WorldWideScience

Sample records for data validation

  1. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  2. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, Nam

    2012-01-01

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  3. Mercury and Cyanide Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Document designed to offer data reviewers guidance in determining the validity ofanalytical data generated through the USEPA Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) Statement ofWork (SOW) ISM01.X Inorganic Superfund Methods (Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration)

  4. ICP-MS Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Document designed to offer data reviewers guidance in determining the validity ofanalytical data generated through the USEPA Contract Laboratory Program Statement ofWork (SOW) ISM01.X Inorganic Superfund Methods (Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration)

  5. Online data validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Nygaard; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to discuss methods for identifying, rejecting, making allowances for, or minimizing the influence of, outlyer observations.The literature provides a variety of vague definitions of the concept of an outlying observation, see (Barnett and Lewis, 1994), yet consensus...... seems to be within reach with the following definition:An Outlier is an observation (or a subset of observations) which appear to be inconsistent with a model of the majority of the data....

  6. Reprocessing input data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.; Bucher, R.G.; Pond, R.B.; Cornella, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), in conjunction with the gravimetric (Pu/U ratio) method for mass determination, provides an independent verification of the input accountancy at the dissolver or accountancy stage of the reprocessing plant. The Isotope Correlation Technique has been applied to many classes of domestic and international reactor systems (light-water, heavy-water, graphite, and liquid-metal) operating in a variety of modes (power, research, production, and breeder), and for a variety of reprocessing fuel cycle management strategies. Analysis of reprocessing operations data based on isotopic correlations derived for assemblies in a PWR environment and fuel management scheme, yielded differences between the measurement-derived and ICT-derived plutonium mass determinations of (-0.02 ± 0.23)% for the measured U-235 and (+0.50 ± 0.31)% for the measured Pu-239, for a core campaign. The ICT analyses has been implemented for the plutonium isotopics in a depleted uranium assembly in a heavy-water, enriched uranium system and for the uranium isotopes in the fuel assemblies in light-water, highly-enriched systems. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  7. PIV Data Validation Software Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshire, James L.

    1997-01-01

    A PIV data validation and post-processing software package was developed to provide semi-automated data validation and data reduction capabilities for Particle Image Velocimetry data sets. The software provides three primary capabilities including (1) removal of spurious vector data, (2) filtering, smoothing, and interpolating of PIV data, and (3) calculations of out-of-plane vorticity, ensemble statistics, and turbulence statistics information. The software runs on an IBM PC/AT host computer working either under Microsoft Windows 3.1 or Windows 95 operating systems.

  8. Quality data validation: Comprehensive approach to environmental data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, L.A. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental data validation consists of an assessment of three major areas: analytical method validation; field procedures and documentation review; evaluation of the level of achievement of data quality objectives based in part on PARCC parameters analysis and expected applications of data. A program utilizing matrix association of required levels of validation effort and analytical levels versus applications of this environmental data was developed in conjunction with DOE-ID guidance documents to implement actions under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order in effect at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This was an effort to bring consistent quality to the INEL-wide Environmental Restoration Program and database in an efficient and cost-effective manner. This program, documenting all phases of the review process, is described here

  9. Validation of EAF-2005 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopecky, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Validation procedures applied on EAF-2003 starter file, which lead to the production of EAF-2005 library, are described. The results in terms of reactions with assigned quality scores in EAF-20005 are given. Further the extensive validation against the recent integral data is discussed together with the status of the final report 'Validation of EASY-2005 using integral measurements'. Finally, the novel 'cross section trend analysis' is presented with some examples of its use. This action will lead to the release of improved library EAF-2005.1 at the end of 2005, which shall be used as the starter file for EAF-2007. (author)

  10. Seismic Data Gathering and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Three recent earthquakes in the last seven years have exceeded their design basis earthquake values (so it is implied that damage to SSC’s should have occurred). These seismic events were recorded at North Anna (August 2011, detailed information provided in [Virginia Electric and Power Company Memo]), Fukushima Daichii and Daini (March 2011 [TEPCO 1]), and Kaswazaki-Kariwa (2007, [TEPCO 2]). However, seismic walk downs at some of these plants indicate that very little damage occurred to safety class systems and components due to the seismic motion. This report presents seismic data gathered for two of the three events mentioned above and recommends a path for using that data for two purposes. One purpose is to determine what margins exist in current industry standard seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) tools. The second purpose is the use the data to validated seismic site response tools and SSI tools. The gathered data represents free field soil and in-structure acceleration time histories data. Gathered data also includes elastic and dynamic soil properties and structural drawings. Gathering data and comparing with existing models has potential to identify areas of uncertainty that should be removed from current seismic analysis and SPRA approaches. Removing uncertainty (to the extent possible) from SPRA’s will allow NPP owners to make decisions on where to reduce risk. Once a realistic understanding of seismic response is established for a nuclear power plant (NPP) then decisions on needed protective measures, such as SI, can be made.

  11. Site characterization and validation - validation drift fracture data, stage 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, G.; Gale, J.; MacLeod, R.; Straahle, A.; Tiren, S.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the mapping procedures and the data collected during fracture mapping in the validation drift. Fracture characteristics examined include orientation, trace length, termination mode, and fracture minerals. These data have been compared and analysed together with fracture data from the D-boreholes to determine the adequacy of the borehole mapping procedures and to assess the nature and degree of orientation bias in the borehole data. The analysis of the validation drift data also includes a series of corrections to account for orientation, truncation, and censoring biases. This analysis has identified at least 4 geologically significant fracture sets in the rock mass defined by the validation drift. An analysis of the fracture orientations in both the good rock and the H-zone has defined groups of 7 clusters and 4 clusters, respectively. Subsequent analysis of the fracture patterns in five consecutive sections along the validation drift further identified heterogeneity through the rock mass, with respect to fracture orientations. These results are in stark contrast to the results form the D-borehole analysis, where a strong orientation bias resulted in a consistent pattern of measured fracture orientations through the rock. In the validation drift, fractures in the good rock also display a greater mean variance in length than those in the H-zone. These results provide strong support for a distinction being made between fractures in the good rock and the H-zone, and possibly between different areas of the good rock itself, for discrete modelling purposes. (au) (20 refs.)

  12. Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase Project: Verification and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Jeff; Policelli, Fritz; Fletcher, Rosea; Holecamp, Kara; Owen, Carolyn; Nicholson, Lamar; Dartez, Deanna

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase Project's verification,and validation process. The topics include: 1) What is Verification and Validation? 2) Why Verification and Validation? 3) Background; 4) ESE Data Purchas Validation Process; 5) Data Validation System and Ingest Queue; 6) Shipment Verification; 7) Tracking and Metrics; 8) Validation of Contract Specifications; 9) Earth Watch Data Validation; 10) Validation of Vertical Accuracy; and 11) Results of Vertical Accuracy Assessment.

  13. Gaia Data Release 1. Catalogue validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arenou, F.; Luri, X.; Babusiaux, C.; Fabricius, C.; Helmi, A.; Robin, A. C.; Vallenari, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Findeisen, K.; Reylé, C.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sordo, R.; Turon, C.; Walton, N. A.; Shih, I.-C.; Antiche, E.; Barache, C.; Barros, M.; Breddels, M.; Carrasco, J. M.; Costigan, G.; Diakité, S.; Eyer, L.; Figueras, F.; Galluccio, L.; Heu, J.; Jordi, C.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lallement, R.; Lambert, S.; Leclerc, N.; Marrese, P. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mor, R.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Sartoretti, P.; Soria, S.; Soubiran, C.; Souchay, J.; Veljanoski, J.; Ziaeepour, H.; Giuffrida, G.; Pancino, E.; Bragaglia, A.

    Context. Before the publication of the Gaia Catalogue, the contents of the first data release have undergone multiple dedicated validation tests. Aims: These tests aim to provide in-depth analysis of the Catalogue content in order to detect anomalies and individual problems in specific objects or in

  14. A project manager's primer on data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    While carrying out their central responsibility of conducting an environmental investigation in a high- quality, timely, and cost-effective manner, project managers also face a significant challenge due to the many inherent uncertainties associated with characterizing and remediating sites. From all aspects and considerations (health and financial risks; and technical, professional, and legal defensibility/credibility), the project manager must minimize the uncertainty associated with making decisions based on environmental data. A key objective for every project manager is to produce sufficient data of known and acceptable quality. In simple terms, the level of confidence in the gathered data directly relates to: (1) the upfront determination of the types and uses of the data needed (which drives the required quality of the data); (2) the ongoing verification that the prescribed methods by which the data are to be obtained and analyzed are being followed; and (3) the validation of the verified data to determine whether the preestablished data quality objectives have been met, therefore making the data adequate for their intended use(s). This paper focuses on the third clement of the equation for data quality, therefore implying that the first two elements (planning and verification) have been accomplished. The open-quotes Who,close quotes open-quotes What,close quotes open-quotes Why,close quotes open-quotes Whenclose quotes and open-quotes Howclose quotes of data validation are discussed in general terms

  15. CASL Validation Data: An Initial Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam Dinh

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to establish a comprehensive view of “data” needed for supporting implementation of the Consortium of Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL). Insights from this review (and its continual refinement), together with other elements developed in CASL, should provide the foundation for developing the CASL Validation Data Plan (VDP). VDP is instrumental to the development and assessment of CASL simulation tools as predictive capability. Most importantly, to be useful for CASL, the VDP must be devised (and agreed upon by all participating stakeholders) with appropriate account for nature of nuclear engineering applications, the availability, types and quality of CASL-related data, and novelty of CASL goals and its approach to the selected challenge problems. The initial review (summarized on the January 2011 report version) discusses a broad range of methodological issues in data review and Validation Data Plan. Such a top-down emphasis in data review is both needed to see a big picture on CASL data and appropriate when the actual data are not available for detailed scrutiny. As the data become available later in 2011, a revision of data review (and regular update) should be performed. It is expected that the basic framework for review laid out in this report will help streamline the CASL data review in a way that most pertinent to CASL VDP.

  16. Towards Seamless Validation of Land Cover Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprikova, Ekaterina; Liebel, Lukas; Meng, Liqiu

    2018-05-01

    This article demonstrates the ability of the Bayesian Network analysis for the recognition of uncertainty patterns associated with the fusion of various land cover data sets including GlobeLand30, CORINE (CLC2006, Germany) and land cover data derived from Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) such as Open Street Map (OSM). The results of recognition are expressed as probability and uncertainty maps which can be regarded as a by-product of the GlobeLand30 data. The uncertainty information may guide the quality improvement of GlobeLand30 by involving the ground truth data, information with superior quality, the know-how of experts and the crowd intelligence. Such an endeavor aims to pave a way towards a seamless validation of global land cover data on the one hand and a targeted knowledge discovery in areas with higher uncertainty values on the other hand.

  17. Nuclear data to support computer code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.E.; Broadhead, B.L.; DeHart, M.D.; Primm, R.T. III

    1997-04-01

    The rate of plutonium disposition will be a key parameter in determining the degree of success of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. Estimates of the disposition rate are dependent on neutronics calculations. To ensure that these calculations are accurate, the codes and data should be validated against applicable experimental measurements. Further, before mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel can be fabricated and loaded into a reactor, the fuel vendors, fabricators, fuel transporters, reactor owners and operators, regulatory authorities, and the Department of Energy (DOE) must accept the validity of design calculations. This report presents sources of neutronics measurements that have potential application for validating reactor physics (predicting the power distribution in the reactor core), predicting the spent fuel isotopic content, predicting the decay heat generation rate, certifying criticality safety of fuel cycle facilities, and ensuring adequate radiation protection at the fuel cycle facilities and the reactor. The U.S. in-reactor experience with MOX fuel is first presented, followed by information related to other aspects of the MOX fuel performance information that is valuable to this program, but the data base remains largely proprietary. Thus, this information is not reported here. It is expected that the selected consortium will make the necessary arrangements to procure or have access to the requisite information

  18. CosmoQuest:Using Data Validation for More Than Just Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehan, C.; Gay, P.

    2016-12-01

    It is often taken for granted that different scientists completing the same task (e.g. mapping geologic features) will get the same results, and data validation is often skipped or under-utilized due to time and funding constraints. Robbins et. al (2014), however, demonstrated that this is a needed step, as large variation can exist even among collaborating team members completing straight-forward tasks like marking craters. Data Validation should be much more than a simple post-project verification of results. The CosmoQuest virtual research facility employs regular data-validation for a variety of benefits, including real-time user feedback, real-time tracking to observe user activity while it's happening, and using pre-solved data to analyze users' progress and to help them retain skills. Some creativity in this area can drastically improve project results. We discuss methods of validating data in citizen science projects and outline the variety of uses for validation, which, when used properly, improves the scientific output of the project and the user experience for the citizens doing the work. More than just a tool for scientists, validation can assist users in both learning and retaining important information and skills, improving the quality and quantity of data gathered. Real-time analysis of user data can give key information in the effectiveness of the project that a broad glance would miss, and properly presenting that analysis is vital. Training users to validate their own data, or the data of others, can significantly improve the accuracy of misinformed or novice users.

  19. Irradiated food: validity of extrapolating wholesomeness data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taub, I.A.; Angelini, P.; Merritt, C. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Criteria are considered for validly extrapolating the conclusions reached on the wholesomeness of an irradiated food receiving high doses to the same food receiving a lower dose. A consideration first is made of the possible chemical mechanisms that could give rise to different functional dependences of radiolytic products on dose. It is shown that such products should increase linearly with dose and the ratio of products should be constant throughout the dose range considered. The assumption, generally accepted in pharmacology, then is made that if any adverse effects related to the food are discerned in the test animals, then the intensity of these effects would increase with the concentration of radiolytic products in the food. Lastly, the need to compare data from animal studies with foods irradiated to several doses against chemical evidence obtained over a comparable dose range is considered. It is concluded that if the products depend linearly on dose and if feeding studies indicate no adverse effects, then an extrapolation to lower doses is clearly valid. This approach is illustrated for irradiated codfish. The formation of selected volatile products in samples receiving between 0.1 and 3 Mrads was examined, and their concentrations were found to increase linearly at least up to 1 Mrad. These data were compared with results from animal feeding studies establishing the wholesomeness of codfish and haddock irradiated to 0.2, 0.6 and 2.8 Mrads. It is stated, therefore, that if ocean fish, currently under consideration for onboard processing, were irradiated to 0.1 Mrad, it would be correspondingly wholesome

  20. Validation of MIPAS HNO3 operational data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Boone

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3 is one of the key products that are operationally retrieved by the European Space Agency (ESA from the emission spectra measured by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS onboard ENVISAT. The product version 4.61/4.62 for the observation period between July 2002 and March 2004 is validated by comparisons with a number of independent observations from ground-based stations, aircraft/balloon campaigns, and satellites. Individual HNO3 profiles of the ESA MIPAS level-2 product show good agreement with those of MIPAS-B and MIPAS-STR (the balloon and aircraft version of MIPAS, respectively, and the balloon-borne infrared spectrometers MkIV and SPIRALE, mostly matching the reference data within the combined instrument error bars. In most cases differences between the correlative measurement pairs are less than 1 ppbv (5–10% throughout the entire altitude range up to about 38 km (~6 hPa, and below 0.5 ppbv (15–20% or more above 30 km (~17 hPa. However, differences up to 4 ppbv compared to MkIV have been found at high latitudes in December 2002 in the presence of polar stratospheric clouds. The degree of consistency is further largely affected by the temporal and spatial coincidence, and differences of 2 ppbv may be observed between 22 and 26 km (~50 and 30 hPa at high latitudes near the vortex boundary, due to large horizontal inhomogeneity of HNO3. Similar features are also observed in the mean differences of the MIPAS ESA HNO3 VMRs with respect to the ground-based FTIR measurements at five stations, aircraft-based SAFIRE-A and ASUR, and the balloon campaign IBEX. The mean relative differences between the MIPAS and FTIR HNO3 partial columns are within ±2%, comparable to the MIPAS systematic error of ~2%. For the vertical profiles, the biases between the MIPAS and FTIR data are generally below 10% in the altitudes of 10 to 30 km. The MIPAS and SAFIRE HNO3 data generally match within their total error

  1. Radiochemical verification and validation in the environmental data collection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosano-Reece, D.; Bottrell, D.; Bath, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A credible and cost effective environmental data collection process should produce analytical data which meets regulatory and program specific requirements. Analytical data, which support the sampling and analysis activities at hazardous waste sites, undergo verification and independent validation before the data are submitted to regulators. Understanding the difference between verification and validation and their respective roles in the sampling and analysis process is critical to the effectiveness of a program. Verification is deciding whether the measurement data obtained are what was requested. The verification process determines whether all the requirements were met. Validation is more complicated than verification. It attempts to assess the impacts on data use, especially when requirements are not met. Validation becomes part of the decision-making process. Radiochemical data consists of a sample result with an associated error. Therefore, radiochemical validation is different and more quantitative than is currently possible for the validation of hazardous chemical data. Radiochemical data include both results and uncertainty that can be statistically compared to identify significance of differences in a more technically defensible manner. Radiochemical validation makes decisions about analyte identification, detection, and uncertainty for a batch of data. The process focuses on the variability of the data in the context of the decision to be made. The objectives of this paper are to present radiochemical verification and validation for environmental data and to distinguish the differences between the two operations

  2. Valid, legally defensible data from your analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, D.D.; Allen, V.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the definition of valid, legally defensible data. The authors describe the expectations of project managers and what should be gleaned from the laboratory in regard to analytical data

  3. GPM Ground Validation Navigation Data ER-2 OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA ER-2 Navigation Data OLYMPEX dataset supplies navigation data collected by the NASA ER-2 aircraft for flights that occurred during...

  4. The validation benchmark analyses for CMS data

    CERN Document Server

    Holub, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this report is to summarize my work at CERN during this summer. My first task was to transport code and dataset files from CERN Open Data Portal to Github that will be more convenient for users. The second part of my work was to copy environment from CERN Open Data Virtual Machine and apply it in the analysis environment SWAN. The last task was to rescale X-axis of the histogram.

  5. Validation of Fourier analysis of videokeratographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideroudi, Haris; Labiris, Georgios; Ditzel, Fienke; Tsaragli, Efi; Georgatzoglou, Kimonas; Siganos, Haralampos; Kozobolis, Vassilios

    2017-06-15

    The aim was to assess the repeatability of Fourier transfom analysis of videokeratographic data using Pentacam in normal (CG), keratoconic (KC) and post-CXL (CXL) corneas. This was a prospective, clinic-based, observational study. One randomly selected eye from all study participants was included in the analysis: 62 normal eyes (CG group), 33 keratoconus eyes (KC group), while 34 eyes, which had already received CXL treatment, formed the CXL group. Fourier analysis of keratometric data were obtained using Pentacam, by two different operators within each of two sessions. Precision, repeatability and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), were calculated for evaluating intrassesion and intersession repeatability for the following parameters: Spherical Component (SphRmin, SphEcc), Maximum Decentration (Max Dec), Regular Astigmatism, and Irregularitiy (Irr). Bland-Altman analysis was used for assessing interobserver repeatability. All parameters were presented to be repeatable, reliable and reproductible in all groups. Best intrasession and intersession repeatability and reliability were detected for parameters SphRmin, SphEcc and Max Dec parameters for both operators using ICC (intrasession: ICC > 98%, intersession: ICC > 94.7%) and within subject standard deviation. Best precision and lowest range of agreement was found for the SphRmin parameter (CG: 0.05, KC: 0.16, and CXL: 0.2) in all groups, while the lowest repeatability, reliability and reproducibility was detected for the Irr parameter. The Pentacam system provides accurate measurements of Fourier tranform keratometric data. A single Pentacam scan will be sufficient for most clinical applications.

  6. Validation of elk resource selection models with spatially independent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priscilla K. Coe; Bruce K. Johnson; Michael J. Wisdom; John G. Cook; Marty Vavra; Ryan M. Nielson

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of how landscape features affect wildlife resource use is essential for informed management. Resource selection functions often are used to make and validate predictions about landscape use; however, resource selection functions are rarely validated with data from landscapes independent of those from which the models were built. This problem has severely...

  7. Worldwide Protein Data Bank validation information: usage and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Oliver S; Horský, Vladimír; Gore, Swanand; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Bendová, Veronika; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Velankar, Sameer

    2018-03-01

    Realising the importance of assessing the quality of the biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners established Validation Task Forces to obtain advice on the methods and standards to be used to validate structures determined by X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and three-dimensional electron cryo-microscopy. The resulting wwPDB validation pipeline is an integral part of the wwPDB OneDep deposition, biocuration and validation system. The wwPDB Validation Service webserver (https://validate.wwpdb.org) can be used to perform checks prior to deposition. Here, it is shown how validation metrics can be combined to produce an overall score that allows the ranking of macromolecular structures and domains in search results. The ValTrends DB database provides users with a convenient way to access and analyse validation information and other properties of X-ray crystal structures in the PDB, including investigating trends in and correlations between different structure properties and validation metrics.

  8. Validation of Structures in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Swanand; Sanz García, Eduardo; Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Westbrook, John D; Yang, Huanwang; Feng, Zukang; Baskaran, Kumaran; Berrisford, John M; Hudson, Brian P; Ikegawa, Yasuyo; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Lawson, Catherine L; Mading, Steve; Mak, Lora; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Oldfield, Thomas J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Peisach, Ezra; Sahni, Gaurav; Sekharan, Monica R; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Smart, Oliver S; Ulrich, Eldon L; Yamashita, Reiko; Quesada, Martha; Young, Jasmine Y; Nakamura, Haruki; Markley, John L; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2017-12-05

    The Worldwide PDB recently launched a deposition, biocuration, and validation tool: OneDep. At various stages of OneDep data processing, validation reports for three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules are produced. These reports are based on recommendations of expert task forces representing crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and cryoelectron microscopy communities. The reports provide useful metrics with which depositors can evaluate the quality of the experimental data, the structural model, and the fit between them. The validation module is also available as a stand-alone web server and as a programmatically accessible web service. A growing number of journals require the official wwPDB validation reports (produced at biocuration) to accompany manuscripts describing macromolecular structures. Upon public release of the structure, the validation report becomes part of the public PDB archive. Geometric quality scores for proteins in the PDB archive have improved over the past decade. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Multimission satellite altimetric data validation in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Yongcun; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of altimetric data is crucial for investigating the regional sea level variability. Few works has been performed to validate the altimetric data [1, 2] in the Baltic Sea. The exploring of multi-mission altimetric data in the Baltic Sea has yet to be published. The number of available...

  10. Processing and validation of intermediate energy evaluated data files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Current accelerator-driven and other intermediate energy technologies require accurate nuclear data to model the performance of the target/blanket assembly, neutron production, activation, heating and damage. In a previous WPEC subgroup, SG13 on intermediate energy nuclear data, various aspects of intermediate energy data, such as nuclear data needs, experiments, model calculations and file formatting issues were investigated and categorized to come to a joint evaluation effort. The successor of SG13, SG14 on the processing and validation of intermediate energy evaluated data files, goes one step further. The nuclear data files that have been created with the aforementioned information need to be processed and validated in order to be applicable in realistic intermediate energy simulations. We emphasize that the work of SG14 excludes the 0-20 MeV data part of the neutron evaluations, which is supposed to be covered elsewhere. This final report contains the following sections: section 2: a survey of the data files above 20 MeV that have been considered for validation in SG14; section 3: a summary of the review of the 150 MeV intermediate energy data files for ENDF/B-VI and, more briefly, the other libraries; section 4: validation of the data library against an integral experiment with MCNPX; section 5: conclusions. (author)

  11. STATISTICS. The reusable holdout: Preserving validity in adaptive data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwork, Cynthia; Feldman, Vitaly; Hardt, Moritz; Pitassi, Toniann; Reingold, Omer; Roth, Aaron

    2015-08-07

    Misapplication of statistical data analysis is a common cause of spurious discoveries in scientific research. Existing approaches to ensuring the validity of inferences drawn from data assume a fixed procedure to be performed, selected before the data are examined. In common practice, however, data analysis is an intrinsically adaptive process, with new analyses generated on the basis of data exploration, as well as the results of previous analyses on the same data. We demonstrate a new approach for addressing the challenges of adaptivity based on insights from privacy-preserving data analysis. As an application, we show how to safely reuse a holdout data set many times to validate the results of adaptively chosen analyses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchat, Thomas K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jernigan, Dann A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  13. Treatment and Combination of Data Quality Monitoring Histograms to Perform Data vs. Monte Carlo Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Nolan

    2013-01-01

    In CMS's automated data quality validation infrastructure, it is not currently possible to assess how well Monte Carlo simulations describe data from collisions, if at all. In order to guarantee high quality data, a novel work flow was devised to perform `data vs. Monte Carlo' validation. Support for this comparison was added by allowing distributions from several Monte Carlo samples to be combined, matched to the data and then displayed in a histogram stack, overlaid with the experimental data.

  14. Validation of multisource electronic health record data: an application to blood transfusion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeven, Loan R van; Bruijne, Martine C de; Kemper, Peter F; Koopman, Maria M W; Rondeel, Jan M M; Leyte, Anja; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Janssen, Mart P; Roes, Kit C B

    2017-07-14

    Although data from electronic health records (EHR) are often used for research purposes, systematic validation of these data prior to their use is not standard practice. Existing validation frameworks discuss validity concepts without translating these into practical implementation steps or addressing the potential influence of linking multiple sources. Therefore we developed a practical approach for validating routinely collected data from multiple sources and to apply it to a blood transfusion data warehouse to evaluate the usability in practice. The approach consists of identifying existing validation frameworks for EHR data or linked data, selecting validity concepts from these frameworks and establishing quantifiable validity outcomes for each concept. The approach distinguishes external validation concepts (e.g. concordance with external reports, previous literature and expert feedback) and internal consistency concepts which use expected associations within the dataset itself (e.g. completeness, uniformity and plausibility). In an example case, the selected concepts were applied to a transfusion dataset and specified in more detail. Application of the approach to a transfusion dataset resulted in a structured overview of data validity aspects. This allowed improvement of these aspects through further processing of the data and in some cases adjustment of the data extraction. For example, the proportion of transfused products that could not be linked to the corresponding issued products initially was 2.2% but could be improved by adjusting data extraction criteria to 0.17%. This stepwise approach for validating linked multisource data provides a basis for evaluating data quality and enhancing interpretation. When the process of data validation is adopted more broadly, this contributes to increased transparency and greater reliability of research based on routinely collected electronic health records.

  15. Validation of argo data in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Reddy, G.V.; Ratnakaran, L.; Revichandran, C.; Murty, V.S.N.

    Gayana (Concepción) - VALIDATION OF ARGO DATA IN THE INDIAN OCEA... 8/11/2006http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0717-65382004000300025&lng=... susceptible to fouling and associated drift because of the possible change... initial profiles (profiles 1 and 2). Figure-1b represents the same as that in figure-1a, but for 29 match-ups involving profile numbers 5 and above. Page 2 of 5Gayana (Concepción) - VALIDATION OF ARGO DATA IN THE INDIAN OCEA... 8/11/2006http://www...

  16. Validation of data and indicators in the Danish Cholecystectomy Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Kirstine Moll; Anthonsen, Kristian; Bardram, Linda

    2009-01-01

    and postoperative complications RESEARCH DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: Data from 1360 medical records of patients undergoing cholecystectomy were compared to the relevant administrative data from the National Patient Registry. The medical records served as the "gold standard". The association between the individual...... indicators and the occurrence of a postoperative complication was assessed. MEASURES: Validation of administrative data against the gold standard was done by the calculation of per cent agreement (including kappa-values) sensitivity/specificity and predictive values. The association between indicators...

  17. Opportunities and Pitfalls in the Definition of Data Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Kuklik, Nils; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2018-01-01

    Several dimensions of data quality are described in the literature. One overriding aspect is considered to be the extent to which data represent the truth which is captured by data validity. Unfortunately, a common terminology, well defined concepts, and approved measures are missing in regard to data validity. In particular, there is a need to discuss the gold standard as reference for the data at hand and respective measures. Ultimate gold standard would be the state of the patient which itself is subjected to human and personal interpretations. Usually, an often diverse form of source data is used as gold standard. Based on the concept of the measure, it might be inappropriate differentiating between present and absent while calculating precision and recall. Due to the complexity and uncertainty of many health care related issues, a more sophisticated comparison might be necessary in order to establish relevant and general figures of data quality. Unfortunately, a harmonization in this field is not visible. Further research is needed to establish validated standards to measure data quality.

  18. Model Validation and Verification of Data Mining from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    In this paper, we seek to present a hybrid method for Model Validation and Verification of Data Mining from the ... This model generally states the numerical value of knowledge .... procedures found in the field of software engineering should be ...

  19. Methods for Geometric Data Validation of 3d City Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.; Alam, N.; Wewetzer, M.; Pries, M.; Coors, V.

    2015-12-01

    Geometric quality of 3D city models is crucial for data analysis and simulation tasks, which are part of modern applications of the data (e.g. potential heating energy consumption of city quarters, solar potential, etc.). Geometric quality in these contexts is however a different concept as it is for 2D maps. In the latter case, aspects such as positional or temporal accuracy and correctness represent typical quality metrics of the data. They are defined in ISO 19157 and should be mentioned as part of the metadata. 3D data has a far wider range of aspects which influence their quality, plus the idea of quality itself is application dependent. Thus, concepts for definition of quality are needed, including methods to validate these definitions. Quality on this sense means internal validation and detection of inconsistent or wrong geometry according to a predefined set of rules. A useful starting point would be to have correct geometry in accordance with ISO 19107. A valid solid should consist of planar faces which touch their neighbours exclusively in defined corner points and edges. No gaps between them are allowed, and the whole feature must be 2-manifold. In this paper, we present methods to validate common geometric requirements for building geometry. Different checks based on several algorithms have been implemented to validate a set of rules derived from the solid definition mentioned above (e.g. water tightness of the solid or planarity of its polygons), as they were developed for the software tool CityDoctor. The method of each check is specified, with a special focus on the discussion of tolerance values where they are necessary. The checks include polygon level checks to validate the correctness of each polygon, i.e. closeness of the bounding linear ring and planarity. On the solid level, which is only validated if the polygons have passed validation, correct polygon orientation is checked, after self-intersections outside of defined corner points and edges

  20. Spatial and Semantic Validation of Secondary Food Source Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyseen, Anders Knørr; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2014-01-01

    Governmental and commercial lists of food retailers are often used to measure food environments and foodscapes for health and nutritional research. Information about the validity of such secondary food source data is relevant to understanding the potential and limitations of its application....... This study assesses the validity of two government lists of food retailer locations and types by comparing them to direct field observations, including an assessment of whether pre-classification of the directories can reduce the need for field observation. Lists of food retailers were obtained from......-classification was measured through the calculation of PPV, sensitivity and negative prediction value (NPV). The application of either CVR or Smiley as a measure of the food environment would result in a misrepresentation. The pre-classification based on the food retailer names was found to be a valid method for identifying...

  1. Validation of CERBRRS against Gentilly-2 station data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varin, E.; Mao, J.; Kaveh, S.; Baudouin, A.

    2008-01-01

    CERBRRS models the CANDU 6 reactor regulating system (RRS) in CERBERUS transient core calculations. The validation of CERBRRS described here is performed against Gentilly-2 reactor data. The present validation focuses on the liquid zone controller (LZC) modelling, specifically the LZC fill rates. Two core transient measurements were compared to CERBRRS results: a shutdown system manual trip and the 1995 adjuster bank test. The standard CERBRRS model is found to produce a slower fill rate than observed at G2 in the SDS1 trip test. A modified LZC model was developed to reproduce the SDS1 trip test results, and compared to the 1995 adjuster bank test data. The CERBRRS results compared to the measurements show good agreement of the average LZC fill level, which is a key parameter in the RRS logic. These comparisons against Gentilly-2 station data also provide additional confidence in the overall performance of the CERBRRS. (author)

  2. Validation Techniques for Sensor Data in Mobile Health Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Miguel Pires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile applications have become a must in every user’s smart device, and many of these applications make use of the device sensors’ to achieve its goal. Nevertheless, it remains fairly unknown to the user to which extent the data the applications use can be relied upon and, therefore, to which extent the output of a given application is trustworthy or not. To help developers and researchers and to provide a common ground of data validation algorithms and techniques, this paper presents a review of the most commonly used data validation algorithms, along with its usage scenarios, and proposes a classification for these algorithms. This paper also discusses the process of achieving statistical significance and trust for the desired output.

