Pd nanograins.

  2. Neurological Complications Associated With Anti-Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Justin C; Liao, Bing; Markovic, Svetomir N; Klein, Christopher J; Naddaf, Elie; Staff, Nathan P; Liewluck, Teerin; Hammack, Julie E; Sandroni, Paola; Finnes, Heidi; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2017-10-01

    symptom severity varied from 1 day to more than 3 months. The median mRS score was 2.5 (range, 1-5), indicating mild to moderate disability. Five patients experienced other systemic immune-mediated complications, including hypothyroidism (n = 3), colitis (n = 2), and hepatitis (n = 1). Treatment with anti-PD-1 antibodies was discontinued in 7 patients. Treatment included corticosteroids (n = 7), intravenous immunoglobulin (n = 3), and plasma exchange (n = 1). Nine patients improved, with a median mRS score of 2 (range, 0-6). One patient with severe necrotizing myopathy died. Neurological adverse events associated with anti-PD-1 therapy have a diverse phenotype, with more frequent neuromuscular complications. Although rare, they will likely be encountered with increasing frequency as anti-PD-1 therapy expands to other cancers. The time of onset is unpredictable, and evolution may be rapid and life-threatening. Prompt recognition and discontinuation of anti-PD-1 therapy is recommended. In some cases, immune rescue treatment may be required.

  3. Young women with PD: a group work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, J; Moore, O; Tassa, D S; Ginzburg, K; Drory, M; Giladi, N

    2000-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) prior to the age of 40 affects between 5-10% of the PD population. The psychosocial changes that patients with early PD encounter, may be more devastating and disabling than the actual motor disability. The paper describes a unique experience in groupwork with young female PD patients treated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. The paper focuses on the special issues which characterized this group's experience: stigma, body and sexual image, and personality traits.

  4. Valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohani, H. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Goyal, R.; Awana, V.P.S. [National Physical Laboratory(CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sekhar, B.R., E-mail: sekhar@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • VB Photoemission study and DFT calculations on Pd based ternary superconductors are presented. • Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} shows a temperature dependent pseudogap. • VB spectral features of ternary superconductors are correlated to their structural geometry. - Abstract: We present a comparative study of the valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5}, Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}Te{sub 6} using experimental photoemission spectroscopy and density functional based theoretical calculations. We observe a qualitatively similarity between valence band (VB) spectra of Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6}. Further, we find a pseudogap feature in Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} at low temperature, unlike other two compounds. We have correlated the structural geometry with the differences in VB spectra of these compounds. The different atomic packing in these compounds could vary the strength of inter-orbital hybridization among various atoms which leads to difference in their electronic structure as clearly observed in our DOS calculations.

  5. Synthesis of Au-Pd Nanoflowers Through Nanocluster Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianguang [Duke University; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Wilson, Adria [Duke University; Rathmall, Aaron [Duke University; Wiley, Benjamin J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of Pd ions by hydroquinone in the presence of gold nanoparticles and polyvinylpyrrolidone resulted in the formation of nanoflowers with a Au core and Pd petals. Addition of HCl to the synthesis halted the reduction by hydroquinone and enabled the acquisition of snapshots of the nanoflowers at different stages of growth. TEM images of the reaction after 10 s show that the nanoflower morphology resulted from the homogeneous nucleation of Pd clusters in solution and their subsequent attachment to gold seeds coated with a thin (0.8 {+-} 0.1 nm) shell of Pd. UV-visible spectra also indicate Pd clusters formed in the early stages of the reaction and disappeared as the nanoflowers grew. The speed at which this reaction can be halted is useful not only for producing a variety of bimetallic nanostructures with precisely controlled dimensions and morphologies but also for understanding the growth mechanism of these structures. The ability of the AuPd core-shell structure to catalyze the Suzuki coupling reaction of iodobenzene to phenylboronic acid was probed and compared against the activity of Pd nanocubes and thin-shelled AuPd core-shell nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest that Suzuki coupling was not affected by the surface structure or subsurface composition of the nanoparticles, but instead was primarily catalyzed by molecular Pd species that leached from the nanostructures.

  6. Synthesis and Catalytic Properties of Au Pd Nanoflowers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianguang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University; Wilson, Adria [Duke University; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Wiley, Benjamin J [Duke University

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of Pd ions by hydroquinone in the presence of gold nanoparticles and polyvinylpyrrolidone resulted in the formation of nanoflowers with a Au core and Pd petals. Addition of HCl to the synthesis halted the reduction by hydroquinone and enabled the acquisition of snapshots of the nanoflowers at different stages of growth. TEM images of the reaction after 10 s show that the nanoflower morphology resulted from the homogeneous nucleation of Pd clusters in solution and their subsequent attachment to gold seeds coated with a thin (0.8 0.1 nm) shell of Pd. UV visible spectra also indicate Pd clusters formed in the early stages of the reaction and disappeared as the nanoflowers grew. The speed at which this reaction can be halted is useful not only for producing a variety of bimetallic nanostructures with precisely controlled dimensions and morphologies but also for understanding the growth mechanism of these structures. The ability of the AuPd core shell structure to catalyze the Suzuki coupling reaction of iodobenzene to phenylboronic acid was probed and compared against the activity of Pd nanocubes and thin-shelled AuPd core shell nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest that Suzuki coupling was not affected by the surface structure or subsurface composition of the nanoparticles, but instead was primarily catalyzed by molecular Pd species that leached from the nanostructures.

  7. Synthesis and catalytic properties of Au-Pd nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianguang; Wilson, Adria R; Rathmell, Aaron R; Howe, Jane; Chi, Miaofang; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2011-08-23

    Reduction of Pd ions by hydroquinone in the presence of gold nanoparticles and polyvinylpyrrolidone resulted in the formation of nanoflowers with a Au core and Pd petals. Addition of HCl to the synthesis halted the reduction by hydroquinone and enabled the acquisition of snapshots of the nanoflowers at different stages of growth. TEM images of the reaction after 10 s show that the nanoflower morphology resulted from the homogeneous nucleation of Pd clusters in solution and their subsequent attachment to gold seeds coated with a thin (0.8 ± 0.1 nm) shell of Pd. UV-visible spectra also indicate Pd clusters formed in the early stages of the reaction and disappeared as the nanoflowers grew. The speed at which this reaction can be halted is useful not only for producing a variety of bimetallic nanostructures with precisely controlled dimensions and morphologies but also for understanding the growth mechanism of these structures. The ability of the AuPd core-shell structure to catalyze the Suzuki coupling reaction of iodobenzene to phenylboronic acid was probed and compared against the activity of Pd nanocubes and thin-shelled AuPd core-shell nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest that Suzuki coupling was not affected by the surface structure or subsurface composition of the nanoparticles, but instead was primarily catalyzed by molecular Pd species that leached from the nanostructures. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. TRAC-PD2 analysis of FLECHT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, T.F.; Mandell, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes TRAC-PD2 calculations of FLECHT (Full Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer) tests 4831 and 17201. The calculations were performed as part of the TRAC-PD2 developmental assessment where the objective was to assess TRAC-PD2 reflood modeling under forced flooding conditions. Calculated and experimental values for peak fuel-rod clad temperature, clad quenching time, and rod bundle effluent rates are compared; and calculations with an approximate radiation heat-transfer model added to the basic TRAC-PD2 code are performed. Findings demonstrate the potential importance of surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer in these tests

  9. Experimental determination of dosimetric characterization of a newly designed encapsulated interstitial brachytherapy source of 103Pd-model Pd-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Ravinder; Yue Ning; Roa, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    A newly designed encapsulated 103 Pd source has been introduced (BrachySeed trade mark sign -Pd-103, also named Model Pd-1, manufactured by DRAXIMAGE Inc. and distributed by Cytogen Corp.) for interstitial brachytherapy to provide more isotropic dose distributions. In this work, the dosimetric characteristics of the 103 Pd source were measured with micro LiF TLD chips and dosimetry parameters were characterized based upon the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 formalism. The dose rate constant of the sources was determined to be 0.66±0.05 cGy h-1 U-1. The radial dose function was measured and was found to be similar to that of the Theragenics Model 200 103 Pd source. The anisotropy constant for the Model Pd-1 source was determined to be 1.03

  10. Size and alloying induced shift in core and valence bands of Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Govind

    2014-01-01

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been carried out on Pd, Ag, Cu, Pd-Ag, and Pd-Cu nanoparticles having identical sizes corresponding to mobility equivalent diameters of 60, 40, and 20 nm. The nanoparticles were prepared by the gas phase synthesis method. The effect of size on valence and core levels in metal and alloy nanoparticles has been studied by comparing the values to those with the 60 nm nanoparticles. The effect of alloying has been investigated by comparing the valence and core level binding energies of Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag alloy nanoparticles with the corresponding values for Pd, Ag, and Cu nanoparticles of identical sizes. These effects have been explained in terms of size induced lattice contractions, alloying induced charge transfer, and hybridization effects. The observation of alloying and size induced binding energy shifts in bimetallic nanoparticles is important from the point of view of hydrogen reactivity

  11. Sleep timing and child and parent outcomes in Australian 4-9-year-olds: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Jon; Price, Anna M H; Bittman, Michael; Hiscock, Harriet

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to use national Australian time-diary data to examine both (1) cross-sectionally and (2) longitudinally whether being late versus early to sleep or wake is associated with poorer child behavior, quality of life, learning, cognition and weight status, and parental mental health. Data from the first three waves of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children were taken. A national representative sample of 4983 4-5-year-olds, recruited in 2004 from the Australian Medicare database and followed up biennially, was taken; 3631 had analyzable sleep information and a concurrent measure of health and well-being for at least one wave. Parents completed 24-h child time-use diaries for one week and one weekend day at each wave. Using median splits, sleep timing was categorized into early-to-sleep/early-to-wake (EE), early-to-sleep/late-to-wake (EL), late-to-sleep/early-to-wake (LE), and late-to-sleep/late-to-wake (LL) at each wave. The outcomes included parent-reported child behavior, health-related quality of life, maternal/paternal mental health, teacher-reported child language, literacy, mathematical thinking, and approach to learning. The study assessed child body mass index and girth. (1) Using EE as the comparator, linear regression analyses revealed that being late-to-sleep was associated with poorer child quality of life from 6 to 9 years and maternal mental health at 6-7 years. There was inconsistent or no evidence for associations between sleep timing and all other outcomes. (2) Using the count of the number of times (waves) at which a child was categorized as late-to-sleep (range 0-3), longitudinal analyses demonstrated that there was a cumulative effect of late-to-sleep profiles on poorer child and maternal outcomes at the child age of 8-9 years. Examined cross-sectionally, sleep timing is a driver of children's quality of life and maternal depression. Examined longitudinally, there appears to be cumulative and adverse relationships

  12. Oral supplementation of vitamin E reduces osmotic fragility of RBC in hemolytic anemic patients with G6PD deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultana, N.; Begum, S.; Begum, N.; Ali, T.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin E has role in maintaining the integrity of red cell member by preventing oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, thus protects cells from oxidative stress-induced lysis in G6PD deficiency. Changes in osmotic fragility of RBC and some absolute values like MCV, MCH and MCHC may occur in haemolytic anaemic patients with G6PD deficiency. To observe the effects of vitamin E supplementation on these changes in order to evaluate the role of this anti-oxidant vitamin in reducing chronic haemolysis in G6PD deficient patients. A total number of 102 subjects with age ranged of 5 to 40 years of both sexes were included in the study. Among them 68 were G6PD enzyme deficient patients, of whom 34 were in supplemented group (experimental group) and 34 were in non-supplemented group (control group). The supplemented group received vitamin E supplementation for 60 consecutive days at a dose of 800 IU/day for adult and 400 IU/day for children ?12 years (in a divided dose, i.e., 4 times daily). Age and sex matched 34 apparently healthy subjects with normal blood G6PD level were taken to observe the base line data (healthy control) and also for comparison. All the G6PD deficient patients were selected from Out Patient Department (OPD) of Haematology, Banglabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2005 to June 2006 and all healthy subjects were selected from personal contact. Blood G6PD level, osmotic fragility of RBC were measured by standard techniques and MCV, MCH, and MCHC were obtained by calculation. All the parameters were measured on day 1 of their first visit and also were on day 60 in deficient group. Data were compared among the deficient groups, also in supplemented group just before and after supplementation. Analysis of data was done by appropriate statistical method. Mean starting and completing points of osmotic fragility of RBC were significantly higher but MCV. MCH, MCHC were significantly lower in patients suffering from

  13. The Emerging Role of PD-1/PD-L1-Targeting Immunotherapy in the Treatment of Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynn, Morgan E; DeRemer, David L

    2018-01-01

    To summarize and evaluate immunotherapy agents targeting programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) recently approved for the treatment of metastatic urothelial carcinomas (UC). A literature review was performed using PubMed (2012 to June 2017), the American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract databases (2012 to June 2017 Annual Meetings/symposia), and the America Association for Cancer Research symposia (2012 to June 2017). A search using clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify studies for atezolizumab, avelumab, durvalumab, nivolumab, and pembrolizumab. English language phase I to III studies assessing PD-1 and PD-L1 in UC were incorporated. Atezolizumab, avelumab, durvalumab, nivolumab, and pembrolizumab have demonstrated clinical efficacy with tolerable toxicities in patients with metastatic UC with disease progression following platinum-based chemotherapy. Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies may provide overall survival advantage; these are currently being evaluated in ongoing phase 3 studies. Greater objective response rates seem to be observed in PD-L1-positive patients versus PD-L1-negative patients, but methodologies in this assessment differ among clinical trials. The identification of biomarkers that provide greater insight into patients who positively respond to PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are needed. Treatment options for metastatic UC have expanded to include PD-1/PD-L1 therapies. These agents should be strongly considered as second-line therapy over single-agent chemotherapy for patients who fail or progress after platinum-based treatment.

  14. Structure characterization of Pd/Co/Pd tri-layer films epitaxially grown on MgO single-crystal substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobari, Kousuke, E-mail: tobari@futamoto.elect.chuo-u.ac.jp; Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nagano, Katsumasa; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2011-09-30

    Pd/Co/Pd tri-layer films were prepared on MgO substrates of (001), (111), and (011) orientations at room temperature by ultra high vacuum rf magnetron sputtering. The detailed film structures around the Co/Pd and the Pd/Co interfaces are investigated by reflection high energy electron diffraction. Pd layers of (001){sub fcc}, (111){sub fcc}, and (011){sub fcc} orientations epitaxially grow on the respective MgO substrates. Strained fcc-Co(001) single-crystal layers are formed on the Pd(001){sub fcc} layers by accommodating the fairly large lattice mismatch between the Co and the Pd layers. On the Co layers,, Pd polycrystalline layers are formed. When Co films are formed on the Pd(111){sub fcc} and the Pd(011){sub fcc} layers, atomic mixing is observed around the Co/Pd interfaces and fcc-CoPd alloy phases are coexisting with Co crystals. The Co crystals formed on the Pd(111){sub fcc} layers consist of hcp(0001) + fcc(111) and Pd(111){sub fcc} epitaxial layers are formed on the Co layers. Co crystals epitaxially grow on the Pd(011){sub fcc} layers with two variants, hcp(11-bar 00) and fcc(111). On the Co layers, Pd(011){sub fcc} epitaxial layers are formed.

  15. Expression of PD-L1 on canine tumor cells and enhancement of IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells by PD-L1 blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Maekawa

    Full Text Available Programmed death 1 (PD-1, an immunoinhibitory receptor, and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1, its ligand, together induce the "exhausted" status in antigen-specific lymphocytes and are thus involved in the immune evasion of tumor cells. In this study, canine PD-1 and PD-L1 were molecularly characterized, and their potential as therapeutic targets for canine tumors was discussed. The canine PD-1 and PD-L1 genes were conserved among canine breeds. Based on the sequence information obtained, the recombinant canine PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins were constructed; they were confirmed to bind each other. Antibovine PD-L1 monoclonal antibody effectively blocked the binding of recombinant PD-1 with PD-L1-expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner. Canine melanoma, mastocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, and other types of tumors examined expressed PD-L1, whereas some did not. Interestingly, anti-PD-L1 antibody treatment enhanced IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells. These results showed that the canine PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is also associated with T-cell exhaustion in canine tumors and that its blockade with antibody could be a new therapeutic strategy for canine tumors. Further investigations are needed to confirm the ability of anti-PD-L1 antibody to reactivate canine antitumor immunity in vivo, and its therapeutic potential has to be further discussed.

  16. Improved ethanol electrooxidation performance by shortening Pd-Ni active site distance in Pd-Ni-P nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Lu, Lilin; Zhu, Hengli; Chen, Yueguang; Huang, Yu; Li, Yadong; Wang, Leyu

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating oxophilic metals into noble metal-based catalysts represents an emerging strategy to improve the catalytic performance of electrocatalysts in fuel cells. However, effects of the distance between the noble metal and oxophilic metal active sites on the catalytic performance have rarely been investigated. Herein, we report on ultrasmall (~5 nm) Pd-Ni-P ternary nanoparticles for ethanol electrooxidation. The activity is improved up to 4.95 A per mgPd, which is 6.88 times higher than commercial Pd/C (0.72 A per mgPd), by shortening the distance between Pd and Ni active sites, achieved through shape transformation from Pd/Ni-P heterodimers into Pd-Ni-P nanoparticles and tuning the Ni/Pd atomic ratio to 1:1. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the improved activity and stability stems from the promoted production of free OH radicals (on Ni active sites) which facilitate the oxidative removal of carbonaceous poison and combination with CH3CO radicals on adjacent Pd active sites.

  17. Targeting immune co-stimulatory effects of PD-L1 and PD-L2 might represent an effective therapeutic strategy in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal eBodhankar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke outcome is worsened by the infiltration of inflammatory immune cells into ischemic brains. Our recent study demonstrated that PD-L1- and to a lesser extent PD-L2-deficient mice had smaller brain infarcts and fewer brain-infiltrating cells vs. WT mice, suggesting a pathogenic role for PD-Ligands in experimental stroke. We sought to ascertain PD-L1 and PD-L2-expressing cell types that affect T-cell activation, post-stroke in the context of other known co-stimulatory molecules. Thus, cells from male WT and PD-L-deficient mice undergoing 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO followed by 96h of reperfusion were treated with neutralizing antibodies to study co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory interactions between CD80, CTLA-4, PD-1 and PD-Ls that regulate CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell activation. We found that antibody neutralization of PD-1 and CTLA-4 signaling post-MCAO resulted in higher proliferation in WT CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells, confirming an inhibitory role of PD-1 and CTLA-4 on T-cell activation. Also, CD80/CD28 interactions played a prominent regulatory role for the CD8+ T-cells and the PD-1/PD-L2 interactions were dominant in controlling the CD4+ T-cell responses in WT mice after stroke. A suppressive phenotype in PD-L1-deficient mice was attributed to CD80/CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L2 interactions. PD-L2 was crucial in modulating CD4+ T-cell responses, whereas PD-L1 regulated both CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells. To establish the contribution of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on regulatory B-cells (Bregs, infarct volumes were evaluated in male PD-L1- and PD-L2-deficient mice receiving IL-10+ B-cells 4h post-MCAO. PD-L2- but not PD-L1-deficient recipients of IL-10+ B-cells had markedly reduced infarct volumes, indicating a regulatory role of PD-L2 on Bregs. These results imply that PD-L1 and PD-L2 differentially control induction of T- and Breg-cell responses after MCAO, thus suggesting that selective targeting of PD-L1 and PD-L2 might represent a valuable therapeutic

  18. `Pd20Sn13' revisited: crystal structure of Pd6.69Sn4.31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Klein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound was previously reported with composition `Pd20Sn13' [Sarah et al. (1981. Z. Metallkd, 72, 517–520]. For the original structure model, as determined from powder X-ray data, atomic coordinates from the isostructural compound Ni13Ga3Ge6 were transferred. The present structure determination, resulting in a composition Pd6.69Sn4.31, is based on single crystal X-ray data and includes anisotropic displacement parameters for all atoms as well as standard uncertainties for the atomic coordinates, leading to higher precision and accuracy for the structure model. Single crystals of the title compound were obtained via a solid-state reaction route, starting from the elements. The crystal structure can be derived from the AlB2 type of structure after removing one eighth of the atoms at the boron positions and shifting adjacent atoms in the same layer in the direction of the voids. One atomic site is partially occupied by both elements with a Pd:Sn ratio of 0.38 (3:0.62 (3. One Sn and three Pd atoms are located on special positions with site symmetry 2. (Wyckoff letter 3a and 3b.

  19. Movements in Parties: OccupyPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella della Porta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available When the United States activists called for people to Occupy#everywhere, it is unlikely they were thinking of the headquarters of the Italian centre-left party. Parties and movements are often considered to be worlds apart. In reality, parties have been relevant players in movement politics, and movements have influenced parties, often through the double militancy of many of their members. OccupyPD testifies to a continuous fluidity at the movement-party border, but also to a blockage in the party’s interactions with society that started long before the economic crisis but drastically accelerated with it. In this paper we present the OccupyPD Movement as a case of interaction between party politics and social movement politics, and in particular between the base membership of a centre-left party and the broader anti-austerity movement that diffused from the US to Europe adopting similar forms of actions and claims. Second, by locating it within the context of the economic and democratic crisis that erupted in 2007, we understand its emergence as a reaction towards politics in times of crisis of responsibility, by which we mean a drastic drop in the capacity of the government to respond to citizens’ requests. To fulfil this double aim, we bridge social movement studies with research on party change, institutional trust and democratic theory, looking at some political effects of the economic crisis in terms of a specific form of legitimacy crisis, as well as citizens’ responses to it, with a particular focus on the political meaning of recent anti-austerity protests. In this analysis, we refer to both quantitative and qualitative data from secondary liter-ature and original in-depth interviews carried out with a sample of OccupyPD activists.

