WorldWideScience

Sample records for daudin reptilia scincidae

  1. Histologia geral dos intestinos do Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802 (Crocodilia: Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Jin

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available General histology of small intestine (duodenum and jejunum and the large intestine (colon and cloaca of C. c. yacare (Daudin, 1802 Crocodilia-Reptilia. A comparative description is made of the histology of the small and large intestine of C. c. yacare. In all segments mucosa, submucosa, muscularis and serosa tunics were observed. The duodenum as very long villi, wich are well-developed and attached together to form irregular transverse ridges, covered with simple columnar epithelium with marginal and goblet cells. In the jejunum, the villi are shorter and less frequent. The colon as few folds, covered with the same epithelium; the lamina própria contains straight tubular glands with absortive cells, goblet and Paneth cells. The cloaca is very complex, with three well-defined regions: coprodeum, urodeum and proctodeum. In the coprodeum, the wall is folded, less muscular and the thin mucosa is covered by an epithelium with a few basal cells and mucosal cells. The urodeum as an additional external muscular tunic, with striated muscle fibers and a stritifield cylindrical epithelium with goblet cells. The proctodeum includes the free part of the penis in the male and, laterally, the ducts of a pair of holocrine cloacal glands. Near the opening of the ducts, the epithelium changes to a squamous keratinized type.

  2. Sarcocystis schneideri n. sp. (Sarcocystidae) infecting the barber skink Eumeces schneideri schneideri (Scincidae) Daudin, 1802. A light and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Al Aal, Zain Abd; Maarouf, Wael; Morsy, Kareem; Al Quraishy, Saleh

    2014-06-01

    The current study provides the first record of infection with Sarcocystis species in the barber skink Eumeces schneideri schneideri (Scincidae) captured from the north region of Egypt around the cities of El-Hamam and Al-Dabaa, Mersa Matruh Governorate, Egypt. Morphology of the parasite cysts was described using light and transmission electron microscopy. Five out of 80 (6.25%) of the examined skinks were found to be infected. The infection was recorded firstly by light microscopy as spindle-shaped cysts embedded in the muscle tissue. The cysts were microscopic and measured 250-900 μm in length × 50-100 μm in width (mean, 575 × 75 μm). The validity of this species was confirmed by means of ultrastructural characteristics of the primary cyst wall (0.28 μm thick) which revealed the presence of irregularly shaped crowded and osmiophilic knob-like projections underlined by a thin layer of ground substance measuring 0.15-0.17 μm (mean, 0.16 μm). This layer consisted mainly of fine, dense homogenous granules enclosing the developing metrocytes and merozoites that usually contain nearly all the structures of the apical complex and fill the interior cavity of the cyst. Several septa derived from the ground substance divided the cyst into compartments. The merozoites were banana-shaped and measured 3-5 μm in length and 1.5-2.5 in width with centrally or posteriorly located nuclei. The morphological and morphometric data obtained during study were compared with those recorded previously from organisms within the Scincidae family. It was observed that this parasite possessed some distinguishing characteristics from the comparable species, which should be considered as a new species of the Sarcocystis genus, and the proposed name was Sarcocystis schneideri n. sp. with new host and locality records in Egypt.

  3. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. III. Anguidae, Scincidae, Teiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A; Amaral, Silvana

    2016-12-09

    We present distribution data of all Anguidae, Scincidae, and Teiidae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 29 species-level taxa, belonging to 14 genera. This represents 11 more species-level taxa than previously reported for these families in this area. Data were based on literature and 46,806 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian museums, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (~55%) are endemic to Amazonia. Except for Ameiva ameiva, that is present in several environments and domains, non-endemic species are either associated with open dry (semideciduous) forest or open vegetation (savanna) enclaves in Amazonia, occupying similar environments outside Amazonia, gallery forests within the Cerrado, or present disjunct populations in the Atlantic Forest. As a whole, six taxa are widespread in Amazonia, four are restricted to eastern Amazonia, four to western Amazonia, three to southwestern Amazonia, one to northern Amazonia, and seven to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Besides, two species present apparently more restricted, unique distributions. Only three species have a distribution that is congruent with one of the areas of endemism (AE) recognized for other organisms (birds and primates), of which two occur in AE Guiana and one in AE Inambari.

  4. Skinks (Reptilia: Scincidae) have highly conserved karyotypes as revealed by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannotti, M; Caputo, V; O'Brien, P C M; Lovell, F L; Trifonov, V; Cerioni, P Nisi; Olmo, E; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Rens, W

    2009-01-01

    Skinks represent the most diversified squamate reptiles with a great variation in body size and form, and are found worldwide in a variety of habitats. Their remarkable diversification has been accompanied by only a few chromosome rearrangements, resulting in highly-conservative chromosomal complements of these lizards. In this study cross-species chromosome painting using Scincus scincus (2n = 32) as the source genome, was used to detect the chromosomal rearrangements and homologies between the following skinks: Chalcides chalcides (2n = 28), C. ocellatus (2n = 28), Eumeces schneideri (2n = 32), Lepidothyris fernandi (2n = 30), Mabuya quinquetaeniata (2n = 32). The results of this study confirmed a high degree of chromosome conservation between these species. The main rearrangements in the studied skinks involve chromosomes 3, 5, 6 and 7 of S. scincus. These subtelocentric chromosomes are homologous to the p and q arms of metacentric pair 3 and 4 in C. chalcides, C. ocellatus, L. fernandi, and M. quinquetaeniata, while they are entirely conserved in E. schneideri. Other rearrangements involve S. scincus 11 in L. fernandi and M. quinquetaeniata, supporting the monophyly of Lygosominae, and one of the chromosomes S. scincus 12-16, in M. quinquetaeniata. In conclusion, our data support the monophyly of Scincidae and confirm that Scincus-Eumeces plus Chalcides do not form a monophyletic clade, suggesting that the Scincus-Eumeces clade is basal to other members of this family. This study represents the first time the whole genome of any reptile species has been used for cross-species chromosome painting to assess chromosomal evolution in this group of vertebrates.

  5. Ghanese Lizards of the Genus Mabuya (Scincidae, Sauria, Reptilia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1974-01-01

    In the present paper the eight species of Mabuya occurring in Ghana are discussed. A key for their identification is given. Two of the species reported for Ghana were known only from the rainforest in the Congo basin, now their presence in the rainforest west of the Dahomey-gap is demonstrated. One

  6. Modyfing an attribute control chart: Daudin's methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Bernabeu, Elena; Sellés Cantó, Miguel Ángel; Carrión García, Andrés; Jabaloyes Vivas, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Copyright (2012) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. The following article appeared in Pérez Bernabeu, E.; Sellés Cantó, MÁ.; Carrión García, A.; Jabaloyes Vivas, JM. (2012). Modyfing an attribute control chart: Daudin's methodology. AIP Conference Proceedings. 1431:920-924 and may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4707651 There are many me...

  7. Cariotipo y región organizadora del nucleolo en Teius teyou (Daudin, 1802) (Squamata: Teiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando, Alejandra

    1994-01-01

    Specimens of Teius teyou (Daudin, 1982) from Formosa and Chaco, Argentina, were citologically analyzed. A karyotype characterized by 54 chromosomes and 2 pairs of ribosomal chromosomes were identified.

  8. First report of Eutropis innovate (Blanford, 1870 (Reptilia: Scincidae from Nallamalai Hills, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.T. Rao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first record of Eutropis innotata (Blanford, 1870 based on a specimen collected in 2002 from Gundla Brahmeswaram Metta Wildlife Sanctuary, Andhra Pradesh, India. The habitat from where it was collected is relatively undisturbed patch of forest in the Nallamalai Hills of Eastern Ghats. This constitutes the range extension of this species from central India to Nallamalai Hills in Eastern Ghats in peninsular India. We provide details on its diagnosis, habits and habitat, and key to species belonging to the genus Eutropis Fitzinger, 1843.

  9. Evolution of Asian and African lygosomine skinks of the Mabuya group (Reptilia : Scincidae): A molecular perspective

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Asian and African lygosomine skinks of the Mabuya group were inferred from 825 base pairs of DNA sequences of mitochondrial 12S and 16S rRNA genes. Results indicated the presence of two distinct lineages within this group, of which one consisted of Lamprolepis and Lygosoma, and the other of Apterygodon, Dasia, and Asian and African Mabuya. Within the latter, African species of Mabuya first diverged from the remainder, leaving the Asian congeners together with ...

  10. Phylogenetic relationships of Australian skinks of the Mabuya group (Reptilia: Scincidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M; Ota, H; Kobayashi, M; Hikida, T

    1999-08-01

    Portions of two mitochondrial genes (12S and 16S ribosomal RNAs) were sequenced to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of the Mabuya group from the Australian region (Corucia, Egernia and Tiliqua). Results indicated the monophyly of these genera and their divergence from Asian and African members of this group. This suggests that the diversity of the Mabuya group in the Australian region has increased through an endemic radiation, not through multiple colonizations from outside. Among the genera from this region, Corucia and Tiliqua were closest to each other. This result contradicts with those of the previous hypotheses on the basis of morphological and immunological data that, respectively, suggested closest affinities between Corucia and Egernia, and Egernia and Tiliqua. We suppose that the morphological characters exclusively joining Corucia and Egernia are actually in plesiomorphic state.

  11. Histological and morphological observations on tongue of Scincella tsinlingensis (Reptilia, Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Limin

    2016-01-01

    The histology and morphology characteristics of the tongue in Scincella tsinlingensis were studied by light and electronic microscopy. Under light microscopy, the tongue consists of tip, lingual body and radix in sequence. Numerous lingual papillae widely distribute on the surface of the dorsal and ventral flanks in the tongue, in addition to some regions of the tip. The papillae's surface is covered with the epithelial layer. The lamina propria and dense connective tissue are distinct existing under the epithelial layer. There are many lingual glands spread over the lamina propria. Tongue muscle is developed and composed of distinct intrinsic muscle, hyoglossus and genioglossus. By scanning electron microscopy, at higher magnification, the epithelial cells of the dorsal surface in the divaricate tongue tips show numerous microvilli, micro-ridges and micro-pores. The surface of dorsal side of the papillae in lingual body is covered with abundant of micro-ridges and taste bud lacuna. On the surface of the papillae in radix, micro-facets and micro-ridges are compactly distributed, as well as scattered mucilage-pores. The lingual epithelium is divided into four layers observed by the transmission electron microscope. Cells of basal layer are irregularly elliptical in shape, with sparse organelles in the cytoplasm. The deep intermediate layer is not always distinct. Small numbers of organelles are scattered into the cytoplasm. The cells of the superficial intermediate layer gradually flatten, as do their nuclei. The cytoplasm contains many keratohyalin granules. Cell membranes are formed processes around cells and joined by abundant desmosomes to the cell membranes of adjacent cells. The cells located on the extreme free-surface side of the keratinized layer have fallen off. The basal lamina is intercalated between the basal layer and the lamina propria. The lamina propria of lingual body contains lingual gland. A large part of the cytoplasm is occupied by mucus granules which located in the distal part of the cell. The connective tissue contains myelinated nerve fibers, vessel and muscle cells.

  12. Daily patterns of metabolic rate among New Zealand lizards (Reptilia: Lacertilia: Diplodactylidae and Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Kelly M; Pledger, Shirley; Thompson, Michael B; Miller, John H; Daugherty, Charles H

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the effects of temperature fluctuations on metabolic rate, entrained endogenous rhythms in metabolism, which are independent of temperature fluctuations, may be important in overall energy metabolism in ectotherms. Daily entrained endogenous rhythms may serve as energy-conserving mechanisms during an animal's active or inactive phase. However, because nocturnal lizards often take advantage of thermal opportunities during the photophase (light), their daily metabolic rhythms may be less pronounced than those of diurnal species. We measured the rate of oxygen consumption (VO(2)) as an index of metabolic rate of eight temperate lizard species (four nocturnal, three diurnal, and one crepuscular/diurnal; n = 7-14) over 24 h at 13 degrees C and in constant darkness to test whether daily patterns (including amplitude, magnitude, and time of peak VO(2)) of metabolic rate in lizards differ with activity period. We also tested for phylogenetic differences in metabolic rate between skinks and geckos. Three daily patterns were evident: 24-h cycle, 12-h cycle, or no daily cycle. The skink Cyclodina aenea has a 12-h crepuscular pattern of oxygen consumption. In four other species, VO(2) increased with, or in anticipation of, the active part of the day, but three species had rhythms offset from their active phase. Although not correlated with activity period or phylogeny, amplitude of VO(2) may be correlated with whether a species is temperate or tropical. In conclusion, the metabolic rate of many species does not always correlate with the recorded activity period. The dichotomy of ecology and physiology may be clarified by more in-depth studies of species behaviors and activity periods.

  13. Cariotipo y región organizadora del núcleo en Teius teyou (Daudin, 1802) (Squamata: teiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando, Alejandra B.

    1994-01-01

    Specimens of Teius teyou (Daudin, 1982) from Formosa and Chaco, Argentina, were citologically analyzed. A karyotype characterized by 54 chromosomes and 2 pairs of ribosomal chromosomes were identified. Asociación Herpetológica Argentina

  14. An investigation into the taxonomy of Dendrelaphis tristis (Daudin, 1803): revalidation of Dipsas schokari (Kuhl, 1820) (Serpentes, Colubridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van J.; Vogel, G.

    2008-01-01

    The taxonomic status of the colubrid snake Dendrelaphis tristis (Daudin, 1803) was investigated on the basis of morphological data taken from 64 museum specimens. Univariate and multivariate analyses of these data reveal that Dendrelaphis tristis is composed of two species. One of these species agre

  15. An investigation into the taxonomy of Dendrelaphis tristis (Daudin, 1803): Revalidation of Dipsas schokari (Kuhl, 1820) (Serpentes, Colubridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Rooijen; G. Vogel

    2008-01-01

    The taxonomic status of the colubrid snake Dendrelaphis tristis (Daudin, 1803) was investigated on the basis of morphological data taken from 64 museum specimens. Univariate and multivariate analyses of these data reveal that Dendrelaphis tristis is composed of two species. One of these species agre

  16. Crescimento alométrico, morfologia e uso do habitat em cinco espécies de Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae Allometric growth, morphology and habitat use in five species of Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Silva Pinto

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas a variação ontogenética da forma do corpo nos lagartos sul-americanos Mabuya agilis, M. bistriata, M. guaporicola, M. macrorhyncha e M. nigropunctata, assim como as diferenças interespecíficas nas proporções do corpo, como resultados de um possível crescimento alométrico. As trajetórias das tendências ontogenéticas foram significativamente diferentes somente entre M. guaporicola e M. nigropunctata; todos os pares de espécies, exceto M. agilis e M. macrorhyncha, M. bistriata e M. nigropunctata, demonstraram diferenças significativas em relação ao intercepto Y. A Análise de Componentes Principais aplicada sobre uma série de caracteres morfométricos demonstrou sinais opostos para as variáveis do corpo e dos membros, corroborando estudos anteriores. Contudo, quando as espécies foram analisadas individualmente, as mãos e dígitos apresentaram alometria negativa, enquanto os demais segmentos apresentaram variação em suas alometrias. Algumas hipóteses levantadas nesse estudo, relacionadas à forma do corpo e ao uso do hábitat nessas espécies, necessitam ser testadas.The ontogenetic variation of body shape in the South American skinks Mabuya agilis Boulenger, 1887, M. bistriata (Spix, 1825, M. guaporicola Dunn, 1936, M. macrorhyncha Hoge, 1946, and M. nigropunctata (Spix, 1825 were analyzed. Interspecific differences in body proportions as a possible result of allometric growth in these species are also examined. Ontogenetic trend lines were significantly different only between M. guaporicola and M. nigropunctata; all other species pairs, except M. agilis and M. macrorhyncha, M. bistriata and M. nigropunctata, showed significantly different Y intercepts. A PCA analysis on a series of morphometric characters showed opposite signals for body and limb variables, corroborating previous studies. However, when the species were analyzed separately, hand and digits were the most likely segments to present negative allometry, while remaining segments were variable. Some hypothesis relating body form and habitat in these species have been raised, which need to be tested.

  17. Phylogeny of the lizard subfamily Lygosominae (Reptilia: Scincidae), with special reference to the origin of the new world taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masanao; Ota, Hidetoshi; Köhler, Gunther; Ineich, Ivan; Chirio, Laurent; Chen, Szu-Lung; Hikida, Tsutomu

    2003-02-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of the three lygosomine skink genera occurring both in the Old World and the New World (Mabuya, Scincella and Sphenomorphus) were inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequence of 12S and 16S rRNA genes. Results strongly suggested the non-monophyly for any of these three genera. Within the Mabuya group, Asian members appear to have diverged first, leaving the Neotropical and the Afro-Malagasy Mabuya as sister groups. These relationships, together with the absence of extant or fossil representatives of the Mabuya group from North America, strongly suggest the trans-Atlantic dispersals of Mabuya from Africa to Neotropics. Our results also indicated a closer affinity of the New World Scincella with the New World Sphenomorphus than with the Old World Scincella. Such relationships suggest the trans-Beringian dispersal of the common ancestor from Asia and its subsequent divergence into the North American Scincella and the Neotropical Sphenomorphus.

  18. Systematics and biogeography of the Neotropical genus Mabuya, with special emphasis on the Amazonian skink Mabuya nigropunctata (Reptilia, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, A; Carranza, S

    2010-03-01

    Phylogenetic analyses using up to 1532 base pairs (bp) of mitochondrial DNA from 106 specimens of Neotropical Mabuya, including 18 of the 19 recognized South American and Mesoamerican species, indicate that most species of the genus are monophyletic, including M. nigropunctata that had previously been reported to be paraphyletic. The present results shows that this species includes three highly divergent and largely allopatric lineages restricted to occidental, meridional, and oriental Amazonia. Our dataset demonstrates that previous claims regarding the paraphyletic status of M. nigropunctata and the phylogenetic relationships within this species complex based on the analysis of three mitochondrial and four nuclear genes (approx. 5000bp) were erroneous and resulted from two contaminated cytochrome b sequences. The phylogenetic results indicate that diversification in the Neotropical genus Mabuya started approximately in the Middle Miocene (15.5-13.4Ma). The divergence dates estimated for the Mabuya nigropunctata species complex suggest that the major cladogenetic events that produced the three main groups (occidental (oriental+meridional)) occurred during the Late Miocene. These estimations show that diversification within the M. nigropunctata species complex was not triggered by the climatic changes that occurred during the Pleistocene, as has been suggested by several authors. Rather, our data support the hypothesis that the late tertiary (essentially Miocene epoch) was a period that played a very important role in the generation of biological diversity in the Amazonian forests. Speciation between Mabuyacarvalhoi, endemic to the coastal mountain range of Venezuela, and M. croizati, restricted to the Guiana Shield, occurred during the Middle Miocene and may have been as the result of a vicariant event produced by the formation of the present day Orinoco river drainage basin and the consequent appearance of the Llanos del Orinoco, which acted as a barrier to dispersal between these two species. The split between M. bistriata and M. altamazonica and between the occidental and (meridional+oriental) clades of M. nigropunctata fits very well with the biogeographic split between the eastern and western Amazon basins reported for several other taxa.

  19. Relationships of scincid lizards (Mabuya spp; Reptilia: Scincidae) from the Cape Verde islands based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, A; Jesus, J; Pinheiro, M; Harris, D J

    2001-05-01

    Partial DNA sequences from two mitochondrial (mt) and one nuclear gene (cytochrome b, 12S rRNA, and C-mos) were used to estimate the phylogenetic relationships among the six extant species of skinks endemic to the Cape Verde Archipelago. The species form a monophyletic unit, indicating a single colonization of the islands, probably from West Africa. Mabuya vaillanti and M. delalandii are sister taxa, as indicated by morphological characters. Mabuya fogoensis and M. stangeri are closely related, but the former is probably paraphyletic. Mabuya spinalis and M. salensis are also probably paraphyletic. Within species, samples from separate islands always form monophyletic groups. Some colonization events can be hypothesized, which are in line with the age of the islands. C-mos variation is concordant with the topology derived from mtDNA.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships, character evolution, and biogeography of the subfamily Lygosominae (Reptilia: Scincidae) inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M; Ota, H; Kobayashi, M; Nabhitabhata, J; Yong, H S; Hikida, T

    2000-06-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the lygosomine skinks were inferred from 1249 base positions of mitochondrial DNA sequences of 12S and 16S rRNA genes. The monophyly of this subfamily was confirmed and the presence of five distinct infrasubfamilial lineages detected. Of these, the Sphenomorphus group appears to have diverged first, followed by the Lygosoma and Egernia groups in order, leaving the Eugongylus and Mabuya groups as sister groups. Our results did not support monophyly of the Mabuya group sensu lato (i.e., an assemblage of the Lygosoma, Egernia, and Mabuya groups), for which a number of morphological and karyological studies demonstrated a considerable similarity. Our results also contradict the previous hypothesis, formulated on the basis of morphological and immunological data, which argued for the sister relationship between the Egernia and the Eugongylus groups. Morphological and karyological characters used to define the Mabuya group (sensu lato) may actually represent plesiomorphic states. The phylogenetic diversity of lygosomine skinks in the Australian region appears to have increased through multiple colonizations from Southeast Asia.

  1. Aspectos morfológicos de células da série eritrocítica de Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802; Reptilia, crocodilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Leal de Moura

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estudar o sistema hematopoético do réptil Caiman crocodilus yacare, foram utilizados cinco exemplares hígidos e jovens (aproximadamente um ano de idade, provenientes de São Paulo e de Mato Grosso do Sul. Amostras de sangue periférico foram colhidas em EDTA, através da punção do seio venoso cervical, e da medula óssea por punção aspirativa do osso femural. Estudo histológico da medula óssea femural foi realizado através da coloração por HE, Giemsa e técnica de Gomori para fibras reticulínicas. Os esfregaços de sangue e de medula foram processados para coloração panótica (Leishman ou Rosenfeld. A presença de sítios hematopoéticos ativos foi demonstrada histologicamente nos cortes transversais do fêmur, principalmente no terço distal. As células da linhagem eritrocítica foram encontradas dentro dos vasos capilares sinusóides medulares, na região central do osso. As células precursoras desta linhagem estavam aderidas à parede do vaso, e suas sucessoras distribuídas em direção ao centro do sinusóide à medida que amadureciam. Nos esfregaços de medula, as células imaturas da linhagem eritrocítica mostraram-se arredondadas e com núcleo predominantemente frouxo, em contraposição às células maduras, de núcleo condensado e forma em geral elíptica. Foram vistos pró-eritroblastos, eritroblastos basofílicos, policromáticos e ortocromáticos, e finalmente eritrócitos.

  2. Aspectos morfológicos e citoquímicos dos glóbulos sangüíneos de Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802 (Reptilia, Crocodilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Leal de Moura

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 10 jacarés Caiman crocodilus yacare, colhendo-se 5 ml do sangue periférico de cada animal. A análise morfológica foi realizada após coloração por Leishman. Para estudo citoquímico, empregaram-se os métodos do PAS, do Sudan black B, da o-toluidina e do azul de bromofenol. Foram identificados 7 tipos celulares: eritrócitos, trombócitos, heterófilos, eosinófilos, basófilos, linfócitos e monócitos azurófilos. Os eritrócitos nucleados apresentam formato elíptico com atividade mitótica e positividade citoplasmática para o azul de bromofenol. Os trombócitos são de formato elíptico, com citoplasma abundante nos pólos, contendo grânulos de glicogênio e núcleo com sulcos profundos. Heterófilos, grosseiramente esféricos, mostram núcleo esférico excêntrico e citoplasma repleto de grânulos corados em salmão, de formato fusiforme, em baqueta, oval ou esférico. A citoquímica nestas células revelou a presença de glicogênio, grânulos citoplasmáticos positivos para azul de bromofenol e parcialmente sudanófilos e positivos para mieloperoxidase. Eosinófilos mostram-se esféricos com núcleo lenticular excêntrico e citoplasma com grânulos esféricos ou ovais róseos positivos para Sudan e mieloperoxidase, porém fracamente para o azul de bromofenol. Basófilos apresentam formato esférico, de tamanho menor em relação aos demais granulócitos, núcleo esférico central e citoplasma com poucos grânulos fortemente basófilos. Linfócitos mostram-se polimórficos com núcleo de formato irregular, citoplasma escasso com projeções e grânulos azurófilos. Monócito azurófilo, de formato esférico, núcleo excêntrico e citoplasma basófilo contendo grânulos azurófilos abundantes.

  3. Aspectos morfológicos e citoquímicos dos glóbulos sangüíneos de Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin, 1802) (Reptilia, Crocodilia)

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Weber Leal De [UNIFESP; Matushima, Eliana Reiko; Oliveira, Luiz Waldemar [UNIFESP; EGAMI,MIZUE IMOTO

    1999-01-01

    Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 10 healthy Caiman crocodilus yacare and stained with Leishman, for morphological analysis, or submitted to the following cytochemical methods: PAS, Sudan black B, o-toluidine and mercury bromophenol blue. Seven types of cells were identified: erythrocytes, thrombocytes, heterophils, eosinophils, basophils, lymphocytes and azurofilic monocytes. Erythrocytes were elliptical and positive for bromophenol blue. Some mitotic figures were noted. Spindl...

  4. Skeletochronology and isotopic analysis of a captive individual of Alligator mississippiensis Daudin, 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Klein

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, bone histology and isotope composition (C, N, O of a femur and three postcranial osteoderms from an approximately 23–25 year-old captive female Alligator mississippiensis Daudin, 1802 were analyzed to infer the recorded life history. The number of visible annual growth marks in the femur cross-section is less than the known age for the individual concerned, this information clearly shows that skeletochronology has certain limits. However, bone histology reflects very well the traceable life history of this individual and its slow growth in early ontogeny. Bone histology on the basis of the osteoderms shows massive remodeling and an only incompletely preserved growth record, reflecting the egg-laying status of this individual. Interestingly, the carbon and especially the nitrogen isotope compositions of the osteoderms differ from those of the femur. This presumably reflects dietary changes and/or differences in resorption and remodeling processes during tissue formation of these bones. The N, C, and O isotope composition of the femur is consistent with the food and water the alligator had ingested during the last years of its life. Thus, contrary to the osteoderms, the femur yields reliable data for the reconstruction of an individual's dietary and environmental history. doi:10.1002/mmng.200900002

  5. A multivariate investigation into the population systematics of Dendrelaphis tristis (Daudin, 1803) and Dendrelaphis schokari (Kuhl, 1820): revalidation of Dendrophis chairecacos Boie, 1827 (Serpentes: Colubridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Rooijen; G. Vogel

    2009-01-01

    The population systematics of the closely related colubrid snakes Dendrelaphis tristis (Daudin, 1803) and Dendrelaphis schokari (Kuhl, 1820) were investigated on the basis of morphological data taken from 82 museum specimens. Multivariate and univariate analyses of these data reveal the existence of

  6. Genome evolution in Reptilia, the sister group of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Daniel E; Organ, Christopher L; Fujita, Matthew K; Shedlock, Andrew M; Edwards, Scott V

    2010-01-01

    The genomes of birds and nonavian reptiles (Reptilia) are critical for understanding genome evolution in mammals and amniotes generally. Despite decades of study at the chromosomal and single-gene levels, and the evidence for great diversity in genome size, karyotype, and sex chromosome diversity, reptile genomes are virtually unknown in the comparative genomics era. The recent sequencing of the chicken and zebra finch genomes, in conjunction with genome scans and the online publication of the Anolis lizard genome, has begun to clarify the events leading from an ancestral amniote genome--predicted to be large and to possess a diverse repeat landscape on par with mammals and a birdlike sex chromosome system--to the small and highly streamlined genomes of birds. Reptilia exhibit a wide range of evolutionary rates of different subgenomes and, from isochores to mitochondrial DNA, provide a critical contrast to the genomic paradigms established in mammals.

  7. Diet of the lizard Mabuya agilis (Sauria; Scincidae) in an insular habitat (Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    We examined the stomach contents of 21 specimens of Mabuya agilis (Sauria; Scincidae) collected during February 2001 at the restinga habitat of Praia do Sul, in Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil. Diet was composed of various types of small arthropods, with no plant material being eaten. Spiders were the most important items in the diet, followed by orthopterans. Apart from the absence of isopterans, the diet of Mabuya agilis from this insular area was similar to those of other conspecific mainland popu...

  8. Diet of the lizard Mabuya agilis (Sauria; Scincidae) in an insular habitat (Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, C F; Vrcibradic, D; Van Sluys, M

    2004-02-01

    We examined the stomach contents of 21 specimens of Mabuya agilis (Sauria; Scincidae) collected during February 2001 at the restinga habitat of Praia do Sul, in Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil. Diet was composed of various types of small arthropods, with no plant material being eaten. Spiders were the most important items in the diet, followed by orthopterans. Apart from the absence of isopterans, the diet of Mabuya agilis from this insular area was similar to those of other conspecific mainland populations. This suggests that factors such as insularity and the absence of other small sympatric lizards may not have a significant effect on the feeding habits of the Praia do Sul population.

  9. Parallel gigantism and complex colonization patterns in the Cape Verde scincid lizards Mabuya and Macroscincus (Reptilia: Scincidae) revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The scincid lizards of the Cape Verde islands comprise the extinct endemic giant Macroscincus coctei and at least five species of Mabuya, one of which, Mabuya vaillanti, also had populations with large body size. Phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase I and 12S rRNA genes (711, 498 and 378 base pairs (bp), respectively) corroborates morphological evidence that these species constitute a clade and that Macroscincus is unrela...

  10. Taxonomy of two endemic Indian skinks, Eutropis bibronii (Gray, 1838)and E. nagarjunensis (Sharma, 1969) (Reptilia: Scincidae), including redescriptions of their types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, A A Thasun; Campbell, Patrick D; Chandramouli, S R; Deuti, Kaushik; Raha, Sujoy; Karunarathna, D M S Suranjan; Ineich, Ivan

    2016-08-19

    Tiliqua bibronii was described by J.E. Gray in December, 1838 based on two syntypes (MNHN-RA 2940, 7076), but the details for locality was missing. These syntypes are currently housed at the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Paris, France (MNHN-RA). The same species (based on the same type specimens) was described by A.M.C. Duméril & G. Bibron in November, 1839 nearly one year after Gray's publication. As such, Gray's publication must therefore be given priority. Another species, Euprepis trilineatus, from Madras, Tamil Nadu, India, was described by Gray in 1846, and it is morphologically similar to E. bibronii. Later, Boulenger (1885) synonymised it with E. bibronii. Eutropis bibronii has subsequently been recorded from other parts of India and Sri Lanka by various authors. Many years later, a closely related species, Mabuya nagarjuni (sic) Sharma, 1969, was described from Andhra Pradesh, India, based on two specimens (a holotype and a paratype) housed at the Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata (ZSI). Here we make a correction for the species epithet as "nagarjunensis" which should be a toponym, not a patronym. Among the skink collections at the Natural History Museum, London (BMNH), ZSI, and MNHN-RA we found E. bibronii specimens collected from various locations in India, but we were unable to find any specimens from Sri Lanka. Based on morphological evidence, E. bibronii represents a single, fairly widespread, species which has to be considered endemic to India. Although, recent phylogenetic studies reveal a distinct genetic divergence between E. bibronii and E. nagarjunensis, both species are morphologically very similar to each other. Here, we examine the morphology of E. nagarjunensis based on the ZSI specimens. A comprehensive comparison between the syntypes of E. bibronii and Euprepis trilineatus confirms that the latter nomen is a junior synonym of the former. The original description of E. bibronii is extremely concise and lacks most of the important diagnostic characters, so here we provide a comprehensive redescription of the species based on the examination of its syntypes.

  11. Parallel gigantism and complex colonization patterns in the Cape Verde scincid lizards Mabuya and Macroscincus (Reptilia: Scincidae) revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, S; Arnold, E N; Mateo, J A; López-Jurado, L F

    2001-08-07

    The scincid lizards of the Cape Verde islands comprise the extinct endemic giant Macroscincus coctei and at least five species of Mabuya, one of which, Mabuya vaillanti, also had populations with large body size. Phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequences derived from the mitochondrial cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase I and 12S rRNA genes (711, 498 and 378 base pairs (bp), respectively) corroborates morphological evidence that these species constitute a clade and that Macroscincus is unrelated to very large skinks in other areas. The relationships are ((M. vaillanti and Mabuya delalandii) (Mabuya spinalis and Macroscincus coctei (Mabuya fogoensis nicolauensis (Mabuya fogoensis antaoensis and Mabuya stangeri)))). The Cape Verde archipelago was colonized from West Africa, probably in the Late Miocene or Early Pliocene period. The north-eastern islands were probably occupied first, after which the ancestor of M. vaillanti and M. delalandii may have originated on Boavista, the ancestor of the latter species arriving on Santiago or Fogo later. The M. fogoensis--M. stangeri clade colonized the islands of Branco, Razo, Santa Luzia and São Vicente from São Nicolau and reached Santo Antão after this. Colonization of these northeastern islands was slow, perhaps because the recipient islands had not developed earlier or because colonization cut across the path of the Canary Current and the Northeast Trade Winds, the main dispersing agents in the region. Rapid extension of range into the southwestern islands occurred later in M. spinalis and then in M. vaillanti and M. delalandii. The long apparent delay between the origin of these species and their southwestern dispersal may have been because there were earlier colonizations of the southern islands which excluded later ones until the earlier inhabitants were exterminated by volcanic or climatic events. The evolution of large size in Macroscincus occurred in the northwestern islands and was paralleled in the eastern and southern islands by populations of M. vaillanti. Both cases of size increase in Cape Verde skinks were accompanied by the development of herbivory.

  12. Nematode assemblages of some insular and continental lizard hosts of the genus Mabuya Fitzinger (Reptilia, Scincidae along the eastern Brazilian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frederico D. Rocha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Nematode assemblages associated to three species of lizards of the genus Mabuya Fitzinger, 1826 [M. agilis (Raddi, 1823, M. caissara Rebouças-spieker, 1974 and M. macrorhyncha Hoge, 1946] from three mainland sites and three island sites along the eastern Brazilian coast were analyzed. A total of six nematode species were recorded, with total nematode richness varying from one to four and overall nematode prevalences varying from 6.7% to 90.5% among host populations. Number of nematode species per host individual (including all hosts, infected and uninfected varied among host populations from 0.07 to 1.05, but most infected lizards in all six host populations harbored a single nematode species. Both insular and continental populations of Mabuya spp. exhibited generally poor nematode assemblages, and no clear tendency for insular host populations to have more depauperate nematode faunas and/or lower infection rates compared to mainland ones (or vice versa was evident on the basis of the present data.

  13. Transplacental nutrient transfer during gestation in the Andean lizard Mabuya sp. (Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia; Rueda, Elkin Darío; Stashenko, Elena

    2011-02-01

    Mabuya skinks have the most specialized allantoplacenta and the greatest degree of placentotrophy known among the Reptilia. Their recently ovulated eggs are microlecithal (1-2 mm) and lack fatty yolk platelets; thus, virtually all of the nutrients for embryonic development must pass across the placenta. We quantified the net uptake of nutrients during gestation in an Andean population of Mabuya and compared these results with other matrotrophic skinks and eutherian mammals. Total dry and wet masses, ash and organic content, ions (calcium, potassium, sodium, magnesium, iron), lipids (cholesterol, vitamin E and fatty acids in the major lipid classes-triacylglycerol, phospholipids, cholesteryl ester, free fatty acids), nitrogen (an index of protein) were measured during the different developmental stages throughout gestation, and in neonates. A significant net uptake of inorganic and organic matter was found. This uptake begins slowly during early gestation but accelerates during the last third of gestation when the growth of the embryo is maximal and the allantoplacenta has developed its greatest complexity. The drastic reduction of egg size in this clade is related to the great reduction in the contribution of lecithotrophic nutrients to the embryo, an obligatory placentotrophy from early developmental stages, and the highest placental complexity known in the Reptilia. All of these features converge with features found in eutherian mammals.

  14. Functional studies of the placenta of the lizard Mabuya sp. (Scincidae) using immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, F B P; Ramirez-Pinilla, M P; Forhead, A S

    2010-08-01

    Most lizards lay eggs. However viviparity has evolved in the Squamata on many separate occasions by the process of extended retention of the egg coincident with gradual loss of the eggshell. This process is linked to reduction of the amount of yolk which is coupled with development of placental nutrient transfer. The family Scincidae currently show a range of multiple independent origins of viviparity and placentation along this pathway, and the genus Mabuya shows one of the most structurally complex placentas. This study investigates the transport potential of the different areas of the Mabuya placenta using immunocytochemistry to localize the systems in place for calcium, glucose and water transfer. The localization of these transporters demonstrated restricted distributions in the specialized areas of this morphologically complex placenta.

  15. Diet of the lizard Mabuya agilis (Sauria; Scincidae in an insular habitat (Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. D. Rocha

    Full Text Available We examined the stomach contents of 21 specimens of Mabuya agilis (Sauria; Scincidae collected during February 2001 at the restinga habitat of Praia do Sul, in Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil. Diet was composed of various types of small arthropods, with no plant material being eaten. Spiders were the most important items in the diet, followed by orthopterans. Apart from the absence of isopterans, the diet of Mabuya agilis from this insular area was similar to those of other conspecific mainland populations. This suggests that factors such as insularity and the absence of other small sympatric lizards may not have a significant effect on the feeding habits of the Praia do Sul population.

  16. Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maia Dias Ledo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil. This paper presents a list of necrophagous insects associated with small size carrions of two reptiles and one amphibian, found in areas of riparian forests and Cerrado sensu stricto physiognomies in a Conservation Unit located in Brasilia, Distrito Federal. We found seven species of insects related to these carcasses, being five Sarcophagidae, one Calliphoridae and one Braconidae parasitoid wasp. Lucilia eximia and Peckia (Pattonella intermutans were the most abundant species in the study, corroborating with other studies that suggests that these species have specializations for colonization of small size animal carcasses.

  17. Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil Sarcophagidae e Calliphoridae associados às carcaças de Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes e Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia em Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Maia Dias Ledo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae related to Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes and Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia carcasses in Brasília, Brazil. This paper presents a list of necrophagous insects associated with small size carrions of two reptiles and one amphibian, found in areas of riparian forests and Cerrado sensu stricto physiognomies in a Conservation Unit located in Brasilia, Distrito Federal. We found seven species of insects related to these carcasses, being five Sarcophagidae, one Calliphoridae and one Braconidae parasitoid wasp. Lucilia eximia and Peckia (Pattonella intermutans were the most abundant species in the study, corroborating with other studies that suggests that these species have specializations for colonization of small size animal carcasses.Sarcophagidae e Calliphoridae associados às carcaças de Rhinella schneideri (Anura, Bufonidae, Bothrops moojeni (Reptilia, Serpentes e Mabuya frenata (Reptilia, Lacertilia em Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brasil. Este trabalho apresenta uma lista de insetos decompositores associados a carcaças de pequeno porte de dois répteis e de um anfíbio, encontrados em áreas de matas de galeria e de cerrado sensu stricto em unidades de conservação do Distrito Federal. Foram encontradas sete espécies de insetos associados a essas carcaças, sendo cinco sarcofagídeos, um califorídeo e uma vespa parasitóide Braconidae. Lucilia eximia e Peckia (Pattonella intermutans foram as espécies mais abundantes, corroborando com outros estudos que sugerem que estas espécies apresentam especializações para a colonização de carcaças menores.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships and limb loss in sub-Saharan African scincine lizards (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Alison S; Bauer, Aaron M; Sites, Jack W

    2003-12-01

    Skinks are the largest family of lizards and are found worldwide in a diversity of habitats. One of the larger and more poorly studied groups of skinks includes members of the subfamily Scincinae distributed in sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan African scincines are one of the many groups of lizards that show limb reduction and loss, and the genus Scelotes offers an excellent opportunity to look at limb loss in a phylogenetic context. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed for a total of 52 taxa representing all subfamilies of skinks as well as other Autarchoglossan families using sequence from six gene regions including; 12S, 16S, and cytochrome b (mitochondrial), as well as alpha-Enolase, 18S, and C-mos (nuclear). The family Scincidae is recovered as monophyletic and is the sister taxon to a (Cordylidae+Xantusiidae) clade. Within skinks the subfamily Acontinae is monophyletic and sister group to all remaining skinks. There is no support for the monophyly of the subfamilies Lygosominae and Scincinae, but sub-Saharan African scincines+Feylinia form a well supported monophyletic group. The monophyly of Scelotes is confirmed, and support is found for two geographic groups within the genus. Reconstructions of ancestral states for limb and digital characters show limited support for the reversal or gain of both digits and limbs, but conservative interpretation of the results suggest that limb loss is common, occurring multiple times throughout evolutionary history, and is most likely not reversible.

  19. Evolutionary diversification of the lizard genus Bassiana (Scincidae across Southern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Dubey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Relatively recent (Plio-Pleistocene climatic variations had strong impacts on the fauna and flora of temperate-zone North America and Europe; genetic analyses suggest that many lineages were restricted to unglaciated refuges during this time, and have expanded their ranges since then. Temperate-zone Australia experienced less severe glaciation, suggesting that patterns of genetic structure among species may reflect older (aridity-driven divergence events rather than Plio-Pleistocene (thermally-mediated divergences. The lizard genus Bassiana (Squamata, Scincidae contains three species that occur across a wide area of southern Australia (including Tasmania, rendering them ideally-suited to studies on the impact of past climatic fluctuations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed molecular phylogenetic and dating analyses using two partial mitochondrial genes (ND2 and ND4 of 97 samples of Bassiana spp. Our results reveal a pattern of diversification beginning in the Middle Miocene, with intraspecific diversification arising from 5.7 to 1.7 million years ago in the Upper Miocene-Lower Pleistocene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to the temperate-zone Northern Hemisphere biota, patterns of evolutionary diversification within southern Australian taxa appear to reflect geologically ancient events, mostly relating to east-west discontinuities imposed by aridity rather than (as is the case in Europe and North America relatively recent recolonisation of northern regions from unglaciated refugia to the south.

  20. Distinct patterns of desynchronized limb regression in malagasy scincine lizards (squamata, scincidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Miralles

    Full Text Available Scincine lizards in Madagascar form an endemic clade of about 60 species exhibiting a variety of ecomorphological adaptations. Several subclades have adapted to burrowing and convergently regressed their limbs and eyes, resulting in a variety of partial and completely limbless morphologies among extant taxa. However, patterns of limb regression in these taxa have not been studied in detail. Here we fill this gap in knowledge by providing a phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences of three mitochondrial and four nuclear gene fragments in an extended sampling of Malagasy skinks, and microtomographic analyses of osteology of various burrowing taxa adapted to sand substrate. Based on our data we propose to (i consider Sirenoscincus Sakata & Hikida, 2003, as junior synonym of Voeltzkowia Boettger, 1893; (ii resurrect the genus name Grandidierina Mocquard, 1894, for four species previously included in Voeltzkowia; and (iii consider Androngo Brygoo, 1982, as junior synonym of Pygomeles Grandidier, 1867. By supporting the clade consisting of the limbless Voeltzkowia mira and the forelimb-only taxa V. mobydick and V. yamagishii, our data indicate that full regression of limbs and eyes occurred in parallel twice in the genus Voeltzkowia (as hitherto defined that we consider as a sand-swimming ecomorph: in the Voeltzkowia clade sensu stricto the regression first affected the hindlimbs and subsequently the forelimbs, whereas the Grandidierina clade first regressed the forelimbs and subsequently the hindlimbs following the pattern prevalent in squamates. Timetree reconstructions for the Malagasy Scincidae contain a substantial amount of uncertainty due to the absence of suitable primary fossil calibrations. However, our preliminary reconstructions suggest rapid limb regression in Malagasy scincids with an estimated maximal duration of 6 MYr for a complete regression in Paracontias, and 4 and 8 MYr respectively for complete regression of forelimbs in

  1. Use of cacti as heat sources by thermoregulating Mabuya agilis (Raddi) and Mabuya macrorhyncha Hoge (Lacertflia, Scincidae) in two restinga habitats in southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Lizards may benefit from gain of heat from contact with the substrate via conduction. In this study, evidence that the lizards Mabuya agilis (Raddi, 1823) and Mabuya macrorhynclui Hoge, 1946 (Scincidae) inhabiting two restinga habitats in southeastern Brazil (Grussaf, Rio de Janeiro and Praia das Neves, Espfrito Santo), may shift microhabitat preferences along the day, and that such shifts may be related to the use of cacti surfaces as direct sources of heat is presented. For both species, bo...

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in beaked sea snake Enhydrina schistose (Daudin, 1803) from the Mandovi estuary, Goa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Sambhaji; Kumar, Ranjeet; Naik, B G; Ingole, Baban S

    2015-02-01

    An ecotoxicological study were conducted to evaluate the concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes, in gut, liver and kidney tissues of two individuals of Enhydrina schistose (Daudin, 1803), using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentrations of PAHs (0.10 µg/g) and n-alkanes (8.12 µg/g) were elevated in the gut, and liver (PAHs 0.05 µg/g tissue, n-alkanes 29.16 µg/g tissue). In kidney of both specimen-A and B the PAHs (0.01 and 0.1 µg/g) and n-alkanes (0.22 and 2.06 µg/g) concentration was detected. This was an initial survey (n = 2) and the main goal was to know accumulation and distribution of PAHs and n-alkanes in the sea snakes. This study indicates high accumulation of petroleum hydrocarbon in gut, liver and kidney of sea snake. Since, this species also act as pray for sea eagles and some predatory fishes such as tiger shark, there is high possibilities of PAHs being circulated in marine food chain.

  3. A revised key to the lizards of Iran (Reptilia: Squamata: Lacertilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabadi, Reza; Rastegar-Pouyani, Nasrullah; Rastegar-Pouyani, Eskandar; Gharzi, Ahmad

    2017-02-03

    During recent years several lizard taxa have been added to the faunal list of Iran. Descriptions and new records are scattered in different publications in the herpetological literature. We here present species accounts for 152 species belonging to 43 genera and 10 families up to July 2016. The most diverse family is Lacertidae with 9 genera, 49 species and 2 subspecies, followed by Gekkonidae with 13 genera and 43 species, Agamidae with 5 genera, 18 species and 4 subspecies, Scincidae with 7 genera, 18 species and 2 subspecies, Phyllodactylidae with 1 genus and 10 species, Sphaerodactylidae with 2 genera and 4 species, Varanidae with 1 genus, 3 species and 2 subspecies, Uromastycidae with 2 genera and 3 species, Eublepharidae with 1 genus and 3 species, and Anguidae with 2 genera and 2 species. The current paper provides a dichotomous key including all of the currently recognized lizards of Iran.

  4. Avaliação físico química da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 de idades diferentes Physichist chymistry evaluation of swampland alligator meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Neto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a composição química e física da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802, de idades diferentes, foram coletadas amostras de dois cortes de 10 jacarés-do-pantanal, sendo: 05 animais 14 meses e 05 animais com 26 meses, criados em cativeiro. Os cortes utilizados foram filé da cauda e filé do dorso. Foram determinados na composição química: umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo e cinzas; e na composição física: perda de peso por cozimento (PPC e força de cisalhamento (FC. Houve interação (PWith the objective of evaluating the chemical and physical composition of swampland alligator meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802, of different ages, samples of two courts of 10 swampland alligator were collected, being: 05 animals 14 months and 05 animals with 26 months, servants in captivity. The used courts were of tail and neck. They were certain in the chemical composition: moisture, protein, ethereal extract and ashes; and in the physical composition: weight loss for cooking (WLC and break force (BF. There was interaction (P<0.05 for moisture and for break force (BF. The animals with 14 months presented average of higher moisture (76.75% in the tail that the animals with 26 months (74.48%. The averages of ethereal extract varied of: 0.40% to 0.54% among the courts for the animals of 14 months and of 0.51% to 0.84% for the animals of 26 months. The found protein values were: 23.57% in the tail and 24.37% in the neck in the animals of 14 months; and of 24.26% in the tail and 23.74% in the neck for the animals of 26 months. The medium value of WLC, in the animals with 14 months was larger (40.02%, that in the animals of 26 months (33.82%. The animals abated with age of 14 months presented softer meat and values of ethereal extract smaller the animals abated with 26 months, demonstrating for these parameters a better physical and chemical quality.

  5. Vascular regression during amphibian metamorphosis--a scanning electron microscope study of vascular corrosion casts of the ventral velum in tadpoles of Xenopus laevis Daudin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichhorn, H; Lametschwandtner, A

    1996-09-01

    We used scanning electron microscopy and vascular casting to study gross arterial supply, venous drainage, and microvascular patterns of the fully developed ventral velum of tadpoles of Xenopus laevis Daudin and analyzed changes of the velar vascular bed from prometamorphosis to metamorphic climax in a qualitative and quantitative manner. The multilayered, highly secretory ventral velum is supplied bilaterally by an anterior and a posterior velar artery, branches of the external carotid artery. Velar arterioles branch mainly dichotomously and form a flat two-dimensional capillary meshwork overlying the tops of filterplates I-IV. Thymopharyngeal veins, dorsal branches of the filter plates veins, and the internal jugular veins drain the velum toward the venous sinus of the heart. Location, architecture, and the drainage of the velar microvascular bed into the venous sinus make a significant contribution of the velar capillaries to gas exchange unlikely. Instead, velar capillaries rather serve the nutrition of the secretory epithelium. The overall morphology of velar vessels from prometamorphosis to metamorphic climax--deduced from vascular corrosion casts--points to atonic vessels with increased leakage indicated by adhering globular extravasations, and to obstructed or blind ending vessels evidenced by the tapered and/or rounded blind ending cast vessels. The significant decrease in the size of the ventral velum during the metamorphic cycle was paralleled by a miniaturization of the velar vascular bed. We hypothetize that this miniaturization occurs by a shortening and fusion of capillary mesh elements. Our findings in corrosion casts, particularly the miniaturization of the velar microvascular bed and the morphology of the regressing capillaries, point to profound morphologic and ultrastructural changes in velar vessels; a study on the fine structure of the microvascular bed of the ventral velum in metamorphic tadpoles is in progress.

  6. Helminths infecting Mabuya dorsivittata (Lacertilia, Scincidae) from a high-altitude habitat in Itatiaia National Park, Rio de Janeiro State, Southeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    We analysed the helminth fauna associated with the lizard Mabuya dorsivittata (Scincidae) from a high-altitude area in Itatiaia National Park, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Of the 16 lizards examined, 12 (75%) were infected by at least one helminth. Only two helminth species were found: Physaloptera retusa and Skrjabinodon spinosulus (Nematoda), the former with a prevalence of 68.8% and a mean infection intensity of 3.6 ± 2.8 and the latter with a prevalence of 56.3% and a mean infection inte...

  7. New host and distributional records for Cryptosporidium sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from lizards (Sauria: Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu, South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993, 295 lizards, comprising 21 species in 2 families (Gekkonidae, Scincidae) from the Cook Islands, Fiji, Palau, Takapoto, and Vanuatu in the South Pacific, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Only 6 lizards (2%) were found to be passing Cryptosporidium oocysts in their feces, including 2 of 30 (7%) Oceania geckos, Gehyra oceanica, from Rarotonga, Cook Islands, and 4 of 26 (15%) Pacific blue-tailed skinks, Emoia caeruleocauda, from Efate Island, Vanuatu. This represents the largest survey for Cryptosporidium in Pacific island lizards, and we document 2 new host and 2 new locality records for this parasite genus.

  8. An annotated type catalogue of the anguid, dibamid, scincid and varanid lizards in the Department of Herpetology, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia (Reptilia: Sauria: Anguidae, Dibamidae, Scincidae and Varanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanov, Andrei; Milto, Konstantin

    2017-03-17

    A complete catalogue is provided for the type specimens of anguid, dibamid, scincid and varanid lizards in the herpetological collection of the Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia (ZISP), as of January 2017. The collection contains a total of 170 type specimens, representing 50 taxa in the four lizard families under consideration. Thirty-one of these taxa are regarded currently as valid. The types of four taxa (one holotype, one lectotype and two paralectotypes) could not be located in the ZISP collections in January 2017. A majority of the types are skinks (43 taxa, 155 types), many of which were described by the late Ilya Darevsky (1924-2009).

  9. taxonomic diversity of agamid lizards (reptilia,sauria,acrodonta,agamidae)from china:a comparative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    results of the analysis of taxonomic diversity and representation of different evolutionary lineages of agamid lizards (reptilia,sauria,agamidae)are provided in this article.for comparison with the fauna of china,the following territories were selected:north eurasia,iran and different countries of south and southeast asia.there are 49 agamid species in china,comprising 12 genera and 4 subfamilies.annotated check-list and identification keys to genera are provided.among the 49 species of agamids present in china,the percent of endemic species is relatively high (22 species; 45%).endemic species refer to 4 genera with the genus japalura having the most,10 of 14 species,proceeded by members of tibetan plateau lineage of phrynocephalus,8 of 12 species,and calotes with 1 species and laudakia with 3.

  10. Lizard Wears Shades. A Spectacled Sphenomorphus (Squamata: Scincidae), from the Sacred Forests of Mawphlang, Meghalaya, North-east India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Roy, Aniruddha; Das, Indraneil; Bauer, Aaron M; Tron, Ronald K Lyngdoh; Karanth, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    A new species of lygosomatine scincid lizard is described from the sacred forests of Mawphlang, in Meghalaya, northeastern India. Sphenomorphus apalpebratus sp. nov. possesses a spectacle or brille, an unusual feature within the Scincidae, and a first for the paraphyletic genus Sphenomorphus. The new species is compared with other members of the genus to which it is here assigned, as well as to members of the lygosomatine genera Lipinia and Scincella from mainland India, the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, and southeast Asia, to which it also bears resemblance. The new taxon is diagnosable in exhibiting the following combination of characters: small body size (SVL to 42.0 mm); moveable eyelids absent; auricular opening scaleless, situated in a shallow depression; dorsal scales show a line of demarcation along posterior edge of ventral pes; midbody scale rows 27-28; longitudinal scale rows between parietals and base of tail 62-64; lamellae under toe IV 8-9; supraoculars five; supralabials 5-6; infralabials 4-5; subcaudals 92; and dorsum golden brown, except at dorsal margin of lateral line, which is lighter, with four faintly spotted lines, two along each side of vertebral row of scales, that extend to tail base. The new species differs from its congeners in the lack of moveable eyelids, a character shared with several distantly related scincid genera.

  11. Radiography atlas of domestic animals. Small mammals, birds, reptilia, and amphibia. Atlas der Roentgendiagnostik bei Heimtieren. Kleinsaeuger, Voegel, Reptilien und Amphibien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebel, G.A.; Isenbuegel, E.; Wolvekamp, P. (eds.); Gabrisch, K.; Grimm, F.; Koblik, P.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Oschwald, C.P.; Schildger, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The 370 radiographs presented in the atlas together with notes and explanations give information on normal roentgenographic findings, physiological variations, and important pathological findings observed in small mammals, birds, reptilia and amphibia. Introductory notes to each chapter explain the principles of exposure techniques and the handling of the animals. (VHE).

  12. [Population ecology of Crocodylus acutus (Reptilia: Crocodylidae) in Palmasola lagoon, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Grajales, Jesús; Silva, Alejandra Buenrostro

    2014-03-01

    Population ecology of Crocodylus acutus (Reptilia: Crocodylidae) in Palmasola lagoon, Oaxaca, Mexico. Abundance and population structure are important parameters to evaluate and compare the conservation status of a population over time in a given area. This study describes the population abundance and structure of Crocodylus acutus in Palmasola lagoon, Oaxaca. The field works consisted of night surveys during the new moon phase, between the 21:00 and 24:00h. These were conducted during the dry and wet seasons and counted the number of individuals to obtain population estimates. Recorded encounter rates ranged from 32 to 109.3ind./ km in 40 journeys deployed with an average time of 18 minutes browsing. The estimated population size using the Messel's model ranged from 32.7 to 93 individuals. For both seasons, there was a marked dominance of subadults, followed by juveniles and to a lesser extent adult individuals, as well as undetermined individuals (i.e. unknown body/size/length), in both seasons. There was also a significant association with mangrove areas (26.1%) by juveniles; the subadults's individual use of superficial water (22.7%) and mangrove areas (15.7%); meanwhile the adults were observed on superficial water (9.7%). This information contributes to our understanding of the population ecology of C. acutus in the Palmasola lagoon where the estimated population size seems to show higher values when compared to other reports in the country.

  13. Helminths infecting Mabuya dorsivittata (Lacertilia, Scincidae) from a high-altitude habitat in Itatiaia National Park, Rio de Janeiro State, southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, C F; Vrcibradic, D; Vicente, J J; Cunha-Barros, M

    2003-02-01

    We analysed the helminth fauna associated with the lizard Mabuya dorsivittata (Scincidae) from a high-altitude area in Itatiaia National Park, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Of the 16 lizards examined, 12 (75%) were infected by at least one helminth. Only two helminth species were found: Physaloptera retusa and Skrjabinodon spinosulus (Nematoda), the former with a prevalence of 68.8% and a mean infection intensity of 3.6 +/- 2.8 and the latter with a prevalence of 56.3% and a mean infection intensity of 2.6 +/- 2.6. The helminth fauna of the studied population of Mabuya dorsivittata was considerably poorer than those of other previously studied populations of congeners.

  14. A revision of the distribution of sea kraits (Reptilia, Laticauda) with an updated occurrence dataset for ecological and conservation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherghel, Iulian; Papeş, Monica; Brischoux, François; Sahlean, Tiberiu; Strugariu, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genus Laticauda (Reptilia: Elapidae), commonly known as sea kraits, comprises eight species of marine amphibious snakes distributed along the shores of the Western Pacific Ocean and the Eastern Indian Ocean. We review the information available on the geographic range of sea kraits and analyze their distribution patterns. Generally, we found that south and south-west of Japan, Philippines Archipelago, parts of Indonesia, and Vanuatu have the highest diversity of sea krait species. Further, we compiled the information available on sea kraits’ occurrences from a variety of sources, including museum records, field surveys, and the scientific literature. The final database comprises 694 occurrence records, with Laticauda colubrina having the highest number of records and Laticauda schistorhyncha the lowest. The occurrence records were georeferenced and compiled as a database for each sea krait species. This database can be freely used for future studies. PMID:27110155

  15. Use of cacti as heat sources by thermoregulating Mabuya agilis (Raddi and Mabuya macrorhyncha Hoge (Lacertflia, Scincidae in two restinga habitats in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Vrcibradic

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Lizards may benefit from gain of heat from contact with the substrate via conduction. In this study, evidence that the lizards Mabuya agilis (Raddi, 1823 and Mabuya macrorhynclui Hoge, 1946 (Scincidae inhabiting two restinga habitats in southeastern Brazil (Grussaf, Rio de Janeiro and Praia das Neves, Espfrito Santo, may shift microhabitat preferences along the day, and that such shifts may be related to the use of cacti surfaces as direct sources of heat is presented. For both species, body temperature (Tb was always significantly correlated (p < 0,05 with air temperature (Ta. Tb was significantly correlated (p < 0,0.5 with substrate temperature (Ts for M. agilis collected on cacti, but not for specimens collected on the ground. For M. macrorhyncha collected on cacti, both Ta and Ts were more important in conjunction than separately, in explaining lizard Tb. Use of cacti as perches by M. agilis was more frequent during late afternoon when environmental temperatures are declining, but such a trend was not evident for M. macrorhynclui. We suggest that the use of cacti as direct heat sources may be more evident in the ground-dwelling M. agilis than in the scansorial M. macrorhynclui.

  16. Anatomía visceral de Feylinia grandisquamis (Squamata: Scincidae. Comparaciones con otros escamados de patrón corporal semejante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Feylinia grandisquamis es un síncido africano caracterizado por contar con el cuerpo alargado y las extremidades ausentes. En el presente trabajo se describe en detalle la anatomía de las vísceras de Feylinia grandisquamis, y algunos aspectos de su variación intraespecífica. Los resultados se comparan con otro género de Scincidae (Anomalopus y representantes de grandes grupos de escamados que exhiben patrones corporales semejantes (Lialis burtonis, Amphisbaena darwinii, Boa constrictor, Ophiodes striatus, Anguis fragilis. Los objetivos de este trabajo fueron: a determinar la morfología de las vísceras de Feylinia; b los aspectos de su variación intraespecífica; c discutir convergencias y paralelismos con Saurios, Anfisbénidos y Ofidios. Feylinia grandisquamis is an African Scincid characterized for a snakeshaped body and total absence of limbs. In this work the visceral anatomy of Feylinia grandisquamis is described, as well as aspects of its intraspecific variation. The results are compared with another scincid (Anomalopus and representatives of other Squamate groups with similar body plans (Lialis burtonis, Amphisbaena darwinii, Boa constrictor, Ophiodes striatus, Anguis fragilis. The objectives were: a To determine the visceral anatomy of Feylinia; b The aspects of its intraespecific variation; and c Discuss convergences and parallelisms with possible occurrence in Lizards, Amphisbaenids and Ophidia.

  17. Two new species of Pseudotelorchis (Digenea, Telorchiidae, parasites of the Caiman, Caiman crocodilus yacare (Reptilia, Crocodylia from the Pantanal Mato-Grossense, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joäo B. Catto

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudotelorchis caimanis n. sp. and P. yacarei n. sp. are described based on specimens collected from Caiman crocodilus yacare (Daudin in the Pantanal Mato-grossense, Brazil. This is the first record of any species of Telorchiidae Stunkard, 1924, parasitizing crocodilians. Pseudotelorchis caimanis n. sp. differs from P. comapactus, the only species described in the genus with seminal receptacle, testes in tandem, and genital pore lateral to acetabulum. Pseudotelorchis yacarei n. sp. differs from the two other species for its body shape, for infecting the intestine instead of the uterus, by having regularly disposed instead of irregulary disposed uterine loops, and by having the vitelline glands disposed in longitudinal lateral lines instead of in lateral bunches.

  18. The international trade in reptiles (Reptilia)--the cause of the transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) to Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Magdalena

    2010-05-11

    The problem of the unnatural transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland is presented. In the period from 2003 to 2007, 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The reptiles most infested with ticks are imported to Poland from Ghana in Africa, and are the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius. As a result of the investigations, the transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland was confirmed. There were 2104 specimens of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Donitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum (Schulze, 1941), Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma sp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Amblyomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. During the research, 13 cases of anomalies of morphological structure were confirmed in the ticks A. flavomaculatum, A. latum and H. aegyptium. The expanding phenomenon of the import of exotic reptiles in Poland and Central Europe is important for parasitological and epidemiological considerations, and therefore requires monitoring and wide-ranging prophylactic activities to prevent the inflow of exotic parasites to Poland.

  19. Diet is a major factor governing the fecal butyrate-producing community structure across Mammalia, Aves and Reptilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Marius; Gao, Jiarong; Rizzo, Mike; Harrison, Tara; Tiedje, James M

    2015-03-17

    Butyrate-producing bacteria have an important role in maintaining host health. They are well studied in human and medically associated animal models; however, much less is known for other Vertebrata. We investigated the butyrate-producing community in hindgut-fermenting Mammalia (n = 38), Aves (n = 8) and Reptilia (n = 8) using a gene-targeted pyrosequencing approach of the terminal genes of the main butyrate-synthesis pathways, namely butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk). Most animals exhibit high gene abundances, and clear diet-specific signatures were detected with but genes significantly enriched in omnivores and herbivores compared with carnivores. But dominated the butyrate-producing community in these two groups, whereas buk was more abundant in many carnivorous animals. Clustering of protein sequences (5% cutoff) of the combined communities (but and buk) placed carnivores apart from other diet groups, except for noncarnivorous Carnivora, which clustered together with carnivores. The majority of clusters (but: 5141 and buk: 2924) did not show close relation to any reference sequences from public databases (identity <90%) demonstrating a large 'unknown diversity'. Each diet group had abundant signature taxa, where buk genes linked to Clostridium perfringens dominated in carnivores and but genes associated with Ruminococcaceae bacterium D16 were specific for herbivores and omnivores. Whereas 16S rRNA gene analysis showed similar overall patterns, it was unable to reveal communities at the same depth and resolution as the functional gene-targeted approach. This study demonstrates that butyrate producers are abundant across vertebrates exhibiting great functional redundancy and that diet is the primary determinant governing the composition of the butyrate-producing guild.