  3. A Comprehensive Validation Methodology for Sparse Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive program of verification and validation has been undertaken to assess the applicability of models to space radiation shielding applications and to track progress as models are developed over time. The models are placed under configuration control, and automated validation tests are used so that comparisons can readily be made as models are improved. Though direct comparisons between theoretical results and experimental data are desired for validation purposes, such comparisons are not always possible due to lack of data. In this work, two uncertainty metrics are introduced that are suitable for validating theoretical models against sparse experimental databases. The nuclear physics models, NUCFRG2 and QMSFRG, are compared to an experimental database consisting of over 3600 experimental cross sections to demonstrate the applicability of the metrics. A cumulative uncertainty metric is applied to the question of overall model accuracy, while a metric based on the median uncertainty is used to analyze the models from the perspective of model development by analyzing subsets of the model parameter space.

  4. Mining Twitter Data to Augment NASA GPM Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Bill; Albayrak, Arif; Huffman, George; Vollmer, Bruce; Loeser, Carlee; Acker, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The Twitter data stream is an important new source of real-time and historical global information for potentially augmenting the validation program of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. There have been other similar uses of Twitter, though mostly related to natural hazards monitoring and management. The validation of satellite precipitation estimates is challenging, because many regions lack data or access to data, especially outside of the U.S. and in remote and developing areas. The time-varying set of "precipitation" tweets can be thought of as an organic network of rain gauges, potentially providing a widespread view of precipitation occurrence. Twitter provides a large source of crowd for crowdsourcing. During a 24-hour period in the middle of the snow storm this past March in the U.S. Northeast, we collected more than 13,000 relevant precipitation tweets with exact geolocation. The overall objective of our project is to determine the extent to which processed tweets can provide additional information that improves the validation of GPM data. Though our current effort focuses on tweets and precipitation, our approach is general and applicable to other social media and other geophysical measurements. Specifically, we have developed an operational infrastructure for processing tweets, in a format suitable for analysis with GPM data; engaged with potential participants, both passive and active, to "enrich" the Twitter stream; and inter-compared "precipitation" tweet data, ground station data, and GPM retrievals. In this presentation, we detail the technical capabilities of our tweet processing infrastructure, including data abstraction, feature extraction, search engine, context-awareness, real-time processing, and high volume (big) data processing; various means for "enriching" the Twitter stream; and results of inter-comparisons. Our project should bring a new kind of visibility to Twitter and engender a new kind of appreciation of the value

  5. Mining Twitter Data Stream to Augment NASA GPM Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, W. L.; Albayrak, A.; Huffman, G. J.; Vollmer, B.

    2017-12-01

    The Twitter data stream is an important new source of real-time and historical global information for potentially augmenting the validation program of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. There have been other similar uses of Twitter, though mostly related to natural hazards monitoring and management. The validation of satellite precipitation estimates is challenging, because many regions lack data or access to data, especially outside of the U.S. and in remote and developing areas. The time-varying set of "precipitation" tweets can be thought of as an organic network of rain gauges, potentially providing a widespread view of precipitation occurrence. Twitter provides a large source of crowd for crowdsourcing. During a 24-hour period in the middle of the snow storm this past March in the U.S. Northeast, we collected more than 13,000 relevant precipitation tweets with exact geolocation. The overall objective of our project is to determine the extent to which processed tweets can provide additional information that improves the validation of GPM data. Though our current effort focuses on tweets and precipitation, our approach is general and applicable to other social media and other geophysical measurements. Specifically, we have developed an operational infrastructure for processing tweets, in a format suitable for analysis with GPM data; engaged with potential participants, both passive and active, to "enrich" the Twitter stream; and inter-compared "precipitation" tweet data, ground station data, and GPM retrievals. In this presentation, we detail the technical capabilities of our tweet processing infrastructure, including data abstraction, feature extraction, search engine, context-awareness, real-time processing, and high volume (big) data processing; various means for "enriching" the Twitter stream; and results of inter-comparisons. Our project should bring a new kind of visibility to Twitter and engender a new kind of appreciation of the value

  6. A rating system for post pulse data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buceti, G.; Centioli, Cristina; Iannone, F.; Panella, M.; Rizzo, A.; Vitale, V.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of an automatic data validation system in a fusion experiment is to account--after every shot--for any occurrence of faulty sensors and unreliable measurements, thus preventing the proliferation of poor pulse data. In the past years a prototype has been successfully developed at Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) on a small set of density measurements. The results have shown that the model can be further extended to plant and diagnostic data, and that the same system can be used to assign to raw data a quality factor, to be stored in the archive and to be used in the post-shot elaboration phase as a selection criterion. In this way, a data validation system can also provide data analysts with an useful tool to be used as a key--together with other significant parameters, like plasma current, or magnetic field--to search the archive for quality data. This paper will describe how, using soft computing techniques, both these functions have been implemented on FTU, providing the users with a simple interface for fault detection developed in an open source environment (PHP-MySQL), to be finalised into the realisation of an overall rating system for FTU data

  7. A rating system for post pulse data validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buceti, G.; Centioli, Cristina E-mail: centioli@frascati.enea.it; Iannone, F.; Panella, M.; Rizzo, A.; Vitale, V

    2003-09-01

    The aim of an automatic data validation system in a fusion experiment is to account--after every shot--for any occurrence of faulty sensors and unreliable measurements, thus preventing the proliferation of poor pulse data. In the past years a prototype has been successfully developed at Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) on a small set of density measurements. The results have shown that the model can be further extended to plant and diagnostic data, and that the same system can be used to assign to raw data a quality factor, to be stored in the archive and to be used in the post-shot elaboration phase as a selection criterion. In this way, a data validation system can also provide data analysts with an useful tool to be used as a key--together with other significant parameters, like plasma current, or magnetic field--to search the archive for quality data. This paper will describe how, using soft computing techniques, both these functions have been implemented on FTU, providing the users with a simple interface for fault detection developed in an open source environment (PHP-MySQL), to be finalised into the realisation of an overall rating system for FTU data.

  8. Validating firn compaction model with remote sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, S. B.; Stenseng, Lars; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg

    A comprehensive understanding of firn processes is of outmost importance, when estimating present and future changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Especially, when remote sensing altimetry is used to assess the state of ice sheets and their contribution to global sea level rise, firn compaction...... models have been shown to be a key component. Now, remote sensing data can also be used to validate the firn models. Radar penetrating the upper part of the firn column in the interior part of Greenland shows a clear layering. The observed layers from the radar data can be used as an in-situ validation...... correction relative to the changes in the elevation of the surface observed with remote sensing altimetry? What model time resolution is necessary to resolved the observed layering? What model refinements are necessary to give better estimates of the surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet from...

  9. Discharge data from 50 selected rivers for GCM validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duemenil, L.; Isele, K.; Liebscher, H.J.; Schroeder, U.; Schumacher, M.; Wilke, K.

    1993-01-01

    This Technical Report refers to a joint project between GRDC Koblenz and MPI Hamburg. The Global Runoff Data Centre operates under the auspieces of WMO at the Federal Institute of Hydrology (Bundesanstalt fuer Gewaesserkunde) in Koblenz. River discharge data of the 50 largest rivers provide an independent data source for the validation of the hydrological cycle in general circulation models. This type of data is particularly valuable, because in some cases the available time series are exceptionally long. The data are presented as time series of annual average discharge (averaged over the period for which data is available, see below for caveats) and as annual cycles of monthly mean discharge averaged over the length of the time series available. (orig./KW)

  10. 100 Area excavation treatability study data validation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frain, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of sampling and chemical analyses at Hanford Reservation. The samples were analyzed by Thermo-Analytic Laboratories and Roy F. Weston Laboratories using US Environmental Protection Agency CLP protocols. Sample analyses included: volatile organics; semivolatile organics; inorganics; and general chemical parameters. The data from the chemical analyses were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site

  11. Indirect Validation of Probe Speed Data on Arterial Corridors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshragh, Sepideh [Center for Advanced Transportation Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, 5000 College Avenue, Suite 2206, College Park, MD 20742; Young, Stanley E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO 80401; Sharifi, Elham [Center for Advanced Transportation Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, 5000 College Avenue, Suite 2206, College Park, MD 20742; Hamedi, Masoud [Center for Advanced Transportation Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, 5000 College Avenue, Suite 2206, College Park, MD 20742; Sadabadi, Kaveh Farokhi [Center for Advanced Transportation Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, 5000 College Avenue, Suite 2206, College Park, MD 20742

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the accuracy of probe speed data on arterial corridors on the basis of roadway geometric attributes and functional classification. It was assumed that functional class (medium and low) along with other road characteristics (such as weighted average of the annual average daily traffic, average signal density, average access point density, and average speed) were available as correlation factors to estimate the accuracy of probe traffic data. This study tested these factors as predictors of the fidelity of probe traffic data by using the results of an extensive validation exercise. This study showed strong correlations between these geometric attributes and the accuracy of probe data when they were assessed by using average absolute speed error. Linear models were regressed to existing data to estimate appropriate models for medium- and low-type arterial corridors. The proposed models for medium- and low-type arterials were validated further on the basis of the results of a slowdown analysis. These models can be used to predict the accuracy of probe data indirectly in medium and low types of arterial corridors.

  12. Validation of the TIARA code to tritium inventory data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.

    1994-03-01

    The TIARA code has been developed to predict tritium inventory in Li 2 O breeder ceramic and to predict purge exit flow rate and composition. Inventory predictions are based on models for bulk diffusion, surface desorption, solubility and precipitation. Parameters for these models are determined from the results of laboratory annealing studies on unirradiated and irradiated Li 2 O. Inventory data from in-reactor purge flow tests are used for model improvement, fine-tuning of model parameters and validation. In this current work, the inventory measurement near the purge inlet from the BEATRIX-II thin-ring sample is used to fine tune the surface desorption model parameters for T > 470 degrees C, and the inventory measurement near the midplane from VOM-15H is used to fine tune the moisture solubility model parameters. predictions are then validated to the remaining inventory data from EXOTIC-2 (1 point), SIBELIUS (3 axial points), VOM-15H (2 axial points), CRITIC-1 (4 axial points), BEATRIX-II thin ring (3 axial points) and BEATRIX-II thick pellet (5 radial points). Thus. of the 20 data points, two we re used for fine tuning model parameters and 18 were used for validation. The inventory data span the range of 0.05--1.44 wppm with an average of 0.48 wppm. The data pertain to samples whose end-of-life temperatures were in the range of 490--1000 degrees C. On the average, the TIARA predictions agree quite well with the data (< 0.02 wppm difference). However, the root-mean-square deviation is 0.44 wppm, mostly due to over-predictions for the SIBELIUS samples and the higher-temperature radial samples from the BEATRIX-11 thick-pellet

  13. Learning from biomedical linked data to suggest valid pharmacogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalleau, Kevin; Marzougui, Yassine; Da Silva, Sébastien; Ringot, Patrice; Ndiaye, Ndeye Coumba; Coulet, Adrien

    2017-04-20

    A standard task in pharmacogenomics research is identifying genes that may be involved in drug response variability, i.e., pharmacogenes. Because genomic experiments tended to generate many false positives, computational approaches based on the use of background knowledge have been proposed. Until now, only molecular networks or the biomedical literature were used, whereas many other resources are available. We propose here to consume a diverse and larger set of resources using linked data related either to genes, drugs or diseases. One of the advantages of linked data is that they are built on a standard framework that facilitates the joint use of various sources, and thus facilitates considering features of various origins. We propose a selection and linkage of data sources relevant to pharmacogenomics, including for example DisGeNET and Clinvar. We use machine learning to identify and prioritize pharmacogenes that are the most probably valid, considering the selected linked data. This identification relies on the classification of gene-drug pairs as either pharmacogenomically associated or not and was experimented with two machine learning methods -random forest and graph kernel-, which results are compared in this article. We assembled a set of linked data relative to pharmacogenomics, of 2,610,793 triples, coming from six distinct resources. Learning from these data, random forest enables identifying valid pharmacogenes with a F-measure of 0.73, on a 10 folds cross-validation, whereas graph kernel achieves a F-measure of 0.81. A list of top candidates proposed by both approaches is provided and their obtention is discussed.

  14. Validation of Australian data in the Australasian Vascular Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, Charles Barry; Bourke, Bernie M

    2014-09-01

    Accuracy of data is important in any clinical audit. It is necessary to determine how complete the dataset is as well as the accuracy of the data that have been entered. The Australasian Vascular Audit has been operational for 4 years and a data validation process has been undertaken. An independent data source is available, which is collected by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This collects all public and private hospital data and is available for interrogation. Similarly, private-only data are available from the Medicare website. This has been compared with the Australasian Vascular Audit dataset to establish completeness of data collection. Quality of data collected has been verified by comparing accuracy of data fields with that present in patient records in a 5% random sample. For the 2 years studied, there was a 63% capture rate in Australia for all patients. In the private sector, only 50% of patients were captured with a significant decrease noted in 2013. The quality of data entered had a 2.6% error rate. There is a need to increase compliance with vascular audit in Australia and data accuracy is acceptable but could be improved. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. EASY-2005: Validation and new tools for data checking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.A.; Kopecky, J.

    2007-01-01

    The European Activation System (EASY) has been developed for activation calculations within the Fusion Technology programme. It comprises the EAF nuclear data libraries and the FISPACT inventory code. EASY-2005 contains about five times more neutron-induced reactions (62,637) than the previous version; due to an increase in the upper energy limit from 20 to 60 MeV. Many measurements of activation in well-defined neutron spectra have been made; these integral results are used to validate EAF. Details of the validation covering 453 reactions are given. Model calculations were used to produce the majority of the data, and the large number of reactions, and the lack of experimental data, make it necessary to develop new checking tools. Within the SAFEPAQ-II code, the new methodology of statistical analysis of cross sections (SACS) has been developed. This enables various quantities such as maximum cross section (σ max ) to be plotted as a function of asymmetry parameter (s) for each reaction type. Such plots show well-defined trends and inconsistent data for a particular reaction can readily be identified. The use of integral data and SACS for improvement are discussed, in relation to the maintenance version, EASY-2005.1 and the planned new version, EASY-2007

  16. Integration and validation of a data grid software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carenton-Madiec, Nicolas; Berger, Katharina; Cofino, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) Peer-to-Peer (P2P) is a software infrastructure for the management, dissemination, and analysis of model output and observational data. The ESGF grid is composed with several types of nodes which have different roles. About 40 data nodes host model outputs and datasets using thredds catalogs. About 25 compute nodes offer remote visualization and analysis tools. About 15 index nodes crawl data nodes catalogs and implement faceted and federated search in a web interface. About 15 Identity providers nodes manage accounts, authentication and authorization. Here we will present an actual size test federation spread across different institutes in different countries and a python test suite that were started in December 2013. The first objective of the test suite is to provide a simple tool that helps to test and validate a single data node and its closest index, compute and identity provider peer. The next objective will be to run this test suite on every data node of the federation and therefore test and validate every single node of the whole federation. The suite already implements nosetests, requests, myproxy-logon, subprocess, selenium and fabric python libraries in order to test both web front ends, back ends and security services. The goal of this project is to improve the quality of deliverable in a small developers team context. Developers are widely spread around the world working collaboratively and without hierarchy. This kind of working organization context en-lighted the need of a federated integration test and validation process.

  17. Validation of the newborn larynx modeling with aerodynamical experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, R; Giordano, J; Garrel, R; Medale, M; Caminat, P; Giovanni, A; Ouaknine, M; Triglia, J M

    2009-06-01

    Many authors have studied adult's larynx modelization, but the mechanisms of newborn's voice production have very rarely been investigated. After validating a numerical model with acoustic data, studies were performed on larynges of human fetuses in order to validate this model with aerodynamical experiments. Anatomical measurements were performed and a simplified numerical model was built using Fluent((R)) with the vocal folds in phonatory position. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and high-frame rate particle image velocimetry (HFR-PIV), on an experimental bench with excised human fetus larynges. It appears that computing with first cry physiological parameters leads to a model which is close to those obtained in experiments with real organs.

  18. EASY-2005: validation and new tools for data checking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Kopecky, J.

    2006-01-01

    The European Activation System (EASY) is the tool developed for activation calculations as part of the Fusion Technology programme. It comprises the EAF nuclear data libraries and the FISPACT inventory code. The version EASY-2005, released last year contains many more neutron-induced reactions than the previous version; an increase of about a factor of five to 62,637. The reason for this was the increase in the upper energy limit from 20 to 60 MeV. A major strand of work within Europe has been the measurement of activation in a series of well-defined neutron spectra, these integral results can then be used to validate a subset of the EAF-2005 library, demonstrating that it can be relied on for activation predictions in similar spectra. A validation report has been produced covering 453 reactions; this shows the integral results and the available differential data from EXFOR for these reactions. For 202 reactions there is good agreement, indicating that the data for the reaction are adequate. In cases of disagreement the report indicates where additional measurements are required or where the library data can be improved. The majority of the data above 20 MeV were obtained from model calculations, and this is also the case for many of the reactions at all energies. Because of the large number of reactions and the lack of experimental data, there was a need to develop new tools that could help in the checking of such a large library. Within the SAFEPAQ-II code that is used for evaluation and production of the EAF libraries, the new methodology of Statistical Analysis of Cross Sections (SACS) has been developed. This enables various quantities such as maximum cross section (σ max ), energy at maximum (E max ) and width at half maximum (W 0.5 ) to be plotted as functions of atomic mass (A) and asymmetry parameter (s) for each type of reaction. Such plots show well defined trends and inconsistent data for a particular reaction can easily be identified. Using the

  19. Validating safeguards effectiveness given inherently limited test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicherman, A.

    1987-01-01

    A key issue in designing and evaluating nuclear safeguards systems is how to validate safeguards effectiveness against a spectrum of potential threats. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by a performance indicator such as the probability of defeating an adversary attempting a malevolent act. Effectiveness validation means a testing program that provides sufficient evidence that the performance indicator is at an acceptable level. Traditional statistical program when numerous independent system trials are possible. However, within the safeguards environment, many situations arise for which traditional statistical approaches may be neither feasible nor appropriate. Such situations can occur, for example, when there are obvious constraints on the number of possible tests due to operational impacts and testing costs. Furthermore, these tests are usually simulations (e.g., staged force-on-force exercises) rather than actual tests, and the system is often modified after each test. Under such circumstances, it is difficult to make and justify inferences about system performance by using traditional statistical techniques. In this paper, the authors discuss several alternative quantitative techniques for validating system effectiveness. The techniques include: (1) minimizing the number of required tests using sequential testing; (2) combining data from models inspections and exercises using Bayesian statistics to improve inferences about system performance; and (3) using reliability growth and scenario modeling to help specify which safeguards elements and scenarios to test

  20. Improving your real-time data infrastructure using advanced data validation and reconciliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wising, Ulrika; Campan, Julien; Vrielynck, Bruno; Anjos, Cristiano dos; Kalitventzeff, Pierre-Boris [Belsim S.A., Awans (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    'Smart fields', 'e-fields', 'field of the future', 'digital oil fields' and 'field monitoring' are all names of real-time data infrastructures aimed at providing information for decision making. This paper discusses these new real-time data infrastructures that are being developed and deployed in oil and gas production and in particular the challenge of supplying these new systems with high quality data. In order for these infrastructures to be successful and provide efficient and successful performance management and optimization, they need to have access to high quality production data. Advanced Data Validation and Reconciliation is a technology that could meet this data quality challenge. It has been successfully deployed in many different industry sectors and more recently in oil and gas production. Advanced Data Validation and Reconciliation provides a coherent, accurate set of production data and basing these new infrastructures on validated and reconciled data brings a solution to the data quality challenge. There are numerous other benefits by applying advanced data validation and reconciliation in oil and gas production, such as uninterrupted well production, optimized valves opening and water or gas injection, backup values for traditional multiphase flow meters, and the avoidance of production upsets. (author)

  1. Spent reactor fuel benchmark composition data for code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1991-09-01

    To establish criticality safety margins utilizing burnup credit in the storage and transport of spent reactor fuels requires a knowledge of the uncertainty in the calculated fuel composition used in making the reactivity assessment. To provide data for validating such calculated burnup fuel compositions, radiochemical assays are being obtained as part of the United States Department of Energy From-Reactor Cask Development Program. Destructive assay data are being obtained from representative reactor fuels having experienced irradiation exposures up to about 55 GWD/MTM. Assay results and associated operating histories on the initial three samples analyzed in this effort are presented. The three samples were taken from different axial regions of the same fuel rod and represent radiation exposures of about 27, 37, and 44 GWD/MTM. The data are presented in a benchmark type format to facilitate identification/referencing and computer code input

  2. Critical Evaluation of Validation Rules Automated Extraction from Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pejcoch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to critically evaluate a possibility of automatic extraction of such kind of rules which could be later used within a Data Quality Management process for validation of records newly incoming to Information System. For practical demonstration the 4FT-Miner procedure implemented in LISpMiner System was chosen. A motivation for this task is the potential simplification of projects focused on Data Quality Management. Initially, this article is going to critically evaluate a possibility of fully automated extraction with the aim to identify strengths and weaknesses of this approach in comparison to its alternative, when at least some a priori knowledge is available. As a result of practical implementation, this article provides design of recommended process which would be used as a guideline for future projects. Also the question of how to store and maintain extracted rules and how to integrate them with existing tools supporting Data Quality Management is discussed

  3. A validation system for data preservation in HEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, Yves; Strutz, Marco; Hessling, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Preserving data from past experiments and preserving the ability to perform analysis with old data is of growing importance in many domains of science, including High Energy Physics (HEP). A study group on this issue, DPHEP, has been established in this field to provide guidelines and a structure for international collaboration on data preservation projects in HEP. This contribution presents a framework that allows experimentalists to validate their software against a previously defined set of tests in an automated way. The framework has been designed with a special focus for longevity, as it makes use of open protocols, has a modular design and is based on simple communication mechanisms. On the fabrics side, tests are carried out in a virtual environment using a cloud infrastructure. Within the framework, it is easy to run validation tests on different hardware platforms, or different major or minor versions of operating systems. Experts from IT or the experiments can automatically detect failures in the test procedure by the help of reporting tools. Hence, appropriate actions can be taken in a timely manner. The design and important implementation aspects of the framework are shown and first experiences from early-bird users will be presented.

  4. Criteria of the validation of experimental and evaluated covariance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badikov, S.

    2008-01-01

    The criteria of the validation of experimental and evaluated covariance data are reviewed. In particular: a) the criterion of the positive definiteness for covariance matrices, b) the relationship between the 'integral' experimental and estimated uncertainties, c) the validity of the statistical invariants, d) the restrictions imposed to correlations between experimental errors, are described. Applying these criteria in nuclear data evaluation was considered and 4 particular points have been examined. First preserving positive definiteness of covariance matrices in case of arbitrary transformation of a random vector was considered, properties of the covariance matrices in operations widely used in neutron and reactor physics (splitting and collapsing energy groups, averaging the physical values over energy groups, estimation parameters on the basis of measurements by means of generalized least squares method) were studied. Secondly, an algorithm for comparison of experimental and estimated 'integral' uncertainties was developed, square root of determinant of a covariance matrix is recommended for use in nuclear data evaluation as a measure of 'integral' uncertainty for vectors of experimental and estimated values. Thirdly, a set of statistical invariants-values which are preserved in statistical processing was presented. And fourthly, the inequality that signals a correlation between experimental errors that leads to unphysical values is given. An application is given concerning the cross-section of the (n,t) reaction on Li 6 with a neutron incident energy comprised between 1 and 100 keV

  5. A psychophysically validated metric for bidirectional texture data reduction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Chantler, M.J.; Green, P.R.; Haindl, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 5 (2008), s. 138:1-138:11 ISSN 0730-0301 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400750407; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Bidirectional Texture Functions * texture compression Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 3.383, year: 2008 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/RO/haindl-a psychophysically validated metric for bidirectional texture data reduction.pdf

  6. Validity of data in the Danish colorectal cancer screening database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette Kielsholm; Njor, Sisse Helle; Rasmussen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Background: In Denmark, a nationwide screening program for colorectal cancer was implemented in March 2014. Along with this, a clinical database for program monitoring and research purposes was established. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the agreement and validity of diagnosis...... and procedure codes in the Danish Colorectal Cancer Screening Database (DCCSD). Methods: All individuals with a positive immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) result who were invited to screening in the first 3 months since program initiation were identified. From these, a sample of 150 individuals...... was selected using stratified random sampling by age, gender and region of residence. Data from the DCCSD were compared with data from hospital records, which were used as the reference. Agreement, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were estimated for categories of codes...

  7. Utilizing Chamber Data for Developing and Validating Climate Change Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Controlled environment chambers (e.g. growth chambers, SPAR chambers, or open-top chambers) are useful for measuring plant ecosystem responses to climatic variables and CO2 that affect plant water relations. However, data from chambers was found to overestimate responses of C fluxes to CO2 enrichment. Chamber data may be confounded by numerous artifacts (e.g. sidelighting, edge effects, increased temperature and VPD, etc) and this limits what can be measured accurately. Chambers can be used to measure canopy level energy balance under controlled conditions and plant transpiration responses to CO2 concentration can be elucidated. However, these measurements cannot be used directly in model development or validation. The response of stomatal conductance to CO2 will be the same as in the field, but the measured response must be recalculated in such a manner to account for differences in aerodynamic conductance, temperature and VPD between the chamber and the field.

  8. The potential of ground gravity measurements to validate GRACE data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Crossley

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New satellite missions are returning high precision, time-varying, satellite measurements of the Earth’s gravity field. The GRACE mission is now in its calibration/- validation phase and first results of the gravity field solutions are imminent. We consider here the possibility of external validation using data from the superconducting gravimeters in the European sub-array of the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP as ‘ground truth’ for comparison with GRACE. This is a pilot study in which we use 14 months of 1-hour data from the beginning of GGP (1 July 1997 to 30 August 1998, when the Potsdam instrument was relocated to South Africa. There are 7 stations clustered in west central Europe, and one station, Metsahovi in Finland. We remove local tides, polar motion, local and global air pressure, and instrument drift and then decimate to 6-hour samples. We see large variations in the time series of 5–10µgal between even some neighboring stations, but there are also common features that correlate well over the 427-day period. The 8 stations are used to interpolate a minimum curvature (gridded surface that extends over the geographical region. This surface shows time and spatial coherency at the level of 2– 4µgal over the first half of the data and 1–2µgal over the latter half. The mean value of the surface clearly shows a rise in European gravity of about 3µgal over the first 150 days and a fairly constant value for the rest of the data. The accuracy of this mean is estimated at 1µgal, which compares favorably with GRACE predictions for wavelengths of 500 km or less. Preliminary studies of hydrology loading over Western Europe shows the difficulty of correlating the local hydrology, which can be highly variable, with large-scale gravity variations.Key words. GRACE, satellite gravity, superconducting gravimeter, GGP, ground truth

  9. Enhanced data validation strategy of air quality monitoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkat, Mohamed-Faouzi; Mansouri, Majdi; Nounou, Mohamed; Nounou, Hazem

    2018-01-01

    Quick validation and detection of faults in measured air quality data is a crucial step towards achieving the objectives of air quality networks. Therefore, the objectives of this paper are threefold: (i) to develop a modeling technique that can be used to predict the normal behavior of air quality variables and help provide accurate reference for monitoring purposes; (ii) to develop fault detection method that can effectively and quickly detect any anomalies in measured air quality data. For this purpose, a new fault detection method that is based on the combination of generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) will be developed. GLRT is a well-known statistical fault detection method that relies on maximizing the detection probability for a given false alarm rate. In this paper, we propose to develop GLRT-based EWMA fault detection method that will be able to detect the changes in the values of certain air quality variables; (iii) to develop fault isolation and identification method that allows defining the fault source(s) in order to properly apply appropriate corrective actions. In this paper, reconstruction approach that is based on Midpoint-Radii Principal Component Analysis (MRPCA) model will be developed to handle the types of data and models associated with air quality monitoring networks. All air quality modeling, fault detection, fault isolation and reconstruction methods developed in this paper will be validated using real air quality data (such as particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen and carbon oxides measurement). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation and augmentation of Inrix arterial travel time data using independent sources : [research summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Although the freeway travel time data has been validated extensively in recent : years, the quality of arterial travel time data is not well known. This project : presents a comprehensive validation scheme for arterial travel time data based : on GPS...

  11. Geophysical validation of MIPAS-ENVISAT operational ozone data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Cortesi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS, on-board the European ENVIronmental SATellite (ENVISAT launched on 1 March 2002, is a middle infrared Fourier Transform spectrometer measuring the atmospheric emission spectrum in limb sounding geometry. The instrument is capable to retrieve the vertical distribution of temperature and trace gases, aiming at the study of climate and atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, and at applications to data assimilation and weather forecasting. MIPAS operated in its standard observation mode for approximately two years, from July 2002 to March 2004, with scans performed at nominal spectral resolution of 0.025 cm−1 and covering the altitude range from the mesosphere to the upper troposphere with relatively high vertical resolution (about 3 km in the stratosphere. Only reduced spectral resolution measurements have been performed subsequently. MIPAS data were re-processed by ESA using updated versions of the Instrument Processing Facility (IPF v4.61 and v4.62 and provided a complete set of level-2 operational products (geo-located vertical profiles of temperature and volume mixing ratio of H2O, O3, HNO3, CH4, N2O and NO2 with quasi continuous and global coverage in the period of MIPAS full spectral resolution mission. In this paper, we report a detailed description of the validation of MIPAS-ENVISAT operational ozone data, that was based on the comparison between MIPAS v4.61 (and, to a lesser extent, v4.62 O3 VMR profiles and a comprehensive set of correlative data, including observations from ozone sondes, ground-based lidar, FTIR and microwave radiometers, remote-sensing and in situ instruments on-board stratospheric aircraft and balloons, concurrent satellite sensors and ozone fields assimilated by the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasting.

    A coordinated effort was carried out

  12. EXAMINATION OF A PROPOSED VALIDATION DATA SET USING CFD CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 C to perhaps 1000 C. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for such for future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present article presents new results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made

  13. Validity of diagnoses, procedures, and laboratory data in Japanese administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamana, Hayato; Moriwaki, Mutsuko; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Kodan, Mariko; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    Validation of recorded data is a prerequisite for studies that utilize administrative databases. The present study evaluated the validity of diagnoses and procedure records in the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) data, along with laboratory test results in the newly-introduced Standardized Structured Medical Record Information Exchange (SS-MIX) data. Between November 2015 and February 2016, we conducted chart reviews of 315 patients hospitalized between April 2014 and March 2015 in four middle-sized acute-care hospitals in Shizuoka, Kochi, Fukuoka, and Saga Prefectures and used them as reference standards. The sensitivity and specificity of DPC data in identifying 16 diseases and 10 common procedures were identified. The accuracy of SS-MIX data for 13 laboratory test results was also examined. The specificity of diagnoses in the DPC data exceeded 96%, while the sensitivity was below 50% for seven diseases and variable across diseases. When limited to primary diagnoses, the sensitivity and specificity were 78.9% and 93.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of procedure records exceeded 90% for six procedures, and the specificity exceeded 90% for nine procedures. Agreement between the SS-MIX data and the chart reviews was above 95% for all 13 items. The validity of diagnoses and procedure records in the DPC data and laboratory results in the SS-MIX data was high in general, supporting their use in future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Collecting the data but missing the point: validity of hand hygiene audit data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanes, A; Coen, P G; Wilson, A P; Drey, N S; Gould, D J

    2015-06-01

    Monitoring of hand hygiene compliance (HHC) by observation has been used in healthcare for more than a decade to provide assurance of infection control practice. The validity of this information is rarely tested. To examine the process and validity of collecting and reporting HHC data based on direct observation of compliance. Five years of HHC data routinely collected in one large National Health Service hospital trust were examined. The data collection process was reviewed by survey and interview of the auditors. HHC data collected for other research purposes undertaken during this period were compared with the organizational data set. After an initial increase, the reported HHC remained unchanged close to its intended target throughout this period. Examination of the data collection process revealed changes, including local interpretations of the data collection system, which invalidated the results. A minority of auditors had received formal training in observation and feedback of results. Whereas observation of HHC is the current gold standard, unless data collection definitions and methods are unambiguous, published, carefully supervised, and regularly monitored, variations may occur which affect the validity of the data. If the purpose of HHC monitoring is to improve practice and minimize transmission of infection, then a focus on progressively improving performance rather than on achieving a target may offer greater opportunities to achieve this. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validating module network learning algorithms using simulated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoel, Tom; Maere, Steven; Bonnet, Eric; Joshi, Anagha; Saeys, Yvan; Van den Bulcke, Tim; Van Leemput, Koenraad; van Remortel, Piet; Kuiper, Martin; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2007-05-03

    In recent years, several authors have used probabilistic graphical models to learn expression modules and their regulatory programs from gene expression data. Despite the demonstrated success of such algorithms in uncovering biologically relevant regulatory relations, further developments in the area are hampered by a lack of tools to compare the performance of alternative module network learning strategies. Here, we demonstrate the use of the synthetic data generator SynTReN for the purpose of testing and comparing module network learning algorithms. We introduce a software package for learning module networks, called LeMoNe, which incorporates a novel strategy for learning regulatory programs. Novelties include the use of a bottom-up Bayesian hierarchical clustering to construct the regulatory programs, and the use of a conditional entropy measure to assign regulators to the regulation program nodes. Using SynTReN data, we test the performance of LeMoNe in a completely controlled situation and assess the effect of the methodological changes we made with respect to an existing software package, namely Genomica. Additionally, we assess the effect of various parameters, such as the size of the data set and the amount of noise, on the inference performance. Overall, application of Genomica and LeMoNe to simulated data sets gave comparable results. However, LeMoNe offers some advantages, one of them being that the learning process is considerably faster for larger data sets. Additionally, we show that the location of the regulators in the LeMoNe regulation programs and their conditional entropy may be used to prioritize regulators for functional validation, and that the combination of the bottom-up clustering strategy with the conditional entropy-based assignment of regulators improves the handling of missing or hidden regulators. We show that data simulators such as SynTReN are very well suited for the purpose of developing, testing and improving module network

  16. Utilizing the social media data to validate 'climate change' indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodtsova, T.; Kirilenko, A.; Stepchenkova, S.