  20. Health service costs and clinical gains of psychotherapy for personality disorders: a randomized controlled trial of day-hospital-based step-down treatment versus outpatient treatment at a specialist practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Day-hospital-based treatment programmes have been recommended for poorly functioning patients with personality disorders (PD). However, more research is needed to confirm the cost-effectiveness of such extensive programmes over other, presumably simpler, treatment formats. Methods This study compared health service costs and psychosocial functioning for PD patients randomly allocated to either a day-hospital-based treatment programme combining individual and group psychotherapy in a step-down format, or outpatient individual psychotherapy at a specialist practice. It included 107 PD patients, 46% of whom had borderline PD, and 40% of whom had avoidant PD. Costs included the two treatment conditions and additional primary and secondary in- and outpatient services. Psychosocial functioning was assessed using measures of global (observer-rated GAF) and occupational (self-report) functioning. Repeated assessments over three years were analysed using mixed models. Results The costs of step-down treatment were higher than those of outpatient treatment, but these high costs were compensated by considerably lower costs of other health services. However, costs and clinical gains depended on the type of PD. For borderline PD patients, cost-effectiveness did not differ by treatment condition. Health service costs declined during the trial, and functioning improved to mild impairment levels (GAF > 60). For avoidant PD patients, considerable adjuvant health services expanded the outpatient format. Clinical improvements were nevertheless superior to the step-down condition. Conclusion Our results indicate that decisions on treatment format should differentiate between PD types. For borderline PD patients, the costs and gains of step-down and outpatient treatment conditions did not differ. For avoidant PD patients, the outpatient format was a better alternative, leaning, however, on costly additional health services in the early phase of treatment. Trial

  1. Corrosion resistance of amorphous and crystalline Pd40Ni40P20 alloys in aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Y.F.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Chu, J.

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of amorphous and crystalline Pd40Ni40P20 alloys in various aqueous solutions are reported in this paper. The corrosion resistance of crystalline (annealed) Pd40Ni40P20 is better than that of amorphous Pd40Ni40P20 in various corrosive solutions, due to crystalline Pd40Ni40P20...... and mainly consists of inert Pd5P2, NI3P, Ni2Pd2P and noble Pd phases. These inert and noble properties result in a higher corrosion resistance in crystalline Pd40Ni40P20....

  2. Alloying Au surface with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Kun

    2016-03-30

    © 2016. Various Au-Pd/SiO2 catalysts with a fixed Au loading but different Au:Pd molar ratios were prepared via deposition-precipitation method followed by H2 reduction. The structures were characterized and the catalytic activities in CO oxidation were evaluated. The formation of Au-Pd alloy particles was identified. The Au-Pd alloy particles exhibit enhanced dispersions on SiO2 than Au particles. Charge transfer from Pd to Au within Au-Pd alloy particles. Isolated Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with large Au:Pd molar ratios while contiguous Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with small Au:Pd molar ratios. Few synergetic effect of Au-Pd alloy occurs on catalyzing CO oxidation under employed reaction conditions. Alloying Au with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation, and contiguous Pd atoms on the Au-Pd alloy particles are capable of catalyzing CO oxidation while isolated Pd atoms are not. These results advance the fundamental understandings of Au-Pd alloy surfaces in catalyzing CO oxidation.

  3. Day-to-day reliability of gait characteristics in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Nielsen, Louise R; Madsen, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    day-to-day reliability of the gait pattern parameters observed in rats during treadmill walking. The results of the present study may serve as a reference material that can help future intervention studies on rat gait characteristics both with respect to the selection of outcome measures...

  4. World Town Planning Day and GIS Day to be celebrated

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2003-01-01

    On Wednesday, Nov. 19, Montgomery County will unveil the county's new comprehensive plan during a joint celebration of the fifth anniversary of Geographic Information Systems Day and the 30th anniversary of World Town Planning Day. The event will feature programs by the Virginia Tech Center for Geospatial Information Technology (CGIT) and Virginia's Geospatial Extension Program (GEP).

  5. Inclusive and semi-inclusive distributions of neutral strange particles produced in π-p interactions at 4.9; 7.5 and 40 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhmukhadze, S.V.; Kladnitskaya, E.N.; Popova, V. M.; Toneeva, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    Results on the investigation of inclusive and semi-inclusive distributions of Λ and K 0 particles, produced in π - p interactions at 4.9, 7.5 and 40 GeV/c are presen--ted. It is shown that the inclusive cross section for production of Ksup(0) mesons increases with the energy mainly in the central region, while the inclusive production of Λ hyperons increases in the fragmentation region of the target proton. The normalized structure fucntion PHIsub(x) for K 0 mesons does not achieve the scaling in the considered energy range, while the function PHIsub(x) for Λ hyperons has the scaling behaviour in a wide range of x, -0.5 < x (<=) 0.1 starting from 4.9 GeV/c

  6. 5-Methyl-3,8-di-(2-amino-4-bromophenyl-4,9-dioxa-1,2,6,7-tetraaza-5λ5-phosphaspiro[4.4]nona-2,7-diene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Kasperowicz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-Methyl-3,8-di-(2-amino-4-bromophenyl-4,9-dioxa-1,2,6,7-tetraaza-5λ5-phosphaspiro[4.4]nona-2,7-diene was obtained by condensation of 2-amino-5-bromobenzohydrazide and methylphosphonyl dichloride in the presence of triethylamine. An initial biological screening was performed for the resulting product. The synthesized compound showed relatively strong cytotoxic activity, which was, however, similar for cancer and non-cancer cell lines.

  7. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  8. Phase transformations in the Cu.6 Pd.4 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imakuma, K.

    1977-01-01

    Order-disorder and structural transformations in the Cu-Pd 60-40% (Cu. 6 Pd. 4 ) alloy by means of a temperature and time dependent treatment are studied. The structural transformations by x-rays diffraction are also studied, where the bcc, fcc and tetragonal phases were observed. A qualitative analyze of the resistivity kinetics are made [pt

  9. Strong paramagnon scattering in single atom Pd contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schendel, V.; Barreteau, Cyrille; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Pd contacts shows a reduction with increasing bias, which gives rise to a peculiar Lambda-shaped spectrum. Supported by theoretical calculations, we correlate this finding with the lifetime of hot quasiparticles in Pd, which is strongly influenced by paramagnon scattering. In contrast to this, Co...

  10. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  11. Atomic Structure of Au−Pd Bimetallic Alloyed Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong; Fan, Fengru; Tian, Zhongqun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-01-01

    shell of the NPs was systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the NPs coated with a single atomic layer of Pd, the strain between the surface Pd layer and the Au core is released by Shockley partial dislocations

  12. Study of Pd-Au/MWCNTs formic acid electrooxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk, Anna; Borodzinski, Andrzej; Kedzierzawski, Piotr; Lesiak, Beata [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Stobinski, Leszek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Koever, Laszlo; Toth, Jozsef [Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P. O. Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lin, Hong-Ming [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, 40, Chungshan N. Rd., 3rd Sec, 104, Taipei (China)

    2010-12-15

    The Pd-Au multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) supported catalyst exhibits higher power density in direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) than similar Pd/MWCNTs catalyst. The Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst also exhibits higher activity and is more stable in electrooxidation reaction of formic acid during cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. After preparation by polyol method, the catalyst was subjected to two type of treatments: (I) annealing at 250 C in 100% of Ar, (II) reducing in 5% of H{sub 2} in Ar atmosphere at 200 C. It was observed that the catalyst after treatment I was completely inactive, whereas after treatment II exhibited high activity. In order to explain this effect the catalysts were characterized by electron spectroscopy methods. The higher initial catalytic activity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst than Pd/MWCNTs catalyst in reaction of formic acid electrooxidation was attributed to electronic effect of gold in Pd-Au solution, and larger content of small Au nanoparticles of 1 nm size. The catalytic inactivity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalysts annealed in argon is attributed to carbon amorphous overlayer covering of Pd oxide shell on the metallic nanoparticles. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a study of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase(G6PD) deficiency in sickle cell anaemia patients attending the haematology clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos- Nigeria. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency among the 130 sickle cell anaemia patients studied was found to be 18.5%. G6PD ...

  14. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd(0)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists, R F ... reactions are scalable to industrial production level and satisfy several 'Green ... Ph Br. H2C CH2. Pd(PPh3)4 or Pd(OAc2). HC CH2. Ph base, solvent, heat. 1. 2. 3. (1).

  15. Estimates of source parameters of M 4.9 M 4.9 M 4.9 Kharsali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    observed ones. It has been inferred that the Kharsali earthquake occurred due to a northerly ... with structural heterogeneities associated with causative fault to understand how seismogenesis is influenced by .... 240) and Taurus digital data acquisition system. ..... structural heterogeneity which can initiate the brittle failures.

  16. Ion beam induced effects on the ferromagnetism in Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Mehta, B. R.; Agarwal, D. C.; Agarwal, Kanika; Kumar, Praveen; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2012-01-01

    Present study demonstrates the role of metal-insulator interface and ion irradiation induced defects on the ferromagnetic properties of the non-magnetic materials. Magnetic properties of the Pd nanoparticles(NPs) embedded in the a-silica matrix synthesized using atom beam sputtering technique, were determined using SQUID magnetometry measurements which showed that ferromagnetic response of Pd increased by 3.5 times on swift heavy ion(SHI) irradiation. The ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited Pd NPs is due to strain induced by the surrounding matrix and modification in the electronic structure at the Pd-silica interface as revealed by insitu XRD and XPS investigations, respectively. The defects created by the SHI bombardment are responsible for enhancement of the magnetization in the Pd NPs.

  17. Hydrogen Storage Performance in Pd/Graphene Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2016-10-05

    We have developed a Pd-graphene nanocomposite for hydrogen storage. The spherically shaped Pd nanoparticles of 5-45 nm in size are homogeneously distributed over the graphene matrix. This new hydrogen storage system has favorable features like desirable hydrogen storage capacity, ambient conditions of hydrogen uptake, and low temperature of hydrogen release. At a hydrogen charging pressure of 50 bar, the material could yield a gravimetric density of 6.7 wt % in the 1% Pd/graphene nanocomposite. As we increased the applied pressure to 60 bar, the hydrogen uptake capacity reached 8.67 wt % in the 1% Pd/graphene nanocomposite and 7.16 wt % in the 5% Pd/graphene nanocomposite. This system allows storage of hydrogen in amounts that exceed the capacity of the gravimetric target announced by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. Ion beam mixing in Ag-Pd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatt, J.L.; Averback, R.S.; Peak, D.

    1989-01-01

    Ion beam mixing during 750 keV Kr + irradiation at 80 K was measured on a series of Ag-Pd alloys using Au marker atoms. The mixing in pure Ag was the greatest and it decreased monotonically with increasing Pd content, being a factor of 10 higher in pure Ag than in pure Pd. This large difference in mixing cannot be explained by the difference in cohesion energy between Ag and Pd in the thermodynamic model of ion beam mixing proposed by Johnson et al. [W. L. Johnson, Y. T. Cheng, M. Van Rossum, and M-A. Nicolet, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 7/8, 657 (1985)]. An alternative model based on local melting in the cascade is shown to account for the ion beam mixing results in Ag and Pd

  19. Pd nanowire arrays as electrocatalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong; Cheng, Faliang [Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan 523106 (China); Xu, Changwei; Jiang, Sanping [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2007-05-15

    Highly ordered Pd nanowire arrays were prepared by template-electrodeposition method using anodic aluminum oxide template. The Pd nanowire arrays, in this paper, have high electrochemical active surface and show excellent catalytic properties for ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline media. The activity of Pd nanowire arrays for ethanol oxidation is not only higher that of Pd film, but also higher than that of commercial E-TEK PtRu(2:1 by weight)/C. The micrometer sized pores and channels in nanowire arrays act as structure units. They make liquid fuel diffuse into and products diffuse out of the catalysts layer much easier, therefore, the utilization efficiency of catalysts gets higher. Pd nanowire arrays are stable catalysts for ethanol oxidation. The nanowire arrays may be a great potential in direct ethanol fuel cells and ethanol sensors. (author)

  20. Montessori All Day, All Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Connie; Davis, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Introducing real community into the Children's House goes back to the roots of Montessori education through all-day Montessori. The all-day environment is a house where children live with a "developmental room" of Montessori materials including a living room, kitchen, dining area, bedroom, bathroom, greeting rooms, and outdoor spaces.…

  1. Green accounts & day high schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1997-01-01

    The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools.......The arcticle presents the concept of green accounts and describes how it can be used in the daily work and the teaching at day high schools....

  2. Production of Pd 103 seed from Rh targets for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afarideh, H.; Ardaneh, K.; Sadeghi, M.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of a given radionuclide for brachytherapy is determined by its half-life, the type of energy, and abundance (number per decay) of its emission. The half-life of a radionuclide must be long enough to permit shipping and implant preparation with an acceptable loss of source strength due to decay, but it must also be short enough to permit source sizes sufficiently small for the intended application. Pd-103 is a low energy photon emitter available for permanent interstitial implantation. Pd-103 has energy and safety characteristics similar to I-125, but its initial peripheral dose rate is approximately three times greater. This may provide improved control of rapidly proliferating tumours. Although Pd-103 has been used for various kinds of cancers, it is almost exclusively used for prostate cancer, the most common cancer, and the death rate from this cancer is the highest. There are two cyclotron production routes for Pd-103, Ag (p,xn) 103 Pd and Rh (p,n) 103 Pd. For a cyclotron with low energy (such as 30Mev that we have in Iran, Karaj, NRCAM) only Rh target can be used. The target material should be deposited on a special designed Cu substrate and the separation process should isolate the desired radionuclide from target material as well as Cu. Our work plan for production of Pd 103 in Karaj, Iran, is as follows: In the first year of the CRP we are going to complete the literature survey of Pd production and perform the relevant experiments as described later. In the second year of the CRP we will construct suitable hot cells for Pd production and also do research for development of Pd seeds. In the last year of the CRP we are going to finalise all the work done during the last two years and propose the automation system for routine production

  3. Enhancement in anomalous Hall resistivity of Co/Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy by Ga+ ion irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing; Mi, Wenbo; Li, Jingqi; Cheng, Yingchun; Zhang, Xixiang

    2014-01-01

    /Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy have been observed after irradiations at doses of 2.4 × 1015 and 3.3×10 15 ions/cm2, respectively. Skew scattering and side jump contributions to AHE have been analyzed based on the scaling relationship ρAH = aρxx + bρ2xx. For the Co

  4. Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts for the alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pd-Ni and Pd-Ru-Ni nanocatalysts were prepared by the chemical reduction method, using sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol mixture as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium...

  5. Promotion of Phenol Photodecomposition over TiO2 Using Au, Pd, and AuPd Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Ren; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; He, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Pd, AuPd alloys) with a narrow size distribution supported on nanocrystalline TiO2 (M/TiO2) have been synthesized via a sol-immobilization route. The effect of metal identity and size on the photocatalytic performance of M/TiO2 has been systematically investigated u...

  6. Carbon supported Pd-Sn and Pd-Ru-Sn nanocatalysts for ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pd-Sn and Pd-Ru-Sn nanocatalysts were prepared by the chemical reduction method, using sodium borohydride and ethylene glycol mixture as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium...

  7. The advantages of PD1 activating chimeric receptor (PD1-ACR) engineered lymphocytes for PDL1(+) cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Li, Qingguo; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zheng, Donghui; Dai, Jingjing; Ni, Wenxuan; Wei, Jia; Xue, Yubao; Chen, Ke; Hou, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Xiaojun; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Tumors exploit immunoregulatory checkpoints to attenuate T cell responses as a means of circumventing immunologic rejection. By activating the inhibitory costimulatory pathway of Programmed Death 1 (PD1)/PDL1 which provides tumor cells an escape mechanism from immune surveillance, Programmed Death Ligand1 (PDL1)(+) tumors hamper activated tumor-specific T cell functions and render them functionally exhausted. To overcome the inhibitory costimulatory effects of PDL1 on the adoptively transferred T cells, we sought to convert PD1 to a T cell costimulatory receptor by exchanging its transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail with CD28 and 4-1BB signaling domains (PD1-CD28-4-1BB, PD1-ACR), anticipating the genetically modified effector T lymphocytes expressing PD1-ACR would exhibit enhanced functional attributes. And the results showed that PD1-ACR expressed T cells retained the ability to bind PDL1, resulting in T cell activation as evidenced by the elevated activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), the augmentation of cytokine secretion and the increased proliferative capacity. Moreover, when systemically administered in the mouse model of glioblastoma metastases, PD1-ACR T cells localized at the area of U87 invasive tumor, which results in suppressed tumor growth and enhanced survival of mice with established U87 glioblastoma. Together, these data demonstrated that PD1-ACR has a high potential to serve as a novel strategy to overcome PDL1 mediated immunosuppression of T cells for cancer therapy.

  8. Supported Pd nanoclusters for the hydrogen mitigation application in severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Zhengfeng; Zhu, Hongzhi; Zhang, Zhi; Zheng, Zhenghua [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621700 (China); Ma, Guohua [University of Science and Technology of Southwest, Mianyang 621010 (China); Lai, Xinchun; Li, Rong; Tang, Tao; Fu, Jun [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621700 (China); Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaobo@caep.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621700 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Pd catalysts were prepared by electroless deposition path with no extra reduction agents. • The Pd catalysts not only have good hydrogen-oxygen recombination efficiency, but also have good stability. • The catalysts were proved to have good resistance to poisoning. • Pd catalysts could be supposed to be used for PARs in severe accidents. - Abstract: Accidents at TMI, USA and Fukushima, Japan have emphasized the need for hydrogen mitigation during nuclear plant accidental conditions, especially during severe accidents which will be no power, massive hydrogen, high temperature, long-term operation, and poisoning environment. Passive autocatalytic recombiners with catalyst sheets are the promising way to deal with the situation in severe accidents. Here we report a new kind of catalyst sheets based on stainless steel supported Pd nanoclusters prepared by electroless deposition route. The catalyst sheets were characterised for morphology and composition of surface by SEM and EDS. The catalytic activity of the catalyst sheets has been evaluated under the conditions of higher temperature, long-term operation and poisoning environments. The catalyst sheets showed high activity and good stability either operating above 500 °C for 24 h or continuous operating for 25 days. For the obtained catalyst sheets after exposed to methanal, iodine vapor and BaSO{sub 4} aerosol respectively with corresponding concentrations higher than SA conditions, the start-up time for H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} recombination reaction was less than 1 min and the catalytic efficiency was more than 90%. These results indicate the potential application of this type of catalyst sheets for hydrogen mitigation in severe accidents.

  9. Evaluation of PD/PID controller for insulin control on blood glucose regulation in a Type-I diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Farhanahani; Isse, Nadir Hussien; Daud, Nur Atikah Mohd; Morsin, Marlia

    2017-01-01

    This project introduces a simulation of Proportional-Derivative (PD) and Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller based on a virtual Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) patient: Hovorka diabetic model using MATLAB-Simulink software. The results of these simulations are based on three tuning responses for each controller which are fast, slow and oscillation responses. The main purpose of this simulation is to achieve an acceptable stability and fastness response towards the regulation of glucose concentration using PD and PID controller response with insulin infusion rate. Therefore, in order to analyze and compare the responses of both controller performances, one-day simulations of the insulin-glucose dynamic have been conducted using a typical day meal plan that contains five meals of different bolus size. It is found that the PID closed-loop control with a short rise time is required to retrieve a satisfactory glucose regulation.

  10. Targeting PD-1/PD-L1 in lung cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Cao M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available María González-Cao,1 Niki Karachaliou,1 Santiago Viteri,1 Daniela Morales-Espinosa,1 Cristina Teixidó,2 Jesús Sánchez Ruiz,3 Miquel Ángel Molina-Vila,2 Mariacarmela Santarpia,4 Rafael Rosell1,2,5,61Translational Cancer Research Unit, Instituto Oncológico Dr Rosell, Quirón Dexeus University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Pangaea Biotech SL, Barcelona, Spain; 3Centro Nacional de Investigación Oncología (CNIO, Madrid, Spain; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Human Pathology Department, University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 5Cancer Biology and Precision Medicine Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Germans Trias i Pujol Health Sciences Institute and Hospital, Campus Can Ruti, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 6Fundación Molecular Oncology Research, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Increased understanding of tumor immunology has led to the development of effective immunotherapy treatments. One of the most important advances in this field has been due to pharmacological design of antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibitors. Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies are currently in advanced phases of clinical development for several tumors, including lung cancer. Results from Phase I–III trials with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in non-small-cell lung cancer have demonstrated response rates of around 20% (range, 16%–50%. More importantly, responses are long-lasting (median duration of response, 18 months and fast (50% of responses are detected at time of first tumor evaluation with very low grade 3–4 toxicity (less than 5%. Recently, the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA breakthrough therapy designation for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer, supported by data from a Phase Ib trial. Another anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, has also been approved for lung cancer based on survival advantage demonstrated in recently released data from a Phase III trial in squamous cell lung cancer.Keywords: immunotherapy, immunoncology

  11. Procedures and practices for day-to-day operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distler, K.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture deals with problems of safe plant operation under day-to-day conditions. Operation, maintenance and surveillance have to be organized in a preventive manner. It will be shown that nearly all expected jobs and proceedings can be done rule-based. The connection of documentation and work preparation will be lined out. Moreover, the need for control and quality assurance for nearly all proceedings will be pointed out. The question of communication and scheduling will be touched. (orig.)

  12. Synthesis of bimetallic Pt-Pd core-shell nanocrystals and their high electrocatalytic activity modulated by Pd shell thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujing; Wang, Zhi Wei; Chiu, Chin-Yi; Ruan, Lingyan; Yang, Wenbing; Yang, Yang; Palmer, Richard E.; Huang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Bimetallic Pt-Pd core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) are synthesized through a two-step process with controlled Pd thickness from sub-monolayer to multiple atomic layers. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and methanol oxidation reactivity of the core-shell NCs for fuel cell applications in alkaline solution are systematically studied and compared based on different Pd thickness. It is found that the Pd shell helps to reduce the over-potential of ORR by up to 50mV when compared to commercial Pd black, while generating up to 3-fold higher kinetic current density. The carbon monoxide poisoning test shows that the bimetallic NCs are more resistant to the CO poisoning than Pt NCs and Pt black. It is also demonstrated that the bimetallic Pt-Pd core-shell NCs can enhance the current density of the methanol oxidation reaction, lowering the over-potential by 35 mV with respect to the Pt core NCs. Further investigation reveals that the Pd/Pt ratio of 1/3, which corresponds to nearly monolayer Pd deposition on Pt core NCs, gives the highest oxidation current density and lowest over-potential. This study shows for the first time the systematic investigation of effects of Pd atomic shells on Pt-Pd bimetallic nanocatalysts, providing valuable guidelines for designing high-performance catalysts for fuel cell applications.Bimetallic Pt-Pd core-shell nanocrystals (NCs) are synthesized through a two-step process with controlled Pd thickness from sub-monolayer to multiple atomic layers. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and methanol oxidation reactivity of the core-shell NCs for fuel cell applications in alkaline solution are systematically studied and compared based on different Pd thickness. It is found that the Pd shell helps to reduce the over-potential of ORR by up to 50mV when compared to commercial Pd black, while generating up to 3-fold higher kinetic current density. The carbon monoxide poisoning test shows that the bimetallic NCs are more

  13. Study on interstitial brachytherapy using 103Pd seeds on tumor-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Huiru; Zhang Jingming; Tian Jiahe; Ding Weimin; Bai Hongsheng; Jin Xiaohai

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low-dose-rate brachytherapy are investigated in tumor-bearing rat. Walker 256 cells are transplanted subcutaneously with a trocar in the left leg of rats (Wistar). Two weeks later, rats with a tumor of 10 mm in mean diameter are divided into three groups (10 per group). Two groups are given 1 seed and 2 seeds implantation of 103 Pd, respectively, the third group is as an untreated control. Tumor size is measured twice a week until the 25th day when the rats are killed. Tumor is monitored either by palpation or further confirmed by histopathology. Kaplan-Meier statistic method is performed for survival analysis. The results show that the average weight of rats in untreated group is lower than in radiation groups (P 0.05). Tumor volumes in all treatment groups increase more obviously than in control till 16 days post-implantation. Tumor regression rate in 1 seed group is higher than in control group and in 2 seeds group. Although survival analysis show that the median survival time in 1 seed, 2 seeds and control groups are 24±0, 21±2 and 19±2 days with survival rate of 80%, 60% and 50% respectively, no significant differences are seen in all groups. So, brachytherapy with 103 Pd seed is effective on tumor-bearing rats. The implantation of seed can cause tumor edema in a self-limited way. A reasonable doses chosen for brachytherapy may play a role in treatment success

  14. 11 CFR 4.9 - Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commission will notify the requestor of the likely cost and, where the requestor has a history of prompt... FOIA fee payment history, the Commission will require an advance payment of an amount up to the full estimated charges; or (2) A requestor has previously failed to pay a fee in a timely fashion (i.e., within...