  20. Ontogenetic Tooth Reduction in Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria: Negative Allometry, Changes in Growth Rate, and Early Senescence of the Dental Lamina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Dick

    Full Text Available We explore the functional, developmental, and evolutionary processes which are argued to produce tooth reduction in the extinct marine reptile Stenopterygius quadriscissus (Reptilia: Ichthyosauria. We analyze the relationship between mandible growth and tooth size, shape, and count, to establish an ontogenetic trend. The pattern in S. quadriscissus is consistent with hypotheses of tooth size reduction by neutral selection, and this unusual morphology (a functionally edentulous rostrum was produced by a series of different evolutionary developmental changes that are known for other taxa showing tooth reduction and loss. Specifically, this species evolved functional edentulism by evolutionary changes in the growth allometry of the dentition and by altering growth rates through ontogeny. This observation supports previous hypotheses that S. quadriscissus underwent ontogenetic tooth reduction. Tooth reduction in S. quadriscissus may be caused by unique selective pressures resulting from prey choice and feeding behavior, expanding our current understanding of the mechanisms producing tooth reduction.

  1. Potential Distribution of Podocnemis lewyana (Reptilia:Podocnemididae and Its Possible Fluctuation Under Different Global Climate Change Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ortiz-Yusty

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We implemented a species distribution modelling approach to establish the potential distribution of Podocnemis lewyana, to explore the climatic factors that may influence the species’ distribution and to evaluate possible changes in distribution under future climate scenarios. The distribution models predicted a continuous distribution from south to north along the Magdalena River, from Rivera and Palermo in the department of Huila to the departments of Atlántico and Magdalena in the north. Temperature was the variable most influential in the distribution of P. lewyana; this species tends to be present in warm regions with low temperature variability. The distribution model predicted an increase in the geographic range of P. lewyana under climate change scenarios. However, taking into account the habitat preferences of this species and its strong association with water, this result should be treated with caution since the model considered only terrestrial climatic variables. Given the life history characteristics of this species (temperature-dependent sex determination, high pivotal temperature and a very narrow transition range and the negative effect of changes in hydrological regimes on embryo survival, expansion of the potential distribution of P. lewyana in the future does not mean that the species will not be affected by global climate change.DISTRIBUCIÓN POTENCIAL DE (Podocnemis lewyana, REPTILIA: Podocnemididae Y SU POSIBLE FLUCTUACIÓN BAJO ESCENARIOS DE CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO GLOBALEn este estudio se implementó el modelaje de distribución de especies para establecer el rango de distribución potencial de Podocnemis lewyana, explorar los componentes del clima que pueden influenciar dicha distribución y evaluar posibles fluctuaciones de su distribución bajo escenarios de clima futuro. Los modelos obtenidos predicen una distribución continua de sur a norte por todo el río Magdalena, desde los municipios de Rivera y Palermo en el

  2. 中国两栖纲和爬行纲动物校正名录%REVISED CHECKLIST OF CHINESE AMPHIBIA & REPTILIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵尔宓; 张学文; 赵蕙; 王鹰岩

    2000-01-01

    @@ 本名录摘自2000年在台湾出版的之十一:Zhao Ermi(赵尔宓), Chang Hsueh-Wen(张学文), and Zhao Hui(赵蕙)编著"Taxonomic Bibliography of Chinese Amphibia and Reptilia, including Karyological Literature"(中国两栖纲和爬行纲动物分类学文献,包括核学文献) 一书215~238页.该书中此名录部分有美国康乃尔大学鹰岩(Kraig Adler)教授参与合作完成.由于原书印数有限,成本较高(其中一部分从台湾航空寄来,寄费高过印刷费),加以原书名录没有阶元的中文名称,对于一些不熟悉拉丁学名的业余爱好者使用困难,因此目前将该书名录部分重印,并加入中文名称,发表于杂志.

  3. An updated and annotated list of Indian lizards (Reptilia: Sauria based on a review of distribution records and checklists of Indian reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Venugopal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades many checklists of reptiles of India and adjacent countries have been published. These publications have furthered the growth of knowledge on systematics, distribution and biogeography of Indian reptiles, and the field of herpetology in India in general. However, the reporting format of most such checklists of Indian reptiles does not provide a basis for direct verification of the information presented. As a result, mistakes in the inclusion and omission of species have been perpetuated and the exact number of reptile species reported from India still remains unclear. A verification of the current listings based on distributional records and review of published checklists revealed that 199 species of lizards (Reptilia: Sauria are currently validly reported on the basis of distributional records within the boundaries of India. Seventeen other lizard species have erroneously been included in earlier checklists of Indian reptiles. Omissions of species by these checklists have been even more numerous than erroneous inclusions. In this paper, I present a plea to report species lists as annotated checklists which corroborate the inclusion and omission of species by providing valid source references or notes.

  4. Fauna Simalurensis. Reptilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, de N.

    1922-01-01

    The collection of reptiles from Simalur, made by Mr. Edw. Jacobson in 1913 is a very interesting one and consists of 35 species: Lacertilia 17, Chelonia and Crocodilia 2, Ophidia 16. Besides, some reptiles were collected at Pulu Babi, at Pulu Si Laut (one of the Cocos Islands, north off Simalur) and

  5. Genome evolution in Reptilia: in silico chicken mapping of 12,000 BAC-end sequences from two reptiles and a basal bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Scott V

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the publication of the draft chicken genome and the recent production of several BAC clone libraries from non-avian reptiles and birds, it is now possible to undertake more detailed comparative genomic studies in Reptilia. Of interest in particular are the genomic events that transformed the large, repeat-rich genomes of mammals and non-avian reptiles into the minimalist chicken genome. We have used paired BAC end sequences (BESs from the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis, painted turtle (Chrysemys picta and emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae to investigate patterns of sequence divergence, gene and retroelement content, and microsynteny between these species and chicken. Results From a total of 11,967 curated BESs, we successfully mapped 725, 773 and 2597 sequences in alligator, turtle, and emu, respectively, to sites in the draft chicken genome using a stringent BLAST protocol. Most commonly, sequences mapped to a single site in the chicken genome. Of 1675, 1828 and 2936 paired BESs obtained for alligator, turtle, and emu, respectively, a total of 34 (alligator, 2%, 24 (turtle, 1.3% and 479 (emu, 16.3% pairs were found to map with high confidence and in the correct orientation and with BAC-sized intermarker distances to single chicken chromosomes, including 25 such paired hits in emu mapping to the chicken Z chromosome. By determining the insert sizes of a subset of BAC clones from these three species, we also found a significant correlation between the intermarker distance in alligator and turtle and in chicken, with slopes as expected on the basis of the ratio of the genome sizes. Conclusion Our results suggest that a large number of small-scale chromosomal rearrangements and deletions in the lineage leading to chicken have drastically reduced the number of detected syntenies observed between the chicken and alligator, turtle, and emu genomes and imply that small deletions occurring widely throughout the

  6. The allantoplacenta of Mabuya mabouya (Sauria, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, A; Ramírez-Pinilla, M P

    2001-08-01

    Analysis of placentation in the final stages of development in Mabuya mabouya shows that the placenta is formed by the apposition of the chorioallantois to the uterine mucosa implicating the entire embryonic chamber, because the allantoic vesicle invades all the exocoelom. The chorioallantoic placenta presents the features proper of a type IV allantoplacenta. However, in the mesometrial area peripheral to the placentome, we found that the paraplacentome is an additional zone specialized for histotrophic transfer, and is separated from the rest of the embryonic chamber by a chorionic invagination formed of polymorphic cells. The chorionic areolae are components of the embryonic hemisphere; they are in apposition to an endometrium with columnar epithelial cells and several glands that secrete toward the cavity of the areolae. They are observed only in the preparturition stage, probably operating in maternal-fetal transfer of nutrients during the last embryonic growth stage. The mesometrial hemisphere possesses specializations related to histotrophic nutrition (placentome, paraplacentome, and chorionic areolae), while in the abembryonic hemisphere there is an allantoplacenta of mixed function, with capacity for histotrophic nutrition and for gas exchange. The absorptive plaques are small rounded areas constituted by chorionic cells similar to the paraplacentomal chorionic cells, in intimate apposition with a secretory uterine epithelium. Separating the absorptive plaques are respiratory segments histologically similar to the type I allantoplacenta. The additional histotrophic areas found for this species demonstrate the great specialization of this allantoplacenta, and support the highest degree of matrotrophy among reptiles reached in the Neotropical Mabuya.

  7. MORFOLOGICAL AND HISTOCHEMICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE SALIVARY GLANDS OF THE ALLIGATOR Caiman latirostris OBSERVAÇÕES MORFOLÓGICAS E HISTOQUÍMICAS SOBRE AS GLÂNDULAS SALIVARES DO JACARÉ Caiman latirostris (Crocodilia Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Herbert de Faria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Using histological and histochemical methods for glicoconjugates, the present work on the salivary glands of the alligator Caiman latirostris (Crocodilia Reptilia, was developed. On the bases of the results obtained, the authors believe that those glands are not well developed, appearing as unicellular structures goblet-like cells, in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oral cavity. Scattered glands alveolus without excretory tubules which extend directly with the epitelium were also present. By means of histochemical methods for glicoconjugates, it was possible to detect the glicoprotein and the sialic acid in the glandular formation of these animals.

    Empregando-se métodos histológicos e histoquímicos para glicoconjugados, desenvolveu-se um trabalho sobre glândulas salivares do jacaré Caiman latirostris. Com base nos resultados obtidos, constatou-se que estas glândulas são pouco desenvolvidas, aparecendo como estruturas unicelulares, semelhantes às células caliciformes, incluídas no epitélio estratificado pavimentoso da cavidade oral. Observou-se, ainda, a presença de esparsos alvéolos glandulares desprovidos de ductos excretores que continuam diretamente com o epitélio. Por meio de métodos histoquímicos para glicoconjugados, foi possível a detecção de glicoproteína e de ácido siálico nas formações glandulares desses animais.

  8. 14. Pisces, Reptilia and Aves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaufort, de L.F.

    1931-01-01

    In the following list of fishes and reptiles, known to occur as fossils in the Indoaustralian Archipelago, I have chiefly followed Smith Woodward (Bibl. 18) for the taxonomy. The teleosts, however, have been arranged according to Boulenger (The Cambridge Natural History, Vol. VII, 1904), with some

  9. The oldest plesiosaur (Reptilia, Sauropterygia from Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wilhelm Armin Kellner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic plesiosaurs are known from the Upper Cretaceous López de Bertodano and Snow Hill Island formations (Campanian to upper Maastrichtian, which crop out within the James Ross Basin region of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here we describe the first plesiosaur fossils from the Lachman Crags Member of the Santa Marta Formation, north-western James Ross Island. This material constitutes the stratigraphically oldest plesiosaur occurrence presently known from Antarctica, extending the occurrence of plesiosaurians in this continent back to Santonian times (86.3–83.5 Mya. Furthermore, MN 7163-V represents the first plesiosaur from this region not referable to the Elasmosauridae nor Aristonectes, indicating a greater diversity of this group of aquatic reptiles in Antarctica than previously suspected.

  10. Lizards of Brazilian Amazonia (Reptilia: Squamata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila-Pires, T.C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Eighty-nine species of lizards, six of which polytypic (forming a total of 97 taxa), are presently known from Brazilian Amazonia. This number includes six species and one subspecies described as new to science in this paper: Stenocercus fimbriatus, Lepidoblepharis hoogmoedi, Leposoma osvaldoi, L. sn

  11. Ovarian histology of the placentotrophic Mabuya mabouya (Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Duperly; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Ovarian structure and folliculogenesis of females at different reproductive stages are described for the viviparous placentotrophic lizard Mabuya mabouya. The small ovaries have a thin wall formed by the ovarian epithelium and a thin tunica albuginea. One to two germinal beds that contain numerous oogonia and developing primordial follicles are derived from the ovarian epithelium and are next to the ovarian hilum. The ovarian cortex contains follicles at different stages of development, corpora lutea, and atretic follicles. The yolk nucleus and Balbiani complex were not evident in the ooplasm of previtellogenic follicles. The follicular epithelium of these follicles is polymorphic, as in other species of Squamata, but the larger cells are spherical and monolayered rather than pyriform. The zona radiata of the preovulatory follicles is less developed than in lecithotrophic species. These features suggest a decrease in metabolic and absorptive processes during follicular growth. In preovulatory follicles (1.5-1.8 mm diameter), primordial yolk vacuoles and small cortical granules are deposited in the ooplasm instead of fatty yolk platelets, so that only one stage of vitellogenesis is observed. Polyovular atretic follicles occur in some females. Follicular atresia is minimal for preovulatory follicles, but is more frequent in follicles with polymorphic epithelia. In the corpus luteum, the luteal tissue is formed from granulosa cells and luteolysis occurs during the late gastrula -- late neurula embryonic stages. Thus, the maintenance of gestation from the pharyngula to preparturition stages seems to be related to secretion of extraluteal progesterone, possibly of placental origin. These observed ovarian features are related to the high degree of placental complexity of this species and show that the evolution of advanced placentotrophy in species of this lineage has been accompanied by concomitant changes in ovarian function.

  12. Allantoplacental ultrastructure of an Andean population of Mabuya (Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia; De Pérez, Gloria; Carreño-Escobar, J Fernando

    2006-10-01

    Mabuya species are highly matrotrophic viviparous lizards with Type IV epitheliochorial allantoplacenta. The allantoplacenta of an Andean population of this genus, currently assigned to Mabuya sp., possesses specializations related to histotrophic nutrition at the embryonic hemisphere (placentome, paraplacentome, and chorionic areolas), while at the abembryonic hemisphere it has a mixed function: histotrophic transfer (absorptive plaques) and hemotrophic nutrition (gas exchange in respiratory segments). These placental specializations were studied using high-resolution light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and were compared with those found in other squamate reptiles and eutherian mammals. Cytological features of the placentome suggest that this is an important region for nutritional provision; the paraplacentome also shows characteristics for nutrient transfer, especially lipids. Chorionic areolas allow the absorption of glandular products, as well as uterine and chorionic cellular debris produced by lysis of some cells of both epithelia during areola formation. In the absorptive plaques both uterine and chorionic epithelia are firmly attached and their cellular apices exhibit electron-dense granules that could be related to autocrine and paracrine functions. The short interhemal distance found in the respiratory segments confirms their role in gas exchange. A common feature of all regional specializations in the Mabuya sp. allantoplacenta is the presence of lipids in the interacting chorionic and uterine epithelia, suggesting that lipids are transferred throughout the entire embryonic chamber; placental transfer of lipids may be the principal fetal energy and lipid source in this species. In spite of this feature, each one of the specialized areas of the allantoplacenta has different features suggesting particular functions in the transfer of nutrients (as ions, lipids, proteins, amino acids, sugar, water, and gases), and in the possible synthesis of hormones and proteins. The placental complexity observed in this species of Mabuya is greater than in any other reptile, and resembles that of eutherian mammals: Each one of these specializations of the placental membranes in Mabuya sp. is similar to those found among different eutherian mammals, indicating a very impressive evolutionary convergence at the histological and cytological levels between both clades. However, no eutherian mammal species simultaneously displays all of these specializations in the embryonic chamber as does Mabuya sp.

  13. Revisionary notes on the Sphenomorphus isolepis complex (Lacertilia, Scincidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storr, G.M.

    1972-01-01

    Taxa that have only just attained specific distinction from each other can be of great interest to students of evolution, though their classification may pose serious problems for taxonomists. For example, the sparrows Passer domesticus and P. hispaniolensis behave as good species in most parts of t

  14. Placental ontogeny in Tasmanian snow skinks (genus Niveoscincus) (Lacertilia: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R; Thompson, Michael B

    2009-04-01

    Lizards of the viviparous genus Niveoscincus contributed importantly to a classic model for the evolution of placentation of squamate reptiles. This model predicts that: (1) placental function is correlated with placental structural complexity and (2) the type of chorioallantoic placenta attributed to three species of Niveoscincus (N. metallicus, N. ocellatus, N. pretiosus) is intermediate in complexity to a highly placentotrophic type of placenta. Recent studies of two of these species (N. metallicus, N. ocellatus) revealed additional variation in placental structure, as well as variation in the level of placentotrophy; N. metallicus is predominantly lecithotrophic, while N. ocellatus is highly placentotrophic. We used light microscopy to study placental ontogeny in two biennially reproducing species of Niveoscincus (N. greeni, N. microlepidotus) and placental morphology in late stage embryos of N. pretiosus. These data, in combination with prior studies, provide descriptions of placental structure for six of the eight species assigned to this lineage. The genus Niveoscincus has greater variation in placental structure than any other squamate lineage. We recognize four distinct groupings among these six species based on placental structure. The most highly placentotrophic species, N. ocellatus, has a complex placental morphology, yet shares these structures with a predominantly lecithotrophic species, N. microlepidotus. Thus, among species of Niveoscincus, placental structural complexity is not an infallible predictor of overall placental function.

  15. Low temperatures reduce skin healing in the Jacaré do Pantanal (Caiman yacare, Daudin 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Nogueira Pressinotti

    2013-09-01

    Studies of skin wound healing in crocodilians are necessary given the frequent occurrence of cannibalism in intensive farming systems. Air temperature affects tissue recovery because crocodilians are ectothermic. Therefore, the kinetics of skin wound healing in Caiman yacare were examined at temperatures of 33°C and 23°C. Sixteen caiman were selected and divided into two groups of eight maintained at 23°C or 33°C. The studied individuals' scars were photographed after 1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of the experimental conditions, and samples were collected for histological processing after 3, 7, 15 and 30 days. Macroscopically, the blood clot (heterophilic granuloma noticeably remained in place covering the wound longer for the caiman kept at 23°C. Microscopically, the temperature of 23°C slowed epidermal migration and skin repair. Comparatively, new blood vessels, labeled using von Willebrand factor (vWF antibody staining, were more frequently found in the scars of the 33°C group. The collagen fibers in the dermis were denser in the 33°C treatment. Considering the delayed healing at 23°C, producers are recommended to keep wounded animals at 33°C, especially when tanks are cold, to enable rapid wound closure and better repair of collagen fibers because such lesions tend to compromise the use of their skin as leather.

  16. [Rudimentary stages of the extremities of Scelotes gronovii (Daudin) embryos, a South African Scincidea reptile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, A; Van den Elzen, P

    1976-01-01

    The development of the limbs has been studied in 15 embryos of Scelotes gronovii, found in 8 ovoviviparous females collected at Saldanha Bay, in South Africa, Cape Province. This study leads to the following constatations: In all the young embryos of this species, their appears anlagen of anterior and of posterior limb-buds. The primordia of forelimb-buds retrogress early and disappear, whereas the primordia of hind limb-buds transform into rudimentary limbs which persist in adult. Histological study of the anlagen of fore limb buds establish that 7 somites (S6 to S12, S1 being the first post-otic somite) send ventral processes in the mesoblast of the anlage. These processes follow a sinuous pathway in the limb-bud, and are bent towards the basal cell layer of the somatopleural mesoderm. On the apical part of the limb-bud lie a wholly rudimentary epiblastic ridge, which disappears early. On the apical part of the hind limb-bud an ectodermic ridge is present, well differentiated which transforms soon in an apical fold; and the anlage of the hind limb produced a short conical appendage with short femur, tibia and fibula and one terminal finger. A comparison was made of the main steps of the development of the limbs in three species of Scelotes with rudimentary limbs. Scelotes inornatus, Scelotes brevipes and Scelotes gronovii. In these three species the ectodermal apical ridge of the fore limb-buds is rudimentary or incompletely differentiated; it never transforms into an ectodermal fold and its retrogresses rapidly; and in these species an early arrest of development and an involution of the primordia of the limb-buds occurs. These fact corroborate the anterior observations made on embryos of Anguis fragilis and of Ophisaurus apodus and they strengthen the interpretation postulating that the spontaneous retrogression of the apical ridge is an essential factor in the morphogenetic events involved in the arrest of development of the limb bud in the snake-like Reptiles.

  17. Spleen morphology and vascularization in the alligator (Caiman crocodilus yacare – Daudin, 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Peres Ferraz de Melo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Caiman crocodilus yacare is found from northern Argentina to the southern Amazon basin, mainly occurring in Pantanal. Its food consists of fishes and other aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates, such as crabs, winkles, and insects. Its length can reach 3 meters and this species is important because it provides biological control of other animal species, by feeding on weak, old, and ill individuals, unable to escape its attack. A total of 15 alligators were used, young males and females, using histological techniques; injection techniques with Neoprene latex 450 and vinyl acetate; and radiographic techniques to observe particularities of spleen in this species. The organ has a conical shape, being thicker at its cranial end and tapering at its caudal end. Spleen involved the cranial mesenteric artery, which went towards the intestines, from its origin in the celiac artery until its middle third, through the splenic parenchyma in all preparations. Spleen irrigation in the alligator was originated from the celiac artery, through its branch, the cranial mesenteric artery, which branched into splenic arteries, only within this organ. The splenic veins showed up as the cranial, craniomedial, medial, and caudal splenic veins which drain from the splenic capsule to the medullary region, going through the cortical region and going towards the hepatic portal vein. Spleen in the alligator showed no correspondence between the arteries and veins responsible for the vascularization of a certain splenic territory, but one observed arteries irrigating and veins draining particular areas of the splenic parenchyma.

  18. Activity of the body wall musculature of the African Clawed Toad, Xenopus laevis (Daudin), during diving and respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, de H.J.

    1972-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Mechanisms for regulating the specific weight of the body are well known in fishes. In other aquatic vertebrates the lungs might have a function similar to that of the swimbladder or the lungs in fishes. In anuran tadpoles the lungs may serve as hydrostatic balancers, but this has not

  19. Growth of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris (Daudin, 1802 hatchlings, fed with diets of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. PINHEIRO

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate the growth rate of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris hatchlings, fed on four animal protein diets: (a dead poultry from a poultry farm; (b dead piglet from nursery and farrowing house in a swine farm; (c whole tilapia (Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus; and (d a balanced mixture of a, b, and c sources. Sixteen seven-month old caimans, average weight of 208 g and, 38 cm of total lenght (TL were distributed in four treatments. Four groups of four caimans each were placed in cement enclosures inside a greenhouse. Diets were supplied at the average rate of 97.8% ± 34.8% of the body weight per week (average and standard deviation; wet weight basis. Body mass and total length of caimans were measured every 30 days for six months (Nov. 1995-April. 1996. An analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed. Diets provided suitable growth for weight and TL (mean ± standard deviation, respectively: (a 2,157 ± 743 g and 79.5 ± 6.9 cm; (b 1,811 ± 222 g and 75.7 ± 1.9 cm; (c 2,431 ± 780 g and 80.7 ± 5.8 cm; (d 1,683.5 ± 736 g and 74.5 ± 7.2 cm. There was no significant effect of diet on weight, but diet effect on TL of hatchlings approached significance (p < 0.10. It is concluded that all diets have good potential, in growth sense, to be used in commercial farms or ranches and for captivity propagation programs of caimans.

  20. Activity of the body wall musculature of the African Clawed Toad, Xenopus laevis (Daudin), during diving and respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, de H.J.

    1972-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Mechanisms for regulating the specific weight of the body are well known in fishes. In other aquatic vertebrates the lungs might have a function similar to that of the swimbladder or the lungs in fishes. In anuran tadpoles the lungs may serve as hydrostatic balancers, but this has not b

  1. Pythons in Burma: Short-tailed python (Reptilia: Squamata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zug, George R.; Gotte, Steve W.; Jacobs, Jeremy F.

    2011-01-01

    Short-tailed pythons, Python curtus species group, occur predominantly in the Malayan Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. The discovery of an adult female in Mon State, Myanmar, led to a review of the distribution of all group members (spot-mapping of all localities of confirmed occurrence) and an examination of morphological variation in P. brongersmai. The resulting maps demonstrate a limited occurrence of these pythons within peninsular Malaya, Sumatra, and Borneo with broad absences in these regions. Our small samples limit the recognition of regional differentiation in the morphology of P. brongersmai populations; however, the presence of unique traits in the Myanmar python and its strong allopatry indicate that it is a unique genetic lineage, and it is described as Python kyaiktiyo new species.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Elaphe bimaculata (Reptilia, Serpentes, Colubridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Geng, Zhang-Zhen; Yan, Peng; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese leopard snake (Elaphe bimaculata) is an endemic species to China. The complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of E. bimaculata is determined in this study. The circle genome was 17,183 bp in length and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 duplicate control regions. Several peculiar features were observed in mitogenome of E. bimaculata, such as the translocation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene and an incomplete copy for tRNA(Pro).

  3. The circumorbital bones of the Gekkota (Reptilia: Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Juan Diego; Bauer, Aaron Matthew

    2010-03-01

    The enormous variation of the orbit in lepidosaurs is better conceptualized in terms of composition and configuration. Broadly, the orbit varies from having totally closed rim to being open posteriorly. Two processes are responsible for changes in the components of the circumorbital series, element loss and fusion. The resulting contacts among elements are the main factors determining orbital configuration. Here, we present a revision of the gekkotan circumorbital bones in the general context of the Lepidosauria. From observations of a sample of 105 species of gekkotans prepared using different techniques, we describe the main changes in the orbit and corroborate the presence or absence of some of the ambiguous elements such as the lacrimal and the jugal. The supraorbital bones of squamates are reviewed and some problems of homology are evaluated using recent phylogenenetic hypothesis.

  4. Taxonomy of the Genus Draco L. (Agamidae, Lacertilia, Reptilia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musters, C.J.M.

    1983-01-01

    CONTENTS 1. Introduction and acknowledgements.................................................................. 2 2. History ...................................................................................................... 3 3. Material and methods...............................................

  5. A functional interpretation of the varanid dentition (Reptilia, Lacertilia, Varanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieppel, O

    1979-01-01

    A cinéradiographic analysis of the feeding movements in Varanus bengalensis produced the following results. The mouth is opened by raising the head (upper jaw) rather than by lowering the lower jaw. Starting from the resting position, the muzzle unit is elevated around 9 degrees relative to the rest of the skull during jaw opening; the quadrate swings anteriorly around 21 degrees. During jaw closure, the snout is depressed around 15 degrees relative to the rest of the skull, hence 6 degrees beyond the resting position. The quadrate swings backwards around 27 degrees. Amphikinesis is interpreted as allowing a stronger posterior recurvature of the maxillary teeth in Varanus. This increases the holding effect of the teeth without increasing their length, an adaptation of Varanus to capture relatively large prey. The formation of plicidentine (dentine infolding) in the teeth of Varanus increases the surface of attachment of the teeth on the supporting bone. Moreover, the dentine lamellae take up tensile and compressive stresses along their long axes upon axial or vertical loading of the teeth. The slope of pleurodonty is modelled so as to minimalize shear stress on the surface of ankylosis upon axial or vertical loading of the teeth.

  6. [Comparative immunochemical study of the serum proteins of Lacertilia (Reptilia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, F

    1978-09-01

    The immunochemical relationships of the serum proteins of Uromastix acanthinurus, Agama mutabilis, Oplurus cuvieri, O. quadrimaculatus, Chamaeleo chamaeleon, Chalcides ocellatus and Lacerta lepida were studied by means of immunoelectrophoresis with an antiserum anti-Uromastix successively absorbed. Homogeneity of the Iguania species was pointed out and they were found more closely related to the Scincid Chalcides ocellatus than to the Lacertid Lacerta lepida. Within the Iguania, the two Agamids are immunologically more closely related to the Chamaeleon than to the two Iguanids.

  7. The nucleus of Darkschwitsch in Pantodactylus schreiberii Wiegmann (Lacertilia, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, J C

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear mass considered the representative of the nucleus of Darkschwitsch in reptiles in studied. It is composed of small, stellate, pyriform or rounded cells, with two or three dendritic trunks resolved in a plexus near the cellular body. Its axons take an ascending direction to the posterior commissure, and not to be medial longitudinal fasciculus as has been conventionally described.

  8. The tectum opticum of Pantodactylus schreiberii Wiegmann (Teiidae, Lacertilia, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, J C

    1978-01-01

    We study the histology of the optic lobe of Pantodactylus schreiberii Wiegmann. It has 14 layers with characteristic cells in each of them. We study with emphasis the elements of the superficial layers, discussing some physiologic implications. We described four strata of optic terminals. To the strata 1 and 3 reach fibres from layer 14. To the stratum 4, from the layer 12 and to the stratum 2, fibres from both layers 14 and 12. Some optic fibres from layer 12 send collaterals which reach the stratum 4 of optic terminals.

  9. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae) from North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae) from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma). Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America.

  10. Anatomy of the digestive tube of sea turtles (Reptilia: Testudines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela dos S. Magalhães

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized the morphology of the digestive tube of five species of sea turtles. We used specimens found dead along the coast of the state Rio Grande do Norte, as well as specimens accidentally killed as a result of pelagic longline fishing. Nineteen animals of the following species were analyzed: Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758 (n = 9, Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholtz, 1829 (n = 6, Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758 (n = 2, Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766 (n = 1 and Dermochelys coriacea (Vandelli, 1761 (n = 1. After opening the plastron, we removed the digestive organs and described the external and internal morphology of each organ. The esophagus of all species had pointed papillae on the mucosa. The stomach varied in shape among species. Differences were found in the mucosa of the small intestine. It was reticular in the duodenum, and longitudinal rectilinear in the jejunum/ileum. In all species an alternation of saccular and narrow regions was observed in the large intestine. The exception was D. coriacea, in which the mucosa of the entire large intestine had irregularly distributed folds. The pattern of the esophagus was the same in all species. The morphology of the stomach differed among species, and these differences reflect their diets. In addition, the distribution pattern of the folds on the mucosa of the small intestine varied between regions of the intestine and among species.

  11. Karyological studies on six species of Indian snakes (Colubridae: Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, G P; Nakhasi, U

    1980-01-01

    Detailed chromosomal analyses have been carried on six species of snakes, viz. Ahaetulla nasutus, Chrysopelea ornata, Dendrelaphis ahaetulla, Xenochrophis piscator, Enhydris enhydris and Acrochordus granulatus. On the basis of these studies, evidence is presented to show that inversions, and in some instances centric fissions and translocations, have played an important role in bringing about structural repatterning in this group, and that the subfamily Acrochordinae is the most primitive, so far known cytologically, of all the subdivisions of the family Colubridae.

  12. Phylogenetic disassembly of species boundaries in a widespread group of Australian skinks (Scincidae: Ctenotus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Hutchinson, Mark N; Donnellan, Stephen C; Talaba, Amanda L; Lovette, Irby J

    2014-08-01

    Scincid lizards in the genus Ctenotus represent one of Australia's most species-rich vertebrate clades, with more than 100 recognized species. Formal diagnoses of many species have relied on qualitative assessments of adult color pattern, but the validity of many such species has not been tested in a phylogenetic framework. We used mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to perform the first phylogenetic analysis of species in the Ctenotus inornatus group, a complex of at least 11 nominal forms that are distributed widely across the Australian continent. Mitochondrial and nuclear gene phylogenies support the presence of multiple species in the group, but these clades largely fail to match species boundaries as currently defined. Multivariate analyses of color pattern indicate that extreme intraspecific morphological variation in this character has created a significant impediment to understanding taxonomic diversity in the group. Our results suggest that nearly all species in the C. inornatus group require substantial taxonomic revision, and several geographically widespread forms ("C. saxatilis" and "C. robustus") appear to be polyphyletic taxa drawn from phenotypically similar but genetically distinct lineages. We describe one new species and provide redescriptions for three additional species. We synonymize names applied to a number of genetically incoherent or otherwise poorly-defined forms. The results of our study highlight an acute need for population genetic studies of species boundaries in Australian skinks, many of which are recognized by morphological traits that vary greatly within and between populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Three new species of Coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Skinks, Lipinia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Oceania

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Austin, Christopher C.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September 1991 and March 1993, 25 moth skinks (Lipinia noctua) were collected from various localities on the Cook Islands, Fiji, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and Vanuatu and examined for coccidians. In addition, a single Roux's lipinia skink (Lipinia rouxi) was collected from PNG and examined for coccidia. Sixteen (64%) L. noctua were found to harbor 2 new eimerians, and L. rouxi harbored another new Eimeria sp. Oocysts of Eimeria lipinia n. sp. from 9 (36%) L. noctua from the Cook Islands, Fiji, and PNG were subspherical with a bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 18.6 × 16.9 μm, with a L/W ratio of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria melanesia n. sp. from 6 (24%) L. noctua from Fiji and Vanuatu and a single L. rouxi from PNG were subspherical to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured 19.8 × 17.5 μm, and L/W was 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria lessoni n. sp. from 1 (4%) L. noctua from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall and measured 28.1 × 15.7 μm, and L/W was 1.8. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single polar granule was present. These represent the third report of Eimeria spp. reported from any host on PNG and the only coccidians, to our knowledge, ever described from L. noctua and L. rouxi and from the Cook Islands and Vanuatu.

  14. Ecology of Mabuya agilis (Squamata: Scincidae from a montane atlantic rainforest area in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira, Rogério L.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Alguns aspectos da ecologia (principalmente reprodução e dieta do lagarto scincídeo Mabuya agilis foram estudados com base em amostras mensais realizadas de dezembro de 1997 a abril de 1999 em uma área de floresta tropical serrana no estado do Espírito Santo, sudeste do Brasil. Dos 197 espécimes coletados, 82 eram machos, 110 eram fêmeas, e o resto não pôde ser corretamente sexado. Lagartos variaram em comprimento rostro-coacal de 30 a 96 mm e foram sexualmente dimórficos em tamanho, com fêmeas atingindo maiores tamanhos que machos. A menor fêmea grávida mediu 54.0 mm. O tamanho da ninhada para 49 fêmeas grávidas variou de 2 a 9 (média = 5.7 e esteve positiva e significativamente relacionado ao tamanho dos lagartos. As presas dominantes na dieta de M. agilis foram baratas, ortópteros e aranhas. A população de M. agilis aqui estudada diferiu de outras populações conspecíficas previamente estudadas em hábitats de «restinga» nos estados do Rio de Janeiro e Espírito Santo, sendo que os indivíduos crescem a tamanhos maiores e a fecundidade é mais alta, possivelmente devido a uma maior disponibilidade de alimento no hábitat de floresta tropical serrana Some aspects of the ecology (mainly reproduction and diet of the skink Mabuya agilis were studied based on monthly samples taken from December 1997 to April 1999 at a montane rainforest area in Espírito Santo state, southeastern Brazil. Of 197 collected specimens, 82 were males, 110 were females, and the rest could not be properly sexed. Lizards varied in snout-vent length (SVL from 30 to 96 mm and were sexually dimorphic in size, with females growing larger than males. The smallest gravid female measured 54.0 mm in SVL. Litter size of 49 gravid females varied from 2 to 9 (mean= 5.7 and was positively and significantly related to lizard SVL. The dominant prey items in the diet of M. agilis were cockroaches, orthopterans and spiders. The population of M. agilis here studied differed from other conspecific populations previously studied in «restinga» habitats from Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo states in that individuals grow to larger sizes and fecundity is higher, possibly because of a higher food availability in the montane rainforest habitat.

  15. Distinct Patterns of Desynchronized Limb Regression in Malagasy Scincine Lizards (Squamata, Scincidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miralles, A.; Hipsley, C.A.; Erens, J.; Gehara, M.; Rakotoarison, A.; Glaw, F.; Müller, J.; Vences, M.

    2015-01-01

    Scincine lizards in Madagascar form an endemic clade of about 60 species exhibiting a variety of ecomorphological adaptations. Several subclades have adapted to burrowing and convergently regressed their limbs and eyes, resulting in a variety of partial and completely limbless morphologies among ext

  16. Morphogenesis of extraembryonic membranes and placentation in Mabuya mabouya (Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, Adriana; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2003-11-01

    Topological and histological analyses of Mabuya mabouya embryos at different developmental stages showed an extraembryonic membrane sequence as follows: a bilaminar omphalopleure and progressive mesodermal expansion around the whole yolk sac at gastrula stages; mesodermal split and formation of an exocoelom in the entire embryonic chamber at neurula stages; beginning of the expansion of the allantois into the exocoelom to form a chorioallantoic membrane at pharyngula stages; complete extension of the allantois into the exocoelom between limb-bud to preparturition stages. Thus, a placental sequence could be enumerated: bilaminar yolk sac placenta; chorioplacenta; allantoplacenta. All placentas are highly specialized for nutrient absorption from early developmental stages. The bistratified extraembryonic ectoderm possesses an external layer with cuboidal cells and a microvillar surface around the whole yolk sac, which absorbs uterine secretions during development of the bilaminar yolk sac placenta and chorioplacenta. During gastrulation, with mesodermal expansion a dorsal absorptive plaque forms above the embryo and several smaller absorptive plaques develop antimesometrially. Both structures are similar histologically and are active in histotrophic transfer from gastrula stages until the end of development. The dorsal absorptive plaque will constitute the placentome and paraplacentome during allantoplacental development. At late gastrula-early neurula stages some absorptive plaques form chorionic concavities or chorionic bags that are penetrated by a long uterine fold and seem to have a specialized histotrophic and/or metabolic role. The extraembryonic mesoderm does not ingress into the yolk sac and neither an isolated yolk mass nor a yolk cleft are formed. This derived pattern of development may be related to the drastic reduction of the egg size and obligatory placentotrophy from early developmental stages. Our results show new specialized placentotrophic structures and a novel arrangement of extraembryonic membrane morphogenesis for Squamata.

  17. Phylogeny of the Asian Eutropis (Squamata: Scincidae) reveals an 'into India' endemic Indian radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Roy, Aniruddha; Singh, Mewa; Srinivasulu, C; Karanth, K Praveen

    2012-06-01

    Recent generic rearrangement of the circumtropical distributed skink genus 'Mabuya' has raised a lot of debate. According to this molecular phylogeny based rearrangement, the tropical Asian members of this genus have been assigned to Eutropis. However, in these studies the Asian members of 'Mabuya' were largely sampled from Southeast (SE) Asia with very few species from Indian subcontinent. To test the validity of this assignment and to determine the evolutionary origin of Indian members of this group we sequenced one nuclear and two mitochondrial genes from most of the species from the Indian subregion. The nuclear and mitochondrial trees generated from these sequences confirmed the monophyly of the tropical Asian Eutropis. Furthermore, in the tree based on the combined mitochondrial and nuclear dataset an endemic Indian radiation was revealed that was nested within a larger Asian clade. Results of dispersal-vicariance analysis and molecular dating suggested an initial dispersal of Eutropis from SE Asia into India around 5.5-17 million years ago, giving rise to the extant members of the endemic Indian radiation. This initial dispersal was followed by two back dispersals from India into SE Asia. We also discuss the relationships within the endemic Indian radiation and its taxonomic implications.

  18. Geographic distribution model for Mabuya agmosticha (Squamata: Scincidae in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul F.D. Sales

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical lizard Mabuya agmosticha Rodrigues, 2000 is a habitat-specialist of thorny bromeliads in rocky outcrops of northeastern Brazil. Its distribution in the Caatinga Domain is most likely relictual. In recent years, new surveys conducted in northeastern Brazil have revealed new records of the species in the Caatinga and also in the Atlantic Forest Domain. In this study, we add four new records for M. agmosticha, extending its known geographic range in the states of Rio Grande do Norte and Paraíba. In addition, we investigated the potential geographical distribution of the species using ecological niche modeling (ENM, which combines the available occurrence records with environmental variables. Our model revealed a continuous range of areas with suitable climatic conditions for the species, from the state of Rio Grande do Norte to the northeast portion of the state of Bahia, plus some relictual distribution spots, mainly in the states of Bahia, Pernambuco, Ceará and western Rio Grande do Norte. Based on the model, we suggest that the distribution of M. agmosticha is continuous on a large geographic scale. On a smaller spatial scale, however, it is clear that its distribution is clumped, reflecting its specialist habits associated with rupicolous bromeliads.

  19. Intestinal helminths of four species of skinks (Mabuya) (Sauria: Scincidae) from southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, S R; Bursey, C R

    2001-06-01

    Intestinal helminths are reported from four species of scincid lizards from southern Africa: Mabuya occidentalis, Mabuya spilogaster, Mabuya striata and Mabuya variegata. The helminth fauna consisted of one species of Cestoda, Oochoristica truncata and five species of Nematoda, Abbreviata paradoxa, Maxvachonia dimorpha, Parapharyngodon rotundatus, Spauligodon petersi and Thubunaea fitzsimonsi. All findings represent new host records. Ascarid larvae were also found. It appears that Mabuya is infected by generalist helminths that occur in other species of African lizards.

  20. Mabuya frenata (Sauria: Scincidae en la provincia de Córdoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ávila, Luciano Javier

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Mabuya frenata (Cope, 1862. REP. ARGENTINA, PROV.DE CÓRDOBA, Dpto. San Justo: Morteros (30°43' S, 62°00' W. 16 de Junio de 1976. Un ejemplar adulto con el número CENAI 696 (Ex- Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Iológicas, colección ahora depositada en el Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia".

  1. Ultrastructure of the ovarian follicles in the placentotrophic Andean lizard of the genus Mabuya (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Simón; de Pérez, Gloria Romero; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2010-06-01

    We studied the ultrastructural organization of the ovarian follicles in a placentotrophic Andean lizard of the genus Mabuya. The oocyte of the primary follicle is surrounded by a single layer of follicle cells. During the previtellogenic stages, these cells become stratified and differentiated in three cell types: small, intermediate, and large globoid, non pyriform cells. Fluid-filled spaces arise among follicular cells in late previtellogenic follicles and provide evidence of cell lysis. In vitellogenic follicles, the follicular cells constitute a monolayered granulosa with large lacunar spaces; the content of their cytoplasm is released to the perivitelline space where the zona pellucida is formed. The oolemma of younger oocytes presents incipient short projections; as the oocyte grows, these projections become organized in a microvillar surface. During vitellogenesis, cannaliculi develop from the base of the microvilli and internalize materials by endocytosis. In the juxtanuclear ooplasm of early previtellogenic follicles, the Balbiani's vitelline body is found as an aggregate of organelles and lipid droplets; this complex of organelles disperses in the ooplasm during oocyte growth. In late previtellogenesis, membranous organelles are especially abundant in the peripheral ooplasm, whereas abundant vesicles and granular material occur in the medullar ooplasm. The ooplasm of vitellogenic follicles shows a peripheral band constituted by abundant membranous organelles and numerous vesicular bodies, some of them with a small lipoprotein core. No organized yolk platelets, like in lecithotrophic reptiles, were observed. Toward the medullary ooplasm, electron-lucent vesicles become larger in size containing remains of cytoplasmic material in dissolution. The results of this study demonstrate structural similarities between the follicles of this species and other Squamata; however, the ooplasm of the mature oocyte of Mabuya is morphologically similar to the ooplasm of mature oocytes of marsupials, suggesting an interesting evolutionary convergence related to the evolution of placentotrophy and of microlecithal eggs.

  2. Morphological variation in the allantoplacenta within the genus Mabuya (squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Francisca; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2008-09-01

    The type IV allantoplacenta has been described for the New World tropical scincids lizards of the genus Mabuya; it possesses the greatest morphological complexity known among viviparous squamates. Although a common morphological pattern has been observed in the few species of this lineage in which the allantoplacental morphology has been studied, some morphological variations may be present among species and populations. Here, we report morphological variation of the allantoplacenta of twelve populations of the genus Mabuya distributed in different geographical areas in northern South America using light microscopy. It is found that all the populations/species conserve a general arrangement of the placental structures. In the embryonic hemisphere there are a placentome, paraplacentome, and chorionic areolas; these structures are related to histotrophic nutrition. At the abembryonic hemisphere, there are absorptive plaques for histotrophic transfer and respiratory segments for gas exchange. However, in some populations some distinctive features in the placentome were found. The presence in the uterine syncytium of non syncytialized columnar cell groups, and invasive cells and apical projections of the chorionic cells directed toward the uterine syncytium, constitute a localized endotheliochorial placenta. Likewise, variations found in the abembryonic region include a greater morphological complexity, such as the folded and delimited absorptive plaques, and highly folded regions at the abembryonic pole (folded respiratory segments integrated with folded absorptive plaques). These specializations allow a larger surface for the passage of nutrients and respiratory exchange. Replication and the regionalized differentiation of the absorptive plaques were probably instrumental in the emergence of specialized structures for nutrient transport such as the placentome and the different types of absorptive plaques. These developmental processes appear to underlie the evolution of the placental complexity within thegenus Mabuya by the morphological variation of serial homologous structures.

  3. Seasonal spermatogenic cycle and morphology of germ cells in the viviparous lizard Mabuya brachypoda (Squamata, Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Franyutti, Arlette; Uribe, Mari Carmen

    2012-11-01

    We describe seasonal variations of the histology of the seminiferous tubules and efferent ducts of the tropical, viviparous skink, Mabuya brachypoda, throughout the year. The specimens were collected monthly, in Nacajuca, Tabasco state, Mexico. The results revealed strong annual variations in testicular volume, stages of the germ cells, and diameter and height of the epithelia of seminiferous tubules and efferent ducts. Recrudescence was detected from November to December, when initial mitotic activity of spermatogonia in the seminiferous tubules were observed, coinciding with the decrease of temperature, photoperiod and rainy season. From January to February, early spermatogenesis continued and early primary and secondary spermatocytes were developing within the seminiferous epithelium. From March through April, numerous spermatids in metamorphosis were observed. Spermiogenesis was completed from May through July, which coincided with an increase in temperature, photoperiod, and rainfall. Regression occurred from August through September when testicular volume and spermatogenic activity decreased. During this time, the seminiferous epithelium decreased in thickness, and germ cell recruitment ceased, only Sertoli cells and spermatogonia were present in the epithelium. Throughout testicular regression spermatocytes and spermatids disappeared and the presence of cellular debris, and scattered spermatozoa were observed in the lumen. The regressed testes presented the total suspension of spermatogenesis. During October, the seminiferous tubules contained only spermatogonia and Sertoli cells, and the size of the lumen was reduced, giving the appearance that it was occluded. In concert with testis development, the efferent ducts were packed with spermatozoa from May through August. The epididymis was devoid of spermatozoa by September. M. brachypoda exhibited a prenuptial pattern, in which spermatogenesis preceded the mating season. The seasonal cycle variations of spermatogenesis in M. brachypoda are the result of a single extended spermiation event, which is characteristic of reptilian species.

  4. Interembryonic regions of the uterus of the viviparous lizard Mabuya brachypoda (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Aranzábal, Mari Carmen; Hernández-Franyutti, Arlette; Guillette, Louis J

    2006-04-01

    Analysis of the structure and physiology of the uterine incubation chambers of viviparous squamates has provided insight concerning adaptations for gestation. However, the literature addressing the biology of the interembryonic regions of the uterus is very limited, presumably because it has been assumed that this area has little role in the development and support of embryos in viviparous squamates. This study was undertaken to examine the histology of the interembryonic regions of Mabuya brachypoda, a viviparous lizard with microlecithal ova and consequently substantial matrotrophic activity. The incubation chambers are oval, distended zones of the uterus, adjacent to the interembryonic regions. The wall of the interembryonic regions includes: mucosa, formed by a cuboidal or columnar epithelium with ciliated and nonciliated cells, and a lamina propria of vascularized connective tissue containing abundant acinar glands; myometrial smooth muscle consisting of inner circular and outer longitudinal layers; and serosa. The segment of the interembryonic region adjacent to the incubation chamber forms a transitional segment that displays folds of the mucosa that protrude into the uterine lumen. The limit of the incubation chamber is well defined by the long mucosal folds of the transitional segment. Long and thin extensions of extraembryonic membranes are present in the lumen of the transitional segment, outside of the incubation chamber region. The presence of abundant uterine glands and extraembryonic membranes in the interembryonic regions during gestation suggests uterine secretory activity and histotrophic transfer of nutrients to embryos in these regions.

  5. Mabuya frenata (Sauria: Scincidae) en la provincia de Córdoba

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Mabuya frenata (Cope, 1862). REP. ARGENTINA, PROV.DE CÓRDOBA, Dpto. San Justo: Morteros (30°43' S, 62°00' W). 16 de Junio de 1976. Un ejemplar adulto con el número CENAI 696 (Ex- Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Iológicas, colección ahora depositada en el Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia").

  6. The Seasonal Acclimatisation of Locomotion in a Terrestrial Reptile, Plestiodon chinensis (Scincidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baojun Sun; Wenqi Tang; Zhigao Zeng; Weiguo Du

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the seasonal acclimatisation of behavioural and physiological processes usually focus on aquatic or semi-aquatic ectotherms and focus less effort on terrestrial ectotherms that experience more thermally heterogeneous environments. We conducted comparative studies and thermal acclimation experiments on the locomotion of the Chinese skink (Plestiodon chinensis) to test whether seasonal acclimatisation in locomotion exists in these terrestrial ectothermic vertebrates, and whether seasonal acclimatisation is predominantly induced by thermal environments. In natural populations, skinks ran faster during the summer season than during the spring season at high-test temperatures ranging from 27°C to 36°C but not at low-test temperatures ranging from 18°C to 24°C. In contrast, the thermal acclimation experiments showed that the cold-acclimated skinks ran faster than the warm-acclimated skinks at the low-test temperatures but not at high-test temperatures. Therefore, the seasonal acclimatisation occurs to P. chinensis, and may be induced by temperature as well as other factors like food availability, as indicated by the seasonal variation in the thermal dependence of locomotion, and the discrepancy between seasonal acclimatisation and thermal acclimation on locomotion.

  7. Comparing alignment methods for inferring the history of the new world lizard genus Mabuya (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Alison S; Sites, Jack W; Pellegrino, Katia C M; Rodrigues, Miguel T

    2006-03-01

    The rapid increase in the ability to generate molecular data, and the focus on model-based methods for tree reconstruction have greatly advanced the use of phylogenetics in many fields. The recent flurry of new analytical techniques has focused almost solely on tree reconstruction, whereas alignment issues have received far less attention. In this paper, we use a diverse sampling of gene regions from lizards of the genus Mabuya to compare the impact, on phylogeny estimation, of new maximum likelihood alignment algorithms with more widely used methods. Sequences aligned under different optimality criteria are analyzed using partitioned Bayesian analysis with independent models and parameter settings for each gene region, and the most strongly supported phylogenetic hypothesis is then used to test the hypothesis of two colonizations of the New World by African scincid lizards. Our results show that the consistent use of model-based methods in both alignment and tree reconstruction leads to trees with more optimal likelihood scores than the use of independent criteria in alignment and tree reconstruction. We corroborate and extend earlier evidence for two independent colonizations of South America by scincid lizards. Relationships within South American Mabuya are found to be in need of taxonomic revision, specifically complexes under the names M. heathi, M. agilis, and M. bistriata (sensu, M.T. Rodrigues, Papeis Avulsos de Zoologia 41 (2000) 313).

  8. Cryptic extinction of a common Pacific lizard Emoia impar (Squamata, Scincidae) from the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert; Ineich, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Most documented declines of tropical reptiles are of dramatic or enigmatic species. Declines of widespread species tend to be cryptic. The early (1900s) decline and extinction of the common Pacific skink Emoia impar from the Hawaiian Islands is documented here through an assessment of literature, museum vouchers and recent fieldwork. This decline appears contemporaneous with the documented declines of invertebrates and birds across the Hawaiian Islands. A review of the plausible causal factors indicates that the spread of the introduced big-headed ant Pheidole megacephala is the most likely factor in this lizard decline. The introduction and spread of a similar skink Lampropholis delicata across the islands appears to temporally follow the decline of E. impar, although there is no evidence of competition between these species. It appears that L. delicata is spreading to occupy the niche vacated by the extirpated E. impar. Further confusion exists because the skink E. cyanura, which is very similar in appearance to E. impar, appears to have been introduced to one site within a hotel on Kaua'i and persisted as a population at that site for approximately 2 decades (1970s–1990s) but is now also extirpated. This study highlights the cryptic nature of this early species extinction as evidence that current biogeographical patterns of non-charismatic or enigmatic reptiles across the Pacific may be the historical result of early widespread invasion by ants. Conservation and restoration activities for reptiles in the tropical Pacific should consider this possibility and evaluate all evidence prior to any implementation.

  9. A new genus to accommodate three skinks currently assigned to Menetia (Lacertilia: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Patrick J; Hoskin, Conrad J

    2014-11-19

    Menetia timlowi Ingram 1977 has had a chequered generic history due to ambiguity in interpreting its various character states. Ingram (1977) assigned this species to Menetia on the strength of "the long narrow obliquely oriented first supraocular" and "enlarged upper circumoculars". In doing so, he admitted the possibility that M. timlowi "may in fact be a Carlia" but because "all Carlia, except burnetti, lack fused lower eyelids and have a typically anvil shaped presubocular", allocating timlowi to Menetia seemed the best available option. Ingram and Covacevich (1988) revisited the generic status of this species when resurrecting Lygisaurus from the synonymy of Carlia to accommodate a group of small leaf-litter dwelling skinks. In proposing the new combination L. timlowi (Ingram 1977), they considered the supraoculars to be transverse whereas Ingram had stated them to be oblique in his original species description.

  10. Prey-handling and the evolutionary ecology of sand-swimming lizards (Lerista : Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pough, F Harvey; Preest, Marion R; Fusari, Margaret H

    1997-10-01

    Fossorial lizards differ in morphology from their surface-dwelling relatives. The Australian sphenomorphine skink genus Ctenotus consists of surface-dwelling species, and is closely related to the genus Lerista, which includes both surface-dwelling and fossorial species. Sand-swimming represents the derived condition and has evolved independently in several lineages of Lerista. The heads of lizards in the two genera differ in shape (blunt snout for Ctenotus versus wedge-shaped for Lerista) and in length relative to the body (approximately 20% of snout-vent length for Ctenotus versus 12% for sand-swimming Lerista). Do these specializations affect the sizes or types of prey that can be consumed by Lerista? We compared prey-handling by Ctenotus and Lerista to correlate morphological differences with differences in prey-handling ability, and to distinguish the effects of snout shape and head length. Feeding trials included three categories of insect prey that the lizards normally eat: soft-bodied larvae (Lepidoptera), hard-bodied larvae (Coleoptera), and roaches (Blatoidea). In comparisons based on the mass of a prey item relative to the mass of a lizard, Lerista had longer handling times for all prey categories and were limited to smaller prey than were Ctenotus. However, when comparisons were based on the length of prey relative to the length of a lizard's head, Lerista ate some elongate prey as fast or faster than did Ctenotus, and both genera successfully swallowed prey more than twice the length of their own head. Thus, the differences in prey-handling performance of Ctenotus and Lerista probably result from the fact that Lerista have a relatively shorter head than Ctenotus. All Lerista species, surface-dwelling and fossorial, have short heads compared to primitive sphenomorphine lizards. Fossorial species of Lerista have elongate trunks, and consequently their heads are shorter in proportion to trunk length than those of surface-dwelling Lerista. However, most fossorial species of Lerista are longer and heavier than any of their surface-dwelling congeners, and the heads of these fossorial species are large relative to the prey they encounter. As a consequence, the diets of large fossorial species of Lerista do not appear to be limited by their morphological specialization for sand-swimming.

  11. Gastric nematode diversity between estuarine and inland freshwater populations of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis, daudin 1802), and the prediction of intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Marisa; Nifong, James

    2014-12-01

    We examined the variation of stomach nematode intensity and species richness of Alligator mississippiensis from coastal estuarine and inland freshwater habitats in Florida and Georgia, and integrated prey content data to predict possible intermediate hosts. Nematode parasitism within inland freshwater inhabiting populations was found to have a higher intensity and species richness than those inhabiting coastal estuarine systems. This pattern potentially correlates with the difference and diversity of prey available between inland freshwater and coastal estuarine habitats. Increased consumption of a diverse array of prey was also correlated with increased nematode intensity in larger alligators. Parasitic nematodes Dujardinascaris waltoni, Brevimulticaecum tenuicolle, Ortleppascaris antipini, Goezia sp., and Contracaecum sp. were present in alligators from both habitat types. Dujardinascaris waltoni, B. tenuicolle, and O. antipini had a significantly higher abundance among inland inhabiting alligators than hosts from estuarine populations. Our findings also suggest that host specific nematode parasites of alligators may have evolved to infect multiple intermediate hosts, particularly fishes, crabs, and turtles, perhaps in response to the opportunistic predatory behaviors of alligators.

  12. Gastric nematode diversity between estuarine and inland freshwater populations of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis, daudin 1802, and the prediction of intermediate hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Tellez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the variation of stomach nematode intensity and species richness of Alligator mississippiensis from coastal estuarine and inland freshwater habitats in Florida and Georgia, and integrated prey content data to predict possible intermediate hosts. Nematode parasitism within inland freshwater inhabiting populations was found to have a higher intensity and species richness than those inhabiting coastal estuarine systems. This pattern potentially correlates with the difference and diversity of prey available between inland freshwater and coastal estuarine habitats. Increased consumption of a diverse array of prey was also correlated with increased nematode intensity in larger alligators. Parasitic nematodes Dujardinascaris waltoni, Brevimulticaecum tenuicolle, Ortleppascaris antipini, Goezia sp., and Contracaecum sp. were present in alligators from both habitat types. Dujardinascaris waltoni, B. tenuicolle, and O. antipini had a significantly higher abundance among inland inhabiting alligators than hosts from estuarine populations. Our findings also suggest that host specific nematode parasites of alligators may have evolved to infect multiple intermediate hosts, particularly fishes, crabs, and turtles, perhaps in response to the opportunistic predatory behaviors of alligators.

  13. Regression of blood vessels in the ventral velum of Xenopus laevis Daudin during metamorphosis: light microscopic and transmission electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, H; Lametschwandtner, A

    2000-08-01

    Structural changes of the ventral velum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles from late prometamorphosis (stage 58) to the height of metamorphic climax (stage 62) were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Special emphasis was given to the blood vessel regression. Early changes of velar capillaries were formation of luminal and abluminal endothelial cell processes, vacuolation, and cytoplasmic and nuclear chromatin condensation. At the height of metamorphic climax, transmission electron microscopy revealed apoptotic endothelial cells with nuclear condensation and fragmentation, intraluminal bulging of rounded endothelial cells which narrowed or even plugged the capillary, and different stages of endothelial cell detachment ('shedding') into the vessel lumen. These changes explain the 'miniaturisation' of the velar microvascular bed as well as the typical features found in resin-casts of regressing velar vessels which have been observed in a previous scanning electron microscopy study of the ventral velum.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-Alkanes in beaked sea snake Enhydrina schistose (Daudin, 1803) from the Mandovi Estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mote, S.; RanjeetKumar; Naik, B.G.; Ingole, B.S.

    on marine organisms. A more extensive characterization and a separation of the complex hydrocarbon mixture into individual components is necessary for distinguishing between hydrocarbons of recent biogenic origin and hydrocarbons from fossil fuels. Among... JM (1993) The Biomarker Guide: Interpreting molecular fossils inpetroleum and ancient sediments, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 363 Readman JW, Fillmann G, Tolosa I, Bartocci J, Villeneuve JP, Catinni C, Mee LD (2002) Petroleum...

  15. Nueva especie de lagartija del norte de Chile, Liolaemus molinai (Reptilia: Liolaeminae New lizard species from northern Chile, Liolaemus molinai (Reptilia: Liolaeminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. PABLO VALLADARES

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Se describe una nueva especie de lagartija del norte de Chile, perteneciente al género Liolaemus y adscrita al grupo montanus. Los ejemplares de la nueva especie fueron capturados en febrero de 1999 en los Farellones de Tara, Provincia del Loa, Región de Antofagasta. Esta difiere de las especies del subgrupo boulengeri en que carece de un parche de escamas alargadas en la parte femoral de la extremidad posterior. Difiere de las demás especies del grupo montanus por presentar un gran número de escamas pequeñas, lisas y redondeadas en la zona dorsal del cuerpo, y escamas cefálicas distintivas. De las especies con patrón de escamación similar, la nueva especie puede ser diferenciada por su moderado tamaño, cola más corta que la longitud cabeza-cloaca y patrón de coloración distintivo. Es de hábitos psammófilos y se encuentra sobre los 4.000 m de altura. Se amplificaron y secuenciaron 1.775 pb de los genes mitocondriales ND1, ND2 y COI del holotipo, alotipo y un paratipo de la nueva especie. Fueron comparadas con dieciséis especies del género Liolaemus, cuatro de ellas del grupo chiliensis y doce del grupo montanus. Además fue usado como grupo externo un ejemplar del género Phymaturus. Las secuencias fueron alineadas y analizadas en los programas Clustal W, Mac Clade, PAUP y MEGA2. El número de sitios variables filogenéticamente informativos fue de 453. La divergencia genética de la nueva especie con las congenéricas del grupo chiliensis fue entre 0,1780 y 0,1985 unidades K2P, mientras que con las especies del grupo montanus fue de 0,0676 y 0,0857 unidades K2P. Con respecto al análisis de Máxima Parsimonia, se detectó el árbol más corto con 1.682 pasos y con un Indice de Consistencia de 0,68, con una topología básicamente similar a la obtenida en Máxima Verosimilitud y Distancia. El análisis de componentes principales permite diferenciar a la nueva especie de otras seis del grupo montanus, principalmente por las medidas corporales, las que explican más del 84 % de la varianza. Tanto el análisis morfológico como los datos moleculares muestran claramente que ésta es una nueva especieA new species of lizard, belonging to the montanus group of the genus Liolaemus, is described from the northern Chile. The specimens of the new species were collected in February, 1999 at the Farellones de Tara, Loa Province, Antofagasta Region. Within the montanus group, the new species differs from the boulengeri group in lacking a patch of enlarged scales on the posterior thigh. It differs from the remaining species of the montanus group in having a high number of small, smooth, rounded dorsal body scale and differentiated head scales. From those species with similar pattern of squamation, the new species can be differentiated by its moderate size, tail shorter than snout - vent length, and distinctive color pattern. It has psammophilus habits and it occurs over 4,000 m of elevation. 1,775 bp of the mitochondrial genes ND1, ND2 and COI were amplified and sequenced from the holotype, allotype and one paratype. These were compared with ten species of Liolaemus, four of the chiliensis groups and six of the montanus group. Additionally, we used a specimen of Phymaturus as "outgroup". Sequences were aligned and analyzed with the programs Clustal W, Mc Clade, PAUP and MEGA2. The number of phylogenetically informative variable sites was 453. The genetic divergence of the new species from congeneric species of the chiliensis group was from 0.1780 to 0.1985 K2P units, whereas among the species of the montanus group it was from 0.0676 to 0.0857 K2P units. With respect to the Maximun Parsimony analysis, the shortest tree found had 1682 steps and the Consistency Index was 0.68, with a topology basically similar to that obtained with Maximum Likelihood and Distance. The principal component analysis allowed the differentiation of the new species from other six species of the montanus group, principally by body measurements that explain more than 84 % of the variance. Thus, evidence from molecular and morphological data support the recognition of a new species

  16. Two new species of Isospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from skinks Emoia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Fiji and Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Between September and October 1991 and again during September 1992, skinks (Emoia spp.) were collected from various localities on Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) and examined for coccidians. One of 4 (25%) De Vis' emo skinks (Emoia pallidiceps) from PNG harbored an undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora grinbikpelapalai n. sp. were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal, 18.1 × 14.9 (17–20 × 14–16) μm, with a bilayered wall and a length/width index (L/W) of 1.2. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a prominent polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 10.7 × 7.6 (10–11 × 7–8) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of large scattered globules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora grinbikpelapalai was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Pope's emo skinks (Emoia popei) from PNG. One of 13 (8%) white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), from Fiji, was passing another undescribed species of Isospora in its feces. Oocysts of Isospora casei n. sp. were elongate, 31.8 × 21.3 (28–35 × 18–24) μm, with a bilayered wall and a L/W index of 1.5. Micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were all absent. Sporocysts were ovoidal, 15.3 × 10.6 (14–16 × 10–12) μm, with a L/W index of 1.4. Stieda and sub-Stieda bodies were present, but para-Stieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum consisted of scattered globules among sporozoites or as a cluster surrounding sporozoites. Sporozoites were elongate with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. Isospora casei was also found in 1 of 2 (50%) Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor) from Fiji. This represents the first report of coccidia from Emoia spp. and, to our knowledge, the initial documentation of reptilian coccidia from herpetofauna from Papua New Guinea.