    2013-12-01

    Reporting the observed and modeled changes in climate to public requires the measures understandable by the general audience. E.g., the NASA GISS Common Sense Climate Index (Hansen et al., 1998) reports the change in climate based on six practically observable parameters such as the air temperature exceeding the norm by one standard deviation. The utility of the constructed indices for reporting climate change depends, however, on an assumption that the selected parameters are felt and connected with the changing climate by a non-expert, which needs to be validated. Dynamic discussion of climate change issues in social media may provide data for this validation. We connected the intensity of public discussion of climate change in social networks with regional weather variations for the territory of the USA. We collected the entire 2012 population of Twitter microblogging activity on climate change topic, accumulating over 1.8 million separate records (tweets) globally. We identified the geographic location of the tweets and associated the daily and weekly intensity of twitting with the following parameters of weather for these locations: temperature anomalies, 'hot' temperature anomalies, 'cold' temperature anomalies, heavy rain/snow events. To account for non-weather related events we included the articles on climate change from the 'prestige press', a collection of major newspapers. We found that the regional changes in parameters of weather significantly affect the number of tweets published on climate change. This effect, however, is short-lived and varies throughout the country. We found that in different locations different weather parameters had the most significant effect on climate change microblogging activity. Overall 'hot' temperature anomalies had significant influence on climate change twitting intensity.

  17. Expert systems application to plant diagnosis and sensor data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.; Chandrasekaran, B.; Josephson, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, over 2000 alarms and displays are available to the operator. For any given set of alarms and displays, the operator must be able to diagnose and correct the problem (s) quickly and accurately. At the same time, the operator is expected to distinguish the plant system faults from instrumentation channel failures and drifts. Needs for plant operator aids have been considered since the accident at TMI. Many of these aids are of the form of the Safety Parameter Display Systems and offer improved methods of displaying otherwise available data to the operator in a more concise and summarized format. diagnosis, however, remains a desirable objective of an operator aid. At The Ohio State University, faculty and students in nuclear engineering and computer science have evaluated this problem. The results of these studies have shown that plant diagnosis and sensor data validation must be considered as one integral problem and cannot be isolated from one another. Otherwise, an incorrect diagnosis based on faulty instrument information might be provided to the operator. In this study, the Knowlege Based System (KBS) technology is being incorporated to accomplish a final goal of an intelligent operator aid system

  18. Validation of COMMIX with Westinghouse AP-600 PCCS test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.G.; Chien, T.H.; Ding, J.; Sha, W.T.

    1993-01-01

    Small-scale test data for the Westinghouse AP-600 Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) have been used to validate the COMMIX computer code. To evaluate the performance of the PCCS, two transient liquid-film tracking models have been developed and implemented in the CO code. A set of heat transfer models and a mass transfer model based on heat and mass transfer analogy were used for the analysis of the AP-600 PCCS. It was found that the flow of the air stream in the annulus is a highly turbulent forced convection and that the flow of the air/steam mixture in the containment vessel is a mixed convection. Accordingly, a turbulent-forced-convection heat transfer model is used on the outside of the steel containment vessel wall and a mixed-convection heat transfer model is used on the inside of the steel containment vessel wall. The results from the CO calculations are compared with the experimental data from Westinghouse PCCS small-scale tests for average wall heat flux, evaporation rate, containment vessel pressure, and vessel wall temperature and heat flux distributions; agreement is good. The CO calculations also provide detailed distributions of velocity, temperature, and steam and air concentrations

  19. An introduction to use of the USACE HTRW program's data validation guidelines engineering manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, L.D.; Coats, K.H.

    1994-01-01

    Data validation has been defined by regulatory agencies as a systematic process (consisting of data editing, screening, checking, auditing, verification, certification, and review) for comparing data to established criteria in order to provide assurance that data are adequate for their intended use. A problem for the USACE HTRW Program was that clearly defined data validation guidelines were available only for analytical data quality level IV. These functional data validation guidelines were designed for validation of data produced using protocols from the US E.P.A.'s Contract Laboratory Program (CLP). Unfortunately, USACE experience demonstrates that these level IV functional data validation guidelines were being used to validate data not produced under the CLP. The resulting data validation product was less than satisfactory for USACE HTRW needs. Therefore, the HTRW-MCX initiated an Engineering Manual (EM) for validation of analytical data quality levels other than IV. This EM is entitle ''USACE HTRW Data Validation Guidelines.'' Use of the EM is required for validation of analytical data relating to projects under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, Hazardous, Toxic, and Radioactive Waste Program. These data validation guidelines include procedures and checklists for technical review of analytical data at quality levels I, II, III, and V

  20. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit first quarter 1994 groundwater sampling data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggerstaff, R.L.

    1994-06-24

    Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit First Quarter 1994 Groundwater Sampling Investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of twenty-four samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The samples were analyzed by Thermo-Analytic Laboratories (TMA) and Roy F. Weston Laboratories (WESTON) using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CLP protocols. Sample analyses included: inorganics; and general chemical parameters. Forty-two samples were validated for radiochemical parameters by TMA and Teledyne.

  1. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit first quarter 1994 groundwater sampling data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggerstaff, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit First Quarter 1994 Groundwater Sampling Investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of twenty-four samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The samples were analyzed by Thermo-Analytic Laboratories (TMA) and Roy F. Weston Laboratories (WESTON) using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CLP protocols. Sample analyses included: inorganics; and general chemical parameters. Forty-two samples were validated for radiochemical parameters by TMA and Teledyne

  2. A mixed methods inquiry into the validity of data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaarst Mette

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research in herd health management solely using a quantitative approach may present major challenges to the interpretation of the results, because the humans involved may have responded to their observations based on previous experiences and own beliefs. This challenge can be met through increased awareness and dialogue between researchers and farmers or other stakeholders about the background for data collection related to management and changes in management. By integrating quantitative and qualitative research methods in a mixed methods research approach, the researchers will improve their understanding of this potential bias of the observed data and farms, which will enable them to obtain more useful results of quantitative analyses. Case description An example is used to illustrate the potentials of combining quantitative and qualitative approaches to herd health related data analyses. The example is based on two studies on bovine metritis. The first study was a quantitative observational study of risk factors for metritis in Danish dairy cows based on data from the Danish Cattle Database. The other study was a semi-structured interview study involving 20 practicing veterinarians with the aim to gain insight into veterinarians' decision making when collecting and processing data related to metritis. Discussion and Evaluation The relations between risk factors and metritis in the first project supported the findings in several other quantitative observational studies; however, the herd incidence risk was highly skewed. There may be simple practical reasons for this, e.g. underreporting and differences in the veterinarians' decision making. Additionally, the interviews in the second project identified several problems with correctness and validity of data regarding the occurrence of metritis because of differences regarding case definitions and thresholds for treatments between veterinarians. Conclusion Studies where

  3. 78 FR 77718 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Information Collection for the Data Validation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Collection for Information Collection for the Data Validation Requirement for Employment and Training... collection of data validation information for the following employment and training programs: Workforce... information on program activities and outcomes is available. Data validation is intended to accomplish the...

  4. Text data extraction for a prospective, research-focused data mart: implementation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliff, Monique; Just, Eric; Podlusky, Sofia; Varga, John; Chang, Rowland W; Kibbe, Warren A

    2012-09-13

    Translational research typically requires data abstracted from medical records as well as data collected specifically for research. Unfortunately, many data within electronic health records are represented as text that is not amenable to aggregation for analyses. We present a scalable open source SQL Server Integration Services package, called Regextractor, for including regular expression parsers into a classic extract, transform, and load workflow. We have used Regextractor to abstract discrete data from textual reports from a number of 'machine generated' sources. To validate this package, we created a pulmonary function test data mart and analyzed the quality of the data mart versus manual chart review. Eleven variables from pulmonary function tests performed closest to the initial clinical evaluation date were studied for 100 randomly selected subjects with scleroderma. One research assistant manually reviewed, abstracted, and entered relevant data into a database. Correlation with data obtained from the automated pulmonary function test data mart within the Northwestern Medical Enterprise Data Warehouse was determined. There was a near perfect (99.5%) agreement between results generated from the Regextractor package and those obtained via manual chart abstraction. The pulmonary function test data mart has been used subsequently to monitor disease progression of patients in the Northwestern Scleroderma Registry. In addition to the pulmonary function test example presented in this manuscript, the Regextractor package has been used to create cardiac catheterization and echocardiography data marts. The Regextractor package was released as open source software in October 2009 and has been downloaded 552 times as of 6/1/2012. Collaboration between clinical researchers and biomedical informatics experts enabled the development and validation of a tool (Regextractor) to parse, abstract and assemble structured data from text data contained in the electronic health

  5. Text data extraction for a prospective, research-focused data mart: implementation and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinchcliff Monique

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translational research typically requires data abstracted from medical records as well as data collected specifically for research. Unfortunately, many data within electronic health records are represented as text that is not amenable to aggregation for analyses. We present a scalable open source SQL Server Integration Services package, called Regextractor, for including regular expression parsers into a classic extract, transform, and load workflow. We have used Regextractor to abstract discrete data from textual reports from a number of ‘machine generated’ sources. To validate this package, we created a pulmonary function test data mart and analyzed the quality of the data mart versus manual chart review. Methods Eleven variables from pulmonary function tests performed closest to the initial clinical evaluation date were studied for 100 randomly selected subjects with scleroderma. One research assistant manually reviewed, abstracted, and entered relevant data into a database. Correlation with data obtained from the automated pulmonary function test data mart within the Northwestern Medical Enterprise Data Warehouse was determined. Results There was a near perfect (99.5% agreement between results generated from the Regextractor package and those obtained via manual chart abstraction. The pulmonary function test data mart has been used subsequently to monitor disease progression of patients in the Northwestern Scleroderma Registry. In addition to the pulmonary function test example presented in this manuscript, the Regextractor package has been used to create cardiac catheterization and echocardiography data marts. The Regextractor package was released as open source software in October 2009 and has been downloaded 552 times as of 6/1/2012. Conclusions Collaboration between clinical researchers and biomedical informatics experts enabled the development and validation of a tool (Regextractor to parse, abstract and assemble

  6. HZETRN radiation transport validation using balloon-based experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, James E.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2018-05-01

    The deterministic radiation transport code HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport) was developed by NASA to study the effects of cosmic radiation on astronauts and instrumentation shielded by various materials. This work presents an analysis of computed differential flux from HZETRN compared with measurement data from three balloon-based experiments over a range of atmospheric depths, particle types, and energies. Model uncertainties were quantified using an interval-based validation metric that takes into account measurement uncertainty both in the flux and the energy at which it was measured. Average uncertainty metrics were computed for the entire dataset as well as subsets of the measurements (by experiment, particle type, energy, etc.) to reveal any specific trends of systematic over- or under-prediction by HZETRN. The distribution of individual model uncertainties was also investigated to study the range and dispersion of errors beyond just single scalar and interval metrics. The differential fluxes from HZETRN were generally well-correlated with balloon-based measurements; the median relative model difference across the entire dataset was determined to be 30%. The distribution of model uncertainties, however, revealed that the range of errors was relatively broad, with approximately 30% of the uncertainties exceeding ± 40%. The distribution also indicated that HZETRN systematically under-predicts the measurement dataset as a whole, with approximately 80% of the relative uncertainties having negative values. Instances of systematic bias for subsets of the data were also observed, including a significant underestimation of alpha particles and protons for energies below 2.5 GeV/u. Muons were found to be systematically over-predicted at atmospheric depths deeper than 50 g/cm2 but under-predicted for shallower depths. Furthermore, a systematic under-prediction of alpha particles and protons was observed below the geomagnetic cutoff, suggesting that

  7. Detailed validation in PCDDF analysis. ISO17025 data from Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernick Carvalhaes, G.; Azevedo, J.A.; Azevedo, G.; Machado, M.; Brooks, P. [Analytical Solutions, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2004-09-15

    When we define validation method we can use the ISO standard 8402, in reference to this, 'validation' is the 'confirmation by the examination and supplying of objective evidences that the particular requirements for a specific intended use are fulfilled'. This concept is extremely important to guarantee the quality of results. Validation method is based on the combined use of different validation procedures, but in this selection we have to analyze the cost benefit conditions. We must focus on the critical elements, and these critical factors must be the essential elements for providing good properties and results. If we have a solid validation methodology and a research of the source of uncertainty of our analytical method, we can generate results with confidence and veracity. When analyzing these two considerations, validation method and uncertainty calculations, we found out that there are very few articles and papers about these subjects, and it is even more difficult to find such materials on dioxins and furans. This short paper describes a validation and uncertainty calculation methodology using traditional studies with a few adaptations, yet it shows a new idea of recovery study as a source of uncertainty.

  8. Automatic, semi-automatic and manual validation of urban drainage data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branisavljević, N; Prodanović, D; Pavlović, D

    2010-01-01

    Advances in sensor technology and the possibility of automated long distance data transmission have made continuous measurements the preferable way of monitoring urban drainage processes. Usually, the collected data have to be processed by an expert in order to detect and mark the wrong data, remove them and replace them with interpolated data. In general, the first step in detecting the wrong, anomaly data is called the data quality assessment or data validation. Data validation consists of three parts: data preparation, validation scores generation and scores interpretation. This paper will present the overall framework for the data quality improvement system, suitable for automatic, semi-automatic or manual operation. The first two steps of the validation process are explained in more detail, using several validation methods on the same set of real-case data from the Belgrade sewer system. The final part of the validation process, which is the scores interpretation, needs to be further investigated on the developed system.

  9. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    conservatism in the existing DWPF safety controls be removed by improving the existing measured-vs.-true gas temperature correlation used in the melter vapor space combustion calculations. The basis for this recommendation comes from the fact that the existing correlation was developed by linearly extrapolating the SGM data taken over a relatively narrow temperature range down to the safety basis minimum of 460°C, thereby under predicting the true gas temperature considerably, as documented in this report. Specifically, the task of improving the current temperature correlation will involve; (1) performing a similar heat/mass balance analysis used in this study on actual DWPF data, (2) validating the measured-vs.-true gas temperature correlation for the CEF developed in this study against the DWPF melter heat/mass balance results, and (3) making adjustments to the CEF correlation, if necessary, before incorporating it into the DWPF safety basis calculations. The steps described here can be completed with relatively minimum efforts.

  10. 75 FR 59294 - Comment Request for Information Collection for The Data Validation Requirement for Employment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... and reliable information on program activities and outcomes is available. Data validation is intended... handbooks provide detailed information on software installation, building and importing a validation file... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information...

  11. The tissue microarray data exchange specification: A document type definition to validate and enhance XML data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohle, David G; Ayers, Leona W

    2005-01-01

    Background The Association for Pathology Informatics (API) Extensible Mark-up Language (XML) TMA Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) proposed in April 2003 provides a community-based, open source tool for sharing tissue microarray (TMA) data in a common format. Each tissue core within an array has separate data including digital images; therefore an organized, common approach to produce, navigate and publish such data facilitates viewing, sharing and merging TMA data from different laboratories. The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR) is a HIV/AIDS tissue bank consortium sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD). The ACSR offers HIV-related malignancies and uninfected control tissues in microarrays (TMA) accompanied by de-identified clinical data to approved researchers. Exporting our TMA data into the proposed API specified format offers an opportunity to evaluate the API specification in an applied setting and to explore its usefulness. Results A document type definition (DTD) that governs the allowed common data elements (CDE) in TMA DES export XML files was written, tested and evolved and is in routine use by the ACSR. This DTD defines TMA DES CDEs which are implemented in an external file that can be supplemented by internal DTD extensions for locally defined TMA data elements (LDE). Conclusion ACSR implementation of the TMA DES demonstrated the utility of the specification and allowed application of a DTD to validate the language of the API specified XML elements and to identify possible enhancements within our TMA data management application. Improvements to the specification have additionally been suggested by our experience in importing other institution's exported TMA data. Enhancements to TMA DES to remove ambiguous situations and clarify the data should be considered. Better specified identifiers and hierarchical relationships will make automatic use of the data possible. Our tool can be

  12. Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Validation on Legacy Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzari, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yuan, Haomin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kraus, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Solberg, Jerome [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ferencz, Robert M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    programs, especially at the design stage. Over the past five years, the Reactor Product Line has developed the integrated multi-physics code suite SHARP. The goal of developing such a tool is to perform multi-physics neutronics, thermal/fluid, and structural mechanics modeling of the components inside the full reactor core or portions of it with a user-specified fidelity. In particular SHARP contains high-fidelity single-physics codes Diablo for structural mechanics and Nek5000 for fluid mechanics calculations. Both codes are state-of-the-art, highly scalable tools that have been extensively validated. These tools form a strong basis on which to build a flow-induced vibration modeling capability. In this report we discuss one-way coupled calculations performed with Nek5000 and Diablo aimed at simulating available FIV experiments in helical steam generators in the turbulent buffeting regime. In this regime one-way coupling is judged sufficient because the pressure loads do not cause substantial displacements. It is also the most common source of vibration in helical steam generators at the low flows expected in integral PWRs. The legacy data is obtained from two datasets developed at Argonne and B&W.

  13. Validation of MIPAS-ENVISAT NO2 operational data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ruhnke

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS instrument was launched aboard the environmental satellite ENVISAT into its sun-synchronous orbit on 1 March 2002. The short-lived species NO2 is one of the key target products of MIPAS that are operationally retrieved from limb emission spectra measured in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Within the MIPAS validation activities, a large number of independent observations from balloons, satellites and ground-based stations have been compared to European Space Agency (ESA version 4.61 operational NO2 data comprising the time period from July 2002 until March 2004 where MIPAS measured with full spectral resolution. Comparisons between MIPAS and balloon-borne observations carried out in 2002 and 2003 in the Arctic, at mid-latitudes, and in the tropics show a very good agreement below 40 km altitude with a mean deviation of roughly 3%, virtually without any significant bias. The comparison to ACE satellite observations exhibits only a small negative bias of MIPAS which appears not to be significant. The independent satellite instruments HALOE, SAGE II, and POAM III confirm in common for the spring-summer time period a negative bias of MIPAS in the Arctic and a positive bias in the Antarctic middle and upper stratosphere exceeding frequently the combined systematic error limits. In contrast to the ESA operational processor, the IMK/IAA retrieval code allows accurate inference of NO2 volume mixing ratios under consideration of all important non-LTE processes. Large differences between both retrieval results appear especially at higher altitudes, above about 50 to 55 km. These differences might be explained at least partly by non-LTE under polar winter conditions but not at mid-latitudes. Below this altitude region mean differences between both processors remain within 5% (during night and up to 10% (during day under undisturbed (September 2002 conditions and up to 40% under perturbed

  14. Integrated Syntactic/Semantic XML Data Validation with a Reusable Software Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golikov, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Data integration is a critical component of enterprise system integration, and XML data validation is the foundation for sound data integration of XML-based information systems. Since B2B e-commerce relies on data validation as one of the critical components for enterprise integration, it is imperative for financial industries and e-commerce…

  15. Hanford Environmental Restoration data validation process for chemical and radiochemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.R.; Bechtold, R.A.; Clark, D.E.; Angelos, K.M.; Winter, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Detailed procedures for validation of chemical and radiochemical data are used to assure consistent application of validation principles and support a uniform database of quality environmental data. During application of these procedures, it was determined that laboratory data packages were frequently missing certain types of documentation causing subsequent delays in meeting critical milestones in the completion of validation activities. A quality improvement team was assembled to address the problems caused by missing documentation and streamline the entire process. The result was the development of a separate data package verification procedure and revisions to the data validation procedures. This has resulted in a system whereby deficient data packages are immediately identified and corrected prior to validation and revised validation procedures which more closely match the common analytical reporting practices of laboratory service vendors

  16. Validating Smoking Data From the Veteran’s Affairs Health Factors Dataset, an Electronic Data Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Cynthia A.; Skanderson, Melissa; Justice, Amy C.; Shahrir, Shahida; Butt, Adeel A.; Brown, Sheldon T.; Freiberg, Matthew S.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Kim, Joon Woo; Pisani, Margaret A.; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Sico, Jason J.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Crothers, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: We assessed smoking data from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic medical record (EMR) Health Factors dataset. Methods: To assess the validity of the EMR Health Factors smoking data, we first created an algorithm to convert text entries into a 3-category smoking variable (never, former, and current). We compared this EMR smoking variable to 2 different sources of patient self-reported smoking survey data: (a) 6,816 HIV-infected and -uninfected participants in the 8-site Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS-8) and (b) a subset of 13,689 participants from the national VACS Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC), who also completed the 1999 Large Health Study (LHS) survey. Sensitivity, specificity, and kappa statistics were used to evaluate agreement of EMR Health Factors smoking data with self-report smoking data. Results: For the EMR Health Factors and VACS-8 comparison of current, former, and never smoking categories, the kappa statistic was .66. For EMR Health Factors and VACS-VC/LHS comparison of smoking, the kappa statistic was .61. Conclusions: Based on kappa statistics, agreement between the EMR Health Factors and survey sources is substantial. Identification of current smokers nationally within the VHA can be used in future studies to track smoking status over time, to evaluate smoking interventions, and to adjust for smoking status in research. Our methodology may provide insights for other organizations seeking to use EMR data for accurate determination of smoking status. PMID:21911825

  17. Small Scale Variability and the Problem of Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, L. C.; Avallone, L.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Numerous measurements taken with a variety of airborne, balloon borne and ground based instruments over the past decade have revealed a complex multiscaled 3D structure in both chemical and dynamical fields in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. The variability occurs on scales that are well below the resolution of satellite measurements, leading to problems in measurement validation. We discuss some statistical ideas that can shed some light on the contribution of the natural variability to the inevitable differences in correlative measurements that are not strictly colocated, or that have different spatial resolution.

  18. A guide to reliability data collection, validation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, B.

    1986-01-01

    The EuReDatA Working Group produced a basic document that addressed many of the problems associated with the design of a suitable data collection scheme to achieve pre-defined objectives. The book that resulted from this work describes the need for reliability data, data sources and collection procedures, component description and classification, form design, data management, updating and checking procedures, the estimation of failure rates, availability and utilisation factors, and uncertainties in reliability parameters. (DG)

  19. Validation Data Acquisition in HTTF during PCC Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardet, Philippe [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2018-02-07

    A validation experimental campaign was conducted in an Integral Effect Test (IET) facility of High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR), the High-Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) at Oregon State University (OSU). The HTTF simulates Depressurized and Pressurized Conduction Cooldowns (DCC and PCC). This campaign required the development of a new laser spectroscopic diagnostic to measure velocity in the challenging conditions of the HTTF: low speed (~1 m/s) gas flows at HTGR prototypical temperature and 1/10th pressure. This was a collaborative effort between co-PIs at The George Washington University (GW), Oregon State University (OSU), and NASA Langley Research Center. The main accomplishments of this project include the record for dynamic range for velocimetry, highest accuracy obtained with this technique, successful deployment in an IET leading to new validation matrix for CFD. These are detailed below and in manuscript appended to this executive summary. For this project, we introduced a new class of laser spectroscopic diagnostics to Thermal-Hydraulics to measure velocity of gases; furthermore, the diagnostic was demonstrated in-situ in an IET during DCC events. In such scenarios, particles used in mainstream techniques, like Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are not appropriate as they settle down too rapidly and also contaminate the experimental facility. Molecular tracers stay mixed within the working gas and can seed the flow in a technique called Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV). In MTV a molecular tracer is photo-dissociated by a first (write) laser into radicals or molecules. The pattern created by the write laser is then interrogated with planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), the read pulse(s), which are recorded with a camera. The pattern is probed and matched at two times (interval or probe time, dt), resulting in a time-of-flight velocimetry technique. This project demonstrated a new application range for MTV in gases. MTV has been extensively used

  20. Likelihood ratio data to report the validation of a forensic fingerprint evaluation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ramos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Data to which the authors refer to throughout this article are likelihood ratios (LR computed from the comparison of 5–12 minutiae fingermarks with fingerprints. These LRs data are used for the validation of a likelihood ratio (LR method in forensic evidence evaluation. These data present a necessary asset for conducting validation experiments when validating LR methods used in forensic evidence evaluation and set up validation reports. These data can be also used as a baseline for comparing the fingermark evidence in the same minutiae configuration as presented in (D. Meuwly, D. Ramos, R. Haraksim, [1], although the reader should keep in mind that different feature extraction algorithms and different AFIS systems used may produce different LRs values. Moreover, these data may serve as a reproducibility exercise, in order to train the generation of validation reports of forensic methods, according to [1]. Alongside the data, a justification and motivation for the use of methods is given. These methods calculate LRs from the fingerprint/mark data and are subject to a validation procedure. The choice of using real forensic fingerprint in the validation and simulated data in the development is described and justified. Validation criteria are set for the purpose of validation of the LR methods, which are used to calculate the LR values from the data and the validation report. For privacy and data protection reasons, the original fingerprint/mark images cannot be shared. But these images do not constitute the core data for the validation, contrarily to the LRs that are shared.

  1. Validation of Cloud Properties From Multiple Satellites Using CALIOP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Christopher R.; Minnis, Patrick; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Heck, Patrick W.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Trepte, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Langley Satellite ClOud and Radiative Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) is routinely applied to multispectral imagery from several geostationary and polar-orbiting imagers to retrieve cloud properties for weather and climate applications. Validation of the retrievals with independent datasets is continuously ongoing in order to understand differences caused by calibration, spatial resolution, viewing geometry, and other factors. The CALIOP instrument provides a decade of detailed cloud observations which can be used to evaluate passive imager retrievals of cloud boundaries, thermodynamic phase, cloud optical depth, and water path on a global scale. This paper focuses on comparisons of CALIOP retrievals to retrievals from MODIS, VIIRS, AVHRR, GOES, SEVIRI, and MTSAT. CALIOP is particularly skilled at detecting weakly-scattering cirrus clouds with optical depths less than approx. 0.5. These clouds are often undetected by passive imagers and the effect this has on the property retrievals is discussed.

  2. Validation of moderator-level reactivity coefficient using station data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younis, M.; Martchouk, I., E-mail: mohamed.younis@amecfw.com, E-mail: iouri.martchouk@amecfw.com [Amec Foster Wheeler, Toronto, ON (Canada); Buchan, P.D., E-mail: david.buchan@opg.com [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    The reactivity effect due to variations in the moderator level has been recognized as a reactor physics phenomenon of importance during normal operation and accident analysis. The moderator-level reactivity coefficient is an important parameter in safety analysis of CANDU reactors, e.g., during Loss of Moderator Heat Sink as well as in the simulation of Reactor Regulating System action in CANDU reactors that use moderator level for reactivity control. This paper presents the results of the validation exercise of the reactor-physics toolset using the measurements performed in Pickering Unit 4 in 2003. The capability of the code suite of predicting moderator-level reactivity effect was tested by comparing measured and predicted reactor-physics parameters. (author)

  3. [Data validation methods and discussion on Chinese materia medica resource survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Ma, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Guo, Lan-Ping; Wang, Xing-Xing

    2013-07-01

    From the beginning of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources, there were 22 provinces have conducted pilots. The survey teams have reported immense data, it put forward the very high request to the database system construction. In order to ensure the quality, it is necessary to check and validate the data in database system. Data validation is important methods to ensure the validity, integrity and accuracy of census data. This paper comprehensively introduce the data validation system of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources database system, and further improve the design idea and programs of data validation. The purpose of this study is to promote the survey work smoothly.

  4. Validating emergency department vital signs using a data quality engine for data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes, N; Chandra, D; Ellis, S; Baumlin, K

    2013-01-01

    Vital signs in our emergency department information system were entered into free-text fields for heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, temperature and oxygen saturation. We sought to convert these text entries into a more useful form, for research and QA purposes, upon entry into a data warehouse. We derived a series of rules and assigned quality scores to the transformed values, conforming to physiologic parameters for vital signs across the age range and spectrum of illness seen in the emergency department. Validating these entries revealed that 98% of free-text data had perfect quality scores, conforming to established vital sign parameters. Average vital signs varied as expected by age. Degradations in quality scores were most commonly attributed logging temperature in Fahrenheit instead of Celsius; vital signs with this error could still be transformed for use. Errors occurred more frequently during periods of high triage, though error rates did not correlate with triage volume. In developing a method for importing free-text vital sign data from our emergency department information system, we now have a data warehouse with a broad array of quality-checked vital signs, permitting analysis and correlation with demographics and outcomes.

  5. Improving Agent Based Models and Validation through Data Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Marek; Demianyk, Bryan C P; Friesen, Marcia R; McLeod, Robert D; Mukhi, Shamir N

    2011-01-01

    This work is contextualized in research in modeling and simulation of infection spread within a community or population, with the objective to provide a public health and policy tool in assessing the dynamics of infection spread and the qualitative impacts of public health interventions. This work uses the integration of real data sources into an Agent Based Model (ABM) to simulate respiratory infection spread within a small municipality. Novelty is derived in that the data sources are not necessarily obvious within ABM infection spread models. The ABM is a spatial-temporal model inclusive of behavioral and interaction patterns between individual agents on a real topography. The agent behaviours (movements and interactions) are fed by census / demographic data, integrated with real data from a telecommunication service provider (cellular records) and person-person contact data obtained via a custom 3G Smartphone application that logs Bluetooth connectivity between devices. Each source provides data of varying type and granularity, thereby enhancing the robustness of the model. The work demonstrates opportunities in data mining and fusion that can be used by policy and decision makers. The data become real-world inputs into individual SIR disease spread models and variants, thereby building credible and non-intrusive models to qualitatively simulate and assess public health interventions at the population level.