  15. Colloidal lithography nanostructured Pd/PdO x core–shell sensor for ppb level H2S detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Samatha; Lumdee, Chatdanai; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Anand, Srinivasan; Bhat, Navakanta

    2018-06-01

    In this work we report on plasma oxidation of palladium (Pd) to form reliable palladium/palladium oxide (Pd/PdO x ) core–shell sensor for ppb level H2S detection and its performance improvement through nanostructuring using hole-mask colloidal lithography (HCL). The plasma oxidation parameters and the sensor operating conditions are optimized to arrive at a sensor device with high sensitivity and repeatable response for H2S. The plasma oxidized palladium/palladium oxide sensor shows a response of 43.1% at 3 ppm H2S at the optimum operating temperature of 200 °C with response and recovery times of 24 s and 155 s, respectively. The limit of detection (LoD) of the plasma oxidised beam is 10 ppb. We further integrate HCL, a bottom-up and cost-effective process, to create nanodiscs of fixed diameter of 100 nm and varying heights (10, 15 and 20 nm) on 10 nm thin Pd beam which is subsequently plasma oxidized to improve the H2S sensing characteristics. The nanostructured Pd/PdO x sensor with nanodiscs of 100 nm diameter and 10 nm height shows an enhancement in sensing performance by 11.8% at same operating temperature and gas concentration. This nanostructured sensor also shows faster response and recovery times (15 s and 100 s, respectively) compared to the unstructured Pd/PdO x counterpart together with an experimental LoD of 10 ppb and the estimated limit going all the way down to 2 ppb. Material characterization of the fabricated Pd/PdO x sensors is done using UV–vis spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

  16. Tackling Cancer Resistance by Immunotherapy: Updated Clinical Impact and Safety of PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifaa M. Abdin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy has been constantly evolving with the hope of finding the most effective agents with the least toxic effects to eradicate tumors. Cancer immunotherapy is currently among the most promising options, fulfilling this hope in a wide range of tumors. Immunotherapy aims to activate immunity to fight cancer in a very specific and targeted manner; however, some abnormal immune reactions known as immune-related adverse events (IRAEs might occur. Therefore, many researchers are aiming to define the most proper protocols for managing these complications without interfering with the anticancer effect. One of these targeted approaches is the inhibition of the interaction between the checkpoint protein, programmed death-receptor 1 (PD-1, and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1, via a class of antibodies known as PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. These antibodies achieved prodigious success in a wide range of malignancies, including those where optimal treatment is not yet fully identified. In this review, we have critically explored and discussed the outcome of the latest PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitor studies in different malignancies compared to standard chemotherapeutic alternatives with a special focus on the clinical efficacy and safety. The approval of the clinical applications of nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, avelumab, and durvalumab in the last few years clearly highlights the hopeful future of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for cancer patients. These promising results of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors have encouraged many ongoing preclinical and clinical trials to explore the extent of antitumor activity, clinical efficacy and safety as well as to extend their applications.

  17. Tackling Cancer Resistance by Immunotherapy: Updated Clinical Impact and Safety of PD-1/PD-L1 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdin, Shifaa M; Zaher, Dana M; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Omar, Hany A

    2018-01-25

    Cancer therapy has been constantly evolving with the hope of finding the most effective agents with the least toxic effects to eradicate tumors. Cancer immunotherapy is currently among the most promising options, fulfilling this hope in a wide range of tumors. Immunotherapy aims to activate immunity to fight cancer in a very specific and targeted manner; however, some abnormal immune reactions known as immune-related adverse events (IRAEs) might occur. Therefore, many researchers are aiming to define the most proper protocols for managing these complications without interfering with the anticancer effect. One of these targeted approaches is the inhibition of the interaction between the checkpoint protein, programmed death-receptor 1 (PD-1), and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), via a class of antibodies known as PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors. These antibodies achieved prodigious success in a wide range of malignancies, including those where optimal treatment is not yet fully identified. In this review, we have critically explored and discussed the outcome of the latest PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitor studies in different malignancies compared to standard chemotherapeutic alternatives with a special focus on the clinical efficacy and safety. The approval of the clinical applications of nivolumab, pembrolizumab, atezolizumab, avelumab, and durvalumab in the last few years clearly highlights the hopeful future of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for cancer patients. These promising results of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors have encouraged many ongoing preclinical and clinical trials to explore the extent of antitumor activity, clinical efficacy and safety as well as to extend their applications.

  18. Targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 Immune Evasion Axis With DNA Aptamers as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Disseminated Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodeus, Aaron; Abdul-Wahid, Aws; Fischer, Nicholas W; Huang, Eric H-B; Cydzik, Marzena; Gariépy, Jean

    2015-04-28

    Blocking the immunoinhibitory PD-1:PD-L1 pathway using monoclonal antibodies has led to dramatic clinical responses by reversing tumor immune evasion and provoking robust and durable antitumor responses. Anti-PD-1 antibodies have now been approved for the treatment of melanoma, and are being clinically tested in a number of other tumor types as both a monotherapy and as part of combination regimens. Here, we report the development of DNA aptamers as synthetic, nonimmunogenic antibody mimics, which bind specifically to the murine extracellular domain of PD-1 and block the PD-1:PD-L1 interaction. One such aptamer, MP7, functionally inhibits the PD-L1-mediated suppression of IL-2 secretion in primary T-cells. A PEGylated form of MP7 retains the ability to block the PD-1:PD-L1 interaction, and significantly suppresses the growth of PD-L1+ colon carcinoma cells in vivo with a potency equivalent to an antagonistic anti-PD-1 antibody. Importantly, the anti-PD-1 DNA aptamer treatment was not associated with off-target TLR-9-related immune responses. Due to the inherent advantages of aptamers including their lack of immunogenicity, low cost, long shelf life, and ease of synthesis, PD-1 antagonistic aptamers may represent an attractive alternative over antibody-based anti PD-1 therapeutics.

  19. Targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 Immune Evasion Axis With DNA Aptamers as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Disseminated Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Prodeus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blocking the immunoinhibitory PD-1:PD-L1 pathway using monoclonal antibodies has led to dramatic clinical responses by reversing tumor immune evasion and provoking robust and durable antitumor responses. Anti-PD-1 antibodies have now been approved for the treatment of melanoma, and are being clinically tested in a number of other tumor types as both a monotherapy and as part of combination regimens. Here, we report the development of DNA aptamers as synthetic, nonimmunogenic antibody mimics, which bind specifically to the murine extracellular domain of PD-1 and block the PD-1:PD-L1 interaction. One such aptamer, MP7, functionally inhibits the PD-L1-mediated suppression of IL-2 secretion in primary T-cells. A PEGylated form of MP7 retains the ability to block the PD-1:PD-L1 interaction, and significantly suppresses the growth of PD-L1+ colon carcinoma cells in vivo with a potency equivalent to an antagonistic anti-PD-1 antibody. Importantly, the anti-PD-1 DNA aptamer treatment was not associated with off-target TLR-9-related immune responses. Due to the inherent advantages of aptamers including their lack of immunogenicity, low cost, long shelf life, and ease of synthesis, PD-1 antagonistic aptamers may represent an attractive alternative over antibody-based anti PD-1 therapeutics.

  20. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  1. Electrochemical gene sensor for Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA using dual signal amplification via a Pt-Pd nanowire and horse radish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Linlin; Xiang, Guiming; Jiang, Dongneng; Du, Chunlan; Liu, Chang; Huang, Weiwei; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    A dually amplified DNA biosensor was constructed for the determination of the DNA of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneu). A gold electrode was modified with 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA; a π-stacking perylene semiconductor dye with outstanding electronic and optical properties), a layer of gold nanoparticles (nano-Au), and capture DNA. Pt-Pd nanowires served as carriers for the co immobilization of complementary probe (CP2) and the mediator thionine (Thi). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) acted as a blocking reagent and signal enhancer. Following base pairing, the modified Pt-Pd nanowires were captured on the surface of the gold electrode. After addition of H 2 O 2 , the Pt-Pd nanowires and HRP both catalyzed the reduction of H 2 O 2 and promoted the electron transfer via the mediator Thi, resulting in an amplified electrochemical signal. The electrical signal, best measured at a working voltage of −200 mV (vs a SCE), is logarithmically related to the concentration of the M. pneu DNA in the 0.1 pM to 20 nM concentration range, and the detection limit (at an S/N ratio of 3) is 0.03 pM. The assay is robust, sensitive and specific. Conceivably, it is a cost-effective alternative to the established PCR method for the detection of M. pneu in clinical samples. (author)

  2. The interaction of deuterium with AgPd/Pd(111) surface alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diemant, Thomas; Martin, Jan; Behm, R. Juergen [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    AgPd/Pd(111) surface alloys, which consist of a reactive and an inert metal, represent an ideal test case for the study of ensemble effects on bimetallic surfaces. In the present contribution, we have studied their deuterium adsorption properties by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements. The structural properties (surface contents and atom distribution) were determined already earlier by high-resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), which enables us to correlate the structural properties of these surface alloys to their adsorption behaviour. Most prominently, a steady decrease of the adsorbate coverage with increasing Ag content is observed. The results will be compared to findings on the interaction of CO with these surface alloys.

  3. PD-1 and PD-L1 as emerging therapeutic targets in gastric cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phu N Tran,1* Sarmen Sarkissian,1* Joseph Chao,2 Samuel J Klempner3,4 1Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of California Irvine, Orange, 2Department of Medical Oncology and Developmental Therapeutics, City of Hope, Duarte, 3Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 4The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gastric adenocarcinoma is a leading cause of global cancer-related morbidity and mortality, and new therapeutic approaches are needed. Despite the improved outcomes with monoclonal antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, durable responses are uncommon. Targeting immune checkpoints including PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 have led to improved survival across several tumor types, frequently characterized by prolonged benefit in responding patients. Tumoral and lymphocyte-derived immunohistochemical staining for PD-1, PD-L1, and tumor mutational burden have shown potential as predictive response biomarkers in several tumor types. Optimal incorporation of immune-mediated therapies into gastric cancer (GC is an area of intense ongoing investigation and benefit has been demonstrated in smaller studies of advanced patients. Important questions of biomarker selection, roles for molecular characterization, optimal combinatorial approaches, and therapeutic sequencing remain. In this study, current data are reviewed for immune checkpoint inhibitors in GC, and putative biomarkers, ongoing trials, and future considerations are discussed. Keywords: immunotherapy, stomach cancer, checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, tumor mutational burden

  4. Effects of atomic and magnetic order on electronic transport in Pd-richPd-Fe alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Khmelevskyi, S.; Turek, Ilja

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 21 (2011), "214436-1"-"214436-8" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1228 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : residual resistivity * anisotropic magnetoresistance * anomalous Hall effect * PdFe-alloys * spin-orbit coupling * theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011

  5. Facile and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted synthesis of Pd-Ni magnetic nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez de Yuso, Alicia; Le Meins, Jean-Marc; Oumellal, Yassine; Paul-Boncour, Valérie; Zlotea, Claudia; Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    An easy and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted soft-template synthesis method for the preparation of Pd-Ni nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbon is reported. This approach allows the formation of mesoporous carbon and the growth of the particles at the same time, under short microwave irradiation (4 h) compared to the several days spent for the classical approach. In addition, the synthesis steps are diminished and no thermopolymerization step or reduction treatment being required. The influence of the Pd-Ni composition on the particle size and on the carbon characteristics was investigated. Pd-Ni solid solutions in the whole composition range could be obtained, and the metallic composition proved to have an important effect on the nanoparticle size but low influence on carbon textural properties. Small and uniformly distributed nanoparticles were confined in mesoporous carbon with uniform pore size distribution, and dependence between the nanoparticle size and the nanoalloy composition was observed, i.e., increase of the particle size with increasing the Ni content (from 5 to 14 nm). The magnetic properties of the materials showed a strong nanoparticle size and/or composition effect. The blocking temperature of Pd-Ni nanoalloys increases with the increase of Ni amount and therefore of particle size. The magnetization values are smaller than the bulk counterpart particularly for the Ni-rich compositions due to the formed graphitic shells surrounding the particles inducing a dead magnetic layer.

  6. Facile and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted synthesis of Pd-Ni magnetic nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Yuso, Alicia; Le Meins, Jean-Marc; Oumellal, Yassine; Paul-Boncour, Valérie; Zlotea, Claudia; Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia

    2016-12-01

    An easy and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted soft-template synthesis method for the preparation of Pd-Ni nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbon is reported. This approach allows the formation of mesoporous carbon and the growth of the particles at the same time, under short microwave irradiation (4 h) compared to the several days spent for the classical approach. In addition, the synthesis steps are diminished and no thermopolymerization step or reduction treatment being required. The influence of the Pd-Ni composition on the particle size and on the carbon characteristics was investigated. Pd-Ni solid solutions in the whole composition range could be obtained, and the metallic composition proved to have an important effect on the nanoparticle size but low influence on carbon textural properties. Small and uniformly distributed nanoparticles were confined in mesoporous carbon with uniform pore size distribution, and dependence between the nanoparticle size and the nanoalloy composition was observed, i.e., increase of the particle size with increasing the Ni content (from 5 to 14 nm). The magnetic properties of the materials showed a strong nanoparticle size and/or composition effect. The blocking temperature of Pd-Ni nanoalloys increases with the increase of Ni amount and therefore of particle size. The magnetization values are smaller than the bulk counterpart particularly for the Ni-rich compositions due to the formed graphitic shells surrounding the particles inducing a dead magnetic layer.

  7. Facile and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted synthesis of Pd-Ni magnetic nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Yuso, Alicia; Le Meins, Jean-Marc [Université de Strasbourg, Université de Haute-Alsace, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, CNRS UMR (France); Oumellal, Yassine; Paul-Boncour, Valérie; Zlotea, Claudia [Institut de Chimie et des Matériaux Paris Est, UMR 7182, CNRS-UPEC (France); Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia, E-mail: camelia.ghimbeu@uha.fr [Université de Strasbourg, Université de Haute-Alsace, Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, CNRS UMR (France)

    2016-12-15

    An easy and rapid one-pot microwave-assisted soft-template synthesis method for the preparation of Pd-Ni nanoalloys confined in mesoporous carbon is reported. This approach allows the formation of mesoporous carbon and the growth of the particles at the same time, under short microwave irradiation (4 h) compared to the several days spent for the classical approach. In addition, the synthesis steps are diminished and no thermopolymerization step or reduction treatment being required. The influence of the Pd-Ni composition on the particle size and on the carbon characteristics was investigated. Pd-Ni solid solutions in the whole composition range could be obtained, and the metallic composition proved to have an important effect on the nanoparticle size but low influence on carbon textural properties. Small and uniformly distributed nanoparticles were confined in mesoporous carbon with uniform pore size distribution, and dependence between the nanoparticle size and the nanoalloy composition was observed, i.e., increase of the particle size with increasing the Ni content (from 5 to 14 nm). The magnetic properties of the materials showed a strong nanoparticle size and/or composition effect. The blocking temperature of Pd-Ni nanoalloys increases with the increase of Ni amount and therefore of particle size. The magnetization values are smaller than the bulk counterpart particularly for the Ni-rich compositions due to the formed graphitic shells surrounding the particles inducing a dead magnetic layer.

  8. Police Incident Blotter (30 Day)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The 30 Day Police Blotter contains the most recent initial crime incident data, updated on a nightly basis. All data is reported at the block/intersection level,...

  9. Summary of the Day (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Summary of the Day data file contains daily selected elements of observations recorded by certified observers. The stations were located in the U.S. and were...

  10. French days on stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These first French days on stable isotopes took place in parallel with the 1. French days of environmental chemistry. Both conferences had common plenary sessions. The conference covers all aspects of the use of stable isotopes in the following domains: medicine, biology, environment, tracer techniques, agronomy, food industry, geology, petroleum geochemistry, cosmo-geochemistry, archaeology, bio-geochemistry, hydrology, climatology, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, isotope separations etc.. Abstracts available on CD-Rom only. (J.S.)

  11. Adsorption of atomic oxygen on PdAg/Pd(111) surface alloys and coadsorption of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Arnold P. [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Reaction Kinetics Research Group, University of Szeged, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Bansmann, Joachim; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, R. Juergen [Institute of Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, Ulm University, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of dissociated oxygen with structurally well-defined PdAg/Pd(111) surface alloys and the coadsorption of CO was studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). After oxygen saturation of the non-modified Pd(111) surface at RT, we observed the formation of a prominent peak in the HREEL spectra at 60 meV corresponding to the perpendicular vibration of oxygen atoms adsorbed in threefold hollow sites. Deposition of small Ag amounts does not change the signal intensity of this peak; it decreases only above 20% Ag. Beyond this Ag content, the peak intensity steeply declines and disappears at around 55-60% Ag. CO coadsorption on the oxygen pre-covered surfaces at 120 K leads to the formation of additional features in HREELS. For a surface alloy with 29% Ag, three loss features due to CO adsorption in on-top, bridge, and threefold-hollow sites can be discriminated already after the lowest CO exposure. Annealing of the co-adsorbed layer to 200 K triggers a decrease of the oxygen concentration due to CO{sub 2} formation. These findings are corroborated by TPD spectra of the CO desorption and CO{sub 2} production.

  12. Experience with day stay surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, D; Keneally, J; Black, A; Gaffney, S; Johnson, A

    1980-02-01

    Potential advantages of day stay surgery are cost saving, improved utilization of staff and hospital facilities, and reduction of stress for the paediatric patient and his family. The successful program requires careful case selection, full operating and anesthetic facilities and good follow-up. Day stay surgery was initiated at Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children in 1974. Experience is reviewed in relation to the total number and nature of surgical admissions and the daily utilisation of the facility. Utilization has markedly increased in the past 2 yr. Current practice is reviewed with regard to initial assessment, preparation for surgery and overall management during the day admission. Parental attitudes towards day stay surgery were evaluated indicating both the advantages and the problems encountered. These related mainly to insufficient information, transport difficulties and afternoon operations. Recommendations for improving the day stay service are discussed with special reference to: (1) communication with the parents as to adequate pre-operative explanation, revision of the day stay information pamphlet and improved distribution, and clear postoperative instructions, (2) the timing of operations, and (3) transport and parking facilities.

  13. Pd thin films on flexible substrate for hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztürk, Sadullah [Fatih Sultan Mehmet Vakıf University, Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Kılınç, Necmettin, E-mail: nkilinc@nigde.edu.tr [Nigde University, Mechatronics Engineering Department, 51245 Nigde (Turkey); Nigde University, Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, 51245 Nigde (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    In this work, palladium (Pd) thin films were prepared via RF sputtering method with various thicknesses (6 nm, 20 nm and 60 nm) on both a flexible substrate and a hard substrate. Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensing properties of Pd films on flexible substrate have been investigated depending on temperatures (25–100 °C) and H{sub 2} concentrations (600 ppm – 10%). The effect of H{sub 2} on structural properties of the films was also studied. The films were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. It is found that whole Pd films on hard substrate show permanent structural deformation after exposed to 10% H{sub 2} for 30 min. But, this H{sub 2} exposure does not causes any structural deformation for 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate and 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate shows reversible sensor response up to 10% H{sub 2} concentration without any structural deformation. On the other hand, Pd film sensors that have the thicknesses 20 nm and 60 nm on flexible substrate are irreversible for higher H{sub 2} concentration (>2%) with film deformation. The sensor response of 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate increased with increasing H{sub 2} concentration up 4% and then saturated. The sensitivity of the film decreased with increasing operation temperature. - Highlights: • Pd thin films fabricated by RF sputtering on both flexible and hard substrates. • Structural deformation observed for films on hard substrate after exposing 10% H{sub 2}. • 6 nm Pd film on flexible substrate shows reversible sensor response up to 10% H{sub 2}. • H{sub 2} sensing properties of film on flexible substrate investigated depending on temperature and concentration. • The sensitivity of the film decreased with increasing operation temperature.

  14. Fuel cells based on the use of Pd foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, P. L.; Guezala, E. [Laboratori de Ciencia i Tecnologia Electroquimica de Materials, Barcelona (Spain); Casado, J. [Departamento de Investigacion, Carburos Metalicos, Barcelona (Spain)

    1999-10-01

    Fuel cells with hydrogen diffusion lead anodes are of particular interest because the ability of lead to filter hydrogen with 100 per cent selectively, thus making it possible to take impure hydrogen from industrial flue gases and use it as feedstock to produce clean energy. In this investigation an alkaline fuel cell with a Pd-based hydrogen diffusion anode combined with a carbon-PFTE oxygen diffusion cathode was built up and tested at low temperatures. The fuel cell was operated by feeding pure hydrogen and pure oxygen at atmospheric pressures and closing the circuit by means of different external loads. Quasi-stationary currents were obtained for each load when the Pd foils were assembled using elastic joints to allow the anode creasing. Experiments with different sections indicated that the anode was the limiting electrode. Results showed that the slowest reactions in the overall anodic process depend on the anode preparation. When Pd black was present only at the Pd/electrolyte interface, the slowest reaction occurred on the gas/Pd interface. For anodes with Pd black on both sides of the foil, the maximum anode power densities were 11 and 18 mW cm{sup 2} at 25 and 50 degrees C, respectively; the corresponding anode current densities were 30 and 65 mA cm{sup 2}. Significant improvements in the anode current and power densities were achieved via surface modification by cathodically charging Pd pieces with atomic hydrogen, and Pd foils with electrodeposited Pd+Pt blacks, obtaining roughly double the power and current density. 31 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Highly Active, Carbon-supported, PdSn Nano-core, Partially ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon-supported, Pt partially covered, PdSn alloy nanoparticles (Pt-PdSn/C) were synthesized via a metathetical reaction of PdSn alloy nanoparticles, and a platinum precursor. The electrochemical activity was evaluated by methanol oxidation. The Pt-PdSn/C catalysts were characterized by transmission electron ...