  17. Molecular phylogenetics and biogeography of the Neotropical skink genus Mabuya Fitzinger (Squamata: Scincidae) with emphasis on Colombian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sánchez, Nelsy Rocío; Calderón-Espinosa, Martha L; Miralles, Aurélien; Crawford, Andrew J; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the phylogenetic and geographical history of Neotropical lineages requires having adequate geographic and taxonomic sampling across the region. However, Colombia has remained a geographical gap in many studies of Neotropical diversity. Here we present a study of Neotropical skinks of the genus Mabuya, reptiles that are difficult to identify or delimit due to their conservative morphology. The goal of the present study is to propose phylogenetic and biogeographic hypotheses of Mabuya including samples from the previously under-studied territory of Colombia, and address relevant biogeographic and taxonomic issues. We combined molecular and morphological data sampled densely by us within Colombia with published data representing broad sampling across the Neotropical realm, including DNA sequence data from two mitochondrial (12S rRNA and cytochrome b) and three nuclear genes (Rag2, NGFB and R35). To evaluate species boundaries we employed a general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model applied to the mitochondrial data set. Our results suggest that the diversity of Mabuya within Colombia is higher than previously recognized, and includes lineages from Central America and from eastern and southern South America. The genus appears to have originated in eastern South America in the Early Miocene, with subsequent expansions into Central America and the Caribbean in the Late Miocene, including at least six oceanic dispersal events to Caribbean Islands. We identified at least four new candidate species for Colombia and two species that were not previously reported in Colombia. The populations of northeastern Colombia can be assigned to M. zuliae, while specimens from Orinoquia and the eastern foothills of the Cordillera Oriental of Colombia correspond to M. altamazonica. The validity of seven species of Mabuya sensu lato was not supported due to a combination of three factors: (1) non-monophyly, (2) <75% likelihood bootstrap support and <0.95 Bayesian posterior probability, and (3) GMYC analysis collapsing named species. Finally, we suggest that Mabuya sensu stricto may be regarded as a diverse monophyletic genus, widely distributed throughout the Neotropics.

  18. Description of Skrjabinodon spinosulus sp. n. (Nematoda, Oxyuroidea, Pharyngodonidae from the Brazilian lizard Mabuya dorsivittata Cope, 1862 (Scincidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Júlio Vicente

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of oxyurid, Skrjabinodon spinosulus, is described, on the basis of samples recovered from Mabuya dorsivittala Cope, 1862 in Brazil. Skrjabinodon spinosulus sp. n. is included in the group in which the males are provided with a spicule. The new species proposed herein, differs from those of the group, by the large number of spines (70-80 on the tail of the females when compared to those (3-48 in the other species. The number of spines is a character of great taxonomic importance in the specific diagnosis of these nematodes. This is the second report of the genus Skrjabinodon Inglis, 1968 in South America.

  19. Resolving the higher-order phylogenetic relationships of the circumtropical Mabuya group (Squamata: Scincidae): An out-of-Asia diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Benjamin R; Metallinou, Margarita; Weinell, Jeffrey L; Jackman, Todd R; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-09-01

    Despite an abundance of phylogenetic studies focused on intrageneric relationships of members of the Mabuya group, the intergeneric relationships have remained difficult to resolve. The most-persistent unresolved regions of the phylogeny of the group include: (1) the placement of the Middle-Eastern Trachylepis with respect to the Afro-Malagasy Trachylepis and its taxonomic status; (2) the phylogenetic position of the Cape Verdean Chioninia within the larger Mabuya group; (3) support for the placement of Dasia with respect to the entire group; and (4) the phylogenetic placement of Eutropis novemcarinata with respect to other Eutropis and Dasia. In this study, we include representatives of all these taxa as well as African Eumecia and Neotropical Mabuya. We seek to address these phylogenetic and systematic issues by generating a well-resolved and supported phylogeny for the Mabuya group as a whole that can be used to develop a stable taxonomy and reconstruct the geographic patterns of diversification within the group. To meet these goals, we built a large multi-locus dataset of 11 markers (nine nuclear and two mitochondrial), and performed concatenated and species tree analyses to generate a well-supported phylogeny for the group. Statistical topology tests reject the monophyly of Middle-Eastern Trachylepis with Afro-Malagasy Trachylepis, and to reflect monophyly we place the Middle-Eastern species into a previously described genus, Heremites. Cape-Verdean Chioninia are resolved as the strongly supported sister-group to Afro-Malagasy Trachylepis. Monophyly of the Southeast-Asian genera, Eutropis and Dasia, is not supported, with a clade composed of Dasia+Eutropis novemcarinata more closely related to the rest of the Mabuya group than to the remaining Eutropis. The phylogenetic position of E. novemcarinata renders Eutropis polyphyletic, and we therefore describe and place E. novemcarinata into a new monotypic genus, Toenayar, to preserve monophyly among the genera. In light of these novel findings, we review and discuss the historical biogeography of the entire Mabuya group.

  20. An addition to the endemic Indian radiation of Eutropis: Phylogenetic position of Eutropis dissimilis Hallowell (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Roy, Aniruddha; Deepak, V; Sidharthan, Chinta; Barley, Anthony J; Karanth, K Praveen

    2015-10-01

    Skinks of the genus Eutropis represent one of the most widespread and speciose lizard groups in tropical Asia. Numerous recent studies have utilized a variety of genes and methods to reconstruct the phylogeny of these lizards, however these studies have not resolved the placement of one of the widely distributed Eutropis Fitzinger, E. dissimilis. We have sequenced a specimen of E. dissimilis from the type locality and our result suggests that it is part of the Indian radiation of Eutropis and not related to African Trachylepis Fitzinger or Southeast Asian Dasia Gray as previously suggested. Furthermore, we report that the sequence of E. dissimilis used in an earlier study of the once cosmopolitan genus 'Mabuya' may have been erroneously identified and appears to be a sequence of E. novemcarinata. We also demonstrate that the evolution of a clear lower eyelid, which was considered a synapomorphy for the sister genus Trachylepis, has arisen multiple times in Eutropis.

  1. Thermal ecology and habitat selection of two cryptic skinks (Scincidae: Emoia cyanura, E. impar) on Mo'orea, French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    McElroy, Matt T

    2007-01-01

    I studied the habitat selection and thermal biology of two cryptic South Pacific skinks (Emoia cyanura and Emoia impar) in order to determine whether or not differences in thermal preference affect habitat partitioning. I measured sun exposure and thermal characteristics of microhabitats selected by each skink, and then quantified preferred substrate temperatures and preferred body temperatures in a laboratory thermal gradient. Compared to E. impar, E. cyanura inhabited areas with open canopy...

  2. Uterine and eggshell structure and histochemistry in a lizard with prolonged uterine egg retention (Lacertilia, Scincidae, Saiphos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R; Mathieson, Ashley N; Ecay, Tom W; Herbert, Jacquie F; Parker, Scott L; Thompson, Michael B

    2010-11-01

    The eggshell of lizards is a complex structure composed of organic and inorganic molecules secreted by the oviduct, which protects the embryo by providing a barrier to the external environment and also allows the exchange of respiratory gases and water for life support. Calcium deposited on the surface of the eggshell provides an important nutrient source for the embryo. Variation in physical conditions encountered by eggs results in a tradeoff among these functions and influences eggshell structure. Evolution of prolonged uterine egg retention results in a significant change in the incubation environment, notably reduction in efficiency of gas exchange, and selection should favor a concomitant reduction in eggshell thickness. This model is supported by studies that demonstrate an inverse correlation between eggshell thickness and length of uterine egg retention. One mechanism leading to thinning of the eggshell is reduction in size of uterine shell glands. Saiphos equalis is an Australian scincid lizard with an unusual pattern of geographic variation in reproductive mode. All populations retain eggs in the uterus beyond the embryonic stage at oviposition typical for lizards, and some are viviparous. We compared structure and histochemistry of the uterus and eggshell of two populations of S. equalis, prolonged egg retention, and viviparous to test the hypotheses: 1) eggshell thickness is inversely correlated with length of egg retention and 2) eggshell thickness is positively correlated with size of shell glands. We found support for the first hypothesis but also found that eggshells of both populations are surprisingly thick compared with other lizards. Our histochemical data support prior conclusions that uterine shell glands are the source of protein fiber matrix of the eggshell, but we did not find a correlation between size of shell glands and eggshell thickness. Eggshell thickness is likely determined by density of uterine shell glands in this species.

  3. Substantial genetic substructuring in southeastern and alpine Australia revealed by molecular phylogeography of the Egernia whitii (Lacertilia: Scincidae) species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, David G; Keogh, J Scott; Hutchinson, Mark N

    2005-04-01

    Palaeoclimatic events and biogeographical processes since the mid-Tertiary are believed to have strongly influenced the evolution and distribution of the terrestrial vertebrate fauna of southeastern Australia. We examined the phylogeography of the temperate-adapted members of the Egernia whitii species group, a group of skinks that comprise both widespread low- to mid-elevation (E. whitii) and montane-restricted species (Egernia guthega, Egernia montana), in order to obtain important insights into the influence of past biogeographical processes on the herpetofauna of southeastern Australia. Sequence data were obtained from all six temperate-adapted species within the E. whitii species group, and specifically from across the distributional ranges of E. whitii, E. guthega and E. montana. We targeted a fragment of the ND4 mitochondrial gene (696 bp) and analysed the data using maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Our data reveal a deep phylogeographical break in the east Gippsland region of Victoria between 'northern' (Queensland, New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory) and 'southern' (Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia) populations of E. whitii. This divergence appears to have occurred during the late Miocene-Pliocene, with the Gippsland basin possibly forming a geographical barrier to dispersal. Substantial structuring within both the 'northern' and the 'southern' clades is consistent with the effects of Plio-Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. Pleistocene glacial cycles also appear to have shaped the phylogeographical patterns observed in the alpine species, E. guthega and E. montana. We used our results to examine the biogeographical process that led to the origin and subsequent diversification of the lowland and alpine herpetofauna of southeastern Australia.

  4. Molecular phylogeography and systematics of the arid-zone members of the Egernia whitii (Lacertilia: Scincidae) species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, David G; Keogh, J Scott; Hutchinson, Mark N

    2004-12-01

    We assembled a molecular phylogeny for the arid-zone members of the Egernia whitii species group to test Pianka's [Zoogeography and speciation of Australian desert lizards: an ecological perspective, Copeia (1972) 127-145] hypothesis that habitat specificity to the three major arid-zone vegetation communities is the primary cause of lizard speciation within the arid interior of Australia. This hypothesis predicts that species should exhibit phylogeographic structuring concordant with the major arid-zone vegetation types. Sequence data were obtained from four of the five arid-zone members of the E. whitii species group, and from across the ranges of the ecologically generalized E. inornata and E. multiscutata and the more specialized E. striata. We targeted a fragment (696 base pair (bp)) of the mitochondrial genome comprising the 3' half of the ND4 gene. We analysed the data using parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods. Our phylogeny confirms the monophyly of the arid-zone members of the species group, although the phylogenetic relationships among species were not fully resolved. Although our topology does not support the recognition of the existing subspecies within E. multiscutata, there is a substantial phylogeographic break between South Australian/Victorian (Clade 1) and Western Australian (Clade 2) populations. We found considerable phylogeographic structure within E. inornata, with six major clades identified. However, these clades were not concordant with the distribution of habitat types in the arid-zone. Phylogeographic structure was also observed in the more specialized E. striata, although our analysis revealed close phylogenetic affinities between the sympatric species E. striata and E. kintorei. Shimodaira-Hasegawa topology tests were equivocal in regard to whether the phylogeographic structure within E. striata was in accordance with Pianka's predictions. Although our data failed to provide strong support for the suggestion that ecological and habitat factors are responsible for the diversification of arid-zone lizards, most E. inornata and E. striata populations had similar habitats, indicating that adaptation to particular habitats may have some role in the speciation of lizards in the Australian arid-zone.

  5. Maternal provision and embryonic uptake of calcium in an oviparous and a placentotrophic viviparous Australian lizard (Lacertilia: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W; Garland, Courtney P; Fregoso, Santiago P; Price, Elizabeth K; Herbert, Jacquie F; Thompson, Michael B

    2009-06-01

    Embryos of oviparous lizards have two sources of calcium for embryonic development: 1) calcium that accumulates in yolk during vitellogenesis, and 2) calcium carbonate deposited in the eggshell from oviductal secretions. Eggs of viviparous lizards lack a calcified eggshell and calcium secreted by the uterus is delivered to the embryo across a placenta. Whereas oviparous lizard embryos recover calcium from the eggshell during late developmental growth stages, viviparous embryos have a lengthy intimate association with the uterus and the potential for an extended interval of placental calcium transfer. We compared the pattern of calcium mobilization of embryos of the viviparous, placentotrophic scincid lizard, Pseudemoia pagenstecheri, to that of a closely related oviparous species, Saproscincus mustelinus, to determine if the timing of uterine calcium secretion was influenced by reproductive mode. Embryos of both species receive a substantial amount of calcium from either the eggshell or placenta (54% and 85% respectively). The ontogeny of calcium uptake by embryos of P. pagenstecheri reveals that the onset of embryonic acquisition of calcium occurs earlier relative to embryonic stage but the timing of peak uterine secretion of calcium is delayed, compared to S. mustelinus.

  6. Isospora manchacensis n. sp., an intranuclear coccidian from the Louisiana ground skink, Scincella lateralis (Say, 1823) (Lacertilia: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C T; Ayala, S C

    1987-08-01

    Isospora manchacensis n. sp. is described from ground skinks, Scincella lateralis (Say, 1823) from Louisiana. Overall prevalence at 6 sites near Lake Ponchartrain was 43.1% (59/137) and ranged from 8% (1/13) to as high as 60% (6/10). Endogenous stages develop inside the nuclei of epithelial cells in the small intestine. Infected hypertrophic nuclei migrate from the basal lamina of the host cell to the luminal striated border. Oocysts in freshly passed fecal pellets usually contain a single contracted sporont that divides to form 2 sporoblasts. These undergo a brief pyramid stage followed by sporulation within 45-50 hr. Sporulated oocysts have a single-layered wall and measure 25.0 X 22.6 (20.0-28.9 X 18.6-26.0) micron. The lemon-shaped sporocysts measure 12.8 X 10.2 (11.1-15.2 X 9.0-11.0) micron and contain a Steida body, a spherical to oval substeida body, and a dispersed, granular sporocyst residuum. Prepatent periods in skinks fed 700 and 1,400 oocysts ranged from 24 to 32 days. Experimentally infected skinks produced large numbers of oocysts continuously during the 3-4 wk they were monitored after the onset of patency, but exhibited no signs of disease. Experimental doses of 200 oocysts failed to produce infections in skinks monitored for as long as 7 wk.

  7. Offspring sex is not related to maternal allocation of yolk steroids in the lizard Bassiana duperreyi (Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radder, Rajkumar; Ali, Sinan; Shine, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The eggs of birds and reptiles contain detectable levels of several steroid hormones, and experimental application of such steroids can reverse genetically determined sex of the offspring. However, any causal influence of maternally derived yolk steroids on sex determination in birds and reptiles remains controversial. We measured yolk hormones (dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, and 17 beta-estradiol) in newly laid eggs of the montane scincid lizard Bassiana duperreyi. This species is well suited to such an analysis because (1) offspring sex is influenced by incubation temperatures and egg size as well as by sex chromosomes, suggesting that yolk hormones might somehow be involved in the complex pathways of sex determination, and (2) experimental application of either estradiol or fadrozole to such eggs strongly influences offspring sex. We obtained yolk by biopsy, before incubating the eggs at a temperature that produces a 50:50 sex ratio. Yolk steroid levels varied over a threefold range between eggs from different clutches, but there were no significant differences in yolk steroids, or in relative composition of steroids, between eggs destined to become male versus female. Further, yolk steroid concentrations were not significantly related to egg size. Thus, yolk steroid hormones do not appear to play a critical role in sex determination for B. duperreyi.

  8. Ecology of Mabuya agilis (Raddi (Lacertilia, Scincidae at the restinga of Grumari, Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Vrcibradic

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Some aspects of the ecology of the skink Mabuya agilis (Raddi, 1823 at the restinga habitat of Grumari, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil are studied. Most of the lizards were first sighted on the ground, though a few were using perches (mainly cacti up to 30 cm high. Mean body temperature in activity was 33.1 ± 2.4ºC and was significantly correlated to air temperature. There was sexual dimorphism in size (snout-vent length - SVL, with females growing larger than males. Frequency of broken tails was high overall (83% and did not differ between sexes. Females and males are sexually mature at 49 mm and 47 mm SVL, respectively. Brood size averaged 3.2 ± 1.0 (range 1-5 and was positively and significantly related to female SVL (r = 0.65, p = 0.001. Relative clutch mass (RCM of seven gravid females averaged 0.250 ± 0.042, being relatively low compared to those of other congeners. The diet of M. agilis was composed basically of arthropods, with relatively large and soft-bodied arthropods such as spiders, caterpillars and homopterans being the most important prey. The results of our work confirm and expand the knowledge of ecological tendencies previously observed for M. agilis in other areas.

  9. Comparative cytogenetics of two species of ground skinks: Scincella assata and S. cherriei (Squamata: Scincidae: Lygosominae from Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Castiglia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard karyotypes of two species of the genus Scincella, S. assata and S. cherriei, both from Chiapas State, Mexico, were described for the first time. The diploid chromosome number was 28 in S. assata, whereas 30 in S. cherriei. The karyotypes of the two species, while differing in the number of microchromosomes, 14-15 in S. assata and 16-17 in S. cherriei, share four pairs of large metacentric, two pairs of medium-sized metacentric, and one particular pair (number 7 of chromosomes. Female S. assata carries chromosome pair 7 composed of two identical medium-sized subtelocentric chromosomes. This chromosome pair is heteromorphic in males of both species, i.e., one component of the pair is similar to the homomorphic chromosomes 7 of the S. assata female, while the other is nearly one-half the size of its counterpart and resembles a microchromosome. The homology of such externally different elements is deducted from the presence of an asymmetric bivalent in spermatocytes at diplotene-diakinesis. Female S. cherriei was not available. We suspect that the two Scincella species possess an XY sex determination system, as previously reported for the North American congeneric species, S. lateralis.

  10. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Carlia spp. (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 from rainbow skinks, Carlia ailanpalai Zug and Carlia eothen Zug is described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Oöcysts of Eimeria zugi n. sp. from one of one (100%) C. eothen are ellipsoidal to cylindroidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 25.1 × 15.5 μm and have a length/width ratio of 1.6. The micropyle and the oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. The sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal and 10.3 × 7.1 μm in size and do not contain Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies; and the sporocyst residuum is composed of a compact mass of large globules. The sporozoites are elongate, 12.8 × 2.9 μm in size, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. This is the ninth species of coccidium described from skinks from PNG, and the new species described herein is apparently endemic to the skink genus Carlia (Gray).

  11. Four new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Owen Stanley Skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 12 Owen Stanley skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Booulenger) were collected from various localities on Papua New Guinea and examined for coccidians. Six (50%) were found to harbour four eimerians that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria burseyi sp. n. were elongate to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured (length x width, L x W) 36.0 x 24.0 microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.5. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria goldbergi sp. n. were ellipsoidal, with a bilayered wall, and measured 21.4 x 16.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.3. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria boulengeri sp. n. were spheroidal to slightly subspheroidal, with a thin, single-layered wall that readily collapses, and measured 16.0 microm, L/W ratio was 1.0. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but usually one (sometimes two) polar granule(s) were present. Oocysts of Eimeria niuginiensis sp. n. were oblong to tapered with a bilayered wall, and measured 20.0 x 13.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.5. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. To our knowledge, these represent the only coccidians ever described from P. stanleyanus.

  12. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa, Eimeriidae) from tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1991 and June 1992, feces from 4 species of tree skinks, Prasinohaema spp. from Papua New Guinea, were collected and examined for coccidia. Two species, P. flavipes and P. prehensicauda were found to harbor eimerians which are described as new. Oocysts of Eimeria krausi sp. nov. from P. flavipes were ellipsoidal to subspheroidal with a smooth bilayered wall and measured (L × W) 19.2 × 16.9 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 6.7 μm, L/W of 1.5. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many small granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, 11.7 × 2.7 μm, in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. Oocysts of Eimeria greeri sp. nov. from P. prehensicauda were ellipsoidal with a smooth bilayered wall, (L × W) 23.0 × 18.3 μm, with a L/W of 1.3. Micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent but a fragmented polar granule was present. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal, 9.7 × 8.4 μm, with a L/W of 1.2. Stieda, subStieda and paraStieda bodies were absent. The sporocyst residuum was composed of many large granules in a compact mass between sporozoites. The sporozoites were sausage-shaped, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. We document here the first report of coccidia from skinks of the genus Prasinohaema.

  13. Composição centesimal e colesterol da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 oriundo de zoocriadouro e habitat natural Proximate composition and cholesterol of the alligator-swampland meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 originating from captivity and wild life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Neto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 12 animais, sendo 06 (peso médio de 5,93 kg oriundos de zoocriadouro (Z autorizado pelo Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis (IBAMA, Estado do Mato Grosso, Brasil, e 06 (peso médio de 6,78 kg oriundos do habitat natural (H, provenientes do município de Cáceres MT. As amostras foram coletadas dos músculos ílio-ischio-caudalis e occipito-cervicalis medialis, cauda e dorso, respectivamente. Nesses músculos foram determinados: umidade, extrato etéreo, proteína e cinzas. A extração de lipídeos foi conduzida com uso de clorofórmio/metanol (2:1. O colesterol foi determinado por colorimetria em espectrofotômetro. O corte da cauda dos jacarés Z apresentou médias de 74,50; 24,20; 0,83; 0,91% e o corte dorso 76,20; 23,68; 0,49 e 0,99% para umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo e cinzas, respectivamente. Nos animais H, as médias foram 72,29; 21,83; 5,43 e 1,09% na cauda e 76,70; 21,93; 0,54 e 1,25% no dorso (umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo e cinzas, respectivamente. As médias de colesterol nos animais Z foram de 48,82 e de 53,73 mg/100 g na cauda e dorso, respectivamente. Nos animais H, as médias foram de 37,05 mg/100 g na cauda e 40,61 mg/100 g no dorso. Assim, os jacarés de Z apresentaram carne mais magra, do que os jacarés H. E quando comparados os cortes, a cauda apresentou mais proteína e extrato etéreo, enquanto o dorso apresentou mais umidade, cinzas e colesterol.They were used 12 animals, 06 (with average weight of 5.93 kg originating from captivity, authorized by Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente e dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis (IBAMA, Mato Grosso state, Brazil, and 06 (with average weight of 6.78 kg originating from natural habitat, every animals coming from municipal district of Cáceres, Mato Grosso state, Brazil. The samples were collected of the muscles ílio-ischio-caudalis and occipito-cervicalis medialis, tail and back, respectively. In those muscles they were determined: moisture, ethereal extract, protein and ashes. The lipids extraction was driven with chloroform/methanol (2:1. The cholesterol was determined by colorimeter in spectrophotometer. The cut tail of the alligators originating from captivity presented averages of 74.50; 24.20; 0.83; 0.91% and the cut back 76.20; 23.68; 0.49 and 0.99% for moisture, protein, ethereal extract and ashes, respectively. In the animals originating from natural habitat, the averages were 72.29; 21.83; 5.43 and 1.09% in the tail and 76.70; 21.93; 0.54 and 1.25% in the back (moisture, protein, ethereal extract and ashes, respectively. The cholesterol averages in the animals originating from captivity were of 48.82 and of 53.73 mg/100 g-1 in the tail and back, respectively. In the animals originating from natural habitat the averages were of 37.05 mg/100 g-1 in the tail and 40.61 mg/100 g in the back. Thus, the alligators originating from captivity presented thinner meat, than the alligators originating from natural habitat. When comparing the cuts, the tail presented higher protein and ethereal extract, while the neck presented higher moisture, ashes and cholesterol.

  14. Coeficiente de digestibilidade aparente de cinco fontes energéticas para o jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare, Daudin, 1802 Apparent digestibility coefficients of five energetic food sources for the "jacaré-do-pantanal" (Caiman yacare, Daudin, 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigues Maciel

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi conduzido um ensaio de digestibilidade nas instalações da Cooperativa de Criadores de Jacaré-do-pantanal, na cidade de Cáceres-MT, com o objetivo de avaliar o valor nutricional de cinco alimentos para o jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare. Utilizou-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com 5 tratamentos e 3 repetições, sendo a unidade experimental formada por 3 jacarés, com peso total médio de 3940 ± 240 g, temperatura ambiente média de 30,5 ± 5,0ºC e temperatura média da água de 27,8 ± 1,0ºC. A quantidade de alimento fornecida por repetição a cada dois dias foi padronizada em 20 g de matéria seca por unidade de peso metabólico (kg0,75. As médias dos coeficientes de digestibilidade aparente foram comparadas pelo teste de Tukey. O coeficiente de digestibilidade aparente da matéria seca foi de 80,78; 68,08; 69,91; 30,12 e 58,95; e o coeficiente de digestibilidade aparente da energia bruta de 82,59; 60,58; 61,66; 25,17 e 48,57, para a glicose, dextrina, amido de milho, milho triturado e pectina, respectivamente. A glicose apresentou o maior CDAEB e o milho, o menor.A metabolism trial was carried out at the facilities of the Cooperative of growers of the "Jacaré do Pantanal" , in Cáceres - MT, with the objective of evaluating the nutritional value of five energetic feedstuffs for the "jacaré-do-pantanal" (Caiman yacare. A completely randomized design with five treatments and three replicates was utilized, the experimental unit being constituted of three caimans, with a total mean weight of 3940 ± 240 g, average environmental temperature of 30.5 ± 5.0ºC and average temperature of the water of 27.8 ± 1.0ºC. The amount of feed furnished per replicate every two days was standardized in 20 g of dry matter per unit of metabolic weight (kg0.75. The means of the coefficients of apparent digestibility were compared through Tukey’s test (P<0,05. The coefficient of apparent digestibility of dry matter was of 80.78; 68.08; 69.91; 30.12 and 58.95 and the coefficient of apparent digestibility of gross energy (CADGE was of 82.59; 60.58; 61.66; 25.17 and 48.57 for glucose, dextrin, cornstarch, ground corn and pectin, respectively. Glucose showed the highest CADGE value and corn the lowest (P<0,05.

  15. Development of III-Nitride Based THz Inter-Subband Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    132 (2002). 16 C. Adelmann, E. Sarigiannidou, D. Jalabert, Y. Hori, J. –L. Rouviere , B. Daudin, S. Fanget, C. Bru-Chevallier, T. Shibata, and M...Jalabert, E. Monroy, E. Sarigiannidou, J.L. Rouviere , T. Shibata, M. Tanaka, J.M. Gerard, and B. Daudin, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 1104 (2004). 19 S. Nicolay, E

  16. A new small karst-dwelling species of Cyrtodactylus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) from Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto, Awal; Bauer, Aaron M; Yudha, Donan Satria

    2014-04-07

    A new small karst-dwelling species of the genus Cyrtodactylus is described from East Java and Special Province of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Cyrtodactylus semiadii sp. nov. is a small species (SVL to 47.1 mm in females, 42.1 mm in males) distinguished from all other congeners by unique characters combination: short, robust, cylindrical tail, indistinct ventrolateral folds, absence of precloacal groove, absence of enlarged femoral scales, absence of precloacal and femoral pores and lack of enlarged median subcaudal scales. It is the third member of the genus recorded from Java. 

  17. A new species of Thecadactylus from Sint Maarten, Lesser Antilles (Reptilia, Squamata, Gekkonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Koehler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of Thecadactylus from the Caribbean island of Sint Maarten. The new species differs from all other species in the genus bya distinct dorsal pattern of numerous irregular but sharply deliminated black spots and blotches on an otherwise almost patternless background.

  18. Phylogeny of the genus Rhynchocalamus (Reptilia; Colubridae) with a first record from the Sultanate of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, Jiří; Martínez, Gabriel; Gebhart, Jurgen; Aznar, Javier; Gállego, Javier; Göçmen, Bayram; De Pous, Philip; Tamar, Karin; Carranza, Salvador

    2015-10-23

    The genus Rhynchocalamus comprises three species distributed in Southwest Asia. Little is known about them, most probably because of their secretive fossorial lifestyle. The poor knowledge of the genus is even underscored by the fact that its phylogenetic affinities remained unclear until very recently. The least known of the species, Rhynchocalamus arabicus, is known only from the holotype collected in Aden, Yemen, and it has not been observed since its description in 1933. Here we provide a second record for this species, which represents the first record of this genus for Oman. This extends its range in southern Arabia by more than 1000 km. The observed specimen was determined as R. arabicus on the basis of its similarity in size, color, and scalation with the holotype. Furthermore, we sequenced three mitochondrial (12S, 16S, cytb) and one nuclear (cmos) genes for R. arabicus and for two individuals of R. melanocephalus and one R. satunini and inferred the phylogenetic relationships of all currently recognized species of the genus for the first time. The results of our phylogenetic analyses indicate that Rhynchocalamus is a member of the Western Palearctic clade of Colubrinae and is sister to Lytorhynchus, with which it forms a very well supported clade and shares some morphological characters. As our results show, R. satunini is the basal lineage of the genus and R. melanocephalus is sister to R. arabicus.

  19. [Reproduction of populations of Eremias olivieri (Reptilia, Lacertidae) from the Kerkennah Islands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouira, S

    1986-12-01

    The study of the genital tractus of 234 Eremias olivieri females caught among two populations from the islands of Kerkennah permitted to define the breeding characteristics of this species: two successive clutches by season of activity; precocious sexual maturity: 7 to 9 months according as the animals are issued from the first or second animal clutche. high pregnant rate: ranging from 87 to 100%; average annual fecundity: 1.98 to 2.98 eggs per female; the importance of each clutche varies between 1 and 7 eggs when the most frequent clutches comprise 2 and 3 eggs. A continuous observation of the populations during different seasons of activity (3 seasons for the population of the island of Gharbi and 2 for the population of the island of Chargui) permitted to notice some differences statistically significant the thorough interpretation of which, in terms of adaptative strategies remains difficult for lack of fuller data on other demographic and ecologic parameters.

  20. A new species of Atractus (Reptilia: Ophidia: Colubridae: Dipsadinae) from the Amazon forest region in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.; Prudente, A.L.C.

    2003-01-01

    Three specimens of Atractus natans were found during fieldwork in the “Reserva Mamirauá”, Amazonas and a fourth one in the “Estação Científica Ferreira Penna”, Floresta de Caxiuanã, Pará, Brazil. The specimens from Mamirauá were all collected in floating logs in várzea forest during the period of fl

  1. Distribution and abundance of pit vipers (Reptilia: Viperidae along the Western Ghats of Goa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Sawant

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and abundance of pit vipers in the Western Ghats namely Trimeresurus gramineus (Bamboo Pit Viper, T. malabaricus (Malabar Pit Viper and Hypnale hypnale (Hump-nosed Pit Viper was investigated in five wildlife sanctuaries of Goa from 2005 to 2009. Seasonal day-night data was collected based on band transect methods. All the pit viper species showed specific habitat preferences and their abundance changed with season. They were most abundant during monsoon. H. hypnale extended its range to the adjoining cashew plantations during the post monsoon and winter.

  2. A new archosauriform (Reptilia: Diapsida from the Manda beds (Middle Triassic of southwestern Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterling J Nesbitt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archosauria and their closest relatives, the non-archosaurian archosauriforms, diversified in the Early and Middle Triassic, soon after the end-Permian extinction. This diversification is poorly documented in most Lower and Middle Triassic rock sequences because fossils of early groups of archosauriforms are relatively rare compared to those of other amniotes. The early Middle Triassic (? late Anisian Manda beds of southwestern Tanzania form an exception, with early archosaur skeletons being relatively common and preserved as articulated or associated specimens. The Manda archosaur assemblage is exceptionally diverse for the Middle Triassic. However, to date, no non-archosaurian archosauriforms have been reported from these rocks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we name a new taxon, Asperoris mnyama gen. et sp. nov., from the Manda beds and thoroughly describe the only known specimen. The specimen consists of a well-preserved partial skull including tooth-bearing elements (premaxilla, maxilla, the nasal, partial skull roof, and several incomplete elements. All skull elements are covered in an autapomorphic highly rugose sculpturing. A unique combination of character states indicates that A. mnyama lies just outside Archosauria as a stem archosaur within Archosauriformes, but more precise relationships of A. mnyama relative to other early archosauriform clades (e.g., Erythrosuchidae cannot be determined currently. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Asperoris mnyama is the first confirmed non-archosaurian archosauriform from the Manda beds and increases the morphological and taxonomic diversity of early archosauriforms known from the Middle Triassic. The direct association of A. mnyama with species referable to Archosauria demonstrates that non-archosaurian archosauriforms were present during the rise and early diversification of Archosauria. Non-archosaurian archosauriforms and archosaurs co-occur in fossil reptile assemblages across Pangaea from the late Early Triassic to the end of the Late Triassic.

  3. Life expectancy and longevity of varanid lizards (Reptilia:Squamata:Varanidae) in North American zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendyk, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    In zoos, life expectancy-the average lifespan of individuals within a population, and longevity-the maximum lifespan within a population, can be useful parameters for evaluating captive husbandry and animal welfare. Using life history and demographic data derived from regional studbooks, this study examined life expectancy and longevity in a total of 782 wild-caught (WC) and captive-bred (CB) varanid lizards of seven species maintained in North American zoos since 1926. The average lifespans for WC and CB animals were 6.3 ± 0.3 and 9.3 ± 0.4 years, respectively, with CB males living significantly longer than females (P = 0.009). A total of 26.4% of WC and 22.5% of CB animals experienced mortality during their first 2 years in captivity, with mortality during this period greatest among Varanus rudicollis and V. prasinus. A positive correlation was observed between life expectancy and adult body mass in captive-bred individuals (r = 0.981; P = 0.002). Wild-caught females with a history of successful reproduction had a significantly greater average lifespan than non-reproducing females (P zoos. In light of these findings, several husbandry-related factors which may be affecting the welfare and lifespans of varanids in zoos are identified and discussed. This study also highlights the utility of demographic and life history data in captive animal management, and offers a general framework for future herpetological studies of a similar nature. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Taxonomic reassessment of two Indian shieldtail snakes in the Uropeltis ceylanicus species group (Reptilia: Uropeltidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropeltis is the most speciose of all shieldtail snake (uropeltid genera, particularly in India, and has been bedeviled by a complex and intricate taxonomic history, with several weakly established synonyms and widely disjunct geographic ranges. Our present work on two Indian Uropeltis species revealed greater species diversity than what is currently recognised. We elevate Uropeltis arcticeps madurensis to species level, and revive Silybura shorttii (in the combination Uropeltis shorttii from the subjective synonymy of U. ceylanicus. We provide differential diagnoses, descriptions of examined material and comparisons with similar species based on an examination of voucher specimens as well as fresh, uncollected topotypes documented in the field.

  5. A new species of Liolaemus (Reptilia: Squamata: Tropiduridae from Mendoza province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etheridge, Richard

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Una nueva especie del complejo Liolaemus darwinii es descrita para el centro de la provincia de Mendoza, Argentina. Se parece más a L. olongasta y L. laurenti en que los machos adultos tienen pigmento negro en el pliegue antehumeral y manchas escapulares que no son agrandadas. Difiere de estas especies en tener un cuerpo adulto menor, un número mayor de escamas en la mitad del cuerpo, una cola más corta y un mayor número de poros precloacales en machos, y un patrón ventral distinto en machos adultos. En el norte de su distribución se encuentra L. darwinii en el norte de la provincia de Mendoza y en la provincia de San Luis, y en el sur en el oeste de la provincia de La Pampa, en el noroeste de la provincia de Neuquén y en la provincia de Río Negro, pero se desconoce si estas poblaciones del norte y del sur de L. darwtnii están separadas por la distribución de la nueva especie. Análisis cladísticos basados en comportamiento, morfología y secuencias de DNA muestran filogenias conflictivas, pero concuerdan en que la nueva especie es un miembro del grupo boulengeri, con afinidades más cercanas a L. darwinii, L. olongasta y L. laurenti. A new species,of the Liolaemus darwinii complex is described from central Mendoza Province, Argentina. It most closely resembles L. olongasta and L. laurenti in that adult males have black pigment in the antehumeral fold and scapular spots that are not enlarged. It differs from these species in having a smaller adult body size, a higher number of midbody scales, a shorter tail, more precloacal pores in males, and a different adult male ventral body pattern. Its range is bordered by L. darwinii on the north in northern Mendoza and San Luis provinces, and on the south in western La Pampa and northwestern Neuquén and Río Negro provinces, but it is unknown whether these northern and southern populations of L. darwinii are separated by the range of the new species. Cladistic analyses based on behaviour, morphology, and DNA sequences yield conflicting phylogenies, but agree that the new species is a member of the boulengeri group, with closest affinities to L. darwinii, L. olongasta, and L. laurenti.

  6. Osteología comparada de las familias Nothosauridae y Simosauridae (Reptilia. Sauropterygia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz, J. L.

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The alleged homodont condition of Simosaurus is not exact, symphisiary and postsymphisiary pieces can be differenciated, based on morphological and size criteria. The dental morphology of Simosaurus is unique within the Sauropterygia, with teeth whose basal diameter has a great relative developpment. The morphology of vertebral centrum between Nothosauridae and Simosauridae is compared. The first ones have a morphotype called "Kreuzform" (dorsal region of centrum facing that of Simosauridae, here called "Fosetado" (pitted, A typical characteristic of Simosaurus is the occurrence (in the neural arch of additional articulatin,g structures (infrazygapophyses, Huene, 1952. From the consideration of morphometric variationof centrum in N. raabi SCHROEDER, 1914, it can be concluded that the cervical vertebrae of Nothosaurus are relatively longer and deeper than the thoracic ones, The topographic variation of diameter and Ienght of centrum in Simosaurus is more accused than in Nothosaurus, while depth is more constant. Based on morphometric criteria the vertebral centra no pachyostotic of Pachypleurosaurs (generally smaller in size can not be discriminated from those of Nothosauridae. The rib morphology of Simosaurus is similar to that of other Notbosaurs. The coracoid of Simosaurus is stronger and unlike Nothosaurus the glenoid notch has a typically anterior position. Simosaurus has a more slender humerus than the rest of Nothosaurs. The analysis of the different genera proposed as Simosauridae up to date, leads towards the conclusion that it is a monogeneric family. Dentary and postcraneal diagnosis of this taxon is proposed.

    La supuesta condición homodonta de Simosaurus es inexacta, pudiéndose diferenciar piezas sinfisiarias y postsinfisiarias, en base a criterios morfológicos y de tamaño. La morfología dentaria de los Simosaurios es única dentro de los Sauropterigios, con piezas dotadas de un diámetro basal de la corona de un elevado desarrollo relativo. Se compara la morfología del centro vertebral entre Nothosauridae y Simosauridae. Frente al morfotipo en "Kreuzform" (zona dorsal del centro de los primeros, los Simosauridae presentan un morfotipo aquí denominado "Fosetado". Simosaurus se caracteriza igualmente por la aparición de estructuras articulares adicionales en el arco neural (infrazigapófisis, Huene, 1952. Del estudio de la variación morfométrica del, centro vertebral en N. raabi SCHROEDER, 1914, puede concluirse que las vértebras cervicales de Nothosaurus son relativamente más largas y netamente más profundas que las torácicas. En Simosaurus la variación topográfica del diámetro y la longitud del centro es más acusada que en Nothosaurus, mientras la profundidad mantiene una mayor constancia. Los centros vertebrales no paquiostóticos de los Paquipleurosaurios, aunque generalmente de menor tamaño, no son diferenciables morfométricamente de las de los Notosáuridos. La morfología costal de Simosaurus es semejante a la de otros Notosaurios. Su coracoides es más robusto que el de Nothosaurus y, a diferencia de este último género, la incisión glenoidea presenta una típica disposición anterior. El húmero de Simosaurus es más grácil que el del resto de los Notosaurios. El análisis de los diferentes géneros hasta ahora propuestos como Simosáuridos conduce a la conclusión de que Simosauridae es una familia monogenérica. Se propone su diagnosis dentaria y postcraneal.

  7. New Material of Pterosaur Sinopterus (Reptilia: Pterosauria) from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation, Western Liaoning, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Junchang; LIU Jinyuan; WANG Xuri; GAO Chunling; MENG Qingjin; JI Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Based on a new nearly complete postcranial skeleton of an adult specimen of Sinopterus from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of western Liaoning, China, the diagnosis of Sinopterus is amended. The revised diagnosis of Sinopterus includes skull relatively elongate with weakly developed cranial crest; ratio of the length of Ph2d4 to that of Ph1d4 is approximately 0.73; ratio of the length of wing metacarpal to that of metatarsal 3 is 4.5; ratio of the length of mt3 to that of tibia is approximately 0.21, and wing phalanges 1 and 2 are straight. Comparison between the ratios of the limb bones between non-adult and adult individuals of Sinopterus indicates that during the ontogenetic process,some ratios between bones are constant, such as the first wing phalanx to the second wing phalanx, the wing metacarpal to the metatarsal 3, metatarsal 3 to the tibia, but others are not, such as humerus to wing metacarpal and femur to tibia, in which the former grows faster than the latter.

  8. Predation of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) by Norops serranoi (Reptilia: Polychrotidae): functional response and evasion ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, Ariane; Valle-Mora, Javier; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Susana Eva; Liedo, Pablo

    2014-06-01

    The Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), is one of the 10 worldwide more important fruit crop pests. Orchards of southeastern Chiapas also shelter the tree-dwelling lizard Norops serranoi (Köhler), which likely prey upon these flies. In standard laboratory conditions, we determined the functional response of four male and four female lizards on mass-reared fruit flies. We used a general logistic analysis of proportion of killed prey versus available prey to determine the shape of the functional response. Male lizards showed a type II functional response, while females showed a type III functional response. For the highest fruit fly densities, female lizards caught significantly more fruit flies than males did. The predator evasion ability and the survival of mass-reared and wild fruit flies were compared. Wild fruit flies evaded more male lizard attacks than mass-reared flies. However, when female lizards attacked, there was no significant difference between strains. Fruit flies survival was higher with male than with female lizards, but it did not depend on fruit fly strains. This is the first report of a vertebrate preying on the Mexican fruit fly, demonstrating that female lizards impose a higher predation pressure and are more efficient at capturing wild fruit flies than males. We discuss the implications of our results on mass-rearing and quality control of sterile flies.

  9. Thermolability of 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid from the liver of Crotalus durissus terrificus (Ophidia, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, J F; De Lucca, F L

    1973-09-01

    Instability of 28S rRNA of Crotalus durissus terrificus liver was observed during hotphenol extraction: purified 28S rRNA is converted into an 18S RNA component by heat treatment. It was also found that ;6S' and ;8S' low-molecular-weight RNA species were released during the thermal conversion. This conversion and the release of the low-molecular-weight species were also induced by 8m-urea and 80% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide at 0 degrees C. Evidence is presented that this phenomenon is an irreversible process and results from the rupture of hydrogen bonds. The 18S RNA product was shown to be homogeneous by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and by sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. The base composition of the 18S RNA products obtained by heat, urea or dimethyl sulphoxide treatments was similar. The C+G content of the 18S RNA product was different from that of the native 18S rRNA, but similar to that of 28S rRNA.

  10. A positive fever response in Agama agama and Sceloporus orcutti (Reptilia: Agamidae and Iguanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, C E; Stranc, D S; Casal, M P; Hallman, G M; Muchlinski, A E

    1991-01-01

    Three species of lizards (Agama agama, Mabuya perrotetii, and Sceloporus orcutti) were tested for a possible increase in mean selected body temperature (MSBT) in response to intraperitoneal injection of alcohol-killed Aeromonas sobria, a gram-negative bacterium known to be pathogenic to reptiles. A paired experimental design was utilized in which each animal was given an injection of sterile saline and 1.10(10) A. sobria. Body temperatures were monitored via indwelling cloacal thermocouples at 4-min intervals for one 12-h light period under saline injection and for two consecutive 12-h light periods under bacteria injection. Agama agama demonstrated a significant increase in MSBT on both day 1 and day 2 of bacteria injection with increases of 2.7 and 2.3 degrees C, respectively. The latency period on day 1 averaged 6.4 h. Sceloporus orcutti demonstrated a significant decrease in MSBT on day 1 of bacteria injection and a significant increase in MSBT of 1.0 degree C on day 2 of bacteria injection. No fever was evident in S. orcutti until the beginning of day 2. Mabuya perrotetii did not exhibit a significant change in MSBT on either day 1 or day 2 of bacteria injection. Agama agama (family Agamidae) is the first Old World reptile to exhibit a fever response to bacteria injection, and with these results fever has now been demonstrated in the lizard families Agamidae, Iguanidae, and Teiidae.

  11. Phylogeny of Trachylepis sp. (Reptilia) from Turkey inferred from mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güçlü, Ozgür; Candan, Kamil; Kankiliç, Tolga; Kumlutaş, Yusuf; Durmuş, Salih Hakan; Poulakakis, Nikos; Ilgaz, Cetin

    2014-12-01

    The taxonomic status of the species included into the genus Trachylepis in Turkey are doubtful. So far, three morphological species have been attributed to this genus in Turkey; Trachylepis aurata. T. vittata, and T. septemtaeniata. Here, we investigated the taxonomy of the Turkish Trachylepis species by employing phylogenetic and phylogeographic approaches and using mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome b and 12 S rRNA). In total, 45 Trachylepis and 6 Mabuya specimens were used analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out using Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian Inference (BI) methods. The phylogenetic relationships and the genetic distances retrieved, revealed that the Turkish species, which currently recognized as Trachylepis, are highly diversified, forming a distinct clade that shows closer phylogenetic affinity with the species of the genus Mabuya rather than the other Trachylepis species. In this clade, the three Turkish species are monophyletic with T. vittata to branch off first in late Miocene (10.54 Mya). The other two species (T. septemtaeniata and T. aurata) seem to have sister group relationship that diverged at the end of Messinian Salinity Crisis (5.27 Mya). As a whole, the examination of mtDNA lineages in the Turkish lizards of the genus Trachylepis may contribute substantially to the refining of their taxonomic status, since the three species of Turkey, although monophyletic, represent a distinct radiation that would could probably recognized as a different genus in Mabuya sensu lato.

  12. Current status of Calotes liocephalus Günther, 1872 (Reptilia: Agamidae of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A.T. Amarasinghe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Calotes liocephalus Günther, 1872 is an endemic and threatened, arboreal agamid lizard of Sri Lanka, which is found only in the forests of the Knuckles Mountain Range and Peak Wilderness up to 1850m. This work is mainly based on examination of the type specimen and WHT specimens as well as published literature and our observations of ecology, behaviour and threats on Calotes liocephalus.

  13. Conquering the Sahara and Arabian deserts: systematics and biogeography of Stenodactylus geckos (Reptilia: Gekkonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinou, Margarita; Arnold, Edwin Nicholas; Crochet, Pierre-André; Geniez, Philippe; Brito, José Carlos; Lymberakis, Petros; Baha El Din, Sherif; Sindaco, Roberto; Robinson, Michael; Carranza, Salvador

    2012-12-31

    The evolutionary history of the biota of North Africa and Arabia is inextricably tied to the complex geological and climatic evolution that gave rise to the prevalent deserts of these areas. Reptiles constitute an exemplary group in the study of the arid environments with numerous well-adapted members, while recent studies using reptiles as models have unveiled interesting biogeographical and diversification patterns. In this study, we include 207 specimens belonging to all 12 recognized species of the genus Stenodactylus. Molecular phylogenies inferred using two mitochondrial (12S rRNA and 16S rRNA) and two nuclear (c-mos and RAG-2) markers are employed to obtain a robust time-calibrated phylogeny, as the base to investigate the inter- and intraspecific relationships and to elucidate the biogeographical history of Stenodactylus, a genus with a large distribution range including the arid and hyper-arid areas of North Africa and Arabia. The phylogenetic analyses of molecular data reveal the existence of three major clades within the genus Stenodactylus, which is supported by previous studies based on morphology. Estimated divergence times between clades and sub-clades are shown to correlate with major geological events of the region, the most important of which is the opening of the Red Sea, while climatic instability in the Miocene is hypothesized to have triggered diversification. High genetic variability is observed in some species, suggesting the existence of some undescribed species. The S. petrii - S. stenurus species complex is in need of a thorough taxonomic revision. New data is presented on the distribution of the sister species S. sthenodactylus and S. mauritanicus. The phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus Stenodactylus presented in this work permits the reconstruction of the biogeographical history of these common desert dwellers and confirms the importance of the opening of the Red Sea and the climatic oscillations of the Miocene as major factors in the diversification of the biota of North Africa and Arabia. Moreover, this study traces the evolution of this widely distributed and highly specialized group, investigates the patterns of its high intraspecific diversity and elucidates its systematics.

  14. Correlation between endoscopic sex determination and gonad histology in pond sliders, Trachemys scripta (Reptilia: Testudines: Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Perpiñán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coelioscopy has been proven to be a valuable technique to determine the sex of juvenile chelonians. However, there is a disagreement regarding the proper way to identify testes and ovaries, which is a direct consequence of the lack of studies correlating the results of endoscopic examination with the histology of the gonad. In this blinded study we assessed two methods of sex determination in juvenile pond sliders (Trachemys scripta using endoscopy: via coelioscopy, with visualization of the gonads, and via cloacoscopy, with visualization of phallus/clitoris; we then compared the results of these procedures with the histology of the gonad. The results of gonad histology correlated 100% with the results from coelioscopic examination, but only 57.77% of the results obtained by cloacoscopy were accurate. Using cloacoscopy, 83.33% of males and 38.46% of females were misdiagnosed. Sex determination of juvenile pond sliders was considered accurate when coelioscopy was used, but inaccurate when cloacoscopy with identification of phallus/clitoris was attempted.

  15. Out of Africa: Phylogeny and biogeography of the widespread genus Acanthodactylus (Reptilia: Lacertidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamar, Karin; Carranza, Salvador; Sindaco, Roberto; Moravec, Jiří; Trape, Jean-François; Meiri, Shai

    2016-10-01

    Acanthodactylus lizards are among the most diverse and widespread diurnal reptiles in the arid regions spanning from North Africa across to western India. Acanthodactylus constitutes the most species-rich genus in the family Lacertidae, with over 40 recognized species inhabiting a wide variety of dry habitats. The genus has seldom undergone taxonomic revisions, and although there are a number of described species and species-groups, their boundaries, as well as their interspecific relationships, remain largely unresolved. We constructed a multilocus phylogeny, combining data from two mitochondrial (12S, cytb) and three nuclear (MC1R, ACM4, c-mos) markers for 302 individuals belonging to 36 known species, providing the first large-scale time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of the genus. We evaluated phylogenetic relationships between and within species-groups, and assessed Acanthodactylus biogeography across its known range. Acanthodactylus cladogenesis is estimated to have originated in Africa due to vicariance and dispersal events from the Oligocene onwards. Radiation started with the separation into three clades: the Western and scutellatus clades largely distributed in North Africa, and the Eastern clade occurring mostly in south-west Asia. Most Acanthodactylus species diverged during the Miocene, possibly as a result of regional geological instability and climatic changes. We support most of the current taxonomic classifications and phylogenetic relationships, and provide genetic validity for most species. We reveal a new distinct blanfordii species-group, suggest new phylogenetic positions (A. hardyi, A. masirae), and synonymize several species and subspecies (A. lineomaculatus, A. boskianus khattensis and A. b. nigeriensis) with their phylogenetically closely-related species. We recommend a thorough systematic revision of taxa, such as A. guineensis, A. grandis, A. dumerilii, A. senegalensis and the pardalis and erythrurus species-groups, which exhibit high levels of intraspecific variability, and clear evidence of phylogenetic complexity.

  16. Lista y distribución de los ofidios (Reptilia: Serpentes de Santa Fe, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzamendia, Vanesa

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la composición y distribución de las serpientes en la provincia de Santa Fe, Argentina, sobre la base de 1.292 registros obtenidos en muestreos de campo, revisión de las colecciones herpetológicas de Argentina y registros bibliográficos. Se registraron 51 especies y subespecies (43 Colubridae, 3 Viperidae, 2 Boidae, 1 Elapidae, 1 Leptotyphlopidae y 1 Typhlopidae, representando un 39% de los taxones registrados para Argentina. Se realizaron mapas con localidades precisas para determinar la distribución de las serpientes. Una especie y 4 subespecies son registros novedosos para la provincia. Los patrones de distribución son brevemente discutidos en relación con las formaciones fitogeográficas. We studied the composition and distribution of the Santa Fe snakes based on 1,292 examined specimens obtained in field survey, revision of the Argentine herpetological collections and reliable literature records. Maps were built for determinate the distribution of snakes. Fifty one species and subspecies were recorded (43 Colubridae, 3 Viperidae, 2 Boidae, 1 Elapidae, 1 Leptotyphlopidae and 1 Typhlopidae, a 39% of the survey taxa in Argentina. One species and three subspecies were new records in Santa Fe province. The distributional patterns are briefly discussed in relation with phytogeographical subdivisions.

  17. Evolution of Fish-Shaped Reptiles (reptilia: Ichthyopterygia) in Their Physical Environments and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Ryosuke

    2005-01-01

    Ichthyosaurs were a group of Mesozoic marine reptiles that evolved fish-shaped body outlines. They are unique in several anatomical characters, including the possession of enormous eyeballs sometimes exceeding 25 cm and an enlarged manus with sometimes up to 20 bones in a single digit, or 10 digits per manus. They are also unique in that their biology has been studied from the perspective of physical constraints, which allowed estimation of such characteristics as optimal cruising speed, visual sensitivity, and even possible basal metabolic rate ranges. These functional inferences, although based on physical principles, obviously contain errors arising from the limitations of fossilized data, but are necessarily stronger than the commonly made inferences based on superficial correlations among quantities without mechanical or optical explanations for why such correlations exist.

  18. Variability in Sex-Determining Mechanisms Influences Genome Complexity in Reptilia

    OpenAIRE

    Janes, D E; Organ, C. L.; Edwards, S V

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe the history of amniote sex determination as a classic example of Darwinian evolution. We suggest that evolutionary changes in sex determination provide a foundation for understanding important aspects of chromosome and genome organization that otherwise appear haphazard in their origins and contents. Species with genotypic sex determination often possess heteromorphic sex chromosomes, whereas species with environmental sex determination lack them. Through a series ...

  19. Variability in sex-determining mechanisms influences genome complexity in reptilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, D E; Organ, C L; Edwards, S V

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we describe the history of amniote sex determination as a classic example of Darwinian evolution. We suggest that evolutionary changes in sex determination provide a foundation for understanding important aspects of chromosome and genome organization that otherwise appear haphazard in their origins and contents. Species with genotypic sex determination often possess heteromorphic sex chromosomes, whereas species with environmental sex determination lack them. Through a series of mutations followed by selection at key genes, sex-determining mechanisms have turned over many times throughout the amniote lineage. As a consequence, amniote genomes have undergone gains or losses of sex chromosomes. We review the genomic and ecological contexts in which either temperature-dependent or genotypic sex determination has evolved. Once genotypic sex determination emerges in a lineage, viviparity and heteromorphic sex chromosomes become more likely to evolve. For example, in extinct marine reptiles, genotypic sex determination apparently led to viviparity, which in turn facilitated their pelagic radiation. Sex chromosomes comprise genome regions that differ from autosomes in recombination rate, mutation rate, levels of polymorphism, and the presence of sex-determining and sexually antagonistic genes. In short, many aspects of amniote genome complexity, life history, and adaptive radiation appear contingent on evolutionary changes in sex-determining mechanisms.

  20. Analysis of marine turtle strandings (Reptilia: Testudine occurring on coast of Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes-Souza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an analysis of the occurrence and the spatial and temporal distribution of marine turtle strandings found in the south of the State of Bahia. Data was collected between January 2006 and June 2008. This study covers an area of 220 km of the southern coast of Bahia State (northeastern Brazil, and spatial analyses were made considering data collected in three bases suported by Petrobras-Petróleo Brasileiro S/A distributed in the area. The records were sorted according to month and year, species, age group and sex. A total of 260 stranding were reported: 183 of Chelonia mydas (74.1%, the most frequent species. The highest number of strandings was recorded in Gamboa do Morro Base. Juveniles presented the highest densities, but no differences between adults and small juveniles were detected. Males were more frequently stranded in Gamboa do Morro Base, while females were more frequent in Ilhéus Base. An increase in the number of stranding between 2006 and 2008 was noted; moreover, the months with more records were January, February, March, October and December. The number of stranding events was discontinuously distributed in the study area. This study also demonstrated the usefulness of implement different strategies of recording marine turtle strandings: direct monitoring efforts (patrol in remote beaches and educational campaigns applied on beaches frequented by tourists. This study demonstrated that, despite spatial nearby, the three bases attend independent biological systems and show different stranding dynamics, thus different conservancy actions should be implemented in order to improve the knowledge on natural history of sea-turtles in the southern coast of Bahia State.

  1. A preliminary phylogeny of the Palearctic naked-toed geckos (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae) with taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Aaron M; Masroor, Rafaqat; Titus-McQuillan, James; Heinicke, Matthew P; Daza, Juan D; Jackman, Todd R

    2013-01-08

    Palearctic naked-toed geckos are a group of gekkonid geckos that range from North Africa to northern India and western China, with their greatest diversity in Iran and Pakistan. Relationships among the constituent genera remain incompletely resolved and the monophyly of key genera remains unverified. Further, competing classifications are in current use and many species have been allocated to different genera by different authors. We used both mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear genes (RAG1, PDC) to explore relationships among representatives of all but one genus in the group (Rhinogecko), including four genera not previously included in phylogenetic analyses (Asiocolotes, Altigekko, Indogekko, and Siwaligekko). Siwaligekko (and presumably other Tibeto-Himalayan species often referred to Cyrtopodion) are more closely related to tropical Asian Cyrtodactylus than to Palearctic naked-toed geckos. Sampled species of Asiocolotes and Altigekko are sister taxa, but both genera are here considered junior subjective synonyms of Altiphylax. Cyrtopodion sensu lato is non-monophyletic; Mediodactylus and Tenuidactylus, which have variably been considered as subgenera or synonyms of Cyrtopodion are both valid genera. Indogekko is embedded within Cyrtopodion and is here treated as a subgenus. Bunopus and Crossobamon are closely related to one-another, and with Agamura are interdigitated among taxa previously assigned to Cyrtopodion. Our data confirm the previous identification of a Saharo-Arabian Stenodactylus/Tropiocolotes/Pseudoceramodactylus clade and verify that Microgecko and Alsophylax are not members of the main clade of Palearctic naked-toed geckos. Osteological differences between Tropiocolotes and Microgecko, formerly treated as congeneric, are discussed and illustrated. The divergence between Cyrtodactylus and the Palearctic naked-toed clade predates the initial collision of the Indian and Eurasian plates, but deeper divergences within both groups are consistent with mountain building in the Himalayas and adjacent ranges as promoting cladogenic events. Miocene divergences within Tenuidactylus are consistent with vicariant speciation caused by uplift events in the Iranian and Transcaspian regions. Taxonomic implications of our phylogenetic results are discussed and a preliminary allocation of all species of padless Palearctic gekkonids to genus is provided.

  2. Microhabitat ecology of semi-aquatic Varanus flavescens (Reptilia: Varanidae in altered habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijanur K. M. Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A potential microhabitat is very important for the survival and successful reproduction of any wildlife species. In this study we assessed the microhabitat characteristics of Varanus flavescens in the human altered ecosystems of Chalan beel area, Baraigram, Natore by flowing the Visual Encounter Survey method and by using several important material. A semi-aquatic microhabitat of canal and river was preferred by the species as compared to other identified microhabitats. The slow moving water of the river and canal was fresh and somewhat cloudy in character but stagnant water of the pond and beel (floodplain was semitransparent having lots of phytoplankton and zooplankton. The soil was mostly silty clay. As the study species is cold blooded, the environmental variables like soil, air and water temperatures inside and outside of the microhabitat play major roles for their activity patterns. In order to regulate their body temperature, during a hot sunny day they were more active within the shady area of the microhabitats but at dawn and dusk they were more seen in the sunny areas where temperature was relatively higher. In winter months, the monitor lizards were almost inactive. During that time of the year they live inside the burrow to avoid the extreme cold and foggy weather but during heavy sunshine they come outside of the hole for thermoregulation purpose for a certain time. We noticed that extensive agricultural practice and the excessive use of insecticides may be having a detrimental effect on the microhabitat features important to this semiaquatic lizard. Still the study species is more seen in the human altered ecosystems of Bangladesh. So, to ensure their existence in our close proximity there is an urgent need to create consciousness of the people regarding this beneficial non-venomous species and their respective microhabitat.

  3. Checklist of helminths from lizards and amphisbaenians (Reptilia, Squamata of South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RW Ávila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive and up to date summary of the literature on the helminth parasites of lizards and amphisbaenians from South America is herein presented. One-hundred eighteen lizard species from twelve countries were reported in the literature harboring a total of 155 helminth species, being none acanthocephalans, 15 cestodes, 20 trematodes and 111 nematodes. Of these, one record was from Chile and French Guiana, three from Colombia, three from Uruguay, eight from Bolivia, nine from Surinam, 13 from Paraguay, 12 from Venezuela, 27 from Ecuador, 17 from Argentina, 39 from Peru and 103 from Brazil. The present list provides host, geographical distribution (with the respective biome, when possible, site of infection and references from the parasites. A systematic parasite-host list is also provided.

  4. Histologia do antro pilórico de Caiman crocodilus yacare (Crocodilia - Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Jin

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se a histologia geral do antro pilórico do estômago de Caiman crocodilus yacare. Essa região gástrica apresenta: mucosa, submucosa, muscular e serosa. A mucosa é revestida por epitélio cilíndrico simples do tipo mucoso e apresenta lâmina própria delgada, com glândulas simples, tubulosas, ramificadas, esparsas; o epitélio glandular é do tipo mucoso e apresenta nas paredes algumas células poliédricas de núcleo central e citoplasma rico em grânulos acidófilos.The general histology of the pyloric antrum of the stomach of Caiman crocodilus yacare is described. In the pyloric antrum, from the lumen outward, are found the mucosa, the submucosa, the muscular and the serosa layers. The mucosa is lined by a simple columnar epithelium and shows lamina propria with tubulous mucous glands. The epithelium of the pyloric glands is mucous and shows in the walls some polyedric cells, with central nuclei and the cytoplasm is rich in acidophilic granules.