  6. Kepler Data Validation I: Architecture, Diagnostic Tests, and Data Products for Vetting Transiting Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Giroud, Forrest; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Seader, Shawn E.; Tennenbaum, Peter; hide

    2018-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was designed to identify and characterize transiting planets in the Kepler Field of View and to determine their occurrence rates. Emphasis was placed on identification of Earth-size planets orbiting in the Habitable Zone of their host stars. Science data were acquired for a period of four years. Long-cadence data with 29.4 min sampling were obtained for approx. 200,000 individual stellar targets in at least one observing quarter in the primary Kepler Mission. Light curves for target stars are extracted in the Kepler Science Data Processing Pipeline, and are searched for transiting planet signatures. A Threshold Crossing Event is generated in the transit search for targets where the transit detection threshold is exceeded and transit consistency checks are satisfied. These targets are subjected to further scrutiny in the Data Validation (DV) component of the Pipeline. Transiting planet candidates are characterized in DV, and light curves are searched for additional planets after transit signatures are modeled and removed. A suite of diagnostic tests is performed on all candidates to aid in discrimination between genuine transiting planets and instrumental or astrophysical false positives. Data products are generated per target and planet candidate to document and display transiting planet model fit and diagnostic test results. These products are exported to the Exoplanet Archive at the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, and are available to the community. We describe the DV architecture and diagnostic tests, and provide a brief overview of the data products. Transiting planet modeling and the search for multiple planets on individual targets are described in a companion paper. The final revision of the Kepler Pipeline code base is available to the general public through GitHub. The Kepler Pipeline has also been modified to support the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission which is expected to commence in 2018.

  7. Kepler Data Validation I—Architecture, Diagnostic Tests, and Data Products for Vetting Transiting Planet Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Girouard, Forrest; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Seader, Shawn E.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wohler, Bill; Bryson, Stephen T.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Christopher E.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.

    2018-06-01

    The Kepler Mission was designed to identify and characterize transiting planets in the Kepler Field of View and to determine their occurrence rates. Emphasis was placed on identification of Earth-size planets orbiting in the Habitable Zone of their host stars. Science data were acquired for a period of four years. Long-cadence data with 29.4 min sampling were obtained for ∼200,000 individual stellar targets in at least one observing quarter in the primary Kepler Mission. Light curves for target stars are extracted in the Kepler Science Data Processing Pipeline, and are searched for transiting planet signatures. A Threshold Crossing Event is generated in the transit search for targets where the transit detection threshold is exceeded and transit consistency checks are satisfied. These targets are subjected to further scrutiny in the Data Validation (DV) component of the Pipeline. Transiting planet candidates are characterized in DV, and light curves are searched for additional planets after transit signatures are modeled and removed. A suite of diagnostic tests is performed on all candidates to aid in discrimination between genuine transiting planets and instrumental or astrophysical false positives. Data products are generated per target and planet candidate to document and display transiting planet model fit and diagnostic test results. These products are exported to the Exoplanet Archive at the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, and are available to the community. We describe the DV architecture and diagnostic tests, and provide a brief overview of the data products. Transiting planet modeling and the search for multiple planets on individual targets are described in a companion paper. The final revision of the Kepler Pipeline code base is available to the general public through GitHub. The Kepler Pipeline has also been modified to support the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Mission which is expected to commence in 2018.

  8. Screening and validation of EXTraS data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpano, Stefania; Haberl, F.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.: Israel, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Belfiore, A.; Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Wilms, J.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Law-Green, D.

    2015-09-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) is aimed at fullyexploring the serendipitous content of the XMM-Newton EPIC database in the timedomain. The project is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany). The several tasks consist in characterise aperiodicvariability for all 3XMM sources, search for short-term periodic variability on hundreds of thousands sources, detect new transient sources that are missed by standard source detection and hence not belonging to the 3XMM catalogue, search for long term variability by measuring fluxes or upper limits for both pointed and slew observations, and finally perform multiwavelength characterisation andclassification. Screening and validation of the different products is essentially in order to reject flawed results, generated by the automatic pipelines. We present here the screening tool we developed in the form of a Graphical User Interface and our plans for a systematic screening of the different catalogues.

  9. CRED Optical Validation Data in the Auau Channel, Hawaii, 2007, to Support Benthic Habitat Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Optical validation data were collected using a RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL). Data were...

  10. ACE-FTS version 3.0 data set: validation and data processing update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Waymark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12 August 2003, the Canadian-led Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE was launched into a 74° inclination orbit at 650 km with the mission objective to measure atmospheric composition using infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy (Bernath et al. 2005. The ACE mission consists of two main instruments, ACE-FTS and MAESTRO (McElroy et al. 2007, which are being used to investigate the chemistry and dynamics of the Earth’s atmosphere.  Here, we focus on the high resolution (0.02 cm-1 infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS, that measures in the 750-4400 cm-1 (2.2 to 13.3 µm spectral region.  This instrument has been making regular solar occultation observations for more than nine years.  The current ACE-FTS data version (version 3.0 provides profiles of temperature and volume mixing ratios (VMRs of more than 30 atmospheric trace gas species, as well as 20 subsidiary isotopologues of the most abundant trace atmospheric constituents over a latitude range of ~85°N to ~85°S.  This letter describes the current data version and recent validation comparisons and provides a description of our planned updates for the ACE-FTS data set. [...

  11. Validation of new cross section data for the Loviisa reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusisto, J.

    1995-01-01

    The cross section data used with HEXBU-3D/MOD 5 core simulator code in the reload design calculations of the Loviisa reactors is revised. The new data was calculated with CASMO-HEX code using library based mainly on ENDF/B-IV. The new data is tested against measurements representing both current type low leakage reduced cores and original type full size cores with out-in-in loading patterns. Reactivity coefficients, boron concentration as a function of cycle burnup and assemblywise power distributions are compared to measurements. Slight adjustments are made so that good results are obtained for current type low leakage cores. When the data is applied to initial cores with out-in-in loading pattern some deviations are observed. (orig.) (4 refs., 18 figs.)

  12. Experimental validation of incomplete data CT image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hsiao, M.L.; Tam, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray CT inspection of large metal parts is often limited by x-ray penetration problems along many of the ray paths required for a complete CT data set. In addition, because of the complex geometry of many industrial parts, manipulation difficulties often prevent scanning over some range of angles. CT images reconstructed from these incomplete data sets contain a variety of artifacts which limit their usefulness in part quality determination. Over the past several years, the authors' company has developed 2 new methods of incorporating a priori information about the parts under inspection to significantly improve incomplete data CT image quality. This work reviews the methods which were developed and presents experimental results which confirm the effectiveness of the techniques. The new methods for dealing with incomplete CT data sets rely on a priori information from part blueprints (in electronic form), outer boundary information from touch sensors, estimates of part outer boundaries from available x-ray data, and linear x-ray attenuation coefficients of the part. The two methods make use of this information in different fashions. The relative performance of the two methods in detecting various flaw types is compared. Methods for accurately registering a priori information with x-ray data are also described. These results are critical to a new industrial x-ray inspection cell built for inspection of large aircraft engine parts

  13. Raw-data display and visual reconstruction validation in ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadel, M

    2008-01-01

    ALICE Event Visualization Environment (AliEVE) is based on ROOT and its GUI, 2D and 3D graphics classes. A small application kernel provides for registration and management of visualization objects. CINT scripts are used as an extensible mechanism for data extraction, selection and processing as well as for steering of frequent event-related tasks. AliEVE is used for event visualization in offline and high-level trigger frameworks. Mechanisms and base-classes provided for visual representation of raw-data for different detector-types are described. Common infrastructure for thresholding and color-coding of signal/time information, placement of detector-modules in various 2D/3D layouts and for user-interaction with displayed data is presented. Methods for visualization of raw-data on different levels of detail are discussed as they are expected to play an important role during early detector operation with poorly understood detector calibration, occupancy and noise-levels. Since September 2006 ALICE applies a regular visual-scanning procedure to simulated proton-proton data to detect any shortcomings in cluster finding, tracking and primary and secondary vertex reconstruction. A high-level of interactivity is required to allow in-depth exploration of event-structure. Navigation back to simulation records is supported for debugging purposes. Standard 2D projections and transformations are available for clusters, tracks and simplified detector geometry

  14. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  15. Data Set for Emperical Validation of Double Skin Facade Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    During the recent years the attention to the double skin facade (DSF) concept has greatly increased. Nevertheless, the application of the concept depends on whether a reliable model for simulation of the DSF performance will be developed or pointed out. This is, however, not possible to do, until...... the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 34 Annex 43. This paper describes the full-scale outdoor experimental test facility ‘the Cube', where the experiments were conducted, the experimental set-up and the measurements procedure for the data sets. The empirical data is composed for the key-functioning modes...

  16. An interactive software package for validating satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.

    to be highly correlated (r = 0.75) with the satellite data. Very good correlation (r = 0.80) is obtained for wind speed measured from both Moored buoy and Autonomous Weather Station. Night time SSTs are found to be closer to the satellite values for wind speed...

  17. Benchmarking comparison and validation of MCNP photon interaction data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colling Bethany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to test available photoatomic data libraries for fusion relevant applications, comparing against experimental and computational neutronics benchmarks. Photon flux and heating was compared using the photon interaction data libraries (mcplib 04p, 05t, 84p and 12p. Suitable benchmark experiments (iron and water were selected from the SINBAD database and analysed to compare experimental values with MCNP calculations using mcplib 04p, 84p and 12p. In both the computational and experimental comparisons, the majority of results with the 04p, 84p and 12p photon data libraries were within 1σ of the mean MCNP statistical uncertainty. Larger differences were observed when comparing computational results with the 05t test photon library. The Doppler broadening sampling bug in MCNP-5 is shown to be corrected for fusion relevant problems through use of the 84p photon data library. The recommended libraries for fusion neutronics are 84p (or 04p with MCNP6 and 84p if using MCNP-5.

  18. Benchmarking comparison and validation of MCNP photon interaction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Bethany; Kodeli, I.; Lilley, S.; Packer, L. W.

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the research was to test available photoatomic data libraries for fusion relevant applications, comparing against experimental and computational neutronics benchmarks. Photon flux and heating was compared using the photon interaction data libraries (mcplib 04p, 05t, 84p and 12p). Suitable benchmark experiments (iron and water) were selected from the SINBAD database and analysed to compare experimental values with MCNP calculations using mcplib 04p, 84p and 12p. In both the computational and experimental comparisons, the majority of results with the 04p, 84p and 12p photon data libraries were within 1σ of the mean MCNP statistical uncertainty. Larger differences were observed when comparing computational results with the 05t test photon library. The Doppler broadening sampling bug in MCNP-5 is shown to be corrected for fusion relevant problems through use of the 84p photon data library. The recommended libraries for fusion neutronics are 84p (or 04p) with MCNP6 and 84p if using MCNP-5.

  19. Implementing an X-ray validation pipeline for the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Swanand; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of a validation pipeline, based on community recommendations, for future depositions of X-ray crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank is described. There is an increasing realisation that the quality of the biomacromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive needs to be assessed critically using established and powerful validation methods. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) organization has convened several Validation Task Forces (VTFs) to advise on the methods and standards that should be used to validate all of the entries already in the PDB as well as all structures that will be deposited in the future. The recommendations of the X-ray VTF are currently being implemented in a software pipeline. Here, ongoing work on this pipeline is briefly described as well as ways in which validation-related information could be presented to users of structural data

  20. Implementing an X-ray validation pipeline for the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, Swanand; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J., E-mail: gerard@ebi.ac.uk [EMBL–EBI, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-01

    The implementation of a validation pipeline, based on community recommendations, for future depositions of X-ray crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank is described. There is an increasing realisation that the quality of the biomacromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive needs to be assessed critically using established and powerful validation methods. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) organization has convened several Validation Task Forces (VTFs) to advise on the methods and standards that should be used to validate all of the entries already in the PDB as well as all structures that will be deposited in the future. The recommendations of the X-ray VTF are currently being implemented in a software pipeline. Here, ongoing work on this pipeline is briefly described as well as ways in which validation-related information could be presented to users of structural data.

  1. Using linked electronic data to validate algorithms for health outcomes in administrative databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Ju; Lee, Todd A; Pickard, Alan Simon; Shoaibi, Azadeh; Schumock, Glen T

    2015-08-01

    The validity of algorithms used to identify health outcomes in claims-based and administrative data is critical to the reliability of findings from observational studies. The traditional approach to algorithm validation, using medical charts, is expensive and time-consuming. An alternative method is to link the claims data to an external, electronic data source that contains information allowing confirmation of the event of interest. In this paper, we describe this external linkage validation method and delineate important considerations to assess the feasibility and appropriateness of validating health outcomes using this approach. This framework can help investigators decide whether to pursue an external linkage validation method for identifying health outcomes in administrative/claims data.

  2. Gaia Science Alerts: Early Validation Phase Data from Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Nicholas; Hodgkin, Simon; van Leeuwen, Floor

    2015-08-01

    The ESA Gaia satellite launched Dec 2013, and after successful completion of its in orbit commissioning in July 2014, begun routine operations, with the aim to accurately measure the astrometric and astrophysical properties of more than a billion stars in our Milky Way.As a significant by product of its observational scanning law, where each point on the sky is observed multiple times (~80 revisits on average) over the nominal 5 year mission, Gaia has significant utility in detecting new transients, both flux (e.g. Supernovae, Flare stars) and positional (e.g. Asteroids).We will present the current status of the Gaia Photometric Science Alerts (PSA) system that has been developed within the Gaia DPAC. The PSA pipeline provides a quick look analysis of the daily data stream from Gaia, and identifies new photometric alerts, from analysis of the object photometric and the low resolution spectro-photometric data. Via a set of filters, those identified as astrophysical in nature, are published to the community. The information provided currently includes positional and flux information.The Gaia Alerts working group has organised a significant early stage followup campaign, providing access to a wide variety of followup facilities. These have been used to provide classification spectra of the Gaia alert candidates, with the early phase data confirming that the alerts issued are indeed largely astrophysical transients, with only a small contamination rate.The presentation will address the early phase issues that have been addressed in localising and classifying alerts in the early phase of Gaia observations (for instance, how lack of early knowledge of the sky as seen by Gaia was mitigated by reference to external image data), and how the alert rate published by the PSA will ramp up towards the end of 2015, with the availability of more Gaia sky data.Information concerning the Gaia alerts system can be found at http://gaia.ac.uk/selected-gaia-science-alerts

  3. Vulnerability in Acquisition, Language Impairments in Dutch: Creating a VALID Data Archive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatter, J.; van Hout, R.; van den Heuvel, H.; Fikkert, P.; Baker, A.; de Jong, J.; Wijnen, F.; Sanders, E.; Trilsbeek, P.; Calzolari, N.; Choukri, K.; Declerck, T.; Maegaard, H.B.; Mariani, J.; Moreno, A.; Odijk, J.; Piperidis, S.

    2014-01-01

    The VALID Data Archive is an open multimedia data archive (under construction) with data from speakers suffering from language impairments. We report on a pilot project in the CLARIN-NL framework in which five data resources were curated. For all data sets concerned, written informed consent from

  4. An expert system for sensor data validation and malfunction detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.; Chandrasekaran, B.; Punch, W.F. III.

    1987-01-01

    During recent years, applications of expert systems in different fields of engineering have been under study throughout the world. At the Ohio State University, the theories developed by the Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research (LAIR) have been implemented for nuclear power plants and chemical processing systems. For nuclear power plants, these techniques have been further developed to reach diagnostic conclusions about malfunctions and faulty sensors, as well as to suggest corrective actions about the malfunctions. This paper concentrates on the AI applications to plant diagnosis and faulty sensor identifications. To achieve the above goals without adding extra sensors in a plant, the use of unlike sensor data (such as relationships between pressure and temperature in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)) and diagnostic conclusions about malfunctions as backups for suspicious sensors has been made. This extra evidence is readily available throughout the plant and is not generally used to backup suspicious sensor data in any manner

  5. Model Validation Against The Modelers’ Data Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Transportation GUI Graphical User Interface HF Hydrogen Fluoride LNG Liquefied Natural Gas LPG Liquefied Propane Gas MDA Modelers’ Data...composition. b) Eight trials; 1.5- to 6-min releases of liquefied propane gas ( LPG ) forming a boiling liquid pool on a water surface. Molecular weight and...water surface. The other eight Maplin Sands trials consist of 1.5- to 6-min releases of liquefied propane gas ( LPG ) forming a boiling liquid pool on a

  6. The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. History, data collection and validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, N; Rasmussen, S; Stenager, E

    2001-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry was formally established in 1956 but started operating in 1949 with a nationwide prevalence survey. Since then, the Registry has continued collecting data on new and old cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) or suspected MS from multiple sources. The Registry...... instrument for monitoring incidence and prevalence, analysing survival, performing genetic analysis, providing unselected patient samples for clinical analyses, performing case-control studies and prospective studies and estimating the need for treatment and care....

  7. An expert system for sensor data validation and malfunction detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power plant operation and monitoring in general is a complex task which requires a large number of sensors, alarms and displays. At any instant in time, the operator is required to make a judgment about the state of the plant and to react accordingly. During abnormal situations, operators are further burdened with time constraints. The possibility of an undetected faulty instrumentation line, adds to the complexity of operators' reasoning tasks. Failure of human operators to cope with the conceptual complexity of abnormal situations often leads to more serious malfunctions and further damages to plant (TMI-2 as an example). During these abnormalities, operators rely on the information provided by the plant sensors and associated alarms. Their usefulness however, is quickly diminished by their large number and the extremely difficult task of interpreting and comprehending the information provided by them. The need for an aid to assist the operator in interpreting the available data and diagnosis of problems is obvious. Recent work at the Ohio State University Laboratory of Artificial Intelligence Research (LAIR) and the nuclear engineering program has concentrated on the problem of diagnostic expert systems performance and their applicability to the nuclear power plant domain. There has also been concern about the diagnostic expert systems performance when using potentially invalid sensor data. Because of this research, an expert system has been developed that can perform diagnostic problem solving despite the existence of some conflicting data in the domain. This work has resulted in enhancement of a programming tool, that allows domain experts to create a diagnostic system that will be to some degree, tolerant of bad data while performing diagnosis. This expert system is described here

  8. A mixed methods inquiry into the validity of data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Erling Lundager; Nielsen, Dorthe B; Jensen, Laila N

    2008-01-01

    increased awareness and dialogue between researchers and farmers or other stakeholders about the background for data collection related to management and changes in management. By integrating quantitative and qualitative research methods in a mixed methods research approach, the researchers will improve...... greatly by adding a qualitative perspective to the quantitative approach as illustrated and discussed in this article. The combined approach requires, besides skills and interdisciplinary collaboration, also openness, reflection and scepticism from the involved scientists, but the benefits may be extended...

  9. Argonne National Laboratory, east hazardous waste shipment data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, C.; Graden, C.; Coveleskie, A.

    1995-09-01

    At the request of EM-331, the Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) is conducting an evaluation of data regarding past hazardous waste shipments from DOE sites to commercial TSDFs. The intent of the evaluation is to find out if, from 1984 to 1991, DOE sites could have shipped hazardous waste contaminated with DOE-added radioactivity to commercial TSDFs not licensed to receive radioactive material. A team visited Argonne National Laboratory, East (ANL-E) to find out if any data existed that would help to make such a determination at ANL-E. The team was unable to find any relevant data. The team interviewed personnel who worked in waste management at the time. All stated that ANL-E did not sample and analyze hazardous waste shipments for radioactivity. Waste generators at ANL-E relied on process knowledge to decide that their waste was not radioactive. Also, any item leaving a building where radioisotopes were used was surveyed using hand-held instrumentation. If radioactivity above the criteria in DOE Order 5400.5 was found, the item was considered radioactive. The only documentation still available is the paperwork filled out by the waste generator and initialed by a health physics technician to show no contamination was found. The team concludes that, since all waste shipped offsite was subjected at least once to health physics instrumentation scans, the waste shipped from ANL-E from 1984 to 1991 may be considered clean

  10. Test Data for USEPR Severe Accident Code Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe

    2007-05-01

    This document identifies data that can be used for assessing various models embodied in severe accident analysis codes. Phenomena considered in this document, which were limited to those anticipated to be of interest in assessing severe accidents in the USEPR developed by AREVA, include: • Fuel Heatup and Melt Progression • Reactor Coolant System (RCS) Thermal Hydraulics • In-Vessel Molten Pool Formation and Heat Transfer • Fuel/Coolant Interactions during Relocation • Debris Heat Loads to the Vessel • Vessel Failure • Molten Core Concrete Interaction (MCCI) and Reactor Cavity Plug Failure • Melt Spreading and Coolability • Hydrogen Control Each section of this report discusses one phenomenon of interest to the USEPR. Within each section, an effort is made to describe the phenomenon and identify what data are available modeling it. As noted in this document, models in US accident analysis codes (MAAP, MELCOR, and SCDAP/RELAP5) differ. Where possible, this report identifies previous assessments that illustrate the impact of modeling differences on predicting various phenomena. Finally, recommendations regarding the status of data available for modeling USEPR severe accident phenomena are summarized.

  11. An expert system for sensor data validation and malfunction detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power plant operation and monitoring in general is a complex task which requires a large number of sensors, alarms and displays. At any instant in time, the operator is required to make a judgment about the state of the plant and to react accordingly. During abnormal situations, operators are further burdened with time constraints. The possibility of an undetected faulty instrumentation line, adds to the complexity of operators' reasoning tasks. Recent work at The Ohio State University Laboratory of Artificial Intelligence Research (LAIR) and the nuclear engineering program has concentrated on the problem of diagnostic expert systems performance and their applicability to the nuclear power plant domain. The authors have also been concerned about the diagnostic expert systems performance when using potentially invalid sensor data. Because of this research, they have developed an expert system that can perform diagnostic problem solving despite the existence of some conflicting data in the domain. This work has resulted in enhancement of a programming tool, CSRL, that allows domain experts to create a diagnostic system that will be to some degree, tolerant of bad data while performing diagnosis. This expert system is described here

  12. Predicting interactions from mechanistic information: Can omic data validate theories?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgert, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    To address the most pressing and relevant issues for improving mixture risk assessment, researchers must first recognize that risk assessment is driven by both regulatory requirements and scientific research, and that regulatory concerns may expand beyond the purely scientific interests of researchers. Concepts of 'mode of action' and 'mechanism of action' are used in particular ways within the regulatory arena, depending on the specific assessment goals. The data requirements for delineating a mode of action and predicting interactive toxicity in mixtures are not well defined from a scientific standpoint due largely to inherent difficulties in testing certain underlying assumptions. Understanding the regulatory perspective on mechanistic concepts will be important for designing experiments that can be interpreted clearly and applied in risk assessments without undue reliance on extrapolation and assumption. In like fashion, regulators and risk assessors can be better equipped to apply mechanistic data if the concepts underlying mechanistic research and the limitations that must be placed on interpretation of mechanistic data are understood. This will be critically important for applying new technologies to risk assessment, such as functional genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. It will be essential not only for risk assessors to become conversant with the language and concepts of mechanistic research, including new omic technologies, but also, for researchers to become more intimately familiar with the challenges and needs of risk assessment

  13. cluML: A markup language for clustering and cluster validity assessment of microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakova, Nadia; Cunningham, Pádraig

    2005-01-01

    cluML is a new markup language for microarray data clustering and cluster validity assessment. The XML-based format has been designed to address some of the limitations observed in traditional formats, such as inability to store multiple clustering (including biclustering) and validation results within a dataset. cluML is an effective tool to support biomedical knowledge representation in gene expression data analysis. Although cluML was developed for DNA microarray analysis applications, it can be effectively used for the representation of clustering and for the validation of other biomedical and physical data that has no limitations.

  14. 48 CFR 252.227-7037 - Validation of restrictive markings on technical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... However, this clause neither creates nor implies privity of contract between the Government and... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.227-7037 Validation of restrictive markings on... following clause: Validation of Restrictive Markings on Technical Data (SEP 1999) (a) Definitions. The terms...

  15. Good validity of the international spinal cord injury quality of life basic data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, M. W. M.; Adriaansen, J. J. E.; Charlifue, S.; Biering-Sorensen, F.; van Asbeck, F. W. A.

    Study design: Cross-sectional validation study. Objectives: To examine the construct and concurrent validity of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Quality of Life (QoL) Basic Data Set. Setting: Dutch community. Participants: People 28-65 years of age, who obtained their SCI between 18 and 35

  16. Use of operational data for the validation of the SOPHT thermal-hydraulic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, S F; Martin, G; Shoukas, L; Siddiqui, Z; Phillips, B [Ontario Hydro, Bowmanville, ON (Canada). Darlington Nuclear Generating Station

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this paper is to describe the validation process of the SOPHT and MINI-SOPHT codes with the use of reactor operational data. The secondary objective is to illustrative the effectiveness of the code as a performance monitoring tool by discussing the discoveries that were made during the validation process. (author). 2 refs.

  17. Validity of thyroid cancer incidence data following the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2011-12-01

    The only clearly demonstrated cancer incidence increase that can be attributed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is thyroid carcinoma in patients exposed during childhood or adolescence. Significant increases in thyroid disease were observed as soon as 4 y after the accident. The solid/follicular subtype of papillary carcinoma predominated in the early period after the accident. Morphological diagnosis of cancer in such cases, if no infiltrative growth is clearly visible, depends mainly on the nuclear criteria. Outdated equipment and insufficient quality of histological specimens impeded reliable evaluation of the nuclear criteria. Access to foreign professional literature has always been limited in the former Soviet Union. The great number of advanced tumors observed shortly after the accident can be explained by the screening effect (detection of previously neglected cancers) and by the fact that many patients were brought from non-contaminated areas and registered as Chernobyl victims. It is also worth noting that exaggeration of the Chernobyl cancer statistics facilitated the writing of dissertations, financing of research, and assistance from outside the former Soviet Union. "Chernobyl hysteria" impeded nuclear energy production in some countries, thus contributing to higher prices for fossil fuel. The concluding point is that since post-Chernobyl cancers tend on average to be in a later stage of tumor progression, some published data on molecular or immunohistochemical characteristics of Chernobyl-related cancers require reevaluation.

  18. Fuel reprocessing data validation using the isotope correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.; Bucher, R.G.; Pond, R.B.; Cornella, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), in conjunction with the gravimetric (Pu/U ratio) method for mass determination, provides an independent verification of the input accountancy at the dissolver or accountancy stage of the reprocessing plant. The Isotope Correlation Technique has been applied to many classes of domestic and international reactor systems (light-water, heavy-water, and graphite reactors) operating in a variety of modes (power, research, and production reactors), and for a variety of reprocessing fuel cycle management strategies. Analysis of reprocessing operations data based on isotopic correlations derived for assemblies in a PWR environment and fuel management scheme, yielded differences between the measurement-derived and ICT-derived plutonium mass determinations of (- 0.02 ± 0.23)% for the measured U-235 and (+ 0.50 ± 0.31)% for the measured Pu-239, for a core campaign. The ICT analyses has been implemented for the plutonium isotopics in a depleted uranium assembly in a heavy-water, enriched uranium system and for the uranium isotopes in the fuel assemblies in light-water, highly-enriched systems

  19. Assessing the validity of commercial and municipal food environment data sets in Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daepp, Madeleine Ig; Black, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    The present study assessed systematic bias and the effects of data set error on the validity of food environment measures in two municipal and two commercial secondary data sets. Sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV) and concordance were calculated by comparing two municipal and two commercial secondary data sets with ground-truthed data collected within 800 m buffers surrounding twenty-six schools. Logistic regression examined associations of sensitivity and PPV with commercial density and neighbourhood socio-economic deprivation. Kendall's τ estimated correlations between density and proximity of food outlets near schools constructed with secondary data sets v. ground-truthed data. Vancouver, Canada. Food retailers located within 800 m of twenty-six schools RESULTS: All data sets scored relatively poorly across validity measures, although, overall, municipal data sets had higher levels of validity than did commercial data sets. Food outlets were more likely to be missing from municipal health inspections lists and commercial data sets in neighbourhoods with higher commercial density. Still, both proximity and density measures constructed from all secondary data sets were highly correlated (Kendall's τ>0·70) with measures constructed from ground-truthed data. Despite relatively low levels of validity in all secondary data sets examined, food environment measures constructed from secondary data sets remained highly correlated with ground-truthed data. Findings suggest that secondary data sets can be used to measure the food environment, although estimates should be treated with caution in areas with high commercial density.

  20. Validating data quality during wet weather monitoring of wastewater treatment plant influents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alferes, Janelcy; Lynggaard-Jensen, Anders; Munk-Nielsen, Thomas

    Efficient monitoring of water systems and proper use of the collected data in further applications such as modelling, forecasting influent water quality and real-time control depends on careful data quality control. Given the size of the data sets produced nowadays in online water quality...... monitoring schemes, automated data validation is the only feasible option. In this paper, software tools for automatic data quality assessment with a practical orientation are presented. The developments from three organizations ranging from simple to more complex methods for automated data validation...

  1. Validation of Satellite AOD Data with the Ground PM10 Data over Islamabad Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Gufran; Shahid, Imran

    2016-07-01

    health. In this study, concentrations of PM10 will be monitored at different sites in H-12 sector and Kashmir Highway Islamabad using High volume air sampler and its chemical characterization will be done using Energy Dispersive XRF. The first application of satellite remote sensing for aerosol monitoring began in the mid-1970s to detect the desert particles above the ocean using data from Landsat, GOES, and AVHRR remote sensing satellites. Maps of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over the ocean were produced using the 0.63 µm channel of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) . Aerosols properties were retrieved using AVHRR. The useable range of wavelengths of spectrum (shorter wavelengths and the longer wavelengths) for the remote sensing of the aerosols particles is mostly restricted due to ozone and gaseous absorptions. The purpose of the study is to validate the satellite Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data for the regional and local scale for Pakistan Objectives • To quantify the concentration of PM10 • To investigate their elemental composition • To find out their possible sources • Validation with MODIS satellite AOD Methodology: PM10 concentration will be measured at different sites of NUST Islamabad, Pakistan using High volume air sampler an Air sampling equipment capable of sampling high volumes of air (typically 57,000 ft3 or 1,600 m3) at high flow rates (typically 1.13 m3/min or 40 ft3/min) over an extended sampling duration (typically 24 hrs). The sampling period will be of 24 hours. Particles in the PM10 size range are then collected on the filter(s) during the specified 24-h sampling period. Each sample filter will be weighed before and after sampling to determine the net weight (mass) gain of the collected PM10 sample (40 CFR Part 50, Appendix M, US EPA). Next step will be the chemical characterization. Element concentrations will be determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique. The ED-XRF system uses an X-ray tube to

  2. Citizen science networks in natural history and the collective validation of biodiversity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnhout, Esther; Lawrence, Anna; Turnhout, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Biodiversity data are in increasing demand to inform policy and management. A substantial portion of these data is generated in citizen science networks. To ensure the quality of biodiversity data, standards and criteria for validation have been put in place. We used interviews and document analysis from the United Kingdom and The Netherlands to examine how data validation serves as a point of connection between the diverse people and practices in natural history citizen science networks. We found that rather than a unidirectional imposition of standards, validation was performed collectively. Specifically, it was enacted in ongoing circulations of biodiversity records between recorders and validators as they jointly negotiated the biodiversity that was observed and the validity of the records. These collective validation practices contributed to the citizen science character or natural history networks and tied these networks together. However, when biodiversity records were included in biodiversity-information initiatives on different policy levels and scales, the circulation of records diminished. These initiatives took on a more extractive mode of data use. Validation ceased to be collective with important consequences for the natural history networks involved and citizen science more generally. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. The Copernicus S5P Mission Performance Centre / Validation Data Analysis Facility for TROPOMI operational atmospheric data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, Steven; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Langerock, Bavo; Granville, José; Hubert, Daan; Keppens, Arno; Rasson, Olivier; De Mazière, Martine; Fjæraa, Ann Mari; Niemeijer, Sander

    2017-04-01

    Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P), to be launched in 2017 as the first atmospheric composition satellite of the Copernicus programme, carries as payload the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) developed by The Netherlands in close cooperation with ESA. Designed to measure Earth radiance and solar irradiance in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared, TROPOMI will provide Copernicus with observational data on atmospheric composition at unprecedented geographical resolution. The S5P Mission Performance Center (MPC) provides an operational service-based solution for various QA/QC tasks, including the validation of S5P Level-2 data products and the support to algorithm evolution. Those two tasks are to be accomplished by the MPC Validation Data Analysis Facility (VDAF), one MPC component developed and operated at BIRA-IASB with support from S[&]T and NILU. The routine validation to be ensured by VDAF is complemented by a list of validation AO projects carried out by ESA's S5P Validation Team (S5PVT), with whom interaction is essential. Here we will introduce the general architecture of VDAF, its relation to the other MPC components, the generic and specific validation strategies applied for each of the official TROPOMI data products, and the expected output of the system. The S5P data products to be validated by VDAF are diverse: O3 (vertical profile, total column, tropospheric column), NO2 (total and tropospheric column), HCHO (tropospheric column), SO2 (column), CO (column), CH4 (column), aerosol layer height and clouds (fractional cover, cloud-top pressure and optical thickness). Starting from a generic validation protocol meeting community-agreed standards, a set of specific validation settings is associated with each data product, as well as the appropriate set of Fiducial Reference Measurements (FRM) to which it will be compared. VDAF collects FRMs from ESA's Validation Data Centre (EVDC) and from other sources (e.g., WMO's GAW, NDACC and TCCON). Data

  4. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NASA ER-2 NAVIGATION DATA MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NASA ER-2 Navigation Data MC3E dataset contains information recorded by an on board navigation recorder (NavRec). In addition to typical...