  16. Design of Pd-Based Bimetallic Catalysts for ORR: A DFT Calculation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing Pd-lean catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR is the key for large-scale application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. In the present paper, we have proposed a multiple-descriptor strategy for designing efficient and durable ORR Pd-based alloy catalysts. We demonstrated that an ideal Pd-based bimetallic alloy catalyst for ORR should possess simultaneously negative alloy formation energy, negative surface segregation energy of Pd, and a lower oxygen binding ability than pure Pt. By performing detailed DFT calculations on the thermodynamics, surface chemistry and electronic properties of Pd-M alloys, Pd-V, Pd-Fe, Pd-Zn, Pd-Nb, and Pd-Ta, are identified theoretically to have stable Pd segregated surface and improved ORR activity. Factors affecting these properties are analyzed. The alloy formation energy of Pd with transition metals M can be mainly determined by their electron interaction. This may be the origin of the negative alloy formation energy for Pd-M alloys. The surface segregation energy of Pd is primarily determined by the surface energy and the atomic radius of M. The metals M which have smaller atomic radius and higher surface energy would tend to favor the surface segregation of Pd in corresponding Pd-M alloys.

  17. Manipulating the optical properties of symmetrically branched Au/Pd nanocrystals through interior design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Christopher J; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2014-05-25

    Au/Pd octopods with hollow, cubic interiors and Oh symmetry were synthesized for the first time by etching core@shell Pd@Au/Pd octopods to selectively remove their Pd interiors. Integration of multiple architectural features - in this case branching symmetry, composition, and interior design - into one nanostructure provides design strategies to new plasmonic colloids.

  18. Antarctica Day: An International Celebration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Hambrook Berkman, J.; Berkman, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For more than half a century, the 1959 Antarctic Treaty continues to shine as a rare beacon of international cooperation. To celebrate this milestone of peace in our civilization with hope and inspiration for future generations, Antarctica Day is celebrated each year on December 1st , the anniversary of the Antarctic Treaty signing. As an annual event - initiated by the Foundation for the Good Governance of International Spaces (www.internationalspaces.org/) in collaboration with the Association of Polar Early Carer Scientists (www.apecs.is) - Antarctica Day encourages participation from around the world. The Antarctic Treaty set aside 10% of the earth, 'forever to be used exclusively for peaceful purposes in the interest of mankind.' It was the first nuclear arms agreement and the first institution to govern all human activities in an international region beyond sovereign jurisdictions. In this spirit, Antarctica Day aims to: - Demonstrate how diverse nations can work together peacefully, using science as a global language of cooperation for decision making beyond national boundaries, - Provide strategies for students learning about Antarctica through art, science and history at all school levels, - Increase collaboration and communication between classrooms, communities, researchers and government officials around the world, and - Provide a focus for polar educators to build on each year. Through close collaboration with a number of partners. Antarctica Day activities have included: a Polar Film Festival convened by The Explorers Club; live sessions connecting classrooms with scientists in Antarctica thanks to PolarTREC and ARCUS; an international activity that involved children from 13 countries who created over 600 flags which exemplify Antarctica Day (these were actually flown in Antarctica with signed certificates then returned to the classes); a map where Antarctica Day participants all over the world could share what they were doing; an Antarctic bird count

  19. Improved Method for PD-Quantification in Power Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Villefrance, Rasmus; Henriksen, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    n this paper, a method is described for improved quantification of partial discharges(PD) in power cables. The method is suitable for PD-detection and location systems in the MHz-range, where pulse attenuation and distortion along the cable cannot be neglected. The system transfer function...... was calculated and measured in order to form basis for magnitude calculation after each measurements. --- Limitations and capabilities of the method will be discussed and related to relevant field applications of high frequent PD-measurements. --- Methods for increased signal/noise ratio are easily implemented...

  20. Application of τc*Pd in earthquake early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Lun; Lin, Ting-Li; Wu, Yih-Min

    2015-03-01

    Rapid assessment of damage potential and size of an earthquake at the station is highly demanded for onsite earthquake early warning. We study the application of τc*Pd for its estimation on the earthquake size using 123 events recorded by the borehole stations of KiK-net in Japan. The new type of earthquake size determined by τc*Pd is more related to the damage potential. We find that τc*Pd provides another parameter to measure the size of earthquake and the threshold to warn strong ground motion.

  1. μ+ studies of dilute PdFe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, K.; Nishida, N.; Yamazaki, T.; British Columbia Univ., Vancouver

    1976-08-01

    In order to investigate the ordering mechanism among giant moments around Fe impurities in Pd, μ + was used to probe the conduction electron polarization in PdFe alloys above and below the critical concentration of 0.1 at. % with reference to pure Pd. Below the ordering temperatures the broadening of the μ + field for 0.015 at. % Fe is substantially larger than that for 0.28 at. % Fe, when normalized to the bulk magnetization. The results can be explained in terms of an RKKY spin oscillation in the region outside the giant moment. (author)

  2. Rapid separation and determination of 107Pd in radioactive waste produced during NPP A-1 decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boris Andris; Miroslav Prazsky; Ferdinand Sebesta

    2015-01-01

    Procedure for 107 Pd determination in radioactive wastes coming from decommissioning of NPP A-1 is proposed and verified. 107 Pd was separated and purified by Pd precipitation with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) and/or ferric hydroxide precipitation. 107 Pd yield was determined gravimetrically by weighing the Pd(DMG) 2 precipitate. 107 Pd counting was performed using liquid scintillation counter (LSC-TDCR) and scintillation cocktail Hionic Fluor. In all analyzed samples the determined activities of 107 Pd were lower than MDA. Nevertheless such analyses permit the decision concerning the storage of solidified wastes in the Mochovce regional repository. (author)

  3. Study of hyperfine interactions in intermetallic compounds Gd(Ni,Pd,Cu)In, Tb(Ni,Pd)In, Dy(Ni,Pd)In and Ho(Ni,Pd)In; Estudo de interacoes hiperfinas em compostos intermetalicos Gd(Ni,Pd,Cu)In, Tb(Ni,Pd)In, Dy(Ni,Pd)In e Ho(Ni,Pd)In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapolli, Andre Luis

    2006-07-01

    Systematic behavior of magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) in the intermetallic compounds Gd(Ni,Pd,Cu)In Tb(Ni,Pd)In, Dy(Ni,Pd)In and Ho(Ni,Pd)In was studied by Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation spectroscopy. The measurements of B{sub hf} were carried out at the rare earth atom and in sites using the nuclear probes {sup 140}Ce and {sup 11}'1Cd respectively. The variation of hyperfine field with temperature, in most cases, follows the Brillouin function predicted from the molecular field theory. The hyperfine field values at rare earth atom sites obtained from {sup 140}Ce probe as well as at in sites obtained from {sup 111}Cd probe for each series of compounds were extrapolated to zero Kelvin B{sub hf}(T=0) from these curves. These values were compared with the values of the literature for other compounds containing the same rare earth element and all of them show a linear relationship with the ordering temperature. This indicates that the main contribution to B{sub hf} comes from the conduction electron polarization (CEP) through Fermi contact interaction and the principal mechanism of magnetic interaction in these compounds can be described by the RKKY type interaction. The values of B{sub hf}(T=0) for each family of intermetallic compounds RNiIn and RPdIn when plotted as a function of 4f spin projection of rare earth element also shows a linear relationship. Exceptions are the results for the compounds RNiIn obtained with {sup 111}Cd probe where a small deviation from linearity is observed. The results of the measurements carried out with the {sup 111}Cd probe were also analyzed to obtain the hyperfine parameters of the quadrupole interaction as a function of temperature for RPdln and GdNiIn compounds. The results show that for the compound GdPdIn there might be some Gd-In disorder at high temperature. (author)

  4. Study of hyperfine interactions in intermetallic compounds Gd(Ni,Pd,Cu)In, Tb(Ni,Pd)In, Dy(Ni,Pd)In and Ho(Ni,Pd)In; Estudo de interacoes hiperfinas em compostos intermetalicos Gd(Ni,Pd,Cu)In, Tb(Ni,Pd)In, Dy(Ni,Pd)In e Ho(Ni,Pd)In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapolli, Andre Luis

    2006-07-01

    Systematic behavior of magnetic hyperfine field (B{sub hf}) in the intermetallic compounds Gd(Ni,Pd,Cu)In Tb(Ni,Pd)In, Dy(Ni,Pd)In and Ho(Ni,Pd)In was studied by Perturbed Gamma-Gamma Angular Correlation spectroscopy. The measurements of B{sub hf} were carried out at the rare earth atom and in sites using the nuclear probes {sup 140}Ce and {sup 11}'1Cd respectively. The variation of hyperfine field with temperature, in most cases, follows the Brillouin function predicted from the molecular field theory. The hyperfine field values at rare earth atom sites obtained from {sup 140}Ce probe as well as at in sites obtained from {sup 111}Cd probe for each series of compounds were extrapolated to zero Kelvin B{sub hf}(T=0) from these curves. These values were compared with the values of the literature for other compounds containing the same rare earth element and all of them show a linear relationship with the ordering temperature. This indicates that the main contribution to B{sub hf} comes from the conduction electron polarization (CEP) through Fermi contact interaction and the principal mechanism of magnetic interaction in these compounds can be described by the RKKY type interaction. The values of B{sub hf}(T=0) for each family of intermetallic compounds RNiIn and RPdIn when plotted as a function of 4f spin projection of rare earth element also shows a linear relationship. Exceptions are the results for the compounds RNiIn obtained with {sup 111}Cd probe where a small deviation from linearity is observed. The results of the measurements carried out with the {sup 111}Cd probe were also analyzed to obtain the hyperfine parameters of the quadrupole interaction as a function of temperature for RPdln and GdNiIn compounds. The results show that for the compound GdPdIn there might be some Gd-In disorder at high temperature. (author)

  5. The PD-1/PD-L1 complex resembles the antigen-binding Fv domains of antibodies and T cell receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Masashi; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Su, Hua-Poo; Mikami, Bunzo; Okazaki, Taku; Honjo, Tasuku; Minato, Nagahiro; Garboczi, David N. (NIH); (Kyoto)

    2008-07-29

    Signaling through the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor upon binding its ligand, PD-L1, suppresses immune responses against autoantigens and tumors and plays an important role in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance. Release from PD-1 inhibitory signaling revives 'exhausted' virus-specific T cells in chronic viral infections. Here we present the crystal structure of murine PD-1 in complex with human PD-L1. PD-1 and PD-L1 interact through the conserved front and side of their Ig variable (IgV) domains, as do the IgV domains of antibodies and T cell receptors. This places the loops at the ends of the IgV domains on the same side of the PD-1/PD-L1 complex, forming a surface that is similar to the antigen-binding surface of antibodies and T cell receptors. Mapping conserved residues allowed the identification of residues that are important in forming the PD-1/PD-L1 interface. Based on the structure, we show that some reported loss-of-binding mutations involve the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction but that others compromise protein folding. The PD-1/PD-L1 interaction described here may be blocked by antibodies or by designed small-molecule drugs to lower inhibitory signaling that results in a stronger immune response. The immune receptor-like loops offer a new surface for further study and potentially the design of molecules that would affect PD-1/PD-L1 complex formation and thereby modulate the immune response.

  6. Soluble Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) Is Decreased in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP): Potential Involvement of PD-1 Pathway in ITP Immunopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtas Atesoglu, Elif; Tarkun, Pinar; Demirsoy, Esra Terzi; Geduk, Ayfer; Mehtap, Ozgur; Batman, Adnan; Kaya, Fatih; Cekmen, Mustafa Baki; Gulbas, Zafer; Hacıhanefioglu, Abdullah

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by dysregulation of T cells. Programmed death (PD) 1 and programmed death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) are cosignaling molecules, and the major role of the PD-1 pathway is the inhibition of self-reactive T cells and to protect against autoimmune diseases. We measured levels of serum soluble PD 1 (sPD-1) and serum soluble PD-L1 (sPD-L1) in 67 patients with ITP (24 newly diagnosed ITP [ndITP], 43 chronic ITP [cITP]) and 21 healthy controls (HCs). We determined decreased serum sPD-1 levels both in patients with ndITP and in patients with cITP when compared to HC. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between sPD-1 levels and platelet counts. The sPD-L1 levels were decreased in patients with ndITP when compared to patients with cITP. This is the first study investigating PD-1 signaling pathway in ITP. Decreased sPD-1 levels may have a role in ITP pathogenesis as without the inhibitory regulation of PD-1, sustained activation of T cells may cause inflammatory responses which is the case in ITP. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Magnetic characteristics of CoPd and FePd antidot arrays on nanoperforated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximenko, A., E-mail: Alexey.Maximenko@ifj.edu.pl [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Str. 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Research Institute for Nuclear Problems of Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Fedotova, J. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems of Belarusian State University, Bobruiskaya Str. 11, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Marszałek, M.; Zarzycki, A.; Zabila, Y. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego Str. 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    Hard magnetic antidot arrays show promising results in context of designing of percolated perpendicular media. In this work the technology of magnetic FePd and CoPd antidot arrays fabrication is presented and correlation between surface morphology, structure and magnetic properties is discussed. CoPd and FePd antidot arrays were fabricated by deposition of Co/Pd and Fe/Pd multilayers (MLs) on porous anodic aluminum oxide templates with bowl-shape cell structure with inclined intercellular regions. FePd ordered L1{sub 0} structure was obtained by successive vacuum annealing at elevated temperatures (530 °C) and confirmed by XRD analysis. Systematic analysis of magnetization curves evidenced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoPd antidot arrays, while FePd antidot arrays revealed isotropic magnetic anisotropy with increased out-of-plane magnetic contribution. MFM images of antidots showed more complicated contrast, with alternating magnetic dots oriented parallel and antiparallel to tip magnetization moment. - Highlights: • CoPd and FePd antidots were fabricated on porous anodic aluminum oxide templates. • CoPd antidot arrays have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. • FePd antidot arrays revealed isotropic magnetic behavior. • The complex morphology of nanoporous template resulted in a complex magnetic domains image.

  8. Electrochemical fabrication of a cauliflower-like nanostructured Pd film from pure Pd and its applications in electrocatalysis and electroanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shili; Zhang, Hefang; Huang, Fuli; Wang, Pengshu; Xia, Yue; Li, Zelin; Huang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A cauliflower-like nanostructured Pd film was fabricated by just applying one double-potential step method. • The film fabrication involves the formation of K 2 PdCl 4 salt from pure Pd and its electroreduction to Pd atoms. • The film electrode exhibits high electrocatalytic activities toward the oxidation of ethanol and ascorbic acid. • Good analytical performances in the higher-concentration regions are obtained on the film electrode. -- Abstract: A cauliflower-like nanostructured Pd film (CNPF) has been fabricated by just applying one double-potential step on a pure Pd substrate in a KCl solution. The CNPF formation mainly involves the formation of K 2 PdCl 4 salt from pure Pd and its electroreduction to Pd atoms. The as-prepared CNPF electrode exhibits high electrocatalytic activities toward the oxidation of ethanol and ascorbic acid (AA). The CNPF electrode is also employed to detect AA by means of constant potential amperometry (CPA) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and good analytical performances in the higher-concentration regions are obtained. In CPA studies performed at −0.4 V, the oxidation current is linearly dependent on AA concentration in the range of 0.1–7.5 mM with a detection limit of 80 μM (based on S/N = 3), a short response time of about 3 s and a high sensitivity of 589.80 μA mM −1 cm −2 . Meanwhile, the peak current responses in CVs are linear over the broad range of 0.1–35 mM with a sensitivity of 178.56 μA mM −1 cm −2 . Besides, the CNPF electrode can also be used to detect AA in medicine vitamin C tablet with satisfactory results

  9. A Prospective, Randomized Study Comparing 7-day and 14-day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... and 14-day quadruple therapies as first-line treatments for Helicobacter pylori infection in ..... Furthermore, in a large-scale, multicenter, Japanese study ... Taylor DE, Ge Z, Purych D, Lo T, Hiratsuka K. Cloning and sequence ...

  10. Measurement of day and night neutrino energy spectra at SNO and constraints on neutrino mixing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Bullard, T.V.; Cox, G.A.; Duba, C.A.; Formaggio, J.A.; Germani, J.V.; Hamian, A.A.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Howe, M.; Kazkaz, K.; Manor, J.; Meijer Drees, R.; Orrell, J.L.; Schaffer, K.K.; Smith, M.W.E.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Allen, R.C.; Buehler, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has measured day and night solar neutrino energy spectra and rates. For charged current events, assuming an undistorted 8 B spectrum, the night minus day rate is 14.0%±6.3% +1.5 -1.4 % of the average rate. If the total flux of active neutrinos is additionally constrained to have no asymmetry, the ν e asymmetry is found to be 7.0%±4.9% +1.3 -1.2 % . A global solar neutrino analysis in terms of matter-enhanced oscillations of two active flavors strongly favors the large mixing angle solution

  11. Performance and economics of a Pd-based planar WGS membrane reactor for coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, M.D. [CSIRO Energy Technology, Pullenvale QLD 4069 (Australia); Donelson, R. [CSIRO Process Science and Engineering, Clayton VIC 3168 (Australia); Dave, N.C. [CSIRO Energy Technology, North Ryde NSW 2113 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    Conceptual 300 tonne per day (tpd) H{sub 2}-from-coal plants have been the subject of several major costing exercises in the past decade. Incorporating conventional high- and low-temperature water-gas-shift (WGS) reactors, amine-based CO{sub 2} removal and PSA-based H{sub 2} purification systems, these studies provide a benchmark against which alternative H{sub 2}-from-coal technologies can be compared. The catalytic membrane reactor (CMR), combining a WGS catalyst and hydrogen-selective metal membrane, can potentially replace the multiple shift and separation stages of a plant based on conventional technology. CMR-based shift and separation offers several major advantages over the conventional approach, including greater-than-equilibrium WGS conversion, the containment of the CO{sub 2} at high-pressure and a reduction in the number of unit processes. To determine capital costs of a WGS CMR-based H{sub 2}-from-coal plant, a prototype planar CMR was constructed and tested with varying catalyst bed depth, residence time and membrane type (commercially-sourced 50 {mu}m Pd or 40 {mu}m Pd-25Ag wt%). Experiments to measure CO conversion, and H{sub 2} flux and yield were conducted at 400 C with a feed pressure of 20 bar H{sub 2}O:C ratio of 3 and a H{sub 2} product pressure of 1 bar. Under the optimum conditions examined (with a 40 {mu}m-thick Pd-25Ag membrane and <3 mm-thick catalyst bed), a membrane surface area of {proportional_to}25,000 m{sup 2} would be required to provide a throughput of 300 tpd with 85% H{sub 2} yield. The capital cost of the CMR component of the plant would be around $US 180 million (based on current metal prices), of which 73% can be attributed to the cost of the Pd-Ag alloy membranes. Incorporation of a membrane that meets the 2015 US DOE cost and flux targets would offer

  12. Performance and economics of a Pd-based planar WGS membrane reactor for coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, M.D.; Donelson, R.; Dave, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual 300 tonne per day (tpd) H 2 -from-coal plants have been the subject of several major costing exercises in the past decade. Incorporating conventional high- and low-temperature water-gas-shift (WGS) reactors, amine-based CO 2 removal and PSA-based H 2 purification systems, these studies provide a benchmark against which alternative H 2 -from-coal technologies can be compared. The catalytic membrane reactor (CMR), combining a WGS catalyst and hydrogen-selective metal membrane, can potentially replace the multiple shift and separation stages of a plant based on conventional technology. CMR-based shift and separation offers several major advantages over the conventional approach, including greater-than-equilibrium WGS conversion, the containment of the CO 2 at high-pressure and a reduction in the number of unit processes. To determine capital costs of a WGS CMR-based H 2 -from-coal plant, a prototype planar CMR was constructed and tested with varying catalyst bed depth, residence time and membrane type (commercially-sourced 50 μm Pd or 40 μm Pd-25Ag wt%). Experiments to measure CO conversion, and H 2 flux and yield were conducted at 400 C with a feed pressure of 20 bar H 2 O:C ratio of 3 and a H 2 product pressure of 1 bar. Under the optimum conditions examined (with a 40 μm-thick Pd-25Ag membrane and 2 would be required to provide a throughput of 300 tpd with 85% H 2 yield. The capital cost of the CMR component of the plant would be around $US 180 million (based on current metal prices), of which 73% can be attributed to the cost of the Pd-Ag alloy membranes. Incorporation of a membrane that meets the 2015 US DOE cost and flux targets would offer cost parity, with a plant cost of $US 44 million and a total membrane area of ∝13,000 m 2 . Meeting these performance and cost targets would likely require a shift to very thin Pd-alloy membranes or highly-permeable Group IV, V body-centred-cubic alloys. (author)

  13. Liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination of tetrabromobisphenol A on supported Pd catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ke; Zheng, Mengjia; Han, Yuxiang; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pd catalysts supported on TiO_2, CeO_2, Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 were prepared. • Deposition-precipitation method resulted in positively charged smaller Pd particle. • Complete debromination of tetrabromobisphenol A could be achieved on Pd/TiO_2. • Pd/TiO_2 prepared by the deposition-precipitation method was more active. - Abstract: Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant and reductive debromination is an effective method for the abatement of TBBPA pollution. In this study, Pd catalysts supported on TiO_2, CeO_2, Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 were prepared by the impregnation (the resulting catalyst denoted as im-Pd/support), deposition-precipitation (the resulting catalyst denoted as dp-Pd/support), and photo-deposition (the resulting catalyst denoted as pd-Pd/support) methods. The catalysts were characterized by N_2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, measurement of zeta potential, CO chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that at an identical Pd loading amount (2.0 wt.%) Pd particle size in dp-Pd/TiO_2 was much smaller than those in im-Pd/TiO_2 and pd-Pd/TiO_2. Pd particle size of the dp-Pd/TiO_2 catalyst increased with Pd loading amount. Additionally, Pd particles in the dp-Pd/TiO_2 catalysts were positively charged due to the strong metal-support interaction, whereas the cationization effect was gradually attenuated with the increase of Pd loading amount. For the liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination (HDB) of TBBPA, tri-bromobisphenol A (tri-BBPA), di-bromobisphenol A (di-BBPA), and mono-bromobisphenol A (mono-BBPA) were identified as the intermediate products, indicative of a stepwise debromination process. The catalytic HDB of TBBPA followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting an adsorption enhanced catalysis mechanism. At an identical Pd loading amount, the Pd catalyst supported on TiO_2 exhibited a much higher catalytic activity

  14. Liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination of tetrabromobisphenol A on supported Pd catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ke [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zheng, Mengjia [Kuang Yaming Honors School, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Han, Yuxiang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xu, Zhaoyi, E-mail: zhaoyixu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zheng, Shourong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Vehicle Emissions Control, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Pd catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} were prepared. • Deposition-precipitation method resulted in positively charged smaller Pd particle. • Complete debromination of tetrabromobisphenol A could be achieved on Pd/TiO{sub 2}. • Pd/TiO{sub 2} prepared by the deposition-precipitation method was more active. - Abstract: Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a widely used brominated flame retardant and reductive debromination is an effective method for the abatement of TBBPA pollution. In this study, Pd catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} were prepared by the impregnation (the resulting catalyst denoted as im-Pd/support), deposition-precipitation (the resulting catalyst denoted as dp-Pd/support), and photo-deposition (the resulting catalyst denoted as pd-Pd/support) methods. The catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, measurement of zeta potential, CO chemisorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that at an identical Pd loading amount (2.0 wt.%) Pd particle size in dp-Pd/TiO{sub 2} was much smaller than those in im-Pd/TiO{sub 2} and pd-Pd/TiO{sub 2}. Pd particle size of the dp-Pd/TiO{sub 2} catalyst increased with Pd loading amount. Additionally, Pd particles in the dp-Pd/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were positively charged due to the strong metal-support interaction, whereas the cationization effect was gradually attenuated with the increase of Pd loading amount. For the liquid phase catalytic hydrodebromination (HDB) of TBBPA, tri-bromobisphenol A (tri-BBPA), di-bromobisphenol A (di-BBPA), and mono-bromobisphenol A (mono-BBPA) were identified as the intermediate products, indicative of a stepwise debromination process. The catalytic HDB of TBBPA followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting an adsorption enhanced catalysis mechanism. At an identical Pd

  15. STS-95 Day 09 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this ninth day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, spend a good part of their day checking out important spacecraft systems for entry and landing. The commander and pilot begin the flight control system checkout by powering up one auxiliary power unit and evaluating the performance of aerodynamic surfaces and flight controls. The flight crew conducts a reaction control system hot fire, followed by a test of the communications system.