  5. Spermiogenesis in the imbricate alligator lizard, Barisia imbricata (Reptilia, Squamata, Anguidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Rheubert, Justin L; Touzinsky, Katherine; Hanover, Jessica; Matchett, Caroline L; Granados-González, Gisela; Hernández-Gallegos, Oswaldo

    2013-06-01

    Although the events of spermiogenesis are commonly studied in amniotes, the amount of research available for Squamata is lacking. Many studies have described the morphological characteristics of mature spermatozoa in squamates, but few detail the ultrastructural changes that occur during spermiogenesis. This study's purpose is to gain a better understanding of the subcellular events of spermatid development within the Imbricate Alligator Lizard, Barisia imbricata. The morphological data presented here represent the first complete ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis within the family Anguidae. Samples of testes from four specimens collected on the northwest side of the Nevado de Toluca, México, were prepared using standard techniques for transmission electron microscopy. Many of the ultrastructural changes occurring during spermiogenesis within B. imbricata are similar to that of other squamates (i.e., early acrosome formation, chromatin condensation, flagella formation, annulus present, and a prominent manchette). However, there are a few unique characteristics within B. imbricata spermatids that to date have not been described during spermiogenesis in other squamates. For example, penetration of the acrosomal granule into the subacrosomal space to form the basal plate of the perforatorium during round spermatid development, the clover-shaped morphology of the developing nuclear fossa of the flagellum, and the bulbous shape to the perforatorium are all unique to the Imbricate Alligator Lizard. These anatomical character differences may be valuable nontraditional data that along with more traditional matrices (such as DNA sequences and gross morphological data) may help elucidate phylogenetic relationships, which are historically considered controversial within Squamata.

  6. Some coccidial parasites of the lizard Amphisbaena alba (Reptilia: Amphisbaenia: Amphisbaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lainson

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Five parasites are described in the lizard Amphisbaena alba (Amphisbaenidae from the state of Pará, North Brazil. Mature oocysts of Choleoeimeria amphisbaenae n. sp., are passed already mature in the faeces. They are ellipsoidal-cylindrical, average 33.7 x 22.8 µm and are devoid of micropyle, oocyst residuum or polar body. The colourless wall is smooth and of 2 layers. The 4 dizoic sporocysts have no Stieda body and average 13 x 9.3 µm. Endogenous stages develop in the epithelial cells of the gall-bladder in the manner described for the genus and may cause extensive tissue damage. Sporulation of Isospora capanemaensis n. sp., is completed 3 days after the oocysts are voided in the faeces. They average 14.8 x 14.5 µm and have no micropyle, oocyst residuum or polar body. The 2 tetrazoic sporocysts are pear-shaped, average 8.6 x 6.6 and have an inconspicuous Stieda body. Endogenous development is in the epithelial cells of the ileum, and heavy infections cause considerable tissue destruction. Multisporocystic oocysts passed in the faeces of one A. alba possibly originated from an invertebrate host ingested by the lizard. A globidium-like cyst in the digestive tract of A. alba measured 105 x 85 µm and contained many hundreds of merozoites. A stained kidney smear of the same lizard revealed the presence of an unidentified parasite producing multinucleate cyst-like stages.

  7. Sexual dimorphism in Amphisbaena nigricauda (Reptilia, Squamata, Amphisbaenidae from Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francco A. N. de Souza e Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amphisbaena nigricauda Gans, 1966 is a small, poorly known amphisbaenid endemic to the restinga of the states of Espírito Santo and Bahia, Brazil. We analyze 178 specimens collected in Vitória municipality, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, to investigate whether this species show sexual dimorphism in pre-cloacal pores and in morphological characters. Sex was determined by a ventral incision and direct inspection of gonads. A PCA analysis was performed to generate a general body size measurement. A T test and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test were used to assess whether this species show sexual dimorphism on five morphometric and five meristic characters, respectively. Sex could not be determined in 36 specimens because they were mutilated in the posterior portion of their bodies. The diagnosis of the species is redefined based on this sample size: the smallest number of body annuli changes from 222 to 192, the number of dorsal and ventral segments in an annulus in the middle of the body changes to 9-11/13-16 (instead of 10/16, and the autotomic tail annulus lies between annulus 7-10 (instead of 6-9. The number of tail annuli remained within the known range of variation of the species (19-24. None of the 80 females analyzed showed pre-cloacal pores, whereas within males 59 out of 62 specimens displayed four and two specimens displayed five pre-cloacal pores. A single male did not possess pre-cloacal pores, but showed irregular scales on its cloacal region. Sex-based difference based on presence or absence of pre-cloacal pores as well as males with wider head was seen in other Neotropical amphisbaenids. However, a pattern of body size differences between males and females has not been identified so far in the few amphisbaenid species studied in this regard. Further studies on this taxonomic group are still needed to elucidate the existence of general patterns of sexual dimorphism and to identify the selective pressures driving these patterns.

  8. A new biogeographically disjunct giant gecko (Gehyra: Gekkonidae: Reptilia) from the East Melanesian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul M.; Clegg, Jonathan R.; Fisher, Robert N.; Richards, Stephen J.; Taylor, Peter N.; Jocque, Merlijn M. T.

    2016-01-01

    The East Melanesian Islands have been a focal area for research into island biogeography and community ecology. However, previously undescribed and biogeographically significant new species endemic to this region continue to be discovered. Here we describe a phylogenetically distinct (~20% divergence at the mitochondrial ND2 gene) and biogeographically disjunct new species of gecko in the genus Gehyra, from the Admiralty and St Matthias Islands. Gehyra rohan sp. nov. can be distinguished from all congeners by the combination of its very large size, ring of bright orange scales around the eye, moderate degree of lateral folding on the limbs and body, and aspects of head, body and tail scalation. Molecular data indicate mid to late Miocene divergence of the new species from nearest relatives occurring nearly 2000 kilometres away in Vanuatu and Fiji. Large Gehyra have not been recorded on the intervening large islands of the Bismark Archipelago (New Britain and New Ireland) and the Solomon Islands, suggesting this dispersal pre-dated the current configuration of these islands, extinction in intervening regions, or potentially elements of both. Conversely, low genetic divergence between disjunct samples on Manus and Mussau implies recent overseas dispersal via either natural or anthropogenic means.

  9. The cell masses in the diencephalon of Amphisbaena darwini heterozonata Burmeister (Amphisbaenia, Squamata, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, J C

    1979-01-01

    The cell masses of the diencephalon of Amphisbaena darwini heterozonata are studied and confronted with those of other reptiles, specially with the burrowing ophidian Typhlopidae. The main differences are in the thalamus dorsalis. The amphisbaenids share with the Typhlopidae the absence of the lateral and pretectal geniculate bodies, and share with the squamate reptiles, differing from the typhlopids, the remaining structures of the dorsal thalamus, characterized by the well-developed nucleus rotundus. These features support the idea that the amphisbaenids could be situated within the Squamata at the same level as in Ophidia and Lacertilia. The adaptive processes toward a burrowing behavior have not been the same in amphisbaenids and in the typhlopids. The causes of the dissimilarities of the dorsal thalamus could be related to other sense and non-sense systems apart from the optic. The morphology of the elements of the cell masses has been studied by the Golgi method.

  10. VALLESAURUS CENENSIS WILD, 1991, A DREPANOSAURID (REPTILIA DIAPSIDA FROM THE LATE TRIASSIC OF NORTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIO RENESTO

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Vallesaurus cenensis, a small drepanosaurid reptile from the Norian (Late Triassic beds of the Calcare di Zorzino (Zorzino Limestone is described. The holotype and only known specimen represents the first drepanosaurid in which the skull is preserved articulated with the postcranial skeleton. The study of Vallesaurus anatomy confirms previous data about arboreal adaptation in all known drepanosaurids and permits more firm hypotheses about the phylogenetic relationships of the Drepanosauridae to be proposed.

  11. Fine Structure of the Epididymal Sperm of the Snake Eryx jayakari (Squamata, Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Z. Al-Onazee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastucture of the snake Eryx jayakari (E. jayakari mature sperm has not been published. Therefore, the present study was conducted to elucidate the sperm ultrastructure of this species in comparison with that of other reptilian species. The present investigation has shown that mature spermatozoa of Eryx jayakari are filiform in shape averaging 45 m (mean of 10 in length with a curved head measuring 9 m. The acrosomal complex, which involves the acrosomal cap and subacrosomal material, measures 2.5 m. The nucleus is 6.5 m in length, the neck approximates 1 m and the tail (midpiece, principal piece and endpiece is maximally 35 m in length. The different tail pieces vary in diameter, being the largest at the midpiece (0.66 m, diminished at the principal piece (0.36 m and the least at the endpiece (0.25 m. The midpiece, the longest tail piece, is composed of mitochondrial and fibrous sheaths encircling the microtubular axoneme. The mitochondria are rod-shaped having linear cristae but no dense bodies interrupt their arrangement. The principal tail piece consists of the microtubular axoneme surrounded by the fibrous sheath. The endpiece involves only an axoneme enveloped within the plasmalemma of the spermatozoon. The present findings were discussed in relation to other relevant studies. It was concluded that the general ultrastucture of the E. jayakari spermatozoon conforms to that reported to be typical of squamates.

  12. Mitochondrial genome of Pogona vitticepes (Reptilia; Agamidae): control region duplication and the origin of Australasian agamids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Sayed A M; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2005-02-14

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence for an Australian agamid Pogona vitticepes was determined. Twenty-two tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, thirteen protein-coding genes, and two control regions were identified in this mitochondrial genome. The second control region was inserted between NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 and 6 genes. The duplication of the control region was found in all Australasian agamids examined and was not found in other Asian or African taxa. The two control regions had nearly identical sequences within species but they were divergent among species, suggesting their concerted sequence evolution. Phylogenetic analyses including divergence time estimation without assuming the molecular clock suggested that the duplication of the control region occurred on a lineage leading to the Australasian agamids 25-45 million years ago after their divergence from a Southeast Asian Physignathus cocincinus. Our finding thus supports the recent dispersal origin of Australasian agamids in connection with plate tectonic movement of Australia to the proximity of Southeast Asia.

  13. Current status of Marsh Crocodiles Crocodylus palustris (Reptilia: Crocodylidae in Vishwamitri River, Vadodara City, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vyas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Data presented here is based on a three year study (2008-2010 on a population of Mugger Crocodylus palustris inhabiting Vishwamitri River near Vadodara City, Gujarat State, India. In total, 155 Muggers were counted in the 25km river stretch during 2010. In all, 40 burrows were observed along the river bank, and the same were clumped in certain sections of the river. Muggers fed eight species of birds, and domestic livestock in addition to scavenging. Eight instances of human-crocodile conflicts were observed including four human causalities. A total 90 Muggers were rescued from the urban areas and the same were relocated elsewhere in the river system. Various types of threats to Mugger were also noticed including habitat loss, alteration and soil erosion and mortality due to rail traffic. The present study suggests further research to propose strategies to conserve this population.

  14. Ophidian fauna (Reptilia, Serpentes from the Uppermost Miocene of Algora (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyndlar, Z.

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil snakes from the Uppermost Miocene (NM 13 of Algora (Guadalajara, Spain are described, The fol1owing forms have been recognized: Scolecophidia indet., Elaphe algorensis sp. nov. and Hispanophis coronelloideus gen. et sp, nov. (Colubridae, Naja iberica sp. nov. (Elapidae, Viperidae indet. This faunistic assemblage, being uncomparable with any other snake fauna of Europe, includes both endemic forms (colubrids as well as close relatives of North African species (Naja iberica sp. nov., may be also vipers.

    Se estudian los restos de ofidios del Mioceno terminal (MN 13 de Algora (Guadalajara, España. Se han detectado las siguientes formas, Scolecophidia indet., Elaphe algorensis sp. nov. e Hispanophis coronelloideus gen. sp, nov. (Colubridae, Naja iberica sp. nov. (Elapidae, y Viperidae indet. Esta asociación faunística no es comparable a las restantes faunas de ofidios conocidas de otras localidades europeas, e incluye tanto formas endémicas (Colubridae, como especies evolutivamente emparentadas con formas norteafricanas (Naja iberica sp. nov., quizás también las víboras.

  15. First Record of Laticauda semifasciata (Reptilia: Squamata: Elapidae: Laticaudinae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park, Jaejin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese sea snake Laticauda semifasciata (Reinwardt in Schlegel, 1837 is newly reported from Korean waters based on three specimens collected from Jeju Island, Korea, in August, September, and November 2015. This is the first time that the genus Laticauda and subfamily Laticaudinae has been reported from Korean waters. The subfamily Laticaudinae has ventrals that are four to five times wider than the adjacent dorsals, which are unlike the ventrals that are similar or up to two times wider than adjacent dorsals in the subfamily Hydrophiinae. Laticauda semifasciata is distinct from other species because it has three prefrontals and its rostrals are horizontally divided into two. As the result of this report, four species (L. semifasciata, Hydrophis (Pelamis platurus, Hydrophis cyanocinctus, and H. melanocephalus of sea snakes have been reported in Korean waters.

  16. Status and diversity of snakes (Reptilia: Squamata: Serpentes at the Chittagong University Campus in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Ahsan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted on the status and diversity of snakes of the Chittagong University Campus (CUC between September 2013 and December 2014, and on preserved snake specimens of museums of CUC (Department of Zoology, University of Chittagong; Institute of Marine Sciences and Fisheries, University of Chittagong; and Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, University of Chittagong.  Thirty-six species of snakes belonging to 22 genera and five families (Typhlopidae, Pythonidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Viperidae were recorded from CUC during the study period. Colubridae comprised the highest (24 species i.e., 66.67% number of species and Pythonidae the lowest (1 species. Checkered Keelback Xenochrophis piscator was the most common snake and the rarest was the Bengalese Kukri Snake Oligodon dorsalis belonging to the family Colubridae.  Among venomous snakes Banded Krait Bungarus fasciatus was the most common snake and Black Krait Bungarus niger was the most rare.  Their status in CUC has been assessed. 

  17. Spectroscopic Analysis of a Theropod Dinosaur (Reptilia, Archosauria from the Ipubi Formation, Araripe Basin, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Hermínio da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araripe Sedimentary Basin is known by the excellence of its fossils, regarding the preservation, diversity, and quantity. Here, we present a spectroscopic analysis using several experimental techniques (X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis applied in small fragments of bones from the posterior members of a theropod dinosaur. The results agree regarding the different composition of the stone matrix and the fossilized bone, indicating a partial substitution of the material by elements present in the depositional environment. However, differently from what is believed to occur, there is evidence that pyritization is not the only mechanism of fossilization for a specimen of Ipubi formation, but calcification, additionally, plays an important role in the fossil production of this Formation.

  18. [Transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In the of period 2003-2007, a total of 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The material for the present study was a collection of reptiles owned by the "Animals" Ltd from Swietochłowice (Upper Silesia, Poland), specialising in import of exotic animals to Poland, as well as the reptile collections of private breeders. The reptiles that turned out to be the most heavily infected with ticks were the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius and they were imported to Poland from Ghana, Africa. Exotic reptiles are also imported from Southern Europe, Asia and Central America. The presently reported study helped to confirm the fact of transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland. A total of 2104 tick specimens, representing all stages of development (males, females, nymphs, larvae), were collected. They represented species of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Dönitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum Schulze, 1941, Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma spp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Ambylomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. The overall prevalence of infection was 77.6%. The highest prevalence value (81.2%) was observed on pythons (Python regius) and (78.7%) on monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus). The highest number of ticks was collected from Python regius and Varanus exanthematicus. The mean infection intensity for V. exanthematicus was 7.6 ticks per host, while for P. regius the intensity reached 4.7 ticks. The most abundant tick transferred to Poland on a host was an African tick, Amblyomma latum. Fifty eight specimens of monitor lizards (V. salvator and V. exanthematicus) and 92 specimens pythons (P. regius) were examined, with detailed descriptions of where the parasite was feeding on the body of the host. Among the 434 specimens of ticks collected from the monitor lizards, the majority were attached on the host's legs (40.5%), on the trunk (29.3%), on the head (20.3%), with fewest on the tail (9.9%). Also, 430 specimens of ticks were collected from the bodies of pythons. They mostly parasitized along the whole length of the back (54.4%) and on the stomach side of the trunk (29.8%), less frequently in the area of the cloaca (5.6%), around the eyes (3.7%), in the nostril openings (0.9%) and on the remainder of the head (5.6%). On the hosts, ticks were found at different development stages, but adult development stages dominated. The most frequent were males (999 specimens), then adult females (552 specimens), nymphs (508 specimens) and larvae (45 specimens). During the research, 13 cases of anomalies of morphological structure were confirmed for ticks Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma latum and Hyalomma aegyptium. Asymmetries and deformations of the general body shape were observed, as were anomalies concerning structures on the surface of the body and anomalies of the legs. For the first time in Poland, epidemiological tests were carried out in the direction of the infection of exotic ticks gathered from reptiles with micro-organisms which pose a threat for the health of people and animals. For this purpose, molecular techniques - polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing were used. The isolates from 345 ticks, were examined for the presence of DNA of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, which is the etiological factor in human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and Rickettsia spp. from the spotted fever group, causing human rickettsiosis. This study confirmed the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in two ticks of Amblyomma flavomaculatum (constituting 0.6% of all the ticks investigated) feeding on Varanus exanthematicus. None of the tick specimens, however, contained Rickettsia spp. DNA. The expanding phenomenon of the import of exotic reptiles in Poland and Central Europe is important for parasitological and epidemiological reasons and therefore requires monitoring and wide-ranging prophylactic activities to prevent the inflow of exotic parasites to Poland.

  19. ANTHROPOGENIC IMPACTS ON YELLOW-SPOTTED RIVER TURTLE Podocnemis unifilis (REPTILIA: PODOCNEMIDIDAE FROM THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Santos ARRAES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este estudio fue investigar la influencia de los impactos antropogénicos en nidos de Podocnemis unifilis en un tramo del Río Falsino, se investigó en dos reservas forestales y tramo urbano del río Araguari, Estado de Amapá, en Amazonia (Brasil. Un total de 180 nidos fueron localizados y 89,4 % estaban en las áreas de reservas forestales, pero sólo el 10,6 % en las zonas urbanas. En el río Falsino, hubo desove patrón, el número de nidos se correlacionó con la longitud y la anchura de los sitios de anidación. En Río Araguari, nidos de P. unifilis se encuentran generalmente en lugares con vegetación circundante de hasta 5 metros de altura, distancia mínima de 120 metros de residencial y de inmediato o después de los lugares de mayor explotación de los guijarros. En el río Falsino, aunque las hembras han demostrado huevos más pequeños, los recién nacidos fueron mayores y la puntuación cuerpo también es mayor que en los recién nacidos del río Araguari. En la región del Río Araguari, aproximadamente el 80 % de los nidos fueron depredados, debido a la gran colección de huevos para la alimentación. Se observó que la presión de caza en las tortugas adultas ha sido intensa. Aunque es una de las áreas a ser bosques protegidos, los impactos humanos fueron similares a los de las zonas urbanas, lo que indica la necesidad de implementar programas de protección para la conservación de P. unifilis .

  20. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. II. Gekkonidae, Phyllodactylidae, Sphaerodactylidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A

    2015-07-02

    I present distribution data of all geckos (Gekkonidae, Phyllodactylidae and Sphaerodactylidae) known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 19 species, belonging to nine genera. This represents six more taxa than previously reported for these families. Data were based on the direct examination of 23,094 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian museums. Most species (68.4%) are endemic to the Amazonia; non-endemic species are mainly associated with open dry (semideciduous) forest or open vegetation (savanna) enclaves in Amazonia. As a whole, three taxa are widespread in Amazonia, two are restricted to eastern Amazonia, two to western Amazonia, three to northern Amazonia (either widespread or restriced to parts of the Guiana region), one to southern Amazonia, one to southwestern Amazonia, and three to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Additionally, four species have unique distributions and four species have a distribution that is congruent with one of the areas of endemism recognized for other organisms (birds and primates), of which two occur in the area of endemism of Guiana, one in Inambari, and one in Tapajós.

  1. The Herpetofauna (Amphibia and Reptilia of Vrachanska Planina Mountains - Species Composition, Distribution and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV NAUMOV

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vrachanska Planina Mts. is located in northwestern Bulgaria and is a relatively well-defined part of Stara Planina Mts. So far, no comprehensive studies on the species composition and distribution of the herpetofauna of Vrachanska Planina Mts. have been published. The current study reports 8 new species of amphibians and reptiles, which are new for the region and confirms all previously known 19 species. All species localities have been mapped in the UTM-grid (1x1 km. The spatial distribution, as well as the vertical distribution and the species richness are analyzed. The importance of the existing protected areas in Vrachanska Planina Mts. and protected Natura2000 zones for the conservation of herpetofauna are discussed. Some potential threats to amphibians and reptiles in the research area (such as drying-up of water basins, fires and road mortality are reported.

  2. Descrição morfológica do sistema respiratório e do coração do jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare, DAUDIN, 1802) proveniente de zoocriatório

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Ana Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Com este estudo objetivou-se descrever os aspectos anatômicos e histológicos do sistema respiratório e do coração do jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare), proveniente de zoocriadouro. Para tanto, estudou-se13exemplares da espécie, os quais foram perfundidos e conservados em solução de formaldeído a 10% e submetidos às técnicas anatômicas específicas. O sistema respiratório e o coração foram separados e amostras colhidas e submetidas a procedimentos histológicos específicos. Macroscopicamente a ...

  3. A new species of Mathevotaenia (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae parasitizing Tropidurus spinulosus (Reptilia, Squamata from northeastern Argentina Una especie nueva de Mathevotaenia (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae parásita de Tropidurus spinulosus (Reptilia, Squamata del noreste de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lía Inés Lunaschi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mathevotaenia chaquensis n. sp. (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae, Linstowiinae from a Spiny Lava Lizard, Tropidurus spinulosus, collected in Chaco Province, Argentina, is described. This is the second species of Mathevotaenia described from Neotropical reptiles. The new species is mainly characterized by having a relatively small strobila, 24 mm in total length, with about 100 craspedote proglottids, and 19-24 testes per proglottid. Among the South American species of Mathevotaenia, M. argentinensis is most similar to the new species by having similar body length and number of testes, but the major differences between both species include the size of suckers, neck, proglottids, testes and egg capsules, and the shape of the genital atrium and ovary (with 10-13 lobules on each side in M. argentinensis,, and 4-7 lobules in M. chaquensis n. sp.. A key to the species of the South American members of the Mathevotaenia Akumyan, 1946 is presented.Mathevotaenia chaquensis n. sp. (Cestoda, Anoplocephalidae, Linstowiinae es descrita parasitando al lagarto de los quebrachales, Tropidurus spinulosus, procedente de la Provincia del Chaco, Argentina. Esta es la segunda especie de Mathevotaenia descrita parasitando reptiles Neotropicales. La nueva especie está caracterizada principalmente por tener un estróbilo relativamente pequeño, 24 mm de largo, con aproximadamente 100 proglótides craspedotas y 19-24 testículos por proglótide. Entre las especies sudamericanas de Mathevotaenia, M. argentinensis es la más semejante a la nueva especie por presentar similar longitud del cuerpo y número de testículos, pero difieren en el tamaño de las ventosas, cuello, proglótides, testículos y huevos. Además difieren en la forma del atrio genital y del ovario (10-13 lóbulos a cada lado enM. argentinensis vs. 4-7 lóbulos en M. chaquensis n. sp.. Se presenta una clave para la determinación de las especies sudamericanas de Mathevotaenia Akumyan, 1946.

  4. Description of a new ascaridoid parasite of Bothrops jararaca Wied (Reptilia, Ophidia in Brazil Descrição de um novo ascarídeo parasito de Bothrops jararaca Wied (Reptilia, Ophidia no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liege R. Siqueira

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Ophidascaris Baylis, 1920 is described on the basis of specimens recovered from the pit viper Bothrops jararaca Wied, 1824 in Brazil. The new species referred here was compared to other of the genus that are the closest. The differentiation was based on reliable morphological characters, mainly on what refers to the spicular length, number and distribution of caudal papillae, location of the vulvar opening, eggs size and aspect of the labial indentations. Moreover, female specimens are the only to possess a most prominent and characteristic post-anal tubercle-like structure and when analyzed together with the males, that show a great number of pre-cloacal papillae, the presence of an unpaired papilla and also of a less conspicuous post-cloacal tubercle-like structure, permit the prompt identification of the new species.Uma nova espécie de Ophidascaris Baylis, 1920 é descrita, com base em exemplares parasitos de jararaca, Bothrops jararaca Wied, 1824 no Brasil. A nova espécie agora descrita foi comparada a outras do gênero que lhe são as mais próximas. A diferenciação foi baseada em caracteres morfológicos consistentes, principalmente nos que dizem respeito ao tamanho dos espículos, número e distribuição de papilas caudais, localização da abertura vulvar, tamanho dos ovos e aspecto das indentações labiais. Além disso, os exemplares fêmeas são os únicos no gênero a apresentarem uma estrutura em forma de tubérculo pós-anal bastante característica e proeminente, quando analisados junto aos exemplares machos, nos quais existe um grande número de papilas pré-cloacais, presença de papila caudal ímpar e, também, da estrutura pós-cloacal em forma de tubérculo, embora menos evidente que nas fêmeas, permitem a pronta identificação da espécie nova.

  5. Registro nuevo del escorpión mexicano Heloderma horridum (Reptilia: Helodermidae en Durango, México New report of Mexican scorpion Heloderma horridum (Reptilia: Helodermidae in Durango State, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Muñiz-Martínez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El escorpión mexicano Heloderma horridum es una de las 2 especies de lagartijas venenosas que se conocen en el mundo; hay 3 subespecies, todas en una distribución muy localizada, a lo largo de la costa del Pacífico. En la parte suroeste de Durango, en el río Presidio, un grupo de técnicos topógrafos observaron un ejemplar de Heloderma horridum y tomaron fotografías, las cuales aportaron al autor de esta nota, quien por medio de claves determinó la especie. Se trata de una especie que se considera amenazada dentro de la NOM-ECOL-059-2001, razón por la cual no se recolectó. Este registro amplía la distribución de la especie hacia el suroeste de la sierra Madre Occidental y confirma su presencia en el estado de Durango, México.The Beaded Mexican Reptile is one of the 2 species recognized as venomous reptiles in the world. There are known 3 subspecies of Heloderma horridum, all show a very localized distribution, along the Pacific Coast. At the Southwestern part of Durango, this species was seen at the river Presidio. One specimen of Heloderma horridum, was observed and photographed, by a group of topography technical, who donated the pictures. By using taxonomic keys, the specimen was determined as Heloderma horridum. This species is registered in NOM-ECOL-059-2001, and is considered Amazing species, so the specimen was not collected. This is new registration, broads the geographical distribution of this taxon towards the southwestern of the Sierra Madre Occidental and its presence in Durango state, Mexico.

  6. Ex situ Annual Egg—Laying Cycles of Rhinoclemmys melanosterna, R. diademata and their Hybrids (Reptilia: Testudines: Emydidae: Batagurinae Ciclos de postura anual ex situ de Rhinoclemmys melanosterna, R. diademata y de sus hibridos (Reptilia: Testudines: Emydidae: Batagurinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Perilla Jaime

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available R. melanosterna, R. diademata and their hybrids (R. melanosterna x R. diademata present annual continuous egg-laying cycles with maximum frequency during the rainy season. The period of maximal annual egg-laying for hybrid R. melanosterna x R. diademata is earlier than its parents. Aparently there is not direct relation between the ad libitum food offer and Rhinoclemmys sp egg-laying cycles.Registros históricos de postura ex situ de huevos de tortugas del género Rhinoclemmys en la Estación de Biología Tropical Roberto Franco (EBTRF, correspondientes a los años 1991-1999, fueron analizados en relación con factores climáticos locales. Rhinoclemmys melanosterna, Rhinoclemmys diademata y sus híbridos presentan ciclos de postura continuos durante el año con máxima frecuencia durante la estación lluviosa. La época de postura máxima durante un ciclo anual del híbrido R. melanosterna x R. diademata es más temprana que la de sus progenitores de origen. No parece existir relación directa entre la oferta de alimento ad libitum y los ciclos de postura de Rhinoclemmys sp.

  7. Frugivoria e dispersão de sementes pelo lagarto teiú Tupinambis merianae (Reptilia: Teiidae Frugivory and seed dispersal by the tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae Reptilia: Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Rodrigo de Castro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Os lagartos teiús possuem uma dieta generalista, podendo agir como importantes dispersores de sementes em florestas semidecíduas do sudeste do Brasil. Foram estudadas a frugivoria e a dispersão de sementes de lagartos teiús usando animais em cativeiro, através da oferta de frutos de uma floresta semidecídua. Frutos de trinta espécies vegetais foram oferecidos aos lagartos em cativeiro, com diâmetro variando de 0,81 a 10,0 cm. Não foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas na germinação entre as sementes que passaram pelo trato digestivo do lagarto e as controle de Eugenia uniflora (chi²= 0.69, P>0.50, Genipa americana (chi²= 6.4, P>0.975, Cereus peruvianus (chi²= 0.018, P>0.10, e Solanum viarum (chi²= 6.23, P>0.975. O tempo de retenção da semente no tubo digestivo do teiú variou de 22 a 23 h para Solanum lycocarpum e 43 a 44 h para Syagrus romanzoffiana. Nossos resultados indicam que o lagarto teiú tem potencial para agir como um importante dispersor de sementes nos trópicos.Tegu lizards have a generalist diet and may play an important role as seed dispersers in semideciduous forests in south-east Brazil. We studied the frugivory and seed dispersal of tegu lizards using captive animals and offering wild fruits from a semideciduous forest. Thirty fruit species were eaten by the lizards in captivity, ranging from 0.81 to 10.0 cm (fruit diameter. Even large fruit adapted to dispersal by large mammals were swallowed (ex. Syagrus oleracea. There were no statistical differences in seed germination between seeds that passed through the lizard gut and the control in Eugenia uniflora (chi2 = 0.69, P>0.50, Genipa americana (chi2 = 6.4, P>0.975, Cereus peruvianus (chi2 = 0.018, P>0.10, and Solanum viarum (chi2 = 6.23, P>0.975. Seed retention time in the tegu gut ranged from 2224 h (Solanum lycocarpum to 4344 h (for Syagrus romanzoffiana. Our results indicate that tegu lizards have a potential to be an important seed dispersers in the Neotropics.

  8. Caracterización citogenética de la tortuga sabanera Podocnemis vogli (reptilia: testudinata: podocnemididae Cytogenetic characterization of the Savannah Sideneck Turtle Podocnemis vogli (Reptilia: Testudinata: Podocnemididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno ML.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron siete ejemplares de Podocnemis vogli, tres fueron colectados en las localidades de Puerto López y Puerto Gaitán, Meta, Colombia; cuatro carecen de datos de localidad. Todos los ejemplares presentaron un complemento constituido por 28 cromosomas, sin cromosomas sexuales, que se organizaron en tres grupos: el primero compuesto por cuatro pares submetacéntricos y uno subtelocéntrico, el segundo grupo por seis pares metacéntricos y el último grupo por tres pares acrocéntricos. Esta organización difiere de la descripción previa realizada por Rhodin et al. (1978, en la cual se encontraron dos pares acrocéntricos. Se describen los patrones de bandas C, G, NOR y Q para la especie. Las regiones organizadoras nucleolares se localizaron en el primer par cromosómico en una banda intercalar en brazos cortos, que se puede visualizar en interfase como uno o dos nucleolos. La técnica de bandas C permitió ubicar las regiones heterocromáticas de los cromosomas asociadas a regiones pericentroméricas. Se identificaron algunos polimorfismos heterocromáticos (bandas intercalares en los cromosomas 1, 2, 3 y 7, los cuales permiten suponer la existencia de marcadores a nivel cromosómico, que pueden estar asociados con diferentes poblaciones de P. vogli dentro de su distribución geográfica.Seven specimens of Podocnemis vogli were studied; three were collected at Puerto López and Puerto Gaitán in the Meta Department of Colombia, four lacks collecting data. All specimens presented a complement consisting of 28 chromosomes without sexual chromosomes. The first group was composed by four submetacentric pairs and one subtelocentric, the second group by six metacentric pairs and the third group by three acrocentric pairs, differing from the previous description by Rhodin et al. (1978 who found two acrocentric pairs. C, G, NOR and Q band patterns are described for the species. Nucleolar Organizer Regions were localized in the first chromosome pair in an intercalary band inserted in the short arms which could be visualized in interphase as one or two nucleoli. The C band technique allowed heterochromatic regions to be located in chromosomes associated with pericentromeric regions. Some heterochromatic polymorphisms (intercalary bands were identified in chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 7, leading to the supposition that there are chromosome markers which could be associated with different P. vogli populations within their geographic distribution.

  9. Comportamento alimentar e dieta de Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron em cativeiro (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae Feeding behavior and diet of Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron in captivity (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio de Barros Molina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1985 the biology and behavior of Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 at São Paulo Zoo is being studied. Feeding behavior is divided in five phases (foraging, approach, capture, dilaceration and ingestion, but not necessarily all of them happen. During phase 1 the food or prey seems to be visually located. During phase 2 the food itens and stationaty preys are approached and examined by olfaction. Moving preys are pursued and there is no olfactory examination. During phase 3 the food is captured by suction. When food is bigger than turtle mouth it is dilacerated by one or both forefeet used alternately (phase 4. Ingestion is accomplished by gradual suction (phase 5. Intra and inter-specific cleptoparasitism was observed. Success in capture and ingestion of food seems not be dependent on species or size of the turtle. Adults, young, and hatchlings of P. hilarii are primarily carnivorous and vegetables were rarely eaten.

  10. Four new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Emoia spp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Austin, Christopher C.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG), and their feces were examined for coccidians. Species included 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white-spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) Species of Eimeria (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 μm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 μm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian was also shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. imparfrom the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidicepsfrom PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicaudawere subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 μm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria emoia n. sp. from Em. longicauda from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall, 29.2 × 15.7 μm, L/W 1.9. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. These are the first eimerians reported from Emoia spp. and they add to our growing knowledge of the coccidian fauna of scincid lizards of the South Pacific.

  11. Radiation, multiple dispersal and parallelism in the skinks, Chalcides and Sphenops (Squamata: Scincidae), with comments on Scincus and Scincopus and the age of the Sahara Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, S; Arnold, E N; Geniez, Ph; Roca, J; Mateo, J A

    2008-03-01

    Phylogenetic analysis using up to 1325 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 179 specimens and 30 species of Chalcides, Sphenops, Eumeces, Scincopus and Scincus indicates that Sphenops arose twice independently within Chalcides. It is consequently synonymized with that genus. Chalcides in this broader sense originated in Morocco, diversifying into four main clades about 10 Ma, after which some of its lineages dispersed widely to cover an area 40 times as large. Two separate lineages invaded the Canary Islands and at least five main lineages colonized southern Europe. At least five more spread across northern Africa, one extending into southwest Asia. Elongate bodies with reduced limbs have evolved at least four times in Chalcides, mesic 'grass-swimmers' being produced in one case and extensive adaptation to life in loose desert sand in two others. In clade, Chalcides striatus colonized SW Europe from NW Africa 2.6 Ma and C. chalcides mainland Italy 1.4 Ma, both invasions being across water, while C. c. vittatus reached Sardinia more recently, perhaps anthropogenically, and C. guentheri spread 1200km further east to Israel. C. minutus is a composite, with individuals from the type locality forming a long independent lineage and the remaining ones investigated being most closely related to C. mertensi. In the Northern clade, C. boulengeri and C. sepsoides spread east through sandy habitats north of the Sahara about 5 Ma, the latter reaching Egypt. C. bedriagai invaded Spain around the same time, perhaps during the Messinian period when the Mediterranean was dry, and shows considerable diversification. Although it is currently recognized as one species, the C. ocellatus clade exhibits as much phylogenetic depth as the other main clades of Chalcides, having at least six main lineages. These have independently invaded Malta and Sardinia from Tunisia and also southwest Arabia C. o. humilis appears to have spread over 4000 km through the Sahel, south of the Sahara quite recently, perhaps in the Pleistocene. In the Western clade of Chalcides, C. delislei appears to have dispersed in a similar way. There were also two invasions of the Canary Islands: one around 5 Ma by C. simonyi, and the other about 7 Ma by the ancestor of C. viridanus+C. sexlineatus. C. montanus was believed to be related to C. lanzai of the Northern clade, but in the mtDNA tree it is placed within C. polylepis of the Western clade, although this may possibly be an artifact of introgression. The Eumeces schneideri group, Scincopus and Scincus form a clade separate from Chalcides. Within this clade, the geographically disjunct E. schneideri group is paraphyletic. One of its members, E. algeriensis is the sister taxon to Scincopus, and Scincus may also be related to these taxa. The phylogeny suggests Scincopus entered desert conditions in Africa, up to 9.6 Ma and the same may have been true of Scincus up to 11.7 Ma. Scincus appears to have diversified and spread into Arabia around 6 Ma. Dates of origin and divergence of these skinks, desert Chalcides and other squamates agree with recent geological evidence that the Sahara is at least 5-7 My old. The subspecies Chalcides viridanus coeruleopunctatus is upgraded to the species level as C. coeruleopunctatus stat nov., on the basis of its large genetic divergence from C. v. viridanus.

  12. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Duszynski, Donald W; Bush, Sarah E; Fisher, Robert N; Austin, Christopher C

    2013-10-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  13. Reproducción y dieta de una población de Mabuya dorsivittata (Squamata, Scincidae en Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Aun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo fueron estudiados los aspectos reproductivos y la dieta de Mabuya dorsivittata, una especie de lagarto vivíparo de la localidad de Alto Alegre (Córdoba. La hembra de menor tamaño, con folículos yemados midió de LHC 41 mm. El tamaño de la camada varió entre 5 – 10 embriones por hembra. Los machos de menor tamaño con espermatozoos en los testículos midieron de LHC 31 mm. Hubo una correlación positiva y significativa entre el peso de las gónadas versus el estadio reproductivo (b= 0,524, R= 0,254, P< 0,001. En los machos hubo una correlación positiva y significativa entre el volumen testicular y el estadio reproductivo (R2= 0,851, b= 0,929, P< 0,002. El incremento de cuerpos grasos en hembras y machos se relacionó con el periodo de gestación, especialmente en las hembras, decreciendo en las últimas fases, indicando un costo energético alto en los últimos meses del crecimiento embrionario. En cuanto a la dieta, las hembras se alimentaron principalmente de Araneae (suelo como ítem fundamental, y de Scarabeidae, Araneae (otras y Acridiidae como ítem secundario y los machos se alimentaran de Isopoda, Acridiidae y Araneae (otras como ítem fundamental y de Tettigonidae como ítem secundario. Hubo diferencias significativas en la selección trófica entre sexos.

  14. Four New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Emoia spp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Austin, Christopher C; Fisher, Robert N

    2017-02-01

    Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG), and their feces were examined for coccidians. Species included 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white-spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) Species of Eimeria (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 μm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 μm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian was also shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. impar from the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidiceps from PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicauda were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 μm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria emoia n. sp. from Em. longicauda from PNG were cylindroidal with a bilayered wall, 29.2 × 15.7 μm, L/W 1.9. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. These are the first eimerians reported from Emoia spp. and they add to our growing knowledge of the coccidian fauna of scincid lizards of the South Pacific.

  15. First Record of the Poorly Known Skink Sphenomorphus oligolepis (Boulenger, 1914) (Reptilia:Squamata:Scincidae) from Seram Island, Maluku Province, Indonesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    sven MeCke; Max kieCkBUsCH; Mark osHea; Hinrich kaiser

    2016-01-01

    Based on four specimens discovered in the collection of the natural History Museum, London, United kingdom, we present a new distribution record for the skink Sphenomorphus oligolepis for seram island, Maluku Province, Indonesia. This find constitutes the westernmost record for the species and extends its range by over 800 km. the species was heretofore only known from apparently isolated mainland new Guinean populations.

  16. Pulmonary infection in two sympatric lizards, Mabuya arajara (Scincidae) and Anolis brasiliensis (Polychrotidae) from a cloud forest in Chapada do Araripe, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, S C; Ferreira, F S; Brito, S V; Teles, D A; Ávila, R W; Almeida, W O; Anjos, L A; Guarnieri, M C

    2012-11-01

    The parameters of infection by lung parasites from two sympatric lizards, Mabuya arajara and Anolis brasiliensis, from the Atlantic Rainforest of the lower slope of Chapada do Araripe in Northeastern Brazil were analyzed between September, 2009 and July, 2010. A total of 202 lizards were collected. 125 specimens were from Mabuya arajara and 77 from Anolis brasiliensis. M. arajara was infected by the pentastomid Raillietiella mottae while A. brasiliensis was infected by the nematode Rhabdias sp., with an overall prevalence of 1.6% and 28.6%, respectively. The mean intensity of infection by Rhabdias sp. was 3.63 ± 2.58 (range 1-15). The body size and sex of lizards did not influence the intensity of infection by Rhabdias sp. The overall prevalence was also not different between males and females hosts in A. brasiliensis. Both Anolis brasiliensis and Mabuya arajara represent a new host to Rhabdias sp. and Raillietiella mottae, respectively.

  17. Geographic distribution and parturition of mabuya arajara Rebouças-Spieker, 1981 (Squamata, sauria, scincidae) from Ceará, northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Mabuya arajara Rebouças-Spieker, 1981 has been considered an endemic species from the southern of state of Ceará, restricted to the Deciduous Dry Forests in the slopes of Plateau of Araripe (Chapada do Araripe). Here, we present an updated distributional map for the species and demonstrate that its range is not restricted as formerly believed. In addition, we had an opportunity to observe a gravid female and we describe aspects regarding parturition and number of offspring for the species.

  18. Pulmonary infection in two sympatric lizards, Mabuya arajara (Scincidae and Anolis brasiliensis (Polychrotidae from a cloud forest in Chapada do Araripe, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SC. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The parameters of infection by lung parasites from two sympatric lizards, Mabuya arajara and Anolis brasiliensis, from the Atlantic Rainforest of the lower slope of Chapada do Araripe in Northeastern Brazil were analyzed between September, 2009 and July, 2010. A total of 202 lizards were collected. 125 specimens were from Mabuya arajara and 77 from Anolis brasiliensis. M. arajara was infected by the pentastomid Raillietiella mottae while A. brasiliensis was infected by the nematode Rhabdias sp., with an overall prevalence of 1.6% and 28.6%, respectively. The mean intensity of infection by Rhabdias sp. was 3.63 ± 2.58 (range 1-15. The body size and sex of lizards did not influence the intensity of infection by Rhabdias sp. The overall prevalence was also not different between males and females hosts in A. brasiliensis. Both Anolis brasiliensis and Mabuya arajara represent a new host to Rhabdias sp. and Raillietiella mottae, respectively.

  19. A new malaria parasite Plasmodium (Sauramoeba) heischi in skinks (Mabuya striata) from Nairobi, with a brief discussion of the distribution of malaria parasites in the family Scincidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnham, P C; Telford, S R

    1984-11-01

    A new species of malaria parasite, Plasmodium (Sauramoeba) heischi, is described from African skinks (Mabuya striata). Eleven individuals of 90 specimens collected in Nairobi were found to be infected. The new parasite is a large species, characterized by spindle-shaped gametocytes, the female often with a subterminal nucleus. The schizonts produce up to 65 nuclei and cause great hypertrophy and distortion of the host cell. Although similar to P. (Sauramoeba) giganteum in dimensions and merozoite numbers, P. heischi is easily distinguished by gametocyte and schizont shapes.

  20. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan sp. n. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bilayered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi sp. n. from both L. smaragdina we collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colorless, bilayered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but 1–4 polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of 2 valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules. PMID:24048748

  1. A reinvestigation of phylogeny and divergence times of the Ablepharus kitaibelii species complex (Sauria, Scincidae) based on mtDNA and nuDNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtanioti, Eirini; Kapli, Paschalia; Ilgaz, Çetin; Kumlutaş, Yusuf; Avcı, Aziz; Ahmadzadeh, Faraham; Crnobrnja-Isailović, Jelka; Gherghel, Iulian; Lymberakis, Petros; Poulakakis, Nikos

    2016-10-01

    Morphological and DNA data support that the East Mediterranean snake-eyed skink Ablepharus kitaibelii represents a species complex that includes four species A. kitaibelii, A. budaki, A. chernovi, and A. rueppellii, highlighting the need of its taxonomic reevaluation. Here, we used Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods to estimate the phylogenetic relationships of all members of the complex based on two mitochondrial (cyt b, 16S rRNA) and two nuclear markers (MC1R, and NKTR) and using Chalcides, Eumeces, and Eutropis as outgroups. The biogeographic history of the complex was also investigated through the application of several phylogeographic (BEAST) and biogeographic (BBM) analyses. Paleogeographic and paleoclimatic data were used to support the inferred phylogeographic patterns. The A. kitaibelli species complex exhibits high genetic diversity, revealing cases of hidden diversity and cases of non-monophyletic species such as A. kitaibelii and A. budaki. Our results indicate that A. pannonicus branches off first and a group that comprises specimens of A. kitaibelli and A. budaki from Kastelorizo Island group (southeast Greece) and southwest Turkey, respectively is differentiated from the rest A. kitaibelli and A. budaki populations and may represent a new species. The estimated divergence times place the origin of the complex in the Middle Miocene (∼16Mya) and the divergence of most currently recognized species in the Late Miocene. The inferred ancestral distribution suggests that the complex originated in Anatolia, supposing that several vicariance and dispersal events that are related with the formation of the Mid-Aegean Trench, the Anatolian Diagonal and the orogenesis of the mountain chains in southern and eastern Anatolia have led to current distribution pattern of A. kitaibelii species complex in the Balkans and Middle East.

  2. Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Seville, R. Scott; Duszynski, Donald W.; Bush, Sarah E.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875, from emerald tree skinks, Lamprolepis smaragdina (Lesson) are described from specimens collected in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Philippines. Oöcysts of Eimeria nuiailan n. sp. from the only L. smaragdina from PNG are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 23.7 × 19.1 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 11.9 × 7.0 μm, L/W 1.7, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is present as a compact mass of granules. Sporozoites are elongate, 14.6 × 2.6 μm, and contain anterior and posterior refractile bodies with a nucleus between them. Oöcysts of Eimeria auffenbergi n. sp. from L. smaragdina collected in the Philippines are ovoidal, with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 19.9 × 15.8 μm, L/W 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but one to four polar granules are present. Sporocysts are ovoidal to ellipsoidal, 10.3 × 5.8 μm, L/W 1.8, and the wall is composed of two valves joined by a longitudinal suture; neither Stieda nor sub-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum is composed of dispersed granules.

  3. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the Solomon ground skink, Sphenomorphus solomonis (Boulenger) (Sauria: Scincidae) from Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September 1990 and November 1991, 19 Sphenomorphus spp. skinks, including nine S. jobiense, three S. simus, and seven Solomon ground skinks, S. solomonis (Boulenger), were collected from Madang and Morobe Provinces, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and examined for coccidia. A single S. solomonis was found to be infected with a new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875. Oöcysts of Eimeria perkinsae n. sp. are ellipsoidal with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure 18.6 × 14.7 μm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a fragmented polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 8.9 × 6.4 μm, L/W 1.4; neither Stieda, sub-Stieda or para-Stieda bodies are present; a sporocyst residuum consisted of a loose cluster of granules dispersed between sporozoites. Sporozoites are comma-shaped with spheroidal anterior and posterior refractile bodies. This represents the first report of coccidia from this skink genus.

  4. Multivariate analyses reveal a new assemblage of diverse and small archosauriforms (Reptilia, Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi Bhat, Mohd; Ray, Sanghamitra; Mohan Datta, Pradipendra

    2017-04-01

    The study is based on a large collection of vertebrate microfossils collected from the Upper Triassic Tiki Formation of the Rewa Gondwana basin of India, which is a mud-dominated fluvial succession. About 8600 kg of mudrocks from the Tiki Formation were screen washed to yield 1865 vertebrate microfossils, of which 67% are isolated teeth. Of these, there are about 450 well-preserved teeth, which are leaf-shaped, slightly recurved and have subtriangular crowns with expanded and asymmetric bases, and distinct denticles both on the posterior or anterior carinae. The morphology of these teeth suggests that these belong to Archosauriformes (Heckert, 2004; Irmis et al., 2007). Since the teeth were found isolated, without being associated with any other skeletal elements, it is not possible to ascertain their taxonomic position up to the generic and species level. However, based on their distinct dental attributes, twelve morphotypes are identified, of which five show similarity with the teeth of the basal saurischian dinosaurs. Principal Component and Canonical Variate analyses (PCA and CVA) are performed on these isolated teeth to evaluate the differentiation of the specimens based on the variance of their variables and to assess the consistency of identification by qualitative and quantitative methods (Hammer and Harper, 2006). PCA and CVA are applied to the variance-covariance matrix of the logarithmically transformed variables, the latter including six measured dimensions characterizing the different crown proportions. Since the first three principal components (PCs) account for more than 98% of the total variance, PC4 is discarded. Principal component scores are plotted on PC 1 and PC 2, and PC 2 and PC 3 to show the scatter of the archosauriform teeth examined. Although distinct clustering of specimens belonging to the different morphotypes is seen, there is considerable overlapping as represented by the convex hull polygons. The quantitative analyses show that many of the teeth collected from the Tiki Formation are similar to that of other known Late Triassic archosauriforms such as Protecovasaurus, Revueltosaurus, Pekinosaurus and Crosbysaurus Although more analyses are required for precise taxonomic identification, the current study highlights a large array of Late Triassic archosauriforms from India, which so far remained unknown. References: Hammer, O., Harper, D.A.T. 2006. Paleontological data analysis. Blackwell Publishing, Ltd., Malden, USA. Heckert, A.B. 2004. Late Triassic microvertebrates from the Upper Triassic Chinle Group (Otischalkian-Adamanian: Carnian), southwestern U.S.A.: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 27:1-170. Irmis, R.B., Parker, W.G., Nesbitt, S.J., Liu, J. 2007. Early ornithischian dinosaurs: the Triassic record. Historical Biology 19: 3-22.

  5. Historical colonization and dispersal limitation supplement climate and topography in shaping species richness of African lizards (Reptilia: Agaminae)

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Kissling, W.; Anne Blach-Overgaard; Zwaan, Roelof E.; Philipp Wagner

    2016-01-01

    To what extent deep-time dispersal limitation shapes present-day biodiversity at broad spatial scales remains elusive. Here, we compiled a continental dataset on the distributions of African lizard species in the reptile subfamily Agaminae (a relatively young, Neogene radiation of agamid lizards which ancestors colonized Africa from the Arabian peninsula) and tested to what extent historical colonization and dispersal limitation (i.e. accessibility from areas of geographic origin) can explain...

  6. Historical colonization and dispersal limitation supplement climate and topography in shaping species richness of African lizards (Reptilia: Agaminae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, W Daniel; Blach-Overgaard, Anne; Zwaan, Roelof E; Wagner, Philipp

    2016-09-27

    To what extent deep-time dispersal limitation shapes present-day biodiversity at broad spatial scales remains elusive. Here, we compiled a continental dataset on the distributions of African lizard species in the reptile subfamily Agaminae (a relatively young, Neogene radiation of agamid lizards which ancestors colonized Africa from the Arabian peninsula) and tested to what extent historical colonization and dispersal limitation (i.e. accessibility from areas of geographic origin) can explain present-day species richness relative to current climate, topography, and climate change since the late Miocene (~10 mya), the Pliocene (~3 mya), and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 0.021 mya). Spatial and non-spatial multi-predictor regression models revealed that time-limited dispersal via arid corridors is a key predictor to explain macro-scale patterns of species richness. In addition, current precipitation seasonality, current temperature of the warmest month, paleo-temperature changes since the LGM and late Miocene, and topographic relief emerged as important drivers. These results suggest that deep-time dispersal constraints - in addition to climate and mountain building - strongly shape current species richness of Africa's arid-adapted taxa. Such historical dispersal limitation might indicate that natural movement rates of species are too slow to respond to rates of ongoing and projected future climate and land use change.

  7. The muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of a 6-month-old Crocodylus niloticus (Reptilia: Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, R; Schwarz-Wings, D

    2013-06-01

    The muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of crocodilians play an important role in their ventilatory mechanism. Yet the anatomy and homology of these muscles is poorly understood. To gain new insights into the anatomy of the crocodilian infrapubic abdominal wall, we dissected a specimen of Crocodylus niloticus. Origin and insertion of the muscles, as well as their arrangement relative to each other was examined in great detail. The findings were compared with those of other crocodilian taxa to detect potential variability of the muscles of interest. The homology of the muscles was studied by comparing the muscles of the crocodilian infrapubic abdominal wall with those of other diapsids. In Crocodylus niloticus, the infrapubic abdominal wall consists of four muscles: Musculus truncocaudalis, M. ischiotruncus, and Mm. rectus abdominis externus and internus. The arrangement of the muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of Crocodylus niloticus is consistent with that found in most other crocodilian taxa. In some crocodilian taxa, an additional muscle, M. ischiopubis, is found. In the remaining diapsids, only M. rectus abdominis is present. The crocodilian M. truncocaudalis, M. ischiotruncus and, if present, M. ischiopubis appear to be derivates of M. rectus abdominis; the development of those might be related to the evolution of the unique crocodilian ventilatory mechanism.

  8. A new species of Macrocnemus (Reptilia: Protorosauria) from the Middle Triassic of southwestern China and its palaeogeographical implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new species of the terrestrial protorosaur Macrocnemus is briefly described and named Macrocnemus fuyuanensis sp.nov.The specimen was found from the marine Triassic of Yunnan Province,southwestern China.It differs from the type species M.bassanii in having the following characters: (1) 17 or 18 dorsal vertebrae; (2) relatively long humerus; and (3) femur longer than tibia.M.fuyuanensis is the only record of the genus outside Monte San Giorgio area and the first definite terrestrial reptile found from the marine Triassic of China.The age of the fossil-bearing Zhuganpo Member of the Falang Formation is believed to be the Ladinian based on associated vertebrate fauna.The existence of Macrocnemus in the limestone suggests the presence of a terrestrial ecosystem which probably originated from the Anisian and well developed in the Ladinian in this region.The island system along the north-coast of Tethyan during the Triassic was probably an important route for the exchanges of reptiles,especially the terrestrial reptiles between the west and east.

  9. Nuevos registros de squamata (reptilia para el pleistoceno superior del norte de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Agnolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente artículo son reportados ejemplares de diversos taxones de reptiles escamados fósiles procedentes de la base de la Formación Luján (Pleistoceno Superior, en la localidad fosilífera de Merlo, provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Entre los ejemplares registrados se reconoce el primer registro fósil para el género y especie Anops kingii (Amphisbaenidae; asimismo se reporta la presencia de especies indeterminadas de los géneros Homonota (Gekkonidae y Liolaemus (Liolaemidae. La asociación conjunta de estos tres taxones hoy en día no se encuentra representada en el norte de la provincia de Buenos Aires, siendo la región geográficamente más cercana en donde encuentran una superposición en su distribución el Partido de Balcarce, ubicado en el extremo Sureste de la provincia y alejado unos 600 kilómetros al sur de la localidad fosilífera de Merlo. La presencia conjunta de estos tres reptiles se encuentra de acuerdo con la posible existencia de un pulso árido y frío, tal como ha sido propuesto con anterioridad para porción más inferior del Pleistoceno Superior en la provincia de Buenos Aires.

  10. Phylogeny of North African Agama lizards (Reptilia: Agamidae) and the role of the Sahara desert in vertebrate speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Duarte V; Brito, José C; Crochet, Pierre-André; Geniez, Philippe; Padial, José M; Harris, D James

    2012-09-01

    The origin of Saharan biodiversity is poorly understood, in part because the geological and paleoclimatic events that presumably shaped species diversity are still controversial, but also because few studies have explored causal explanations for the origin of Saharan diversity using a phylogenetic framework. Here, we use mtDNA (16S and ND4 genes) and nDNA (MC1R and CMOS genes) to infer the relationships and biogeographic history of North African agamas (genus Agama). Agamas are conspicuous, diverse and abundant African lizards that also occur in the Saharan xeric and mesic environments. Our results revealed the presence of three Agama lineages in North Africa: one Afrotropical, one Sahelo-Saharan, and one broadly distributed in North Africa and mainly Saharan. Southern Mauritania contains the highest known diversity, with all three lineages present. Results suggest that agamas colonized the Sahara twice, but only one lineage was able to radiate and diversify there. Species in the Saharan lineage are mostly allopatric, and their splitting, genetic diversity and distribution are greatly explained by mountain ranges. One species in this lineage has colonized the Mediterranean climatic zone (A. impalearis), and another one the Sahel savannah (A. boueti). The other lineage to colonize the Sahara corresponds to A. boulengeri, an eminently Sahelian species that also inhabits Saharan mountain ranges in Mauritania and Mali. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that allopatric montane populations within some currently recognized species are also genetically divergent. Our study therefore concludes that vicariant speciation is a leading motor of species diversification in the area: Inside the Sahara, associated to mountain-ranges isolated by dune seas and bare plains; outside, associated to less harsh climates to the North and South. Paleoclimatic oscillations are suggested as causal explanations of the vicariant distribution and origin of species. Agamas are thought to have colonized northern Africa during wet periods, with subsequent dry periods fragmenting species distribution and leading to allopatric populations associated to milder and wetter climates in the Mediterranean, Sahel, and in Saharan mountains, in an island-model fashion. Finally, our results support the synonymization of A. castroviejoi with A. boueti, the reciprocal monophyly of all other North African agamas, and suggest one candidate species within A. boulengeri.

  11. Long term observations on the alimentation of wild Eastern Greek Tortoises Testudo graeca ibera (Reptilia: Testudines: Testudinidae in Dobrogea, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Iftime

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The wild diet of Testudo graeca ibera in Dobrogea, Romania is investigated by direct observation. A clear predominance (over 95% of plant matter is noticed, with 25 plant species consumed. Moreover the ingestion of animal matter (carrion as well as calcareous earth was observed.

  12. Effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity in island populations of the Aegean wall lizard Podarcis erhardii (Lacertidae, Reptilia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurston, H; Voith, L; Bonanno, J; Foufopoulos, J; Pafilis, P; Valakos, E; Anthony, N

    2009-08-01

    Landbridge islands offer unique opportunities for understanding the effects of fragmentation history on genetic variation in island taxa. The formation of islands by rising sea levels can be likened to a population bottleneck whose magnitude and duration is determined by island area and time since isolation, respectively. The Holocene landbridge islands of the Aegean Sea (Greece) were formed since the last glacial maximum and constitute an ideal system for disentangling the effects of island area, age and geographic isolation on genetic variability. Of the many reptile species inhabiting this island system, the Aegean wall lizard Podarcis erhardii is an excellent indicator of fragmentation history due to its widespread distribution and poor over-water dispersal abilities. In this study, we utilize a detailed record of Holocene fragmentation to investigate the effects of island history on wall lizard mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite diversity. Findings show that the spatial distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes reflects historical patterns of fragmentation rather than geographic proximity per se. In keeping with neutral bottleneck theory, larger and younger islands retain more nuclear genetic variation than smaller, older islands. Conversely, there is no evidence of an effect of isolation by distance or effect of distance to the nearest larger landmass on genetic variability, indicating little gene flow between islands. Lastly, population-specific measures of genetic differentiation are inversely correlated with island area, suggesting that smaller islands exhibit greater divergence due to their greater susceptibility to drift. Taken together, these results suggest that both island area and time since isolation are important predictors of genetic variation and that these patterns likely arose through the progressive fragmentation of ancestral diversity and the ensuing cumulative effects of drift.

  13. High diversity, low disparity and small body size in plesiosaurs (Reptilia, Sauropterygia from the Triassic-Jurassic boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B J Benson

    Full Text Available Invasion of the open ocean by tetrapods represents a major evolutionary transition that occurred independently in cetaceans, mosasauroids, chelonioids (sea turtles, ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Plesiosaurian reptiles invaded pelagic ocean environments immediately following the Late Triassic extinctions. This diversification is recorded by three intensively-sampled European fossil faunas, spanning 20 million years (Ma. These provide an unparalleled opportunity to document changes in key macroevolutionary parameters associated with secondary adaptation to pelagic life in tetrapods. A comprehensive assessment focuses on the oldest fauna, from the Blue Lias Formation of Street, and nearby localities, in Somerset, UK (Earliest Jurassic: 200 Ma, identifying three new species representing two small-bodied rhomaleosaurids (Stratesaurus taylori gen et sp. nov.; Avalonnectes arturi gen. et sp. nov and the most basal plesiosauroid, Eoplesiosaurus antiquior gen. et sp. nov. The initial radiation of plesiosaurs was characterised by high, but short-lived, diversity of an archaic clade, Rhomaleosauridae. Representatives of this initial radiation were replaced by derived, neoplesiosaurian plesiosaurs at small-medium body sizes during a more gradual accumulation of morphological disparity. This gradualistic modality suggests that adaptive radiations within tetrapod subclades are not always characterised by the initially high levels of disparity observed in the Paleozoic origins of major metazoan body plans, or in the origin of tetrapods. High rhomaleosaurid diversity immediately following the Triassic-Jurassic boundary supports the gradual model of Late Triassic extinctions, mostly predating the boundary itself. Increase in both maximum and minimum body length early in plesiosaurian history suggests a driven evolutionary trend. However, Maximum-likelihood models suggest only passive expansion into higher body size categories.

  14. Dieta de la lagartija de las playas Microlophus peruvianus (Reptilia: Tropiduridae en la playa Santo Domingo, Ica, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Quispitúpac

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La lagartija de las playas Microlophus peruvianus es uno de los saurios más conspicuos del Desierto Costero peruano, sin embargo, existe muy poca información sobre su dieta. Se reporta información de la dieta de M. peruvianus en la playa Santo Domingo, Ica, que evidencia importantes diferencias entre los principales item alimentarios de juveniles y adultos, que podrían estar reduciendo la competencia intraespecífica.

  15. Case 3693 Cryptodacus Hendel, 1914 (Insecta: Diptera: Tephritidae): Proposed suppression of Cryptodacus Gundlach, 1862 (Reptilia, Serpentes, Colubridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbom, Allen L.; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Chen, Xiao-Lin; David, King J.; De Meyer, Marc; Freidberg, Amnon; Han, Ho-Yeon; Steck, Gary J.; Thompson, F. Christian; White, Ian M.; Zucchi, Roberto A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this application, under Article 23.9.3, is to conserve current usage of the well-established genus-group name Cryptodacus Hendel, 1914 for a genus of Neotropical fruit flies by suppression of the earlier, unused name Crypto- dacus Gundlach, 1862, currently a junior synonym of Arrhyton Günther, 1858, a genus of snakes, under the plenary power of the Commission, in the interest of nomenclatural stability. Cryptodacus Gundlach has not been used as a valid name since 1883, whereas Cryptodacus Hendel has been used in a significant body of literature relating to fruit fly systematics, morphology and phylogeny and is the currently used name in various name and molecular databases. 