  5. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NOAA UHF 449 PROFILER RAW DATA SPC FORMAT MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NOAA UHF 449 Profiler Raw Data SPC Format MC3E dataset was collected during the NASA supported Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds...

  6. Verification and Validation of FAARR Model and Data Envelopment Analysis Models for United States Army Recruiting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piskator, Gene

    1998-01-01

    ...) model and to develop a Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) modeling strategy. First, the FAARR model was verified using a simulation of a known production function and validated using sensitivity analysis and ex-post forecasts...

  7. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NOAA S-BAND PROFILER MINUTE DATA MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NOAA S-Band Profiler Minute Data MC3E dataset was gathered during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in...

  8. Determination of clouds in MSG data for the validation of clouds in a regional climate model

    OpenAIRE

    Huckle, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Regional climate models (e.g. CLM) can help to asses the influence of the antropogenic climate change on the different regions of the earth. Validation of these models is very important. Satellite data are of great benefit, as data on a global scale and high temporal resolution is available. In this thesis a cloud detection and object based cloud classification for Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) was developed and used to validate CLM clouds. Results show sometimes too many clouds in the CLM.

  9. Data validation summary report for the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit Round 8 Groundwater Sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, A.T.

    1996-03-01

    The information provided in this validation summary report includes data from the chemical analyses of samples from the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit Round 8 Groundwater Sampling Investigation. All of the data from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that the reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. Sample analyses included metals, general chemistry and radiochemistry

  10. Process data validation according VDI 2048 in conventional and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenstein, M.; Laipple, B.; Schmid, F.

    2004-01-01

    Process data validation according VDI 2048 in conventional and nuclear power plants is required for acceptance testing, process and component monitoring, and status-oriented maintenance. Once a validation system like VALI III has been certified according to VDI 2048, power plant owners can use the data obtained for efficiency increase. Further, all control variables can be adjusted so as to ensure maximum plant efficiency. (orig.)

  11. Likelihood ratio data to report the validation of a forensic fingerprint evaluation method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, Daniel; Haraksim, Rudolf; Meuwly, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Data to which the authors refer to throughout this article are likelihood ratios (LR) computed from the comparison of 5–12 minutiae fingermarks with fingerprints. These LRs data are used for the validation of a likelihood ratio (LR) method in forensic evidence evaluation. These data present a

  12. Implementing an X-ray validation pipeline for the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Swanand; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2012-04-01

    There is an increasing realisation that the quality of the biomacromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive needs to be assessed critically using established and powerful validation methods. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) organization has convened several Validation Task Forces (VTFs) to advise on the methods and standards that should be used to validate all of the entries already in the PDB as well as all structures that will be deposited in the future. The recommendations of the X-ray VTF are currently being implemented in a software pipeline. Here, ongoing work on this pipeline is briefly described as well as ways in which validation-related information could be presented to users of structural data.

  13. Good validity of the international spinal cord injury quality of life basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, M W M; Adriaansen, J J E; Charlifue, S

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional validation study. OBJECTIVES: To examine the construct and concurrent validity of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Quality of Life (QoL) Basic Data Set. SETTING: Dutch community. PARTICIPANTS: People 28-65 years of age, who obtained their SCI between 18...... and 35 years of age, were at least 10 years post SCI and were wheelchair users in daily life.Measure(s):The International SCI QoL Basic Data Set consists of three single items on satisfaction with life as a whole, physical health and psychological health (0=complete dissatisfaction; 10=complete...... and psychological health (0.70). CONCLUSIONS: This first validity study of the International SCI QoL Basic Data Set shows that it appears valid for persons with SCI....

  14. NPOESS Preparatory Project Validation Program for Atmsophere Data Products from VIIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, D.; Wong, E.

    2009-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite Suite (NPOESS) Program, in partnership with National Aeronautical Space Administration (NASA), will launch the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), a risk reduction and data continuity mission, prior to the first operational NPOESS launch. The NPOESS Program, in partnership with Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS), will execute the NPP Validation program to ensure the data products comply with the requirements of the sponsoring agencies. Data from the NPP Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) will be used to produce Environmental Data Records (EDR's) for aerosol and clouds, specifically Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), Aerosol Particle Size Parameter (APSP), and Suspended Matter (SM); and Cloud Optical Thickness (COT), Cloud Effective Particle Size (CEPS), Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Height (CTH) and Pressure (CTP), and Cloud Base Height (CBH). The Aerosol and Cloud EDR Validation Program is a multifaceted effort to characterize and validate these data products. The program involves systematic comparison to heritage data products, e.g., MODIS, and ground-based correlative data, such as AERONET and ARM data products, and potentially airborne field measurements. To the extent possible, the domain is global. The program leverages various investments that have and are continuing to be made by national funding agencies in such resources, as well as the operational user community and the broad Earth science user community. This presentation will provide an overview of the approaches, data and schedule for the validation of the NPP VIIRS Aerosol and Cloud environmental data products.

  15. Impacts of Sample Design for Validation Data on the Accuracy of Feedforward Neural Network Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles M. Foody

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Validation data are often used to evaluate the performance of a trained neural network and used in the selection of a network deemed optimal for the task at-hand. Optimality is commonly assessed with a measure, such as overall classification accuracy. The latter is often calculated directly from a confusion matrix showing the counts of cases in the validation set with particular labelling properties. The sample design used to form the validation set can, however, influence the estimated magnitude of the accuracy. Commonly, the validation set is formed with a stratified sample to give balanced classes, but also via random sampling, which reflects class abundance. It is suggested that if the ultimate aim is to accurately classify a dataset in which the classes do vary in abundance, a validation set formed via random, rather than stratified, sampling is preferred. This is illustrated with the classification of simulated and remotely-sensed datasets. With both datasets, statistically significant differences in the accuracy with which the data could be classified arose from the use of validation sets formed via random and stratified sampling (z = 2.7 and 1.9 for the simulated and real datasets respectively, for both p < 0.05%. The accuracy of the classifications that used a stratified sample in validation were smaller, a result of cases of an abundant class being commissioned into a rarer class. Simple means to address the issue are suggested.

  16. Validation of Simulation Codes for Future Systems: Motivations, Approach and the Role of Nuclear Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; G. Aliberti

    2007-01-01

    The validation of advanced simulation tools will still play a very significant role in several areas of reactor system analysis. This is the case of reactor physics and neutronics, where nuclear data uncertainties still play a crucial role for many core and fuel cycle parameters. The present paper gives a summary of validation motivations, objectives and approach. A validation effort is in particular necessary in the frame of advanced (e.g. Generation-IV or GNEP) reactors and associated fuel cycles assessment and design

  17. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, fifth round groundwater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukelich, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    The data from the chemical analysis of 68 samples from the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit Third Quarter 1993 Groundwater Sampling Investigation and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at the site. Sample analysis included inorganics and general chemical parameters. Fifty three samples were validated for radiochemical parameters

  18. Data validation report for the 100-KR-4 operable unit first quarter, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Samples were obtained from the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit first Quarter 1994 Groundwater Sampling event. The data from the chemical analysis of fifty-eight samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported samples results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. Information fro the sampling event and the information validation processes are presented in this document

  19. Data validation report for the 100-D Ponds Operable Unit: 100-D ponds sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovich, M.T.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that 100 percent of the Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-D Ponds Operable Unit Sampling Investigation. Therefore the data from the chemical analysis of all 30 samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site

  20. Validation of virtual instrument for data analysis in metrology of time and frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordao, Bruno; Quaresma, Daniel; Rocha, Pedro; Carvalho, Ricardo; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Commercial Software (CS) for collection, analysis and plot time and frequency data plots are being increasingly used in reference laboratories worldwide. With this, it has greatly improved the results of calculations of uncertainty for these values. We propose the creation of a collection of software and data analysis using Virtual Instruments (VI) developed the Primary Laboratory Time and frequency of the National Observatory - ON and validation of this instrument. To validate the instrument developed, it made a comparative analysis between the results obtained (VI) with the results obtained by (CS) widely used in many metrology laboratories. From these results we can conclude that there was equivalence between the analyzed data. (author)

  1. A new generation of crystallographic validation tools for the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Randy J; Adams, Paul D; Arendall, W Bryan; Brunger, Axel T; Emsley, Paul; Joosten, Robbie P; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Krissinel, Eugene B; Lütteke, Thomas; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Perrakis, Anastassis; Richardson, Jane S; Sheffler, William H; Smith, Janet L; Tickle, Ian J; Vriend, Gert; Zwart, Peter H

    2011-10-12

    This report presents the conclusions of the X-ray Validation Task Force of the worldwide Protein Data Bank (PDB). The PDB has expanded massively since current criteria for validation of deposited structures were adopted, allowing a much more sophisticated understanding of all the components of macromolecular crystals. The size of the PDB creates new opportunities to validate structures by comparison with the existing database, and the now-mandatory deposition of structure factors creates new opportunities to validate the underlying diffraction data. These developments highlighted the need for a new assessment of validation criteria. The Task Force recommends that a small set of validation data be presented in an easily understood format, relative to both the full PDB and the applicable resolution class, with greater detail available to interested users. Most importantly, we recommend that referees and editors judging the quality of structural experiments have access to a concise summary of well-established quality indicators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Internal Cluster Validation on Earthquake Data in the Province of Bengkulu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rini, D. S.; Novianti, P.; Fransiska, H.

    2018-04-01

    K-means method is an algorithm for cluster n object based on attribute to k partition, where k < n. There is a deficiency of algorithms that is before the algorithm is executed, k points are initialized randomly so that the resulting data clustering can be different. If the random value for initialization is not good, the clustering becomes less optimum. Cluster validation is a technique to determine the optimum cluster without knowing prior information from data. There are two types of cluster validation, which are internal cluster validation and external cluster validation. This study aims to examine and apply some internal cluster validation, including the Calinski-Harabasz (CH) Index, Sillhouette (S) Index, Davies-Bouldin (DB) Index, Dunn Index (D), and S-Dbw Index on earthquake data in the Bengkulu Province. The calculation result of optimum cluster based on internal cluster validation is CH index, S index, and S-Dbw index yield k = 2, DB Index with k = 6 and Index D with k = 15. Optimum cluster (k = 6) based on DB Index gives good results for clustering earthquake in the Bengkulu Province.

  3. Analysis and classification of data sets for calibration and validation of agro-ecosystem models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kersebaum, K C; Boote, K J; Jorgenson, J S

    2015-01-01

    Experimental field data are used at different levels of complexity to calibrate, validate and improve agro-ecosystem models to enhance their reliability for regional impact assessment. A methodological framework and software are presented to evaluate and classify data sets into four classes regar...

  4. Tools for the Validation of Genomes and Transcriptomes with Proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Aya, Carlos; Tay, Aidan

    data generated from protein mass spectrometry. We are developing a set of tools which allow users to: •Co-visualise genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data using the Integrated Genomics Viewer (IGV).1 •Validate the existence of genes and mRNAs using peptides identified from mass spectrometry...

  5. Internal validation of risk models in clustered data: a comparison of bootstrap schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, W.; Moons, K.G.M.; Kappen, T.H.; van Klei, W.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Eijkemans, M.J.C.; Vergouwe, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Internal validity of a risk model can be studied efficiently with bootstrapping to assess possible optimism in model performance. Assumptions of the regular bootstrap are violated when the development data are clustered. We compared alternative resampling schemes in clustered data for the estimation

  6. Implicit structural inversion of gravity data using linear programming, a validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon, A.T. van; Roy Chowdhury, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a regional scale gravity data set has been inverted to infer the structure (topography) of the top of the basement underlying sub-horizontal strata. We apply our method to this real data set for further proof of concept, validation and benchmarking against results from an earlier

  7. A New Statistical Method to Determine the Degree of Validity of Health Economic Model Outcomes against Empirical Data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corro Ramos, Isaac; van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Feenstra, Talitha L; Al, Maiwenn J

    2017-01-01

    The validation of health economic (HE) model outcomes against empirical data is of key importance. Although statistical testing seems applicable, guidelines for the validation of HE models lack guidance on statistical validation, and actual validation efforts often present subjective judgment of

  8. When Assessment Data Are Words: Validity Evidence for Qualitative Educational Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Kuper, Ayelet; Hatala, Rose; Ginsburg, Shiphra

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative scores fail to capture all important features of learner performance. This awareness has led to increased use of qualitative data when assessing health professionals. Yet the use of qualitative assessments is hampered by incomplete understanding of their role in forming judgments, and lack of consensus in how to appraise the rigor of judgments therein derived. The authors articulate the role of qualitative assessment as part of a comprehensive program of assessment, and translate the concept of validity to apply to judgments arising from qualitative assessments. They first identify standards for rigor in qualitative research, and then use two contemporary assessment validity frameworks to reorganize these standards for application to qualitative assessment.Standards for rigor in qualitative research include responsiveness, reflexivity, purposive sampling, thick description, triangulation, transparency, and transferability. These standards can be reframed using Messick's five sources of validity evidence (content, response process, internal structure, relationships with other variables, and consequences) and Kane's four inferences in validation (scoring, generalization, extrapolation, and implications). Evidence can be collected and evaluated for each evidence source or inference. The authors illustrate this approach using published research on learning portfolios.The authors advocate a "methods-neutral" approach to assessment, in which a clearly stated purpose determines the nature of and approach to data collection and analysis. Increased use of qualitative assessments will necessitate more rigorous judgments of the defensibility (validity) of inferences and decisions. Evidence should be strategically sought to inform a coherent validity argument.

  9. Validation of a case definition to define hypertension using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Hude; Khan, Nadia; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Tu, Karen; Chen, Guanmin; Campbell, Norm; Hill, Michael D; Ghali, William A; McAlister, Finlay A

    2009-12-01

    We validated the accuracy of case definitions for hypertension derived from administrative data across time periods (year 2001 versus 2004) and geographic regions using physician charts. Physician charts were randomly selected in rural and urban areas from Alberta and British Columbia, Canada, during years 2001 and 2004. Physician charts were linked with administrative data through unique personal health number. We reviewed charts of approximately 50 randomly selected patients >35 years of age from each clinic within 48 urban and 16 rural family physician clinics to identify physician diagnoses of hypertension during the years 2001 and 2004. The validity indices were estimated for diagnosed hypertension using 3 years of administrative data for the 8 case-definition combinations. Of the 3,362 patient charts reviewed, the prevalence of hypertension ranged from 18.8% to 33.3%, depending on the year and region studied. The administrative data hypertension definition of "2 claims within 2 years or 1 hospitalization" had the highest validity relative to the other definitions evaluated (sensitivity 75%, specificity 94%, positive predictive value 81%, negative predictive value 92%, and kappa 0.71). After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbid conditions, the sensitivities between regions, years, and provinces were not significantly different, but the positive predictive value varied slightly across geographic regions. These results provide evidence that administrative data can be used as a relatively valid source of data to define cases of hypertension for surveillance and research purposes.

  10. Applicability of U.S. Army tracer test data to model validation needs of ERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, D.L.; Minott, D.H.

    1976-06-01

    This report covers the first phase of an atmospheric dispersion model validation project sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The project will employ dispersion data generated during an extensive series of field tracer experiments that were part of a meteorological research program which was conducted by the U. S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, from the late 1950's to the early 1970's. The tests were conducted at several locations in the U. S., South America, Germany, and Norway chosen to typify the effects of certain environmental factors on atmospheric dispersion. The purpose of the Phase I work of this project was to identify applicable portions of the Army data, obtain and review that data, and make recommendations for its uses for atmospheric dispersion model validations. This report presents key information in three formats. The first is a tabular listing of the Army dispersion test reports summarizing the test data contained in each report. This listing is presented in six separate tables with each tabular list representing a different topical area that is based on model validation requirements and the nature of the Army data base. The second format for presenting key information is a series of discussions of the Army test information assigned to each of the six topical areas. These discussions relate the extent and quality of the available data, as well as its prospective use for model validation. The third format is a series of synopses for each Army test report

  11. Validation Data and Model Development for Fuel Assembly Response to Seismic Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardet, Philippe; Ricciardi, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Vibrations are inherently present in nuclear reactors, especially in cores and steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR). They can have significant effects on local heat transfer and wear and tear in the reactor and often set safety margins. The simulation of these multiphysics phenomena from first principles requires the coupling of several codes, which is one the most challenging task in modern computer simulation. Here an ambitious multiphysics multidisciplinary validation campaign is conducted. It relied on an integrated team of experimentalists and code developers to acquire benchmark and validation data for fluid-structure interaction codes. Data are focused on PWR fuel bundle behavior during seismic transients.

  12. Validation Data and Model Development for Fuel Assembly Response to Seismic Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardet, Philippe [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Ricciardi, Guillaume [Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) (France)

    2016-01-31

    Vibrations are inherently present in nuclear reactors, especially in cores and steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR). They can have significant effects on local heat transfer and wear and tear in the reactor and often set safety margins. The simulation of these multiphysics phenomena from first principles requires the coupling of several codes, which is one the most challenging tasks in modern computer simulation. Here an ambitious multiphysics multidisciplinary validation campaign is conducted. It relied on an integrated team of experimentalists and code developers to acquire benchmark and validation data for fluid-structure interaction codes. Data are focused on PWR fuel bundle behavior during seismic transients.

  13. Validity and efficiency of conformal anomaly detection on big distributed data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia Nouretdinov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Conformal Prediction is a recently developed framework for reliable confident predictions. In this work we discuss its possible application to big data coming from different, possibly heterogeneous data sources. On example of anomaly detection problem, we study the question of saving validity of Conformal Prediction in this case. We show that the straight forward averaging approach is invalid, while its easy alternative of maximizing is not very efficient because of its conservativeness. We propose the third compromised approach that is valid, but much less conservative. It is supported by both theoretical justification and experimental results in the area of energy engineering.

  14. DBCG hypo trial validation of radiotherapy parameters from a national data bank versus manual reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Carsten; Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Krogh, Simon Long

    2018-01-01

    of dose information, since the two patients had been treated with an electron boost based on a manual calculation, thus data was not exported to the data bank, and this was not detected prior to comparison with the manual data. For a few database fields in the manual data an ambiguity of the parameter...... definition of the specific field is seen in the data. This was not the case for the data bank, which extract all data consistently. CONCLUSIONS: In terms of data quality the data bank is superior to manually reported values. However, there is a need to allocate resources for checking the validity...... of the available data as well as ensuring that all relevant data is present. The data bank contains more detailed information, and thus facilitates research related to the actual dose distribution in the patients....

  15. A systematic review of validated methods to capture acute bronchospasm using administrative or claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Mona; Krishanswami, Shanthi; McPheeters, Melissa L

    2013-12-30

    To identify and assess billing, procedural, or diagnosis code, or pharmacy claim-based algorithms used to identify acute bronchospasm in administrative and claims databases. We searched the MEDLINE database from 1991 to September 2012 using controlled vocabulary and key terms related to bronchospasm, wheeze and acute asthma. We also searched the reference lists of included studies. Two investigators independently assessed the full text of studies against pre-determined inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently extracted data regarding participant and algorithm characteristics. Our searches identified 677 citations of which 38 met our inclusion criteria. In these 38 studies, the most commonly used ICD-9 code was 493.x. Only 3 studies reported any validation methods for the identification of bronchospasm, wheeze or acute asthma in administrative and claims databases; all were among pediatric populations and only 2 offered any validation statistics. Some of the outcome definitions utilized were heterogeneous and included other disease based diagnoses, such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, which are typically of an infectious etiology. One study offered the validation of algorithms utilizing Emergency Department triage chief complaint codes to diagnose acute asthma exacerbations with ICD-9 786.07 (wheezing) revealing the highest sensitivity (56%), specificity (97%), PPV (93.5%) and NPV (76%). There is a paucity of studies reporting rigorous methods to validate algorithms for the identification of bronchospasm in administrative data. The scant validated data available are limited in their generalizability to broad-based populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of simulation codes for future systems: motivations, approach, and the role of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.

    2007-01-01

    The validation of advanced simulation tools will still play a very significant role in several areas of reactor system analysis. This is the case of reactor physics and neutronics, where nuclear data uncertainties still play a crucial role for many core and fuel cycle parameters. The present paper gives a summary of validation motivations, objectives and approach. A validation effort is in particular necessary in the frame of advanced (e.g. Generation-IV or GNEP) reactors and associated fuel cycles assessment and design. Validation of simulation codes is complementary to the 'verification' process. In fact, 'verification' addresses the question 'are we solving the equations correctly' while validation addresses the question 'are we solving the correct equations with the correct parameters'. Verification implies comparisons with 'reference' equation solutions or with analytical solutions, when they exist. Most of what is called 'numerical validation' falls in this category. Validation strategies differ according to the relative weight of the methods and of the parameters that enter into the simulation tools. Most validation is based on experiments, and the field of neutronics where a 'robust' physics description model exists and which is function of 'input' parameters not fully known, will be the focus of this paper. In fact, in the case of reactor core, shielding and fuel cycle physics the model (theory) is well established (the Boltzmann and Bateman equations) and the parameters are the nuclear cross-sections, decay data etc. Two types of validation approaches can and have been used: (a) Mock-up experiments ('global' validation): need for a very close experimental simulation of a reference configuration. Bias factors cannot be extrapolated beyond reference configuration; (b) Use of 'clean', 'representative' integral experiments ('bias factor and adjustment' method). Allows to define bias factors, uncertainties and can be used for a wide range of applications. It

  17. ValidatorDB: database of up-to-date validation results for ligands and non-standard residues from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnal, David; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Pravda, Lukáš; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Geidl, Stanislav; Horský, Vladimír; Jaiswal, Deepti; Wimmerová, Michaela; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of serious errors in the structure of biomacromolecules, structure validation has become a key topic of research, especially for ligands and non-standard residues. ValidatorDB (freely available at http://ncbr.muni.cz/ValidatorDB) offers a new step in this direction, in the form of a database of validation results for all ligands and non-standard residues from the Protein Data Bank (all molecules with seven or more heavy atoms). Model molecules from the wwPDB Chemical Component Dictionary are used as reference during validation. ValidatorDB covers the main aspects of validation of annotation, and additionally introduces several useful validation analyses. The most significant is the classification of chirality errors, allowing the user to distinguish between serious issues and minor inconsistencies. Other such analyses are able to report, for example, completely erroneous ligands, alternate conformations or complete identity with the model molecules. All results are systematically classified into categories, and statistical evaluations are performed. In addition to detailed validation reports for each molecule, ValidatorDB provides summaries of the validation results for the entire PDB, for sets of molecules sharing the same annotation (three-letter code) or the same PDB entry, and for user-defined selections of annotations or PDB entries. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Funding for the 2ND IAEA technical meeting on fusion data processing, validation and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2017-06-02

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will organize the second Technical Meeting on Fusion Da Processing, Validation and Analysis from 30 May to 02 June, 2017, in Cambridge, MA USA. The meeting w be hosted by the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC). The objective of the meeting is to provide a platform where a set of topics relevant to fusion data processing, validation and analysis are discussed with the view of extrapolation needs to next step fusion devices such as ITER. The validation and analysis of experimental data obtained from diagnostics used to characterize fusion plasmas are crucial for a knowledge based understanding of the physical processes governing the dynamics of these plasmas. The meeting will aim at fostering, in particular, discussions of research and development results that set out or underline trends observed in the current major fusion confinement devices. General information on the IAEA, including its mission and organization, can be found at the IAEA websit Uncertainty quantification (UQ) Model selection, validation, and verification (V&V) Probability theory and statistical analysis Inverse problems & equilibrium reconstru ction Integrated data analysis Real time data analysis Machine learning Signal/image proc essing & pattern recognition Experimental design and synthetic diagnostics Data management

  19. Validating Machine Learning Algorithms for Twitter Data Against Established Measures of Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Scott R; Giraud-Carrier, Christophe; West, Josh; Barnes, Michael D; Hanson, Carl Lee

    2016-05-16

    One of the leading causes of death in the United States (US) is suicide and new methods of assessment are needed to track its risk in real time. Our objective is to validate the use of machine learning algorithms for Twitter data against empirically validated measures of suicidality in the US population. Using a machine learning algorithm, the Twitter feeds of 135 Mechanical Turk (MTurk) participants were compared with validated, self-report measures of suicide risk. Our findings show that people who are at high suicidal risk can be easily differentiated from those who are not by machine learning algorithms, which accurately identify the clinically significant suicidal rate in 92% of cases (sensitivity: 53%, specificity: 97%, positive predictive value: 75%, negative predictive value: 93%). Machine learning algorithms are efficient in differentiating people who are at a suicidal risk from those who are not. Evidence for suicidality can be measured in nonclinical populations using social media data.

  20. User's Manual for Data for Validating Models for PV Module Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W.; Anderberg, A.; Deline, C.; Glick, S.; Muller, M.; Perrin, G.; Rodriguez, J.; Rummel, S.; Terwilliger, K.; Silverman, T. J.

    2014-04-01

    This user's manual describes performance data measured for flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in Cocoa, Florida, Eugene, Oregon, and Golden, Colorado. The data include PV module current-voltage curves and associated meteorological data for approximately one-year periods. These publicly available data are intended to facilitate the validation of existing models for predicting the performance of PV modules, and for the development of new and improved models. For comparing different modeling approaches, using these public data will provide transparency and more meaningful comparisons of the relative benefits.

  1. Using 'big data' to validate claims made in the pharmaceutical approval process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Thomas; Haynes, Kevin; Barron, John; Cziraky, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Big Data in the healthcare setting refers to the storage, assimilation, and analysis of large quantities of information regarding patient care. These data can be collected and stored in a wide variety of ways including electronic medical records collected at the patient bedside, or through medical records that are coded and passed to insurance companies for reimbursement. When these data are processed it is possible to validate claims as a part of the regulatory review process regarding the anticipated performance of medications and devices. In order to analyze properly claims by manufacturers and others, there is a need to express claims in terms that are testable in a timeframe that is useful and meaningful to formulary committees. Claims for the comparative benefits and costs, including budget impact, of products and devices need to be expressed in measurable terms, ideally in the context of submission or validation protocols. Claims should be either consistent with accessible Big Data or able to support observational studies where Big Data identifies target populations. Protocols should identify, in disaggregated terms, key variables that would lead to direct or proxy validation. Once these variables are identified, Big Data can be used to query massive quantities of data in the validation process. Research can be passive or active in nature. Passive, where the data are collected retrospectively; active where the researcher is prospectively looking for indicators of co-morbid conditions, side-effects or adverse events, testing these indicators to determine if claims are within desired ranges set forth by the manufacturer. Additionally, Big Data can be used to assess the effectiveness of therapy through health insurance records. This, for example, could indicate that disease or co-morbid conditions cease to be treated. Understanding the basic strengths and weaknesses of Big Data in the claim validation process provides a glimpse of the value that this research

  2. Data validation summary report for the 100-HR-3 Round 8, Phases 1 and 2 groundwater sampling task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a summary of data validation results on groundwater samples collected for the 100-HR-3 Round 8 Groundwater Sampling task. The analyses performed for this project consisted of: metals, general chemistry, and radiochemistry. The laboratories conducting the analyses were Quanterra Environmental Services (QES) and Lockheed Analytical Services. As required by the contract and the WHC statement of work (WHC 1994), data validation was conducted using the Westinghouse data validation procedures for chemical and radiochemical analyses (WHC 1993a and 1993b). Sample results were validated to levels A and D as described in the data validation procedures. At the completion of validation and verification of each data package, a data validation summary was prepared and transmitted with the original documentation to Environmental Restoration Contract (ERC) for inclusion in the project QA record

  3. A Comprehensive Plan for the Long-Term Calibration and Validation of Oceanic Biogeochemical Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; McClain, Charles R.; Mannino, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this planning document is to establish a long-term capability and validating oceanic biogeochemical satellite data. It is a pragmatic solution to a practical problem based primarily o the lessons learned from prior satellite missions. All of the plan's elements are seen to be interdependent, so a horizontal organizational scheme is anticipated wherein the overall leadership comes from the NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry (OBB) Program Manager and the entire enterprise is split into two components of equal sature: calibration and validation plus satellite data processing. The detailed elements of the activity are based on the basic tasks of the two main components plus the current objectives of the Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems Roadmap. The former is distinguished by an internal core set of responsibilities and the latter is facilitated through an external connecting-core ring of competed or contracted activities. The core elements for the calibration and validation component include a) publish protocols and performance metrics; b) verify uncertainty budgets; c) manage the development and evaluation of instrumentation; and d) coordinate international partnerships. The core elements for the satellite data processing component are e) process and reprocess multisensor data; f) acquire, distribute, and archive data products; and g) implement new data products. Both components have shared responsibilities for initializing and temporally monitoring satellite calibration. Connecting-core elements include (but are not restricted to) atmospheric correction and characterization, standards and traceability, instrument and analysis round robins, field campaigns and vicarious calibration sites, in situ database, bio-optical algorithm (and product) validation, satellite characterization and vicarious calibration, and image processing software. The plan also includes an accountability process, creating a Calibration and Validation Team (to help manage

  4. Towards a Generic Information Data Model for Verification, Validation & Accreditation VV&A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roza, Z.C.; Voogd, J.M.; Giannoulis, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Generic Methodology for Verification, Validation and Acceptance (GM-VV) is intended to provide a common generic framework for making formal and well balanced acceptance decisions on a specific usage of models, simulations and data. GM-VV will offer the international M&S community with a

  5. New approach for validating the segmentation of 3D data applied to individual fibre extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emerson, Monica Jane; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen

    2017-01-01

    We present two approaches for validating the segmentation of 3D data. The first approach consists on comparing the amount of estimated material to a value provided by the manufacturer. The second approach consists on comparing the segmented results to those obtained from imaging modalities...