  16. Day-Care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Helle

    2011-01-01

    interacting with ethnic minority children and their parents, however, staff are occasionally forced to make explicit the reasoning behind their actions. A focus on the interaction of ethnic minority children and their parents in day-care centres therefore provides insights into the cultural beliefs and values......  The chapter explores central notions of appropriate social behavior in what is arguably the most important institution in Denmark when it comes to social integration, namely day-care, also known as pre-school. Moral values guiding everyday practices are generally taken for granted. When...

  17. Registration Day-Camp 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2016-01-01

    Reminder Registration for the CERN Staff Association Day-camp are open for children from 4 to 6 years old More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. The day-camp is open to all children. An inscription per week is proposed, cost 480.-CHF/week, lunch included The camp will be open weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. For further questions, thanks you for contacting us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch.

  18. The Role of Programmed Cell Death Ligand-1 (PD-L1/CD274) in the Development of Graft versus Host Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Chaqmaqchi, Heevy; Sadeghi, Behnam; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr; Al-Hashmi, Sulaiman; Fares, Mona; Kuiper, Raoul; Lundahl, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1/CD274) is an immunomodulatory molecule involved in cancer and complications of bone marrow transplantation, such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease. The present study was designed to assess the dynamic expression of this molecule after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relation to acute graft-versus-host disease. Female BALB/c mice were conditioned with busulfan and cyclophosphamide and transplanted with either syngeneic or allogeneic (male C57BL/6 mice) bone marrow and splenic cells. The expression of PD-L1 was evaluated at different time points employing qPCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Allogeneic- but not syngeneic-transplanted animals exhibited a marked up-regulation of PD-L1 expression in the muscle and kidney, but not the liver, at days 5 and 7 post transplantation. In mice transplanted with allogeneic bone marrow cells, the enhanced expression of PD-L1 was associated with high serum levels of IFNγ and TNFα at corresponding intervals. Our findings demonstrate that PD-L1 is differently induced and expressed after allogeneic transplantation than it is after syngeneic transplantation, and that it is in favor of target rather than non-target organs at the early stages of acute graft-versus-host disease. This is the first study to correlate the dynamics of PD-L1 at the gene-, protein- and activity levels with the early development of acute graft-versus-host disease. Our results suggest that the higher expression of PD-L1 in the muscle and kidney (non-target tissues) plays a protective role in skeletal muscle during acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:23593203

  19. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes from one or both parents to a child. The gene responsible for this deficiency is on the X chromosome. G6PD deficiency is most common in males of African heritage. Many females of African heritage are carriers ...

  20. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1995; Lyubovsky and Pfefferle 1999; Sales et al 1999;. Hill et al 2000). ... For a catalytic system, whose activity ... catalytic systems containing Pd, supported on various acid- ..... Further studies are needed to optimize a balance between.

  1. P-d capture reactions in muonic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friar, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Capture reactions for very low-energy n-d and p-d systems are calculated and compared with experiment, as are low-energy n-d and p-d scattering. We find excellent agreement for the n-d scattering lengths, but poor agreement for the p-d case, which we believe is a problem with the experimental extrapolation. The n-d radiative capture is sensitive to details of the meson-exchange currents, but reasonable models agree with the data. The latter models are in good agreement with experiment when extended to the p-d case. Our large quartet capture rate resolves a long-standing anomaly. The EO capture matrix element recently obtained from a reanalysis of internal conversion in muonic molecules is in excellent agreement with our predictions. This matrix element is very clean theoretically and provides the best test of the calculations. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conducting molecule; nanocrystals; scanning tunneling microscopy; negative differential resistance. Abstract. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a single molecule device formed by two Pd ... Current Issue : Vol.

  3. Thermodynamic assessment of the Pd-H-D-T system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, J.-M., E-mail: jean-marc.joubert@icmpe.cnrs.f [Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares, Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est, CNRS, Universite de Paris XII, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France); Thiebaut, S. [CEA/DAM/Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2009-12-15

    The three binary systems H-Pd, D-Pd and Pd-T have been modelled in the frame of the Calphad approach. A complete literature search has been undertaken and the most significant experimental data have been selected for a thermodynamic assessment of these systems. To complement the available data, pressure-composition curves have been measured for the three systems in the present work. The three systems are characterized by a strong isotope effect which is well taken into account in the modelling. They have been combined to perform calculations in the quaternary H-D-Pd-T system. It is shown that a reasonable extrapolation can be made without the use of ternary parameters if it is calculated with the so-called Toop model.

  4. Hydrogen adsorption on bimetallic PdAu(111) surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takehiro, Naoki; Liu, Ping; Bergbreiter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen on structurally well defined PdAu-Pd(111) monolayer surface alloys was investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical study, aiming at a quantitative understanding of the adsorption and desorption properties of individual PdAu nanostructures. Combining...... the structural information obtained by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in particular on the abundance of specific adsorption ensembles at different Pd surface concentrations, with information on the adsorption properties derived from temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopy...... and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) provides conclusions on the minimum ensemble size for dissociative adsorption of hydrogen and on the adsorption energies on different sites active for adsorption. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations give detailed insight...

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of granular CoPd multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivas, L.G.; Figueroa, A.I.; Bartolomé, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Dept. de Física de la Materia Condensada, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubín, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Dept. de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); García, L.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Dept. de Física de la Materia Condensada, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Deranlot, C.; Petroff, F. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex, France and Université Paris-Sud, F-191405 Orsay Cedex (France); Ruiz, L.; González-Calbet, J.M [Dept. de Química Inorgánica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Brookes, N.B.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS40220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bartolomé, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Dept. de Física de la Materia Condensada, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Multilayers of bimetallic CoPd alloyed and assembled nanoparticles, prepared by room temperature sequential sputtering deposition on amorphous alumina, were studied by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, SQUID-based magnetometry and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Alloying between Co and Pd in these nanoparticles gives rise to a high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic properties are temperature dependent: at low temperature, the multilayers are ferromagnetic with a high coercive field; at intermediate temperature the behavior is of a soft-ferromagnet, and at higher temperature, the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the nanoparticles disappears. The magnetic orbital moment to spin moment ratio is enhanced compared with Co bare nanoparticles and Co fcc bulk. - Highlights: • CoPd granular nanolayers show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. • Three magnetic phases are detected: hard-ferro, soft-ferro and superparamagnetism. • The nanoparticles have Co-core and CoPd alloy shell morphology.

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of granular CoPd multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivas, L.G.; Figueroa, A.I.; Bartolomé, F.; Rubín, J.; García, L.M.; Deranlot, C.; Petroff, F.; Ruiz, L.; González-Calbet, J.M; Brookes, N.B.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Bartolomé, J.

    2016-01-01

    Multilayers of bimetallic CoPd alloyed and assembled nanoparticles, prepared by room temperature sequential sputtering deposition on amorphous alumina, were studied by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, SQUID-based magnetometry and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Alloying between Co and Pd in these nanoparticles gives rise to a high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic properties are temperature dependent: at low temperature, the multilayers are ferromagnetic with a high coercive field; at intermediate temperature the behavior is of a soft-ferromagnet, and at higher temperature, the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the nanoparticles disappears. The magnetic orbital moment to spin moment ratio is enhanced compared with Co bare nanoparticles and Co fcc bulk. - Highlights: • CoPd granular nanolayers show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. • Three magnetic phases are detected: hard-ferro, soft-ferro and superparamagnetism. • The nanoparticles have Co-core and CoPd alloy shell morphology.

  7. Hybrid NiCoOx adjacent to Pd nanoparticles as a synergistic electrocatalyst for ethanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Yan; Liu, Yanqin; Zhang, Zhe; Dong, Wenkui; Lei, Ziqiang

    2015-01-01

    To improve the electrocatalytic activity of Pd for ethanol oxidation, hybrid NiCoOx adjacent to Pd catalyst (Pd-NiCoOx/C) is successfully synthesized. Physical characterization shows NiCoOx is closely adjacent to Pd nanoparticles in Pd-NiCoOx/C catalyst, which leads to Strong Metal-Support Interactions (SMSI) between the NiCoOx and Pd nanoparticles, in favor of the electrocatalytic properties. The Pd-NiCoOx/C catalyst is estimated to own larger electrochemically active surface area than Pd/C and Pd-NiO/C catalysts. Moreover, compared to Pd/C catalyst, the onset potential of Pd-NiCoOx/C catalyst is negative 40 mV for ethanol oxidation. Noticeably, the current density of Pd-NiCoOx/C catalyst is 2.05 and 1.43 times higher contrasted to Pd/C and Pd-NiO/C catalysts accordingly. Importantly, the Pd-NiCoOx/C catalyst exhibits better stability during ethanol oxidation, which is a promising electrocatalyst for application in direct alkaline alcohol fuel cells.

  8. Isomer spectroscopy in 92Ru and 95Pd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorska, M.; Rejmund, M.; Schubart, R.; Grawe, H.; Heese, J.; Maier, K.H.; Spohr, K.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Fossan, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    The parity changing γ-transitions like E1, M2, E3 in 92 Ru and 95 Pd nuclei have been investigated to probe the purity of the Shell Model. Two isomers of 92 Ru and 95 Pd have been produced in the 58 Ni + 40 Ca heavy ion reaction at 58 Ni beams energy 215 MeV. The gamma-ray transition strength have been deduced

  9. Incommensurate magnetic ordering of PrPdAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, L. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Doenni, A. [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Lab.; Fauth, F. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    The intermetallic rare earth compound PrPdAl with ZrNiAl-type structure was investigated by means of powder neutron diffraction. PrPdAl orders below T{sub N} {approx_equal}4.2 K with an incommensurate antiferromagnetic propagation vector k = [1/2,0,{tau}], {tau}=0.398. The best fit was obtained with a sinusoidal modulation of the magnetic moments along the c-axis. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  10. Thermal induced structural transformation of bimetallic AuPd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, A; Li, Z Y

    2014-01-01

    High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (HAADF-STEM) has been employed for the study of thermal effects of structural transformation of AuPd nanoparticles produced by physical vapour deposition. Depending on the duration of annealing at a temperature of 500 K, atomic resolved imaging analysis reveals the formation of various structure morphologies from the ordered L1 2 superlattice to the core-shell structure. The effects of Pd-oxides are also discussed

  11. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of Pd sub(3)Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnen, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we study the electronic and magnetic properties of the Pd sub(3)Fe alloy. For the ordered phase of Pd sub(3)Fe we employed the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbitals Method, with the atomic sphere approximation, which is a first principles method and includes spin polarization. The theoretical results for the thermal and magnetic properties show good agreement with experience. Here we explain the formation of the localized magnetic moments from completely itinerant electrons. We investigate the influence of the hydrogen in the physical properties of the compound Pd sub(3)Fe, where we obtain a drastic reduction in the magnetic moments at the Pd and Fe sites. This reduction is confirmed by experience. The self consistent potentials of the Pd sub(3)Fe compound were used for an analysis of the influence of the disorder in the electronic structure of Pd sub(3)Fe alloy. To this end, we employ a spin polarized version of the Green's Function Method with the Coherent Potential Approximation (or KKR-CPA). The results obtained show that in random ferromagnetic alloys different degrees of disorder occurs for the different spin directions. The formation of the magnetic moments in these alloys were explained from the existence of 'virtual crystal' states for spin up electrons and 'split band' states for spin down electrons. Finally we employ the muffin-tin orbitals to calculate the X-ray photoemission spectra of the Pd sub(3)Fe and Pd sub(3)FeH compounds, which allows us a direct comparison between theory and experiment. (author)

  12. National Latino AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast highlights National Latino AIDS Awareness Day, to increase awareness of the disproportionate impact of HIV on the Hispanic or Latino population in the United States and dependent territories. The podcast reminds Hispanics or Latinos that they have the power to take control of their health and protect themselves against HIV.

  13. Music All the Livelong Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcik, Eva

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how creating a musical climate in early childhood classrooms can give children a way to express feelings and ideas, and can smoothly blend the activities and routines of the classroom day. Provides suggestions for making new songs from old and creating new songs. Includes sample songs. (KB)

  14. Colour Day: an innovative project

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    This year, the Children’s Day-Care Centre (EVE) and School works on the theme of colours. Every class has their own project revolving around this common theme. The class of Claire, Sandrine and Nadia, introduced a monthly “Colour Day”. The objective of this day is to offer children different activities (arts and crafts, baking, etc.) designed around a specific colour. The children get a chance to decorate their classroom and learn in many different ways inspired by the colours blue, red, and many others. The parents are also called to contribute and invited to dress their children in the colour of the day. In September, we discovered the colour blue, in October it was time for red, and in mid-November yellow will brighten up our structure. Everyone plays along, making this a very festive day for us all. On Tuesday, 20 September, we saw the whole School turn blue! We were all dressed in blue and we made blue paintings, too! We made beautiful artwork inspired by artists like Ma...

  15. A day in the life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Achintya

    2017-12-01

    Even the most avid physics enthusiast does not necessarily awaken each morning and turn their mind to the various physical processes they will encounter over the course of their day. Yet this is precisely the sort of journey that author James Kakalios takes us on in his book The Physics of Everyday Things.

  16. Wind Turbine Acoustic Day 2018

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jesper; Søndergaard, Bo; Hünerbein, Sabine Von

    The bi-annual event entitled Wind Turbine Acoustic Day dealing with wind turbine noise issues organized by DTU Wind Energy took place on May, 17th 2018 as its third edition. The abstracts and slides for the presentations are reported....

  17. Earth Day 2012: Greening Government

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-19

    This podcast describes sustainability efforts at CDC in relation to Earth Day celebrations and details agency greenhouse gas reduction strategies and successes.  Created: 4/19/2012 by Office of the Chief Operating Officer (OCOO)/ Chief Sustainability Office (CSO).   Date Released: 4/23/2012.

  18. World AIDS Day PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    December 1 is World AIDS Day. In this PSA, communities are encouraged to get tested for HIV.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  19. ATLAS Assembly Hall Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    To mark the 50th Anniversary of the founding of CERN, a day of tours, displays and presentations was held in October 2004. The assembly halls for the experiments that were waiting to be installed on the LHC, such as ATLAS shown here, were transformed into display areas and cafés.

  20. Children and Modern Day Slavery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    It decries the varied proliferation of Child Slavery to this modern day .... Children are forced to work long hours in mines for little to no pay. They toil in 24 ..... of child in mines, quarries and mechanical and engineering workshops, imposition of.

  1. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  2. Open Days a smash hit!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The general public seized the one and only opportunity to visit the Large Hadron Collider before it goes into service. The Open Days on 5 and 6 April attracted record numbers of visitors, with 53,000 visitors on the Sunday alone!

  3. XXIVth days of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of papers submitted to the 24th Days of Nuclear Medicine held in Opava, Czechoslovakia between Oct 9 and 11, 1985. The conference proceeded in three sessions, namely nuclear pediatrics, miscellaneous and technicians' session. The publication also contains abstracts of posters. (L.O.)

  4. The PD-1/B7-H1 pathway modulates the natural killer cells versus mouse glioma stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan Huang

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most malignant primary type of brain tumor in adults. There has been increased focus on the immunotherapies to treat GBM patients, the therapeutic value of natural killer (NK cells is still unknown. Programmed death-1 (PD-1 is a major immunological checkpoint that can negatively regulate the T-cell-mediated immune response. We tested the combination of the inhibiting the PD-1/B7H1 pathway with a NK-cell mediated immune response in an orthotopic mouse model of GBM.Mouse glioma stem cells (GL261GSCs and mouse NK cells were isolated and identified. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay was perfomed to detect the cytotoxicity of NK cells against GL261GSCs. GL261GSCs were intracranially implanted into mice, and the mice were stratified into 3 treatment groups: 1 control, 2 NK cells treatment, and 3 PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group. Overall survival was quantified, and animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed to determine tumor growth. The brains were harvested after the mice were euthanized, and immunohistochemistry against CD45 and PCNA was performed.The mouse NK cells were identified as 90% CD3- NK1.1+CD335+ by flow cytometric analysis. In the LDH assay, the ratios of the damaged GL261GSCs, with the E:T ratios of 2.5:1, 5:1, and 10:1, were as follows: 1 non-inhibited group: 7.42%, 11.31%, and 15.1%, 2 B7H1 inhibited group: 14.75%, 18.25% and 29.1%, 3 PD-1 inhibited group: 15.53%, 19.21% and 29.93%, 4 double inhibited group: 33.24%, 42.86% and 54.91%. In the in vivo experiments, the mice in the PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group and IL-2-stimulated-NK cells treatment group displayed a slowest tumor growth (F = 308.5, P<0.01 and a slower tumor growth compared with control group (F = 118.9, P<0.01, respectively. The median survival of the mice in the three groups were as follows: 1 conrol group: 29 days, 2 NK cells treatment group: 35 days (P = 0.0012, 3 PD-1 inhibited NK cells treatment group

  5. Tools for predicting the PK/PD of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Lei; Meibohm, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Assessments of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics are an integral part in the development of novel therapeutic agents. Compared with traditional small molecule drugs, therapeutic proteins possess many distinct PK/PD features that necessitate the application of modified or separate approaches for assessing their PK/PD relationships. In this review, the authors discuss tools that are utilized to describe and predict the PK/PD features of therapeutic proteins and that are valuable additions in the armamentarium of drug development approaches to facilitate and accelerate their successful preclinical and clinical development. A variety of state-of-the-art PK/PD tools is currently being applied and has been adjusted to support the development of proteins as therapeutics, including allometric scaling approaches, target-mediated disposition models, first-in-man dose calculations, physiologically based PK models and empirical and semi-mechanistic PK/PD modeling. With the advent of the next generation of biologics including bioengineered antibody constructs being developed, these tools will need to be further refined and adapted to ensure their applicability and successful facilitation of the drug development process for these novel scaffolds.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of pure iron implanted with Pd ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, J.M.; Lin, W.L.; Wu, Z.D.; Wang, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of pure iron implanted with Pd ions up to doses in the range 1x10 16 -1x10 18 ions/cm 2 at an extracting voltage 45kV by using MEVVA source ion implanter has been investigated. The concentration profiles and valence states of elements at the near surface of Pd implanted iron specimens were analyzed by AES and XPS respectively. The Anodic dissolution process of Pd implanted pure iron was measured by means of potentiokinetic sweep in a 0.5 mol/1 NaAc/Hac buffer solution with pH5.0. The open circuit corrosion potential as a function of immersion time was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of Pd implanted iron specimens. The experimental results show that Pd ion implantation decreases the critical passive current of iron and maintains a better passivity in acetate buffer solution with pH5.0. It is interesting that the active corrosion rate of Pd implanted iron is even higher than that of unimplanted one, when the oxide layer on the surface of iron has been damaged. (author)

  7. Preparation technology of 103Pd-110Agm composite alloy membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhuo; Chen Daming; Jin Xiaohai; Li Zhongyong; Guo Feihu; Qin Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of 103 Pd- 110 Ag m alloy membranes was the basis for the production of 103 Pd- 125 I composite sources. Taking 103 Pd and 110 Ag m as trace elements, the method of non-electrolytical plating was chosen to prepare the alloy membrane. A γ-detector and electron microscope (SEM) were used for quantitative and qualitative analysis, respectively. The pre-treatment of the support before the preparation of Palladium-silver composite membranes was discussed in detail. It was found that when the concentration of PdCl 2 was between 0.5 and 2.0 mmol/L the result was good. The effects of various factors were investigated, including the proportion of Pd and Ag, the concentrations of the total metal, ammonium hydroxide hydrazine and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, temperature, the time, and the rotation speed. By improving the reaction conditions the alloy membrane with metallic luster was obtained. Besides, the presence of Pd and Ag was observed in the alloy membranes by qualitative analysis. (authors)

  8. Diffusion of hydrogen in Pd-(Ce, Y, B) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kaneko, H.; Tsukahara, T.; Hirata, S.