  16. An integrative systematic revision and biogeography of Rhynchocalamus snakes (Reptilia, Colubridae) with a description of a new species from Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamar, Karin; Šmíd, Jiří; Göçmen, Bayram; Meiri, Shai; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    The colubrid snakes of the genus Rhynchocalamus are seldom studied and knowledge of their ecology and life history is scarce. Three species of Rhynchocalamus are currently recognized, R. satunini (from Turkey eastwards to Iran), R. arabicus (Yemen and Oman), and R. melanocephalus (from the Sinai Peninsula northwards to Turkey). All are slender, secretive, mainly nocturnal and rare fossorial snakes. This comprehensive study is the first to sample all known Rhynchocalamus species in order to review the intra-generic phylogenetic relationships and historical biogeography of the genus. We revised the systematics of Rhynchocalamus using an integrative approach and evaluated its phylogeography. The phylogenetic position within the Colubridae and the phylogenetic relationships within the genus were inferred using 29 individuals belonging to the three known species, with additional sampling of two other closely-related genera, Muhtarophis and Lytorhynchus. We analysed three mitochondrial (12S, 16S, cytb) and one nuclear (c-mos) gene fragments. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods; the latter method also used to provide the first time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of the genus. We generated a nuclear network and carried out a topology test and species delimitation analysis. Morphological comparisons were used to differentiate among species and to describe a new species from Israel. The studied material was comprised of 108 alcohol-preserved specimens, 15 photographs, and data from the literature for the examination of 17 mensural, 14 meristic, and two categorical characters. The molecular results support Rhynchocalamus as monophyletic, and as having split from its sister genus Lytorhynchus during the Late Oligocene. The three recognized species of Rhynchocalamus comprise four independently evolving groups. The molecular results reveal that the genus began to diverge during the Middle Miocene. We revealed that the best-studied species, R. melanocephalus, is paraphyletic. A population, formally ascribed to this species, from the Negev Mountain area in southern Israel is phylogenetically closer to R. arabicus from Oman than to the northern populations of the species from Israel, Syria and Turkey. Herein we describe this population as a new species: Rhynchocalamus dayanaesp. nov. We identify four species within Rhynchocalamus: R. satunini, R. arabicus, R. melanocephalus, and R. dayanaesp. nov., the latter, to the best of our knowledge, is endemic to southern Israel. The onset of Rhynchocalamus diversification is very old and estimated to have occurred during the Middle Miocene, possibly originating in the Levant region. Radiation probably resulted from vicariance and dispersal events caused by continuous geological instability, sea-level fluctuations and climatic changes within the Levant region.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of the Afroedura nivaria (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) species complex in South Africa provides insight on cryptic speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhubo, Buyisile G; Tolley, Krystal A; Bates, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The Afroedura nivaria species complex (A. nivaria, A. karroica, A. amatolica, A. tembulica and A. halli) is a morphologically conservative group of medium-sized flat geckos endemic to South Africa and Lesotho. Species are allopatric, as are some populations within species that are separated by large expanses of unsuitable habitat. Because of this isolation of populations we hypothesised that several cryptic species may be present. To investigate this hypothesis we constructed a molecular phylogeny using multiple markers, and included representatives of other Afroedura species. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses (439bp 16S, 593bp ND4, 948bp RAG1) strongly supported the genetic distinctiveness of the five described species. However, the A. nivaria species complex as currently described is not monophyletic, as A. karroica was positioned outside a clade containing all other Afroedura species, and A. pondolia (which was presumed to belong to a different species complex) was recovered within the A. nivaria complex. Several distinct clades within A. halli and A. nivaria were also recovered, and the narrowly-distributed A. amatolica consisted of two highly divergent clades. We also conducted a multivariate analysis using 19 morphological characters to investigate whether the clades recovered by the phylogeny were distinct in terms of head, body and limb shape. The analysis showed some variation between clades in terms of locomotor apparatus (forelimbs and feet), head and body dimensions, but overall the morphological differences were minor. This morphological conservatism in the A. nivaria complex may be a result of adaptation to similar microhabitats. Exclusive of A. karroica, the results suggest that there are at least nine species in this complex, of which four are cryptic and undescribed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human-crocodile conflict and conservation implications of Saltwater Crocodiles Crocodylus porosus (Reptilia: Crocodylia: Crocodylidae in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Thasun Amarasinghe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human-wildlife conflict occurs when human requirements encroach on those of wildlife populations, with potential costs to both humans and wild animals.  As top predators in most inland waters, crocodilians are involved in human-wildlife conflicts in many countries.  Here we present findings of a 5-year survey on human-crocodile conflict on the island of Sri Lanka and relate the results to improving management practices. We aimed to quantify and understand the causes of human-crocodile conflict in Sri Lanka, and propose solutions to mitigate it.  Visual encounter surveys were carried out to estimate the population size of Saltwater Crocodiles. We recorded 778 sightings of Saltwater Crocodiles at 262 of 400 locations surveyed, and estimate the total population to comprise more than 2000 non-hatchlings and to have increased at an average rate of 5% p.a. since 1978. We propose four crocodile vigilance zones within the wet zone and one crocodile vigilance zone within the dry zone of the country. Specific threats to Saltwater Crocodiles identified in crocodile vigilance zones were: habitat destruction and loss; illegal killing and harvesting (17 killings out of fear, ~200 incidents of killing for meat and skins, ~800 eggs annually for consumption; unplanned translocations; and, interaction with urbanization (10 incidents of crocodiles being run over by trains/vehicles and electrocution. Additionally, 33 cases of crocodile attacks on humans were recorded [8 fatal, 25 non-fatal (minor to grievous injuries] and more than 50 incidents of attacks on farm and pet animals. 

  19. A gigantic nothosaur (Reptilia: Sauropterygia) from the Middle Triassic of SW China and its implication for the Triassic biotic recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Hu, Shi-Xue; Rieppel, Olivier; Jiang, Da-Yong; Benton, Michael J.; Kelley, Neil P.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Zhou, Chang-Yong; Wen, Wen; Huang, Jin-Yuan; Xie, Tao; Lv, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The presence of gigantic apex predators in the eastern Panthalassic and western Tethyan oceans suggests that complex ecosystems in the sea had become re-established in these regions at least by the early Middle Triassic, after the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). However, it is not clear whether oceanic ecosystem recovery from the PTME was globally synchronous because of the apparent lack of such predators in the eastern Tethyan/western Panthalassic region prior to the Late Triassic. Here we report a gigantic nothosaur from the lower Middle Triassic of Luoping in southwest China (eastern Tethyan ocean), which possesses the largest known lower jaw among Triassic sauropterygians. Phylogenetic analysis suggests parallel evolution of gigantism in Triassic sauropterygians. Discovery of this gigantic apex predator, together with associated diverse marine reptiles and the complex food web, indicates global recovery of shallow marine ecosystems from PTME by the early Middle Triassic.

  20. An investigation into the Swan Island Honduras collecting event of Tiaporus fuliginosus Cope (Reptilia: Teiidae) and its systematic status

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranie, James R.; Gotte, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Confusion exists in the literature concerning the collecting event of the teiid lizard Tiaporus fuliginosus. We investigated the literature and documents stored at the Smithsonian Institution Archives involving the collector of those specimens in an effort to resolve that confusion. We conclude that the type series was collected on the Swan Islands of Honduras by Charles H. Townsend during 1887. We also provide a redescription of that nominal form and show that it is a valid species that should be called Ameiva fuliginosa. We also examined the type series of A. panchlora from Old Providence, Colombia and confirm that its 1950 placement as a junior synonym of A. fuliginosa is correct.

  1. An integrative systematic revision and biogeography of Rhynchocalamus snakes (Reptilia, Colubridae with a description of a new species from Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Tamar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The colubrid snakes of the genus Rhynchocalamus are seldom studied and knowledge of their ecology and life history is scarce. Three species of Rhynchocalamus are currently recognized, R. satunini (from Turkey eastwards to Iran, R. arabicus (Yemen and Oman, and R. melanocephalus (from the Sinai Peninsula northwards to Turkey. All are slender, secretive, mainly nocturnal and rare fossorial snakes. This comprehensive study is the first to sample all known Rhynchocalamus species in order to review the intra-generic phylogenetic relationships and historical biogeography of the genus. Methods We revised the systematics of Rhynchocalamus using an integrative approach and evaluated its phylogeography. The phylogenetic position within the Colubridae and the phylogenetic relationships within the genus were inferred using 29 individuals belonging to the three known species, with additional sampling of two other closely-related genera, Muhtarophis and Lytorhynchus. We analysed three mitochondrial (12S, 16S, cytb and one nuclear (c-mos gene fragments. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods; the latter method also used to provide the first time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of the genus. We generated a nuclear network and carried out a topology test and species delimitation analysis. Morphological comparisons were used to differentiate among species and to describe a new species from Israel. The studied material was comprised of 108 alcohol-preserved specimens, 15 photographs, and data from the literature for the examination of 17 mensural, 14 meristic, and two categorical characters. Results The molecular results support Rhynchocalamus as monophyletic, and as having split from its sister genus Lytorhynchus during the Late Oligocene. The three recognized species of Rhynchocalamus comprise four independently evolving groups. The molecular results reveal that the genus began to diverge during the Middle Miocene. We revealed that the best-studied species, R. melanocephalus, is paraphyletic. A population, formally ascribed to this species, from the Negev Mountain area in southern Israel is phylogenetically closer to R. arabicus from Oman than to the northern populations of the species from Israel, Syria and Turkey. Herein we describe this population as a new species: Rhynchocalamus dayanae sp. nov. Discussion We identify four species within Rhynchocalamus: R. satunini, R. arabicus, R. melanocephalus, and R. dayanae sp. nov., the latter, to the best of our knowledge, is endemic to southern Israel. The onset of Rhynchocalamus diversification is very old and estimated to have occurred during the Middle Miocene, possibly originating in the Levant region. Radiation probably resulted from vicariance and dispersal events caused by continuous geological instability, sea-level fluctuations and climatic changes within the Levant region.

  2. Speciation on the rocks: integrated systematics of the Heteronotia spelea species complex (Gekkota; Reptilia from Western and Central Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitzy Pepper

    Full Text Available The isolated uplands of the Australian arid zone are known to provide mesic refuges in an otherwise xeric landscape, and divergent lineages of largely arid zone taxa have persisted in these regions following the onset of Miocene aridification. Geckos of the genus Heteronotia are one such group, and have been the subject of many genetic studies, including H. spelea, a strongly banded form that occurs in the uplands of the Pilbara and Central Ranges regions of the Australian arid zone. Here we assess the systematics of these geckos based on detailed examination of morphological and genetic variation. The H. spelea species complex is a monophyletic lineage to the exclusion of the H. binoei and H. planiceps species complexes. Within the H. spelea complex, our previous studies based on mtDNA and nine nDNA loci found populations from the Central Ranges to be genetically divergent from Pilbara populations. Here we supplement our published molecular data with additional data gathered from central Australian samples. In the spirit of integrative species delimitation, we combine multi-locus, coalescent-based lineage delimitation with extensive morphological analyses to test species boundaries, and we describe the central populations as a new species, H. fasciolatus sp. nov. In addition, within the Pilbara there is strong genetic evidence for three lineages corresponding to northeastern (type, southern, and a large-bodied melanic population isolated in the northwest. Due to its genetic distinctiveness and extreme morphological divergence from all other Heteronotia, we describe the melanic form as a new species, H. atra sp. nov. The northeastern and southern Pilbara populations are morphologically indistinguishable with the exception of a morpho-type in the southeast that has a banding pattern resembling H. planiceps from the northern monsoonal tropics. Pending more extensive analyses, we therefore treat Pilbara H. spelea as a single species with phylogenetic structure and morphological heterogeneity.

  3. Notas sobre la ocurrencia de Pelamis platurus (Reptilia: Serpentes: Hydrophiidae en el Pacífico Colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez León Ricardo

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the Pelamis platurus (Linnaeus in the Colombian Pacific coast, is confirmed based on 35 reports (18 published and 17 unpublished, and 36 individual records in national colections. The pelagic sea snake is commonly found in large yellow and black aggregations along slick and drift lines in the areas of Isla Gorgona-Cabo Marzo. Additionally, the brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis is recorded for the first time as a predator of Pelamis platurus in the American Pacific.Se discute la presencia de Pelamis platurus (Linnaeus en el Pacífico colombiano con base en 35 registros (18 publicados y 17 inéditos, y 36 ejemplares en colecciones nacionales. La serpiente marina es común y abundante entre Isla Gorgona y Cabo Marzo, donde forma densas agregaciones amarillas y negras, a lo largo de las costas. Adicionalmente se registra el pelícano marrón Pelecanus occidentalis por primera vez como un depredador de Pelamis platurus en el Pacífico americano.

  4. Abundancia y estructura poblacional de Crocodylus acutus (Reptilia: Crocodylidae en la laguna Palmasola, Oaxaca, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús García-Grajales

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available La abundancia y estructura poblacional son pará-metros importantes para evaluar y comparar el estatus de conservación de una población a través del tiempo en un área determinada. Este estudio describe la abundancia y estructura poblacional de Crocodylus acutus en la laguna Palmasola, Oaxaca. El trabajo consistió en recorridos nocturnos, entre las 21 y 24h, durante la fase de luna nueva para contabilizar el número de individuos y obtener estimaciones poblacionales. El tamaño poblacional estimado fluctuó de 32.7 a 93 individuos según el modelo utilizado. Las tasas de encuentro registradas fluctuaron de 32 a 109.3 ind/km lineal durante los 40 recorridos efectuados con un tiempo promedio de navegación de 18 minutos. Existió una marcada dominancia de la clase III (subadultos, seguido por la clase II y en menor proporción las clases IV y V, así como aquellos individuos en los que no se pudo determinar el tamaño corporal, en ambas épocas del año. Mientras tanto, los individuos juveniles (Clase II se observaron en mayor proporción asociados al manglar que cubre las orillas del cuerpo de agua (26.1%, los individuos subadultos (Clase III a menudo se observaron sobre el espejo de agua sin vegetación flotante (22.7% y entre el manglar que cubre las orillas del cuerpo de agua (15.7%, mientras que los ejemplares adultos se observaron con mayor frecuencia sobre el espejo de agua sin vegetación flotante (9.7%. Con la presente información se contribuye al conocimiento de la ecología poblacional de C. acutus en la laguna Palmasola donde el tamaño poblacional estimado parece mostrar valores altos con respecto a lo reportado en otros estados de la República Mexicana.

  5. Rediscovery and a new record of Hemidactylus laevis (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) from Somaliland, with notes on and resurrection of Hemidactylus fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuch, Tomáš; Šmíd, Jiří; Bauer, Aaron M

    2016-06-02

    Hemidactylus laevis, a gekkonid lizard originally described from the Gaan Libah Mountains in Somaliland, is recorded herein from Erigavo, Sanaag Region, in the same state, which represents the second-ever known specimen and locality for this species in more than 100 years since its description. The species is endemic to Somaliland. Data on morphology and natural history, as well as the first life photographs are provided. Based on morphological data we conclude the species to be closely related to H. laticaudatus. Additionally, H. fragilis from southern Somalia and extreme south-east Ethiopia is resurrected from the synonymy of H. frenatus based on morphological data.

  6. Estado de conservación de la fauna de Sauria y Amphisbaenidae (Reptilia: Squamata de Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carreira Vidal, Santiago

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Se evalúa el estado de conservación de la fauna de Sauria y Amphisbaenia del Uruguay, basado en el índice propuesto por Reca et al. (1994, y se aplican las categorías propuestas por Ávila et al. (2000. Se analizaron en total 17 especies, de las cuales se destacan como vulnerables (V Leposternon microcephalum, Anisolepis undulatus, Tropidurus torquatus y Stenocercus azureus, representando el 23,5% de los taxones investigados. La limitación principal detectada en la utilización del índice de Reca es que, dada la carencia de información básica sobre algunas especies, los resultados deben ser re-evaluados de forma constante ante la generación de nuevos conocimientos. Based on the index proposed by Reca et al. (1994, and the categories proposed by Ávila et al. (2000, the conservation status for Sauria and Amphisbaenia from Uruguay is evaluated. Seventeen species were analized, four of them stood out as vulnerable (V Leposternon microcephalum, Anisolepis undulatus, Tropidurus torquatus and Stenocercus azureus, representing the 23.5% of the taxa. The most important constraint detected using Reca's Index, is that due to the lack of basic information about some of the species, the results should be revisited any time new knowledge arises.

  7. First record of Mesoclemmys tuberculata (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae in the Cerrado area of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Lima Silveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesoclemmys tuberculata is a turtle species that is distributed in northeastern Brazil, recorded mainly in the Caatinga and at some localities in the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. In this paper we report the first species record in an area of Cerrado of Minas Gerais state, and it is the only known state record in a specific location. During field sampling, a specimen of M. tuberculata was collected in the municipality of João Pinheiro, northwest state, in a Cerrado nuclear area in the São Francisco river basin. The locality of this record is the southern and western limits of M. tuberculata’s known distribution, as well as the most inland locality of species record in the Cerrado biome.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the striped-tailed rat-snake, Orthriophis taeniurus (Reptilia, Serpentes, Colubridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, En; Sun, Fuxiao; Zhang, Ruidong; Chen, Jing; Wu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the striped-tailed rat-snake Orthriophis taeniurus was determined in the present study. The genome is 17,183 bp in size, containing 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and 2 control regions (CRI and CRII). The gene order and orientation in O. taeniurus mitogenome are basically identical to that of other alethinophidian snakes. Nucleotide composition is very similar with other vertebrates, showing an AT bias.

  9. Cryptodacus Hendel, 1914 (Insecta: Diptera: TEPHRITIDAE): Proposed conservation by suppression of Cryptodacus Gundlach, 1862 (Reptilia: Serpentes: COLUBRIDAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this application under Articles 78.1, 80.2.2, and 81.2.1 is to conserve current usage of the well-established genus-group name Cryptodacus Hendel, 1914 for a genus of Neotropical fruit flies by suppression of the earlier name Cryptodacus Gundlach, 1862, currently a junior synonym of A...

  10. A new species of Homonota (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkota: Phyllodactylidae) endemic to the hills of Paraje Tres Cerros, Corrientes Province, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajade, Rodrigo; Etchepare, Eduardo Gabriel; Falcione, Camila; Barrasso, Diego Andrés; Alvarez, Blanca Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    The genus Homonota comprises nine South American species of terrestrial and nocturnal lizards. Homonota lizards lack the femoral pores typical of other South American Phyllodactylidae, and their infradigital lamellas are not expanded. We here describe a new species, Homonota taragui sp. nov., exclusively found on a small group of three hills up to 179 meters above sea level in central eastern Corrientes Province, Argentina. The new species differs from other Homonota species by a combination of characters, including: a well-marked dorsal, reticulate, dark pattern contrasting with a lighter colored background; small, star-shaped chromatophores on the abdomen; the post-orbital region of the head covered by granular scales; the dorsal and anterior regions of the thighs covered by keeled scales interspersed with cycloid scales; and the internasal scale in contact with rostral scales. The conservation status of Homonota taragui sp. nov. may be vulnerable, due to its localized endemism with populations on three small hills surrounded by intense agricultural and livestock activity. Two endemic plant species are known from these hills, and this new lizard represents the first endemic animal species.

  11. Restinga lizards (Reptilia: Squamata at the Imbassaí Preserve on the northern coast of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Couto-Ferreira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the diversity of lizard species at the Imbassaí Preserve, located in the Mata de São João municipality, on the northern coast of Bahia region, Brazil, with special attention to the threatened and endemic species. We present the main results on richness and abundance, from a long term monitoring program and especially from the period between November 2008 and June 2010. We applied the visual search method associated with pitfall traps and random encounters, on a 200m linear transect, in four different vegetation habitats. We detected 26 lizard species, distributed in 19 genera of 10 families. The study reveals a high diversity area for lizards, within the restinga ecosystem along the northern coast line, and therefore contributes to the knowledge of the herpetofauna on the northern coast of the Bahia region, as well as to future management and monitoring programs.

  12. [The comparative aspects of spatial ecology of lizards exemplified by the toad-headed lizards (Reptilia, Agamidae, Phrynocephalus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, D V

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of analysis of phylogenetic parameters of the spatial distribution of populations is discussed by an example of the agamid toad-headed lizards (Phrynocephalus). Summarizing both original and published data on the individual home ranges and the relocation of individuals of 30 populations from 12 species showed that differentiation of the type of spatial distribution is weak in toad-headed lizards. This observation confirms the idea that this clade of agamids is phylogenetically young and relatively recently radiated. At the interspecific level, positive correlation between home range size and body size was observed in the studied group. Such spatial parameters, shared by all toad-headed lizards, as relatively large size and weakly structured individual home ranges can be explained by the peculiarities of their reproduction features and their foraging mode. The individual type of space-usage in toad-headed does not fit the traditional scheme dividing all the lizards into the territorial Iguania and the nonterritorial Autarchoglossa.

  13. Correlation between endoscopic sex determination and gonad histology in pond sliders, Trachemys scripta (Reptilia: Testudines: Emydidae)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Coelioscopy has been proven to be a valuable technique to determine the sex of juvenile chelonians. However, there is a disagreement regarding the proper way to identify testes and ovaries, which is a direct consequence of the lack of studies correlating the results of endoscopic examination with the histology of the gonad. In this blinded study we assessed two methods of sex determination in juvenile pond sliders (Trachemys scripta) using endoscopy: via coelioscopy, with visualization of the...

  14. Out of Arabia: A Complex Biogeographic History of Multiple Vicariance and Dispersal Events in the Gecko Genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, Jiří; Carranza, Salvador; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Gvoždík, Václav; Nasher, Abdul Karim; Moravec, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b) and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2) genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7–7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot. PMID:23724016

  15. Human-crocodile conflict and conservation implications of Saltwater Crocodiles Crocodylus porosus (Reptilia: Crocodylia: Crocodylidae) in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. Thasun Amarasinghe; Majintha B. Madawala; D.M.S. Suranjan Karunarathna; S. Charlie Manolis; Anslem de Silva; Ralf Sommerlad

    2015-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflict occurs when human requirements encroach on those of wildlife populations, with potential costs to both humans and wild animals.  As top predators in most inland waters, crocodilians are involved in human-wildlife conflicts in many countries.  Here we present findings of a 5-year survey on human-crocodile conflict on the island of Sri Lanka and relate the results to improving management practices. We aimed to quantify and understand the causes of human-crocodile conflic...

  16. Complex longitudinal diversification across South China and Vietnam in Stejneger's pit viper, Viridovipera stejnegeri (Schmidt, 1925) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Liu, Qin; Zhu, Fei; Zhong, Guang H; Chen, Xin; Myers, Edward A; Che, Jing; Zhang, Liang; Ziegler, Thomas; Nguyen, Truong Q; Burbrink, Frank T

    2016-06-01

    Viridovipera stejnegeri is one of the most common pit vipers in Asia, with a wide distribution in southern China and Vietnam. We investigated historical demography and explored how the environment and climatic factors have shaped genetic diversity and the evolutionary history of this venomous snake. A total of 171 samples from 47 localities were sequenced and analysed for two mitochondrial gene fragments and three nuclear genes. Gene trees reveal the existence of two well-supported clades (Southwest China and Southeast China) with seven distinct and strongly supported, geographically structured subclades within V. stejnegeri. Estimation of divergence time and ancestral area suggests that V. stejnegeri originated at ~6.0 Ma in the late Miocene on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau. The estimated date of origin and divergence of the island populations of Taiwan and Hainan closely matches the geological origin of the both islands. The mtDNA gene tree reveals the presence of west-east diversification in V. stejnegeri populations. Complex orogenesis and heterogeneous habitats, as well as climate-mediated habitat differentiation including glacial cycles, all have influenced population structure and the distribution of this taxon. The validity of V. stejnegeri chenbihuii is questionable, and this subspecies most probably represents an invalid taxon.

  17. Out of Arabia: a complex biogeographic history of multiple vicariance and dispersal events in the gecko genus Hemidactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíd, Jiří; Carranza, Salvador; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Gvoždík, Václav; Nasher, Abdul Karim; Moravec, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The geological history of the Arabian Peninsula has played a crucial role in shaping current diversity and distribution patterns of many Arabian and African faunal elements. The gecko genus Hemidactylus is not an exception. In this study, we provide an insight into the phylogeny and systematics of 45 recognized species of the so-called Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus from Arabia, the Horn of Africa, the Levant and Iran. The material comprises 358 specimens sequenced for up to two mitochondrial (12S rRNA, cytochrome b) and four nuclear (mc1r, cmos, rag1, rag2) genes with 4766 bp of the concatenated alignment length. A robust calibrated phylogeny and reconstruction of historical biogeography are inferred. We link the history of this genus with major geological events that occurred in the region within the last 30 million years. Two basal divergences correspond with the break-ups of the Arabian and African landmasses and subsequent separation of Socotra from the Arabian mainland, respectively, segregating the genus by means of vicariance. Formation of the Red Sea led to isolation and subsequent radiation in the Arabian Peninsula, which was followed by multiple independent expansions: 13.1 Ma to Iran; 9.8 Ma to NE Africa; 8.2 to Socotra Archipelago; 7-7.3 Ma two colonizations to the Near East; 5.9 Ma to NE Africa; and 4.1 to Socotra. Moreover, using multiple genetic markers we detected cryptic diversity within the genus, particularly in south-western Arabia and the Ethiopian highlands, and confirmed the existence of at least seven new species in the area. These findings highlight the role of Arabia and the Horn of Africa as an important Hemidactylus diversity hotspot.

  18. A NEW SPECIMEN OF TANYSTROPHEUS (REPTILIA PROTOROSAURIA FROM THE MIDDLE TRIASSIC OF SWITZERLAND AND THE ECOLOGY OF THE GENUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIO RENESTO

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A new specimen of the protorosaurian diapsid reptile Tanystropheus is described. The specimen was collected at  the Valle Serrata locality (Switzerland and is of Ladinian (Middle Triassic age. Its study elucidates some issues regarding the anatomy of Tanystropheus to be addressed, and allow to suggest hypotheses about its mode of life. In particular, the specimen is the first one in which the skin and other soft tissues can be described. In particular, wide patches of black phosphatic material, filled with small carbonate spherules are preserved, as it occurs in corpses lying in stagnant water due to decomposition of consistent amount of proteins. This suggests that a huge mass of flesh was present in the caudal part of the body, shifting posteriorly the center of mass of the animal and helping in balancing the weight of the neck even if raised off horizontal plane and out of water. In addition, no evidence of caudal autotomy is present in Tanystropheus and the structure of the tail and of the limbs are consistent with a shoreline habitat rather than with a fully aquatic mode of life. 

  19. Two new species of Andean gymnophthalmid lizards of the genus Euspondylus (Reptilia, Squamata) from central and southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Germán; Siu-Ting, Karen; Duran, Vilma; Venegas, Pablo J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of lizards assigned to the genus Euspondylus from the montane forests of the Peruvian Andes in the Pasco Department (central Peru) and Ayacucho Department (southern Peru) both at elevations of 2550 and 3450 m, respectively, are described. The new species are distinguishable from all other Peruvian and Ecuadorian species of Euspondylus by a unique combination of morphometric, scalation and color pattern characteristics. Natural history data for the new species and for Euspondylus spinalis are also provided. PMID:21852931

  20. The snakes of the genus Atractus Wagler (Reptilia: Squamata: Colubridae) from the Manaus region, central Amazonia, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, M.; Oliveira, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Taxonomic and natural history data are presented on eight species of Atractus from the Manaus region, central Amazonia, Brazil, namely: A. alphonsehogei, A. latifrons, A, major, A. poeppigi, A. schach, A. snethlageae, A. torquatus, and A. trilineatus. Four of these species are recorded for the first

  1. New distribution data for Podocnemis erythrocephala (Spix) with remarks on some other turtle taxa (Reptilia: Chelonia: Pelomedusidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.; Avila-Pires, de T.C.S.

    1990-01-01

    During fieldwork in the Lago de Faro, the lower reaches of the Rio Nhamundá, on the border of the Brazilian states of Pará and Amazonas, several species of pelomedusid turtles were observed. Podocnemis erythrocephala and P. unifilis occur in the area and breed there; P. expansa seems to be absent or

  2. A new species of pine anole from the Sierra Madre del Sur in Oaxaca, Mexico (Reptilia, Squamata, Dactyloidae: Anolis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Gunther; Pérez, Raúl Gómez Trejo; Petersen, Claus Bo P; de La Cruz, Fausto R Mendez

    2014-01-09

    We describe the new species Anolis peucephilus sp. nov. from the Pacific versant of southern Mexico. Anolis peucephilus differs from all congeners by having a combination of (1) smooth ventral scales; (2) usually a patch of three greatly enlarged supraocular scales; (3) extremely short hind legs, longest toe of adpressed hind leg reaching to a point between levels of axilla and ear opening, ratio shank length/snout-vent length 0.18-0.21; (4) circumnasal usually in contact with first supralabial; and (5) a large yellowish orange dewlap in males and a very small to small white dewlap in females. In external morphology, A. peucephilus is most similar to A. omiltemanus from which it differs by having even shorter hind legs with the longest toe of adpressed hind leg reaching to a point between levels of axilla and ear opening (versus usually to ear opening, occasionally to slightly beyond ear opening or to a point between shoulder and ear opening in A. omiltemanus), a slightly larger dewlap in females, to 64 mm2 (versus to 41 mm2 in A. omiltemanus), the circumnasal usually in contact with the first supralabial (versus those scales separated by the presence of a subnasal in A. omiltemanus), and 4-6 internasal scales in the new species (versus usually 6-7 in A. omiltemanus). Furthermore, A. peucephilus differs from A. omiltemanus in hemipenial morphology (no finger-like processus on asulcate side in A. peucephilus versus such a processus present in A. omiltemanus). Also, in a preliminary molecular genetic analysis of the mitochondrial CO1 gene fragment, A. peucephilus has a genetic distance of 11.5% from A. omiltemanus. Anolis peucephilus was collected at night while the lizards were sleeping in pine trees, 2-10 m above the ground.

  3. The snakes of the genus Atractus Wagler (Reptilia: Squamata: Colubridae) from the Manaus region, central Amazonia, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, M.; Oliveira, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Taxonomic and natural history data are presented on eight species of Atractus from the Manaus region, central Amazonia, Brazil, namely: A. alphonsehogei, A. latifrons, A, major, A. poeppigi, A. schach, A. snethlageae, A. torquatus, and A. trilineatus. Four of these species are recorded for the first

  4. Description of Serpentirhabdias atroxi n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae), a parasite of Bothrops atrox (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Viperidae) in Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; da Costa, Paulo André Ferreira Borges; Maschio, Gleomar Fabiano; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    A new lung-dwelling nematode species is described from the common lancehead Bothrops atrox (Linnaeus) in the Brazilian Amazon Region. The species is assigned to the genus Serpentirhabdias Tkach, Kuzmin & Snyder, 2014 based on the presence of six lips arranged in two lateral groups, the absence of prominent cuticular inflations, and lung parasitism in snakes. Serpentirhabdias atroxi n. sp. differs from other species of the genus mainly by details of the morphology of the anterior end: cuticularised ring surrounding the anterior part of the buccal cavity and six minute onchia present in the oesophastome. Serpentirhabdias atroxi n. sp. is the seventh species of the genus known from the Neotropical Realm and the second species described from viperid snakes.

  5. Catalogue of distribution of lizards (Reptilia: Squamata) from the Brazilian Amazonia. I. Dactyloidae, Hoplocercidae, Iguanidae, Leiosauridae, Polychrotidae, Tropiduridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Júnior, Marco A

    2015-07-08

    I present distribution data of all Dactyloidae, Hoplocercidae, Iguanidae, Leiosauridae, Polychrotidae and Tropiduridae lizards known from the Brazilian Amazonia, totaling 40 species-level taxa, belonging to 11 genera. This represents four more species-level taxa than previously reported for these families. Data were based on the direct examination of 41,243 specimens deposited in three North American and eight Brazilian musea, including the main collections harboring Amazonian material. Most species (62.5%) are endemic to the Amazonia; non-endemic species are mainly associated with open dry (semideciduous) forest or open vegetation (savanna) enclaves in Amazonia, with a few exceptions. As a whole, seven taxa are widespread in Amazonia, one is restricted to eastern Amazonia, three to western Amazonia, five to northern Amazonia (either in part of it or widespread in the Guiana region), two to northwestern Amazonia, one to southern Amazonia, nine to southwestern Amazonia, and seven to the southern peripheral portion of Amazonia. Five species have unique distributions and five species have a distribution that is congruent with one of the areas of endemism (AE) recognized for other organisms (birds and primates). The first herpetological gazetteer for the Brazilian Amazonia with about 3,600 georeferenced localities was also produced.

  6. [The quantities of dried venom collected from specimens of Vipera ammodytes L., 1758 (Reptilia, Viperidae) in captivity in Bulgaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavtchev, R S

    1985-12-01

    Some researches have been made to obtain more data about quantities of dried venom collected from Vipera ammodytes L., 1758 in captivity. The minimal quantity of dried venom collected by exemplar is 9.7 mg to 36.4 mg and the maximal quantity is 49.0 mg to 90.3 mg. From 810 exemplars of V. ammodytes of Bulgaria and 9 months of investigations, 10597 samples were made, with a total of 298.164 g of dried venom (average for animal: 28.14 mg).

  7. The fossil vertebrates of Ksâr'akil, a palaeolithic rock shelter in the Lebanon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1961-01-01

    CONTENTS Introduction................... 4 Systematic part.................. 5 Pisces.................... 5 Amphibia................... 6 Hyla arborea (L.) subsp............... 6 Reptilia................... 6 Testudo spec.................. 6 Ophisaurus apodus (Pallas).............. 8 Chamaeleo chama

  8. Observations on the natural history of the lizard Mabuya macrorhyncha Hoge (Scincidae in Queimada Grande Island, São Paulo, Brazil Observações sobre a história natural do lagarto Mabuya macrorhyncha Hoge (Scincidae na Ilha da Queimada Grande, São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Vrcibradic

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Data are presented on the on diet, thermal biology, microhabitat use, reproduction and helminth infection parameters of a population of Mabuya macrorhyncha hoge, 1946 inhabiting the small island of Queimada Grande, on the southern coast of São Paulo State. The lizards were collected on November 1997 (spring and on July 1998 (winter. Most lizards were perched above ground, mainly on herbaceous vegetation. Mean lizard body temperatures were significantly higher in spring (32.6 ± 1.9ºC than in winter (28.5 ± 2.4ºC, as were air temperatures. Mean litter size of females was 2.7 (range 2-3. The diet was composed of a diverse array of arthropods and some small fruits. Of the 19 lizards examined, 16 (84.2% harboured helminths. Three species of helminth (one acanthocephalan and two nematodes were found infecting the lizards. Compared to other M. macrorhyncha populations previously studied in mainland areas, the Queimada Grande population appears to be less strongly associated to bromeliads, to consume plant matter (fruits more frequently, and to have a poorer helminth fauna.Dados são apresentados referentes à dieta, biologia térmica, uso de microhabitats, reprodução e parâmetros de infecção por helmintos de uma população de Mabuya macrorhyncha Hoge, 1946 habitando a pequena ilha da Queimada Grande, na costa sul do Estado de São Paulo. Os lagartos foram coletados em novembro de 1997 (primavera e em julho de 1998 (inverno. A maioria dos lagartos foi encontrada empoleirada acima do solo, principalmente sobre vegetação herbácea. As temperaturas corpóreas médias dos lagartos foram significativamente mais altas na primavera (32,6 ± 1,9ºC do que no inverno (28,5 ± 2,4ºC, como ocorreu com as temperaturas do ar. O tamanho médio de ninhada das fêmeas foi de 2.7 (amplitude 2-3. A dieta foi composta por artrópodes variados e por alguns pequenos frutos. Dos 19 lagartos examinados, 16 (84.2% estavam infectados por helmintos. Três espécies de helmintos (um acantocéfalo e dois nematódeos foram encontrados infectando os lagartos. Quando comparada a outras populações de M. macrorhyncha previamente estudadas em áreas continentais, a população da Queimada Grande parece ser menos fortemente associada a bromélias, consumir material vegetal (frutos mais freqüentemente, e ter uma fauna de helmintos mais pobre.

  9. Esqueleto pré-sacral e sacral dos lagartos teiêdeos (Squamata, Teiidae Pressacral and sacral skeleton of teiids lizards (Squamata, Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Betina Veronese

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the axial skeleton -pressacral and sacral regions - of the nine genera of Teiidae Boulenger, 1885 comprising Ameiva Meyer, 1795, Callopistes Gravenhorst, 1838, Cnemidophorus Wagler, 1830, Crocodilurus Spix, 1825, Dicrodon Duméril & Bibron, 1839, Dracaena Daudin, 1802, Kenlropyx Spix, 1825, Teius Merrem, 1820 and Tupinambis Daudin, 1803 is here analysed under a comparative approach. The study is in a generic levei, and the principal conclusions reter to differences on the total number of vertebrae and some aspects of the ribs, especially their insertion and presence.

  10. Road kills of the endemic snake Perrotet’s Shieldtail Plectrurus perrotetii, Dumeril, 1851 (Reptilia: Squamata: Uropeltidae in Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Santhoshkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Twenty seven road killed specimens of Plectrurus perrotetii were recorded in Emerald and its surrounding areas in the Nilgiris. Among the road kills, fourteen of them were females, seven were males and six are juveniles. Among the road kill female specimens of this species, it was observed that seven were gravid with fully developed young. Three to six developing young ones were observed

  11. Histology of tooth attachment tissues and plicidentine in Varanus (Reptilia: Squamata), and a discussion of the evolution of amniote tooth attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Erin E; Caldwell, Michael W; Lamoureux, Denis O; Budney, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Few recent studies have examined the histological basis for tooth attachment in squamates. In the past few years, a surge of interest in this topic has led to the intriguing suggestion that the major tissues derived from the tooth germ (enamel, dentine, cementum and alveolar bone), are conservative and are present in all amniotes. In this study, we describe the histology and development of the tooth attachment complex in Varanus rudicollis, the rough-neck monitor. We provide the first published evidence for the role of cementum and alveolar bone in tooth attachment in varanoid lizards. In Varanus, cementum is deposited on the external surface of the tooth root as well as at the base of the tooth, where it plays a role in the attachment of the tooth to the jawbone. Alveolar bone is also involved in tooth ankylosis. Our results support the hypothesis that the major tooth germ tissues are found in all amniotes. We provide insights into the structure and development of plicidentine, defined as infolding of the dentine around the tooth base. This feature is unique to varanoids among extant tetrapods and is the third tissue implicated in tooth attachment in Varanus. Plicidentine develops asymmetrically along the labial-lingual axis of a tooth. Varanus is characterized by the presence of both primary and higher-order lamellae, which anastomose to form a honeycomb-like surface that then interacts with the more basal attachment tissues.

  12. New primitive ichthyosaurian (Reptilia,Diapsida) from the Middle Triassic of Panxian,Guizhou,southwestern China and its position in the Triassic biotic recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dayong Jianga; Ryosuke Motani; Weicheng Hao; Lars Schmitz; Olivier Rieppel; Yuanlin Sun; Zuoyu Sun

    2008-01-01

    A new primitive ichthyopterygian Xinminosaurus catactes gen.et.sp.nov,is erected based on a complete skeleton from the Middle Triassic Upper Member of the Guanling Formation at Panxian,Guizhou,southwestern China.It has a suite of uniquely derived characters in its dentition,ulna,carpals and tarsals.It is similar to primitive ichthyopterygians in retaining elongated limb bones.The new taxon and a diversity of marine reptiles in Panxian Fauna are the physical markers of the Middle Triassic Biotic radiation.Detailed studies of this fauna will supply essential knowledge on the diversity,migration and paleobiogeographic affinity of Middle Triassic ichthyopterygians.

  13. Catalogue of the Type Specimens of Amphibians and Reptiles in the Herpetological Museum of the Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences:V. Viperidae (Reptilia, Serpentes)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng GUO; Qin LIU; Jiatang LI; Yan CAO; Yuezhao WANG

    2016-01-01

    In China, there are about 37 species of vipers belonging to 12 genera in the family Viperidae. In the Herpetological Museum of the Chengdu Institute of Biology (CIB), Chinese Academy of Sciences, the type specimens of snakes represent seven species in four genera. As a series of reports on the type specimens of Amphibians and Reptilies deposited in the Herpetological Museum of CIB, this paper focuses on the venomous snake family Viperidae in the collections at this Museum.

  14. Microanatomical and histological features in the long bones of Mosasaurine mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata)--implications for aquatic adaptation and growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Lindgren, Johan; Pellegrini, Rodrigo; Lee, Andrew H; Germain, Damien; Polcyn, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the internal organization (microanatomy) and tissue types and characteristics (histology) of propodial and epipodial bones in one lineage of mosasauroids; i.e., the subfamily Mosasaurinae. By using microanatomical and histological data from limb bones in combination with recently acquired knowledge on the inner structure of ribs and vertebrae, and through comparisons with extant squamates and semi-aquatic to fully marine amniotes, we infer possible implications on mosasaurine evolution, aquatic adaptation, growth rates, and basal metabolic rates. Notably, we observe the occurrence of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone, with large and randomly shaped osteocyte lacunae (otherwise typical of fibrous bone) and particular microanatomical features in Dallasaurus, which displays, rather than a spongious inner organization, bone mass increase in its humeri and a tubular organization in its femora and ribs. The dominance of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone suggests growth rates and, by extension, basal metabolic rates intermediate between that of the extant leatherback turtle, Dermochelys, and those suggested for plesiosaur and ichthyosaur reptiles. Moreover, the microanatomical features of the relatively primitive genus Dallasaurus differ from those of more derived mosasaurines, indicating an intermediate stage of adaptation for a marine existence. The more complete image of the various microanatomical trends observed in mosasaurine skeletal elements supports the evolutionary convergence between this lineage of secondarily aquatically adapted squamates and cetaceans in the ecological transition from a coastal to a pelagic lifestyle.

  15. Characterization of ribonucleic acids from the venom glands of Crotalus durissus terrificus (Ophidia, Reptilia) after manual extraction of the venom. Studies on template activity and base composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucca, F. L.; Imaizumi, M. T.; Haddad, A.

    1974-01-01

    RNA synthesis in the venom glands of Crotalus durissus terrificus was stimulated by the manual extraction of the venom (milking). RNA was extracted from venom glands activated by milking and fractionated by centrifugation through sucrose density gradients. Template activity for protein synthesis and base composition of the RNA fractions were studied. RNA fractions that sediment between 18S and 4S had the highest template activity. The base composition analysis indicated that the 28S and 18S rRNA have a C+G content of 65.4 and 58% respectively. The `melting' temperature (Tm) of DNA in 0.15m-NaCl–0.015m-trisodium citrate, pH7.0, was 85°C, corresponding to a C+G content of 38%. The base ratio of the RNA fractions that showed a high template activity was intermediate between that of rRNA and homologous DNA. The possible role of these fractions in the synthesis of the two main toxins (crotoxin and crotamine) of the South American rattlesnake's venom is discussed. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:4463939

  16. Anatomy of the Enigmatic Reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Triassic of Germany and Its Relevance for the Origin of Sauria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, Gabriela; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Müller, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The holotype and only known specimen of the enigmatic small reptile Elachistosuchus huenei Janensch, 1949 from the Upper Triassic (Norian) Arnstadt Formation of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany) is redescribed using μCT scans of the material. This re-examination revealed new information on the morphology of this taxon, including previously unknown parts of the skeleton such as the palate, braincase, and shoulder girdle. Elachistosuchus is diagnosed especially by the presence of the posterolateral process of the frontal, the extension of the maxillary tooth row to the posterior margin of the orbit, the free posterior process of the jugal, and the notched anterior margin of the interclavicle. Phylogenetic analyses using two recently published character-taxon matrices recovered conflicting results for the phylogenetic position of Elachistosuchus-either as an archosauromorph, as a lepidosauromorph or as a more basal, non-saurian diapsid. These different placements highlight the need of a thorough revision of critical taxa and new character sets used for inferring neodiapsid relationships.

  17. Homonota fasciata Duméril y Bibron, 1839 (Reptilia, Squamata, Phyllodactylidae. Primer registro para la provincia de Corrientes (República Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcione, Camila

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Homonota fasciata Duméril & Bibron, 1839. República Argentina, Provincia de Corrientes, Departamento Bella Vista, Cuarta Sección, Colonia Progreso, Loma Sur, Toropí (28°35'55" S; 59°03'38" W (Figura 1. Colectores: Eduardo Etchepare, María del Rosario Ingaramo, Camila Falcione y Roberto Aguirre. 05 de abril de 2011. Se colectaron 4 ejemplares adultos (2 machos y 2 hembras y 1 juvenil, depositados en la Colección Herpetológica de la Universidad Nacional del Nordeste (UNNEC-11212, UNNEC-11213, UNNEC- 11214, UNNEC-11215 y UNNEC-11216.

  18. A study on the Gut contents of six Leathery Turtles Dermochelys Coriacea (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Testudines: Dermochelyidae) from British waters and from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den J.C.; Nierop, van M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopical investigations of the gut contents of six individuals of Dermochelys coriacea from southern England and the North Sea revealed the presence in all of these of numerous nematocysts, mainly scyphozoan. Only six species of Scyphozoa occur in British shallow waters and in the North Sea,

  19. Systematics and phylogeny of Sitana (Reptilia: Agamidae) of Peninsular India, with the description of one new genus and five new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deepak, V.; Giri, V.B.; Asif, M.; Dutta, S.K.; Vyas, R.; Zambre, A.M.; Bhosale, H.; Karanth, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    We revise the taxonomy of the agamid genus Sitana Cuvier, 1829, a widely distributed terrestrial lizard from the Indian subcontinent based on detailed comparative analyses of external morphology, osteology and molecular data. We sampled 81 locations spread over 160,000 km2 in Peninsular India includ

  20. Genetic Evidence of Hybridization between the Endangered Native Species Iguana delicatissima and the Invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae in the Lesser Antilles: Management Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Vuillaume

    Full Text Available The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact of interspecific hybridization on the decline of I. delicatissima. 59 I. delicatissima (5 localities, 47 I. iguana (12 localities and 27 hybrids (5 localities, who were all identified based on morphological characters, have been genotyped at 15 microsatellites markers. We also sequenced hybrids using ND4 mitochondrial loci to further investigate mitochondrial introgression. The genetic clustering of species and hybrid genetic assignment were performed using a comparative approach, through the implementation of a Discriminant Analysis of Principal Component (DAPC based on statistics, as well as genetic clustering approaches based on the genetic models of several populations (Structure, NewHybrids and HIest, in order to get full characterization of hybridization patterns and introgression dynamics across the islands. The iguanas identified as hybrids in the wild, thanks to morphological analysis, were all genetically F1, F2, or backcrosses. A high proportion of individuals were also the result of a longer-term admixture. The absence of reproductive barriers between species leads to hybridization when species are in contact. Yet morphological and behavioral differences between species could explain why males I. iguana may dominate I. delicatissima, thus resulting in short-term species displacement and extinction by hybridization and recurrent introgression from I. iguana toward I. delicatissima. As a consequence, I. delicatissima gets eliminated through introgression, as observed in recent population history over several islands. These results have profound implications for species management of the endangered I. delicatissima and practical conservation recommendations are being discussed in the light of these findings.

  1. Does diet in lacertid lizards reflect prey availability? Evidence for selective predation in the Aeolian wall lizard, Podarcis raffonei (Mertens, 1952 (Reptilia, Lacertidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Lo Cascio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the invertebrate fauna occurring on Scoglio Faraglione, a tiny Aeolian island (AeolianArchipelago, NE Sicily inhabited by a population of the critically endangered lacertid lizard Podarcis raffonei(Mertens, 1952, was censused at different seasons and the resulting data were then compared with dataobtained analysing prey composition and prey abundance in the diet of the lizards occurring on the same islet.The diet of Podarcis raffonei was mainly based on insects and other arthropods. The results indicate that dietcomposition is not directly influenced by prey availability and temporal prey abundance, and that there isstrong evidence indicating selective predation. Lizards prey upon a number of arthropod categories fewer thanthat recorded in field. Some invertebrate taxa (e.g. Diptera and Gastropoda are really less attractive for lizardsand are rarely preyed or not preyed at all despite their spatial and/or temporal abundance. This suggests thatPodarcis raffonei is able to operate a hierarchical choice within the range of prey items constituting its preyspectrum, probably through the ability to discriminate between prey chemicals or visually oriented predation.

  2. A retrospective study of mortality in varanid lizards (Reptilia: Squamata: Varanidae) at the Bronx Zoo: implications for husbandry and reproductive management in zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendyk, Robert W; Newton, Alisa L; Baumer, Megan

    2013-03-01

    Varanid lizards have been maintained in zoological parks for more than a century, yet few studies to date have attempted to pinpoint significant health issues affecting their management or areas of captive husbandry that are in need of improvement. In an effort to identify and better understand some of the husbandry-related challenges and health issues specifically affecting varanids in zoos, this study examined mortality in 16 species maintained at the Bronx Zoo between 1968 and 2009. Out of 108 records reviewed, complete necropsy reports were available for 85 individuals. Infection-related processes including bacterial (15.3%), protozoal (12.9%), nematode (9.4%), and fungal (3.5%) infections accounted for the greatest number of deaths (47.1%). Noninfectious diseases including female reproductive disorders (7.1%), neoplasia (7.1%), gout (10.8%), and hemipenal prolapse (1.3%) accounted for 29.4% of deaths. Multiple disease agents were responsible for 5.9% of deaths, and a cause for death could not be determined for 17.7% of individuals. Reproductive complications accounted for 11.5% of female deaths, but were identified in 23.1% of females. Although not necessarily the cause for death, gout was present in 18.8% of individuals. Differences in mortality between species, genders, and origin (captive-bred vs. wild-caught) were also evaluated. The results of this study corroborate earlier findings that identify bacterial infections, neoplasia, female reproductive disorders, gout, and endoparasitism as major sources of mortality in captive varanids. In light of these results, we discuss potential etiologies and offer recommendations for improving captive management practices in zoos. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.

  4. Catalogue of the Type Specimens of Amphibians and Reptiles in the Herpetological Museum of the Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences:IV. Lizards (Reptilia, Sauria)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo WANG; Ke JIANG; Jiatang LI; Yuezhao WANG; Daode YANG

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we report the six type specimens and two paratypes of eight lizard species in the Herpetological Museum of the Chengdu Institute of Biology (CIB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). Each entry provides the information of the original description, the catalog number of the holotype, sex, type locality, and information of allotype and paratype (if any), number and distribution of deposited specimens, and comments. Additionally, two invalid species and one invalid subspecies are discussed.

  5. Proterodiplostome Parasites (Digenea, Proterodiplostomidae of the Caiman, Caiman crocodilus yacare (Reptilia, Crocodylia in the Pantanal mato-Grossense, Brazil, with the description of two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B. Catto

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new species are described from the caiman. Caiman crocodilus yacare. Proterodiplostomum breve n. sp. differs from all other species in the genus by the following chacacteristics: (1 the paraprostate gland is shorter and club-shaped; (2 the genital cone is, in average, eight times longer than that of P. medusae; (3 the genital atrium is larger and without pseudosuckers; (4 the oral sucker and pharynx are longer; and (5 there are larger numbers of papillae surrounding the tribocytic organ (40 against 20 in P. longum, 16 in p. tumidilum, 8 in P. ophidum, and 16-18 in P. medusae. Proterodiplostomum globulare n. sp. differs from all the other species in the fenus by the following characteristics: (1 from P. tumidilum, P. lomgum, P. medusae, and P. breve n. sp. for the absense of pseudosuckers or muscular bunches in the inferior wall of the genital atrium; (2 the shape of the paraprostate gland, which is globular and not cylindrical as in P. longum, P. tumidilum, P. medusae, and P. ophidum; (3 the size of the tribocytic organ 201-407 long, 183-495 wide, while is 138-270 long, 102-292 wide in P. medusae, and 138-270 long, 255 wide in P. ophidum; (4 the number of papillae in the tribocytic organ (18-20 in P. globulare and 16-18 in P. medusae, and 8 in P. ophidum. Specimens belonging to six other species of proterodiplostomes are recorded for the first time infecting the caiman, C. c. yacare in the Pantanal Mato-grossense, Brazil, namely: Proterodiplostomum medusae, P. tumidilum, Cystodiplostomum hollyi, Prolecithodiplostomum constrictum, Paradiplostomum abbreviatum, and Herpetodiplostomum caimancola.

  6. Using maximum entropy to predict the distribution of a critically endangered reptile species (Eryx jaculus, Reptilia: Boidae at its Northern range limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Gherghel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The sand boa (Eryx jaculus is one of the least known and rarest reptile species in Europe. InRomania, the sand boa is the rarest reptile species with only four locality records being known; atCernavodă, Cărpiniş-Giuvegea, Cochirleni and Mahmudia (Kirițescu 1903; Fuhn & Vancea 1961; Zinke &Hielscher 1990. To estimate the predictors and the probability distribution of the target species (Eryxjaculus we used MaxEnt 3.3. The potential distribution model of E. jaculus in Romania have a very goodscore performance (AUC = 0.959. The most important variables for the model are BIO13 (92.5% ofcontribution, BIO9 (3.2% of contribution, BIO17 (3% of contribution and BIO6 (1.3% of contribution.A previously mentioned hypothesis regarding the extinction of the sand boa from Romania hold theconstruction of the Danube River – Black Sea canal as the main responsable factor, this constructionhaving destroyed most of the natural habitats in which the species has been recorded (Krecsak & Iftime2006. We also support this hypothesis as the generated model indicates a suitable niche for the speciesalong the current canal area.

  7. [The first case of Ophionyssus natricis (Gervais, 1844) on a sea snake (Natrix tessellata, Laurente 1768) (Reptilia: Squamata: Colubridae) in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Bilal

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to increase information about Ophionyssus natricis (Gervais, 1844) detected on the sea snake (Natrix tessellata). The mite individuals collected from the cage of a sea snake were brought to our laboratory by the owner of the snake. They werepreserved in 70% alcohol, and then the mites were mounted on slides in Canada balsam, after making them transparent in lacto phenol for a few days. They were identified to species in respect of their morphological characters under the light microscope. A total of nine mite individuals were collected from the cage of a sea snake, and all of them were identified as Ophionyssus natricis as the result of microscopical examination. Ophionyssus natricis was recorded from the sea snake for the first time in Turkey. knowledge about this mite is provided in this paper.

  8. Revision of the phylogeny and chorology of the tribe Iphisini with the revalidation of Colobosaura kraepelini Werner, 1910 (Reptilia, Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciali, Pier; Martínez, Nicolás; Köhler, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The family Gymnophthalmidae contains nearly 235 species with a distribution range from southern Mexico to central Argentina as well as in the Antilles. Among gymnophthalmids, the genus Colobosaura is a member of the tribe Iphisini, and currently is considered monotypic (C. modesta). The diversity of the tribe was studied recently, with the erection of several new genera. In this work genetic and morphological data of specimens of Colobosaura recently collected in Paraguay were analyzed. Genetic (16S barcode) data indicate that these samples are not conspecific with C. modesta and they are allocated to the nominal species C. kraepelini. Because the original primary type of the latter taxon is considered to be lost, a neotype (SMF 101370) is designated for this species and a redescription provided based on our material. Colobosaura kraepelini is distributed in the Humid Chaco, being the only member of the whole tribe in this ecoregion. PMID:28769654

  9. The snake family Psammophiidae (Reptilia: Serpentes): phylogenetics and species delimitation in the African sand snakes (Psammophis Boie, 1825) and allied genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher M R; Barker, Nigel P; Villet, Martin H; Broadley, Donald G; Branch, William R

    2008-06-01

    This study constitutes the first evolutionary investigation of the snake family Psammophiidae--the most widespread, most clearly defined, yet perhaps the taxonomically most problematic of Africa's family-level snake lineages. Little is known of psammophiid evolutionary relationships, and the type genus Psammophis is one of the largest and taxonomically most complex of the African snake genera. Our aims were to reconstruct psammophiid phylogenetic relationships and to improve characterisation of species boundaries in problematic Psammophis species complexes. We used approximately 2500 bases of DNA sequence from the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, and 114 terminals covering all psammophiid genera and incorporating approximately 75% of recognised species and subspecies. Phylogenetic reconstructions were conducted primarily in a Bayesian framework and we used the Wiens/Penkrot protocol to aid species delimitation. Rhamphiophis is diphyletic, with Rhamphiophis acutus emerging sister to Psammophylax. Consequently we transfer the three subspecies of Rhamphiophis acutus to the genus Psammophylax. The monotypic genus Dipsina is sister to Psammophis. The two species of Dromophis occupy divergent positions deeply nested within Psammophis, and we therefore relegate Dromophis to the synonymy of Psammophis. Our results allow division of the taxonomically problematic Psammophis 'sibilans' species complex into two monophyletic entities, provisionally named the 'phillipsii' and 'subtaeniatus' complexes. Within these two clades we found support for the status of many existing species, but not for a distinction between P.p. phillipsii and P. mossambicus. Additionally, P. cf. phillipsii occidentalis deserves species status as the sister taxon of P. brevirostris.

  10. Notes on the Herpetofauna of surinam : IX. Xenodon Werneri Eiselt, a poorly known snake from Guiana, with notes on Waglerophis Merremii (Wagler) (Reptilia: Serpentes: Colubridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Xenodon werneri Eiselt is redescribed on the basis of new material from Surinam and French Guiana. Its distribution and the Zoogeographie meaning of it are discussed. A key to the species of Xenodon in Guiana is presented. From the present data it appears that Waglerophis merremii (Wagler) is absent

  11. A new species of Serpentirhabdias Tkach, Kuzmin & Snyder, 2014 (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) parasitic in the brown ground snake Atractus major Boulenger (Reptilia: Serpentes: Dipsadidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2014-10-01

    Serpentirhabdias atracti n. sp. is described based on specimens discovered in the lung of Atractus major Boulenger from Caxiuanã National Forest, Pará, Brazil. The new species is assigned to Serpentirhabdias Tkach, Kuzmin & Snyder, 2014 based on morphological characters (comparatively thin body cuticle without prominent inflations, arrangement of circumoral papillae in two lateral groups, pre-equatorial position of vulva, eggs in uteri at early cleavage stages), as well as because of its parasitism in snakes. The new species is most similar to S. vellardi (Pereira, 1928) due to the absence of lips and buccal capsule, similar body dimensions, and the specificity to dipsadid snakes in Brazil. The two species differ in the shape of the tail (bulbous dilatation in the posterior part followed by a thread-like tail tip present in S. atracti n. sp.), the width of the oesophagus, and the size of the excretory glands. Serpentirhabdias atracti n. sp. is the sixth species of this genus found in the Neotropical Region.

  12. Activities That May Influence the Risk of Crocodile (Crocodylus Acutus: Reptilia: Crocodilidae) Attack to Humans in the Tempisque River Area, Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval-Hernández, Iván; Duran-Apuy, Alejandro; Quirós-Valerio, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest populations of crocodiles in Costa Rica is located at the Tempisque River. The species is threatened by habitat loss and poaching; but its populations have grown due to the protection given by law. The research was conducted in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We made a characterization of popular knowledge, activities and perceptions of 374 residents of the study area. It was found that 55% believe that the crocodiles are abundant, 70% believe that populations have increased. The m...

  13. Skull osteology of the Eocene amphisbaenian Spathorhynchus fossorium (Reptilia, Squamata) suggests convergent evolution and reversals of fossorial adaptations in worm lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Johannes; Hipsley, Christy A; Maisano, Jessica A

    2016-11-01

    The fossorial amphisbaenians, or worm lizards, are characterized by a suite of specialized characters in the skull and postcranium, however fossil evidence suggests that at least some of these shared derived traits evolved convergently. Unfortunately the lack of detailed knowledge of many fossil taxa has rendered a more precise interpretation difficult. Here we describe the cranial anatomy of the oldest-known well-preserved amphisbaenian, Spathorhynchus fossorium, from the Eocene Green River Formation, Wyoming, USA, using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT). This taxon possesses one of the most strongly reinforced crania known among amphisbaenians, with many dermal bones overlapping each other internally. In contrast to modern taxa, S. fossorium has a paired orbitosphenoid, lacks a true compound bone in the mandible, and possesses a fully enclosed orbital rim. The last feature represents a highly derived structure in that the jugal establishes contact with the frontal internally, reinforcing the posterior orbital margin. S. fossorium also possesses a strongly modified Vidian canal with a previously unknown connection to the ventral surface of the parabasisphenoid. Comparison with the closely related fossil taxon Dyticonastis rensbergeri reveals that these derived traits are also shared by the latter species and potentially represent synapopmorphies of an extinct Paleogene clade of amphisbaenians. The presence of a reinforced orbital rim suggests selection against the loss of a functional eye and indicates an ecology potentially different from modern taxa. Given the currently accepted phylogenetic position of Spathorhynchus and Dyticonastis, we predict that supposedly 'unique' cranial traits traditionally linked to fossoriality such as a fused orbitosphenoid and the reduction of the eye show a more complex character history than previously assumed, including both parallel evolution and reversals to superficially primitive conditions. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  14. Phylogeography of Mabuya maculilabris (Reptilia) from São Tomé Island (Gulf of Guinea) inferred from mtDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, José; Harris, D James; Brehm, António

    2005-11-01

    The pattern of genetic variation of the lizard Mabuya maculilabris from São Tomé Island (Gulf of Guinea) was investigated using a combination of three mitochondrial DNA gene fragments. Forty-eight haplotypes were recovered among 66 individuals covering the whole island. The genealogy inferred from the most parsimonious network of haplotypes allows us to detect two main and long branches departing from the putative group of oldest haplotypes. The tips of these branches exhibit star-like phylogenies, which may indicate of recently expanded populations, most probably from a small number of founders. A nested clade analysis suggests a complex pattern of past events that gave rise to the extant geographical pattern found in the haplotype distribution: past and allopatric fragmentation, range expansion, restricted gene flow and long-distance dispersal. These results are consistent with the complex geological history of the island where important volcanic activity with extensive lava flows has occurred during several periods. Mismatch-distribution analysis and AMOVA also support these conclusions. Substantial genetic structuring among these lizards was detected as well as high levels of differentiation between the southern edge populations (particularly those from the Rolas Islet) and the remaining ones. However, variation is low relative to the geological age of the island. Our results indicate that patterns of variation observed in reptiles in other oceanic islands are not indicative of those observed in the islands of the Gulf of Guinea.

  15. Preliminary Data on Age Estimation and Body Size of the Dwarf Lizard, Parvilacerta parva (Boulenger, 1887 (Reptilia: Lacertilia from Akşehir, Konya (Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batuhan Yaman Yakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, age determination was done by using the skeletochronology method on Akşehir, Konya (Turkey, 14 (5♂♂; 9♀♀ Parvilacerta parva specimens. Cross-sections of femurs were examined in total 14 individuals, the lowest number of LAGs was seen in one female and one male individuals as 4, the highest number of LAGs were seen in two female individuals as 8. Average SVL was found 50.8 mm (SD=2.27 in male individuals, and 53.1 mm (SD = 3.27 in females. For all the samples, the age-length equation was calculated as SVL (mm = 37.82 + (2.47 * age. As a result of Pearson correlation analysis, a significant positive correlation (r=0.93, P˂0.01 between age and SVL. Pileus length does not increase constantly with age (r=0.007, P=0.98, while pileus width increases normally together with age (r=0.212, P=0.46.

  16. Cryptic diversity in Ptyodactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) from the northern Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates uncovered by an integrative taxonomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó-Riudalbas, Marc; Metallinou, Margarita; de Pous, Philip; Els, Johannes; Jayasinghe, Sithum; Péntek-Zakar, Erika; Wilms, Thomas; Al-Saadi, Saleh; Carranza, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    The Hajar Mountains of south-eastern Arabia form an isolated massif surrounded by the sea to the east and by a large desert to the west. As a result of their old geological origin, geographical isolation, complex topography and local climate, these mountains provide an important refuge for endemic and relict species of plants and animals. With 19 species restricted to the Hajar Mountains, reptiles are the vertebrate group with the highest level of endemicity, becoming an excellent model for understanding the patterns and processes that generate and shape diversity in this arid mountain range. The geckos of the Ptyodactylus hasselquistii species complex are the largest geckos in Arabia and are found widely distributed across the Arabian Mountains, constituting a very important component of the reptile mountain fauna. Preliminary analyses suggested that their diversity in the Hajar Mountains may be higher than expected and that their systematics should be revised. In order to tackle these questions, we inferred a nearly complete calibrated phylogeny of the genus Ptyodactylus to identify the origin of the Hajar Mountains lineages using information from two mitochondrial and four nuclear genes. Genetic variability within the Hajar Mountains was further investigated using 68 specimens of Ptyodactylus from 46 localities distributed across the entire mountain range and sequenced for the same genes as above. The molecular phylogenies and morphological analyses as well as niche comparisons indicate the presence of two very old sister cryptic species living in allopatry: one restricted to the extreme northern Hajar Mountains and described as a new species herein; the other distributed across the rest of the Hajar Mountains that can be confidently assigned to the species P. orlovi. Similar to recent findings in the geckos of the genus Asaccus, the results of the present study uncover more hidden diversity in the northern Hajar Mountains and stress once again the importance of this unique mountain range as a hot spot of biodiversity and a priority focal point for reptile conservation in Arabia.