  6. Integration of data validation and user interface concerns in a DSL for web applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, D.M.; Visser, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a pre-print of: Danny M. Groenewegen, Eelco Visser. Integration of Data Validation and User Interface Concerns in a DSL for Web Applications. In Mark G. J. van den Brand, Jeff Gray, editors, Software Language Engineering, Second International Conference, SLE 2009, Denver, USA, October,

  7. Validating hospital antibiotic purchasing data as a metric of inpatient antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlie; Ritchie, Michael; Alldred, Jason; Daneman, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotic purchasing data are a widely used, but unsubstantiated, measure of antibiotic consumption. To validate this source, we compared purchasing data from hospitals and external medical databases with patient-level dispensing data. Antibiotic purchasing and dispensing data from internal hospital records and purchasing data from IMS Health were obtained for two hospitals between May 2013 and April 2015. Internal purchasing data were validated against dispensing data, and IMS data were compared with both internal metrics. Scatterplots of individual antimicrobial data points were generated; Pearson's correlation and linear regression coefficients were computed. A secondary analysis re-examined these correlations over shorter calendar periods. Internal purchasing data were strongly correlated with dispensing data, with correlation coefficients of 0.90 (95% CI = 0.83-0.95) and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.95-0.99) at hospitals A and B, respectively. Although dispensing data were consistently lower than purchasing data, this was attributed to a single antibiotic at both hospitals. IMS data were favourably correlated with, but underestimated, internal purchasing and dispensing data. This difference was accounted for by eight antibiotics for which direct sales from some manufacturers were not included in the IMS database. The correlation between purchasing and dispensing data was consistent across periods as short as 3 months, but not at monthly intervals. Both internal and external antibiotic purchasing data are strongly correlated with dispensing data. If outliers are accounted for appropriately, internal purchasing data could be used for cost-effective evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship programmes, and external data sets could be used for surveillance and research across geographical regions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  8. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses - Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-01-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotopes) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data, usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, was considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation

  9. Mathematical model validation of a thermal architecture system connecting east/west radiators by flight data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Alejandro; Mishkinis, Donatas; Kaya, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    A novel satellite thermal architecture connecting the east and west radiators of a geostationary telecommunication satellite via loop heat pipes (LHPs) is flight tested on board the satellite Hispasat 1E. The LHP operating temperature is regulated by using pressure regulating valves (PRVs). The flight data demonstrated the successful operation of the proposed concept. A transient numerical model specifically developed for the design of this system satisfactorily simulated the flight data. The validated mathematical model can be used to design and analyze the thermal behavior of more complex architectures. - Highlights: •A novel spacecraft thermal control architecture is presented. •The east–west radiators of a GEO communications satellite are connected using LHPs. •A transient mathematical model is validated with flight data. •The space flight data proved successful in-orbit operation of the novel architecture. •The model can be used to design/analyze LHP based complex thermal architectures

  10. Computer assistance in the collection, validation and manipulation of data for epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Venn, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The difficulties encountered in assembling and storing adequate data for a large cohort study of 50,000 radiation and other workers are discussed. A computer database management system was designed to permit the storage of information that could be conflicting and incomplete. The way in which it was used to validate data and to match records from a variety of sources is described. (author)

  11. Ensemble Kalman filter regularization using leave-one-out data cross-validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rayo Schiappacasse, Lautaro Jerónimo

    2012-09-19

    In this work, the classical leave-one-out cross-validation method for selecting a regularization parameter for the Tikhonov problem is implemented within the EnKF framework. Following the original concept, the regularization parameter is selected such that it minimizes the predictive error. Some ideas about the implementation, suitability and conceptual interest of the method are discussed. Finally, what will be called the data cross-validation regularized EnKF (dCVr-EnKF) is implemented in a 2D 2-phase synthetic oil reservoir experiment and the results analyzed.

  12. Validation of the H-SAF precipitation product H03 over Greece using rain gauge data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feidas, H.; Porcu, F.; Puca, S.; Rinollo, A.; Lagouvardos, C.; Kotroni, V.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive validation of the combined infrared/microwave H-SAF (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) precipitation product H03, for a 1-year period, using gauge observations from a relatively dense network of 233 stations over Greece. First, the quality of the interpolated data used to validate the precipitation product is assessed and a quality index is constructed based on parameters such as the density of the station network and the orography. Then, a validation analysis is conducted based on comparisons of satellite (H03) with interpolated rain gauge data to produce continuous and multi-categorical statistics at monthly and annual timescales by taking into account the different geophysical characteristics of the terrain (land, coast, sea, elevation). Finally, the impact of the quality of interpolated data on the validation statistics is examined in terms of different configurations of the interpolation model and the rain gauge network characteristics used in the interpolation. The possibility of using a quality index of the interpolated data as a filter in the validation procedure is also investigated. The continuous validation statistics show yearly root mean squared error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) corresponding to the 225 and 105 % of the mean rain rate, respectively. Mean error (ME) indicates a slight overall tendency for underestimation of the rain gauge rates, which takes large values for the high rain rates. In general, the H03 algorithm cannot retrieve very well the light (10 mm/h) precipitation. The poor correlation between satellite and gauge data points to algorithm problems in co-locating precipitation patterns. Seasonal comparison shows that retrieval errors are lower for cold months than in the summer months of the year. The multi-categorical statistics indicate that the H03 algorithm is able to discriminate efficiently the rain from the no rain events

  13. High spatial resolution satellite observations for validation of MODIS land products: IKONOS observations acquired under the NASA scientific data purchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey T. Morisette; Jaime E. Nickeson; Paul Davis; Yujie Wang; Yuhong Tian; Curtis E. Woodcock; Nikolay Shabanov; Matthew Hansen; Warren B. Cohen; Doug R. Oetter; Robert E. Kennedy

    2003-01-01

    Phase 1I of the Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) has provided NASA investigators access to data from four different satellite and airborne data sources. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) land discipline team (MODLAND) sought to utilize these data in support of land product validation activities with a lbcus on tile EOS Land Validation Core Sites. These...

  14. A multi-source satellite data approach for modelling Lake Turkana water level: calibration and validation using satellite altimetry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Velpuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Turkana is one of the largest desert lakes in the world and is characterized by high degrees of inter- and intra-annual fluctuations. The hydrology and water balance of this lake have not been well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable ground truth datasets. Managing surface water resources is a great challenge in areas where in-situ data are either limited or unavailable. In this study, multi-source satellite-driven data such as satellite-based rainfall estimates, modelled runoff, evapotranspiration, and a digital elevation dataset were used to model Lake Turkana water levels from 1998 to 2009. Due to the unavailability of reliable lake level data, an approach is presented to calibrate and validate the water balance model of Lake Turkana using a composite lake level product of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and ENVISAT satellite altimetry data. Model validation results showed that the satellite-driven water balance model can satisfactorily capture the patterns and seasonal variations of the Lake Turkana water level fluctuations with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE of 0.80 during the validation period (2004–2009. Model error estimates were within 10% of the natural variability of the lake. Our analysis indicated that fluctuations in Lake Turkana water levels are mainly driven by lake inflows and over-the-lake evaporation. Over-the-lake rainfall contributes only up to 30% of lake evaporative demand. During the modelling time period, Lake Turkana showed seasonal variations of 1–2 m. The lake level fluctuated in the range up to 4 m between the years 1998–2009. This study demonstrated the usefulness of satellite altimetry data to calibrate and validate the satellite-driven hydrological model for Lake Turkana without using any in-situ data. Furthermore, for Lake Turkana, we identified and outlined opportunities and challenges of using a calibrated

  15. A multi-source satellite data approach for modelling Lake Turkana water level: Calibration and validation using satellite altimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N.M.; Senay, G.B.; Asante, K.O.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana is one of the largest desert lakes in the world and is characterized by high degrees of interand intra-annual fluctuations. The hydrology and water balance of this lake have not been well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable ground truth datasets. Managing surface water resources is a great challenge in areas where in-situ data are either limited or unavailable. In this study, multi-source satellite-driven data such as satellite-based rainfall estimates, modelled runoff, evapotranspiration, and a digital elevation dataset were used to model Lake Turkana water levels from 1998 to 2009. Due to the unavailability of reliable lake level data, an approach is presented to calibrate and validate the water balance model of Lake Turkana using a composite lake level product of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and ENVISAT satellite altimetry data. Model validation results showed that the satellitedriven water balance model can satisfactorily capture the patterns and seasonal variations of the Lake Turkana water level fluctuations with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE) of 0.80 during the validation period (2004-2009). Model error estimates were within 10% of the natural variability of the lake. Our analysis indicated that fluctuations in Lake Turkana water levels are mainly driven by lake inflows and over-the-lake evaporation. Over-the-lake rainfall contributes only up to 30% of lake evaporative demand. During the modelling time period, Lake Turkana showed seasonal variations of 1-2m. The lake level fluctuated in the range up to 4m between the years 1998-2009. This study demonstrated the usefulness of satellite altimetry data to calibrate and validate the satellite-driven hydrological model for Lake Turkana without using any in-situ data. Furthermore, for Lake Turkana, we identified and outlined opportunities and challenges of using a calibrated satellite-driven water balance

  16. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  17. Validating Quantitative Measurement Using Qualitative Data: Combining Rasch Scaling and Latent Semantic Analysis in Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rense

    2015-02-01

    An extension of concurrent validity is proposed that uses qualitative data for the purpose of validating quantitative measures. The approach relies on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) which places verbal (written) statements in a high dimensional semantic space. Using data from a medical / psychiatric domain as a case study - Near Death Experiences, or NDE - we established concurrent validity by connecting NDErs qualitative (written) experiential accounts with their locations on a Rasch scalable measure of NDE intensity. Concurrent validity received strong empirical support since the variance in the Rasch measures could be predicted reliably from the coordinates of their accounts in the LSA derived semantic space (R2 = 0.33). These coordinates also predicted NDErs age with considerable precision (R2 = 0.25). Both estimates are probably artificially low due to the small available data samples (n = 588). It appears that Rasch scalability of NDE intensity is a prerequisite for these findings, as each intensity level is associated (at least probabilistically) with a well- defined pattern of item endorsements.

  18. Modification and Validation of an Automotive Data Processing Unit, Compessed Video System, and Communications Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    The primary purpose of the "modification and validation of an automotive data processing unit (DPU), compressed video system, and communications equipment" cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) was to modify and validate both hardware and software, developed by Scientific Atlanta, Incorporated (S-A) for defense applications (e.g., rotary-wing airplanes), for the commercial sector surface transportation domain (i.e., automobiles and trucks). S-A also furnished a state-of-the-art compressed video digital storage and retrieval system (CVDSRS), and off-the-shelf data storage and transmission equipment to support the data acquisition system for crash avoidance research (DASCAR) project conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In turn, S-A received access to hardware and technology related to DASCAR. DASCAR was subsequently removed completely and installation was repeated a number of times to gain an accurate idea of complete installation, operation, and removal of DASCAR. Upon satisfactory completion of the DASCAR construction and preliminary shakedown, ORNL provided NHTSA with an operational demonstration of DASCAR at their East Liberty, OH test facility. The demonstration included an on-the-road demonstration of the entire data acquisition system using NHTSA'S test track. In addition, the demonstration also consisted of a briefing, containing the following: ORNL generated a plan for validating the prototype data acquisition system with regard to: removal of DASCAR from an existing vehicle, and installation and calibration in other vehicles; reliability of the sensors and systems; data collection and transmission process (data integrity); impact on the drivability of the vehicle and obtrusiveness of the system to the driver; data analysis procedures; conspicuousness of the vehicle to other drivers; and DASCAR installation and removal training and documentation. In order to identify any operational problems not captured by the systems

  19. Analytic Validation of Immunohistochemistry Assays: New Benchmark Data From a Survey of 1085 Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Lauren N; Volmar, Keith E; Nowak, Jan A; Fatheree, Lisa A; Souers, Rhona J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Astles, J Rex; Nakhleh, Raouf E

    2017-09-01

    - A cooperative agreement between the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was undertaken to measure laboratories' awareness and implementation of an evidence-based laboratory practice guideline (LPG) on immunohistochemical (IHC) validation practices published in 2014. - To establish new benchmark data on IHC laboratory practices. - A 2015 survey on IHC assay validation practices was sent to laboratories subscribed to specific CAP proficiency testing programs and to additional nonsubscribing laboratories that perform IHC testing. Specific questions were designed to capture laboratory practices not addressed in a 2010 survey. - The analysis was based on responses from 1085 laboratories that perform IHC staining. Ninety-six percent (809 of 844) always documented validation of IHC assays. Sixty percent (648 of 1078) had separate procedures for predictive and nonpredictive markers, 42.7% (220 of 515) had procedures for laboratory-developed tests, 50% (349 of 697) had procedures for testing cytologic specimens, and 46.2% (363 of 785) had procedures for testing decalcified specimens. Minimum case numbers were specified by 85.9% (720 of 838) of laboratories for nonpredictive markers and 76% (584 of 768) for predictive markers. Median concordance requirements were 95% for both types. For initial validation, 75.4% (538 of 714) of laboratories adopted the 20-case minimum for nonpredictive markers and 45.9% (266 of 579) adopted the 40-case minimum for predictive markers as outlined in the 2014 LPG. The most common method for validation was correlation with morphology and expected results. Laboratories also reported which assay changes necessitated revalidation and their minimum case requirements. - Benchmark data on current IHC validation practices and procedures may help laboratories understand the issues and influence further refinement of LPG recommendations.

  20. Examples of Use of SINBAD Database for Nuclear Data and Code Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodeli, Ivan; Žerovnik, Gašper; Milocco, Alberto

    2017-09-01

    The SINBAD database currently contains compilations and evaluations of over 100 shielding benchmark experiments. The SINBAD database is widely used for code and data validation. Materials covered include: Air, N. O, H2O, Al, Be, Cu, graphite, concrete, Fe, stainless steel, Pb, Li, Ni, Nb, SiC, Na, W, V and mixtures thereof. Over 40 organisations from 14 countries and 2 international organisations have contributed data and work in support of SINBAD. Examples of the use of the database in the scope of different international projects, such as the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation of the OECD and the European Fusion Programme demonstrate the merit and possible usage of the database for the validation of modern nuclear data evaluations and new computer codes.

  1. Validation of US3D for Capsule Aerodynamics using 05-CA Wind Tunnel Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Several comparisons of computational fluid dynamics to wind tunnel test data are shown for the purpose of code validation. The wind tunnel test, 05-CA, uses a 7.66% model of NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle in the 11-foot test section of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind tunnel. A variety of freestream conditions over four Mach numbers and three angles of attack are considered. Test data comparisons include time-averaged integrated forces and moments, time-averaged static pressure ports on the surface, and Strouhal Number. The applicability of the US3D code to subsonic and transonic flow over a bluff body is assessed on a comprehensive data set. With close comparison, this work validates US3D for highly separated flows similar to those examined here.

  2. Data Visualization and Analysis Tools for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kenneth R.; Schwaller, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    The Validation Network (VN) prototype for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission compares data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Precipitation Radar (PR) to similar measurements from U.S. and international operational weather radars. This prototype is a major component of the GPM Ground Validation System (GVS). The VN provides a means for the precipitation measurement community to identify and resolve significant discrepancies between the ground radar (GR) observations and similar satellite observations. The VN prototype is based on research results and computer code described by Anagnostou et al. (2001), Bolen and Chandrasekar (2000), and Liao et al. (2001), and has previously been described by Morris, et al. (2007). Morris and Schwaller (2009) describe the PR-GR volume-matching algorithm used to create the VN match-up data set used for the comparisons. This paper describes software tools that have been developed for visualization and statistical analysis of the original and volume matched PR and GR data.

  3. Sample size determination for disease prevalence studies with partially validated data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shi-Fang; Poon, Wai-Yin; Tang, Man-Lai

    2016-02-01

    Disease prevalence is an important topic in medical research, and its study is based on data that are obtained by classifying subjects according to whether a disease has been contracted. Classification can be conducted with high-cost gold standard tests or low-cost screening tests, but the latter are subject to the misclassification of subjects. As a compromise between the two, many research studies use partially validated datasets in which all data points are classified by fallible tests, and some of the data points are validated in the sense that they are also classified by the completely accurate gold-standard test. In this article, we investigate the determination of sample sizes for disease prevalence studies with partially validated data. We use two approaches. The first is to find sample sizes that can achieve a pre-specified power of a statistical test at a chosen significance level, and the second is to find sample sizes that can control the width of a confidence interval with a pre-specified confidence level. Empirical studies have been conducted to demonstrate the performance of various testing procedures with the proposed sample sizes. The applicability of the proposed methods are illustrated by a real-data example. © The Author(s) 2012.

  4. Genomic Prediction in Animals and Plants: Simulation of Data, Validation, Reporting, and Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daetwyler, Hans D.; Calus, Mario P. L.; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; de los Campos, Gustavo; Hickey, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The genomic prediction of phenotypes and breeding values in animals and plants has developed rapidly into its own research field. Results of genomic prediction studies are often difficult to compare because data simulation varies, real or simulated data are not fully described, and not all relevant results are reported. In addition, some new methods have been compared only in limited genetic architectures, leading to potentially misleading conclusions. In this article we review simulation procedures, discuss validation and reporting of results, and apply benchmark procedures for a variety of genomic prediction methods in simulated and real example data. Plant and animal breeding programs are being transformed by the use of genomic data, which are becoming widely available and cost-effective to predict genetic merit. A large number of genomic prediction studies have been published using both simulated and real data. The relative novelty of this area of research has made the development of scientific conventions difficult with regard to description of the real data, simulation of genomes, validation and reporting of results, and forward in time methods. In this review article we discuss the generation of simulated genotype and phenotype data, using approaches such as the coalescent and forward in time simulation. We outline ways to validate simulated data and genomic prediction results, including cross-validation. The accuracy and bias of genomic prediction are highlighted as performance indicators that should be reported. We suggest that a measure of relatedness between the reference and validation individuals be reported, as its impact on the accuracy of genomic prediction is substantial. A large number of methods were compared in example simulated and real (pine and wheat) data sets, all of which are publicly available. In our limited simulations, most methods performed similarly in traits with a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL), whereas in traits

  5. Generation of integral experiment covariance data and their impact on criticality safety validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuke, Maik; Peters, Elisabeth; Sommer, Fabian

    2016-11-15

    The quantification of statistical dependencies in data of critical experiments and how to account for them properly in validation procedures has been discussed in the literature by various groups. However, these subjects are still an active topic in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECDNEA Nuclear Science Committee. The latter compiles and publishes the freely available experimental data collection, the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, ICSBEP. Most of the experiments were performed as series and share parts of experimental setups, consequently leading to correlation effects in the results. The correct consideration of correlated data seems to be inevitable if the experimental data in a validation procedure is limited or one cannot rely on a sufficient number of uncorrelated data sets, e.g. from different laboratories using different setups. The general determination of correlations and the underlying covariance data as well as the consideration of them in a validation procedure is the focus of the following work. We discuss and demonstrate possible effects on calculated k{sub eff}'s, their uncertainties, and the corresponding covariance matrices due to interpretation of evaluated experimental data and its translation into calculation models. The work shows effects of various modeling approaches, varying distribution functions of parameters and compares and discusses results from the applied Monte-Carlo sampling method with available data on correlations. Our findings indicate that for the reliable determination of integral experimental covariance matrices or the correlation coefficients a detailed study of the underlying experimental data, the modeling approach and assumptions made, and the resulting sensitivity analysis seems to be inevitable. Further, a Bayesian method is discussed to include integral experimental covariance data when estimating an

  6. Generation of integral experiment covariance data and their impact on criticality safety validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuke, Maik; Peters, Elisabeth; Sommer, Fabian

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of statistical dependencies in data of critical experiments and how to account for them properly in validation procedures has been discussed in the literature by various groups. However, these subjects are still an active topic in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECDNEA Nuclear Science Committee. The latter compiles and publishes the freely available experimental data collection, the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, ICSBEP. Most of the experiments were performed as series and share parts of experimental setups, consequently leading to correlation effects in the results. The correct consideration of correlated data seems to be inevitable if the experimental data in a validation procedure is limited or one cannot rely on a sufficient number of uncorrelated data sets, e.g. from different laboratories using different setups. The general determination of correlations and the underlying covariance data as well as the consideration of them in a validation procedure is the focus of the following work. We discuss and demonstrate possible effects on calculated k eff 's, their uncertainties, and the corresponding covariance matrices due to interpretation of evaluated experimental data and its translation into calculation models. The work shows effects of various modeling approaches, varying distribution functions of parameters and compares and discusses results from the applied Monte-Carlo sampling method with available data on correlations. Our findings indicate that for the reliable determination of integral experimental covariance matrices or the correlation coefficients a detailed study of the underlying experimental data, the modeling approach and assumptions made, and the resulting sensitivity analysis seems to be inevitable. Further, a Bayesian method is discussed to include integral experimental covariance data when estimating an application

  7. Validation of IT-based Data Communication Protocol for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K. I.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    The communication network designed to transmit control and processing signals in digital Instrument and Control (I and C) systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), should provide a high level of safety and reliability. There are different features between the communication networks of NPPs and other commercial communication networks. Safety and reliability are the most important factors in the communication networks of an NPP rather than efficiency which are important factors of a commercial communication network design. To develop Data Communication Protocol for Nuclear Power Plant, We analyze the design criteria and performance requirements of existing commercial communication protocols based on Information Technology(IT). And also, we examine the adaptability to the communication protocol of an NPP. Based on these results, we developed our own protocol(Nuclear power plant Safety Communication Protocol : NSCP) for NPP I and C, which meet the required specifications through design overall protocol architecture and data frame format, definition of functional requirements and specifications. NSCP is the communication protocol designed for a safety-grade control network in the nuclear power plant. In this report, we had specified NSCP protocol by FDT(Formal Description Technique) and established validation procedures based on the validation methodology. It was confirmed specification error, major function's validity and reachability of NSCP by performing simulation and the validation process using Telelogic Tau tool

  8. Valid and complete data on endometrial cancer in the Danish Gynaecological Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Caroline S; Hansen, Estrid S; Høgdall, Claus K

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is a comparative register study designed for data validation of surgery, pathology and recurrence for endometrial cancer in the Danish Gynaecological Cancer Database (DGCD) in the 2005-2009 period. The main outcomes were completeness of the data registered in the DGCD, agreement...... concerning data reported and comparability between the DGCD and a definite reference. MATERIAL AND METHODS: DGCD data on women with endometrial cancer or adenomatous hyperplasia supplemented with patient charts for data on recurrence were retrieved and compared with a definite reference (the pathology report...... and clinical journals). RESULTS: The completeness of data on pathology and surgery reported to the DGCD was 97.3%. The comparability between the DGCG and the definite reference was 94.4%. The agreement for the reported data in the DGCD was 88.3%. For recurrence, the comparability was 94.5% and the agreement...

  9. Development of an automated testing system for verification and validation of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, B. S.; Anghaie, S.; White, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    Verification and validation of nuclear data is critical to the accuracy of both stochastic and deterministic particle transport codes. In order to effectively test a set of nuclear data, the data must be applied to a wide variety of transport problems. Performing this task in a timely, efficient manner is tedious. The nuclear data team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in collaboration with the University of Florida is developing a methodology to automate the process of nuclear data verification and validation. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP) provides a set of criticality problems that may be used to evaluate nuclear data. This process tests a number of data libraries using cases from the ICSBEP benchmark set to demonstrate how automation of these tasks may reduce errors and increase efficiency. The process is driven by an integrated set of Python scripts. Material and geometry data may be read from an existing code input file to generate a standardized template or the template may be generated directly by the user The user specifies the desired precision and other vital problem parameters. The Python scripts generate input decks for multiple transport codes from these templates, run and monitor individual jobs, and parse the relevant output. This output can then be used to generate reports directly or can be stored into a database for later analysis. This methodology eases the burden on the user by reducing the amount of time and effort required for obtaining and compiling calculation results. (authors)

  10. Data validation and risk assessment -- some pitfalls when evaluating VOC measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korte, N.; Kearl, P.

    1993-01-01

    Data validation, as described in Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protocols under the Contract Laboratory Program (CLP), yields false confidence in the data and drives up costs while providing little benefit (Korte and Brown 1992). Commonly, these data are then used to perform a risk assessment. Much of the published guidance for risk assessments in and arid soils is inadequate because it does not take into account vapor migration due to density-driven flow (Korte and others 1992). Investigations into both of these problems have been performed by personnel of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and are described in this presentation

  11. Collection, validation, and description of data for the Oak Ridge nuclear industry mortality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.; Reagan, J.; Cragle, D.; West, C.; Tankersley, W.; Frome, E.; Watson, J.

    1992-01-01

    In response to the continuing controversy over the long-term health effects of protracted occupational exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation, a mortality study was initiated pooling data for all workers hired before December 31, 1982, and employed for at least 30 days by one of the three DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Topics of discussion will include issues involving the collection and validation of this large, complex data set and characteristics of demographic and exposure data for the study cohort

  12. VISUAL TOOLS FOR CROWDSOURCING DATA VALIDATION WITHIN THE GLOBELAND30 GEOPORTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chuprikova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the role of visualization of the user generated data that can empower the geoportal of GlobeLand30 produced by NGCC (National Geomatics Center of China. The focus is set on the development of a concept of tools that can extend the Geo-tagging functionality and make use of it for different target groups. The anticipated tools should improve the continuous data validation, updating and efficient use of the remotely-sensed data distributed within GlobeLand30.

  13. Visual Tools for Crowdsourcing Data Validation Within the GLOBELAND30 Geoportal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprikova, E.; Wu, H.; Murphy, C. E.; Meng, L.

    2016-06-01

    This research aims to investigate the role of visualization of the user generated data that can empower the geoportal of GlobeLand30 produced by NGCC (National Geomatics Center of China). The focus is set on the development of a concept of tools that can extend the Geo-tagging functionality and make use of it for different target groups. The anticipated tools should improve the continuous data validation, updating and efficient use of the remotely-sensed data distributed within GlobeLand30.

  14. A multisite validation of whole slide imaging for primary diagnosis using standardized data collection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wack, Katy; Drogowski, Laura; Treloar, Murray; Evans, Andrew; Ho, Jonhan; Parwani, Anil; Montalto, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Text-based reporting and manual arbitration for whole slide imaging (WSI) validation studies are labor intensive and do not allow for consistent, scalable, and repeatable data collection or analysis. The objective of this study was to establish a method of data capture and analysis using standardized codified checklists and predetermined synoptic discordance tables and to use these methods in a pilot multisite validation study. Fifteen case report form checklists were generated from the College of American Pathology cancer protocols. Prior to data collection, all hypothetical pairwise comparisons were generated, and a level of harm was determined for each possible discordance. Four sites with four pathologists each generated 264 independent reads of 33 cases. Preestablished discordance tables were applied to determine site by site and pooled accuracy, intrareader/intramodality, and interreader intramodality error rates. Over 10,000 hypothetical pairwise comparisons were evaluated and assigned harm in discordance tables. The average difference in error rates between WSI and glass, as compared to ground truth, was 0.75% with a lower bound of 3.23% (95% confidence interval). Major discordances occurred on challenging cases, regardless of modality. The average inter-reader agreement across sites for glass was 76.5% (weighted kappa of 0.68) and for digital it was 79.1% (weighted kappa of 0.72). These results demonstrate the feasibility and utility of employing standardized synoptic checklists and predetermined discordance tables to gather consistent, comprehensive diagnostic data for WSI validation studies. This method of data capture and analysis can be applied in large-scale multisite WSI validations.

  15. A multisite validation of whole slide imaging for primary diagnosis using standardized data collection and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Wack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Text-based reporting and manual arbitration for whole slide imaging (WSI validation studies are labor intensive and do not allow for consistent, scalable, and repeatable data collection or analysis. Objective: The objective of this study was to establish a method of data capture and analysis using standardized codified checklists and predetermined synoptic discordance tables and to use these methods in a pilot multisite validation study. Methods and Study Design: Fifteen case report form checklists were generated from the College of American Pathology cancer protocols. Prior to data collection, all hypothetical pairwise comparisons were generated, and a level of harm was determined for each possible discordance. Four sites with four pathologists each generated 264 independent reads of 33 cases. Preestablished discordance tables were applied to determine site by site and pooled accuracy, intrareader/intramodality, and interreader intramodality error rates. Results: Over 10,000 hypothetical pairwise comparisons were evaluated and assigned harm in discordance tables. The average difference in error rates between WSI and glass, as compared to ground truth, was 0.75% with a lower bound of 3.23% (95% confidence interval. Major discordances occurred on challenging cases, regardless of modality. The average inter-reader agreement across sites for glass was 76.5% (weighted kappa of 0.68 and for digital it was 79.1% (weighted kappa of 0.72. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility and utility of employing standardized synoptic checklists and predetermined discordance tables to gather consistent, comprehensive diagnostic data for WSI validation studies. This method of data capture and analysis can be applied in large-scale multisite WSI validations.

  16. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_SM Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf Helmut; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Liu, Qing; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Chen, Fan; Colliander, Andreas; Conaty, Austin; Crow, Wade; Jackson, Thomas; Kimball, John; hide

    2016-01-01

    During the post-launch SMAP calibration and validation (Cal/Val) phase there are two objectives for each science data product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithm, and 2) validate the accuracy of the science data product as specified in the science requirements and according to the Cal/Val schedule. This report provides an assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture Passive (L4_SM) product specifically for the product's public Version 2 validated release scheduled for 29 April 2016. The assessment of the Version 2 L4_SM data product includes comparisons of SMAP L4_SM soil moisture estimates with in situ soil moisture observations from core validation sites and sparse networks. The assessment further includes a global evaluation of the internal diagnostics from the ensemble-based data assimilation system that is used to generate the L4_SM product. This evaluation focuses on the statistics of the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals and the analysis increments. Together, the core validation site comparisons and the statistics of the assimilation diagnostics are considered primary validation methodologies for the L4_SM product. Comparisons against in situ measurements from regional-scale sparse networks are considered a secondary validation methodology because such in situ measurements are subject to up-scaling errors from the point-scale to the grid cell scale of the data product. Based on the limited set of core validation sites, the wide geographic range of the sparse network sites, and the global assessment of the assimilation diagnostics, the assessment presented here meets the criteria established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites for Stage 2 validation and supports the validated release of the data. An analysis of the time average surface and root zone soil moisture shows that the global pattern of arid and humid regions are captured by the L4_SM estimates. Results from the

  17. Validating a proxy for disease progression in metastatic cancer patients using prescribing and dispensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vikram; Adelstein, Barbara-Ann; Schaffer, Andrea; Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Dobbins, Timothy; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2017-10-01

    Routine data collections are used increasingly to examine outcomes of real-world cancer drug use. These datasets lack clinical details about important endpoints such as disease progression. To validate a proxy for disease progression in metastatic cancer patients using prescribing and dispensing claims. We used data from a cohort study of patients undergoing chemotherapy who provided informed consent to the collection of cancer-treatment data from medical records and linkage to pharmaceutical claims. We derived proxy decision rules based on changes to drug treatment in prescription histories (n = 36 patients) and validated the proxy in prescribing data (n = 62 patients). We adapted the decision rules and validated the proxy in dispensing data (n = 109). Our gold standard was disease progression ascertained in patient medical records. Individual progression episodes were the unit of analysis for sensitivity and Positive Predictive Value (PPV) calculations and specificity and Negative Predictive Value (NPV) were calculated at the patient level. The sensitivity of our proxy in prescribing data was 74.3% (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 55.6-86.6%) and PPV 61.2% (95% CI, 45.0-75.3%); specificity and NPV were 87.8% (95% CI, 73.8-95.9%) and 100% (95% CI, 90.3-100%), respectively. In dispensing data, the sensitivity of our proxy was 64% (95% CI, 55.0-77.0%) and PPV 56.0% (95% CI, 43.0-69.0%); specificity and NPV were 81% (95% CI, 70.05-89.0%) and 91.0% (95% CI, 82.0-97.0%), respectively. Our proxy overestimated episodes of disease progression. The proxy's performance is likely to improve if the date of prescribing is used instead of date of dispensing in claims data and by incorporating medical service claims (such as imaging prior to drug changes) in the algorithm. Our proxy is not sufficiently robust for use in real world comparative effectiveness research for cancer medicines. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Calibration And Validation Of CryoSat-2 Low Resolution Mode Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeije, M.; Schrama, E.; Scharroo, R.

    2011-02-01

    Running ahead of the continuously growing need for operational use of sea level products, TUDelft started off the Radar Altimeter Database System RADS many years ago. This system attends to a global international sea- level service. It supports, on one hand, science, like studies on ocean circulation, El Nio, sea level change, and ice topography, and on the other hand (offshore) operations, like delivery of ocean current information, wind and wave statistics, ice detection and ice classification. At present, the database is used by a large scientific community throughout the world, and is daily maintained and developed by Altimetrics LLC, TUDelft and NOAA. It contains all historic altimeter data, and now has to be up- dated with the data from ESAs ice mission CryoSat-2, which was launched successfully in April 2010. These new data are important to augment the data set and by that to improve the estimates of sea level change and its contributors. For this the data have to be validated and calibrated, necessary corrections added and improved (including modelling of corrections that are not directly available from the CryoSat-2 platform), and the orbit ac- curacy verified and if possible the orbits brushed up. Subsequently, value-added ocean and ice products need to be developed in synergy with all the other satellite altimeter data. During the commissioning phase we primarily looked at the sanity of the available level-1b and level-2 Low Resolution Mode (LRM) data. Here, for the 2011 CryoSat Validation Workshop, we present the results of our calibration and validation of LRM L2 data by internal comparison of CryoSat-2 and external comparison with other satellites. We have established a range bias of 3.77 (measurement range too long) and a timing bias of 8.2ms (measurement range too late).