    1987-01-01

    The study has been carried out to determine the diffusivity of hydrogen in Pd alloys containing Ce, Y and B in atom fractions up to θ/sub μ/ = 0.1 by an electrochemical permeation method, and to examine the lattice dilation effect on the diffusivity in these alloys. Ce and Y have been chosen because the solid solubility of both in Pd is about 13 at% in spite of the very large atomic size-factor difference between Pd and the solutes, and thus the expansion of the Pd lattice by Ce and Y is much larger than by Ag. Furthermore, it is of interest that the partial enthalpy of the dissolved hydrogen at infinite dilution ΔH 0 /sub H/ for Ce and Y is much smaller than for Pd. On the other hand, B atom also expands the Pd lattice in a way similar to Y, and sometimes B atoms may dissolve in the octahedral interstitial sites in the same way as hydrogen atoms

  9. Evidence for Anti-Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd Activity of Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS in bats, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd, is a cutaneous infection that has devastated North American bat populations since 2007. At present, there is no effective method for controlling this disease. Here, we evaluated the effect of propolis against Pd in vitro. Using Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA medium, approximately 1.7 × 107 conidia spores of the Pd strain M3906-2/mL were spread on each plate and grown to form a consistent lawn. A Kirby–Bauer disk diffusion assay was employed using different concentrations of propolis (1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, in plates incubated at 8 °C and 15 °C. At 8 °C and 15 °C, as the concentration of propolis increased, there was an increasing zone of inhibition (ZOI, reaching the highest degree at 10% and 25% concentrations, respectively. A germule suppression assay showed a similar effect on Pd conidia germination. A MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of propolis revealed multiple constituents with a potential anti-Pd activity, including cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, and dihydrochalcones, which could be further tested for their individual effects. Our study suggests that propolis or its individual constituents might be suitable products against Pd.

  10. Evidence for Anti-Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) Activity of Propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumya; McArthur, Robyn; Guo, Zhi Chao; McKerchar, Rory; Donkor, Kingsley; Xu, Jianping; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2017-12-21

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans ( Pd ), is a cutaneous infection that has devastated North American bat populations since 2007. At present, there is no effective method for controlling this disease. Here, we evaluated the effect of propolis against Pd in vitro. Using Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) medium, approximately 1.7 × 10⁷ conidia spores of the Pd strain M3906-2/mL were spread on each plate and grown to form a consistent lawn. A Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was employed using different concentrations of propolis (1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), in plates incubated at 8 °C and 15 °C. At 8 °C and 15 °C, as the concentration of propolis increased, there was an increasing zone of inhibition (ZOI), reaching the highest degree at 10% and 25% concentrations, respectively. A germule suppression assay showed a similar effect on Pd conidia germination. A MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of propolis revealed multiple constituents with a potential anti- Pd activity, including cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, and dihydrochalcones, which could be further tested for their individual effects. Our study suggests that propolis or its individual constituents might be suitable products against Pd .

  11. Aromatization of n-octane over Pd/C catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, Mengchen; Natelson, Robert H.; Campos, Andrew A.; Kolar, Praveen; Roberts, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase aromatization of n-octane was investigated using Pd/C catalyst. The objectives were to: (1) determine the effects of temperature (400-600 °C), weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) (0.8-∞), and hydrogen to hydrocarbon molar ratio (MR) (0-6) on conversion, selectivity, and yield (2) compare the activity of Pd/C with Pt/C and Pt/KL catalysts and (3) test the suitability of Pd/C for aromatization of different alkanes including n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane. Pd/C exhibited the best aromatization performance, including 54.4% conversion and 31.5% aromatics yield at 500 °C, WHSV = 2 h-1, and a MR of 2. The Pd/C catalyst had higher selectivity towards the preferred aromatics including ethylbenzene and xylenes, whereas Pt/KL had higher selectivity towards benzene and toluene. The results were somewhat consistent with adsorbed n-octane cyclization proceeding mainly through the six-membered ring closure mechanism. In addition, Pd/C was also capable of catalyzing aromatization of n-hexane and n-heptane. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure and Mobility of Metal Clusters in MOFs: Au, Pd, and AuPd Clusters in MOF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Walton, Krista S.; Sholl, David S.

    2012-01-01

    is just as important for nanocluster adsorption as open Zn or Mg metal sites. Using the large number of clusters generated by the GA, we developed a systematic method for predicting the mobility of adsorbed clusters. Through the investigation of diffusion paths a relationship between the cluster......Understanding the adsorption and mobility of metal–organic framework (MOF)-supported metal nanoclusters is critical to the development of these catalytic materials. We present the first theoretical investigation of Au-, Pd-, and AuPd-supported clusters in a MOF, namely MOF-74. We combine density...... functional theory (DFT) calculations with a genetic algorithm (GA) to reliably predict the structure of the adsorbed clusters. This approach allows comparison of hundreds of adsorbed configurations for each cluster. From the investigation of Au8, Pd8, and Au4Pd4 we find that the organic part of the MOF...

  13. The Pd distribution and Cu flow pattern of the Pd-plated Cu wire bond and their effect on the nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Wang, Ren-You; Ke, Wun-Bin; Wang, I-Sheng; Chiu, Ying-Ta; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pd distribution in Pd-plated Cu wires reveals the whirlpool flow pattern of Cu. ► The mechanisms of the Cu flow behavior and Pd distribution are proposed. ► At Pd-rich phases, small voids formed and followed the direction of Cu flow. ► Nanoindentation studies show the Cu ball bond is harder in regions with Pd. - Abstract: The Pd plating on the 20 μm Cu wire dissolves in the free air ball (FAB) and the Cu ball bond during the wire bonding process without forming intermetallic compounds. The limiting supply of Pd and the short bonding process, 15 ms of thermosonic bonding, result in uneven distribution of Pd in the as produced Cu ball bond. Also, the Pd-rich phase may accompany small voids formed within the FAB and the wire bond, and following the direction of semi-solid Cu flow. The Pd distribution, as evidenced by the focused ion beam (FIB) and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) mapping, reveals the whirlpool flow pattern of Cu within the FAB and the ball bond. Pd distributes within the copper ball through convective transport by the copper flow. Additionally, hardness measurements by nanoindentation testing show that the Cu ball bond is harder in the regions where Pd exists.

  14. Glycerol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Silva, Dionisio Fortunato da; Pino, Eddy Segura; Spinace, Estevan Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo; Santos, Mauro Coelhos dos

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-supported metal nanoparticles were prepared for fuel cell applications by radiation-induced reduction of metal ions precursors. Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts (Pd:Sn atomic ratio 90:10), prepared by using electron beam irradiation, were tested for glycerol electro-oxidation in single alkaline direct glycerol fuel cell (ADGFC). EDX analysis showed that the Pd:Sn atomic ratio is very similar to the nominal one. X-ray diffractograms of PdSn/C electrocatalyst showed the presence of Pd (fcc) phase. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) indicated that Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts have good activity for glycerol electro-oxidation, at room temperature. Experiments with single ADGFC were carried out from 60 to 90 deg C, using Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts and glycerol 2.0 mol.L -1 , as fuel. The best performance was obtained at 85 deg C, for both electrocatalysts. The Pd/C and PdSn/C electrocatalysts showed similar performance (34 mW cm -2 ), at 85 deg C. (author)

  15. Registration Day-Camp 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2016-01-01

    Registration for the CERN SA Day-camp are open for children from 4 to 6 years old From March 14 to 25 for children already enrolled in CERN SA EVE and School From April 4 to 15 for the children of CERN members of the personnel (MP) From April 18 for other children More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. The day-camp is open to all children. An inscription per week is proposed, cost 480.-CHF/week, lunch included The camp will be open weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. For further questions, thanks you for contacting us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch.

  16. Three Presidents in one day

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, President of Argentina, in the ATLAS cavern with Minister of Science and Technology, Lino Barañao. The President of Mozambique, Armando Guebuza, being shown a crystal from the CMS calorimeter by Jim Virdee, CMS spokesperson, and Felicitas Pauss, CERN Coordinator for External Relations. The President of Poland, Lech Kaczyński, and the First Lady visited the CMS experiment. It was a busy day for many at CERN on 15 June with visits from the Presidents of Argentina, Poland and Mozambique all in one day! The three Presidents were in Geneva for a summit organized by the International Labour Organization (ILO), and couldn’t resist the opportunity to see CERN before heading home. Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, President of Argentina, visited the ATLAS cavern with Minister of Science and Technology, Lino Barañao. While at CERN Kirchner signed an agreement be...

  17. 2005 yearly days of petroleum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, R.; Susbielles, G.

    2005-01-01

    14 articles are gathered in this data sheet; they deal with the opening address of the 2005 petroleum days; the hydrocarbons: the evolutive resource; the para-petroleum engineers and the Europe; the speech of Mr Francois Loos; the Shell global scenarios to 2025; the evolution of the gas resource and its uses; the French para-petroleum industry; Bernard Bensaid, Corinne Sagary, Armelle Saniere, economic studies, IFP; the contribution of the innovation and of the technology in the diversification of the hydrocarbons supply; innovation and diversification of the petroleum resource: the point of view of Total; research, development and diversification of the petroleum resource; innovation in services companies; innovation in study and development and engineering; the closing address of the 2005 petroleum days. (O.M.)

  18. Electrodeposition of thin Pd-Ag films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasler, P.; Allmendinger, T.

    1993-01-01

    Thin Pd-Ag layers were electroplated preferably on brass and on nickel substrates using a two-compartment cell separated by an anion exchange membrane. The weakly alkaline electrolyte contained glycine-glycinate as the major complexing agents. The plating experiments were usually carried out without stirring, at different potentials and temperatures and in the absence or in the presence of sodium benzaldehyde-2,4-disulphonate (BDS). The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Their compositions were determined analytically by the inductively coupled plasma technique. In addition, the film porosity was tested. Electrodeposition in almost limiting current conditions for both components and without simultaneous hydrogen evolution led to deposits with compositions being in good agreement with the molar metal ratio in the electrolyte (77:23). The best results were achieved between 0 and -50 mV with respect to a reversible hydrogen electrode at 0 C in the presence of BDS. These deposits were bright, had good adherence and exhibited no pores at a film thickness of 1.2 μm. At too negative potentials, the deposits became black and powdery. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of colloidal Pd and Pd-alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, M.H. [General Motors R and D Technical Center, Warren, MI (United States); Gyenge, E.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Northwood, D.O. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    An evaluation was conducted to assess the use of colloidal palladium (Pd) and Pd alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell applications. A modified Bonneman method was used to investigate borohydride oxidation on supported Pd and Pd-alloy nano-electrocatalysts. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry, and single fuel cell test stations were used to determine Tafel slopes, exchange current densities, oxidation peak potentials, and fuel cell performance. The study also investigated the influence of temperature and oxidant flow and fuel flow rates on fuel cell performance. The study showed that the current density of the fuel cell increased with increases in temperature for all the investigated Pd electrocatalysts. However, the increase in current density was not as high as expected when fuel flow rates were increased. A current density of 50 mA cm{sup -2} was observed at 298 K with a Pd-Ir anode catalyst operating at a cell voltage of 0.5 V. 28 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs.

  20. Enhancement in anomalous Hall resistivity of Co/Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy by Ga+ ion irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we report the effect of Ga+ ion irradiation on anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and longitudinal resistivity (ρxx) in [Co(3 Å)/Pd(5 Å)]80 multilayer and Co 42Pd58 alloy. 4- and 2-fold increases in anomalous Hall resistivity (ρAH) in the Co/Pd multilayer and CoPd alloy have been observed after irradiations at doses of 2.4 × 1015 and 3.3×10 15 ions/cm2, respectively. Skew scattering and side jump contributions to AHE have been analyzed based on the scaling relationship ρAH = aρxx + bρ2xx. For the Co/Pd multilayer, AHE is mainly affected by ion irradiation-induced interface diffusion and defects. For the CoPd alloy, the increase in doses above 1.5 × 1015 ions/cm2 induces a sign change in skew scattering, followed by the skew scattering contribution to AHE overwhelming the side jump contribution, this phenomenon should be attributed to irradiation-induced defects and modifications in chemical ordering. © Copyright EPLA, 2014.

  1. "Every day..." : [poems] / Doris Kareva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kareva, Doris, 1958-

    2003-01-01

    Autori tutvustus lk. 282. Sisu: "Every day..." ; "I dream that I heard Satan speak..." ; "Rainbow-coloured confusion bears us..." ; "Viewing the rainbowing world..." ; "No time to write the final draft..." ; "Burnt poems..." ; Midas ; Pygmalion ; Enigma 1-5 ; Concerto strumenti e voce. Orig.: "Iga päev..." ; "Ma nägin unes - Saatan kõneles..." ; "Viib sünnieelsest unest surmaunne..." ; "Vaadeldes vikerkaarlevat maailma..." ; "Põletatud luuletused..." ; Pygmalion ; Müsteerium 1-5 ; Concerto strumenti e voce

  2. STS-95 Day 03 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this third day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen checking out equipment that will be used for the deployment of the Spartan, a small, Shuttle-launched and retrieved satellite, whose mission is to study the Sun.

  3. The early days of incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Landfills reaching capacity, beaches fouled with trash, neighborhood residents protesting waste disposal sites in their backyards, and municipalities forced to recycle. Sound familiar? These issues might have been taken from today`s headlines, but they were also problems facing mechanical engineers a century ago. Conditions such as these were what led engineers to design the first incinerators for reducing the volume of municipal garbage, as well as for producing heat and electricity. The paper discusses these early days.

  4. Innovation and energy. ECRIN day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    ECRIN is an association jointly created by the French atomic energy commission (CEA) and the French national center of scientific research (CNRS). It gathers experts from the research and industry worlds, representatives of institutions and decision making peoples in order to work on important topics like energy. This document gathers the working documents and transparencies presented at the ECRIN day on energy and innovation: opening talk of C. Birraux (head of the parliamentary office of evaluation of scientific and technological choices); the energy of seas (offshore wind power, wave energy, tide currents energy, thermal energy of seas, osmotic energy, tidal energy); synthetic fuels (stakes, possible options, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, GTL, CTL, BTL, production with CO 2 recycling); capture and geological sequestration of CO 2 : a general overview (stakes, solutions, capture and sequestration, transport, geologic disposal, present day situation and perspectives); geothermal energy: new prospects (enhanced geothermal systems, hot-dry-rocks and hot fractured rocks, advances, cost, advantages and drawbacks); heat pumps and valorization of low temperature heat sources (space heating, district heating networks, heat pumps, artificial geothermal energy, low temperature water transport, thermal potentiality); heat and coldness storage and transport (use of intermittent energy sources, cogeneration, optimisation of processes, recovery of heat losses, CO 2 capture, present-day situation, problems to be solved, integration of systems and processes); plastic photovoltaic solar cells (market, stakes, potentialities of organic materials for photovoltaic conversion, state-of-the-art, research in Europe and France, perspectives); conclusion of the Ecrin day (challenges, diversification of energy sources, energy efficiency, abatement of CO 2 emissions, role of ECRIN). (J.S.)

  5. [Organizational recommendations for day surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontemps, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    In France, the delayed development of day surgery compared to other countries led the ANAP and the HAS in 2011 to enter into a joint work program to provide some reference guide for hospitals to change their practices to outpatient. In this context, organizational guidelines and operational tools were published in May 2013. The method of construction of the recommendations resulting from an original work that combined a three-fold approach: field vision by identifying the highlights of 15 hospitals selected for their representative performance and analyzing the risks of five voluntary hospitals, mobilization organizational theories from the social sciences, using 53 professional experts. The work concluded on 16 organizational recommendations under four forms (basic principles, strategic elements, operational elements and perspectives). These recommendations are accompanied by tools and guides diagnosis and implementation, as well as productions for further reflection. These organizational recommendations confirmed the specificity of day surgery, which is not related to the act, but to the organization, management and optimization of different flows of a hospital (patient flow, professional flows, logistical, informational…). The performance of a day surgery organization is linked to its ability to control its flow and anticipation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation of Pd-Diimine@SBA-15 and Its Catalytic Performance for the Suzuki Coupling Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahuan Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient and stable Pd-diimine@SBA-15 catalyst was successfully prepared by immobilizing Pd onto diimine-functionalized mesoporous silica SBA-15. With the help of diimine functional groups grafted onto the SBA-15, Pd could be anchored on a support with high dispersion. Pd-diimine@SBA-15 catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic performance for the Suzuki coupling reaction of electronically diverse aryl halides and phenylboronic acid under mild conditions with an ultralow amount of Pd (0.05 mol % Pd. When the catalyst amount was increased, it could catalyze the coupling reaction of chlorinated aromatics with phenylboronic acid. Compared with the catalytic performances of Pd/SBA-15 and Pd-diimine@SiO2 catalysts, the Pd-diimine@SBA-15 catalyst exhibited higher hydrothermal stability and could be repeatedly used four times without a significant decrease of its catalytic activity.

  7. Effect of Pt coverage in Pt-deposited Pd nanostructure electrodes on electrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ah-Reum; Lee, Young-Woo; Kwak, Da-Hee; Park, Kyung-Won [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We have fabricated Pt-deposited Pd electrodes via a two-gun sputtering deposition system by separately operating Pd and Pt target as a function of sputtering time of Pt target. For Pt-deposited Pd electrodes (Pd/Pt-X), Pd were first deposited on the substrates at 20 W for 5min, followed by depositing Pt on the Pd-only electrodes as a function of sputtering time (X=1, 3, 5, 7, and 10min) at 20W on the Pt target. As the sputtering time of Pt target increased, the portion of Pt on the Pd electrodes increased, representing an increased coverage of Pt on the Pd electrodes. The Pd/Pt-7 electrode having an optimized Pt coverage exhibits an excellent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction.

  8. Structural basis of a novel PD-L1 nanobody for immune checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Wei, Hudie; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Bai, Yu; Wang, Pilin; Wu, Jiawei; Jiang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yugang; Cai, Haiyan; Xu, Ting; Zhou, Aiwu

    2017-01-01

    The use of antibodies to target immune checkpoints, particularly PD-1/PD-L1, has made a profound impact in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we identified KN035, an anti-PD-L1 nanobody that can strongly induce T-cell responses and inhibit tumor growth. The crystal structures of KN035 complexed with PD-L1 and free PD-L1, solved here at 1.7 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively, show that KN035 competes with PD-1 (programmed death protein 1) for the same flat surface on PD-L1, mainly through a single surface loop of 21 amino acids. This loop forms two short helices and develops key hydrophobic and ionic interactions with PD-L1 residues, such as Ile54, Tyr56 and Arg113, which are also involved in PD-1 binding. The detailed mutagenesis study identified the hotspot residues of the PD-L1 surface and provides an explanation for the stronger (~1 000-fold) binding of KN035 to PD-L1 than PD-1 and its lack of binding to PD-L2. Overall, this study reveals how a single immunoglobulin-variable scaffold of KN035 or PD-1 can bind to a flat protein surface through either a single surface loop or beta-sheet strands; and provides a basis for designing new immune checkpoint blockers and generating bi-specific antibodies for combination therapy.

  9. Affinity purification mass spectrometry analysis of PD-1 uncovers SAP as a new checkpoint inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Michael; Tocheva, Anna S; Sandigursky, Sabina; Nayak, Shruti; Philips, Elliot A; Nichols, Kim E; Strazza, Marianne; Azoulay-Alfaguter, Inbar; Askenazi, Manor; Neel, Benjamin G; Pelzek, Adam J; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Mor, Adam

    2018-01-16

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is an essential inhibitory receptor in T cells. Antibodies targeting PD-1 elicit durable clinical responses in patients with multiple tumor indications. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of patients do not respond to anti-PD-1 treatment, and a better understanding of the signaling pathways downstream of PD-1 could provide biomarkers for those whose tumors respond and new therapeutic approaches for those whose tumors do not. We used affinity purification mass spectrometry to uncover multiple proteins associated with PD-1. Among these proteins, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) was functionally and mechanistically analyzed for its contribution to PD-1 inhibitory responses. Silencing of SAP augmented and overexpression blocked PD-1 function. T cells from patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), who lack functional SAP, were hyperresponsive to PD-1 signaling, confirming its inhibitory role downstream of PD-1. Strikingly, signaling downstream of PD-1 in purified T cell subsets did not correlate with PD-1 surface expression but was inversely correlated with intracellular SAP levels. Mechanistically, SAP opposed PD-1 function by acting as a molecular shield of key tyrosine residues that are targets for the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, which mediates PD-1 inhibitory properties. Our results identify SAP as an inhibitor of PD-1 function and SHP2 as a potential therapeutic target in patients with XLP.

  10. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs.

  11. Immunohistochemical Analysis of PD-L1 Expression in Canine Malignant Cancers and PD-1 Expression on Lymphocytes in Canine Oral Melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Maekawa

    Full Text Available Spontaneous cancers are common diseases in dogs. Among these, some malignant cancers such as oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, and mast cell tumor are often recognized as clinical problems because, despite their high frequencies, current treatments for these cancers may not always achieve satisfying outcomes. The absence of effective systemic therapies against these cancers leads researchers to investigate novel therapeutic modalities, including immunotherapy. Programmed death 1 (PD-1 is a costimulatory receptor with immunosuppressive function. When it binds its ligands, PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1 or PD-L2, PD-1 on T cells negatively regulates activating signals from the T cell receptor, resulting in the inhibition of the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Aberrant PD-L1 expression has been reported in many human cancers and is considered an immune escape mechanism for cancers. In clinical trials, anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies induced tumor regression for several malignancies, including advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. In this study, to assess the potential of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis as a novel therapeutic target for canine cancer immunotherapy, immunohistochemical analysis of PD-L1 expression in various malignant cancers of dogs was performed. Here, we show that dog oral melanoma, osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumor, mammary adenocarcinoma, and prostate adenocarcinoma expressed PD-L1, whereas some other types of cancer did not. In addition, PD-1 was highly expressed on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from oral melanoma, showing that lymphocytes in this cancer type might have been functionally exhausted. These results strongly encourage the clinical application of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors as novel therapeutic agents against these cancers in dogs.

  12. A rare moderate‐sized (Mw 4.9) earthquake in Kansas: Rupture process of the Milan, Kansas, earthquake of 12 November 2014 and its relationship to fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, George; Rubinstein, Justin L.; Yeck, William; McNamara, Daniel E.; Mueller, Charles; Boyd, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The largest recorded earthquake in Kansas occurred northeast of Milan on 12 November 2014 (Mw 4.9) in a region previously devoid of significant seismic activity. Applying multistation processing to data from local stations, we are able to detail the rupture process and rupture geometry of the mainshock, identify the causative fault plane, and delineate the expansion and extent of the subsequent seismic activity. The earthquake followed rapid increases of fluid injection by multiple wastewater injection wells in the vicinity of the fault. The source parameters and behavior of the Milan earthquake and foreshock–aftershock sequence are similar to characteristics of other earthquakes induced by wastewater injection into permeable formations overlying crystalline basement. This earthquake also provides an opportunity to test the empirical relation that uses felt area to estimate moment magnitude for historical earthquakes for Kansas.