  17. The morphology of the lung of the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis (Reptilia: Ophidia: Elapidae). A scanning and transmission electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, J N

    1989-12-01

    The lung of a snake, the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis), has been investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This species has only one lung, the right, which is long and occupies most of the pleuro-peritoneal cavity. Grossly, the lung could be divided into two discrete anatomical regions: an anterior respiratory area made up of a honeycomb network of capillary-bearing partitions, and a posterior membranous saccular region. The exchange region consisted of a central air duct, the bronchus, which was delineated both dorsally and laterally by morphologically and spatially distinct hierarchically arranged septa. The primary septa gave rise to the secondary septa from which the much deeper peripherally situated tertiary septa that formed the immediate openings to the faveoli arose. The faveoli were rather parallel elongated pockets separated by partitions, the interfaveolar septa, and terminated peripherally on the pleura. A double capillary disposition of the blood capillaries was observed on the relatively thick primary and secondary septa. These septa were lined by a heterogenous epithelium made up of ciliated cells, secretory cells, and smooth squamous cells. This epithelium was continued from the trachea and the bronchus. At the faveolar level the blood capillaries exhibited a single system where they formed a matrix on both sides of the partitions. The surface of the faveoli was covered by two types of cells: Type I cells were squamous and their remarkably attenuated cytoplasmic arborisations were notably extensive while the Type II cells were rather cuboidal, bore stubby microvilli and contained the characteristic osmiophilic lamellated bodies. On the basis of the clearly evident complete differentiation of the pneumocytes and the presence of both the double and single capillary systems, it was observed that this lung, and apparently the reptilian lung in general, manifests a transitional developmental and structural stage in the evolution of the lungs of the air-breathing vertebrates from lower through to higher vertebrates. The gross and ultrastructural heterogeneity of the organisation of the ophidian lung is illustrated and the dearth of pulmonary morphological data in this taxon is pointed out.

  18. BYCATCH OF Helicops angulatus (LINNAEUS 1758 (REPTILIA: SQUAMATA: COLUBRIDAE IN HOOP-TRAPS USED TO CAPTURE FRESH WATER TURTLES ON THE COAST OF PARÁ, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMIL JOSÉ HERNÁNDEZ-RUZ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre septiembre de 2007 y agosto de 2009, seis excursiones de campo se llevaron a cabo en la costa norte de Brasil (islas Romana y Maiandeua, estado de Pará para la recolección de especímenes de tortugas de agua dulce (Rhinoclemmys punctularia y Kinosternon scorpioides en posos naturales. Utilizamos trampas en embudo. 35 ejemplares de la serpiente acuática Helicops angulatus, fueron capturados como pesca incidental en las trampas. Por lo tanto, además de las tortugas, el procedimiento puede ser útil para la toma de muestras de las poblaciones de serpientes acuáticas.

  19. Genetic evidence of hybridization between the endangered native species Iguana delicatissima and the invasive Iguana iguana (Reptilia, Iguanidae) in the Lesser Antilles: management Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Vuillaume; Victorien Valette; Olivier Lepais; Frédéric Grandjean; Michel Breuil

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide increase of hybridization in different groups is thought to have become more important with the loss of isolating barriers and the introduction of invasive species. This phenomenon could result in the extinction of endemic species. This study aims at investigating the hybridization dynamics between the endemic and threatened Lesser Antillean iguana (Iguana delicatissima) and the invasive common green iguana (Iguana iguana) in the Lesser Antilles, as well as assessing the impact ...

  20. Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Heitor de Oliveira; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2013-03-01

    The use of ethnoecological tools to evaluate possible damage and loss of biodiversity related to the populations of species under some degree of threat may represent a first step towards integrating the political management of natural resources and conservation strategies. From this perspective, this study investigates fishermen's ecological knowledge about sea turtles and attitudes towards the conservation and bycatch in Ilhéus, Southern Bahia, Brazil. Fishermen experts semi-structured interviews were performed using snowball sampling method. The interviews consisted of a series of questions relating to the fishermen's profile, structure and work equipment, the local ecological knowledge of fishermen about sea turtles and bycatch, a projective test, attitudes towards turtle conservation and beliefs and taboos regarding turtles. Indicators for quantitative comparisons of respondents in terms of their broad knowledge and attitudes towards turtle conservation were created. Correlation analyses were made between indicators of knowledge and attitude as well as the relationship between education level and knowledge and attitudes. Thirty experts were interviewed for the study. The local ecological knowledge and attitudes of fishermen towards the conservation of sea turtles were respectively medium (0.43) and moderate (0.69) according to experts (based on Likert scale and Cronbach's Alpha). Potential areas of spawning were reported from Barra Grande to Una covering the entire coast of Ilhéus. Methods for identifying the animal, behavior, and popular names were described by fishermen. The most recent captures of turtles were attributed to fishing line, but according to the respondents, lobster nets and shrimp traps are more likely to capture turtles. Knowledge and attitudes were weakly inversely correlated (r = -0.38, p = 0.04), and the education level of the respondent showed a positive correlation with positive attitudes towards turtle conservation (H = 8.33; p = 0.04). Life history, habitat, specific and exogenous taboos, beliefs and the use of hawksbill turtle to make glasses and other handcrafts are also reported in the study. Monitoring of spawning areas, preservation of traditional practices, strategies to moderate the use of fishery resources and the local ecological knowledge/attitudes can provide data to improve the conservation practices and management of sea turtles.

  1. A study on the Gut contents of six Leathery Turtles Dermochelys Coriacea (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Testudines: Dermochelyidae) from British waters and from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den J.C.; Nierop, van M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopical investigations of the gut contents of six individuals of Dermochelys coriacea from southern England and the North Sea revealed the presence in all of these of numerous nematocysts, mainly scyphozoan. Only six species of Scyphozoa occur in British shallow waters and in the North Sea, vi

  2. Clima, distribución geográfica y viviparismo en especies de Liolaemus (Reptilia; Squamata: cuando las hipótesis se ponen a prueba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix B. Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La distribución de los reptiles, dada su dependencia de la temperatura, puede verse restringida en función del clima. En particular, se han planteado tres hipótesis que vinculan el clima con la distribución y el viviparismo en las especies de reptiles: i hipótesis de clima variable, ii hipótesis del clima frío e iii hipótesis de manipulación materna. Entre las lagartijas de Sudamérica las especies del género Liolaemus se distribuyen tanto en ambientes cálidos como fríos y más del 50 % de ellas son vivíparas. En este trabajo estudiamos 47 especies de Liolaemus, tomando datos climáticos de sus sitios de colecta, su temperatura de preferencia (Tpref, el coeficiente de variación de la misma (CV y los límites de tolerancia térmica (TT. Nuestros resultados no apoyan la hipótesis de clima variable, aunque ésta ha sido sustentada en estudios anteriores. Se encontró relación entre viviparismo y altitud, pero no entre viviparismo y las variables térmicas ambientales. Finalmente, las especies vivíparas de Liolaemus mostraron un comportamiento termorregulador más preciso que las especies ovíparas, reforzando la hipótesis de manipulación materna.

  3. DISTRIBUCIÓN POTENCIAL DE Podocnemis lewyana (REPTILIA: PODOCNEMIDIDAE Y SU POSIBLE FLUCTUACIÓN BAJO ESCENARIOS DE CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO GLOBAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ortíz-Yusty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se implementó el modelaje de distribución de especies para establecer el rango de distribución potencial de Podocnemis lewyana, explorar los componentes del clima que pueden influenciar dicha distribución y evaluar posibles fluctuaciones de su distribución bajo escenarios de clima futuro. Los modelos obtenidos predicen una distribución continua de sur a norte por todo el río Magdalena, desde los municipios de Rivera y Palermo en el departamento de Huila, hasta los departamentos de Atlántico y Magdalena en el norte. La temperatura fue el elemento del clima que más influyó en la distribución de P. lewyana; esta especie tiende a estar presente en climas cálidos y con poca variabilidad en la temperatura. El modelo de distribución transferido a los escenarios de clima futuro predicen un aumento en el rango geográfico de P. lewyana. Sin embargo, teniendo en cuenta las preferencias de hábitat de esta especie y su fuerte asociación con los cuerpos de agua, este resultado debe tomarse con cautela, dado que el modelo solo tuvo en cuenta variables climáticas terrestres. Dadas las características de historia de vida de esta especie (presencia de determinación sexual dependiente de la temperatura, alta temperatura pivotal y un rango de transición de temperatura muy estrecho, y el efecto negativo de los cambios en los regímenes hidrológicos en la mortalidad embrionaria, la expansión del área potencial de P. lewyana en el futuro no significa que esta especie no vaya a verse afectada por el cambio climático global.

  4. [Influence of temperature on the rate of spermatogenesis, duration of spermatogenic activity and development of secondary sex characteristics in the wall-lizard, Lacerta muralis L. (Reptilia, Lacertidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, J; Saint Girons, H

    1975-01-01

    A series of experiments was carried out primarily between the 22nd of March and the 27th of June, on 60 Lacerta muralis maintained either under semi-natural conditions in large enclosures or in constant-temperature cabinets maintained at 17.5 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 22.5 degrees C and 27.5 degrees C with a natural photoperiod. Following an injection of tritiated thymidine, the animals were sacrificed at regular intervals and the rate of spermatogenesis was deduced from the progression of the radioactive front in the seminiferous epithelium. The following results were obtained: 1. The rate of spermatogenesis is temperature dependent and increases by a factor of approximately 1.2 per degree centigrade between 17.5 and 27.5 degrees C. The rate is seven times greater at 27.5 degrees C than at 17.5 degrees C. 2. Under semi-natural conditions the interval leptotene-spermatozooid lasts 70 days, slightly less than that found at a constant temperature of 22.5 degrees C. 3. Under semi-natural conditions the rate of spermatogenesis was similar to that in August-September, April-May and May-June which indicates that the lizards were able to maintain their body temperature at an equivalent level by behavioural temperature regulation during the greater part of their activity period. 4. Under semi-natural conditions, or at temperatures in excess of 22 degrees C, spermiogenesis lasts 1.8 times as long as meiosis. 5. At constant temperatures lower than 21 degrees C the development of the cellular lineage is aressted at the young spermatid stage. 6. Constant temperatures between 17.5 and 22.5 degrees C had no effect on the time of involution of the testis at the start of summer. 7. At low constant temperatures, secondary sexual characteristics regress before the usual time: after 4 weeks at 20 degrees C and after 8 weeks at 17.5 degrees C. An expected regression after 8 weeks produced after exposure to a temperature of 22.5 degrees C is probably due to factors other than temperature. 8. In the case of different individuals kept either under natural, semi-natural or experimental conditions, there was no close relationship observed between the time of involution of the seminiferous tubules and regression of secondary sexual characters. ters. 9. These results confirm the concept of endogenous control of sexual regression at the commencement of summer and argue in favour of 2 separate gonadotrophic hormones in reptiles.

  5. Microanatomical and Histological Features in the Long Bones of Mosasaurine Mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata) – Implications for Aquatic Adaptation and Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Lindgren, Johan; Pellegrini, Rodrigo; Lee, Andrew H.; Germain, Damien; Polcyn, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. Methodology/Principal Findings The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the internal organization (microanatomy) and tissue types and characteristics (histology) of propodial and epipodial bones in one lineage of mosasauroids; i.e., the subfamily Mosasaurinae. By using microanatomical and histological data from limb bones in combination with recently acquired knowledge on the inner structure of ribs and vertebrae, and through comparisons with extant squamates and semi-aquatic to fully marine amniotes, we infer possible implications on mosasaurine evolution, aquatic adaptation, growth rates, and basal metabolic rates. Notably, we observe the occurrence of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone, with large and randomly shaped osteocyte lacunae (otherwise typical of fibrous bone) and particular microanatomical features in Dallasaurus, which displays, rather than a spongious inner organization, bone mass increase in its humeri and a tubular organization in its femora and ribs. Conclusions/Significance The dominance of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone suggests growth rates and, by extension, basal metabolic rates intermediate between that of the extant leatherback turtle, Dermochelys, and those suggested for plesiosaur and ichthyosaur reptiles. Moreover, the microanatomical features of the relatively primitive genus Dallasaurus differ from those of more derived mosasaurines, indicating an intermediate stage of adaptation for a marine existence. The more complete image of the various microanatomical trends observed in mosasaurine skeletal elements supports the evolutionary convergence between this lineage of secondarily aquatically adapted squamates and cetaceans in the ecological transition from a coastal to a pelagic lifestyle. PMID:24146919

  6. [Ultrastructure of the "rudimentary secretory photoreceptors" (RSP) of the embryonic pineal body of Lacerta vivipara J. (Reptilia, Lacertilia) and the origin of the RSP of Sauropsida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiniel, A

    1975-10-20

    The "secretory rudimentary photoreceptor-cells" of Lacerta vivipara J., during embryonic stages, exhibit photosensory differentiations (disks). Our ontogenetic observations agree with the phylogenetic studies and support the concept of a "sensory cell line" (Colin, 1969) in the pineal organ of vertebrates.

  7. CICLO DE POSTURA ex situ DE Trachemys scripta ornata (Reptilia: Testudines: Emydidae EN RELACION CON RÉGIMEN CLIMÁTICO ANUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAIME RAMÍREZ-PERILLA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available 96% de la postura anual de Trachemys scripta ornata sucede entre los meses de noviem- bre hasta marzo con frecuencias máximas de oviposición en diciembre (34% y enero (23% correspondientes al período seco del año. No existe asociación (correlación de Pearson entre porcentaje de posturas promedio/mes vs. precipitación, humedad relativa o temperatura (ρ = -0,23; ρ = -0,08; ρ = 0,02 pero es positiva en relación con horas luz/día (ρ = 0,42.

  8. Revision of the phylogeny and chorology of the tribe Iphisini with the revalidation of Colobosaura kraepelini Werner, 1910 (Reptilia, Squamata, Gymnophthalmidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Cacciali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The family Gymnophthalmidae contains nearly 235 species with a distribution range from southern Mexico to central Argentina as well as in the Antilles. Among gymnophthalmids, the genus Colobosaura is a member of the tribe Iphisini, and currently is considered monotypic (C. modesta. The diversity of the tribe was studied recently, with the erection of several new genera. In this work genetic and morphological data of specimens of Colobosaura recently collected in Paraguay were analyzed. Genetic (16S barcode data indicate that these samples are not conspecific with C. modesta and they are allocated to the nominal species C. kraepelini. Because the original primary type of the latter taxon is considered to be lost, a neotype (SMF 101370 is designated for this species and a redescription provided based on our material. Colobosaura kraepelini is distributed in the Humid Chaco, being the only member of the whole tribe in this ecoregion.

  9. Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braga, Heitor de Oliveira; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    ... the political management of natural resources and conservation strategies. From this perspective, this study investigates fishermen's ecological knowledge about sea turtles and attitudes towards the conservation and bycatch...

  10. Establishing a New Species Encephalitozoon pogonae for the Microsporidian Parasite of Inland Bearded Dragon Pogona vitticeps Ahl 1927 (Reptilia, Squamata, Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Yuliya Y; Sakaguchi, Kanako; Paulsen, Daniel B

    2016-07-01

    The microsporidium parasitizing Inland Bearded Dragons Pogona vitticeps, and developing primarily in macrophages within foci of granulomatous inflammation of different organs, is described as a new species Encephalitozoon pogonae. Establishing the new species was based on sequencing the ITS-SSUrDNA region of the ribosomal gene and consequent SSUrDNA-inferred phylogenetic analyses, as well as on comparison of pathogenesis, host specificity, and ultrastructure among Encephalitozoon species and isolates. The new species is closely related to E. lacertae and E. cuniculi. Analysis of the literature suggests that this microsporidium has been reported previously as an unidentified microsporidian species or isolate of E. cuniculi and may represent a common infection in bearded dragons. All stages of E. pogonae develop in parasitophorous vacuoles. Uninucleate spores on methanol-fixed smears measured 2.1 × 1.1 μm, range 1.7-2.6 × 0.9-1.7 μm; on ultrathin sections spores measured 0.8-1.1 × 1.8-2.2 μm. Ultrastructural study revealed 3-6 polar filament coils, a mushroom-shaped polar disk, and a polar sac embracing half of the volume occupied by the lamellar polaroplast. In activated spores, polar filament everted eccentrically. The overall morphology and intracellular development of E. pogonae were similar to other Encepahalitozoon spp. We also review the existing data on microsporidia infecting reptiles. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  11. NEW FOSSIL VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM SAN GIOVANNI DI SINIS (LATE PLEISTOCENE, SARDINIA: THE LAST MAUREMYS (REPTILIA, TESTUDINES IN THE CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCESCO CHESI

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available New fossil vertebrates from the most representative Upper Pleistocene section (Tyrrhenian, MIS 5e of the outcrop of San Giovanni di Sinis (Oristano, Sardinia are here reported and described. The fossils, although scarce and fragmentary, document the occurrence of a terrapin (Mauremys sp. and the endemic Sardinian deer (Praemegaceros cazioti. Significant is the occurrence of the terrapin because it is the youngest representative of the genus in the central Mediterranean area where it is extinct at present. The Late Pleistocene extinction of Mauremys in Italy follows the same pattern of other Mediterranean reptiles, in being in some cases delayed on the islands. A comparison of the modern range of Mauremys and that of the pond turtle, Emys, as well as of their past ranges as evidenced by the fossil record, might suggest that some sort of thermophily (at least during pre-hatching stages characterized the former taxon and is responsible for its past and present distribution. SHORT NOTE

  12. Description and phylogenetic relationships of a new genus and two new species of lizards from Brazilian Amazonia, with nomenclatural comments on the taxonomy of Gymnophthalmidae (Reptilia: Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Guarino R; Hoogmoed, Marinus S; Cannatella, David C; Cassimiro, José; Gomes, Jerriane Oliveira; Ghellere, José Mário; Gomes, Jerriane Oliveira; Ghellere, José Mário; Nunes, Pedro M Sales; Pellegrino, Kátia C M; Salerno, Patricia; Souza, Sergio Marques De; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut

    2015-08-18

    We describe a new genus and two new species of gymnophthalmid lizards based on specimens collected from Brazilian Amazonia, mostly in the "arc of deforestation". The new genus is easily distinguished from other Gymnophthalmidae by having very wide, smooth, and imbricate nuchals, arranged in two longitudinal and 6-10 transverse rows from nape to brachium level, followed by much narrower, strongly keeled, lanceolate, and mucronate scales. It also differs from all other Gymnophthalmidae, except Iphisa, by the presence of two longitudinal rows of ventrals. The new genus differs from Iphisa by having two pairs of enlarged chinshields (one in Iphisa); posterior dorsal scales lanceolate, strongly keeled and not arranged in longitudinal rows (dorsals broad, smooth and forming two longitudinal rows), and lateral scales keeled (smooth). Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses based on morphological and molecular data indicate the new species form a clade that is most closely related to Iphisa. We also address several nomenclatural issues and present a revised classification of Gymnophthalmidae.

  13. A study on the Gut contents of six Leathery Turtles Dermochelys Coriacea (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Testudines: Dermochelyidae) from British waters and from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den J.C.; Nierop, van M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopical investigations of the gut contents of six individuals of Dermochelys coriacea from southern England and the North Sea revealed the presence in all of these of numerous nematocysts, mainly scyphozoan. Only six species of Scyphozoa occur in British shallow waters and in the North Sea, vi

  14. REDESCUBRIMIENTO DE MABUYA BERENGERAE, MABUYA PERGRAVIS (SQUAMATA: SCINCIDAE Y CONIOPHANES ANDRESENSIS (SQUAMATA: COLUBRIDAE Y EVALUACIÓN DE SU ESTADO DE AMENAZA EN LAS ISLAS DE SAN ANDRÉS Y PROVIDENCIA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ RANCES CAICEDO-PORTILLA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta nueva información sobre la taxonomía, la distribución y la historia natural de los lagartos Mabuya berengerae y M. pergravis; así como de la serpiente Coniophanes andresensis, tres especies endémicas y poco conocidas de las islas de San Andrés y Providencia, las cuales se creían muy raras e incluso extintas. A pesar del poco tiempo de estudio en las islas, se evidenció que los lagartos no son raros, encontrándose hasta ocho ejemplares cada media hora. La evaluación del estado de conservación según los parámetros de la IUCN para las tres especies, clasifica a M. berengerae y M. pergravis como especies casi amenazadas (NT y a C. andresensis como una especie en peligro crítico de extinción (CR. La pequeña área de distribución geográfica, el impacto antrópico y la introducción de especies exóticas pueden ser las principales causas de la disminución de la población de C. andresensis. Se analizaron algunos caracteres taxonómicos en M. berengerae (hasta ahora conocida de un solo ejemplar, encontrándose ciertas discrepancias que hacen necesaria su redefinición. Se recomienda realizar programas de investigación básica, conservación y educación, así como proteger los hábitats naturales de las islas.

  15. Divergence and long-distance overseas dispersals of island populations of the Ryukyu five-lined skink, Plestiodon marginatus (Scincidae: Squamata), in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan, as revealed by mitochondrial DNA phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Kazuki; Hikida, Tsutomu

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the historical biogeography of the Ryukyu five-lined skink, Plestiodon marginatus, and related species (P. stimpsonii and P. elegans). Our specific aims were to reveal the origin, tim- ing, and route of the colonization to three volcanic islands in the northern Tokara Group of the northern Ryukyus: Kuchinoshima, Nakanoshima, and Suwanosejima. We conducted phylogenetic analyses and divergence time estimation using a partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for P. marginatus collected from across its whole range (the northern and central Ryukyus), and for P. stimpsonii (from the Yaeyama Group of the southern Ryukyus) and P. elegans (from Taiwan). Our results suggest three major clades (A, B, and C). Clades A and B consist of P. marginatus, excluding the Kuchinoshima population, and Clade C consisted of the Kuchinoshima population, P. stimpsonii, and P. elegans. These clades are estimated to have diverged during the Late Miocene to the Late Pliocene. Among the three examined northern Tokara populations, the Kuchinoshima population was shown to be a sister group of P. stimpsonii. The two other populations from Nakanoshima and Suwanosejima Islands were closely related to P. marginatus from the northern part of the Okinawa Group and that from Kodakarajima Island in the southern Tokara Group, respectively. These populations are estimated to have diverged from their respective related spe cies in various ages of the Early to Late Pleistocene, suggesting that they colonized the islands by independent overseas dispersals of approximately 50-850 km via the Kuroshio Current. Taxonomic implications for P. marginatus are also discussed.

  16. Infecção pulmonar em dois lagartos simpátricos, Mabuya arajara (Scincidae) e Anolis brasiliensis na mata-úmida da Chapada do Araripe, Ceará, Nordeste do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Os parâmetros de infecção por parasitas pulmonares em dois lagartos simpátricos, Mabuya arajara e Anolis brasiliensis, da floresta úmida da encosta da Chapada do Araripe, Nordeste do Brasil, foram analisados entre setembro de 2009 e julho de 2010. Um total de 202 lagartos foi coletado, sendo 125 espécimes de Mabuya arajara e 77 de Anolis brasiliensis. M. arajara estava infectado pelo pentastomídeo Raillietiella mottae, enquanto A. brasiliensis apresentava infecção pelo nematódeo Rhabdias sp.,...

  17. Redescubrimiento de mabuya berengerae, mabuya pergravis (squamata: scincidae) y coniophanes andresensis (squamata: colubridae) y evaluación de su estado de amenaza en las islas de san andrés y providencia, colombia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Se presenta nueva información sobre la taxonomía, la distribución y la historia natural de los lagartos Mabuya berengerae y M. pergravis; así como de la serpiente Coniophanes andresensis, tres especies endémicas y poco conocidas de las islas de San Andrés y Providencia, las cuales se creían muy raras e incluso extintas. A pesar del poco tiempo de estudio en las islas, se evidenció que los lagartos no son raros, encontrándose hasta ocho ejemplares cada media hora. La evaluación del estado de c...

  18. Skrjabinodon heliocostai sp.n. (Nematoda, Pharyngodonidae parasitizing Mabuya frenata (Cope (Lacertilia, Scincidae in Brazil and the reallocation of Skrjabinodon capacyupanquii (Freitas, Vicente & Ibanez in the genus Thelandros Wedl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim J. Vicente

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report is related to an oxyurid nematode recovered from a reptilian host, Mabuya frenata (Cope, 1862 and the proposal of Skrjabinodon helicostai sp.n., based mainly on findings referring to the lateral alae, position of excretory pore and vulvar apertures, cuticular spines of the tail and aspect of the eggs. The examination of types of Skrjabinodon capacyupanquii (Freitas, Vicente & Ibanez, 1968 from a Peruvian lizard, indicated the reallocation of this species in the genus Thelandros Wedl., 1862, as T. capacyupanquii comb.n., based on the diameter of the caudal appendage of males and position of the vulvar aperture. The new species described herein represents the first report of a species of the genus Skrjabinodon Inglis, 1968 in South America.

  19. Extreme feeding behaviours in the Italian wall lizard, Podarcis siculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Capula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the occurrence of cannibalism, unusual predation on small reptiles [Hemidactylus turcicus (Reptilia, Gekkonidae], and foraging on small mammal carrion [Suncus etruscus (Mammalia, Soricidae] by P. siculus is reported.

  20. Analysis of the gut contents of Vipera aspis (Reptilia, Viperidae from an area of Central Italy (Tolfa Mountains, Latium: a new method to study the terrestrial small mammals / Contributo allo studio della microteriofauna di un'area dell'Italia centrale (Monti della Tolfa, Lazio mediante analisi del contenuto stomacale di Vipera aspis (Reptilia, Viperidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Capula

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A preliminary study of the trophic system between terrestrial small mammals and their specialized predator, the Asp Viper (Vipera aspis, was carried out through analysis of gut contents of 62 Vipera aspis specimens from 6 localities of Tolfa Mountains (Latium, Central Italy. Two different techniques were used in order to obtain the gut contents from a living viper: (i gently pressing its belly; (ii exposing the animal at a low temperature (<8 °C. Twelve out of 18 small mammal species occurring in this area were preyed by the vipers. The number of preyed species is very similar to that observed in the pellets of Tyto alba (Aves, Strigiformes from the same area. The only apparent exception is represented by Microtus savii: this mammal was never preyed by Vipera aspis, although being one of the principal preys of Tyto alba. These data indicate that the analysis of Vipera aspis gut contents could be utilized as a method to integrate faunistic observations on terrestrial micromammals obtained with both traditional and Barn Owl pellets data. Riassunto Nel presente contributo sono stati presi in esame i dati desunti dall'analisi dei contenuti stomacali di 62 esemplari di Vipera aspis catturati in 6 diverse stazioni dei Monti della Tolfa (Lazio, Italia centrale. Tali dati sono stati confrontati con quelli esistenti sui micromammiferi della medesima area ottenuti con l'analisi dei rigetti dei rapaci notturni e con i metodi tradizionali. Le vipere esaminate hanno predato 12 delle 18 specie di micromammiferi terrestri presenti nei Monti della Tolfa. Un numero simile di specie predate è stato osservato nella stessa area con il metodo dell'analisi dei rigetti del Barbagianni (Tyto alba. Tali dati indicano che la metodologia descritta può essere utilizzata efficacemente al fine di integrare i dati faunistici sui micromammiferi terrestri ottenuti con metodi tradizionali e con il metodo dell'analisi dei rigetti di rapaci notturni.

  1. Incubação artificial dos ovos e processo de eclosão em Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae Artificial egg incubation and hatching proccess in Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudimes, Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio de Barros Molina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial incubation of 558 eggs from 70 clutches of Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 were performed at São Paulo Zoo during 1992 and 1993. Hatching occurred when eggs were incubated between 25 and 31.5oC. Incubation time varied from 54 (at 31.5oC to 120 days (at 25oC, similarly to Trachemys scripla sspp. Hatchling used the caruncle to made small incisions in the egg shell, latter enlarged by movements of the head and forefeet. Hatching usually lasted from one to two days. Newborn's carapace and plastron showed their natural form few hours after the emergence from the egg shell. During the third or fourth week, caruncle usually disappeared, and yolk sac was completely absorbed. Average (x±sd measures of newborn were 3.55±0.18cm of carapace length, 3.35±0.17cm of plastron length, and 10.73±1.36g of weight.

  2. Egg retention and intrauterine embryonic development in Sceloporus aeneus (Reptilia: Phrynosomatidae: implications for the evolution of viviparity Retención de huevos y avance embrionario intrauterino en Sceloporus aeneus (Reptilia: Phrynosomatidae: implicaciones para la evolución de la viviparidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo García-Collazo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Egg retention (ER and intrauterine embryonic development (IED have been considered intermediate steps in the evolution from oviparity to viviparity. Sceloporus aeneus is an oviparous lizard that is closely related to the viviparous species (Sceloporus bicanthalis. The present study addresses the following 2 questions: 1 Are intermediate stages of egg retention (ER and IED present in populations of Sceloporus aeneus? and 2 Are ER and/or IED explained by elevation, precipitation or phylogenetic effects? Results indicate that in S. aeneus, ER differs among populations. ER was negatively related to altitude and pluvial precipitation, whereas average environmental temperature had no effect on ER or IER. In contrast to previous observations of oviparous species related to viviparous species, populations of S. aeneus with advanced IED are associated with environmental factors such as low elevation and aridity instead of high elevation and cold climate, whereas the comparative analysis shows that there are no significative evolutionary changes throughout the phylogeny, which means that the altitude has no effect on the transition to the evolution of viviparity in S. aeneus-S bicanthalis.La retención de huevos (ER y el desarrollo embrionario intrauterino (IED han sido considerados pasos intermedios hacia la viviparidad. Sceloporus aeneus es un lacertilio ovíparo estrechamente relacionado a una especie vivípara (Sceloporus bicanthalis. El presente estudio derivó de las preguntas: ¿El ER y el IED presentes en las poblaciones de S. aeneus son estadios intermedios a la viviparidad? ¿ER y/o IED son explicados por la temperatura, altitud, precipitación pluvial o son un efecto filogenético? En S. aeneus, el ER y el IED fueron diferentes entre poblaciones. Los resultados indicaron que la ER se relacionó negativamente con la altitud y la precipitación pluvial, mientras que no se encontró efecto con la temperatura ambiental. En contraste con observaciones previas en especies emparentadas con las especies vivíparas, los resultados de la presente investigación indican que en las poblaciones de S. aeneus estudiadas, el mayor avance en el IED lo presentaron los organismos que habitan en baja elevación y áreas secas en lugar de alta elevación y climas fríos. Por otro lado, el análisis comparativo mostró que no existen cambios evolutivos significativos en los valores a lo largo de la filogenia, lo que significa que la altitud no tiene un efecto significativo en la transición hacia la viviparidad en Sceloporus aeneus-S. bicanthalis.

  3. A new scincid lizard of the genus Leiolopisma from New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweifel, R.G.

    1972-01-01

    The lizard fauna of New Guinea numbers over 150 species (for a list, now well out-dated, see Loveridge, 1948), and probably more than two-thirds of these belong to the family Scincidae. With the exception of studies by Brown (1953, 1954) on the genus Emoia, the large and diverse scincid fauna has re

  4. An inconspicuous, conspicuous new species of Asian pipesnake, genus Cylindrophis (Reptilia: Squamata: Cylindrophiidae), from the south coast of Jawa Tengah, Java, Indonesia, and an overview of the tangled taxonomic history of C. ruffus (Laurenti, 1768).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieckbusch, Max; Mecke, Sven; Hartmann, Lukas; Ehrmantraut, Lisa; O'shea, Mark; Kaiser, Hinrich

    2016-03-20

    We describe a new species of Cylindrophis currently known only from Grabag, Purworejo Regency, Jawa Tengah Pro-vince (Central Java), Java, Indonesia. Cylindrophis subocularis sp. nov. can be distinguished from all congeners by the presence of a single, eponymous subocular scale between the 3rd and 4th or 4th and 5th supralabial, preventing contact between the 4th or 5th supralabial and the orbit, and by having the prefrontal in narrow contact with or separated from the orbit. We preface our description with a detailed account of the tangled taxonomic history of the similar and putatively wide-ranging species C. ruffus, which leads us to (1) remove the name Scytale scheuchzeri from the synonymy of C. ruffus, (2) list the taxon C. rufa var. javanica as species inquirenda, and (3) synonymize C. mirzae with C. ruffus. We provide additional evidence to confirm that the type locality of C. ruffus is Java. Cylindrophis subocularis sp. nov. is the second species of Asian pipesnake from Java.

  5. Histologie comparée des fosses nasales de quelques Tortues marines (Dermochelys coriacea et Chelonia mydas) et d’eaux douces (Emys orbicularis et Pseudemys scripta) (Reptilia, Dermochelyidae, Cheloniidae, Emydidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saint-Girons, H.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative histological studies carried out on the nasal cavity of four species of turtles showed that the sea turtles have a more or less regressed olfactive epithelium compared to that of the Emydidae but that their vomeronasal epithelium is more developed. The location of the vomeronasal epithel

  6. A new species of bent-toed gecko, genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae), from Jawa Timur Province, Java, Indonesia, with taxonomic remarks on C. fumosus (Müller, 1895).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lukas; Mecke, Sven; Kieckbusch, Max; Mader, Felix; Kaiser, Hinrich

    2016-01-26

    A new species of the gekkonid lizard genus Cyrtodactylus Gray, 1827 is described from Klakah, Lumajang Regency, Jawa Timur Province, Java, Indonesia. Cyrtodactylus klakahensis sp. nov. can be distinguished from all other congeners by the presence of (1) a deep precloacal groove in males, (2) three rows of enlarged precloacofemoral scales, of which the third row bears 37-38 pores in males, (3) three or four rows of enlarged scales between the precloacofemoral scale rows and the cloaca, forming distinct chevrons, (4) raised and strongly keeled dorsal tubercles in 15-19 rows at midbody, (5) an indistinct lateral fold, (6) 17-20 subdigital lamellae under the 4th toe, and (7) subcaudal scales which are not transversely enlarged. Cyrtodactylus klakahensis sp. nov. is only the third bent-toed gecko species described from Java, indicating that the diversity of this genus on this island has been neglected in the past. Furthermore, we confirm that C. fumosus (Müller, 1895) is a species that possesses a precloacal groove in males and is most likely restricted to northern Sulawesi. That species is defined by a single female holotype (NMB-REPT 2662). Specimens in museum collections catalogued as C. fumosus from localities elsewhere are misidentified and likely represent undescribed species.

  7. A NEARLY COMPLETE SKELETON OF IKECHOSAURUS PIJIAGOUENSIS SP.NOV.(REPTILIA:CHORISTODERA) FROM THE JIUFOTANG FORMATION (LOWER CRETACEOUS) OF LIAONING,CHINA%辽宁下白垩统九佛堂组伊克昭龙一新种

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊

    2004-01-01

    A nearly complete skeleton of a choristodere is described and Ikechosaurus pijiagouensis sp.nov. Is erected on the basis of this specimen. This new species is distinguished from other species of the genus Ikechosaurus by the following features: the jugal extends anteriorly to about the middle of the lacrymal; the interorbital bar is narrower than the diameter of the orbit; the postorbital separated from the postfrontal; the anterior process of the iliac blade is less pronounced; there is no distinct neck region be tween the acetabulum and iliac blade; the ratio of epipodials to the propodials are relatively small. The morphology of this specimen reveals that certain characters like the fusion of the posffrontal and postorbital and the lack of a prominent postorbital process of the jugal cannot be used to diagnose the Simoedosaridae and Champsosauridae. Comparison with other choristoderes suggests that Ikechosaurus is more closely re lated to Tchoiria than with Champsosaurus and Simoedosaurus.%伊克昭龙(Ikechosaurus)是一类长吻的离龙类,以前根据内蒙古的材料建立了孙氏种(I.sunailinae Sigogneau-Russell,1981)及高氏种(I.gaoi Lu et al.,1999).根据蒙古的材料建立的Tchoiria magnus Efimov,1979也于1983年被原作者归入本属.本文记述了辽宁义县皮家沟九佛堂组新发现的一个近于完整保存的骨架(中国科学院古脊椎动物与古人类研究所标本编号:IVPP V 13283),并建立一新种:皮家沟伊克昭龙(Ikechosaurus pijiagouensis sp.nov.).新种以下列特征区别于伊克昭龙其他种:轭骨前伸约至泪骨之半;眶间距小于眼眶短径;眶后骨与后额骨不愈合;髂骨片前突不发育,颈区不收缩;四肢中桡胫骨与肱股骨之比相对较小.另外其荐前椎数目与孙氏种相同,为25枚,比鳄龙属(Champsosaurus)少1枚;坐骨明显比孙氏种短;桡肱骨长度之比为0.58,胫股骨长度之比为0.60,在所知新离龙类(Neochoristodera)中属最小;前肢腕骨至少7块,后肢跗骨至少6块;指/趾式均为2-3-4-4-3.在正型标本中其第二远侧跗骨在左右脚中不对称.提出眶后骨与后额骨的愈合与分离以及轭骨眶后支发育程度不能作为Simoedosaridae和鳄龙科间的鉴别特征;股骨内转子与股骨头分离不该作为高氏种的鉴定特征;新离龙类中指/趾式应该均为2-3-4-4-3.伊克昭龙与Tchoiria有不少仅限于二者的特征:它们的吻部约为头长之半,上颞孔位于下颞孔之上稍后,荐前椎后关节突下有小的棘突但没有附属面,肩胛骨腹侧强烈扩展,坐骨后边缘缺乏明显的瘤状突起;这表明二者关系可能最近.认为长吻的离龙类与鳄类生活方式相近.

  8. All that glitters is not gold: A projected distribution of the endemic Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkonidae indicates a major range shrinkage due to future climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Srinivasulu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has a perceived threat on biodiversity due to its effect on species range.  Species with narrow ranges and highly specific climatic and habitat requirements are at higher risk.  To understand the influence of climate change on the Indian endemic gekkonid, the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Beddome, 1870 we model the present and future predicted distribution (2050 and 2070 under the CMIP5 RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios using MaxEnt under the HadGEM3-ES Model.  Our analysis revealed the negative impact of climate change on the Indian Golden Gecko with a decrease in the amount of climatically suitable areas in the future, and an almost total range shrinkage by 2070.  Despite its wide distribution in the eastern Deccan Peninsula, according to our predictions, the species is threatened by a shrinkage in the future range due to climate change. 

  9. 软骨鱼系动物与爬行纲动物血红蛋白A2现象的研究%HbA2 Phenomenon in Some Species of Chondrichthyes and Reptilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦勇钢; 秦文斌; 雎天林

    2005-01-01

    目的:比较研究软骨鱼系动物(孔鳐)与爬行纲动物(乌龟、中华鳖、翠青蛇)的"HbA2(血红蛋白A2)现象" . 方法:将动物溶血液和其红细胞悬浮液并排进行淀粉-琼脂糖混合凝胶电泳,观察有无差异.结果:软骨鱼类动物孔鳐"HbA2现象"阳性;爬行纲动物乌龟"HbA2现象"阳性,中华鳖和翠青蛇"HbA2现象"阴性.结论: 在生物进化中,两类动物血红蛋白结构的不同造成了"HbA2现象"的不同.

  10. 中国一新纪录种--缅北原矛头蝮(爬行纲,蛇亚目,蝰科)%A NEW RECORD FROM CHINA-PROTOBOTHROPS KAULBACKI (REPTILIA, SERPENTES, VIPERIDAE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶定齐; 赵尔宓

    2005-01-01

    记述了采自西藏Protobothrops属标本1条,该蛇原报道于缅甸北部,所获标本为中国新纪录种.标本保存在沈阳师范大学化学与生命科学学院标本馆.%During the Herpetological survey of Xizang Autonomous Region, China in August, 2004, a female Kaulback's pitviper was collected in Medog County. This is the first record of this snake from China. A detailed description of this specimen is given.

  11. Food Composition of the Snake-Eyed Lizard, Ophisops elegans Ménétriés, 1832 (Reptilia: Sauria: Lacertidae from Gökçeada (Imbros, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Varol Tok

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presents data on the food composition of the snake-eyed lizard (Ophisops elegans, from Gökçeada (Imbros, Çanakkale, Turkey. A total of 94 preys were determined in thedigestive systems of 20 individuals (10 males, 10 females examined in the study. Insects (67%constitute most of its food composition. Major prey groups in the food composition are included inAranea (13%, Lepidoptera (13%, Coleoptera (19%, and Homoptera (20% in numeric proportion.No significant difference was observed between sexes considering food composition.

  12. ESPÉCIES VEGETAIS UTILIZADAS NA ALIMENTAÇÃO DE Podocnemis unifilis, Troschel 1948 (REPTILIA, TESTUDINAE, PELOMEDUSIDAE NA REGIÃO DO PRACUÚBA -AMAPÁ-BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda Soares de Lucena Bataus

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram obtidas, junto às comunidades que vivem às margens dos rios e lagos da região do Pracuúba, Estado do Amapá, informações sobre 35 espécies vegetais que fazem parte da alimentação natural de Podocnemis unifilis (tracajá. Após a identificação dos vegetais, procedeu-se à coleta de suas partes comestíveis, para posteriores classificação taxonômica e análise química. Foram encontrados vegetais de 21 famílias botânicas, sendo que as famílias Leguminosae e Graminae ocorreram em 22,81% e 8,57% do total. A caracterização físico-química mostrou a composição centesimal quanto aos níveis de proteína, lipídios, cálcio, fósforo, potássio e magnésio, fibra bruta e de resíduo mineral fixo. Dentre os vegetais analisados, 12 espécies mostraram teores de proteína superiores a 10%. Dentre estas, oito espécies apresentaram boa possibilidade de servirem como ingredientes de uma ração regional, em função de suas propriedades nutricionais e de sua disponibilidade na natureza. São elas: Commelina longicaulis (maria-mole (20,78%, Polyganum acuminatum (pimenteira brava (20,19%; Aschymene sensitiva (corticeira (19,93%; Macrolobium acaiae folium (jandaruá (17,06%; Oryza glandiglumes (canarana grande (15,00%; Thalia geniculata (14,14%; Nymphaeae rudgeana (11,55% e Hymenachine amplexicaulis (10,11%. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Podocnemis unifilis, tracajá, alimentação de quelônios na natureza.

  13. A preliminary survey on Amphibia and Reptilia in Wanghu Wetland Nature Reserve in Hubei province%湖北网湖湿地自然保护区两栖爬行动物资源调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴宗兴; 石道良; 吴少斌; 刘国跃; 石教法; 刘道锦; 孙道; 李儒生

    2006-01-01

    2004年对湖北省阳新县网湖湿地自然保护区的两栖类和爬行类进行了系统调查,分别记录到两栖类27种、爬行类38种.对它们的物种组成、地理区系特点和保护等级进行了研究,并提出了保护建议.

  14. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in the anti-aversive effects of cannabidiol on panic attack-like behaviors evoked in the presence of the wild snake Epicrates cenchria crassus (Reptilia, Boidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardowschy, André; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Uribe-Mariño, Andres; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-12-01

    The potential anxiolytic and antipanic properties of cannabidiol have been shown; however, its mechanism of action seems to recruit other receptors than those involved in the endocannabinoid-mediated system. It was recently shown that the model of panic-like behaviors elicited by the encounters between mice and snakes is a good tool to investigate innate fear-related responses, and cannabidiol causes a panicolytic-like effect in this model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) co-participation in the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol on the innate fear-related behaviors evoked by a prey versus predator interaction-based paradigm. Male Swiss mice were treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) administrations of cannabidiol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and its vehicle and the effects of the peripheral pre-treatment with increasing doses of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg, i.p.) on instinctive fear-induced responses evoked by the presence of a wild snake were evaluated. The present results showed that the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol were blocked by the pre-treatment with WAY-100635 at different doses. These findings demonstrate that cannabidiol modulates the defensive behaviors evoked by the presence of threatening stimuli, and the effects of cannabidiol are at least partially dependent on the recruitment of 5-HT1A receptors.

  15. [Artículo Retractado/Retracted Article]:BYCATCH OF HELICOPS ANGULATUS (LINNAEUS 1758 (REPTILIA: SQUAMATA: COLUBRIDAE IN HOOP-TRAPS USED TO CAPTURE FRESH WATER TURTLES ON THE COAST OF PARÁ, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil José Hernández Ruz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Between September, 2007, and August, 2009, six field excursions were conducted on the northern Brazilian coast (Romana and Maiandeua islands, state of Pará for the collection of specimens of freshwater turtles (Rhinoclemmys punctularia and Kinosternon scorpioides in natural ponds. Hoop-nets were used and 35 specimens of brown-banded water snakes, Helicops angulatus, were captured as bycatch in the traps. Thus, in addition to turtles, the procedure may be useful for the sampling populations of aquatic snakes. RESUMEN Entre septiembre de 2007 y agosto de 2009, seis excursiones de campo se llevaron a cabo en la costa norte de Brasil (islas Romana y Maiandeua, estado de Pará para la recolección de especímenes de tortugas de agua dulce (Rhinoclemmys punctularia y Kinosternon scorpioides en posos naturales. Utilizamos trampas en embudo. 35 ejemplares de la serpiente acuática Helicops angulatus, fueron capturados como pesca incidental en las trampas. Por lo tanto, además de las tortugas, el procedimiento puede ser útil para la toma de muestras de las poblaciones de serpientes acuáticas.

  16. Бедренные поры агамовых ящериц (Agamidae, Sauna, Reptilia)

    OpenAIRE

    АНАНЬЕВА Н.Б.; ДУЙСЕБАЕВА Т.Н.

    2007-01-01

    Comparative analisys of the development of femoral and preanal pores in different subfamilies of agamids is conducted. A review of the data on distribution of different types of integument structures (skin receptors, glands) in different evolutionary lineages shows that, as a rule, femoral and prepanal pores are present in the integument together with lens-like receptors in basal clades of agamids. In more advanced subfamilies Draconinae and Agaminae lizards have sense organs with hairs and n...

  17. Histologie comparée des fosses nasales de quelques Tortues marines (Dermochelys coriacea et Chelonia mydas) et d’eaux douces (Emys orbicularis et Pseudemys scripta) (Reptilia, Dermochelyidae, Cheloniidae, Emydidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saint-Girons, H.

    1991-01-01

    Comparative histological studies carried out on the nasal cavity of four species of turtles showed that the sea turtles have a more or less regressed olfactive epithelium compared to that of the Emydidae but that their vomeronasal epithelium is more developed. The location of the vomeronasal epithel

  18. On the Identity and Taxonomic Status ofColuber nuthalli Theobald, 1868, with Redescription of the Type Specimens of Coluber nuthalli andElaphis yunnanensis Anderson, 1879 (Reptilia, Squamata, Colubridae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus Dieter SCHULZ; Frank TILLACK; Abhijit DAS; Notker HELFENBERGER

    2015-01-01

    The taxaColuber nuthalli Theobald, 1868 andElaphis yunnanensis Anderson, 1879 are compared and re-described, based on the examination of their type material. The morphological similarities of these two taxa revealed them as conspeciifc.Elaphis yunnanensis Anderson is thus declared as a protected name (nomen conservandum) with priority overC. nuthalli Theobald (nomen oblitum). A lectotype forElaphis yunnanensis is designated and described. The validity ofyunnanensis as subspecies name in combination withOrthriophis taeniurus (Cope) will be discussed. A key to the subspecies ofO. taeniurus is provided.

  19. Taxonomic analysis of Paraguayan samples of Homonota fasciata Duméril & Bibron (1836 with the revalidation of Homonota horrida Burmeister (1861 (Reptilia: Squamata: Phyllodactylidae and the description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Cacciali

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Homonota is a Neotropical genus of nocturnal lizards characterized by the following combination of characters: absence of femoral pores, infradigital lamellae not dilated, claws without sheath, inferior lamellae laterally not denticulate, and presence of a ceratobranchial groove. Currently the genus is composed of 10 species assembled in three groups: two groups with four species, and the fasciata group with only two species. Here, we analyzed genetic and morphologic data of samples of Homonota fasciata from Paraguay; according to Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses, the Paraguay population represents an undescribed species. Additionally, morphological analysis of the holotype of H. fasciata (MNHN 6756 shows that it is morphologically different from the banded, large-scaled Homonota commonly referred to as “H. fasciata”. Given the inconsistency between morphological characters of the name-bearing type of H. fasciata and the species commonly referred to as H. fasciata, we consider them as different taxa. Thus, H. fasciata is a species inquirenda which needs further studies, and we resurrect the name H. horrida for the banded, large-scaled Homonota. The undescribed species from Paraguay is similar to H. horrida, but can be differentiated by the high position of the auditory meatus relative to the mouth commissure (vs. low position in H. horrida; and less developed tubercles on the sides of the head, including a narrow area between the orbit and the auditory meatus covered with small granular scales with or without few tubercles (vs. several big tubercles on the sides of the head even in the area between the orbit and the auditory meatus. The new species is distributed in the Dry Chaco in South America. With the formal description of this species, the actual diversity of the genus Homonota is increased to 12 species. Furthermore, we infer phylogenetic relationships for 11 of the 12 described species of the genus, based on 11 molecular markers (two mitochondrial and nine nuclear genes, with concatenated and species tree approaches.

  20. The missing leopard lizard: Liolaemus ubaghsi sp. nov., a new species of the leopardinus clade (Reptilia: Squamata: Liolaemidae) from the Andes of the O'Higgins Region in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Damien; Troncoso-Palacios, Jaime; Garín, Carlos F; Núnez, Herman

    2014-06-17

    Liolaemus is an extremely species rich genus of iguanid lizards from southern South America. Most of the diversity though is found in the Andes Cordillera, between Argentina and Chile. Here we describe Liolaemus ubaghsi sp. nov., from El Teniente Mine, in the Andean mountains of the O'Higgins Region in Chile. This species presents scalation and pattern traits that belong to the leopardinus clade, a group of viviparous, high altitude lizards that inhabit the mountain ranges surrounding Santiago City. The species of this clade in turn belong to the Andean and Patagonian elongatus-kriegi complex. Liolaemus ubaghsi sp. nov. has been previously recognized as L. leopardinus and L. elongatus, nevertheless we present diagnostic traits that allow us to describe it as a new species. It mainly differs from the rest of the leopardinus clade (L. leopardinus, L. ramonensis, L. valdesianus and L. frassinettii) by having the following unique combination of traits: ochre background coloration, a wide dark occipital stripe, dark flanks, white dots dispersed on the dorsum, absence of leopard-like spots and enlarged infralabial scales. 

  1. Yeasts Occurring in Surface and Mouth Cavity of Two Chelonian Species, Podocnemis expansa Schweigger and P. unifilis Troschel (Reptilia: Chelonia: Pelomedusidae, in the Javaés River Border of Araguaia National Park in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Benevides de Morais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-eight specimens of free-ranging Podocnemis expansa (Amazon turtle and 22 of P. unifilis (Tracajá were screened for yeast isolation from surface (plastron, skin, and nails, eye, and mouth cavity. A hundred and eighteen yeast isolates belonging to 39 species were obtained. Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida galli, C. sake, and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were the most frequent species isolated from these chelonians. Species diversity measured by Shannon's index was shown to be low and a degree of dominance could be detected as species known as potential pathogens were commonly isolated. The effective number of species in plastron of P. expansa was higher than in mouth samples, but not in P. unifilis probably due to dietary factors. P. expansa animals were captured on the beaches, and the superficial yeast populations may include terrestrial species. P. unifilis animals were captured in the water and the yeasts from superficial sites may represent species from river water.

  2. Yeasts Occurring in Surface and Mouth Cavity of Two Chelonian Species, Podocnemis expansa Schweigger and P. unifilis Troschel (Reptilia: Chelonia: Pelomedusidae), in the Javaés River Border of Araguaia National Park in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Paula Benevides; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; Tavares, Inara Brito; de Garcia, Virginia; Rosa, Carlos Augusto

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight specimens of free-ranging Podocnemis expansa (Amazon turtle) and 22 of P. unifilis (Tracajá) were screened for yeast isolation from surface (plastron, skin, and nails), eye, and mouth cavity. A hundred and eighteen yeast isolates belonging to 39 species were obtained. Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida galli, C. sake, and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were the most frequent species isolated from these chelonians. Species diversity measured by Shannon's index was shown to be low and a degree of dominance could be detected as species known as potential pathogens were commonly isolated. The effective number of species in plastron of P. expansa was higher than in mouth samples, but not in P. unifilis probably due to dietary factors. P. expansa animals were captured on the beaches, and the superficial yeast populations may include terrestrial species. P. unifilis animals were captured in the water and the yeasts from superficial sites may represent species from river water. PMID:20936145

  3. Contribución al conocimiento de los hábitos alimenticios de Lepidochelys olivacea y Chelonia mydas agassizi (Reptilia, Cheloniidae en el Pacífico Mexicano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Casas-Andreu

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study on the feeding habits of L. olivacea and C. mydas agassizi from the Pacific coast, located at 19ºN and 105ºW, are presented. A preference for feeding on crustacea was observed on L. olivacea, proving to be essentially a carnivorous specie. In the case of C. m. agassizi a certain balance between algae and animal feeding was appreciated, beeing the plants in a greater volume and animals more diversified. Related to animal preying C m. agassizi bucal structure, seems to be adapted toward the retention of animals captured with algae. Apparently there is no competition for food between both species,, given that L. olivacea feeds on organisms from sandy bottoms, while C. m, agassizi feeds on arrecifal or rocky bottoms.

  4. A revision of the Mexican Anolis (Reptilia, Squamata, Dactyloidae) from the Pacific versant west of the Isthmus de Tehuantepec in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Puebla, with the description of six new species .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Gunther; Pérez, Raúl Gómez Trejo; Petersen, Claus Bo P; De La Cruz, Fausto R Méndez

    2014-09-19

    We revise the species of anoles occurring along the Pacific versant of Mexico west of the Isthmus de Tehuantepec in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Puebla. Based on our analyses of morphological and molecular genetic data, we recognize 21 species, six of which we describe as new (i.e., Anolis carlliebi sp. nov., A. immaculogularis sp. nov., A. nietoi sp. nov., A. sacamecatensis sp. nov., A. stevepoei sp. nov., and A. zapotecorum sp. nov.). Furthermore, we synonymize Anolis forbesi Smith & Van Gelder 1955 with Anolis microlepidotus Davis 1954. Of the recognized species, six have smooth ventral scales (i.e., Anolis dunni, A. gadovii, A. liogaster, A. omiltemanus, A. peucephilus, and A. taylori) and 14 have keeled ventral scales (i.e., A. boulengerianus, A. carlliebi, A. immaculogularis, A. megapholidotus, A. microlepidotus, A. nebuloides, A. nebulosus, A. nietoi, A. quercorum, A. sacamecatensis, A. stevepoei, A. subocularis, A. unilobatus, and A. zapotecorum). In one species, A. macrinii, the ventral scales vary from smooth to weakly keeled. For each species we provide color descriptions in life, color photographs in life, descriptions and illustration of hemipenis morphology (if available), description of external morphology, distribution maps based on the specimensexamined, comments on the conservation status, and natural history notes. Finally, we provide a dichotomous key for the identification of the 21 species of anoles occurring along the Pacific versant of Mexico west of the Isthmus de Tehuantepec in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Puebla. 

  5. US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Chemical Biological Agent Simulant Knowledgebase (ASK) (Information Workbench & Graphical User Interface)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-17

    Type of Data Collected: ~50 viruses/fevers identified. ~150 data fields Source of Data: Published reports, reference books (Virus Taxonomy : The...Classification and Nomenclature of Viruses), journal articles, other database efforts, some web sources (International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses...toxins, mollusca toxins, insecta toxins, amphibia toxins, and reptilia venoms. Data Collected: ~180 toxins identified, 100 data fields Source of Data

  6. 50 CFR 10.12 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... dead, including without limitation any wild mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish, mollusk, crustacean... and organized but not operated for profit. Reptile means a member of the class, Reptilia, including... several States of the United States of America, District of Columbia, Commonwealth of Puerto...

  7. Adaptation to life in aeolian sand: how the sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus, prevents sand particles from entering its lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Anna T.; Vihar, Boštjan; Günther, Mathias; Huemer, Michaela; Riedl, Martin; Shamiyeh, Stephanie; Mayrhofer, Bernhard; Böhme, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus (Squamata: Scincidae), spends nearly its whole life in aeolian sand and only comes to the surface for foraging, defecating and mating. It is not yet understood how the animal can respire without sand particles entering its respiratory organs when buried under thick layers of sand. In this work, we integrated biological studies, computational calculations and physical experiments to understand this phenomenon. We present a 3D model of the upper res...

  8. Sound Localization Strategies in Three Predators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compare some of the neural strategies for sound localization and encoding interaural time differences (ITDs) in three predatory species of Reptilia, alligators, barn owls and geckos. Birds and crocodilians are sister groups among the extant archosaurs, while geckos are lepidosau...... spatial locations, while geckos may use a meter strategy or population code composed of broadly sensitive neurons that represent ITD via changes in the firing rate.......In this paper, we compare some of the neural strategies for sound localization and encoding interaural time differences (ITDs) in three predatory species of Reptilia, alligators, barn owls and geckos. Birds and crocodilians are sister groups among the extant archosaurs, while geckos are lepidosaurs....... Despite the similar organization of their auditory systems, archosaurs and lizards use different strategies for encoding the ITDs that underlie localization of sound in azimuth. Barn owls encode ITD information using a place map, which is composed of neurons serving as labeled lines tuned for preferred...

  9. Third cumulative index for Koedoe: volumes 35/2-44/1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Rautenbach

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Index to Koedoe: volumes 35/2 - 44/1 Authors85 Subjects98 Botany 98 Ecology and behaviour 100 Wildlife conservation & techniques 100 Zoology102 Invertebrata 102 Pisces 103 Amphibia 103 Reptilia 103 Aves104 Mammalia 104 Archaeology and History 105 Bibliography 106 Climate 106 Geologyand Pedology 106 Environmental impact on rivers & water quality 106 Check list 107 Issues in conservation 107 Maps 108 Social Science 108 Parks

  10. Esparganose em alguns vertebrados do Brasil: dificuldades na identificaçao das espécies de Luheella (Spirometra Sparganum in some brazilian vertebrates: problems in the identification of species of Luheella (Spirometra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arandas Rego

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Some species of Amphibia and Reptilia are listed as new hosts of spargana, from material deposited in the Helminthological Collection of Oswaldo Cruz Institute. It is discussed the difficulties in identifying the larvae (Sparganum and also the identification of adults of Luheella species from South America. The histopathology induced by spargana in the liver of a species of Amphibia is briefly described.

  11. Reptilian spermatogenesis: A histological and ultrastructural perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gribbins, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, the histology and ultrastructural events of spermatogenesis in reptiles were relatively unknown. Most of the available morphological information focuses on specific stages of spermatogenesis, spermiogenesis, and/or of the mature spermatozoa. No study to date has provided complete ultrastructural information on the early events of spermatogenesis, proliferation and meiosis in class Reptilia. Furthermore, no comprehensive data set exists that describes the ultrastructure of the ...

  12. Rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity in the 'all cone' retina of the chameleon (Chameleo chameleo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Mohamed; Molday, Robert S; Versaux-Botteri, Claudine; Repérant, Jacques; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; McDevitt, David S

    2005-05-01

    Chameleons (Order, Reptilia: Family, Lacertilia) are unique among vertebrates in being able to make independent eye movements. The organisation of their retina, however, closely ressembles that of other diurnal lizards; based on morphological studies, it is typically described as containing only cone photoreceptors. We show here that a subpopulation of the photoreceptors are immunolabelled by an antibody directed against rhodopsin, suggesting the presence of rods. We conclude that in the nonmammalian retina, rods and cones cannot be exclusively distinguished on purely morphological grounds.

  13. Factors underlying the natural resistance of animals against snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moussatché

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of mammals and reptilia with a natural resistance to snake venoms is known since a long time. This fact has been subjected to the study by several research workers. Our experiments showed us that in the marsupial Didelphis marsupialis, a mammal highly resistant to the venom of Bothrops jararaca, and other Bothrops venoms, has a genetically origin protein, a alpha-1, acid glycoprotein, now highly purified, with protective action in mice against the jararaca snake venom.

  14. Cytogenetic analyses of five amazon lizard species of the subfamilies Teiinae and Tupinambinae and review of karyotyped diversity the family Teiidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Natália Dayane Moura; Arias, Federico José; da Silva, Francijara Araújo; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Lizards of the family Teiidae (infraorder Scincomorpha) were formerly known as Macroteiidae. There are 13 species of such lizards in the Amazon, in the genera Ameiva (Meyer, 1795), Cnemidophorus (Wagler, 1830), Crocodilurus (Spix, 1825), Dracaena (Daudin, 1801), Kentropyx (Spix, 1825) and Tupinambis (Daudin, 1802). Cytogenetic studies of this group are restricted to karyotype macrostructure. Here we give a compilation of cytogenetic data of the family Teiidae, including classic and molecular cytogenetic analysis of Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868) and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758) collected in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata and Kentropyx pelviceps have 2n=50 chromosomes classified by a gradual series of acrocentric chromosomes. Cnemidophorus sp.1 has 2n=48 chromosomes with 2 biarmed chromosomes, 24 uniarmed chromosomes and 22 microchromosomes. Tupinambis teguixin has 2n=36 chromosomes, including 12 macrochromosomes and 24 microchromosomes. Constitutive heterochromatin was distributed in the centromeric and terminal regions in most chromosomes. The nucleolus organizer region was simple, varying in its position among the species, as evidenced both by AgNO3 impregnation and by hybridization with 18S rDNA probes. The data reveal a karyotype variation with respect to the diploid number, fundamental number and karyotype formula, which reinforces the importance of increasing chromosomal analyses in the Teiidae.