  19. The Role of Laboratory Experiments in the Validation of Field Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouneyrac, Catherine; Lagarde, Fabienne; Chatel, Amelie

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence and persistency of microplastics (MPs) in aquatic environments are of particular concern, since they constitute a potential threat to marine organisms and ecosystems. However, evaluating this threat and the impacts of MP on aquatic organisms is challenging. MPs form a very...... and to what degree these complexities are addressed in the current literature, to: (1) evaluate how well laboratory studies, investigated so far, represent environmentally relevant processes and scenarios and (2) suggest directions for future research The Role of Laboratory Experiments in the Validation...... of Field Data | Request PDF. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/310360438_The_Role_of_Laboratory_Experiments_in_the_Validation_of_Field_Data [accessed Jan 15 2018]....

  20. Do coder characteristics influence validity of ICD-10 hospital discharge data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Cynthia A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Administrative data are widely used to study health systems and make important health policy decisions. Yet little is known about the influence of coder characteristics on administrative data validity in these studies. Our goal was to describe the relationship between several measures of validity in coded hospital discharge data and 1 coders' volume of coding (≥13,000 vs. Methods This descriptive study examined 6 indicators of face validity in ICD-10 coded discharge records from 4 hospitals in Calgary, Canada between April 2002 and March 2007. Specifically, mean number of coded diagnoses, procedures, complications, Z-codes, and codes ending in 8 or 9 were compared by coding volume and employment status, as well as hospital type. The mean number of diagnoses was also compared across coder characteristics for 6 major conditions of varying complexity. Next, kappa statistics were computed to assess agreement between discharge data and linked chart data reabstracted by nursing chart reviewers. Kappas were compared across coder characteristics. Results 422,618 discharge records were coded by 59 coders during the study period. The mean number of diagnoses per record decreased from 5.2 in 2002/2003 to 3.9 in 2006/2007, while the number of records coded annually increased from 69,613 to 102,842. Coders at the tertiary hospital coded the most diagnoses (5.0 compared with 3.9 and 3.8 at other sites. There was no variation by coder or site characteristics for any other face validity indicator. The mean number of diagnoses increased from 1.5 to 7.9 with increasing complexity of the major diagnosis, but did not vary with coder characteristics. Agreement (kappa between coded data and chart review did not show any consistent pattern with respect to coder characteristics. Conclusions This large study suggests that coder characteristics do not influence the validity of hospital discharge data. Other jurisdictions might benefit from

  1. SPECTRa: the deposition and validation of primary chemistry research data in digital repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Jim; Murray-Rust, Peter; Tonge, Alan P; Morgan, Peter; Rzepa, Henry S; Cotterill, Fiona; Day, Nick; Harvey, Matt J

    2008-08-01

    The SPECTRa (Submission, Preservation and Exposure of Chemistry Teaching and Research Data) project has investigated the practices of chemists in archiving and disseminating primary chemical data from academic research laboratories. To redress the loss of the large amount of data never archived or disseminated, we have developed software for data publication into departmental and institutional Open Access digital repositories (DSpace). Data adhering to standard formats in selected disciplines (crystallography, NMR, computational chemistry) is transformed to XML (CML, Chemical Markup Language) which provides added validation. Context-specific chemical metadata and persistent Handle identifiers are added to enable long-term data reuse. It was found essential to provide an embargo mechanism, and policies for operating this and other processes are presented.

  2. Validation of new 240Pu cross section and covariance data via criticality calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Heon; Gil, Choong-Sup; Kim, Hyeong Il; Lee, Young-Ouk; Leal, Luiz C.; Dunn, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent collaboration between KAERI and ORNL has completed an evaluation for 240 Pu neutron cross section with covariance data. The new 240 Pu cross section data has been validated through 28 criticality safety benchmark problems taken from the ICSBEP and/or CSEWG specifications with MCNP calculations. The calculation results based on the new evaluation have been compared with those based on recent evaluations such as ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1, and JENDL-4.0. In addition, the new 240 Pu covariance data has been tested for some criticality benchmarks via the DANTSYS/SUSD3D-based nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of k eff . The k eff uncertainty estimates by the new covariance data has been compared with those by JENDL-4.0, JENDL-3.3, and Low-Fidelity covariance data. (author)

  3. Reliability, Validity, Comparability and Practical Utility of Cybercrime-Related Data, Metrics, and Information

    OpenAIRE

    Nir Kshetri

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing pervasiveness, prevalence and severity of cybercrimes, various metrics, measures and statistics have been developed and used to measure various aspects of this phenomenon. Cybercrime-related data, metrics, and information, however, pose important and difficult dilemmas regarding the issues of reliability, validity, comparability and practical utility. While many of the issues of the cybercrime economy are similar to other underground and underworld industries, this economy ...

  4. Validity and reliability of stillbirth data using linked self-reported and administrative datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hure, Alexis J; Chojenta, Catherine L; Powers, Jennifer R; Byles, Julie E; Loxton, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A high rate of stillbirth was previously observed in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALSWH). Our primary objective was to test the validity and reliability of self-reported stillbirth data linked to state-based administrative datasets. Self-reported data, collected as part of the ALSWH cohort born in 1973-1978, were linked to three administrative datasets for women in New South Wales, Australia (n = 4374): the Midwives Data Collection; Admitted Patient Data Collection; and Perinatal Death Review Database. Linkages were obtained from the Centre for Health Record Linkage for the period 1996-2009. True cases of stillbirth were defined by being consistently recorded in two or more independent data sources. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, percent agreement, and kappa statistics were calculated for each dataset. Forty-nine women reported 53 stillbirths. No dataset was 100% accurate. The administrative datasets performed better than self-reported data, with high accuracy and agreement. Self-reported data showed high sensitivity (100%) but low specificity (30%), meaning women who had a stillbirth always reported it, but there was also over-reporting of stillbirths. About half of the misreported cases in the ALSWH were able to be removed by identifying inconsistencies in longitudinal data. Data linkage provides great opportunity to assess the validity and reliability of self-reported study data. Conversely, self-reported study data can help to resolve inconsistencies in administrative datasets. Quantifying the strengths and limitations of both self-reported and administrative data can improve epidemiological research, especially by guiding methods and interpretation of findings.

  5. Preliminary Validation of the MATRA-LMR Code Using Existing Sodium-Cooled Experimental Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Kim, Sangji

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the SFR prototype plant is to verify TRU metal fuel performance, reactor operation, and transmutation ability of high-level wastes. The core thermal-hydraulic design is used to ensure the safe fuel performance during the whole plant operation. The fuel design limit is highly dependent on both the maximum cladding temperature and the uncertainties of the design parameters. Therefore, an accurate temperature calculation in each subassembly is highly important to assure a safe and reliable operation of the reactor systems. The current core thermalhydraulic design is mainly performed using the SLTHEN (Steady-State LMR Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code Based on ENERGY Model) code, which has been already validated using the existing sodium-cooled experimental data. In addition to the SLTHEN code, a detailed analysis is performed using the MATRA-LMR (Multichannel Analyzer for Transient and steady-state in Rod Array-Liquid Metal Reactor) code. In this work, the MATRA-LMR code is validated for a single subassembly evaluation using the previous experimental data. The MATRA-LMR code has been validated using existing sodium-cooled experimental data. The results demonstrate that the design code appropriately predicts the temperature distributions compared with the experimental values. Major differences are observed in the experiments with the large pin number due to the radial-wise mixing difference

  6. Endogenous protein "barcode" for data validation and normalization in quantitative MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wooram; Lazar, Iulia M

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative proteomic experiments with mass spectrometry detection are typically conducted by using stable isotope labeling and label-free quantitation approaches. Proteins with housekeeping functions and stable expression level such actin, tubulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are frequently used as endogenous controls. Recent studies have shown that the expression level of such common housekeeping proteins is, in fact, dependent on various factors such as cell type, cell cycle, or disease status and can change in response to a biochemical stimulation. The interference of such phenomena can, therefore, substantially compromise their use for data validation, alter the interpretation of results, and lead to erroneous conclusions. In this work, we advance the concept of a protein "barcode" for data normalization and validation in quantitative proteomic experiments. The barcode comprises a novel set of proteins that was generated from cell cycle experiments performed with MCF7, an estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cell line, and MCF10A, a nontumorigenic immortalized breast cell line. The protein set was selected from a list of ~3700 proteins identified in different cellular subfractions and cell cycle stages of MCF7/MCF10A cells, based on the stability of spectral count data generated with an LTQ ion trap mass spectrometer. A total of 11 proteins qualified as endogenous standards for the nuclear and 62 for the cytoplasmic barcode, respectively. The validation of the protein sets was performed with a complementary SKBR3/Her2+ cell line.

  7. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the Building America research team ARBI validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. This project also looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. The team concluded that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws, which has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  8. Stochastic modeling of oligodendrocyte generation in cell culture: model validation with time-lapse data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Mark

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is two-fold. The first objective is to validate the assumptions behind a stochastic model developed earlier by these authors to describe oligodendrocyte generation in cell culture. The second is to generate time-lapse data that may help biomathematicians to build stochastic models of cell proliferation and differentiation under other experimental scenarios. Results Using time-lapse video recording it is possible to follow the individual evolutions of different cells within each clone. This experimental technique is very laborious and cannot replace model-based quantitative inference from clonal data. However, it is unrivalled in validating the structure of a stochastic model intended to describe cell proliferation and differentiation at the clonal level. In this paper, such data are reported and analyzed for oligodendrocyte precursor cells cultured in vitro. Conclusion The results strongly support the validity of the most basic assumptions underpinning the previously proposed model of oligodendrocyte development in cell culture. However, there are some discrepancies; the most important is that the contribution of progenitor cell death to cell kinetics in this experimental system has been underestimated.

  9. ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: DESCRIPTION AND SUMMARY OF DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chang H.; Kim, Eung S.

    2010-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory performed air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics code (CFD). An isothermal stratified flow experiment was designed and set to understand stratified flow phenomena in the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) and to provide experimental data for validating computer codes. The isothermal experiment focused on three flow characteristics unique in the VHTR air-ingress accident: stratified flow in the horizontal pipe, stratified flow expansion at the pipe and vessel junction, and stratified flow around supporting structures. Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids and water was used as light fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between heavy and light fluids is generated even for very small density differences. The code was validated by conducting blind CFD simulations and comparing the results to the experimental data. A grid sensitivity study was also performed based on the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for modeling confidence. As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

  10. DBCG hypo trial validation of radiotherapy parameters from a national data bank versus manual reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Carsten; Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Krogh, Simon Long; Westberg, Jonas; Berg, Martin; Jensen, Ingelise; Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Yates, Esben Svitzer; Offersen, Birgitte Vrou

    2018-01-01

    The current study evaluates the data quality achievable using a national data bank for reporting radiotherapy parameters relative to the classical manual reporting method of selected parameters. The data comparison is based on 1522 Danish patients of the DBCG hypo trial with data stored in the Danish national radiotherapy data bank. In line with standard DBCG trial practice selected parameters were also reported manually to the DBCG database. Categorical variables are compared using contingency tables, and comparison of continuous parameters is presented in scatter plots. For categorical variables 25 differences between the data bank and manual values were located. Of these 23 were related to mistakes in the manual reported value whilst the remaining two were a wrong classification in the data bank. The wrong classification in the data bank was related to lack of dose information, since the two patients had been treated with an electron boost based on a manual calculation, thus data was not exported to the data bank, and this was not detected prior to comparison with the manual data. For a few database fields in the manual data an ambiguity of the parameter definition of the specific field is seen in the data. This was not the case for the data bank, which extract all data consistently. In terms of data quality the data bank is superior to manually reported values. However, there is a need to allocate resources for checking the validity of the available data as well as ensuring that all relevant data is present. The data bank contains more detailed information, and thus facilitates research related to the actual dose distribution in the patients.

  11. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper) using Excel - 1: Data entry and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Victor

    2018-02-01

    Data collection for the purposes of analysis, after the planning and execution of a research study, commences with data input and validation. The process of data entry and analysis may appear daunting to the uninitiated, but as pointed out in the 1970s in a series of papers by British Medical Journal Deputy Editor TDV Swinscow, modern hardware and software (he was then referring to the availability of hand calculators) permits the performance of statistical testing outside a computer laboratory. In this day and age, modern software, such as the ubiquitous and almost universally familiar Microsoft Excel™ greatly facilitates this process. This first paper comprises the first of a collection of papers which will emulate Swinscow's series, in his own words, "addressed to readers who want to start at the beginning, not to those who are already skilled statisticians." These papers will have less focus on the actual arithmetic, and more emphasis on how to actually implement simple statistics, step by step, using Excel, thereby constituting the equivalent of Swinscow's papers in the personal computer age. Data entry can be facilitated by several underutilised features in Excel. This paper will explain Excel's little-known form function, data validation implementation at input stage, simple coding tips and data cleaning tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of 18FDG biodistribution data in healthy mice obtained with G.E. LABPET4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Adriana Marcia Guimaraes; Mendes, Bruno Melo; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana Batista da; Campos, Danielle Cunha; Santos, Priscilla Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to validate biodistribution data obtained with CDTN's MicroPET. To achieve this goal, correction and image acquisition procedures were established. 1 '8FDG dynamic images of 90 minutes were obtained following these procedures for Swiss healthy mice. Biodistribution data obtained after quantification of acquired images were compared with data available in literature. Considering the uptake time of 60 minutes and similar animal handling, data obtained in this work showed a satisfactory agreement with reference data. Some evaluated organs/tissues showed high interindividual variability. These findings are consistent with those observed in reference literature. However, improvements in VOI positioning VOI technique as well as increasing the number of animals (n) per group can minimize this problem. (author)

  13. Validation of CFD predictions using process data obtained from flow through an industrial control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J; Mishra, R; Charlton, M; Owen, R

    2012-01-01

    This study uses the experimental flow test data to validate CFD simulations for a complex control valve trim. In both the simulation and the experimental flow test the capacity of the trim (Cv) is calculated in order to test the ability of CFD software to provide a design tool for these trims. While CFD tests produced results for the capacity which were consistent across a series of five different simulations, it differed from the experimental flow data by nearly 25%. This indicates that CFD simulations need to be properly calibrated before being used in designing complex valve trims.

  14. Quantifying the foodscape: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the validity of commercially available business data

    OpenAIRE

    Lebel, Alexandre; Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Block, Jason P.; Walker, Renée; Lalonde, Benoît; Kestens, Yan; Subramanian, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews studies of the validity of commercially available business (CAB) data on food establishments (?the foodscape?), offering a meta-analysis of characteristics associated with CAB quality and a case study evaluating the performance of commonly-used validity indicators describing the foodscape. Existing validation studies report a broad range in CAB data quality, although most studies conclude that CAB quality is ?moderate? to ?substantial?. We conclude that current studies may ...

  15. Generation, Validation, and Application of Abundance Map Reference Data for Spectral Unmixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, McKay D.

    Reference data ("ground truth") maps traditionally have been used to assess the accuracy of imaging spectrometer classification algorithms. However, these reference data can be prohibitively expensive to produce, often do not include sub-pixel abundance estimates necessary to assess spectral unmixing algorithms, and lack published validation reports. Our research proposes methodologies to efficiently generate, validate, and apply abundance map reference data (AMRD) to airborne remote sensing scenes. We generated scene-wide AMRD for three different remote sensing scenes using our remotely sensed reference data (RSRD) technique, which spatially aggregates unmixing results from fine scale imagery (e.g., 1-m Ground Sample Distance (GSD)) to co-located coarse scale imagery (e.g., 10-m GSD or larger). We validated the accuracy of this methodology by estimating AMRD in 51 randomly-selected 10 m x 10 m plots, using seven independent methods and observers, including field surveys by two observers, imagery analysis by two observers, and RSRD using three algorithms. Results indicated statistically-significant differences between all versions of AMRD, suggesting that all forms of reference data need to be validated. Given these significant differences between the independent versions of AMRD, we proposed that the mean of all (MOA) versions of reference data for each plot and class were most likely to represent true abundances. We then compared each version of AMRD to MOA. Best case accuracy was achieved by a version of imagery analysis, which had a mean coverage area error of 2.0%, with a standard deviation of 5.6%. One of the RSRD algorithms was nearly as accurate, achieving a mean error of 3.0%, with a standard deviation of 6.3%, showing the potential of RSRD-based AMRD generation. Application of validated AMRD to specific coarse scale imagery involved three main parts: 1) spatial alignment of coarse and fine scale imagery, 2) aggregation of fine scale abundances to produce

  16. Use of standard vocabulary services in validation of water resources data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jonathan; Cox, Simon; Ratcliffe, David

    2010-05-01

    Ontology repositories are increasingly being exposed through vocabulary and concept services. Primarily this is in support of resource discovery. Thesaurus functionality and even more sophisticated reasoning offers the possibility of overcoming the limitations of simple text-matching and tagging which is the basis of most search. However, controlled vocabularies have other important roles in distributed systems: in particular in constraining content validity. A national water information system established by the Australian Bureau of Meterorology ('the Bureau') has deployed a system for ingestion of data from multiple providers. This uses a http interface onto separately maintained vocabulary services as part of the quality assurance chain. With over 200 data providers potentially transferring data to the Bureau, a standard XML-based Water Data Transfer Format (WDTF) was developed for receipt of data into an integrated national water information system. The WDTF schema was built upon standards from the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The structure and syntax specified by a W3C XML Schema is complemented by additional constraints described using Schematron. These implement important content requirements and business rules including: • Restricted cardinality: where optional elements and attributes inherited from the base standards become mandatory in the application, or repeatable elements or attributes are limited to one or omitted. For example, the sampledFeature element from O&M is optional but is mandatory for a samplingPoint element in WDTF. • Vocabulary checking: WDTF data use seventeen vocabularies or code lists derived from Regulations under the Commonwealth Water Act 2007. Examples of codelists are the Australian Water Regulations list, observed property vocabulary, and units of measures. • Contextual constraints: in many places, the permissible value is dependent on the value of another field. For example, within observations the unit of measure

  17. Data collection, validation, and description for the Oak Ridge nuclear facilities mortality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.P.; Reagan, J.L.; Cragle, D.L.; West, C.M.; Tankersley, W.G.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the long-term health effects of protracted occupational exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation, a mortality study was initiated by pooling data for 118,588 workers hired between 1943 and 1982, at three Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with follow-up through 1984. Topics for this discussion will include issues involving the collection and validation of data for individuals in the study cohort, and characteristics of their demographic and radiation exposure data. Since the data were compiled between the late 1960s and the present under the direction of several principal investigators, it was essential to verify data precision and to understand how exposure data were generated prior to beginning any analysis. A stratified random sample of workers in the cohort was chosen for verification of their computerized data as it appeared in the database. Original source documents were reviewed to verify demographic data, as well as internal and external radiation exposure data. Extensive effort was expended to document the personal radiation monitoring policies and types of dosimeters used at each facility over the 42 years included in the study. Characteristics of internal and external exposure data by facility and year were examined by graphical methods with the intent of combining these monitoring data over time and across facilities

  18. ODM Data Analysis-A tool for the automatic validation, monitoring and generation of generic descriptive statistics of patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Tobias Johannes; Bruland, Philipp; Sarfraz, Saad; Ernsting, Jan; Neuhaus, Philipp; Storck, Michael; Doods, Justin; Ständer, Sonja; Dugas, Martin

    2018-01-01

    A required step for presenting results of clinical studies is the declaration of participants demographic and baseline characteristics as claimed by the FDAAA 801. The common workflow to accomplish this task is to export the clinical data from the used electronic data capture system and import it into statistical software like SAS software or IBM SPSS. This software requires trained users, who have to implement the analysis individually for each item. These expenditures may become an obstacle for small studies. Objective of this work is to design, implement and evaluate an open source application, called ODM Data Analysis, for the semi-automatic analysis of clinical study data. The system requires clinical data in the CDISC Operational Data Model format. After uploading the file, its syntax and data type conformity of the collected data is validated. The completeness of the study data is determined and basic statistics, including illustrative charts for each item, are generated. Datasets from four clinical studies have been used to evaluate the application's performance and functionality. The system is implemented as an open source web application (available at https://odmanalysis.uni-muenster.de) and also provided as Docker image which enables an easy distribution and installation on local systems. Study data is only stored in the application as long as the calculations are performed which is compliant with data protection endeavors. Analysis times are below half an hour, even for larger studies with over 6000 subjects. Medical experts have ensured the usefulness of this application to grant an overview of their collected study data for monitoring purposes and to generate descriptive statistics without further user interaction. The semi-automatic analysis has its limitations and cannot replace the complex analysis of statisticians, but it can be used as a starting point for their examination and reporting.

  19. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean

  20. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  1. Data validation report for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit, third round groundwater samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse-Hanford has requested that a minimum of 20% of the total number of Sample Delivery Groups be validated for the 100-FR-3 operable Unit Third Round Groundwater sampling investigation. Therefore, the data from the chemical analysis of 51 samples from this sampling event and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at this site. The report is broken down into sections for each chemical analysis and radiochemical analysis type. Each section addresses the data package completeness, holding time adherence, instrument calibration and tuning acceptability, blank results, accuracy, precision, system performance, as well as the compound identification and quantitation. In addition, each section has an overall assessment and summary for the data packages reviewed for the particular chemical/radiochemical analyses. Detailed backup information is provided to the reader by SDG No. and sample number. For each data package, a matrix of chemical analyses per sample number is presented, as well as data qualification summaries

  2. Validation of NEPTUNE-CFD two-phase flow models using experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Manes, Jorge; Sanchez Espinoza, Victor Hugo; Bottcher, Michael; Stieglitz, Robert; Sergio Chiva Vicent

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the validation of the two-phase flow models of the CFD code NEPTUNE-CFD using experimental data provided by the OECD BWR BFBT and PSBT Benchmark. Since the two-phase models of CFD codes are extensively being improved, the validation is a key step for the acceptability of such codes. The validation work is performed in the frame of the European NURISP Project and it was focused on the steady state and transient void fraction tests. The influence of different NEPTUNE-CFD model parameters on the void fraction prediction is investigated and discussed in detail. Due to the coupling of heat conduction solver SYRTHES with NEPTUNE-CFD, the description of the coupled fluid dynamics and heat transfer between the fuel rod and the fluid is improved significantly. The averaged void fraction predicted by NEPTUNE-CFD for selected PSBT and BFBT tests is in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, areas for future improvements of the NEPTUNE-CFD code were identified, too. (authors)

  3. Validating hierarchical verbal autopsy expert algorithms in a large data set with known causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, Henry D; Perin, Jamie; Black, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Physician assessment historically has been the most common method of analyzing verbal autopsy (VA) data. Recently, the World Health Organization endorsed two automated methods, Tariff 2.0 and InterVA-4, which promise greater objectivity and lower cost. A disadvantage of the Tariff method is that it requires a training data set from a prior validation study, while InterVA relies on clinically specified conditional probabilities. We undertook to validate the hierarchical expert algorithm analysis of VA data, an automated, intuitive, deterministic method that does not require a training data set. Using Population Health Metrics Research Consortium study hospital source data, we compared the primary causes of 1629 neonatal and 1456 1-59 month-old child deaths from VA expert algorithms arranged in a hierarchy to their reference standard causes. The expert algorithms were held constant, while five prior and one new "compromise" neonatal hierarchy, and three former child hierarchies were tested. For each comparison, the reference standard data were resampled 1000 times within the range of cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMF) for one of three approximated community scenarios in the 2013 WHO global causes of death, plus one random mortality cause proportions scenario. We utilized CSMF accuracy to assess overall population-level validity, and the absolute difference between VA and reference standard CSMFs to examine particular causes. Chance-corrected concordance (CCC) and Cohen's kappa were used to evaluate individual-level cause assignment. Overall CSMF accuracy for the best-performing expert algorithm hierarchy was 0.80 (range 0.57-0.96) for neonatal deaths and 0.76 (0.50-0.97) for child deaths. Performance for particular causes of death varied, with fairly flat estimated CSMF over a range of reference values for several causes. Performance at the individual diagnosis level was also less favorable than that for overall CSMF (neonatal: best CCC = 0.23, range 0

  4. Prediction, Detection, and Validation of Isotope Clusters in Mass Spectrometry Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Treutler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a key analytical platform for metabolomics. The precise quantification and identification of small molecules is a prerequisite for elucidating the metabolism and the detection, validation, and evaluation of isotope clusters in LC-MS data is important for this task. Here, we present an approach for the improved detection of isotope clusters using chemical prior knowledge and the validation of detected isotope clusters depending on the substance mass using database statistics. We find remarkable improvements regarding the number of detected isotope clusters and are able to predict the correct molecular formula in the top three ranks in 92 % of the cases. We make our methodology freely available as part of the Bioconductor packages xcms version 1.50.0 and CAMERA version 1.30.0.

  5. Cloud detection algorithm comparison and validation for operational Landsat data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foga, Steven Curtis; Scaramuzza, Pat; Guo, Song; Zhu, Zhe; Dilley, Ronald; Beckmann, Tim; Schmidt, Gail L.; Dwyer, John L.; Hughes, MJ; Laue, Brady

    2017-01-01

    Clouds are a pervasive and unavoidable issue in satellite-borne optical imagery. Accurate, well-documented, and automated cloud detection algorithms are necessary to effectively leverage large collections of remotely sensed data. The Landsat project is uniquely suited for comparative validation of cloud assessment algorithms because the modular architecture of the Landsat ground system allows for quick evaluation of new code, and because Landsat has the most comprehensive manual truth masks of any current satellite data archive. Currently, the Landsat Level-1 Product Generation System (LPGS) uses separate algorithms for determining clouds, cirrus clouds, and snow and/or ice probability on a per-pixel basis. With more bands onboard the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI)/Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) satellite, and a greater number of cloud masking algorithms, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is replacing the current cloud masking workflow with a more robust algorithm that is capable of working across multiple Landsat sensors with minimal modification. Because of the inherent error from stray light and intermittent data availability of TIRS, these algorithms need to operate both with and without thermal data. In this study, we created a workflow to evaluate cloud and cloud shadow masking algorithms using cloud validation masks manually derived from both Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) and Landsat 8 OLI/TIRS data. We created a new validation dataset consisting of 96 Landsat 8 scenes, representing different biomes and proportions of cloud cover. We evaluated algorithm performance by overall accuracy, omission error, and commission error for both cloud and cloud shadow. We found that CFMask, C code based on the Function of Mask (Fmask) algorithm, and its confidence bands have the best overall accuracy among the many algorithms tested using our validation data. The Artificial Thermal-Automated Cloud Cover Algorithm (AT-ACCA) is the most accurate

  6. In-Flight Validation of Mid and Thermal Infrared Remotely Sensed Data Using the Lake Tahoe and Salton Sea Automated Validation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    The presentation includes an introduction, Lake Tahoe site layout and measurements, Salton Sea site layout and measurements, field instrument calibration and cross-calculations, data reduction methodology and error budgets, and example results for MODIS. Summary and conclusions are: 1) Lake Tahoe CA/NV automated validation site was established in 1999 to assess radiometric accuracy of satellite and airborne mid and thermal infrared data and products. Water surface temperatures range from 4-25C.2) Salton Sea CA automated validation site was established in 2008 to broaden range of available water surface temperatures and atmospheric water vapor test cases. Water surface temperatures range from 15-35C. 3) Sites provide all information necessary for validation every 2 mins (bulk temperature, skin temperature, air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, net radiation, relative humidity). 4) Sites have been used to validate mid and thermal infrared data and products from: ASTER, AATSR, ATSR2, MODIS-Terra, MODIS-Aqua, Landsat 5, Landsat 7, MTI, TES, MASTER, MAS. 5) Approximately 10 years of data available to help validate AVHRR.

  7. A New Statistical Method to Determine the Degree of Validity of Health Economic Model Outcomes against Empirical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corro Ramos, Isaac; van Voorn, George A K; Vemer, Pepijn; Feenstra, Talitha L; Al, Maiwenn J

    2017-09-01

    The validation of health economic (HE) model outcomes against empirical data is of key importance. Although statistical testing seems applicable, guidelines for the validation of HE models lack guidance on statistical validation, and actual validation efforts often present subjective judgment of graphs and point estimates. To discuss the applicability of existing validation techniques and to present a new method for quantifying the degrees of validity statistically, which is useful for decision makers. A new Bayesian method is proposed to determine how well HE model outcomes compare with empirical data. Validity is based on a pre-established accuracy interval in which the model outcomes should fall. The method uses the outcomes of a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and results in a posterior distribution around the probability that HE model outcomes can be regarded as valid. We use a published diabetes model (Modelling Integrated Care for Diabetes based on Observational data) to validate the outcome "number of patients who are on dialysis or with end-stage renal disease." Results indicate that a high probability of a valid outcome is associated with relatively wide accuracy intervals. In particular, 25% deviation from the observed outcome implied approximately 60% expected validity. Current practice in HE model validation can be improved by using an alternative method based on assessing whether the model outcomes fit to empirical data at a predefined level of accuracy. This method has the advantage of assessing both model bias and parameter uncertainty and resulting in a quantitative measure of the degree of validity that penalizes models predicting the mean of an outcome correctly but with overly wide credible intervals. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using hospital discharge data for determining neonatal morbidity and mortality: a validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algert Charles S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite widespread use of neonatal hospital discharge data, there are few published reports on the accuracy of population health data with neonatal diagnostic or procedure codes. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of using routinely collected hospital discharge data in identifying neonatal morbidity during the birth admission compared with data from a statewide audit of selected neonatal intensive care (NICU admissions. Methods Validation study of population-based linked hospital discharge/birth data against neonatal intensive care audit data from New South Wales, Australia for 2,432 babies admitted to NICUs, 1994–1996. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPV with exact binomial confidence intervals were calculated for 12 diagnoses and 6 procedures. Results Sensitivities ranged from 37.0% for drainage of an air leak to 97.7% for very low birthweight, specificities all exceeded 85% and PPVs ranged from 70.9% to 100%. In-hospital mortality, low birthweight (≤1500 g, retinopathy of prematurity, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration, pneumonia, pulmonary hypertension, selected major anomalies, any mechanical ventilation (including CPAP, major surgery and surgery for patent ductus arteriosus or necrotizing enterocolitis were accurately identified with PPVs over 92%. Transient tachypnea of the newborn and drainage of an air leak had the lowest PPVs, 70.9% and 83.6% respectively. Conclusion Although under-ascertained, routinely collected hospital discharge data had high PPVs for most validated items and would be suitable for risk factor analyses of neonatal morbidity. Procedures tended to be more accurately recorded than diagnoses.