  13. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel with 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV with ATLAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

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    2012-03-16

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is performed in the diphoton decay channel. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb(-1) collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s=7 TeV. In the diphoton mass range 110-150 GeV, the largest excess with respect to the background-only hypothesis is observed at 126.5 GeV, with a local significance of 2.8 standard deviations. Taking the look-elsewhere effect into account in the range 110-150 GeV, this significance becomes 1.5 standard deviations. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass ranges of 113-115 GeV and 134.5-136 GeV.

  14. Autoionisation of N5+ (nln'l') with n = 2,3,4 and n' >= n measured by electron spectrometry in collisions of N7+ with He and H2, at 4.9 keV amu-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Marrakchi, A.I.; Dousson, S.; Hitz, D.

    1984-01-01

    a spectroscopic investigation of electrons coming from autoionising states N 5+ (nln'l'), with n=2,3,4 and n' >= n, of the fast ion has been made at 11.6 0 and 4.9 keV amu -1 . Only exothermic reactions are observed. It is shown that the ionisation potential of the target has a strong influence on the more probable values of n and n'. In N 7+ -He collisions, the n=3, n'=3 configurations are the more excited. In N 7+ -H 2 , the capture process is less selective since n=3, n' > 3 and also n=4, n' >= 4 configurations are strongly populated. In all these cases, the residual N 6+ ion is left in an excited state (n=2 or 3). The n=2, n' > 2 excitation probability is found to be much smaller for the two collisional systems. (author)

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the diphoton decay channel with 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

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Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dean, Simon; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kennedy, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuler, Georges; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Vellidis, Constantine; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vlasov, Nikolai; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Loeben, Joerg; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobiev, Alexander; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Voss, Thorsten Tobias; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zanello, Lucia; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson is performed in the diphoton decay channel. The data used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb-1 collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. In the diphoton mass range 110-150 GeV, the largest excess with respect to the background-only hypothesis is observed at 126.5 GeV, with a local significance of 2.8 standard deviations. Taking the look-elsewhere effect into account in the range 110-150 GeV, this significance becomes 1.5 standard deviations. The Standard Model Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass ranges of 113-115 GeV and 134.5-136 GeV.

  16. Constrained Photophysics of 5,7-dimethoxy-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-1-one in the Bioenvironment of Serum Albumins: A Spectroscopic Endeavour Supported by Molecular Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Amrit Krishna; Sau, Abhishek; Pal, Uttam; Saha, Chandan; Basu, Samita

    2017-07-01

    This paper vividly indicates that steady state as well as time-resolved fluorescence techniques can serve as highly sensitive monitors to explore the interactions of 5,7-dimethoxy-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-1-one with model transport proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA). Besides these, we have used fluorescence anisotropy study to assess the degree of restrictions imparted by the micro-environments of serum albumins. Again, to speculate the triplet excited state interaction between such fluorophore and albumin proteins (BSA& HSA), laser flash-photolysis experiments have been carried out. Molecular docking experiments have also been performed to support the conclusions obtained from steady state experiments.

  17. Synthesis and biological activity of novel series of 4-methoxy, and 4,9-dimethoxy-5-substituted furo[2,3-g]-1,2,3-benzoxathiazine-7,7-dioxide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawy, Eslam R; Ebaid, Manal S; Abo-Salem, Heba M; El-Hallouty, Salwa; Kassem, Emad M; Mandour, Adel H

    2014-05-01

    A novel series of 4-methoxy, and 4,9-dimethoxy-5-substituted furo[2,3-g]-1,2,3-benzoxathiazine-7,7-dioxide derivatives 3a,b, 10a-g and 11a-g were prepared in good yields via the reaction of 4-methoxy (1a) and 4,7-dimethoxy-5-acetyl-6-hydroxybenzofurans (1b) and their α,β-unsaturated keto derivatives 6a-g and 7a-g with chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI). On the other hand, N-chlorosulfonyl carbamate derivatives 4a,b, 12a,b and 13a,b were prepared and allowed to react with piperidine to give the corresponding N-piperidinosulfonyl carbamate derivatives 5a,b, 14a,b and 15a,b, respectively. Sixteen new target compounds 3a,b, 10a-g, and 11a-g were tested for their DPPH radical-scavenging, and in vitro antiproliferative activity against A-549, MCF7 and HCT-116 cancer cell lines. Compounds 10a, 11c, 11e, and 11g showed moderate DPPH radical-scavenging activity compared to ascorbic acid at 100 μg/mL. 4,9-Dimethoxy-5-substituted styrylfuro[3,2-g]-1,2,3-benzoxathiazine-7,7-dioxides 11a, 11b, and 11c were found to be highly active against A-549 and HCT-116 cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 0.02 to 0.08 μmol/mL compared to doxorubicin with IC50 = 0.04 and 0.06 μmol/mL, respectively.

  18. Buffer layer annealing effects on the magnetization reversal process in Pd/Co/Pd systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassatoui, A.; Belhi, R.; Vogel, J.; Abdelmoula, K.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of annealing the buffer layer on the magnetization reversal behavior in Pd/Co/Pd thin films using magneto-optical Kerr microscopy. It was found that annealing the buffer layer at 150 °C for 1 h decreases the coercivity and increases the saturation magnetization and the effective magnetic anisotropy constant. This study also shows that the annealing induces a change of the magnetization reversal from a mixed nucleation and domain wall propagation process to one dominated by domain wall propagation. This result demonstrates that the main effect of annealing the buffer layer is to decrease the domain wall pinning in the Co layer, favoring the domain wall propagation mode. - Highlights: • The buffer layer surface morphology changes upon annealing of the buffer layer. • The coercivity decreases while the saturation magnetization and the effective anisotropy increase with the annealing of the buffer layer. • The reversal process changes from a mixed nucleation and domain wall propagation process to one dominated by domain wall propagation when annealing the buffer layer.

  19. Brazing of Cu with Pd-based metallic glass filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terajima, Takeshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: terajima@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nakata, Kazuhiro [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yuji [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Zhang, Wei; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Metallic glass has several unique properties, including high mechanical strength, small solidification shrinkage, small elastic modulus and supercooling state, all of which are well suited as a residual stress buffer for metal and ceramic joining. In the present preliminary study, we demonstrated brazing of Cu rods with Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} metallic glass filler. The brazing was carried out at 873 K for 1 min in a vacuum atmosphere (1 x 10{sup -3} Pa), and then the specimens were quenched at the rate of 30 K/s by blowing He. The metallic glass brazing of Cu using Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} filler was successful, with the exception that several voids remained in the filler. According to micro-focused X-ray diffraction, no diffraction patterns were observed at both the center of the Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} filler and the Cu/Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} interface. The result showed that the Cu specimens were joined with Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} filler in the glassy state. The tensile fracture strength of the brazed specimens ranged from 20 to 250 MPa. The crack extension from the voids in the Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} filler may have caused the results to be uneven and very low compared to the strength of Pd-based bulk metallic glass.

  20. Reorienting the immune system in the treatment of cancer by using anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels H; Donia, Marco; Andersen, Mads H

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, the programmed death 1 (PD-1) pathway is involved in limiting the killing of bystander cells during an infection and controlling autoimmunity. However, cancers exploit this system to avoid immune killing, and PD-1 ligand 1 and 2 (PD-L1 and PD-L2) expression on tumor cells, as wel...... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. As already shown with nivolumab and ipilimumab, the combination of PD-1 pathway blockade with other anticancer agents holds promise in the form of additive synergistic anticancer effects....

  1. Synthesis of PdO/MCM-41 nanocomposites using trans-[PdCl2(PEt3)2] as the source of metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Pineda, Jessica; Rio, Jose Manuel del; Carreto, Enrique; Terres, Eduardo; Montoya, J. Asencion; Zuniga-Gonzalez, Maria de Jesus; Morgado, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Three PdO/MCM-41 nanocomposites containing PdO species that are dispersed on an MCM-41 support have been prepared using trans-[PdCl 2 (PEt 3 ) 2 ] as the source of metal. Thermal gravimetric analysis of the decomposition of this complex in air reveals a remarkable mass loss of all nonmetallic elements centered at 300 deg. C. The materials were characterized with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), nitrogen sorption and TEM, which showed that the PdO nanoparticles were present inside the pores of MCM-41. XRPD analysis confirms formation of PdO (palladinite) nanocrystals, as the sole crystalline phase present in the nanocomposites.

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis and prognostic significance of PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Isidro; López-Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Scotlandi, Katia; Picci, Piero; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) are aggressive neoplasms with scant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. We analyzed the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of PD-L1 and PD-1 and their prognostic significance in clinically localized neoplasms in a cohort of 370 ESFT. Slides prepared from tissue microarrays were stained for PD-L1, PD-1, and CD8. Membranous/cytoplasmic staining over 5% of tumor cells was regarded as positive for PD-L1 and PD-1. Prognostic analysis was done considering only clinically localized tumors (n = 217). PD-L1 expression was present in 19% of ESFT, while PD-1 was expressed in 26%. Forty-eight percent of tumors were negative and 12% were positive for both PD-L1 and PD-1. Metastatic tumors displayed higher expression of PD-L1 (p < 0.0001). Histological subtypes were not correlated with PD-L1 or PD-1 positivity. ESFT with elevated proliferation index (Ki-67) were associated with higher PD-L1 expression (p = 0.049). Regarding prognosis, no significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS), whereas lack of PD-1 expression in tumor cells was correlated with both poor PFS (p = 0.02) and poor OS (p = 0.004). Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes were observed in 15.4% of ESFT with informative results (347 tumors). No correlation was found between tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes and ESFT histological subtypes, tumor location, or PD-1 and PD-L1 expression, nor with PFS (p = 0.473) or OS (p = 0.087). PD-L1 expression was not significantly related to prognosis. PD-1 was expressed in 26% of ESFT tumor cells and may have prognostic and therapeutic implications. CD8 expression in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was not related to prognosis.

  3. High stability and high activity Pd/ITO-CNTs electrocatalyst for direct formic acid fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Wei-Li; Gu, Da-Ming; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Zhang, Jing-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The addition of ITO in Pd/CNTs catalyst significantly improves the activity and stability of catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation due to excellent stability and high electrical conductivity of ITO, and metal-support interaction between Pd nanoparticles and ITO. - Highlights: • Pd catalyst with ITO and CNTs as a mixture support for DFAFC was first prepared by microwave-assisted polyol process. • The activity and stability of Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst is significantly higher than those of Pd/CNTs. • When ITO content is 50% of ITO/CNTs support mass, Pd/ITO-CNTs exhibits the best performance. - Abstract: Indium tin oxide (ITO) and carbon nanotube hybrid has been explored as a support for Pd catalyst. Pd/ITO-CNTs catalysts with different ITO contents were prepared by the microwave-assisted polyol process. The as-prepared Pd/ITO-CNTs catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and electrochemical measurements in this work. The TEM results show that Pd particle size distribution in the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst is more uniform than that in Pd/CNTs, indicating that the ITO can promote the dispersion of Pd nanoparticles. It is found that there is metal-support interaction between Pd nanoparticles and ITO in the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst through XPS test. The results of electrochemical tests prove that the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalysts exhibit higher electro-catalytic activity and stability than Pd/CNTs toward formic acid electrooxidation. When the ITO content is 50% of ITO-CNTs support mass, the Pd/ITO-CNTs catalyst has the best catalytic performance for formic acid electrooxidation. The peak current density of formic acid electrooxidation on the Pd/ITO-CNTs50% electrode is 1.53 times as high as that on Pd/CNTs, 2.31 times higher than that on Pd/ITO. The results of aging

  4. Rheed Investigation of Pd/Al Bimetallic System on KCl(001) Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, K.; Moroz, V.; Matolín, V.

    Pd/Al alloys have very interesting properties from the point of view of their possible application in heterogeneous catalysis. Preparation of small heteroepitaxial Pd/Al alloy particles opens a new way in studies of the influence of Pd/Al crystallographic structure on the alloy catalytic properties. Pd/Al alloy particles were grown by the molecular beam epitaxy method. Their crystallographical structure was controlled by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). It was found that Pd deposited on epitaxial 3D Al particles grown on KCl is intermixing with Al. This process is accompanied by the variation of lattice parameter from the Al value to the Pd one.

  5. National Latino AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-10-08

    This podcast highlights National Latino AIDS Awareness Day, to increase awareness of the disproportionate impact of HIV on the Hispanic or Latino population in the United States and dependent territories. The podcast reminds Hispanics or Latinos that they have the power to take control of their health and protect themselves against HIV.  Created: 10/8/2014 by Office of Health Equity, Office of the Director, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 10/14/2014.

  6. STS-72 Flight Day 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-72 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Brian Duffy, Pilot Brent W. Jett, and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Daniel T. Barry, Winston E. Scott, and Koichi Wakata (NASDA), awakened to music from the Walt Disney movie, 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Chiao and Scott performed the second spacewalk of the mission where they tested equipment and work platforms that will be used in building the planned International Space Station. This spacewalk was almost seven hours long. Wakata conducted an interview with and answered questions from six graders from a Japanese school in Houston, Texas.

  7. STS-95 Day 02 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen preparing a glovebox device in the middeck area of Discovery, an enclosed research facility that will support numerous science investigations throughout the mission. Payload Specialist John Glenn, activates the Microgravity Encapsulation Process experiment (MEPS). This experiment will study the formation of capsules containing two kinds of anti-tumor drugs that could be delivered directly to solid tumors with applications for future chemotherapy treatments and the pharmaceutical industry.

  8. STS-95 Day 05 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this fifth day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, check the status of components of the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test (HOST) payload, which provides an on-orbit test bed for hardware that will be used during the third Hubble servicing mission. Then Parazynski and Pilot Steve Lindsey set up some of the tools that will be used during the rendezvous and subsequent capture and reberthing of the Spartan satellite.

  9. STS-95 Day 06 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this sixth day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, test a device called the Video Guidance Sensor, a component of an automated docking system being prepared for use on the International Space Station. As Discovery closes in on Spartan, the astronauts will use a laser system that provides precise measurements of how far away the shuttle is from a target and how fast it is moving toward or away from the target.

  10. US pediatric trauma patient unplanned 30-day readmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Krista K; Shi, Junxin; Xiang, Henry; Thakkar, Rajan K; Groner, Jonathan I

    2018-04-01

    We sought to determine readmission rates and risk factors for acutely injured pediatric trauma patients. We produced 30-day unplanned readmission rates for pediatric trauma patients using the 2013 National Readmission Database (NRD). In US pediatric trauma patients, 1.7% had unplanned readmissions within 30days. The readmission rate for patients with index operating room procedures was no higher at 1.8%. Higher readmission rates were seen in patients with injury severity scores (ISS)=16-24 (3.4%) and ISS ≥25 (4.9%). Higher rates were also seen in patients with LOS beyond a week, severe abdominal and pelvic region injuries (3.0%), crushing (2.8%) and firearm injuries (4.5%), and in patients with fluid and electrolyte disorders (3.9%). The most common readmission principal diagnoses were injury, musculoskeletal/integumentary diagnoses and infection. Nearly 39% of readmitted patients required readmission operative procedures. Most common were operations on the musculoskeletal system (23.9% of all readmitted patients), the integumentary system (8.6%), the nervous system (6.6%), and digestive system (2.5%). Overall, the readmission rate for pediatric trauma patients was low. Measures of injury severity, specifically length of stay, were most useful in identifying those who would benefit from targeted care coordination resources. This is a Level III retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of Pd/PANI/Pd sandwich-structured nanotube array catalysts with special shape effects and synergistic effects for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Liang; Xu, Han; Feng, Jin-Xian; Ding, Liang-Xin; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-07-24

    Low cost, high activity, and long-term durability are the main requirements for commercializing fuel cell electrocatalysts. Despite tremendous efforts, developing non-Pt anode electrocatalysts with high activity and long-term durability at low cost remains a significant technical challenge. Here we report a new type of hybrid Pd/PANI/Pd sandwich-structured nanotube array (SNTA) to exploit shape effects and synergistic effects of Pd-PANI composites for the oxidation of small organic molecules for direct alcohol fuel cells. These synthesized Pd/PANI/Pd SNTAs exhibit significantly improved electrocatalytic activity and durability compared with Pd NTAs and commercial Pd/C catalysts. The unique SNTAs provide fast transport and short diffusion paths for electroactive species and high utilization rate of catalysts. Besides the merits of nanotube arrays, the improved electrocatalytic activity and durability are especially attributed to the special Pd/PANI/Pd sandwich-like nanostructures, which results in electron delocalization between Pd d orbitals and PANI π-conjugated ligands and in electron transfer from Pd to PANI.

  12. Ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/c and PdRh/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Pino, Eddy Segura; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, carbon-supported Pd (Pd/C) and bimetallic PdRh (Pd:Rh 90:10 atomic ratio) (PdRh/C) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The morphology and composition of the obtained materials were characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (VC), Chronoamperometry (CA), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic activities of the electrocatalysts toward the ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in alkaline medium in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in a range temperature of 50 to 85 deg C. The best performances were obtained at 85 deg C (25 mW.cm -2 ) and 75 deg C (38 mW.cm -2 ) for Pd/C and PdRh/C electrocatalysts, respectively. The XRD of the PdRh/C electrocatalyst showed the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) phase. CV and CA experiments showed that PdRh/C electrocatalyst demonstrated superior activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation at room temperature, compared to Pd/C electrocatalyst. (author)

  13. Ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline medium using Pd/c and PdRh/C electrocatalysts prepared by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Geraldes, Adriana Napoleao; Pino, Eddy Segura; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Linardi, Marcelo, E-mail: dfsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: drinager@ig.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, carbon-supported Pd (Pd/C) and bimetallic PdRh (Pd:Rh 90:10 atomic ratio) (PdRh/C) electrocatalysts were prepared using electron beam irradiation. The morphology and composition of the obtained materials were characterized by Cyclic voltammetry (VC), Chronoamperometry (CA), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic activities of the electrocatalysts toward the ethanol electro-oxidation were evaluated in alkaline medium in a single alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC), in a range temperature of 50 to 85 deg C. The best performances were obtained at 85 deg C (25 mW.cm{sup -2}) and 75 deg C (38 mW.cm{sup -2}) for Pd/C and PdRh/C electrocatalysts, respectively. The XRD of the PdRh/C electrocatalyst showed the presence of Pd-rich (fcc) phase. CV and CA experiments showed that PdRh/C electrocatalyst demonstrated superior activity toward ethanol electro-oxidation at room temperature, compared to Pd/C electrocatalyst. (author)

  14. Malignant mesothelioma effusions are infiltrated by CD3+ T cells highly expressing PD-L1 and the PD-L1+ tumor cells within these effusions are susceptible to ADCC by the anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Swati; Thomas, Anish; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Zhang, Jingli; Morrow, Betsy; Steinberg, Seth M.; Orlandi, Augusto; Ferroni, Patrizia; Schlom, Jeffrey; Guadagni, Fiorella; Hassan, Raffit

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The functional aspects of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and PD ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoints in malignant mesothelioma have not been studied. METHODS Tumor samples from 65 patients with mesothelioma were evaluated for PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry and its prognostic significance. Malignant effusions from patients with pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma were evaluated for PD-1+ and PD-L1+ infiltrating lymphocytes and their role in inducing tumor cell PD-L1 expression. Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of avelumab, a fully humanized IgG1 anti PD-L1 antibody towards primary mesothelioma cell lines was evaluated in presence of autologous and allogeneic NK cells. RESULTS Of 65 pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma tumors examined, 41 (63%) were PD-L1 positive, which was associated with slightly inferior overall survival compared to patients with PD-L1 negative tumors (median 23.0 vs. 33.3 months; p=0.35). The frequency of PD-L1 expression was similar in pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma patients with 62% and 64% of samples positive, respectively. Of nine mesothelioma effusion samples evaluated, the fraction of cells expressing PD-L1 ranged from 12 to 83%. Of 7 patients with paired malignant effusion and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) samples, PD-L1 expression was significantly higher on CD3+ T cells present in malignant effusions as compared with PBMC (p=0.016). In addition, CD14+PD-1+ cells were elevated in malignant effusions compared with PBMC (p=0.031). The lymphocytes present in malignant effusions recognized autologous tumor cells and induced IFN-γ-mediated PD-L1 expression on the tumor cell surface. Of the three primary mesothelioma cell lines tested, two were susceptible to avelumab mediated ADCC in presence of autologous NK cells. CONCLUSION The majority of pleural as well as peritoneal mesothelioma express PD-L1. Malignant effusions in this disease are characterized by presence of tumor cells and CD3+ T

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells increase skin graft survival time and up-regulate PD-L1 expression in splenocytes of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravej, Ali; Geramizadeh, Bita; Azarpira, Negar; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Yaghobi, Ramin; Kalani, Mehdi; Khosravi, Maryam; Kouhpayeh, Amin; Karimi, Mohammad-Hossein

    2017-02-01

    Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gained considerable interests as hopeful therapeutic cells in transplantation due to their immunoregulatory functions. But exact mechanisms underlying MSCs immunoregulatory function is not fully understood. Herein, in addition to investigate the ability of MSCs to prolong graft survival time, the effects of them on the expression of PD-L1 and IDO immunomodulatory molecules in splenocytes of skin graft recipient mice was clarified. To achieve this goal, full-thickness skins were transplanted from C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice. MSCs were isolated from bone marrow of BALB/c mice and injected to the recipient mice. Skin graft survival was monitored daily to determine graft rejection time. On days 2, 5 and 10 post skin transplantation, serum cytokine levels and expression of PD-L1 and IDO mRNA and protein in the splenocytes of recipient mice were evaluated. The results showed that administration of MSCs prolonged skin graft survival time from 11 to 14 days. On days 2 and 5 post transplantation, splenocytes PD-L1 expression and IL-10 serum level in MSCs treated mice were higher than those in the controls, while IL-2 and IFN-γ levels were lower. Rejection in MSCs treated mice was accompanied by an increase in IL-2 and IFN-γ, and decrease in PD-L1 expression and IL-10 level. No difference in the expression of IDO between MSCs treated mice and controls was observed. In conclusion, we found that one of the mechanisms underlying MSCs immunomodulatory function could be up-regulating PD-L1 expression. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. IAEA Supports World Cancer Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cancer can strike anyone at anytime, young or old, rich or poor. It knows no borders. World Cancer Day, on 4 February, was initiated to raise global awareness of cancer issues and stimulate new strategies and thinking to combat the killer disease. Nowhere is the need greater than in the developing world, where millions of people are suffering and dying due to lack of cancer prevention and treatment. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 84 million people will die of cancer in the next 10 years, more than 70% of them in low-income countries, unless action is taken now. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) was created to help poorer countries confront the growing cancer crisis by integrating radiotherapy into comprehensive cancer control programmes. As it celebrates its third birthday on World Cancer Day, PACT can claim significant progress in building effective relationships with a broad array of stakeholders, initiating six pilot projects and gaining increasing support from Member States. The IAEA commends all organizations, agencies and individuals engaged in the battle to defeat this dreadful disease. We look forward to continued collaboration with international partners to help bring hope to cancer patients, to relieve their suffering and to save lives. (IAEA)

  17. Antiferromagnetic ordering in the plumbide EuPdPb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heletta, Lukas; Klenner, Steffen; Block, Theresa; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-07-01

    The plumbide EuPdPb was synthesized in polycrystalline form by reaction of the elements in a sealed niobium ampoule in a muffle furnace. The structure was refined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data: TiNiSi type, Pnma, a = 752.4(2), b = 476.0(2), c = 826.8(2) pm, wR2 = 0.0485, 704 F{sup 2} values and 20 variables. The europium atoms are coordinated by two tilted and puckered Pd{sub 3}Pb{sub 3} hexagons (280-289 pm Pd-Pb) with pronounced Eu-Pd bonding (312-339 pm). Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements show Curie-Weiss behaviour and an experimental magnetic moment of 7.35(1) μB per Eu atom. EuPdPb orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N} = 13.8(5) K and shows a metamagnetic transition at a critical field of 15 kOe. {sup 151}Eu Moessbauer spectra confirm divalent europium (δ = -10.04(1) mm s{sup -1}) and show full magnetic hyperfine field splitting (B{sub hf} = 21.1(1) T) at 6 K.