  15. Comment on Spracklandus Hoser, 2009 (Reptilia, Serpentes, ELAPIDAE): request for confirmation of availability of the generic name and for the nomenclatural validation of the journal in which it was published (Case 3601; BZN 70:234–237; 71:30–38; 133-135,181-182 ,252-253)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, Anders G.J.; Kaiser, Hinrich; van Dijk, Peter Paul; Wüster, Wolfgang; O’Shea, Mark; Archer, Michael; Auliya, Mark; Boitani, Luigi; Bour, Roger; Clausnitzer, Viola; Contreras-MacBeath, Topiltzin; Crother, Brian I.; Daza, Juan M.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Frazier, Jack; Fritz, Uwe; Gardner, Alfred L.; Gascon, Claude; Georges, Arthur; Glaw, Frank; Grazziotin, Felipe G.; Groves, Colin P.; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Havaš, Peter; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hoffmann, Michael; Hoogmoed, Marinus S.; Horne, Brian D.; Iverson, John B.; Jäch, Manfred; Jenkins, Christopher L.; Jenkins, Richard K.B.; Kiester, A. Ross; Keogh, J. Scott; Lacher, Thomas E.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Luiselli, Luca; Mahler, D. Luke; Mallon, David P.; Mast, Roderic; McDiarmid, Roy W.; Measey, John; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Molur, Sanjay; Mosbrugger, Volker; Murphy, Robert W.; Naish, Darren; Niekisch, Manfred; Ota, Hidetoshi; Parham, James F.; Parr, Michael J.; Pilcher, Nicolas J.; Pine, Ronald H.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Sanderson, James G.; Savage, Jay M.; Schleip, Wulf; Scrocchi, Gustavo J.; Shaffer, H. Bradley; Smith, Eric N.; Sprackland, Robert; Stuart, Simon N.; Vetter, Holger; Vitt, Laurie J.; Waller, Tomás; Webb, Grahame; Wilson, Edward O.; Zaher, Hussam; Thomson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In Case 3601 Raymond Hoser has asked the Commission to validate for the purposes of nomenclature the name Spracklandus Hoser, 2009, and ‘the journal in which it was published,’ issue 7 of the Australasian Journal of Herpetology (AJH). We note that the entire run of AJH has been written, edited, and published solely by Hoser. Although his requests to the Commission were presented as narrow and, in his words, ‘routine matters,’ we are convinced that they represent an important tipping-point with broad implications of major concern for zoological taxonomy and nomenclature as a whole and, by extension, the greater scientific community. Since Hoser’s actions and works have failed to follow scientific best practices (e.g. Turtle Taxonomy Working Group, 2007, 2014; Kaiser et al., 2013; Kaiser, 2014) and both the Commission’s general Recommendations and Code of Ethics in Appendix A, the global herpetological community has widely rejected his taxonomic decisions and resultant nomenclature. This has unfortunately caused a confusing dual nomenclature to develop in the herpetological community, with most boycotting or ignoring Hoser’s 700+ new names coined in the AJH, while he and a few personal followers actively promote their usage. We believe that suppression of the name Spracklandus, and all issues of AJH, is the only effective way to bring this contentious and confusing issue to resolution. The plenary power available under Article 81.1 of the Code exist specifically to allow the Commission to make rulings in individual cases that disturb stability and cause confusion, whether the works are Code-compliant or not. We maintain that it is in the interest of nomenclatural stability, not only for herpetology, but for all of zoological taxonomy, that the plenary power be invoked to declare the works in AJH unavailable, regardless of any narrow interpretation of their technical Code-compliance. We present our arguments for rejection of the validity of AJH in the following commentary. In view of the wide-reaching implications of this case for all of zoology, and reflecting the deep and broad-based community concern over these issues, our contributing authors include 70 global scientific leaders and accomplished amateurs from a wide variety of zoological disciplines.

  16. Plasma lipid concentrations for some Brazilian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, M P; Lima, V L; Costa, J C; Sibrian, A M

    1979-01-01

    1. Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides were determined for ten species of Brazilian lizards, Iguana iguana, Tropidurus torquatos and T. semitaeniatus (Iguanidae), Tupinambis teguixin, Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae), Mabuya maculata (Scincidae), Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae), Amphisbaenia vermicularis and Leposternon polystegum (Amphisbaenidae). 2. Considerable inter- and intra-species variations in plasma lipid concentrations were observed. 3. The percentage of total cholesterol esterified and the individual phospholipid composition of plasma were relatively constant for each species. 4. Over 60% of the cholesteryl esters present in plasma from three species each of iguanid and teiid lizards were polyenoic.

  17. Survey of the reptilian fauna of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. V. The lizard fauna of Turaif region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadoon, Mohammed K; Paray, Bilal Ahmad; Al-Otaibi, Hamad S

    2016-09-01

    Turaif area located in the Northern border region of Saudi Arabia is one of the most important regions of the Kingdom. This work was proposed to throw light on the diversity of lizard fauna investigated through the collection and subsequent identification of specimens from different localities of Turaif region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Sixteen species of lizards belonging to 5 families (Agamidae, Gekkonidae, Lacertidae, Scincidae and Varanidae) were recorded. Lacertidae was the most common family. Three species of lizards namely Acanthodactylus orientalis, Acanthodactylus scutellatus and Acanthodactylus grandis were reported for the first time in the Turaif region of Saudi Arabia. The geographical distribution of the collected species within this province was mapped.

  18. Lagartos da Marambaia, um remanescente insular de Restinga e Floresta Atlântica no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,André Luiz Gomes de; Araújo,Alexandre Fernandes Bamberg de; Silva,Hélio Ricardo da

    2007-01-01

    Este estudo apresenta os resultados de um inventário da fauna de lagartos da Marambaia, RJ. Foram registradas 12 espécies de lagartos, distribuídas em sete famílias. Teiidae é a família mais rica (3 spp.), seguida por Gekkonidae (2), Scincidae (2), e Tropiduridae (2), Gymnophthalmidae (1), Leiosauridae (1) e Polychrotidae (1). A composição da comunidade de lagartos da Marambaia é semelhante à de outras localidades do litoral sudeste brasileiro, entretanto a área comporta espécies de distribui...

  19. Behind the scenes of GS: the impact of IMPACT

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Carrying out a job at CERN can be a complicated task, with coordinators reaching across departments to manage personnel, ensure safety and minimise the impact of their activities on the rest of the Laboratory.  To help coordinators with this tough task, the GS Department developed IMPACT, the platform that, since 2011, has unified CERN's major experiment, accelerator and injector coordination tools.   When planning interventions both large and small, IMPACT (the Intervention Management Planning and Coordination Tool) is the go-to gizmo on every CERN coordinator's tool belt. "IMPACT is a central repository of activity requests that standardises the way work is declared at CERN," says Benoit Daudin, GS-AIS-PM Section Leader. "If you need to intervene in any of CERN's major facilities, you need to declare this work on IMPACT. The tool will analyse the job and see whose approval is required. This could simply b...

  20. Comportamento alimentar e dieta de serpentes, gêneros Boiruna e Clelia (Serpentes, Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Carla da Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Boiruna maculata Boulenger, 1896 and Clelia rustica (Cope, 1878 were observed in captivity feeding snakes and rodents, respectively. Both species have shown a similar procedure in relation to the prey. Major behavior differences among the two species were: rodents killed before being swallowed, and snakes were mostly swallowed alive; both species are able to find the rodents head faster than the snake one; the coils formed during constriction were also used to hold the prey, specially the last coil, while swallowing rodents. Informations on stomach contents was gathered by dissection of preserved specimens of Clelia clelia (Daudin, 1803 and C. plumbea (Wied, 1820 were also included in the dietary study. The majority of preys consisted on snakes and lizards. Other prey items were mammals and birds. Adult snakes prey relatively smaller animals than the juvenile snakes do.

  1. Effect of temperature on feeding period of larval blacklegged ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on eastern fence lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient temperature can influence tick development time, and can potentially affect tick interactions with pathogens and with vertebrate hosts. We studied the effect of ambient temperature on duration of attachment of larval blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis Say, to eastern fence lizards, Sceloporus undulatus (Bose & Daudin). Feeding periods of larvae that attached to lizards under preferred temperature conditions for the lizards (WARM treatment: temperatures averaged 36.6°C at the top of the cage and 25.8°C at the bottom, allowing behavioral thermoregulation) were shorter than for larvae on lizards held under cool conditions (COOL treatment temperatures averaged 28.4°C at top of cage and 24.9°C at the bottom). The lizards were infested with larvae four times at roughly monthly intervals. Larval numbers successfully engorging and dropping declined and feeding period was longer after the first infestation.

  2. Molecular and functional approaches to understand the natural history of snake short disintegrins

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz-Soler, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: El grupo Reptilia, consta de aves y reptiles no aviares. Los reptiles son uno de los grupos de organismos vivos más notables, desde el punto de vista ecológico y evolutivo, que han colonizado la mayor parte del planeta. La mayor diversidad de los reptiles no aviares (96,4%) se concentra en Squamata (lagartos y serpientes). Por otra parte, tortugas y cocodrilos representan el 3,4% y el 0,2%, respectivamente (reptile-database.org) (Uetz and Hošek 2015). En la figura 1 (p.7) se...

  3. catalogue of the type specimens of amphibians and reptiles in the herpetological museum of chengdu institute of biology,chinese academy of sciences:i.rhacophoridae (anura,amphibia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    in order to facilitate herpetological research for all the herpetologists both in and outside of china,we will report all the type specimens of amphibia and reptilia deposited in the herpetological museum of chengdu institute of biology (cib),chinese academy of sciences in series.this report focuses on the family rhacophoridae of anura in amphibia,including 13 species.the contents of the report include synonym lists and generic transfer of type species,measurements of type specimens,particularly for those with no previously published measurement data,and chromosomal data for each species.

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Reeve's pond turtle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Reeve's pond turtle Chinemys reevesii Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Chinemys_reevesii_L.png Chinemys_reev...esii_NL.png Chinemys_reevesii_S.png Chinemys_reevesii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reeve...sii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: Nile crocodile [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Crocodylus_niloticus_L.png Croco...dylus_niloticus_NL.png Crocodylus_niloticus_S.png Crocodylus_niloticus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ico...n/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Croco...dylus+niloticus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Croco...dylus+niloticus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Ratsnake [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese Ratsnake Elaphe climacophora Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Elaphe_climacophora_L.png Elaphe_clim...acophora_NL.png Elaphe_climacophora_S.png Elaphe_climacophora_NS.png http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=3 ...

  7. FY 1998 geothermal development promotion survey. Report on the environmental effect survey (No. A-4 Kunbetsu-dake area); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Kankyo eikyo chosa hokokusho (No.A-4 Kunbetsudake chiiki)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-30

    Of the FY 1998 geothermal development promotion survey, the primary environmental effect survey in the Kunbetsu-dake area was conducted, and the results were arranged. In the well drilling survey, etc., the survey was made aiming at extracting areas to be preserved from an environmental aspect. The results of the survey were summarized as follows: As to the mammalia, 12 families 46 species were confirmed in the area surveyed and the periphery by literature survey. Out of them, the noticeable species which are considered important from an academic viewpoint are 10 families 19 species. As to the aves, 55 families 340 species were confirmed, of which 29 families 79 species are noticeable species. About the amphibia/reptilia, 3 families 3 species in the amphibia and 4 families 6 species in the reptilia were confirmed by literature and hearing survey. The noticeable species is 1 family 1 species in the amphilia. Concerning the terrestrial insecta, 135 families 873 species were confirmed, and the noticeable species is 11 families 20 species. As to the flora, 115 families 1055 species were confirmed, and the noticeable species is 46 families 126 species. Relating to the living vegetation, the one higher than 9 in nature reserves shows a substantial rate, and the periphery of Kaibetsu-dake is designated as the specified flora colony. (NEDO)

  8. Asociacion faunistica de vertebrados mesozoicos de la localidad de Galve (Teruel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Hemández, B.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Sediments of Tithonian-Barremian of Iberian Basin in the surroundings of Galve (Teniel, Spain have a high content of vertebrate's remains. These ones have been studied since s. XX until today by different scientists. More than ninety taxons have been mentioned in these papers, distributed in Hybodontiformes, Squalomorpha, Batoidea, Rajiforms, Amphibia, Reptilia (Chelonia, Sauria, Crocodylia, Pterosauria, Ornithischia, Saurischia and Marnmalia.Los sedimentos del Tithónico-Barremiense de la Cuenca Ibérica aflorantes en los alrededores de la localidad de Galve (Teniel, son particularmente ricos en restos de vertebrados mesozoicos. Estos han sido estudiados por diferentes autores, desde principios del siglo xx hasta la actualidad. El objetivo del presente artículo es recopilar los distintos taxones que han sido citados para esta área, a lo largo del tiempo, recogiéndose más de noventa taxones distribuidos entre Hybodontiformes, Squalomorpha, Batoidea, Rajiformes, Amphibia, Reptilia (Testudines, Sauria, Crocodilia, Pterosauria, Ornithischia, Saurischia y Mammalia.

  9. Survey of the reptilian fauna of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. V. The lizard fauna of Turaif region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K. Al-Sadoon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Turaif area located in the Northern border region of Saudi Arabia is one of the most important regions of the Kingdom. This work was proposed to throw light on the diversity of lizard fauna investigated through the collection and subsequent identification of specimens from different localities of Turaif region of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Sixteen species of lizards belonging to 5 families (Agamidae, Gekkonidae, Lacertidae, Scincidae and Varanidae were recorded. Lacertidae was the most common family. Three species of lizards namely Acanthodactylus orientalis, Acanthodactylus scutellatus and Acanthodactylus grandis were reported for the first time in the Turaif region of Saudi Arabia. The geographical distribution of the collected species within this province was mapped.

  10. Ultrastructure of developmental stages of Hemolivia mariae (Apicomplexa: Haemogregarinidae), natural parasite of the Australian sleepy lizard, in experimentally infected deviant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paperna, I; Smallridge, C J

    2001-01-01

    Mabuya vitatta (Olivier) (Scincidae) and Agama stellio (L.) (Agamidae) were infected with Hemolivia mariae Smallridge et Paperna, 1997 by ingestion of tick viscera from Amblyomma limbatum Neumann, fed as nymphs on naturally infected Australian sleepy lizards, Tiliqua rugosa Gray. The unnatural infection apparently interfered with the developmental schedule of the parasites. Transmission electron microscopic images of merogonic stages were obtained, as well as images of early developing gametocytes. Tissue and intraerythrocytic meronts were bound by a hardened wall. Intraerythrocytic gametocytes were lodged in a parasitophorous vacuole, which was filled with granular material, and were bound by a two-membrane wall. Small and large osmiophilic bodies were located in a sub-pellicular position. With differentiation, the wall membranes tightened with the parasitophorous vacuole wall, and the osmiophilic bodies disappeared. The outer parasite membrane consolidated into a thick encasing with distinct sutures. Late infection in A. stellio comprised gametocytes only.

  11. Eimeria auratae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) infecting the lizard Mabuya aurata in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyousif, M S; AL-Rasheid, K A

    2001-03-01

    Eimeria auratae n. sp. was described from the gall bladder of the lizard Mabuya aurata collected at Al-Hofuf village, eastern region, Saudi Arabia. Morphology of sporulated as well as non-sporulated oocysts were studied. Sporulated oocysts were ellipsoidal 22-31.5x13.5-21.8 (27.7x18.5) microm with smooth brownish-yellow bilayered wall, 1.1 (0.9-1.3) microm. Micropyle, polar granule and oocyst residuum were absent. Sporocysts were ellipsoidal 10.5-12.8x7.5-9 (11.8x8.5) microm. Sporocyst residuum was present but Stieda body was absent. Sporozoites were crescent-shaped, blunt at one end and slightly tapered at the other. Eimeria species from Scincidae were compared.

  12. Herpetofauna of an urban fragment of Atlantic Forest in Paraíba State, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri C. C. Lima

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Herpetofauna of an urban fragment of Atlantic Forest was investigated in relation to species richness and habitat use. Fourteen species of amphibian anurans pertaining to the families Bufonidae, Brachycephalidae, Hylidae, Leptodactylidae, Leiuperidae, Microhylidae and Ranidae were recorded. The reptiles were represented by 37 species, distributed in the families Gekkonidae, Gymnophthalmidae, Polychrotidae, Scincidae, Teiidae, Tropiduridae, Amphisbaenidae, Boidae, Colubridae, Elapidae, Typhlopidae, Chelidae, Testudinidae and Alligatoridae. Most of the recorded species presented wide geographic distribution, although some of them had distributions that were restricted to the Atlantic Forest. The species richness of Mata do Buraquinho is relatively high for an urban fragment of Atlantic Forest, and the observed anthropogenic impacts show the urgent necessity of conservation in order to guarantee the viability of populations of amphibians and reptiles.

  13. Estado actual del registro de escamados extinguidos de América del Sur y sus implicancias paleoambientales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino, Adriana María

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The record of the South American fossil Squamata extends from the Late Cretaceous to the Holocene. The recorded families are Iguanidae s.l., Teiidae, Gekkonidae, ?Scincidae, Amphisbaenidae, Boidae, Aniliidae, Colubridae and Viperidae Dinilysiidae from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia and Palaeopheidae from the Late Eocene of Ecuador are the only known extinct recorded families. The families distribution during the Cretaceous and most of the Tertiary apparently was more extensive than at present, due to more generalized subtropical climatic conditions. The geological events during the Cenozoic would have caused climatic and environmental changes that would have favoured the appeareance of new adaptative types and the restriction in the distribution of many forms.

  14. 重庆市两栖爬行动物分类分布名录%A Classification and Distribution of Herpetological Checklist in Chongqing Municipality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗键; 唐兰; 刘颖梅; 高红英; 罗颖; 黄静; 肖伟; 王宇; 周元媛; 罗书桃

    2012-01-01

    该文以《中国动物志·两栖纲》(三卷)和《中国动物志·爬行纲》(三卷)为蓝本,并按照新的分类系统对重庆市两栖爬行动物标本和记录进行了核实和厘定,确定重庆市已知两栖类57种,隶属2目9科26属;爬行类63种,隶属2目12科45属.增补18种,即2新种:金佛拟小鲵Pseudoh ynobius jinfo和黔江林蛙Rana qianjiang;重庆市新纪录16种:龙里瘰螈Paramesotriton longliensis、川南短腿蟾Brachytarsophrys chuannanensis、蛾眉髭蟾Vibrissaphora boringii、弹琴蛙Hylarana adenopleura、云南臭蛙Odorrana andersonii(?)、合江臭蛙Odorrana hejiangensis、合江棘蛙Paa robertingeri、黑点树蛙Rhacophorus nigropunctatus、峨眉树蛙Rhacophorus omeimontis、潘氏闭壳龟Cuora pani、白头蝰Azemiops eae、四川竹叶青蛇Trimeresurus sichuanensis、黄链蛇Dinodon flavozonatum、灰腹绿蛇Rhadinophis frenatum、龙胜小头蛇Oligodon lungshenensis和宁陕小头蛇Oligodon ningshaanensis.并根据标本采集情况和相关文献,对物种的区县分布进行了补充.另外,发现外来入侵两栖类和爬行类物种各1种,即牛蛙Lithobates catesbeianus和红耳龟Trachemys scripta elegans.%This paper deals with the study on herpediversity in evaluation of vertebrate biodiversity in the Chongqing Field Project of EU-China Biodiversity Programme (CQECBP). On the basis of "Fauna Sinica, Amphibia Vol. 1 - 3". "Fauna Sinica, Reptilia Vol. 1 - 3", and the new system of herpetological classification, the specimens and records of amphibia and reptilia in Chongqing have been verified and classified in this paper. It is determined that there are 57 species of amphibia belonging to 2 orders, 9 families and 26 genera; and 63 species of reptilia to 2 orders, 12 families and 45 genera in Chongqing. There supplement in this paper 18 species of amphibian and reptilia in Chongqing, including 2 new species: Pseudohynobius jinfo (published recently) and Rana qianjiang, and 16 new species

  15. Evolution of viviparous reproduction in Paleozoic and Mesozoic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Daniel G; Sidor, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Although viviparity (live-bearing reproduction) is widely distributed among lizards and snakes, it is entirely absent from other extant Reptilia and many extinct forms. However, paleontological evidence reveals that viviparity was present in at least nine nominal groups of pre-Cenozoic reptiles, representing a minimum of six separate evolutionary origins of this reproductive mode. Two viviparous clades (sauropterygians and ichthyopterygians) lasted more than 155 million years, a figure that rivals the duration of mammalian viviparity. Circumstantial evidence indicates that extinct viviparous reptiles had internal fertilization, amniotic fetal membranes, and placentas that sustained developing embryos via provision of respiratory gases, water, calcium, and possibly organic nutrients. Production of offspring via viviparity facilitated the invasion of marine habitats in at least five reptilian lineages. Thus, this pattern of embryonic development and reproduction was central to the ecology and evolution of these ancient animals, much as it is to numerous extant species of vertebrates.

  16. The oldest caseid synapsid from the Late Pennsylvanian of Kansas, and the evolution of herbivory in terrestrial vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R; Fröbisch, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The origin and early evolution of amniotes (fully terrestrial vertebrates) led to major changes in the structure and hierarchy of terrestrial ecosystems. The first appearance of herbivores played a pivotal role in this transformation. After an early bifurcation into Reptilia and Synapsida (including mammals) 315 Ma, synapsids dominated Paleozoic terrestrial vertebrate communities, with the herbivorous caseids representing the largest vertebrates on land. Eocasea martini gen. et sp. nov., a small carnivorous caseid from the Late Carboniferous, extends significantly the fossil record of Caseidae, and permits the first clade-based study of the origin and initial evolution of herbivory in terrestrial tetrapods. Our results demonstrate for the first time that large caseid herbivores evolved from small, non-herbivorous caseids. This pattern is mirrored by three other clades, documenting multiple, independent, but temporally staggered origins of herbivory and increase in body size among early terrestrial tetrapods, leading to patterns consistent with modern terrestrial ecosystem.

  17. [Feeding ecology of the Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) in the northeastern Buenos Aires Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, Guillermo E; Darrieu, Carlos A; Aribalzaga, María E; Camperi, Aníbal R; Lucía, Mariano; Williams, Jorge; Juarez, Marcos

    2008-12-01

    We studied the diet and feeding ecology of the Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira), a bird that has a wide distribution in Argentina. We analyzed 62 stomachs, obtained between 1991 and 1997 (26 in spring, 13 in summer, 10 in autumn and 13 in winter), in the localities La Balandra and Punta Blanca, Magdalena district, Buenos Aires province. In order to establish the contribution of each prey item, we applied the relative importance index. The dietary contribution in terms of number and volume was also taken into account. This species feeds only on animals. The trophic spectrum was determined on the basis of the identification of 92 items, all of animal origin, principally Insecta (98%), Annelida, Mollusca, Arachnida, Crustacea, Amphibia, Reptilia and Aves. In conclusion, G. guira is a opportunistic species that consumes animal preys exclusively.

  18. The fine structure of Garnia gonadati and its association with the host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, J A; Silva, E O; Lainson, R; de Souza, W

    2000-12-01

    Most of the studies on the fine structure of protozoa of the Apicomplexa group have been carried out with members of the ToxoPlasma, Eimeria, and Plasmodium genera. In the present study we analyzed the fine structure of Garnia gonadoti parasitizing the red blood cells of the Amazonian reptile Gonatodes humeralis (Reptilia; Lacertilia). Transmission electron microscopy of thin sections showed that G. gonadoti presented all structures characteristic of the group, including the apicoplast. However, four special features were observed: (1) absence of the hemozoin (malarial) pigment; (2) a group of microtubules associated with the mitochondrion; (3) a vacuole containing electron-dense material, which resembled the acidocalcisome described in trypanosomatids; and (4) a special array of the host-cell endoplasmic reticulum around the parasitophorous vacuole.

  19. A record of Horned viper Vipera ammodytes (L. in the diet of the Stone marten Martes foina (Erxl. (Mammalia: Mustelidae in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilian Georgiev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Among undigested prey remains in Stone marten’s Martes foina (Erxl. faeces (n=47, collected in Sakar Mountain (near Sladun Village a single lower jaw from a Horned viper (Vipera ammodytes was found. The rest of taxa registered in the Rock marten’s diet among the faecas were: Insceta indet., Lacerta sp., Pseudopus apodus, Aves indet., Dryomis nitedula, Sylvaemus sp., Arvicola terrestris, Microtus sp., and fruits of Rosa sp., Rubus sp., and Pyrus sp. The percent frequency of the main prey groups in the faeces were as follows: Mammalia (n=35, 74.5%, Aves (n=16, 34.0%, Reptilia (n=4, 8.5%, Insecta (n=4, 8.5%, and fruits (n=5, 10.6%.

  20. Contribuciones al estudiode los anfibios y reptiles de Méxicodurante el siglo XVIII y la Ilustración

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Casas Andreu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Las bases de la herpetología moderna en general se establecieron en el siglo XVIII,particularmente durante la Ilustración y quienes hicieron la mayor contribución fueronfundamentalmente los naturalistas franceses. No obstante, en México se hicieron varias publicacionesde cierto relieve, en especial por los misioneros jesuitas y otros estudiosos de la Nueva España. Esinteresante mencionar que aun con la trascendencia de Linneo para la biología moderna, algunoshistoriadores de los anfibios y los reptiles señalan que por lo menos para la herpetofauna de Méxicoexistió una importante regresión, ya que era mucho mayor el conocimiento que había dejadoFrancisco Hernández en el siglo XVI. Las contribuciones de los autores de la escuela francesa comoBuffon y quienes lo sucedieron como Lacepéde y Daudin, fueron los grandes pilares de laherpetología o estudios de los anfibios y los reptiles de la manera en que la conocemos en laactualidad. Las bases establecidas en el siglo XVIII sirvieron para que con la apertura de México almundo a partir de su independencia, se entrara en una de las etapas de mayor relevancia para laherpetología del país.

  1. Effect of piezoelectric field of threading dislocations on electron transport and capture in nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Dmitri; Auner, Gregory

    2001-03-01

    In nitride semiconductor structures, stress is known to induce considerable electric fields due to piezoelectric effect. We consider an AlN layer grown on a sapphire substrate and containing a number of threading dislocations. Most them are edge dislocations running in the growth direction. The strain field of such a dislocation results in electric field aligned with the dislocation axis and having alternate directions in the areas of compression and tension. These electric fields make for anisotropic electron diffusion in the layer. They also change the rates of electron capture by impurities, depending on the distance to the dislocation core. We apply these results to photoexcited electrons in a GaN/AlN quantum dot system where the dot nucleation occurred preferably in the tension regions near the dislocations [1]. The biased diffusion leads to photoinduced polarization of the dot-containing layer even in the absence of external electric field. [1] J.L. Rouviere, J. Simon, N. Pelekanos, B. Daudin, and G. Feuillet, Appl. Phys. Lett., 75, 2632-2634 (1999)

  2. Rediscovery of the 220-year-old holotype of the Banded Iguana, Brachylophus fasciatus (Brongniart, 1800) in the Paris Natural History Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineich, Ivan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Natural History Museum herpetological collection (MNHN-RA) has seven historical specimens of Brachylophus spp. collected late in the 18th and early in the 19th centuries. Brachylophus fasciatus was described in 1800 by Brongniart but its type was subsequently considered as lost and never present in MNHN-RA collections. We found that 220 year old holotype among existing collections, registered without any data, and we show that it was donated to MNHN-RA from Brongniart’s private collection after his death in 1847. It was registered in the catalogue of 1851 but without any data or reference to its type status. According to the coloration (uncommon midbody saddle-like dorsal banding pattern) and morphometric data given in its original description and in the subsequent examination of the type in 1802 by Daudin and in 1805 by Brongniart we found that lost holotype in the collections. Another MNHN-RA specimen has Horn Islands (Wallis and Futuna) as the collection location but we show that most of the collections given to MNHN-RA by its collector, Louis Arnoux, have mixed localities in the MNHN-RA catalogues. We thus conclude that the locality is wrong and that the species never inhabited those islands located west of Western Samoa and north-east of Fiji.

  3. Commented distributional list of the Reptiles of Mauritania (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padial, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first comprehensive review of the reptiles of Mauritania. It includes distributional information and comments. Mauritania harbors 86 species of reptiles belonging to 21 families. Among these families, Colubridae and Lacertidae are the most diverse, with 14 and 13 species respectively. Other families, such as Agamidae, Gekkonidae, Scincidae or Viperidae are also well represented. Among the 80 continental species, 47.5% are Saharan, 33.8% Afrotropical, 16.2% Sahelian and 2.5% Mediterranean. The marine turtles form another important group, with six species. Eight species are excluded from the country list because of old identification errors, there is not enough evidence of their presence or due to changes in political borders. Among the species expected to occur in Mauritania, at least nine may occur in Saharan environments, 13 in the Sahel savannah and two may have been introduced.

    Esta es la primera lista de reptiles comentada con datos de distribución para la República Islámica de Mauritania. La fauna de reptiles de Mauritania se compone de 86 especies pertenecientes a 21 familias. Entres ellas, Colubridae y Lacertidae son las más diversas, con 14 y 13 especies respectivamente. Otras familias como Agamidae, Gekkonidae, Scincidae y Viperidae también son representativas. Entre las 80 especies continentales el 47.5% son de distribución sahariana, el 33.8% afrotropical, el 16.2% sahelianas y el 2.5% mediterráneas. Las tortugas marinas, con seis especies, es otro grupo importante. Ocho especies no han sido incluidas en la lista debido a que se trataba de viejos errores de identificación, por carecer de suficiente evidencia o debido a la redistribución de las viejas fronteras políticas. Entre las especies potencialmente presentes, al menos nueve de ellas se esperan para las zonas saharianas, trece para las sabanas del Sahel, y dos podrían haber sido introducidas.

  4. Adaptation to life in aeolian sand: how the sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus, prevents sand particles from entering its lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Anna T; Vihar, Boštjan; Günther, Mathias; Huemer, Michaela; Riedl, Martin; Shamiyeh, Stephanie; Mayrhofer, Bernhard; Böhme, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-11-15

    The sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus (Squamata: Scincidae), spends nearly its whole life in aeolian sand and only comes to the surface for foraging, defecating and mating. It is not yet understood how the animal can respire without sand particles entering its respiratory organs when buried under thick layers of sand. In this work, we integrated biological studies, computational calculations and physical experiments to understand this phenomenon. We present a 3D model of the upper respiratory system based on a detailed histological analysis. A 3D-printed version of this model was used in combination with characteristic ventilation patterns for computational calculations and fluid mechanics experiments. By calculating the velocity field, we identified a sharp decrease in velocity in the anterior part of the nasal cavity where mucus and cilia are present. The experiments with the 3D-printed model validate the calculations: particles, if present, were found only in the same area as suggested by the calculations. We postulate that the sandfish has an aerodynamic filtering system; more specifically, that the characteristic morphology of the respiratory channel coupled with specific ventilation patterns prevent particles from entering the lungs.

  5. Experimental transmission of Hepatozoon gracilis (Wenyon, 1909) com. nov., in its natural host the bean skink lizard (Mabuya quinquetaeniata quinquetaeniata) and vector Culex (C.) pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adham, Fatma K; Gabre, Refaat M; Ayaad, Tahany A; Galal, Fatma H

    2007-12-01

    The bean skink lizard Mabuya quinquetaeniata quinquetaeniata (Family: Scincidae) collected from Abu-Rawash, Giza was infected with the protozoon Hepatozoon gracilis. The mean percent of infection rate all over the year was 12.57% with the highest peak was in October (33%), meanwhile the lowest infection rate was detected in June (2.1%) and no infection was detected in February. Microscopical examination of experimentally infected Culex (C.) pipiens L smears revealed the presence of gamogony and sporogony stages of H. gracilis in their haemoceal. Cx. pipiens was capable to transmit H. gracilis to non-infected M. q. quinquetaeniata under laboratory conditions (21 +/- 1 & 60-70% R.H) after a prepatent period of 32 +/- 1 days from the infective bite. Various developmental schizogony stages were detected both in the lung endothelial cells and liver parenchymal cells. Developmental stages of H. gracilis in both vector or vertebrate host were described. Cx. pipiens was unable to transmit H. gracilis to snake, Psammophis schokari present in the same area of the bean skink lizard.

  6. Paraspirura bettinae n. sp. from a South African skink with comments on spirurid nematodes from saurians and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering-Hagenbeck, S; Boomker, J; Bain, O

    2001-08-01

    The spirurid nematode, Paraspirura bettinae n. sp., described from Mabuya spilogaster (Scincidae) in South Africa (Molopo Reserve), can be distinguished from the single known species of the genus, Paraspirura mabuyae Sandground, 1936 (also reviewed) by the larger size of the eggs, the shape of the tail of the female, and the smaller body size in both sexes. The cephalic anatomy of Paraspirura spp. does not fit the original description but appears similar to that of spirurid parasites of mammals, Spirura spp. and Protospirura spp. Previous descriptions did not mention the rim and bulges in members of Protospirura. Paraspirura appears close to Protospirura, particularly to Protospirura muricola from the Ethiopian region, but it is distinct because of the persistence of the larval caudal tubercles in the adult stage, the simple right spicule without alae, and the more developed rim and bulges. The species parasitic in saurians may have arisen from Protospirura spp. by capture, or the spirurids of mammals may have been derived from species of Paraspirura and quickly split into a Protospirura line and a more specialized Spirura assemblage.

  7. Nesting lizards (Bassiana duperreyi) compensate partly, but not completely, for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telemeco, Rory S; Elphick, Melanie J; Shine, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Species in which ambient temperatures directly determine offspring sex may be at particular risk as global climates change. Whether or not climate change affects sex ratio depends upon the effectiveness of buffering mechanisms that link ambient regimes to actual nest temperatures. For example, females may simply lay nests earlier in the season, or in more shaded areas, such that incubation thermal regimes are unchanged despite massive ambient fluctuation. Based on eight years of monitoring nests over a 10-year period in the field at an alpine site in southeastern Australia, we show that, even though lizards (Bassiana duperreyi, Scincidae) have adjusted both nest depth and seasonal timing of oviposition in response to rising ambient temperatures, they have been unable to compensate entirely for climate change. That inability stems from the fact that the seasonal progression of soil temperatures, and thus, the degree to which thermal regimes at the time of laying predict subsequent conditions during incubation, also has shifted with climate change. As a result, mean incubation temperatures in natural nests now have crossed the thermal threshold at which incubation temperature directly affects offspring sex in this population.

  8. Life on the rocks: habitat use drives morphological and performance evolution in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brett A; Miles, Donald B; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2008-12-01

    As a group, lizards occupy a vast array of habitats worldwide, yet there remain relatively few cases where habitat use (ecology), morphology, and thus, performance, are clearly related. The best known examples include: increased limb length in response to increased arboreal perch diameter in anoles and increased limb length in response to increased habitat openness for some skinks. Rocky habitats impose strong natural selection on specific morphological characteristics, which differs from that imposed on terrestrial species, because moving about on inclined substrates of irregular sizes and shapes constrains locomotor performance in predictable ways. We quantified habitat use, morphology, and performance of 19 species of lizards (family Scincidae, subfamily Lygosominae) from 23 populations in tropical Australia. These species use habitats with considerable variation in rock availability. Comparative phylogenetic analyses revealed that occupation of rock-dominated habitats correlated with the evolution of increased limb length, compared to species from forest habitats that predominantly occupied leaf litter. Moreover, increased limb length directly affected performance, with species from rocky habitats having greater sprinting, climbing, and clinging ability than their relatives from less rocky habitats. Thus, we found that the degree of rock use is correlated with both morphological and performance evolution in this group of tropical lizards.

  9. The lizard fauna of Guam's fringing islets: Island biogeography, phylogenetic history, and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G.; Rodda, G.H.; Fritts, T.H.; Sharp, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    We sampled the lizard fauna of twenty-two small islets fringing the Pacific island of Guam and used these data to shed light on the processes responsible for present-day diversity. Habitat diversity, measured by islet area and vegetation complexity, was significantly correlated with the number of species found on an islet. However, islet distance and elevation were not significant predictors of diversity. Distribution patterns were slightly different for the two major families in our sample, Scincidae and Gekkonidae: skinks needed larger islets to maintain a population than did geckos. Presence/absence patterns were highly and significantly nested, and population density was correlated with the number of islets on which a species was found. An area cladogram was poorly supported and showed no faunal similarity between nearby islands. These patterns indicate that extinctions on most islets were due mostly to non-catastrophic, long-acting biological causes. The presence on the islets of species extirpated on Guam and the lack of significant nestedness on islands with greater maximum elevation highlight the impact that predators (primarily brown treesnakes) can have. Our findings also show that small reserves will not suffice to protect endangered lizard faunas, and that the islets may serve as a short-term repository of such species until snake-free areas can be established on Guam.

  10. A taxonomic revision of small neotropical saurian Malarias allied to Plasmodium minasense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, S R

    1979-01-01

    Saurian malaria species which produce schizonts smaller than normal erythrocyte nuclei, with 4-8 merozoietes and gametocytes equal to or smaller than erythrocyte nuclei in size, parasitizing hosts of the lizard families Scincidae, Iguanidae and Teiidae in the Neotropics are considered to be Plasmodium minasense Carini and Rudolph, 1912. Subspecific designations are given to distinctive populations parasitizing different host species: P. minasense minasense is recognized from the type host, Mabuya mabouya of Brasil; P. minasense carinii Leger and Mouzels, 1917 from Iguana iguana of coastal South America; P. minasense anolisi subsp. nov. from Anolis limifrons of Panama; P. minasense capitoi subsp. nov. from Anolis capito of Panama; P. minasense plicae subsp. nov. from Plica umbra of Guyana; P. minasense tegui subsp. nov. from Tupinambis teguixin of Venezuela; and P. minasense diminutivum Telford, 1973, new combination, from Ameiva ameiva of Panama. Plasmodium rhadinurum Thompson and Huff, 1944 is recognized as a distinct species at present on the basis of possessing schizonts of different shape, asexual stages with filamentous projections in most portions of its range, and larger gametocytes, as well as apparent sympatry with P. minasense carinii in some areas.

  11. Subdigital and subcaudal microornamentation in Chamaeleonidae--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Marlene; Westhoff, Guido; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-06-01

    Locomotion on horizontal and vertical substrates requires effective attachment systems. In three clades of arboreal and rupicolous Iguanidae, Gekkota and Scincidae adhesive systems consisting of microscopic hair-like structures (setae) have been evolved independently. Also the substrate contacting sites on toes and tails of chameleons (Chamaeleonidae) are covered with setae. In the present comparative scanning electron microscopy study, we show that representatives from the chamaeleonid genera Calumma, Chamaeleo, Furcifer, and Trioceros feature highly developed setae that are species-specific and similar on their feet and tail. These 10 μm long, unbranched setae rather resemble those in anoline and scincid lizards than the larger and branched setae of certain gecko species. In contrast to the thin triangular tips of other lizards, all examined species of the genera Furcifer and Calumma and one of the five examined species of the genus Trioceros have spatulate tips. All other examined species of genera Trioceros and Chamaeleo bear setae with narrowed, fibrous tips. Unlike the setae of other lizards, chamaeleonid setal tips do not show any orientation along the axis of the toes, but they are flexible to bend in any direction. With these differences, the chameleon's unique microstructures on the zygodactylous feet and prehensile tail rather increase friction for arboreal locomotion than being a shear-induced adhesive system as setal pads of other lizards.

  12. Adaptation to life in aeolian sand: how the sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus, prevents sand particles from entering its lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihar, Boštjan; Günther, Mathias; Huemer, Michaela; Riedl, Martin; Shamiyeh, Stephanie; Mayrhofer, Bernhard; Böhme, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sandfish lizard, Scincus scincus (Squamata: Scincidae), spends nearly its whole life in aeolian sand and only comes to the surface for foraging, defecating and mating. It is not yet understood how the animal can respire without sand particles entering its respiratory organs when buried under thick layers of sand. In this work, we integrated biological studies, computational calculations and physical experiments to understand this phenomenon. We present a 3D model of the upper respiratory system based on a detailed histological analysis. A 3D-printed version of this model was used in combination with characteristic ventilation patterns for computational calculations and fluid mechanics experiments. By calculating the velocity field, we identified a sharp decrease in velocity in the anterior part of the nasal cavity where mucus and cilia are present. The experiments with the 3D-printed model validate the calculations: particles, if present, were found only in the same area as suggested by the calculations. We postulate that the sandfish has an aerodynamic filtering system; more specifically, that the characteristic morphology of the respiratory channel coupled with specific ventilation patterns prevent particles from entering the lungs. PMID:27852763

  13. Allelic expression of mammalian imprinted genes in a matrotrophic lizard, Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Oliver W; Brandley, Matthew C; Belov, Katherine; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that results in the differential expression of genes depending on their parent of origin. It occurs in both plants and live-bearing mammals, with imprinted genes typically regulating the ability of an embryo to manipulate the maternal provision of nutrients. Genomic imprinting increases the potential for selection to act separately on paternally and maternally expressed genes, which increases the number of opportunities that selection can facilitate embryonic control over maternal nutrient provision. By looking for imprinting in an independent matrotrophic lineage, the viviparous lizard Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii (Scincidae), we test the hypothesis that genomic imprinting facilitates the evolution of substantial placental nutrient transport to embryos (matrotrophy). We sequenced transcriptomes from the embryonic component of lizard placentae to determine whether there are parent-of-origin differences in expression of genes that are imprinted in mammals. Of these genes, 19 had sufficiently high expression in the lizard to identify polymorphisms in transcribed sequences. We identified bi-allelic expression in 17 genes (including insulin-like growth factor 2), indicating that neither allele was imprinted. These data suggest that either genomic imprinting has not evolved in this matrotrophic skink or, if it has, it has evolved in different genes to mammals. We outline how these hypotheses can be tested. This study highlights important differences between mammalian and reptile pregnancy and the absence of any shared imprinting genes reflects fundamental differences in the way that pregnancy has evolved in these two lineages.

  14. Clutch size in the tropical scincid lizard Emoia sanfordi, a species endemic to the Vanuatu Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison Madeline; Eckstut, Mallory Elizabeth; Klein, Elaine Renee; Austin, Christopher Cowell

    2008-08-01

    The majority of species in the scincid genus Emoia (Squamata: Scincidae) have a fixed clutch size of two eggs per clutch and produce between two and four clutches per year. One lineage within Emoia, the Emoia samoensis species group, consists of 13 species occurring in Melanesia and the islands of the southwestern Pacific Ocean, and exhibits variation in clutch size, with previously reported clutch sizes of two to five eggs. Little is known about reproduction in several members of this lineage including Emoia sanfordi, a large-bodied lizard endemic to the archipelago of Vanuatu in the South Pacific. We analyzed reproduction and clutch size in E. sanfordi females and discovered that there is a substantial amount of intraspecific variation, with clutch size ranging from two to seven eggs, with a modal clutch size of five eggs. Females were reproductively active throughout the study period of June through October and appear to be laying multiple clutches. The variation in clutch size seen in E. sanfordi is congruent with the variation previously reported within other closely related species.

  15. Diet of Chinese skink, Eumeces chinensis: is prey size important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Jiang, Yong

    2006-06-01

    The diet of the skink, Eumeces chinensis (Lacertilia: Scincidae), in Xiamen (Amoy), China was examined using stomach analysis during April and May, and its selection of prey size was tested by feeding trials. Insects (primarily Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera), gastropods and arachnids constituted most of the E. chinensis diet, but earthworms, leeches, crustaceans and fish were also consumed. In the field, male skinks ate more prey items that were 11-20 mm in length than other size classes. When presented with a choice of different-sized prey in the laboratory, male E. chinensis exhibited a strong preference for prey items 11-20 mm in length over other size classes. The relationship between prey size and handling time was exponential, indicating that there is an upper limit to the ability of E. chinensis to process prey. Mean energy intake for handling different-sized prey showed that selection of midsizeclass prey items would provide male E. chinensis with the most energy-efficient prey option. These results indicate that prey size selection in E. chinensis favors maximization of rates of energy intake, which is in agreement with optimal foraging theory.

  16. Reptile Specimen Catalogue of Natural History Museum of Chongqing%重庆自然博物馆馆藏爬行动物名录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健; 钟婧; 张虹; 刘文萍; 李华

    2011-01-01

    本研究对重庆自然博物馆馆藏的爬行动物标本进行清点、整理,得到自然博物馆馆藏国内爬行动物标本164种,分属于壁虎科(Gekkonidae)7属,鬣蜥科(Agamidae)6属,巨蜥科(Varanidae)1属,蜥蜴科(Lacertidae)4属,石龙子科(Scincidae)3属,盲蛇科(Typhlopidae)1属,蟒科(Boidae)2属,游蛇科(Megapodiidae)25属,眼镜蛇科(Elapidae)6属,蝰科(Viperidae)7属,鳖科(Trionychidae)2属,海龟科(Cheloniidae)1属,平胸龟科(Platystemidae)1属,乌龟科(Emydidae)2属,陆龟科(Tesrudinidae)2属,鳄科(Crocodylidae)1属,以及3个国外物种粗颈龟(Siebenrockiella crassicollis)、咸水泥彩龟(Callagur borneoensis)和蛇鳄龟(Macro-clemys temminckii.)

  17. Functional specialization and ontogenetic scaling of limb anatomy in Alligator mississippiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vivian; Elsey, Ruth M; Jones, Nicola; Wright, Jordon; Hutchinson, John R

    2010-01-01

    Crocodylians exhibit a fascinating diversity of terrestrial gaits and limb motions that remain poorly described and are of great importance to understanding their natural history and evolution. Their musculoskeletal anatomy is pivotal to this diversity and yet only qualitative studies of muscle-tendon unit anatomy exist. The relative masses and internal architecture (fascicle lengths and physiological cross-sectional areas) of muscles of the pectoral and pelvic limbs of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis Daudin 1801) were recorded for an ontogenetic series of wild specimens (n = 15, body masses from 0.5 to 60 kg). The data were analysed by reduced major axis regression to determine scaling relationships with body mass. Physiological cross-sectional areas and therefore muscle force-generating capacity were found to be greater in the extensor (anti-gravity) muscles of the pelvic limb than in the pectoral limb, reflecting how crocodylians differ from mammals in having greater loading of the hindlimbs than the forelimbs. Muscle masses and architecture were generally found to scale isometrically with body mass, suggesting an ontogenetic decrease in terrestrial athleticism. This concurs with the findings of previous studies showing ontogenetic decreases in limb bone length and the general scaling principle of a decline of strength : weight ratios with increasing size in animals. Exceptions to isometric scaling found included positive allometry in fascicle length for extensor musculature of both limbs, suggesting an ontogenetic increase in working range interpreted as increasing postural variability – in particular the major hip extensors – the interpretation of which is complicated by previous described ontogenetic increase of moment arms for these muscles. PMID:20148991

  18. Osteology and cranial musculature of Caiman latirostris (crocodylia: Alligatoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Paula; Desojo, Julia Brenda

    2011-07-01

    Caiman latirostris Daudin is one of the extant species of Caimaninae alligatorids characterized taxonomically only by external morphological features. In the present contribution, we describe the cranial osteology and myology of this species and its morphological variation. Several skull dissections and comparisons with other caimans were made. Although jaw muscles of living crocodiles show the same general "Bauplan" and alligatorids seem to have a similar cranial musculature pattern, we describe some morphological variations (e.g., in C. latirostris the superficial portion of the M. adductor mandibulae externus did not reach the postorbital; the M. adductor mandibulae internus pars pterygoideus dorsalis did not reach the pterygoid and lacrimal and contrary to the case of C. crocodilus the M. adductor mandibulae internus pars pterygoideus ventralis attaches to the posterodorsal surface of the pterygoid and the pterygoid aponeurosis, without contacting the dorsal and ventral surface of the pterygoid margin; the M. intermandibularis is attached to the anterior half of the splenial and posteriorly inserts medially by a medial raphe that serves as attachment zone for M. constrictor colli, and the M. constrictor colli profundus presents a medial notch in its anterior margin). In addition, the skull of C. latirostris differs from that of other caimans and possesses several characters that are potential diagnostic features of this species (e.g., outline of glenoid cavity in dorsal view, extension of the rostral ridges, and occlusion of the first dentary tooth). Nevertheless, these characters should be analyzed within the phylogenetic context of the Caimaninae to evaluate its evolutionary implications for the history of the group.

  19. Male discrimination of receptive and unreceptive female calls by temporal features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Taffeta M; Kelley, Darcy B

    2007-08-01

    In murky, crowded ponds in South Africa, female clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis (Daudin), vocalize to signal reproductive state. Female calls consist of acoustically similar clicks delivered in trains with characteristic rates. The rapping call of a sexually receptive female has a more rapid click rate [81 ms mean interclick interval (ICI)] than the ticking call of an unreceptive female (219 ms ICI). Rapping stimulates male advertisement calling, whereas ticking suppresses an already calling male. We examined how males label and discriminate female click rates. A labeling boundary experiment revealed that males perceive click rates between the means of rapping and ticking as lying on a continuum. They respond to 98 and 160 ms ICI as though to rapping and ticking, respectively. However, calling evoked by a click rate equally common to both calls (120 ms ICI) did not differ from the response to either rapping or ticking. A second experiment evaluated whether males discriminate click rates both labeled as ticking (180 and 219 ms ICI). Ticking suppresses advertising males, and suppressed males habituate (resume calling) to prolonged ticking. Both ticking stimuli suppressed males with equal effectiveness, and males habituated in equivalent amounts of time. When the stimulus was switched during habituation, no dishabituation occurred. We conclude that male labeling of click trains as rapping or ticking reflects an ambiguity resulting from the overlap in ICIs naturally occurring in the calls. Males do not respond differentially to click rates within the ticking category. Males thus combine discriminating and non-discriminating strategies in responding to the salient feature of female calls.

  20. Primary Survey on Herpetofauna in Campus of Hechi University in Central Guangxi%河池学院校园两栖爬行动物初步调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋爱伍; 粟通萍; 于家捷; 梁晓凤

    2011-01-01

    A primary survey on herpetofauna was conducted by specimen collecting and interviewing in campus of Hechi University, central Guangxi, during July 2008 to December 2009. Totally 26 species were detected in this survey. Among them, 6 species of 4 families, 1 order belonged to the class Amphibia, and 20 species of 7 families, 2 orders belonged to the class Reptilia. The dominant Amphibia is Polypedates leucomystax, and the dominant Reptilia is Rhabdphis subminiatus,Naja atra and Eumeces chinensis. 6 species of 12 snakes are vipers in the campus, and Naja atra is the most dangerous. The Amphibia depend on running water have already disappeared along with urbanization, and the species breeding or preying on the building,such as Pol y pedates leucom ystax , Naja atra and Hem idact ylus bowrin gii , can adapt the habitat of urban.%2008年7月至2009年12月,利用标本采集和访问的方法对河池学院校园内两栖爬行动物资源进行了初步的调查,共记录到两栖爬行动物26种,其中两栖动物1目4科6种,爬行动物2目7科20种.在校园中最常见的两栖动物是斑腿泛树蛙(Polypedates leucomystax),最常见的爬行动物是红脖颈槽蛇(Rhabdphissubminiatus)、舟山眼镜蛇(Naja atra)和中国石龙子(Eumeces chinensis).在校园分布的12种蛇类中,6种为毒蛇,其中舟山眼镜蛇的危害最为严重.师生在工作和学习要特别注意防止咬伤.与周边地区相比,在城市化过程中,流水型的两栖动物最容易灭绝;能利用建筑物繁殖或捕食的种类,如斑腿泛树蛙、原尾蜥虎和舟山眼镜蛇等,在城市化过程中占有较大的优势.

  1. Material tipo de la Colección de Herpetología del Museo de La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro, Daiana Paola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El Museo de la Plata (Buenos Aires, República Argentina se fundó en 1889, y la colección herpetológica comenzó a funcionar poco tiempo después, bajo la responsabilidad deJulio G. Koslowsky. En esta contribución se listan los ejemplares tipo de Anfibios y Reptiles depositados en la colección herpetológica del Museo de La Plata. El material tipo depositado corresponde a 32 especies descriptas desde 1895 hasta la actualidad, incluyendo: 14 holotipos, 115 paratipos, 4 lectotipos, 22 paralectotipos, 1 neotipo y 12 sintipos (sin incluir los ejemplares extraviados. Se proporciona, para cada taxón, la información completa referida a estatus de cada ejemplar tipo, sexo, datos de recolección y modificaciones taxonómicas posteriores. The La Plata Museum (Buenos Aires, República Argentina was founded on 1889, and after a little time, the herpetological collection started under the responsibility of Julio G. Koslowsky. In this paper the type specimens of Amphibia and Reptilia housed in the collection of the Herpetology Section at the La Plata Museum are listed. These type materials correspondto 32 species described since 1895 until nowadays, and include: 14 holotypes, 115 paratypes, 4 lectotypes, 22 paralectotypes, 1 neotype and 12 sintypes (this list does not include lost specimens. Complete data about taxonomic status, sex, collection data, and subsequent taxonomic changes are given for each taxon.

  2. Terrestrial origin of viviparity in mesozoic marine reptiles indicated by early triassic embryonic fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Ryosuke; Jiang, Da-yong; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier; Chen, Guan-bao

    2014-01-01

    Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic). This exceptional specimen captures an articulated embryo in birth position, with its skull just emerged from the maternal pelvis. Its headfirst birth posture, which is unlikely to be a breech condition, strongly indicates a terrestrial origin of viviparity, in contrast to the traditional view. The tail-first birth posture in derived ichthyopterygians, convergent with the conditions in whales and sea cows, therefore is a secondary feature. The unequivocally marine origin of viviparity is so far not known among amniotes, a subset of vertebrate animals comprising mammals and reptiles, including birds. Therefore, obligate marine amniotes appear to have evolved almost exclusively from viviparous land ancestors. Viviparous land reptiles most likely appeared much earlier than currently thought, at least as early as the recovery phase from the end-Permian mass extinction.

  3. Provisioning rates and time budgets of adult and nestling Bald Eagles at Inland Wisconsin nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Warnke D.; Andersen, D.E.; Dykstra, C.R.; Meyer, M.W.; Karasov, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    We used a remote video recording system and direct observation to quantify provisioning rate and adult and nestling behavior at Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests in north-central Wisconsin in 1992 (N = 5) and 1993 (N = 8). Eagles nesting in this region have a high reproductive rate (??? 1.3 young/occupied territory), and the number of occupied territories has expanded nearly three-fold since 1980. The season-long provisioning rate averaged 5.2 prey deliveries/nest/d and 3.0 prey deliveries/nestling/d, and did not vary by year or with nestling number or age. Fish (Osteichthyes) made up 97% of identified prey deliveries followed by reptiles (Reptilia) (1.5%), birds (Aves) (1.2%), and mammals (Mammalia) (0.6%). Nearly 85% of prey items were >15 cm and 90% of the day and was negatively correlated with nestling age. Time adults spent feeding nestlings was negatively correlated with nestling age. Nestlings stood or sat in the nest >30% of the day, began to feed themselves, and exhibited increased mobility in the nest at 6-8 wk. We identified three stages of the nestling period and several benchmarks that may be useful when scheduling data collection for comparison of Bald Eagle nesting behavior. Our results support the hypothesis that food was not limiting this breeding population of Bald Eagles. ?? 2002 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  4. Elbow joint adductor moment arm as an indicator of forelimb posture in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-07-07

    Forelimb posture has been a controversial aspect of reconstructing locomotor behaviour in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods. This is partly owing to the qualitative and subjective nature of typical methods, which focus on bony articulations that are often ambiguous and unvalidated postural indicators. Here we outline a new, quantitatively based forelimb posture index that is applicable to a majority of extant tetrapods. By determining the degree of elbow joint adduction/abduction mobility in several tetrapods, the carpal flexor muscles were determined to also play a role as elbow adductors. Such adduction may play a major role during the stance phase in sprawling postures. This role is different from those of upright/sagittal and sloth-like creeping postures, which, respectively, depend more on elbow extensors and flexors. Our measurements of elbow muscle moment arms in 318 extant tetrapod skeletons (Lissamphibia, Synapsida and Reptilia: 33 major clades and 263 genera) revealed that sprawling, sagittal and creeping tetrapods, respectively, emphasize elbow adductor, extensor and flexor muscles. Furthermore, scansorial and non-scansorial taxa, respectively, emphasize flexors and extensors. Thus, forelimb postures of extinct tetrapods can be qualitatively classified based on our quantitative index. Using this method, we find that Triceratops (Ceratopsidae), Anhanguera (Pterosauria) and desmostylian mammals are categorized as upright/sagittally locomoting taxa.

  5. Terrestrial origin of viviparity in mesozoic marine reptiles indicated by early triassic embryonic fossils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Motani

    Full Text Available Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia, which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic. This exceptional specimen captures an articulated embryo in birth position, with its skull just emerged from the maternal pelvis. Its headfirst birth posture, which is unlikely to be a breech condition, strongly indicates a terrestrial origin of viviparity, in contrast to the traditional view. The tail-first birth posture in derived ichthyopterygians, convergent with the conditions in whales and sea cows, therefore is a secondary feature. The unequivocally marine origin of viviparity is so far not known among amniotes, a subset of vertebrate animals comprising mammals and reptiles, including birds. Therefore, obligate marine amniotes appear to have evolved almost exclusively from viviparous land ancestors. Viviparous land reptiles most likely appeared much earlier than currently thought, at least as early as the recovery phase from the end-Permian mass extinction.

  6. Phylogenomics of nonavian reptiles and the structure of the ancestral amniote genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Andrew M; Botka, Christopher W; Zhao, Shaying; Shetty, Jyoti; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Jun S; Deschavanne, Patrick J; Edwards, Scott V

    2007-02-20

    We report results of a megabase-scale phylogenomic analysis of the Reptilia, the sister group of mammals. Large-scale end-sequence scanning of genomic clones of a turtle, alligator, and lizard reveals diverse, mammal-like landscapes of retroelements and simple sequence repeats (SSRs) not found in the chicken. Several global genomic traits, including distinctive phylogenetic lineages of CR1-like long interspersed elements (LINEs) and a paucity of A-T rich SSRs, characterize turtles and archosaur genomes, whereas higher frequencies of tandem repeats and a lower global GC content reveal mammal-like features in Anolis. Nonavian reptile genomes also possess a high frequency of diverse and novel 50-bp unit tandem duplications not found in chicken or mammals. The frequency distributions of approximately 65,000 8-mer oligonucleotides suggest that rates of DNA-word frequency change are an order of magnitude slower in reptiles than in mammals. These results suggest a diverse array of interspersed and SSRs in the common ancestor of amniotes and a genomic conservatism and gradual loss of retroelements in reptiles that culminated in the minimalist chicken genome. The sequences reported in this paper have been deposited in the GenBank database (accession nos. CZ 250707-CZ 257443 and DX 390731-DX 389174).

  7. A review of thermoregulation and physiological performance in reptiles: what is the role of phenotypic flexibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Biological functions are dependent on the temperature of the organism. Animals may respond to fluctuation in the thermal environment by regulating their body temperature and by modifying physiological and biochemical rates. Phenotypic flexibility (reversible phenotypic plasticity, acclimation, or acclimatisation in rate functions occurs in all major taxonomic groups and may be considered as an ancestral condition. Within the Reptilia, representatives from all major groups show phenotypic flexibility in response to long-term or chronic changes in the thermal environment. Acclimation or acclimatisation in reptiles are most commonly assessed by measuring whole animal responses such as oxygen consumption, but whole animal responses are comprised of variation in individual traits such as enzyme activities, hormone expression, and cardiovascular functions. The challenge now lies in connecting the changes in the components to the functioning of the whole animal and its fitness. Experimental designs in research on reptilian thermal physiology should incorporate the capacity for reversible phenotypic plasticity as a null-hypothesis, because the significance of differential body temperature-performance relationships (thermal reaction norms) between individuals, populations, or species cannot be assessed without testing that null-hypothesis.

  8. Morphological specializations of the yolk sac for yolk processing in embryonic corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus: Colubridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kathryn G; Blackburn, Daniel G

    2017-03-23

    Non-avian reptiles commonly are assumed to be like birds in their overall patterns of development. However, colubrid corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) have mechanisms of yolk cellularization and processing that are entirely different from the avian pattern. In birds, a vascular "yolk sac" surrounds and digests the liquid yolk. In contrast, in corn snakes, the yolk material is converted into vascularized cords of yolk-filled cells. In this study, we used stereomicroscopy, histology, and scanning electron microscopy to analyze this unusual developmental pattern in corn snakes. Our observations reveal that the yolk sac cavity is invaded by endodermal cells that proliferate, absorb yolk spheres, and form aggregates of interconnected cells within the liquid yolk mass. As development proceeds, small blood vessels arise from the yolk sac omphalopleure, penetrate into the yolk mass, and become tightly encased in the endodermal cells. The entire vitellus ultimately becomes converted into a mass of vascularized, "spaghetti-like" strands of yolk-laden cells. The resulting arrangement allows yolk to be digested intracellularly and yolk products to be transported to the developing embryo. Indirect evidence for this pattern in other species raises the possibility that it is ancestral for squamates and quite possibly Reptilia in general.

  9. Invasion of Ancestral Mammals into Dim-light Environments Inferred from Adaptive Evolution of the Phototransduction Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghua; Wang, Haifeng; Hadly, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Nocturnality is a key evolutionary innovation of mammals that enables mammals to occupy relatively empty nocturnal niches. Invasion of ancestral mammals into nocturnality has long been inferred from the phylogenetic relationships of crown Mammalia, which is primarily nocturnal, and crown Reptilia, which is primarily diurnal, although molecular evidence for this is lacking. Here we used phylogenetic analyses of the vision genes involved in the phototransduction pathway to predict the diel activity patterns of ancestral mammals and reptiles. Our results demonstrated that the common ancestor of the extant Mammalia was dominated by positive selection for dim-light vision, supporting the predominate nocturnality of the ancestral mammals. Further analyses showed that the nocturnality of the ancestral mammals was probably derived from the predominate diurnality of the ancestral amniotes, which featured strong positive selection for bright-light vision. Like the ancestral amniotes, the common ancestor of the extant reptiles and various taxa in Squamata, one of the main competitors of the temporal niches of the ancestral mammals, were found to be predominate diurnality as well. Despite this relatively apparent temporal niche partitioning between ancestral mammals and the relevant reptiles, our results suggested partial overlap of their temporal niches during crepuscular periods. PMID:28425474

  10. Profil Farmakokinetik Amikasin Pemberian Intravena Melalui Vena Sublingualis dan Coccygea pada Ular Sanca Batik (PHARMACOKINETIC PROFILE OF AMIKACIN ADMINISTERED INTRA VENOUSLY VIA SUBLINGUAL AND COCCYGEA VEINS IN BROGHAMMERUS RETICULATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Dwi Wijayanti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to find out the pharmacokinetic profile of amikacin in sanca batik snake(Broghammerus reticulatus which is expected to be beneficial in the therapy management of reptiliaes.The eight of adult snakes with averages body weight of 2-14 kg were used and they were devided into twogroups (n=4. Amikacin (5 mg/kg bw was given by sublingualis (anterior or coccygea (posterior venous ingroups, respectively. Blood samples were collected by intracardiac puncture to all snakes at minutes 1,5,10, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480, 960, 1440 (24 hours and 2880 (48 hours post administrations. Bloods werecollected using heparinized tubes and sentrifuged at 2500 G to obtain the plasma. The Plasma sampleswere stored at -200c. Plasma were firstly extracted with trichloroacetid acid solution 10% and then injectedinto High Performace Liquid Chromatography Shimadzu 6.1. The results of amikacin levels werestatistically lower on sublingualis vein administration as compared to that of coccygea vein administrationusing Student T-Test (P<0.05. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with non compartementalmethod resulted for anterior application : Vd 3.6 L, clearance 0.066 mL/minute/kg, AUC 75.384 ug/mL.minute and for posterior application : Vd 0.78 L, T1/2 213.09 hours, clearance 0.427 mL/minute/kg,AUC 117.143,7 ug/mL/minute.

  11. Invasive cells in the placentome of Andean populations of Mabuya: an endotheliochorial contribution to the placenta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Simón; de Perez, Gloria; Ramírez-Pinilla, Martha Patricia

    2007-12-01

    New world lizards of the genus Mabuya have the most specialized level of placentotrophy among reptiles known to date, and related to that, they have the most complex allantoplacenta characterized by a series of morphological specializations that converge with those known for eutherian mammals. One of these specializations is the placentome that is found in the embryonic pole of the incubation chamber. In the mature allantoplacenta, this structure is morphologically the most complex, which could support an important amount of nutrient exchange between mother and fetus. According to the relationship between the chorioallantois and the syncytial uterine epithelia, the placenta of Mabuya populations shows some interesting similarities to the synepitheliochorial type. Recently, cells of chorionic origin have been found invading the syncytial uterine epithelium, and in very close proximity with uterine blood vessels. In this study, we describe the relationship between these invasive chorionic cells, the uterine syncytium, and the subjacent blood vessels of several populations of this genus, by means of high resolution optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cell groups originating from the chorion, of variable size and shape, penetrate the uterine syncytial epithelium extending complex cytoplasmic projections that come in contact with uterine capillaries and form an extensive and complex double-membrane system that surrounds the capillary. The close relationship between the chorion and the maternal circulation suggests that the Mabuya placentome shows some characteristics of an endotheliochorial placenta. This finding constitutes so far the only documented example of an endotheliochorial placentation in Reptilia.