  18. Perancangan Sistem Informasi Penjualan Buku pada PD. Kencana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryani Maryani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available PD KENCANA is a company engaged in the sale of school administration equipment, office equipment and so forth. One of the processes that exist in PD KENCANA is the sales process. Based on book sales processes currently running on KENCANA PD, there are still some issues, namely duration of the process of making the sales memorandum book, because the manufacturing process is still done by hand writing. The purpose of this research is to design information systems in PD KENCANA book sales and provide reports on sales data of books with ease and on time. Methodology in the development of this system consists of activities which can be grouped into several stages, systems methodologies used in information system design uses the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC. Book Sales Information Systems In this KENCANA PD can assist the administration in managing the sale of books and making reports. In addition, this information system can also easily generate reports on book sales information per month or per year, accurate, precise and relevant, as expected.

  19. Influence of aging time on residual tritium in Pd beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinshui; Zhang Zhi; Su Yongjun; Jing Wenyong; Du Jie

    2012-01-01

    The amount of tritium in Pd beds. which were initially loaded at room temperature with tritium at the atomic ratio of T/Pd≈0.65 and aged 1.66 years, 3.47 years and 5.94 years, respectively, was investigated by methods of deuterium exchange, thermal desorption and aqua regia dissolution. Obtained results show that after deuterium exchange and thermal desorption, about 99% of tritium is desorbed from Pd tritide. and the amount of residual tritium become in- creasing significantly as the aged time is increased. which is 3.99 × 10 -7 gT/gPd, 4. 97 × 10 -7 gT/gPd and 1.29 × 10 -6 gT/gPd respectively. The increasing amount of residual tritium could be attributed to the increase of interstitial form of tritium, resulting from increasing interstitial type defects induced by the migration of 3 He atoms in interstitial sites as a function of aged time. (authors)

  20. Functional differences between PD-1+ and PD-1- CD4+ effector T cells in healthy donors and patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany A Goods

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 have been highly successful in the treatment of cancer. While PD-1 expression has been widely investigated, its role in CD4+ effector T cells in the setting of health and cancer remains unclear, particularly in the setting of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most aggressive and common form of brain cancer. We examined the functional and molecular features of PD-1+CD4+CD25-CD127+Foxp3-effector cells in healthy subjects and in patients with GBM. In healthy subjects, we found that PD-1+CD4+ effector cells are dysfunctional: they do not proliferate but can secrete large quantities of IFNγ. Strikingly, blocking antibodies against PD-1 did not rescue proliferation. RNA-sequencing revealed features of exhaustion in PD-1+ CD4 effectors. In the context of GBM, tumors were enriched in PD-1+ CD4+ effectors that were similarly dysfunctional and unable to proliferate. Furthermore, we found enrichment of PD-1+TIM-3+ CD4+ effectors in tumors, suggesting that co-blockade of PD-1 and TIM-3 in GBM may be therapeutically beneficial. RNA-sequencing of blood and tumors from GBM patients revealed distinct differences between CD4+ effectors from both compartments with enrichment in multiple gene sets from tumor infiltrating PD-1-CD4+ effectors cells. Enrichment of these gene sets in tumor suggests a more metabolically active cell state with signaling through other co-receptors. PD-1 expression on CD4 cells identifies a dysfunctional subset refractory to rescue with PD-1 blocking antibodies, suggesting that the influence of immune checkpoint inhibitors may involve recovery of function in the PD-1-CD4+ T cell compartment. Additionally, co-blockade of PD-1 and TIM-3 in GBM may be therapeutically beneficial.

  1. Ultra-low Pt decorated PdFe Alloy Nanoparticles for Formic Acid Electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yawei; Du, Chunyu; Han, Guokang; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A cost-efficient way is used to prepare transition-noble metal alloy nanoparticles. • The Pd 50 Fe 50 /C catalyst shows excellent activity for formic acid oxidation (FAO). • Much activity enhancement of FAO is acquired by ultra-low Pt decorated Pd 50 Fe 50 . • A synergistic mechanism between Pt clusters and PdFe is proposed during the FAO. - Abstract: Palladium (Pd), has demonstrated promising electro-catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation, but suffers from extremely low abundance. Recently alloying with a transition metal has been considered as an effective approach to reducing the loading of Pd and enhancing the activity of Pd-based catalysts simultaneously. Herein, carbon supported PdFe nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized at room temperature by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and potassium ferrocyanide as Fe precursor. The Pd 50 Fe 50 alloy sample annealed at 900 °C for 1 h shows the best catalytic activity among Pd x Fe 1-x (x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.8) towards formic acid oxidation. To further improve both catalytic activity and stability, the ultra-low Pt (0.09 wt %) decorated Pd 50 Fe 50 NPs (PtPd/PdFe) are prepared via the galvanic replacement reaction. Compared with Pd 50 Fe 50 /C, the PtPd/PdFe/C Exhibits 1.52 times higher catalytic activity and lower onset potential (−0.12 V). The significant enhancements of formic acid oxidation can be attributed to the accelerated dehydrogenation reaction of formic acid by Pt atomic clusters. Moreover, the PtPd/PdFe/C also demonstrates better tolerance to poisons during formic acid oxidation.

  2. A three-dimensional hierarchical nanoporous PdCu alloy for enhanced electrocatalysis and biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aihua; Geng Haoran; Xu Caixia; Qiu Huajun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nanotubular mesoporous PdCu (NM-PdCu) alloy is facilely fabricated via one-step metal replacement reaction between nanoporous Cu and H 2 PdCl 4 . → The NM-PdCu exhibits remarkably improved structure stability and electrocatalytic activity towards formic acid and hydrogen peroxide oxidation compared with NP-Pd. → When coupled with GOx, the GOx/NM-PdCu electrode can be used for sensitive detection of glucose over a wide concentration range. - Abstract: Nanoporous copper (NPC) obtained by dealloying CuAl alloy is used as both three-dimensional template and reducing agent for the fabrication of nanoporous PdCu alloy with hollow ligaments by a simple galvanic replacement reaction with H 2 PdCl 4 aqueous solution. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterizations demonstrate that after the replacement reaction, the ligaments become hollow tubular structure and the ligament shell is also comprised of small pores and nanoparticles with a typical size of ∼4 nm (third order porosity). The as-prepared nanotubular mesoporous PdCu alloy (NM-PdCu) structure exhibits remarkably improved electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of formic acid and H 2 O 2 compared with nanoporous Pd (NP-Pd), and can be used for sensitive electrochemical sensing applications. After coupled with glucose oxidase (GOx), the enzyme modified NM-PdCu electrode can sensitively detect glucose over a wide linear range (0.5-20 mM).

  3. Enhancement of PSMA-Directed CAR Adoptive Immunotherapy by PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Serganova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapy in hematologic malignancies has shown remarkable responses, but the same level of success has not been observed in solid tumors. A new prostate cancer model (Myc-CaP:PSMA(+ and a second-generation anti-hPSMA human CAR T cells expressing a Click Beetle Red luciferase reporter were used to study hPSMA targeting and assess CAR T cell trafficking and persistence by bioluminescence imaging (BLI. We investigated the antitumor efficacy of human CAR T cells targeting human prostate-specific membrane antigen (hPSMA, in the presence and absence of the target antigen; first alone and then combined with a monoclonal antibody targeting the human programmed death receptor 1 (anti-hPD1 mAb. PDL-1 expression was detected in Myc-CaP murine prostate tumors growing in immune competent FVB/N and immune-deficient SCID mice. Endogenous CD3+ T cells were restricted from the centers of Myc-CaP tumor nodules growing in FVB/N mice. Following anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 treatment, the restriction of CD3+ T cells was reversed, and a tumor-treatment response was observed. Adoptive hPSMA-CAR T cell immunotherapy was enhanced when combined with PD-1 blockade, but the treatment response was of comparatively short duration, suggesting other immune modulation mechanisms exist and restrict CAR T cell targeting, function, and persistence in hPSMA expressing Myc-CaP tumors. Interestingly, an “inverse pattern” of CAR T cell BLI intensity was observed in control and test tumors, which suggests CAR T cells undergo changes leading to a loss of signal and/or number following hPSMA-specific activation. The lower BLI signal intensity in the hPSMA test tumors (compared with controls is due in part to a decrease in T cell mitochondrial function following T cell activation, which may limit the intensity of the ATP-dependent Luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence signal.

  4. Eating Three Times a Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hensler Douglas A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In poor countries, the burgeoning middle-class population, people who eat three times a day1, is placing profound worldwide price pressure on food and natural resources. This keynote address examines the implications of the boom in middle-class population on the world economy and innovation. Where not long ago food production was aplenty and the problem was distribution, today growing middle-class demand on food production has prices of food staples such as wheat and corn, and their derivatives, inflating. This follows the trend in the growth of prices of natural resources and durable commodities emanating from economic globalization and the building of infrastructure. This keynote address examines the five prices that are in play in the global economy and a brief perspective through the supply chain window. The address also examines implications of the middle-class boom and the additional importance this places on innovation, particularly in three areas of economic structure.

  5. STS-95 Day 01 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this first day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, can be seen performing pre-launch activities such as eating the traditional breakfast, crew suit-up, and the ride out to the launch pad. Also, included are various panoramic views of the shuttle on the pad. The crew is readied in the 'white room' for their mission. After the closing of the hatch and arm retraction, launch activities are shown including countdown, engine ignition, launch, and the separation of the Solid Rocket Boosters.

  6. STS-95 Day 04 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this forth day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, are seen performing an evaluation of bone cell activity under microgravity conditions. Glenn then provides blood samples as part of the Protein Turnover Experiment, which is looking at the balance between the building and breakdown of muscle. He also works with the Advanced Organic Separations (ADSEP) experiment, to provides the capability to separate and purify biological materials in microgravity; and with the Microencapsulation Electrostatic Processing System (MEPS), that studies the formation of anti-tumor capsules containing two kinds of drugs.

  7. STS-95 Day 07 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this seventh day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, again test the Orbiter Space Vision System. OSVS uses special markings on Spartan and the shuttle cargo bay to provide an alignment aid for the arm's operator using shuttle television images. It will be used extensively on the next Space Shuttle flight in December as an aid in using the arm to join together the first two modules of the International Space Station. Specialist John Glenn will complete a daily back-pain questionnaire by as part of a study of how the muscle, intervertebral discs and bone marrow change after exposure to microgravity.

  8. STS-95 Day 08 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-95 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Curtis L. Brown, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson, and Pedro Duque, and Payload Specialists Chiaki Mukai and John H. Glenn, continue to perform microgravity experiments. Specialist John Glenn completes a back-pain questionnaire as part of a study of how the muscle, intervertebral discs and bone marrow change due to microgravity. The results will then be compared with data provided by astronauts during previous missions. Glenn continues blood sample analysis and blood processing that are part of the Protein Turnover (PTO) experiment, which is studying the muscle loss that occurs during space flight.

  9. Cleaning lady saves the day

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    At lunch time on Wednesday 21 January a guest at the CERN hostel put her food in the microwave oven and switched it on. "Within seconds I smelt plastic. I looked into the oven and saw flames. I switched it off, took my food out. But the flames continued and so I ran for the door." In the corridor she ran into Jane Kiranga, a cleaning lady working for the company ISS. Without hesitation Jane picked up a portable fire extinguisher, returned to the kitchen and stopped the fire. The Fire Brigade arrived a few minutes later and only needed to ventilate the kitchen. "Jane was just in time, because the flames had not left the oven yet. Her model behaviour deserves recognition," said the team leader on duty for the CERN Fire Brigade. A few days later Jane received a gift voucher from the Prevention and Training section of the Safety Commission (photo).

  10. STS-72 Flight Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    On this second day of the STS-72 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Brian Duffy, Pilot Brent W. Jett, and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Daniel T. Barry, Winston E. Scott, and Koichi Wakata (NASDA), awakened to music from the motion picture 'Star Wars.' The crew performed a systems checkout, prepared for the retrieval of the Japanese Space Flyer Unit (SFU), tested the spacesuits for the EVA, and activated some of the secondary experiments. An in-orbit news interview was conducted with the crew via satellite downlinking. Questions asked ranged from the logistics of the mission to the avoidance procedures the Endeavour Orbiter performed to miss hitting the inactive Air Force satellite, nicknamed 'Misty' (MSTI). Earth views included cloud cover, several storm systems, and various land masses with several views of the shuttle's open cargo bay in the foreground.

  11. Highly efficient catalytic systems based on Pd-coated microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Ahyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bumkyo; Kang, Dong Woo; Koo, Chong Min; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of two prototype catalysis systems using palladium (Pd)-coated microparticles was investigated with regard to the recovery and recyclability of the catalytic particles. One such system was the interface-adsorption method, in which polymer particles coated with Pd nanoparticles strongly and irreversibly attach to the oil-water interface. Due to the irreversible adsorption of the catalytic particles to the interface, particle loss was completely prevented while mixing the aqueous solution and while collecting the products. The other system was based on the magnetic field-associated particle recovery method. The use of polymeric microparticles containing Pd nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles accelerated the sedimentation of the particles in the aqueous phase by applying a strong magnetic field, consequently suppressing drainage of the particles from the reactor along the product stream. Upon multiple runs of the catalytic reactions, it was found that conversion does not change significantly, demonstrating the excellent recyclability and performance efficiency in the catalytic processes.

  12. Performance of the PdNi and PdNiSe as cathodes in PEM fuel cells; Desempeno de PdNi y PdNiSe como catodos en celdas de combustible tipo PEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, A.; Ramos-Sanchez, G.; Vazquez, G.; Solorza-Feria, O. [Centro de Investigaciones y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gramos@cinvestav.mx

    2009-09-15

    The search for new materials capable of catalyzing oxygen reactions in low temperature fuel cells continues to be one of the key issues in the development of a hydrogen economy. Electrochemical and physical characterization studies have demonstrated that the PdNi and PdNiSe catalysts have adequate properties for use as cathodes in fuel cells. Nevertheless, the performance of the materials in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells depends not only on the catalytic properties but also on the adequate preparation of the electrocatalyst membrane interface (EMI). This work presents the results of the search for optimal conditions to prepare the EMIs with PdNi and PdNiSe cathodes. There are many variables for handling the preparation of the interfaces, nevertheless our search focuses on two: catalyst ratio/Vulcan Carbon® and the catalyst amount. Interfaces were prepared with an active area of 5 cm{sup 2} with PdNi and PdNiSe cathodes and carbon fabric anode with Pt E-tek®. These interfaces were tested with an ElectroChem model under different gas pressure and temperature conditions. The optimization method was carried out using a simplex method with the variables mentioned above and power density per unit mass and catalyst area as response variables. [Spanish] La busqueda de nuevos materiales capaces de catalizar la Reaccion de Oxigeno (RRO) en celdas de combustible de baja temperatura, sigue siendo uno de los temas clave para el desarrollo de una Economia del Hidrogeno. Estudios electroquimicos y de caracterizacion fisica han demostrado que los catalizadores PdNi y PdNiSe, tienen las propiedades adecuadas para poder ser utilizados como catodos en celdas de combustible; sin embargo el desempeno de los materiales en celdas de combustible de membrana de intercambio protonico (PEM), no solo depende de las propiedades del catalizador, sino tambien de la preparacion adecuada del Ensamble Membrana Electrocatalizador (EME). En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de la

  13. Separation of 103Pd from metal Rhodium by dry distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuecs, Z.; Takacs, S.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Introduction. The use of Auger emitters as potential radiopharmaceuticals is increasingly investigated. One such radionuclide of interest is 103m Rh. This can be produced from 103 Ru or from 103 Pd in an in vivo generator. It has been proven on theoretical considerations that use of 103 Pd/ 103m Rh in vivo generator will be successful in delivering 103 mRh to a target site when complexed to a tumor selective carrier. 103 Pd is widely used in internal radiotherapy with one of the production routes via the irradiation of Rh by protons in a cyclotron. The charged particle production of 103 Pd is the only way for no-carrier -added production of this radionuclide, which is required for use in nuclear medicine. However, the widely used separation technique to get 103 Pd from the target material (as well as recovery of the Rh) by wet chemistry is a very complicated, labour intensive and expensive procedure, resulting in low yields of 103 Pd and high amounts of radioactive waste. An alternative more efficient separation and production technology can be developed based on differential evaporation. The principle is the following: The produced 103 Pd 'contaminating' new element within the crystal structure of the Rh target can be forced to diffuse out from the deformed crystal lattice by heating up the target. In this process the 103 Pd accumulates on the surface of the target from where it can be evaporated. A prerequisite for this process is that the target metal (Rh) has a different partial pressure than the evaporated metal (Pd). The thick target yield is 6MBq/μ Ah and the activities of potential contaminating radioisotopes produced by side reaction are negligible, if the energy of the irradiating beam will be chosen precisely. The natural abundance of 116 Cd is 7,5%, it means that the price of the enriched material is reasonable. A potential cyclotron facility with α-beam was found at JINR, Dubna, Russia where the radiochemical

  14. Crystallization in Pd40Ni40P20 glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Saksl, K.; Nishiyama, N.

    2002-01-01

    Phase segregation and the effect of pressure on crystallization of bulk and ribbon Pd40Ni40P20 glasses have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. The DSC measurements show only one glass transition event in the samples annealed at different...... temperatures in the supercooled liquid region. Phase analyses reveal at least five crystalline phases crystallized from the glass: monoclinic; body-centered tetragonal; orthorhombic; Ni2Pd2P and fcc-(Ni,Pd) solid solution phases. In the pressure range from 0 to 4.2 GPa, the crystallization temperature...... increases with pressure having a slope of 11 K/GPa. The eutectic crystallization reaction mode and crystalline phases formed are unchanged in the pressure range used. The enhancement of the crystallization temperature with increasing pressure in the glass can be explained by the suppression of atomic...

  15. Negotiation of values as driver in community-based PD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronvall, Erik; Malmborg, Lone; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Community-based PD projects are often characterized by the meeting of conflicting values among stakeholder groups, but in research there is no uncontested account of the relation between design and conflicting values. Through analysis of three community-based PD cases in Denmark and South Africa......, this paper identifies and discusses challenges for community-based PD that exist in these settings based on the emergence of contrasting and often conflicting values among participants and stakeholders. Discussions of participation are shaped through two theoretical perspectives: the notion of thinging...... and design things; and different accounts of values in design. Inspired by the concept of design things, and as a consequence of the need for continuous negotiation of values observed in all three cases, we suggest the concept of thinging as fruitful for creating productive agonistic spaces with a stronger...

  16. Common extraction of Tc, Pd and Eu by phosphorylated calixarenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babain, V.; Smirnov, I.; Kvasnitskiy, I.; Karavan, M.; Boiko, V.; Miroshnichenko, V.; Klimchuk, O.; Kalchenko, V.

    2003-01-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the extraction systems based on neutral organophosphorus extractants - phosphorylated calixarenes for recovery of Pd and Tc together with Am and Cm from high-level radioactive wastes. Extraction of Pd, Tc and Eu (Am) was studied for phosphorylated calixarenes in meta-nitrobenzotrifluoride (NBTF). Main results are presented in Table. On the basis of available data one can suggest that type and position of phosphor-organic substituents are not so important for extraction of Tc and Pd, as for Eu and Am extraction. The phosphorylated at upper rim calix[4]arenas with small alkyl substituents at phosphorus atom are of prime interest for joint recovery of europium, americium, technetium and palladium. (authors)

  17. PD-L1 expression by neurons nearby tumors indicates better prognosis in glioblastoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Carlsson, Robert; Ambjørn, Malene

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain tumor. In general, tumor growth requires disruption of the tissue microenvironment, yet how this affects glioma progression is unknown. We studied program death-ligand (PD-L)1 in neurons and gliomas in tumors from GBM patients...... and associated the findings with clinical outcome. Remarkably, we found that upregulation of PD-L1 by neurons in tumor-adjacent brain tissue (TABT) associated positively with GBM patient survival, whereas lack of neuronal PD-L1 expression was associated with high PD-L1 in tumors and unfavorable prognosis...... in GBM patients, better survival in wild-type mice was associated with high neuronal PD-L1 in TABT and downregulation of PD-L1 in tumors, which was defective in Ifnb-/- mice. Our data indicated that neuronal PD-L1 signaling in brain cells was important for GBM patient survival. Reciprocal PD-L1...

  18. Comparison of bacterial cells and amine-functionalized abiotic surfaces as support for Pd nanoparticle synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Corte, Simon; Bechstein, Stefanie; Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing demand for catalytic Pd nanoparticles has motivated the search for sustainable production methods. An innovative approach uses bacterial cells as support material for synthesizing Pd nanoparticles by reduction of Pd(II) with e.g. hydrogen or formate. Nevertheless, drawbacks...... nanoparticles, and that abiotic surfaces could support the Pd particle synthesis as efficiently as bacteria. In this study, we explore the possibility of replacing bacteria with amine-functionalized materials, and we compare different functionalizati