  12. Evidence for self-cleaning in gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, W. R.; Autumn, K.

    2005-01-01

    A tokay gecko can cling to virtually any surface and support its body mass with a single toe by using the millions of keratinous setae on its toe pads. Each seta branches into hundreds of 200-nm spatulae that make intimate contact with a variety of surface profiles. We showed previously that the combined surface area of billions of spatulae maximizes van der Waals interactions to generate large adhesive and shear forces. Geckos are not known to groom their feet yet retain their stickiness for months between molts. How geckos manage to keep their feet clean while walking about with sticky toes has remained a puzzle until now. Although self-cleaning by water droplets occurs in plant and animal surfaces, no adhesive has been shown to self-clean. In the present study, we demonstrate that gecko setae are a self-cleaning adhesive. Geckos with dirty feet recovered their ability to cling to vertical surfaces after only a few steps. Self-cleaning occurred in arrays of setae isolated from the gecko. Contact mechanical models suggest that self-cleaning occurs by an energetic disequilibrium between the adhesive forces attracting a dirt particle to the substrate and those attracting the same particle to one or more spatulae. We propose that the property of self-cleaning is intrinsic to the setal nanostructure and therefore should be replicable in synthetic adhesive materials in the future. adhesion | contact mechanics | locomotion | reptilia | nanotechnology

  13. 常用实验脊椎动物形态解剖结构比较%Comparison of Morphological and Anatomic Structure of Vertebrates Commonly Used in Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐虎; 梁小锦; 叶强; 赵芯芯; 杨芳; 张佩君

    2015-01-01

    脊椎动物常被选为科学研究动物材料,在鱼纲、两栖纲、爬行纲、鸟纲和哺乳纲动物中选择几种代表动物进行解剖学研究,针对外形特征、骨骼系统、呼吸系统、消化系统、循环系统、生殖系统中一般相同特征和部分特征的不同点进行排列比较,并对部分系统做简要描述。%Vertebrates are often selected as scientific research material. In this paper, several representative animals of Pisces, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia were anatomically studied. The common similar and different characteristics of the shape feature, the skeletal system, respiratory system, digestive system, circulatory system and reproductive system of the selected animals are compared, and some certain above systems were described briefly.

  14. FY 1998 geothermal development promotion survey. Report on the environmental effect survey (animals/plants, No. B-7 Kuwanosawa area); 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Kankyo eikyo chosa hokokusho (doshokubutsu, No.B-7 Kuwanosawa chiiki)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This survey was conducted to estimate effects of drilling of geothermal exploration well on the environment, aiming at grasping the present state of environmental elements before the survey/development. As a result of the literature survey, the following distribution were confirmed in the fauna: 5 orders 10 families 19 species in the mammalia, 10 orders 25 families 73 species in the aves, 1 order 3 families 6 species in the reptilia, 2 orders 6 families 9 species in the amphibia, and 17 orders 179 families 719 species in the insecta. In the flora, a distribution of 132 families 670 species was confirmed. The results of studying the above indicated that in the fauna, there were 10 species such as antelope as valuable animal in the area surveyed and that it is necessary to pay much attention to the environmental preservation of the habitat for those animals in the well drilling associated with geothermal survey. In the flora, the 13 valuable animals selected as animal having a fear of extinction in the 'plant-version red list' were confirmed in the area surveyed and the periphery. Further, as to the plant colony, there are no important colonies in terms of preservation. In well drilling, important things are efforts exerted to restore to the original state of the area altered, prevention of the washed-away of mud water, etc., and efforts exerted to preserve the environment of vegetation. (NEDO)

  15. QTL mapping for two commercial traits in farmed saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, L G; Isberg, S R; Thomson, P C; Glenn, T C; Lance, S L; Dalzell, P; Moran, C

    2010-04-01

    The recent generation of a genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) has now made it possible to carry out the systematic searches necessary for the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting traits of economic, as well as evolutionary, importance in crocodilians. In this study, we conducted genome-wide scans for two commercially important traits, inventory head length (which is highly correlated with growth rate) and number of scale rows (SR, a skin quality trait), for the existence of QTL in a commercial population of saltwater crocodiles at Darwin Crocodile Farm, Northern Territory, Australia. To account for the uncommonly large difference in sex-specific recombination rates apparent in the saltwater crocodile, a duel mapping strategy was employed. This strategy employed a sib-pair analysis to take advantage of our full-sib pedigree structure, together with a half-sib analysis to account for, and take advantage of, the large difference in sex-specific recombination frequencies. Using these approaches, two putative QTL regions were identified for SR on linkage group 1 (LG1) at 36 cM, and on LG12 at 0 cM. The QTL identified in this investigation represent the first for a crocodilian and indeed for any non-avian member of the Class Reptilia. Mapping of QTL is an important first step towards the identification of genes and causal mutations for commercially important traits and the development of selection tools for implementation in crocodile breeding programmes for the industry.

  16. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) have novel asymmetrical antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Dagenais, Julie; Breeden, Renee; Schneemann, Anette; Sung, Joyce; Hew, Brian; Balazs, George H.; Berestecky, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Igs in vertebrates comprise equally sized H and L chains, with exceptions such as H chain–only Abs in camels or natural Ag receptors in sharks. In Reptilia, Igs are known as IgYs. Using immunoassays with isotype-specific mAbs, in this study we show that green turtles (Chelonia mydas) have a 5.7S 120-kDa IgY comprising two equally sized H/L chains with truncated Fc and a 7S 200-kDa IgY comprised of two differently sized H chains bound to L chains and apparently often noncovalently associated with an antigenically related 90-kDa moiety. Both the 200- and 90-kDa 7S molecules are made in response to specific Ag, although the 90-kDa molecule appears more prominent after chronic Ag stimulation. Despite no molecular evidence of a hinge, electron microscopy reveals marked flexibility of Fab arms of 7S and 5.7S IgY. Both IgY can be captured with protein G or melon gel, but less so with protein A. Thus, turtle IgY share some characteristics with mammalian IgG. However, the asymmetrical structure of some turtle Ig and the discovery of an Ig class indicative of chronic antigenic stimulation represent striking advances in our understanding of immunology.

  17. The hooked element in the pes of turtles (Testudines): a global approach to exploring primary and secondary homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Werneburg, Ingmar; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-11-01

    The hooked element in the pes of turtles was historically identified by most palaeontologists and embryologists as a modified fifth metatarsal, and often used as evidence to unite turtles with other reptiles with a hooked element. Some recent embryological studies, however, revealed that this element might represent an enlarged fifth distal tarsal. We herein provide extensive new myological and developmental observations on the hooked element of turtles, and re-evaluate its primary and secondary homology using all available lines of evidence. Digital count and timing of development are uninformative. However, extensive myological, embryological and topological data are consistent with the hypothesis that the hooked element of turtles represents a fusion of the fifth distal tarsal with the fifth metatarsal, but that the fifth distal tarsal dominates the hooked element in pleurodiran turtles, whereas the fifth metatarsal dominates the hooked element of cryptodiran turtles. The term 'ansulate bone' is proposed to refer to hooked elements that result from the fusion of these two bones. The available phylogenetic and fossil data are currently insufficient to clarify the secondary homology of hooked elements within Reptilia.

  18. Descrição macroscópica da musculatura dos membros do Tupinambis merianae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barbosa Casals

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2012v25n1p103 O lagarto teiú (Tupinambis merianae pertence à família Teiidae. Distribui-se ao longo das Américas, com numerosas espécies, inclusive no Brasil. São do gênero Tupinambis, os maiores representantes da família Teiidae. Para este estudo foram utilizados três animais (atropelados provenientes de doação. Os lagartos dissecados foram fixados em formol 10%, e a análise macroscópica foi realizada de forma detalhada e fotodocumentada, guardando as estruturas selecionadas “in situ”. Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo contribuir com a descrição macroscópica da miologia peitoral e dos membros torácico e pélvico do lagarto T. merianae. Os resultados obtidos nesta pesquisa foram comparados com autores que estudaram animais da mesma classe Reptilia. Com isso, concluímos que nossos resultados macroscópicos assemelham-se aos já descritos pelos pesquisadores Hildebrand (1995, Moro e Abdala, (2004 e Abdala e Diogo (2010. Devemos ressaltar que o conhecimento da anatomia tem importâncias e aplicações em diversas áreas dentro da Biologia, contribuindo de maneira substancial para as áreas da saúde humana e da tecnologia.

  19. Reptilian spermatogenesis: A histological and ultrastructural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M

    2011-07-01

    Until recently, the histology and ultrastructural events of spermatogenesis in reptiles were relatively unknown. Most of the available morphological information focuses on specific stages of spermatogenesis, spermiogenesis, and/or of the mature spermatozoa. No study to date has provided complete ultrastructural information on the early events of spermatogenesis, proliferation and meiosis in class Reptilia. Furthermore, no comprehensive data set exists that describes the ultrastructure of the entire ontogenic progression of germ cells through the phases of reptilian spermatogenesis (mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis). The purpose of this review is to provide an ultrastructural and histological atlas of spermatogenesis in reptiles. The morphological details provided here are the first of their kind and can hopefully provide histological information on spermatogenesis that can be compared to that already known for anamniotes (fish and amphibians), birds and mammals. The data supplied in this review will provide a basic model that can be utilized for the study of sperm development in other reptiles. The use of such an atlas will hopefully stimulate more interest in collecting histological and ultrastructural data sets on spermatogenesis that may play important roles in future nontraditional phylogenetic analyses and histopathological studies in reptiles.

  20. Spermatogenic cycle length and sperm production in the freshwater turtle Kinosternon scorpioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Alana Lislea; Campos-Junior, Paulo Henrique Almeida; Costa, Guilherme Mattos Jardim; de França, Luiz Renato

    2014-02-01

    Kinosternon scorpioides is a Brazilian freshwater turtle that belongs to the class Reptilia, encompassing almost 10,000 species. Nevertheless, very little is known about the testicular quantitative parameters, particularly those related to spermatogenesis, in this vertebrate class. Our main objectives were to investigate in detail the structure and function of the testis in K. scorpioides, particularly the aspects related to spermatogenic cycle length and Sertoli cell (SC) and spermatogenic efficiencies. Nine sexually mature turtles were examined, and intraperitoneal bromodeoxyuridine injections were administered to estimate duration of spermatogenesis. Based on the acrosome development in spermatids and the overall germ cell associations, 10 stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle were characterized. Similar to birds, humans, and some primate species, several stages were observed per seminiferous tubule cross-sections. One spermatogenic cycle and the entire spermatogenic process lasted, respectively, 12 and 53 days. The SC efficiency (number of round spermatids per SC) and daily sperm production per gram of testis were, respectively, 20 and 40 million spermatids. As established for mammals, our findings suggest that SC efficiency is also a critical determinant of sperm production in reptiles. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the kinetics of spermatogenesis and testis function in any reptilian species. Besides allowing a better understanding of reproductive biology in reptiles, these data will be useful in comparative studies. Moreover, these results could provide the basis for investigations related to the evaluation of spermatogonial stem cell physiology niche in Kinosternon scorpioides.

  1. The life cycle of the reptile-inhabiting nematode Abbreviata hastaspicula (Spirurida: Physalopteridae: Physalopterinae) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C; Jones, H I

    2016-12-01

    This study elucidates the life-cycle of the reptile inhabiting nematode Abbreviata hastaspicula (Spirurida: Physalopteridae: Physalopterinae) in Australia. Eight Varanus gouldii (Lacertilia: Varanidae), and two Christinus marmoratus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) lizards were captured in the wild. Two V. gouldii were used as controls and no experimental procedures were carried out on them. Another six V. gouldii (final host) and the two C. marmoratus (paratenic host) were treated with oral anthelmintics to remove all parasitic worms and were fed with infected live arthropods containing third stage larvae of Abbreviata hastaspicula. Faeces of V. gouldii were examined under the microscope weekly to determine whether the third stage larvae had developed into adults. Two months later, a total of 30 larvae and adults of A. hastaspicula were found in the stomachs of four experimentally-infected V. gouldii lizards. No cysts or larva were found in the C. marmoratus. This is the first study to demonstrate the life-cycle of this genus of nematode in their definitive reptile hosts.

  2. The life cycle of the reptile-inhabiting nematode Abbreviata hastaspicula (Spirurida: Physalopteridae: Physalopterinae in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. King

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study elucidates the life-cycle of the reptile inhabiting nematode Abbreviata hastaspicula (Spirurida: Physalopteridae: Physalopterinae in Australia. Eight Varanus gouldii (Lacertilia: Varanidae, and two Christinus marmoratus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae lizards were captured in the wild. Two V. gouldii were used as controls and no experimental procedures were carried out on them. Another six V. gouldii (final host and the two C. marmoratus (paratenic host were treated with oral anthelmintics to remove all parasitic worms and were fed with infected live arthropods containing third stage larvae of Abbreviata hastaspicula. Faeces of V. gouldii were examined under the microscope weekly to determine whether the third stage larvae had developed into adults. Two months later, a total of 30 larvae and adults of A. hastaspicula were found in the stomachs of four experimentally-infected V. gouldii lizards. No cysts or larva were found in the C. marmoratus. This is the first study to demonstrate the life-cycle of this genus of nematode in their definitive reptile hosts.

  3. Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Have Novel Asymmetrical Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M; Dagenais, Julie; Breeden, Renee; Schneemann, Anette; Sung, Joyce; Hew, Brian; Balazs, George H; Berestecky, John M

    2015-12-01

    Igs in vertebrates comprise equally sized H and L chains, with exceptions such as H chain-only Abs in camels or natural Ag receptors in sharks. In Reptilia, Igs are known as IgYs. Using immunoassays with isotype-specific mAbs, in this study we show that green turtles (Chelonia mydas) have a 5.7S 120-kDa IgY comprising two equally sized H/L chains with truncated Fc and a 7S 200-kDa IgY comprised of two differently sized H chains bound to L chains and apparently often noncovalently associated with an antigenically related 90-kDa moiety. Both the 200- and 90-kDa 7S molecules are made in response to specific Ag, although the 90-kDa molecule appears more prominent after chronic Ag stimulation. Despite no molecular evidence of a hinge, electron microscopy reveals marked flexibility of Fab arms of 7S and 5.7S IgY. Both IgY can be captured with protein G or melon gel, but less so with protein A. Thus, turtle IgY share some characteristics with mammalian IgG. However, the asymmetrical structure of some turtle Ig and the discovery of an Ig class indicative of chronic antigenic stimulation represent striking advances in our understanding of immunology.

  4. Macroscopic description of the limb muscles of Tupinambis merianae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Barbosa Casals

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae belongs to the Teiidae family. It is distributed throughout the Americas, with many species, including Brazilian ones. They are from the Tupinambis genus, the largest representatives of the Teiidae family. For this study three animals (run over coming from donation were used. The dissected lizards were fixed in 10%, formaldehyde, and the macroscopic analysis was carried out in a detailed and photo documented way, keeping the selected structures “in situ”. This paper had as its main aim contributing to the macroscopic description of the chest myology, as well as the thoracic and pelvic limbs of the lizard T. merianae. The results obtained from this research were compared to authors who have studied animals from the same Reptilia class. Thus, we conclude that our macroscopic results are similar to those already described by the researchers Hildebrand (1995, Moro and Abdala (2004 and Abdala and Diogo (2010. We should highlight that the knowledge on anatomy has importance and applications to various areas within Biology, contributing in a substantial way to the areas of human health and technology.

  5. The hooked element in the pes of turtles (Testudines): a global approach to exploring primary and secondary homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Werneburg, Ingmar; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-01-01

    The hooked element in the pes of turtles was historically identified by most palaeontologists and embryologists as a modified fifth metatarsal, and often used as evidence to unite turtles with other reptiles with a hooked element. Some recent embryological studies, however, revealed that this element might represent an enlarged fifth distal tarsal. We herein provide extensive new myological and developmental observations on the hooked element of turtles, and re-evaluate its primary and secondary homology using all available lines of evidence. Digital count and timing of development are uninformative. However, extensive myological, embryological and topological data are consistent with the hypothesis that the hooked element of turtles represents a fusion of the fifth distal tarsal with the fifth metatarsal, but that the fifth distal tarsal dominates the hooked element in pleurodiran turtles, whereas the fifth metatarsal dominates the hooked element of cryptodiran turtles. The term ‘ansulate bone’ is proposed to refer to hooked elements that result from the fusion of these two bones. The available phylogenetic and fossil data are currently insufficient to clarify the secondary homology of hooked elements within Reptilia. PMID:24102560

  6. The dragon lizard Pogona vitticeps has ZZ/ZW micro-sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaz, Tariq; Quinn, Alexander E; Miura, Ikuo; Sarre, Stephen D; Georges, Arthur; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2005-01-01

    The bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps (Agamidae: Reptilia) is an agamid lizard endemic to Australia. Like crocodilians and many turtles, temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is common in agamid lizards, although many species have genotypic sex determination (GSD). P. vitticeps is reported to have GSD, but no detectable sex chromosomes. Here we used molecular cytogenetic and differential banding techniques to reveal sex chromosomes in this species. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), GTG- and C-banding identified a highly heterochromatic microchromosome specific to females, demonstrating female heterogamety (ZZ/ZW) in this species. We isolated the P. vitticeps W chromosome by microdissection, re-amplified the DNA and used it to paint the W. No unpaired bivalents were detected in male synaptonemal complexes at meiotic pachytene, confirming male homogamety. We conclude that P. vitticeps has differentiated previously unidentifable W and Z micro-sex chromosomes, the first to be demonstrated in an agamid lizard. Our finding implies that heterochromatinization of the heterogametic chromosome occurred during sex chromosome differentiation in this species, as is the case in some lizards and many snakes, as well as in birds and mammals. Many GSD reptiles with cryptic sex chromosomes may also prove to have micro-sex chromosomes. Reptile microchromosomes, long dismissed as non-functional minutiae and often omitted from karyotypes, therefore deserve closer scrutiny with new and more sensitive techniques.

  7. Elbow joint adductor moment arm as an indicator of forelimb posture in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Hutchinson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Forelimb posture has been a controversial aspect of reconstructing locomotor behaviour in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods. This is partly owing to the qualitative and subjective nature of typical methods, which focus on bony articulations that are often ambiguous and unvalidated postural indicators. Here we outline a new, quantitatively based forelimb posture index that is applicable to a majority of extant tetrapods. By determining the degree of elbow joint adduction/abduction mobility in several tetrapods, the carpal flexor muscles were determined to also play a role as elbow adductors. Such adduction may play a major role during the stance phase in sprawling postures. This role is different from those of upright/sagittal and sloth-like creeping postures, which, respectively, depend more on elbow extensors and flexors. Our measurements of elbow muscle moment arms in 318 extant tetrapod skeletons (Lissamphibia, Synapsida and Reptilia: 33 major clades and 263 genera) revealed that sprawling, sagittal and creeping tetrapods, respectively, emphasize elbow adductor, extensor and flexor muscles. Furthermore, scansorial and non-scansorial taxa, respectively, emphasize flexors and extensors. Thus, forelimb postures of extinct tetrapods can be qualitatively classified based on our quantitative index. Using this method, we find that Triceratops (Ceratopsidae), Anhanguera (Pterosauria) and desmostylian mammals are categorized as upright/sagittally locomoting taxa. PMID:22357261

  8. La lacertofauna de Mendoza: lista actualizada, distribución y riqueza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbalán, Valeria

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available La provincia de Mendoza posee una rica fauna de lagartos pertenecientes a las familias Leiosauridae, Liolaemidae, Teiidae, Scincidae y Gekkonidae. Algunos son propios del Monte, Puna, Payunia o región andina, mientras que otros poseen una amplia distribución, ocupando dos o más ecosistemas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue actualizar la lista lacertofaunística de la provincia y determinar las áreas de mayor riqueza de especies en relación a estos cuatro tipos de ecosistemas. Se utilizaron datos de procedencia de 43 especies de lagartos a partir de colecciones herpetológicas y de bibliografía. Las localidades fueron georreferenciadas y mapeadas. Una primera estimación de las áreas de mayor riqueza fue realizada sobre la base de las distribuciones de acuerdo a los puntos de colecta. En un segundo análisis, se generaron modelos predictivos de distribución utilizan-do 26 variables ambientales. Estas áreas potenciales fueron superpuestas a fin de obtener el número de especies en cuadrículas de 4,6 km x 4,6 km. Los resultados de ambos métodos indican que la mayor riqueza de especies se encuentra en la Payunia, probablemente en relación a la mayor heterogeneidad ambiental de la zona, ya que es considerada un área ecotonal entre la región fitogeográfica de la Patagonia y el Monte. Un análisis de similitud (Índice de Morisita demuestra que la similitud entre ecosistemas en cuanto a la composición de especies es baja, conformándose dos grupos: el Monte y Patagonia por un lado, y el ecosistema Andino y Puneño por otro. Mendoza province has a rich fauna of lizards that belongs to the Leiosauridae, Liolaemidae, Teiidae, Scincidae and Gekkonidae families. Some of them are typical of the Monte, Puna, Payunia or Andean region, whereas some others are widespread, inhabiting two or more ecosystems. The objective of this work is to perform an updating of the Mendoza lizard fauna and to determine the most highly species-rich areas related to

  9. Global taxonomic diversity of living reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel; Bauer, Aaron M; Meiri, Shai; Uetz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Reptiles are one of the most ecologically and evolutionarily remarkable groups of living organisms, having successfully colonized most of the planet, including the oceans and some of the harshest and more environmentally unstable ecosystems on earth. Here, based on a complete dataset of all the world's diversity of living reptiles, we analyse lineage taxonomic richness both within and among clades, at different levels of the phylogenetic hierarchy. We also analyse the historical tendencies in the descriptions of new reptile species from Linnaeus to March 2012. Although (non-avian) reptiles are the second most species-rich group of amniotes after birds, most of their diversity (96.3%) is concentrated in squamates (59% lizards, 35% snakes, and 2% amphisbaenians). In strong contrast, turtles (3.4%), crocodilians (0.3%), and tuataras (0.01%) are far less diverse. In terms of species discoveries, most turtles and crocodilians were described early, while descriptions of lizards, snakes and amphisbaenians are multimodal with respect to time. Lizard descriptions, in particular, have reached unprecedented levels during the last decade. Finally, despite such remarkably asymmetric distributions of reptile taxonomic diversity among groups, we found that the distributions of lineage richness are consistently right-skewed, with most clades (monophyletic families and genera) containing few lineages (monophyletic genera and species, respectively), while only a few have radiated greatly (notably the families Colubridae and Scincidae, and the lizard genera Anolis and Liolaemus). Therefore, such consistency in the frequency distribution of richness among clades and among phylogenetic levels suggests that the nature of reptile biodiversity is fundamentally fractal (i.e., it is scale invariant). We then compared current reptile diversity with the global reptile diversity and taxonomy known in 1980. Despite substantial differences in the taxonomies (relative to 2012), the patterns of

  10. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) of squamate reptiles (Squam1 and Squam2): structure and phylogenetic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechko, Vernata V; Kosushkin, Sergei A; Borodulina, Olga R; Butaeva, Fatima G; Darevsky, Ilya S

    2011-05-15

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are important nuclear molecular markers of the evolution of many eukaryotes. However, the SINEs of squamate reptile genomes have been little studied. We first identified two families of SINEs, termed Squam1 and Squam2, in the DNA of meadow lizard Darevskia praticola (Lacertidae) by performing DNA hybridization and PCR. Later, the same families of retrotransposons were found using the same methods in members of another 25 lizard families (from Iguania, Scincomorpha, Gekkota, Varanoidea, and Diploglossa infraorders) and two snake families, but their abundances in these taxa varied greatly. Both SINEs were Squamata-specific and were absent from mammals, birds, crocodiles, turtles, amphibians, and fish. Squam1 possessed some characteristics common to tRNA-related SINEs from fish and mammals, while Squam2 belonged to the tRNA(Ala) group of SINEs and had a more unusual and divergent structure. Squam2-related sequences were found in several unannotated GenBank sequences of squamate reptiles. Squam1 abundance in the Polychrotidae, Agamidae, Leiolepididae, Chamaeleonidae, Scincidae, Lacertidae, Gekkonidae, Varanidae, Helodermatidae, and two snake families were 10(2) -10(4) times higher than those in other taxa (Corytophanidae, Iguanidae, Anguidae, Cordylidae, Gerrhosauridae, Pygopodidae, and Eublepharidae). A less dramatic degree of copy number variation was observed for Squam2 in different taxa. Several Squam1 copies from Lacertidae, Chamaeleonidae, Gekkonidae, Varanidae, and Colubridae were sequenced and found to have evident orthologous features, as well as taxa-specific autapomorphies. Squam1 from Lacertidae and Chamaeleonidae could be divided into several subgroups based on sequence differences. Possible applications of these SINEs as Squamata phylogeny markers are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. The terrestrial reptile fauna of the Abrolhos Archipelago: species list and ecological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCHA C. F. D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the terrestrial reptile fauna of the Abrolhos Archipelago (a group of five islands located ca. 70 km off the southern coast of the State of Bahia, Brazil and analyze here some of its ecological aspects such as diet, thermal ecology, activity, and some reproductive parameters. Three lizards comprise the archipelago's terrestrial reptile fauna: Tropidurus torquatus (Tropiduridae, Mabuya agilis (Scincidae, and Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae. The first two are diurnal and the latter is crepuscular/nocturnal (initiating activity at ca. 17:30. The activity period of T. torquatus extended from 5:30 to 18:30 h. Mean field body temperatures of active T. torquatus, M. agilis, and H. mabouia were, respectively, 34.0 ± 3.7ºC (range 23.8-38.0ºC; N = 75, 34.5 ± 2.2ºC (range 30.8-37.0ºC; N = 6, and 26.3 ± 1.1ºC (range 24.8-28.0ºC; N = 8. The predominant prey items in the diet of T. torquatus were ants, coleopterans, and hemipterans. In the diet of M. agilis, coleopterans were the most frequent prey items. For H. mabouia, the most important dietary items were orthopterans. Clutch size of T. torquatus averaged 4.1 ± 1.1 (range 2-6; N = 15 and was significantly related to female size (R² = 0.618; p = 0.001; N = 15. Clutch size for H. mabouia was fixed (two and mean litter size of the viviparous M. agilis was 3.3 ± 0.6 (range 3-4; N = 3. Tropidurus torquatus and H. mabouia deposit their eggs under rocks in the study area, with the former burying them but not the latter; in both species, more than one female often oviposit under the same rock.

  12. The terrestrial reptile fauna of the Abrolhos Archipelago: species list and ecological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, C F D; Dutra, G F; Vrcibradic, D; Menezes, V A

    2002-05-01

    We have studied the terrestrial reptile fauna of the Abrolhos Archipelago (a group of five islands located ca. 70 km off the southern coast of the State of Bahia, Brazil) and analyze here some of its ecological aspects such as diet, thermal ecology, activity, and some reproductive parameters. Three lizards comprise the archipelago's terrestrial reptile fauna: Tropidurus torquatus (Tropiduridae), Mabuya agilis (Scincidae), and Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae). The first two are diurnal and the latter is crepuscular/nocturnal (initiating activity at ca. 17:30). The activity period of T. torquatus extended from 5:30 to 18:30 h. Mean field body temperatures of active T. torquatus, M. agilis, and H. mabouia were, respectively, 34.0 +/- 3.7 degrees C (range 23.8-38.0 degrees C; N = 75), 34.5 +/- 2.2 degrees C (range 30.8-37.0 degrees C; N = 6), and 26.3 +/- 1.1 degrees C (range 24.8-28.0 degrees C; N = 8). The predominant prey items in the diet of T. torquatus were ants, coleopterans, and hemipterans. In the diet of M. agilis, coleopterans were the most frequent prey items. For H. mabouia, the most important dietary items were orthopterans. Clutch size of T. torquatus averaged 4.1 +/- 1.1 (range 2-6; N = 15) and was significantly related to female size (R2 = 0.618; p = 0.001; N = 15). Clutch size for H. mabouia was fixed (two) and mean litter size of the viviparous M. agilis was 3.3 +/- 0.6 (range 3-4; N = 3). Tropidurus torquatus and H. mabouia deposit their eggs under rocks in the study area, with the former burying them but not the latter; in both species, more than one female often oviposit under the same rock.

  13. Sequência de ossificação do sincrânio e hioide em embriões de Caiman yacare (Crocodylia, Alligatoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano C. Lima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O crânio representa uma estrutura única e complexa dos vertebrados, sendo foco relevante objeto de estudos morfológicos e sistemáticos. Embora os crocodilianos constituam um importante grupo representante dos Archosauria, nossos conhecimentos acerca de seu desenvolvimento e homologias ainda são escassos. Aqui descrevemos uma sequência detalhada de ossificação dos ossos do crânio de Caiman yacare (Daudin, 1802, objetivando contribuir com informações de foco anatômico. Coletaram-se ao acaso embriões em intervalos regulares durante todo o período de incubação, sendo estes posteriormente submetidos a protocolo de diafanização e coloração de ossos. O padrão de ossificação em C. yacare segue parâmetros gerais em répteis e outros tetrápodes. Os primeiros centros de ossificação correspondem aos ossos dérmicos, envolvidos com funções primárias como a alimentação e respiração (e.g. maxila, dentário, esplenial, angular, pterigoide, ectopterigoide e jugal, incluindo ainda os dentes. Os ossos da porção dorsal do neurocrânio se ossificam posteriormente, evidenciando uma fontanela cranial que permanece até o momento da eclosão. Os ossos parietal, frontal e opstótico possuem mais de um centro de ossificação que se fundem durante a ontogenia. O centro de ossificação do parisfenoide está ausente, e apenas um centro de ossificação está presente para o basisfenoide. A porção posterior do crânio é formada por centros de substituição do condrocrânio que se ossificam em estágios posteriores.

  14. Methodological limitations of counting total leukocytes and thrombocytes in reptiles (Amazon turtle, Podocnemis expansa: an analysis and discussion Limitações metodológicas de contagens de leucócitos e trombócitos totais em répteis (tartaruga da Amazônia, Podocnemis expansa: uma análise e discussão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tavares-Dias

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare three different methods for counting white blood cells [WBC] (Natt and Herrick method, estimation with 1,000 and 2,000 erythrocytes and three methods for counting total thrombocytes [TT] (Wojtaszek method, estimation with 1,000 and 2,000 erythrocytes in a South American freshwater turtle species, Podocnemis expansa, Schweigger 1812 (Reptilia, Pelomedusidae. Direct WBC counts using the Natt and Herrick method showed limitations, which are discussed here. The WBC and TT counts using 1,000 erythrocytes from blood smears are not recommended for Amazon turtles nor other reptilian species, since wide variation in counts can be observed. Estimation methods for determining WBC and TT based on 2,000 erythrocytes of blood smears were most acceptable because they allow a differentiation between leukocytes and thrombocytes and also had a smaller variation. The methods investigated here for the Amazon turtle, which have been widely used in other reptile species, provided evidence that the most acceptable method is not that of using diluted stains and a hemocytometer.O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar três diferentes métodos para contar leucócitos totais [LT] (método de Natt & Herrick, de estimação em 1000 e 2000 eritrócitos e três métodos para contar trombócitos totais [TT] ( método de Wojtaszek, de estimação em 1000 e 2000 eritrócitos em uma espécie de tartaruga de água doce da América do Sul, Podocnemis expansa, Schweigger 1812 (Reptilia, Pelomedusidae. As contagens diretas de LT usando o método de Natt & Herrick mostraram limitações que são aqui discutidas. As contagens de LT e TT usando estimativa em 1000 eritrócitos na extensão sanguínea não são recomendadas para tartaruga-da-Amazônia nem para outras espécies de répteis, pois houve ampla variação nestas contagens. Os métodos para determinar LT e TT baseados em 2000 eritrócitos nas extensões sanguíneas foram mais aceitáveis porque

  15. Genetics and evolution of colour patterns in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Ballen, Cissy

    2013-01-01

    The study of coloration in the polyphyletic reptilians has flourished in the last two decades, in particular with respect to the underlying genetics of colour traits, the function of colours in social interactions, and ongoing selection on these traits in the wild. The taxonomic bias, however, is profound: at this level of resolution almost all available information is for diurnal lizards. Therefore, we focus on case studies, for which there are as complete causal sequences of colour evolution as possible, from phenotypic expression of variation in colour, to ongoing selection in the wild. For work prior to 1992 and for a broader coverage of reptilian coloration we refer the readers to Cooper and Greenburg's (Biology of the Reptilia, 1992) review. There are seven major conclusions we would like to emphasise: (a) visual systems in diurnal lizards are broadly conserved but among the wider range of reptiles in general, there is functionally important variation in the number and type of photoreceptors, spectral tuning of photopigments and optical properties of the eye; (b) coloration in reptiles is a function of complex interactions between structural and pigmentary components, with implications for both proximate control and condition dependence of colour expression; (c) studies of colour-variable species have enabled estimates of heritability of colour and colour patterns, which often show a simple Mendelian pattern of inheritance; (d) colour-polymorphic lizard species sometimes, but not always, show striking differences in genetically encoded reproductive tactics and provide useful models for studying the evolution and maintenance of polymorphism; (e) both male and female colours are sometimes, but not always, a significant component of socio-sexual signalling, often based on multiple traits; (f) evidence for effects of hormones and condition on colour expression, and trade-offs with immunocompetence and parasite load, is variable; (g) lizards show fading of colours

  16. New cyt b gene universal primer set for forensic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Oceja, A; Gamarra, D; Borragan, S; Jiménez-Moreno, S; de Pancorbo, M M

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial DNA, and in particular the cytochrome b gene (cyt b), has become an essential tool for species identification in routine forensic practice. In cases of degraded samples, where the DNA is fractionated, universal primers that are highly efficient for the amplification of the target region are necessary. Therefore, in the present study a new universal cyt b primer set with high species identification capabilities, even in samples with highly degraded DNA, has been developed. In order to achieve this objective, the primers were designed following the alignment of complete sequences of the cyt b from 751 species from the Class of Mammalia listed in GenBank. A highly variable region of 148bp flanked by highly conserved sequences was chosen for placing the primers. The effectiveness of the new pair of primers was examined in 63 animal species belonging to 38 Families from 14 Orders and 5 Classes (Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia, Actinopterygii, and Malacostraca). Species determination was possible in all cases, which shows that the fragment analyzed provided a high capability for species identification. Furthermore, to ensure the efficiency of the 148bp fragment, the intraspecific variability was analyzed by calculating the concordance between individuals with the BLAST tool from the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnological Information). The intraspecific concordance levels were superior to 97% in all species. Likewise, the phylogenetic information from the selected fragment was confirmed by obtaining the phylogenetic tree from the sequences of the species analyzed. Evidence of the high power of phylogenetic discrimination of the analyzed fragment of the cyt b was obtained, as 93.75% of the species were grouped within their corresponding Orders. Finally, the analysis of 40 degraded samples with small-size DNA fragments showed that the new pair of primers permits identifying the species, even when the DNA is highly degraded as it is very common in

  17. Is Response to Fire Influenced by Dietary Specialization and Mobility? A Comparative Study with Multiple Animal Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bros, Vicenç; Brotons, Lluís; De Mas, Eva; Herraiz, Joan A.; Herrando, Sergi; Miño, Àngel; Olmo-Vidal, Josep M.; Quesada, Javier; Ribes, Jordi; Sabaté, Santiago; Sauras-Yera, Teresa; Serra, Antoni; Vallejo, V. Ramón; Viñolas, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Fire is a major agent involved in landscape transformation and an indirect cause of changes in species composition. Responses to fire may vary greatly depending on life histories and functional traits of species. We have examined the taxonomic and functional responses to fire of eight taxonomic animal groups displaying a gradient of dietary and mobility patterns: Gastropoda, Heteroptera, Formicidae, Coleoptera, Araneae, Orthoptera, Reptilia and Aves. The fieldwork was conducted in a Mediterranean protected area on 3 sites (one unburnt and two burnt with different postfire management practices) with five replicates per site. We collected information from 4606 specimens from 274 animal species. Similarity in species composition and abundance between areas was measured by the Bray-Curtis index and ANOSIM, and comparisons between animal and plant responses by Mantel tests. We analyze whether groups with the highest percentage of omnivorous species, these species being more generalist in their dietary habits, show weak responses to fire (i.e. more similarity between burnt and unburnt areas), and independent responses to changes in vegetation. We also explore how mobility, i.e. dispersal ability, influences responses to fire. Our results demonstrate that differences in species composition and abundance between burnt and unburnt areas differed among groups. We found a tendency towards presenting lower differences between areas for groups with higher percentages of omnivorous species. Moreover, taxa with a higher percentage of omnivorous species had significantly more independent responses of changes in vegetation. High- (e.g. Aves) and low-mobility (e.g. Gastropoda) groups had the strongest responses to fire (higher R scores of the ANOSIM); however, we failed to find a significant general pattern with all the groups according to their mobility. Our results partially support the idea that functional traits underlie the response of organisms to environmental changes caused

  18. Pentastomídeos de répteis do Brasil: revisão dos cephalobaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arandas Rêgo

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os Cephalobaenidae (Pentastomida, depositados na coleção helmintológica do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz e na coleção de parasitologia do Instituto Butantan. São redescritas e discutidas as espécies, Cephalobaena tetrapoda, C. freitasi, C. giglioli, Raillietiella furcocerca e Mahafaliella venteli. Esses parasitas foram coletados dos répteis: Lachesis sp., Drymarchon c. corais, Xenodon merremii, Crotatus terrificus, Amphisbaena sp., Tropidurus torquatus, Bothrops atrox, Mabuya punctata e de Bufo paracnemis (anfíbio.In this work the author studies Cephalobaenidae parasites using specimens from the helminthological collection of the Oswaldo Cruz and Butantan Institutes. This material was collected from Lachesis sp., Drymarchon corais, Xenodon merremii, Crotalus terrificus, Amphisbaena sp., Tropidurus torquatus, Bothrops atrox, Mabuya punctata (Reptilia and Bufo paracnemis (Amphibia. The species studied are Cephalobaena tetrapoda Heymons, 1922, Cephalobaena giglioli (Hett, 1924 comb. n., Cephalobaena freitasi (Motta & Gomes, 1968 comb. n., Raillietiella furcocerca (Diesing, 1836 and Mahafaliella venteli (Motta, 1965. C. recurvocauda becomes a synonym of C. tetrapoda and as do the specimens that Motta called erronously R. furcocerca. Raillietiella giglioli is changed to Cephalobaena giglioli (Hett, 1924 comb. n. The author describes here the male of C. giglioli for the first time. Travassostulida freitasi and T. acutiacanthus enter in synonymy with C. freitasi, and T. acutiacanthus is considered to be a subspecies of C. freitasi. Raillietiella gomesi becomes a synonym of R. furcocerca. The author discusses Mahafaliella venteli, and also questions the validity of the genus Gretillaria proposed by Motta for some species of Raillietiella. The latter is considered a synonym of Raillietiella.

  19. Trichospirura aethiopica n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae from Malacomys longipes (Rodentia: Muridae in Gabon, first record of the genus in the Ethiopian Realm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bain Odile

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichospirura aethiopica n. sp. is described from unidentified tubular structures (pancreatic ducts? near the stomach of the murid Malacomys longipes Milne-Edwards, 1877 in Gabon. The extremely long and narrow buccal capsule, posterior position of the vulva, unequal spicules and absence of caudal alae readily identified the specimens as belonging to Trichospirura Smith & Chitwood, 1967, but a combination of several characters distinguished them from the described species in this genus. Males of the new species are characterized by the absence of precloacal papillae, the presence of four pairs of postcloacal papillae and a left spicule length of 165–200 μm. With only five nominal and one unnamed species, the host range of Trichospirura extends into the Neotropical, Indo-Malayan and Ethiopian Realms and comprises three classes of vertebrates, Amphibia, Reptilia and Mammalia, suggesting a larger species diversity than that currently recorded. Detection is difficult as predilection sites are often outside the gut lumen. It was noted that, irrespective of their geographic origin, species from mammals share certain characters (shorter left spicule and absence of precloacal papillae that oppose them to those from amphibians and reptiles. A hypothesis for the origin of Trichospirura in mammals through a remote host-switching event in tupaiids in southern Asia, likely facilitated by the intermediate hosts, and for their subsequent migration to the Ethiopian and finally Neotropical Realm is proposed. Regarding the two species from anurans and saurians in the Antilles, one or two host-switching events are considered equally possible, based on morphological characters.

  20. No evidence of the effect of extreme weather events on annual occurrence of four groups of ectothermic species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka H Malinowska

    Full Text Available Weather extremes may have strong effects on biodiversity, as known from theoretical and modelling studies. Predicted negative effects of increased weather variation are found only for a few species, mostly plants and birds in empirical studies. Therefore, we investigated correlations between weather variability and patterns in occupancy, local colonisations and local extinctions (metapopulation metrics across four groups of ectotherms: Odonata, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Reptilia. We analysed data of 134 species on a 1×1 km-grid base, collected in the last 20 years from the Netherlands, combining standardised data and opportunistic data. We applied dynamic site-occupancy models and used the results as input for analyses of (i trends in distribution patterns, (ii the effect of temperature on colonisation and persistence probability, and (iii the effect of years with extreme weather on all the three metapopulation metrics. All groups, except butterflies, showed more positive than negative trends in metapopulation metrics. We did not find evidence that the probability of colonisation or persistence increases with temperature nor that extreme weather events are reflected in higher extinction risks. We could not prove that weather extremes have visible and consistent negative effects on ectothermic species in temperate northern hemisphere. These findings do not confirm the general prediction that increased weather variability imperils biodiversity. We conclude that weather extremes might not be ecologically relevant for the majority of species. Populations might be buffered against weather variation (e.g. by habitat heterogeneity, or other factors might be masking the effects (e.g. availability and quality of habitat. Consequently, we postulate that weather extremes have less, or different, impact in real world metapopulations than theory and models suggest.

  1. Evolution of the plasma and tissue kallikreins, and their alternative splicing isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Lila Koumandou

    Full Text Available Kallikreins are secreted serine proteases with important roles in human physiology. Human plasma kallikrein, encoded by the KLKB1 gene on locus 4q34-35, functions in the blood coagulation pathway, and in regulating blood pressure. The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles, including cancer-related processes such as cell growth regulation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA, the product of the KLK3 gene, is the most widely used biomarker in clinical practice today. A total of 15 KLKs are encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome (19q13.3-13.4, which makes them ideal for evolutionary analysis of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs have traced mammalian homologs as well as a probable early origin of the family in aves, amphibia and reptilia. The aim of this study was to address the evolutionary and functional relationships between tissue KLKs and plasma kallikrein, and to examine the evolution of alternative splicing isoforms. Sequences of plasma and tissue kallikreins and their alternative transcripts were collected from the NCBI and Ensembl databases, and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed by Bayesian as well as maximum likelihood methods. Plasma and tissue kallikreins exhibit high sequence similarity in the trypsin domain (>50%. Phylogenetic analysis indicates an early divergence of KLKB1, which groups closely with plasminogen, chymotrypsin, and complement factor D (CFD, in a monophyletic group distinct from trypsin and the tissue KLKs. Reconstruction of the earliest events leading to the diversification of the tissue KLKs is not well resolved, indicating rapid expansion in mammals. Alternative transcripts of each KLK gene show species-specific divergence, while examination of sequence conservation indicates that many annotated human KLK isoforms

  2. Brief quarantine technology instructions of Sporozoosis%住肉孢子虫病检疫技术概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雅为; 魏澍; 闫海滨; 朱江巍

    2013-01-01

      住肉孢子虫病是由住肉孢子虫引起的一种原虫病,本病发生于各种家畜(马、牛、羊、猪、兔等)、鼠类、鸟类、爬虫类和鱼类中,偶尔也寄生于人。我国各地的牛羊,尤其是南方的水牛和黄牛、北方的绵羊和山羊常有发现,有些地区的感染率可达100%。住肉孢子虫寄生于各种家畜的横纹肌,致使肌肉不能食用,引起巨大的经济损失。本文对住肉孢子虫病的产地检疫技术、屠宰检疫技术和实验室检疫技术作以简要介绍。%Sporozoosis is a kind of protozoosis caused by sarcocystis sp. It can oc-cur in livestock such as horse, cattle, sheep, swine, rabbit, muroid, birds, reptil-ia and fish. Occasionally occurred in human. Cattle and sheep, especially buffalo and cattle in southern area in China, and sheep and goat in north area in China are more often positive of sporozoosis, in some area the posistive rate can be achieved 100%. Sarcocystis can be found in striated muscle of livestock, cause a huge econom-ic lost. In this article producing area quarantine technology, slaughting quarantine technology and lab quarantine technology of sporozoosis is described, providing use-ful technology.

  3. Percepção entomológica por docentes e discentes do município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Frida Hatsue Modro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2009v22n2p153 Este trabalho objetivou identificar e interpretar a percepção entomológica de alunos e professores residentes em Santa Cruz do Xingu, região do Médio Araguaia. Entrevistas semi-estruturadas foram realizadas em dezembro de 2006 com alunos e professores dos ensinos fundamental, médio e Educação de Jovens e Adultos em dezembro de 2006, no Município de Santa Cruz do Xingu, Mato Grosso. Dos seres vivos percebidos como “insetos” por todos os entrevistados, 82,75% pertenceram à Classe Insecta, as demais citações foram pertencentes ao Reino Fungi e a outras Classes do Reino Animalia (Amphibia, Arachnida, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Gastropoda, Mammalia e Reptilia. Os “insetos” foram definidos, como bichos pequenos, nojentos ou perigosos. Em contato com os “insetos”, 76% dos entrevistados admitiram matá-los e a maior razão para tal reação foi o dano psicológico causado pela presença destes animais (65%. Para 78% dos entrevistados, os “insetos” foram seres sem importância positiva. Devido ao pouco conhecimento sobre os seus aspectos positivos, a percepção dos “insetos” por alunos e professores residentes da região de Santa Cruz do Xingu está relacionada, principalmente, à atribuição de qualidades negativas a estes animais, provocando reações de agressividade contra os “insetos” assim que percebidos no ambiente.

  4. Reavaliação da Suposta Ocorrência de Ornithischia na Formação Santana (Cretáceo Inferior, Bacia do Araripe, Nordeste, Brasil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Batista Machado

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Em 1981, Giuseppe Leonardi e GuidoBorgomanero reportaram a primeira evidênciaosteológica da presença de dinossauros na Baciado Araripe. Estes pesquisadores identificaram umosso isolado como sendo um possível ísquio deOrnithischia, na época o primeiro registro desteclado em depósitos brasileiros. O material emquestão foi encontrado em 1978 em terrenos daFormação Santana, preservado em um nódulocalcário de coloração escura do Membro Romualdo,e estava guardado nas coleções Borgomanero (sobo número CB-PV-F-089. Com a morte de GuidoBorgomanero, o material foi doado pela viúvaRagnhild Borgomanero ao Museu Nacional(MN 7021-V.Ao descreverem o material, os autores nãohaviam preparado este exemplar completamente,e um lado estava totalmente coberto pela rochasedimentar. A preparação deste osso acaba de serfinalizada, e permitiu que o mesmo fosse identificadocom segurança como sendo uma costela do ladoesquerdo. O tamanho total preservado é de 32 cm(35 cm seguindo a curvatura. A parte proximalé expandida, com o capitulum e o tuberculumincompletos. A parte distal é mais fina, indicandoque se trata de uma costela de pequenas dimensões.Na superfície postero-medial este material exibe umaconcavidade que termina num forâmen pneumático.Apesar de poder ser identificado como umacostela reptiliana, a sua classificação dentro deReptilia é dificultada por ter sido encontrada isolada.Na Formação Santana foram identificados restosde Pterosauria, Crocodylomorpha e Theropoda.MN 7021-V difere das costelas de pterossauros,que possuem parede óssea bem fina e não são tãorobustos. O seu tamanho e curvatura também diferemdas costelas da maior parte dos crocodilomorfos.A morfologia geral de MN 7021-V se assemelhacom costelas de dinossauros terópodes, levando aclassificação deste material como Theropoda indet.Desta forma, a ocorrência de material osteológicode Ornithischia em depósitos do Cretáceo brasileiropermanece desconhecida at

  5. Telomeres shorten more slowly in slow-aging wild animals than in fast-aging ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzer, Ben; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2015-11-01

    Research on the physiological causes of senescence aim to identify common physiological mechanisms that explain age-related declines in fitness across taxonomic groups. Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found on the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Past research indicates that telomere attrition is strongly correlated with inter-specific rates of aging, though these studies cannot distinguish whether telomere attrition is a cause or consequence of the aging process. We extend previous research on this topic by incorporating recent studies to test the hypothesis that telomeres shorten more slowly with age in slow-aging animals than in fast-aging ones. We assembled all studies that have quantified cross-sectional (i.e. between-individual) telomere rates of change (TROC) over the lifespans of wild animals. This included 22 estimates reflecting absolute TROC (TROCabs, bp/yr, primarily measured using the terminal restriction fragment length method), and 10 estimates reflecting relative TROC (TROCrel, relative telomere length/yr, measured using qPCR), from five classes (Aves, Mammalia, Bivalvia, Reptilia, and Actinopterygii). In 14 bird species, we correlated between-individual (i.e. cross-sectional) TROCabs estimates with both maximum lifespan and a phylogenetically-corrected principle component axis (pcPC1) that reflected the slow-fast axis of life-history variation. Bird species characterized by faster life-histories and shorter maximum lifespans had faster TROCabs. In nine studies, both between-individual and within-individual TROC estimates were available (n=8 for TROCabs, n=1 for TROCrel). Within-individual TROC estimates were generally greater than between-individual TROC estimates, which is indicative of selective disappearance of individuals with shorter telomeres. However, the difference between within- and between-individual TROC estimates was only significant in two out of nine studies. The relationship between within-individual TROCabs and maximum

  6. Integration of morphological data sets for phylogenetic analysis of Amniota: the importance of integumentary characters and increased taxonomic sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert V

    2005-08-01

    data set compiled from published sources and data original to this study supports monophyly of Amniota, Synapsida, Reptilia, Parareptilia, Eureptilia, Eosuchia, Diapsida, Neodiapsida, Sauria, Lepidosauria, and Archosauriformes, as well as several more highly nested divisions within the latter two clades. Turtles are here resolved as the sister taxon to a monophyletic Lepidosauria (squamates + Sphenodon), a novel phylogenetic position that nevertheless is consistent with recent molecular and morphological studies that have hypothesized diapsid affinities for this clade.

  7. A genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance Stacey L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome elucidation is now in high gear for many organisms, and whilst genetic maps have been developed for a broad array of species, surprisingly, no such maps exist for a crocodilian, or indeed any other non-avian member of the Class Reptilia. Genetic linkage maps are essential tools for the mapping and dissection of complex quantitative trait loci (QTL, and in order to permit systematic genome scans for the identification of genes affecting economically important traits in farmed crocodilians, a comprehensive genetic linage map will be necessary. Results A first-generation genetic linkage map for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus was constructed using 203 microsatellite markers amplified across a two-generation pedigree comprising ten full-sib families from a commercial population at Darwin Crocodile Farm, Northern Territory, Australia. Linkage analyses identified fourteen linkage groups comprising a total of 180 loci, with 23 loci remaining unlinked. Markers were ordered within linkage groups employing a heuristic approach using CRIMAP v3.0 software. The estimated female and male recombination map lengths were 1824.1 and 319.0 centimorgans (cM respectively, revealing an uncommonly large disparity in recombination map lengths between sexes (ratio of 5.7:1. Conclusion We have generated the first genetic linkage map for a crocodilian, or indeed any other non-avian reptile. The uncommonly large disparity in recombination map lengths confirms previous preliminary evidence of major differences in sex-specific recombination rates in a species that exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD. However, at this point the reason for this disparity in saltwater crocodiles remains unclear. This map will be a valuable resource for crocodilian researchers, facilitating the systematic genome scans necessary for identifying genes affecting complex traits of economic importance in the crocodile industry. In addition

  8. 广西邕江流域贝丘遗址动物群研究%STUDY ON FAUNA FROM SHELL MIDDEN SITES ALONG YONG RIVER,GUANGXI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕鹏

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, faunal remains unearthed from six shell midden sites along Yong River are discussed. The sites are located in Nanning city and Yongning county which include Baozitou( located in the first terrace of the left side of Yong River, 2km southwest of Nabei village, Liusha horticultural field, southeast of Nanning city), Huiyaotian (located in the first terrace of the left side of Yong River, at the foot of Huiyaotian mountain ridge, south of San'an horticultural field, Qingxiu district of Nanning city ) , Dingsishan (located in the first terrace of the right side of Bachi River-the main tributary of Yong River, on the Dingsishan hill, 1km northeast of Jiuwanpo administrative village,Xinxin village,Pumiao town,Yongning county) ,Niulanshi( located in the first terrace of the left side of Yong River, southwest of Xin village, Changtang town, Yongning county) , Lingwu ( located in the first terrace of the left side of Yong River,southwest of Wuhe village,Changtang town, Yongning county) and Luosishan( located in the first terrace of the right side of Yong River, on the Luosishan hill, Tianwo village, Changtang town, Yongning county ) .The sites are dated from 10000a B. P. To 6000a B. P. And can be divided into four stages; Stage 1 dates back to around 10000a B. P., Stage 2 dates back to around 8000a B. P., Stage 3 dates back to around 7000a B. P., and Stage 4 dates back to around 6000a B. P.The identified fauna include mollusks ( Gastropoda and Lamellibranchia ) , arthropods ( Custacea ) , and vertebrates ( Pisces, Reptilia, Aves, and Mammalia). Within these seven classes, 84 species are identified (Gastropoda includes 28 species,Lamellibranchia includes 14 species,Custacea includes 1 species,Pisces includes 6 species, Reptilia includes 4 species, Aves includes 4 species, Mammalia includes 27 species). Diachronic and synchronic studies of these taxa demonstrate the biodiversity of the Yong River shell mound sites.The four archaeological phases represent the

  9. 蝘蜓消化管内分泌细胞的免疫组织化学定位%IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATIION OF ENDOCRINE CELLS IN THE DIGESTIVE TRACT OF SPHENOMORPHUS INDICUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄徐根; 吴孝兵

    2006-01-01

    Objective To clarify the types, regional distributional and distributional density as well as morphological features of gastrointestinal (GI) endocrine cells in the digestive tract (DT) of a reptilian, Sphenomorphus indicus. Methods Using the immunohistochemical streptavidin-peroxidase (S-P)method. Results Five types of endocrine cells, namely 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), somatostatin(SS), gastrin (GAS), substance P (SP) and glucagon (GLU) immunoreactive (IR) cells, were identified in the DT of S. indicus . 5-HT-IR cells, which were most commonly found in the pylorus, distributed throughout the DT at various densities. SS-IR cells were only found in the stomach, GAS-IR only in pylorus and duodenum, GLU-IR only in ileum and rectum, and SP-IR only in the rectum. The endocrine cells were round, oval, fusiform cuneiform, conical or irregular in shape. Most were found in the gastric glands of the stomach and in the epithelium of oesophagus and intestine. Conclusion The regional distribution and relative frequency of IR cells inS. indicus are similar to those of other Reptilia. However,some characteristic differences are observed in this species.%目的阐明爬行动物蝘蜓消化管各段内分泌细胞的类型、局部分布、分布密度和形态学特征.方法应用免疫组织化学技术中链霉卵白素-过氧化物酶(S-P)法.结果在蝘蜓消化管内鉴别出5种内分泌细胞,即:5-羟色胺(5-hydroxytryptamine,5-HT)、生长抑素(somatostatin,SS)、胃泌素(gastrin,GAS)、高血糖素(glucagon,GLU)、P-物质(substance P,SP)免疫活性(immnoreactive,IR)细胞.5-羟色胺免疫活性细胞是消化管中最主要的内分泌细胞类型,以不同密度分布于消化管各段,其中胃幽门部位分布密度最高.生长抑素免疫活性细胞在消化管内仅局限分布于胃部.胃泌素免疫活性细胞仅见于幽门和十二指肠部位.高血糖素免疫活性细胞仅分布于回肠和直肠.P-物质免疫活性细胞仅出现在直肠

  10. 达氏鲟生长激素基因cDNA克隆、表达及免疫荧光定位研究%cDNA CLONING, EXPRESSION AND IMMUNOLOCALIZATION OF GROWTH HORMONE GENE IN ACIPENSER DABRYANUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单喜双; 岳华梅; 陈细华; 叶欢; 杨晓鸽; 李创举

    2015-01-01

    为研究达氏鲟(Acipenser dabryanus)生长激素(Growth Hormone, GH)基因的功能,合成了达氏鲟垂体SMART cDNA,克隆得到GH全长cDNA序列。达氏鲟GH全长cDNA序列为1008 bp,由52 bp的5′端非编码区(Untranslated region, UTR)、编码214个氨基酸的645 bp开放阅读框(Open reading frame, ORF)和311 bp的3′UTR构成。运用GH氨基酸序列构建进化树分析发现,达氏鲟与两栖类、爬行类和哺乳类的一致性要高于真骨鱼类。实时荧光定量PCR结果表明,达氏鲟GH mRNA主要在垂体和下丘脑中表达,且垂体中GH的表达量约为下丘脑的110倍; Western-blot研究结果与qRT-PCR一致,仅在垂体和下丘脑中检测到生长激素蛋白,且垂体中GH的表达量远高于下丘脑。免疫荧光定位结果显示, GH主要定位于垂体中部,下丘脑中也有少量荧光信号;苏木精-伊红组织切片染色研究表明, GH主要是由嗜酸性的生长激素分泌细胞分泌。研究为深入研究脊椎动物生长激素基因的进化和人工养殖达氏鲟的生长调控提供了基础。%The Dabry’s sturgeon (Acipenser dabryanus Dumeril, 1868) mainly distributes in the upper Yangtze River of China. It is currently endangered due to the destruction of their spawning grounds and other anthropogenic interferences. In this study, the full-length cDNA sequence of GH was cloned from SMART cDNAs of pituitary in A. dabryanus. The Dabry’s sturgeon GH cDNA was 1008 bp in length, including a 52 bp 5′-untranslated region (UTR), a 311 bp 3′ UTR and a 645 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a peptide of 143 amino acids. Amino acid sequence alignment revealed that A. dabryanus GH shared extremely high identities (over 95%) with its counterparts in other sturgeons. Moreover, sturgeons showed lower GH sequence identities with other bony fish than that of Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves, and Mammalia. By quantitative real-time PCR, GH mRNAs were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus but

  11. OLIGOCENE STRATIGRAPHY BASED ON A SEDIMENT-BASALT ASSOCIATION IN CENTRAL MONGOLIA(TAATSIIN GOL AND TAATSIIN TSAGAAN NUUR AREA,VALLEY OF LAKES):REVIEW OF A MONGOLIAN-AUSTRIAN PROJECT%蒙古中部湖泊之谷沉积岩-玄武岩共存的渐新世地层:蒙古-奥地利合作项目回顾

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gudrun DAXNER-H(O)CK; Demchig BADAMGARAV; Margarita ERBAJEVA

    2010-01-01

    The Oligocene sedimentary sequence of the Taatsiin Gol and Taatsiin Tsagaan Nuur area is of unique stratigraphic importance:here,the exposed sediments of the Hsanda Gol and the Loh Formations display multiple fossil horizons and interbedded basah layers.In the frame of a Mongolian-Austrian pro-ject,289 fossil taxa(11 Gastropoda,2 Amphibia,9 Reptilia and 267 Mammalia)were collected from 85 fossil horizons of 33 sections/fossil sites of the study area.The taxa were identified by an interna-tional team of specialists.This contribution presents comprehensive mammal lists of all localities.By integrating the new data on large and small mammals,the Mongolian informal biozones A,B,C,C1 were updated.40Ar/39Ar-datings provide at least two groups of basalt ages,the Early Oligocene ba-salt I group around 31.5 Ma and the Late Oligocene basalt II group around 28 Ma.They serve as chronological tie points in the Oligocene mammalian stratigraphy.From the Early to the Late Oligocene the mammal associations underwent remarkable changes involving a ignificant decrease of species numbers in the Late Oligocene.This trend was most strik-ing in creodont,carnivore and ruminant communities.%Taatsiin Col和Taatsiin Tsagaan Nuur地区的渐新世沉积序列具有重要的地层学意义:这里出露的三达河组和Loh组沉积含有多个化石层和玄武岩夹层.在蒙古-奥地利合作项目中,从研究区域的33个剖面/化石地点的85个化石层中采集了289种化石(11种腹足类、2种两柄类、9种爬行类和267种哺乳类).本文提供了所有地点的完整哺乳动物清单,并结合大、小哺乳动物的新资料,对蒙古非正式的生物带A,B,C和Cl进行了更新.40Ar/39Ar测年给出了至少两组玄武岩年龄:早渐新世玄武岩Ⅰ组大约31.5 Ma,晚渐新世玄武岩Ⅱ组大约28 Ma.它们可以用作渐新世哺乳动物地层学的年代校正点.从早渐新世至晚渐新世,哺乳动物群发生了显著的变化,包括晚渐新世种

  12. The development of the Middle Triassic tectonical controlled Germanic Basin of Central Europe and the palaeoenvironmental related distribution of marine and terrestrial reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    -Italy). Bolletino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 41 (1), 37-40. Bachmann, G.H. and Aref, M.A.M., 2005. A seismite in Triassic gypsum deposits (Grabfeld Formation, Ladinian), Southwest Germany. Sedimentary Geology 180, 75-89. De Zanche, V. and Farabegoli, E. 1988. Anisian paleogeographic evolution in the Central-Western Southern Alps. Memoirs Scientifique Geologique 40, 399-411. Demathieu, G.R. 1985. Trace fossil assemblages in Middle Triassic marginal marine deposits, eastern border of the Massif Central, France. Societe Economie Paléontologie et Mineralogie, Special Publications, 35, 53-66. Diedrich, C. 2005. Actuopalaeontological trackway experiments with Iguana on intertidal flat carbonates of the Arabian Gulf - a comparison to fossil Rhynchosauroides tracks of Triassic carbonate tidal flat megatracksites in the European Germanic Basin. Senckenbergiana maritime, 35 (2), 203-220. Diedrich, C. 2008a. Millions of reptile tracks - Early to Middle Triassic carbonate tidal flat migration bridges of Central Europe. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 259, 410-423. Diedrich, C. 2008b. Palaeogeographic evolution of the marine Middle Triassic marine Germanic Basin changements - with emphasis on the carbonate tidal flat and shallow marine habitats of reptiles in Central Pangaea. Global and Planetary Change, 65 (2009), 27-55. Diedrich, C. 2009a. The vertebrates of the Anisian/Ladinian boundary (Middle Triassic) from Bissendorf (NW Germany) and their contribution to the anatomy, palaeoecology, and palaeobiogeography of the Germanic Basin reptiles. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 273 (2009), 1-16. Diedrich, C. 2009b. Die Saurierspuren-Grabung im basalen Mittleren Muschelkalk (Anis, Mitteltrias) von Bernburg (Sachsen-Anhalt). Archäologie in Sachsen-Anhalt, Sonderband 2009, 1-62. Diedrich, 2010a. Palaeoecology of Placodus gigas (Reptilia) and other placodontids - macroalgae feeder of the Middle Triassic in the Germanic Basin of Central Europe and