  9. Using hospital discharge data for determining neonatal morbidity and mortality: a validation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jane B; Roberts, Christine L; Algert, Charles S; Bowen, Jennifer R; Bajuk, Barbara; Henderson-Smart, David J

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite widespread use of neonatal hospital discharge data, there are few published reports on the accuracy of population health data with neonatal diagnostic or procedure codes. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of using routinely collected hospital discharge data in identifying neonatal morbidity during the birth admission compared with data from a statewide audit of selected neonatal intensive care (NICU) admissions. Methods Validation study of population-based linked hospital discharge/birth data against neonatal intensive care audit data from New South Wales, Australia for 2,432 babies admitted to NICUs, 1994–1996. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPV) with exact binomial confidence intervals were calculated for 12 diagnoses and 6 procedures. Results Sensitivities ranged from 37.0% for drainage of an air leak to 97.7% for very low birthweight, specificities all exceeded 85% and PPVs ranged from 70.9% to 100%. In-hospital mortality, low birthweight (≤1500 g), retinopathy of prematurity, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration, pneumonia, pulmonary hypertension, selected major anomalies, any mechanical ventilation (including CPAP), major surgery and surgery for patent ductus arteriosus or necrotizing enterocolitis were accurately identified with PPVs over 92%. Transient tachypnea of the newborn and drainage of an air leak had the lowest PPVs, 70.9% and 83.6% respectively. Conclusion Although under-ascertained, routinely collected hospital discharge data had high PPVs for most validated items and would be suitable for risk factor analyses of neonatal morbidity. Procedures tended to be more accurately recorded than diagnoses. PMID:18021458

  10. Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission L4_C Data Product Assessment (Version 2 Validated Release)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, John S.; Jones, Lucas A.; Glassy, Joseph; Stavros, E. Natasha; Madani, Nima; Reichle, Rolf H.; Jackson, Thomas; Colliander, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP satellite was successfully launched January 31st 2015, and began acquiring Earth observation data following in-orbit sensor calibration. Global data products derived from the SMAP L-band microwave measurements include Level 1 calibrated and geolocated radiometric brightness temperatures, Level 23 surface soil moisture and freezethaw geophysical retrievals mapped to a fixed Earth grid, and model enhanced Level 4 data products for surface to root zone soil moisture and terrestrial carbon (CO2) fluxes. The post-launch SMAP mission CalVal Phase had two primary objectives for each science product team: 1) calibrate, verify, and improve the performance of the science algorithms, and 2) validate accuracies of the science data products as specified in the L1 science requirements. This report provides analysis and assessment of the SMAP Level 4 Carbon (L4_C) product pertaining to the validated release. The L4_C validated product release effectively replaces an earlier L4_C beta-product release (Kimball et al. 2015). The validated release described in this report incorporates a longer data record and benefits from algorithm and CalVal refinements acquired during the SMAP post-launch CalVal intensive period. The SMAP L4_C algorithms utilize a terrestrial carbon flux model informed by SMAP soil moisture inputs along with optical remote sensing (e.g. MODIS) vegetation indices and other ancillary biophysical data to estimate global daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and component carbon fluxes for vegetation gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco). Other L4_C product elements include surface (10 cm depth) soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and associated environmental constraints to these processes, including soil moisture and landscape freeze/thaw (FT) controls on GPP and respiration (Kimball et al. 2012). The L4_C product encapsulates SMAP carbon cycle science objectives by: 1) providing a direct link between terrestrial carbon fluxes and

  11. Validation of MODIS Data for localized spatio-temporal evapotranspiration mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadzri, M I; Hashim, M

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in satellite remote sensing sensors allows evapo-transpiration (ET) from land surfaces to be derived from selected reflectance and emmitance in visible and thermal infrared wavelengths, such as using Moderate Solution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). In this paper, we report the validation of recent MODIS-generated higher-order global terrestrial ET product 16A2. The main focus of this paper is to devise the follow-up calibration for the localised region covering the entire Malaysia peninsular. The validation is carried out locally by dividing the study area into 3 distinct climatological regions based on the influence to monsoons, and using multi-temporal MODIS data acquired in 2000-2009. The results, evidently show the local effects still inherit in the MODIS 16A2 products; with varying R2 within the 3 local climatological regions established (Northwest = 0.49 South = 0.47, and Southwest = 0.52; all with P < 0.001). The accuracy of each region validated is within + RMSE 43mm for monthly ET. With P value in acceptable range, the correction is useable for further usage

  12. Validation of SCALE-4 criticality sequences using ENDF/B-V data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.; Wright, R.Q.; DeHart, M.D.; Taniuchi, H.

    1993-01-01

    The SCALE code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains criticality safety analysis sequences that include the KENO V.a Monte Carlo code for calculation of the effective multiplication factor. These sequences are widely used for criticality safety analyses performed both in the United States and abroad. The purpose of the current work is to validate the SCALE-4 criticality sequences with an ENDF/B-V cross-section library for future distribution with SCALE-4. The library used for this validation is a broad-group library (44 groups) collapsed from the 238-group SCALE library. Extensive data testing of both the 238-group and the 44-group libraries included 10 fast and 18 thermal CSEWG benchmarks and 5 other fast benchmarks. Both libraries contain approximately 300 nuclides and are, therefore, capable of modeling most systems, including those containing spent fuel or radioactive waste. The validation of the broad-group library used 93 critical experiments as benchmarks. The range of experiments included 60 light-water-reactor fuel rod lattices, 13 mixed-oxide fuel rod lattice, and 15 other low- and high-enriched uranium critical assemblies

  13. Distribution and Validation of CERES Irradiance Global Data Products Via Web Based Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutan, David; Mitrescu, Cristian; Doelling, David; Kato, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    The CERES SYN1deg product provides climate quality 3-hourly globally gridded and temporally complete maps of top of atmosphere, in atmosphere, and surface fluxes. This product requires efficient release to the public and validation to maintain quality assurance. The CERES team developed web-tools for the distribution of both the global gridded products and grid boxes that contain long term validation sites that maintain high quality flux observations at the Earth's surface. These are found at: http://ceres.larc.nasa.gov/order_data.php. In this poster we explore the various tools available to users to sub-set, download, and validate using surface observations the SYN1Deg and Surface-EBAF products. We also analyze differences found in long-term records from well-maintained land surface sites such as the ARM central facility and high quality buoy radiometers, which due to their isolated nature cannot be maintained in a similar manner to their land based counterparts.

  14. Landspotting: Social gaming to collect vast amounts of data for satellite validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, S.; Purgathofer, P.; Kayali, F.; Fellner, M.; Wimmer, M.; Sturn, T.; Triebnig, G.; Krause, S.; Schindler, F.; Kollegger, M.; Perger, C.; Dürauer, M.; Haberl, W.; See, L.; McCallum, I.

    2012-04-01

    At present there is no single satellite-derived global land cover product that is accurate enough to provide reliable estimates of forest or cropland area to determine, e.g., how much additional land is available to grow biofuels or to tackle problems of food security. The Landspotting Project aims to improve the quality of this land cover information by vastly increasing the amount of in-situ validation data available for calibration and validation of satellite-derived land cover. The Geo-Wiki (Geo-Wiki.org) system currently allows users to compare three satellite derived land cover products and validate them using Google Earth. However, there is presently no incentive for anyone to provide this data so the amount of validation through Geo-Wiki has been limited. However, recent competitions have proven that incentive driven campaigns can rapidly create large amounts of input. The LandSpotting Project is taking a truly innovative approach through the development of the Landspotting game. The game engages users whilst simultaneously collecting a large amount of in-situ land cover information. The development of the game is informed by the current raft of successful social gaming that is available on the internet and as mobile applications, many of which are geo-spatial in nature. Games that are integrated within a social networking site such as Facebook illustrate the power to reach and continually engage a large number of individuals. The number of active Facebook users is estimated to be greater than 400 million, where 100 million are accessing Facebook from mobile devices. The Landspotting Game has similar game mechanics as the famous strategy game "Civilization" (i.e. build, harvest, research, war, diplomacy, etc.). When a player wishes to make a settlement, they must first classify the land cover over the area they wish to settle. As the game is played on the earth surface with Google Maps, we are able to record and store this land cover/land use classification

  15. Innovative use of soft data for the validation of a rainfall-runoff model forced by remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Eilander, Dirk; Piet, Marijn; Mulder, Gert

    2013-04-01

    The Chamcar Bei catchment in southern Cambodia is a typical ungauged basin. Neither meteorological data or discharge measurements are available. In this catchment, local farmers are highly dependent on the irrigation system. However, due to the unreliability of the water supply, it was required to make a hydrological model, with which further improvements of the irrigation system could be planned. First, we used knowledge generated in the IAHS decade on Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB) to estimate the annual water balance of the Chamcar Bei catchment. Next, using remotely sensed precipitation, vegetation, elevation and transpiration data, a monthly rainfall-runoff model has been developed. The rainfall-runoff model was linked to the irrigation system reservoir, which allowed to validate the model based on soft data such as historical knowledge of the reservoir water level and groundwater levels visible in wells. This study shows that combining existing remote sensing data and soft ground data can lead to useful modeling results. The approach presented in this study can be applied in other ungauged basins, which can be extremely helpful in managing water resources in developing countries.

  16. Experimental validation of decay heat calculation codes and associated nuclear data libraries for fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    Validity of decay heat calculations for safety designs of fusion reactors was investigated by using decay heat experimental data on thirty-two fusion reactor relevant materials obtained at the 14-MeV neutron source facility of FNS in JAERI. Calculation codes developed in Japan, ACT4 and CINAC version 4, and nuclear data bases such as JENDL/Act-96, FENDL/A-2.0 and Lib90 were used for the calculation. Although several corrections in algorithms for both the calculation codes were needed, it was shown by comparing calculated results with the experimental data that most of activation cross sections and decay data were adequate. In cases of type 316 stainless steel and copper which were important for ITER, prediction accuracy of decay heat within ±10% was confirmed. However, it was pointed out that there were some problems in parts of data such as improper activation cross sections, e,g., the 92 Mo(n, 2n) 91g Mo reaction in FENDL, and lack of activation cross section data, e.g., the 138 Ba(n, 2n) 137m Ba reaction in JENDL. Modifications of cross section data were recommended for 19 reactions in JENDL and FENDL. It was also pointed out that X-ray and conversion electron energies should be included in decay data. (author)

  17. Experimental validation of decay heat calculation codes and associated nuclear data libraries for fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    Validity of decay heat calculations for safety designs of fusion reactors was investigated by using decay heat experimental data on thirty-two fusion reactor relevant materials obtained at the 14-MeV neutron source facility of FNS in JAERI. Calculation codes developed in Japan, ACT4 and CINAC version 4, and nuclear data bases such as JENDL/Act-96, FENDL/A-2.0 and Lib90 were used for the calculation. Although several corrections in algorithms for both the calculation codes were needed, it was shown by comparing calculated results with the experimental data that most of activation cross sections and decay data were adequate. In cases of type 316 stainless steel and copper which were important for ITER, prediction accuracy of decay heat within {+-}10% was confirmed. However, it was pointed out that there were some problems in parts of data such as improper activation cross sections, e,g., the {sup 92}Mo(n, 2n){sup 91g}Mo reaction in FENDL, and lack of activation cross section data, e.g., the {sup 138}Ba(n, 2n){sup 137m}Ba reaction in JENDL. Modifications of cross section data were recommended for 19 reactions in JENDL and FENDL. It was also pointed out that X-ray and conversion electron energies should be included in decay data. (author)

  18. External validation of a decision tree early warning score using only laboratory data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Atkins, Tara E; Öhman, Malin C; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Early warning scores (EWS) have been developed to identify the degree of illness severity among acutely ill patients. One system, The Laboratory Decision Tree Early Warning Score (LDT-EWS) is wholly laboratory data based. Laboratory data was used in the development of a rare...... computerized method, developing a decision tree analysis. This article externally validates LDT-EWS, which is obligatory for an EWS before clinical use. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected data based on a time limited sample of all patients admitted through the medical......) and calibration (precision) as Hosmer-Lemeshow Goodness of fit test. RESULTS: A total of 5858 patients were admitted and 4902 included (83.7%). In-hospital mortality in our final dataset (n=4902) was 3.5%. Discriminatory power (95% CI), identifying in-hospital death was 0.809 (0.777-0.842). Calibration was good...

  19. Absorber and regenerator models for liquid desiccant air conditioning systems. Validation and comparison using experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M.; Heinzen, R.; Jordan, U.; Vajen, K. [Kassel Univ., Inst. of Thermal Engineering, Kassel (Germany); Saman, W.; Halawa, E. [Sustainable Energy Centre, Univ. of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    Solar assisted air conditioning systems using liquid desiccants represent a promising option to decrease high summer energy demand caused by electrically driven vapor compression machines. The main components of liquid desiccant systems are absorbers for dehumidifying and cooling of supply air and regenerators for concentrating the desiccant. However, high efficient and validated reliable components are required and the design and operation have to be adjusted to each respective building design, location, and user demand. Simulation tools can help to optimize component and system design. The present paper presents new developed numerical models for absorbers and regenerators, as well as experimental data of a regenerator prototype. The models have been compared with a finite-difference method model as well as experimental data. The data are gained from the regenerator prototype presented and an absorber presented in the literature. (orig.)

  20. Assessing the Validity of Automated Webcrawlers as Data Collection Tools to Investigate Online Child Sexual Exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, Bryce; Bouchard, Martin; Frank, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of child sexual exploitation (CE) material has been aided by the growth of the Internet. The graphic nature and prevalence of the material has made researching and combating difficult. Although used to study online CE distribution, automated data collection tools (e.g., webcrawlers) have yet to be shown effective at targeting only relevant data. Using CE-related image and keyword criteria, we compare networks starting from CE websites to those from similar non-CE sexuality websites and dissimilar sports websites. Our results provide evidence that (a) webcrawlers have the potential to provide valid CE data, if the appropriate criterion is selected; (b) CE distribution is still heavily image-based suggesting images as an effective criterion; (c) CE-seeded networks are more hub-based and differ from non-CE-seeded networks on several website characteristics. Recommendations for improvements to reliable criteria selection are discussed.

  1. Proceedings of the workshop on integral experiment covariance data for critical safety validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuke, Maik (ed.)

    2016-04-15

    For some time, attempts to quantify the statistical dependencies of critical experiments and to account for them properly in validation procedures were discussed in the literature by various groups. Besides the development of suitable methods especially the quality and modeling issues of the freely available experimental data are in the focus of current discussions, carried out for example in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The same committee compiles and publishes also the freely available experimental data in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Most of these experiments were performed as series and might share parts of experimental setups leading to correlated results. The quality of the determination of these correlations and the underlying covariance data depend strongly on the quality of the documentation of experiments.

  2. CERESVis: A QC Tool for CERES that Leverages Browser Technology for Data Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C.; Sun-Mack, S.; Heckert, E.; Chen, Y.; Doelling, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this poster, we are going to present three user interfaces that CERES team uses to validate pixel-level data. Besides our home grown tools, we will aslo present the browser technology that we use to provide interactive interfaces, such as jquery, HighCharts and Google Earth. We pass data to the users' browsers and use the browsers to do some simple computations. The three user interfaces are: Thumbnails -- it displays hundrends images to allow users to browse 24-hour data files in few seconds. Multiple-synchronized cursors -- it allows users to compare multiple images side by side. Bounding Boxes and Histograms -- it allows users to draw multiple bounding boxes on an image and the browser computes/display the histograms.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on integral experiment covariance data for critical safety validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuke, Maik

    2016-04-01

    For some time, attempts to quantify the statistical dependencies of critical experiments and to account for them properly in validation procedures were discussed in the literature by various groups. Besides the development of suitable methods especially the quality and modeling issues of the freely available experimental data are in the focus of current discussions, carried out for example in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The same committee compiles and publishes also the freely available experimental data in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Most of these experiments were performed as series and might share parts of experimental setups leading to correlated results. The quality of the determination of these correlations and the underlying covariance data depend strongly on the quality of the documentation of experiments.

  4. Using a mobile app and mobile workforce to validate data about emergency public health resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna Marie; Leung, Alison C; Saynisch, Olivia; Griffis, Heather; Hill, Shawndra; Hershey, John C; Becker, Lance B; Asch, David A; Seidman, Ariel; Merchant, Raina Martha

    2014-07-01

    Social media and mobile applications that allow people to work anywhere are changing the way people can contribute and collaborate. We sought to determine the feasibility of using mobile workforce technology to validate the locations of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), an emergency public health resource. We piloted the use of a mobile workforce application, to verify the location of 40 AEDs in Philadelphia county. AEDs were pre-identified in public locations for baseline data. The task of locating AEDs was posted online for a mobile workforce from October 2011 to January 2012. Participants were required to submit a mobile phone photo of AEDs and descriptions of the location. Thirty-five of the 40 AEDs were identified within the study period. Most, 91% (32/35) of the submitted AED photo information was confirmed project baseline data. Participants also provided additional data such as business hours and other nearby AEDs. It is feasible to engage a mobile workforce to complete health research-related tasks. Participants were able to validate information about emergency public health resources. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Development and validation of a nuclear data and calculation system for Superphenix with steel reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosq, J.Ch.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis concerns the definition and the validation of the ERANOS neutronic calculation system for steel reflected fast reactors. The calculation system uses JEF2.2 evaluated nuclear data, the ECCO cell code and the BISTRO and VARIANT transport codes. After a description of the physical phenomena induced by the existence of the these sub-critical media, an inventory of the past studies related to steel reflectors is reported. A calculational scheme taking into account the important physical phenomena (strong neutronic slowing-down, presence of broad resonances of the structural materials and spatial variation of the spectrum in the reflector) is defined. This method is validated with the TRIPOLI4 reference Monte-Carlo code. The use of this upgraded calculation method for the analysis of the part of the CIRANO experimental program devoted to the study of steel reflected configurations leads to discrepancies between the calculated and measured values. These remaining discrepancies obtained for the reactivity and the fission rate traverses are due to inaccurate nuclear data for the structural materials. The adjustment of these nuclear data in order to reduce these discrepancies id demonstrated. The additional uncertainty associated to the integral parameters of interest for a nuclear reactor (reactivity and power distribution) induced by the replacement of a fertile blanket by a steel reflector is determined for the Superphenix reactor and is proved to be small. (author)

  6. Driving simulator validation of driver behavior with limited safe vantage points for data collection in work zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bham, Ghulam H; Leu, Ming C; Vallati, Manoj; Mathur, Durga R

    2014-06-01

    This study is aimed at validating a driving simulator (DS) for the study of driver behavior in work zones. A validation study requires field data collection. For studies conducted in highway work zones, the availability of safe vantage points for data collection at critical locations can be a significant challenge. A validation framework is therefore proposed in this paper, demonstrated using a fixed-based DS that addresses the issue by using a global positioning system (GPS). The validation of the DS was conducted using objective and subjective evaluations. The objective validation was divided into qualitative and quantitative evaluations. The DS was validated by comparing the results of simulation with the field data, which were collected using a GPS along the highway and video recordings at specific locations in a work zone. The constructed work zone scenario in the DS was subjectively evaluated with 46 participants. The objective evaluation established the absolute and relative validity of the DS. The mean speeds from the DS data showed excellent agreement with the field data. The subjective evaluation indicated realistic driving experience by the participants. The use of GPS showed that continuous data collected along the highway can overcome the challenges of unavailability of safe vantage points especially at critical locations. Further, a validated DS can be used for examining driver behavior in complex situations by replicating realistic scenarios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of MOPITT carbon monoxide using ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometer data from NDACC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Rebecca R.; Deeter, Merritt N.; Worden, Helen M.; Gille, John; Edwards, David P.; Hannigan, James W.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Griffith, David W. T.; Smale, Dan; Robinson, John; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Sussmann, Ralf; Hase, Frank; Blumenstock, Thomas; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Langerock, Bavo

    2017-06-01

    The Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite instrument provides the longest continuous dataset of carbon monoxide (CO) from space. We perform the first validation of MOPITT version 6 retrievals using total column CO measurements from ground-based remote-sensing Fourier transform infrared spectrometers (FTSs). Validation uses data recorded at 14 stations, that span a wide range of latitudes (80° N to 78° S), in the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). MOPITT measurements are spatially co-located with each station, and different vertical sensitivities between instruments are accounted for by using MOPITT averaging kernels (AKs). All three MOPITT retrieval types are analyzed: thermal infrared (TIR-only), joint thermal and near infrared (TIR-NIR), and near infrared (NIR-only). Generally, MOPITT measurements overestimate CO relative to FTS measurements, but the bias is typically less than 10 %. Mean bias is 2.4 % for TIR-only, 5.1 % for TIR-NIR, and 6.5 % for NIR-only. The TIR-NIR and NIR-only products consistently produce a larger bias and lower correlation than the TIR-only. Validation performance of MOPITT for TIR-only and TIR-NIR retrievals over land or water scenes is equivalent. The four MOPITT detector element pixels are validated separately to account for their different uncertainty characteristics. Pixel 1 produces the highest standard deviation and lowest correlation for all three MOPITT products. However, for TIR-only and TIR-NIR, the error-weighted average that includes all four pixels often provides the best correlation, indicating compensating pixel biases and well-captured error characteristics. We find that MOPITT bias does not depend on latitude but rather is influenced by the proximity to rapidly changing atmospheric CO. MOPITT bias drift has been bound geographically to within ±0.5 % yr-1 or lower at almost all locations.

  8. Validation and discovery of genotype-phenotype associations in chronic diseases using linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard; Freimuth, Robert; Chute, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates federated SPARQL queries over Linked Open Data (LOD) in the Semantic Web to validate existing, and potentially discover new genotype-phenotype associations from public datasets. In particular, we report our preliminary findings for identifying such associations for commonly occurring chronic diseases using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and Database for SNPs (dbSNP) within the LOD knowledgebase and compare them with Gene Wiki for coverage and completeness. Our results indicate that Semantic Web technologies can play an important role for in-silico identification of novel disease-gene-SNP associations, although additional verification is required before such information can be applied and used effectively.

  9. Initialization of the Euler model MODIS with field data from the 'EPRI plume model validation project'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.; Eppel, D.; Lautenschlager, M.; Mueller, A.

    1985-01-01

    The program deck MODIS (''MOment DIStribution'') is designed to be used as operational tool for modelling the dispersion of a point source under general atmospheric conditions. The concentration distribution is determined by calculating its cross-wind moments on a vertical grid oriented in the main wind direction. The model contains a parametrization for horizontal and vertical coefficients based on a second order closure model. The Eulerian time scales, preliminary determined by fitting measured plume cross sections, are confirmed by comparison with data from the EPRI plume model validation project. (orig.) [de

  10. Exploring Deep Computing in CMS for Automated Data Validation in DQM

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Madrazo, Celia

    2017-01-01

    This project has explored the possibility of inclusion of a variational autoencoder in Automated Data Validation in DQM. The analysis has been carried out only with muon features. The main goal is to reconstruct the given lumisections and check if they can be separated between good and bad lumisections by means of the latent space representation given by the developed autoencoder. At the end, many features of good lumisections seem to be correctly reconstructed but the latent space representation does not give a proper distintion between both types of samples.

  11. Data validation summary report for the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit Round 9 Groundwater Sampling. Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, A.T.

    1996-03-01

    The information provided in this validation summary report includes chemical analyses of samples from 100-BC-5 Operable Unit Round 9 Groundwater sampling data. Data from this sampling event and their related quality assurance (QA) samples were reviewed and validated in accordance with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidelines at the requested level. Sample analyses included metals, general chemistry, and radiochemistry. Sixty metals samples were analyzed by Quanterra Environmental Services (QES) and Lockheed Analytical Services (LAS). The metals samples were validated using WHC protocols specified in Data Validation Procedures for Chemical Analyses. All qualifiers assigned to the metals data were based on this guidance. The Table 1.1 lists the metals sample delivery group (SDG) that were validated for this sampling event

  12. Production and validation of nuclear data for reactor and fuel cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakas, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Toubon, H.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this technical meeting is the improvement of the existing nuclear data and the production of new data of interest for the upstream and downstream of the fuel cycle (enrichment, fabrication, management, storage, transport, reprocessing), for the industrial reactors, the research reactors and the new reactor concepts (criticality, dimensioning, exploitation), for the instrumentation systems (external and internal sensors), the radioprotection, the residual power, the structures (neutron bombardment effect on vessels, rods etc..), and for the activation of steel structures (Fr, Ni, Co). The expected result is the collection of more reliable and accurate data in a wider spectrum of energies and temperatures thanks to more precise computer codes and measurement techniques. This document brings together the communications presented at this meeting and dealing with: the process of production and validation of nuclear data; the measurement facilities and the big international programs; the users needs and the industrial priorities; the basic nuclear data (BND) needs at Cogema; the expression and evaluation of BND; the evaluation work: the efficient cross-sections; the processing of data and the creation of activation libraries; from the integral measurement to the qualification and the feedback on nuclear data. (J.S.)

  13. Validation of iron nuclear data for the neutron calculation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaglio-Gaudard, C.

    2010-01-01

    The GEN-III and GEN-IV reactors will be equipped with heavy reflectors. However, the existing integral validation of the iron nuclear data in the latest JEFF3 European library in the frame of the neutron calculation of the heavy reflector is very partial: some results exist concerning fast reactors but there is no result corresponding to the LWR heavy reflector. No clear trend on the JEFF3 iron cross sections was brought into evidence up to now for fission reactor calculations. Iron nuclear data were completely re-evaluated in the JEFF3 library. Despite the fact that iron is widely used in the nuclear industry, large uncertainties are still associated with its nuclear data, particularly its inelastic cross section which is very important in the neutron slowing down. A validation of 56 Fe nuclear data was performed on the basis of the analysis of integral experiments. Two major critical experiments, the PERLE experiment and the Gas Benchmark, were interpreted with 3D reference Monte-Carlo calculations and the JEFF3.1.1 library. The PERLE experiment was recently performed in the EOLE zero-power facility (CEA Cadarache). This experiment is dedicated to heavy reflector physics in GEN-III light water reactors. It was especially conceived for the validation of iron nuclear data. The Gas Benchmark is representative of a Gas Fast Reactor with a stainless steel reflector (with no fertile blanket) in the MASURCA facility (CEA Cadarache). Radial traverses of reaction rates were measured to characterize flux attenuation at various energies in the reflector. The results of the analysis of both experiments show good agreement between the calculations and the measurements, which is confirmed by the analysis of complementary experiments (ZR-6M, MISTRAL4, CIRANO-ZONA2B). A process of re-estimating the 56 Fe nuclear data was implemented on the basis of feedback from these two experiments and the RDN code. This code relies on a non-linear regression method using an iterative

  14. Designing the Social Context for Easier Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification of Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, B. R.; Loeb, N. G.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification (VVUQ) are key actions that support conclusions based on Earth science data. Communities of data producers and users must undertake VVUQ when they create and use their data. The strategies [S] and tools [T] suggested below come from successful use on two large NASA projects. The first was the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The second is the investigation of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). [S] 1. Partition the production system into subsystems that deal with data transformations confined to limited space and time scales. Simplify the subsystems to minimize the number of data transformations in each subsystem. [S] 2. Derive algorithms from the fundamental physics and chemistry governing the parameters in each subsystem including those for instrument calibration. [S] 3. Use preliminary uncertainty estimates to detect unexpected discrepancies. Removing these requires diagnostic work as well as development and testing of fixes. [S] 4. Make sure there are adequate resources to support multiple end-to-end reprocessing of all data products. [T] 1. Create file identifiers that accommodate temporal and spatial sequences of data files and subsystem version changes. [T] 2. Create libraries of parameters used in common by different subsystems to reduce errors due to inconsistent values. [T] 3. Maintain a list of action items to record progress on resolving discrepancies. [T] 4. Plan on VVUQ activities that use independent data sources and peer review before distributing and archiving data. The goal of VVUQ is to provide a transparent link between the data and the physics and chemistry governing the measured quantities. The VVUQ effort also involves specialized domain experience and nomenclature. It often requires as much effort as the original system development. ERBE and CERES demonstrated that these strategies and tools can reduce the cost of VVUQ for Earth science data products.

  15. Validating administrative data for the detection of adverse events in older hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackroyd-Stolarz S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stacy Ackroyd-Stolarz,1,2 Susan K Bowles,3–5 Lorri Giffin6 1Performance Excellence Portfolio, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 3Geriatric Medicine, Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 4College of Pharmacy and Division of Geriatric Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 5Department of Pharmacy at Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 6South Shore Family Health, Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, Canada Abstract: Older hospitalized patients are at risk of experiencing adverse events including, but not limited to, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events. A significant challenge in monitoring and managing adverse events is lack of readily accessible information on their occurrence. Purpose: The objective of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to validate diagnostic codes for pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events found in routinely collected administrative hospitalization data. Methods: All patients 65 years of age or older discharged between April 1, 2009 and March 31, 2011 from a provincial academic health sciences center in Canada were eligible for inclusion in the validation study. For each of the three types of adverse events, a random sample of 50 patients whose records were positive and 50 patients whose records were not positive for an adverse event was sought for review in the validation study (n=300 records in total. A structured health record review was performed independently by two health care providers with experience in geriatrics, both of whom were unaware of the patient's status with respect to adverse event coding. A physician reviewed 40 records (20 reviewed by each health care provider to establish interrater agreement. Results: A total of 39 pressure ulcers, 56 fall

  16. Estimating mortality from external causes using data from retrospective surveys: A validation study in Niakhar (Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Pison

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, data on causes of death is often inaccurate or incomplete. In this paper, we test whether adding a few questions about injuries and accidents to mortality questionnaires used in representative household surveys would yield accurate estimates of the extent of mortality due to external causes (accidents, homicides, or suicides. Methods: We conduct a validation study in Niakhar (Senegal, during which we compare reported survey data to high-quality prospective records of deaths collected by a health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS. Results: Survey respondents more frequently list the deaths of their adult siblings who die of external causes than the deaths of those who die from other causes. The specificity of survey data is high, but sensitivity is low. Among reported deaths, less than 60Š of the deaths classified as due to external causes by the HDSS are also classified as such by survey respondents. Survey respondents better report deaths due to road-traffic accidents than deaths from suicides and homicides. Conclusions: Asking questions about deaths resulting from injuries and accidents during surveys might help measure mortality from external causes in LMICs, but the resulting data displays systematic bias in a rural population of Senegal. Future studies should 1 investigate whether similar biases also apply in other settings and 2 test new methods to further improve the accuracy of survey data on mortality from external causes. Contribution: This study helps strengthen the monitoring of sustainable development targets in LMICs by validating a simple approach for the measurement of mortality from external causes.

  17. K-means clustering versus validation measures: a data-distribution perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hui; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Jian

    2009-04-01

    K-means is a well-known and widely used partitional clustering method. While there are considerable research efforts to characterize the key features of the K-means clustering algorithm, further investigation is needed to understand how data distributions can have impact on the performance of K-means clustering. To that end, in this paper, we provide a formal and organized study of the effect of skewed data distributions on K-means clustering. Along this line, we first formally illustrate that K-means tends to produce clusters of relatively uniform size, even if input data have varied "true" cluster sizes. In addition, we show that some clustering validation measures, such as the entropy measure, may not capture this uniform effect and provide misleading information on the clustering performance. Viewed in this light, we provide the coefficient of variation (CV) as a necessary criterion to validate the clustering results. Our findings reveal that K-means tends to produce clusters in which the variations of cluster sizes, as measured by CV, are in a range of about 0.3-1.0. Specifically, for data sets with large variation in "true" cluster sizes (e.g., CV > 1.0), K-means reduces variation in resultant cluster sizes to less than 1.0. In contrast, for data sets with small variation in "true" cluster sizes (e.g., CV K-means increases variation in resultant cluster sizes to greater than 0.3. In other words, for the earlier two cases, K-means produces the clustering results which are away from the "true" cluster distributions.

  18. Development and validity data of the Brazilian Internet Study on Temperament and Psychopathology (BRAINSTEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Diogo R; Ottoni, Gustavo L; Brunstein, Miriam G; Frozi, Julia; de Carvalho, Hudson W; Bisol, Luísa W

    2012-12-10

    The internet provides a research opportunity for psychiatry and psychology. This article presents the development and preliminary data of a large web-survey created to study how temperament relates to other psychological measures, behavior and psychiatric disorders. We used the Affective and Emotional Composite Temperament Scale (AFECTS) to evaluate temperament and we selected several self-report instruments to evaluate behavior, psychological constructs and mental disorders. The system provides anonymous psychological (phase 1) and psychiatric (phase 2) feedback and includes questions to assess the validity of the answers. Each phase has around 450 questions. This system was broadcast utilizing Brazilian media. After the exclusion of 21.5% of the volunteers (those who failed the validation questions), 41,427 participants concluded the first part of the system (mean age=31.2±10.5 yrs, 26.9% males), and 21,836 (mean age=32.5±10.9 yrs, 25.1% males) completed phase 2. Around 25% have received a psychiatric diagnosis from a mental health professional. Demographic and temperament profiles of those who completed either only 80 questions, only phase 1, or the whole system were similar. The rate of non-serious answers (e.g. on bizarre behaviors) was very low and congruency of answers was very high. The internal consistency of classical trait scales (TCI-R and PANAS) was high (Cronbach's alpha>0.80) for all dimensions. Relatively high dropout rate due to the length of the process and an overrepresentation of female, young and well-educated subjects. The BRAINSTEP provides valid and abundant data on psychological and psychiatric measures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of the CATHARE2 code against experimental data from Brayton-cycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentivoglio, Fabrice; Tauveron, Nicolas; Geffraye, Genevieve; Gentner, Herve

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has commissioned a wide range of feasibility studies of future-advanced nuclear reactors, in particular gas-cooled reactors (GCR). The thermohydraulic behaviour of these systems is a key issue for, among other things, the design of the core, the assessment of thermal stresses, and the design of decay heat removal systems. These studies therefore require efficient and reliable simulation tools capable of modelling the whole reactor, including the core, the core vessel, piping, heat exchangers and turbo-machinery. CATHARE2 is a thermal-hydraulic 1D reference safety code developed and extensively validated for the French pressurized water reactors. It has been recently adapted to deal also with gas-cooled reactor applications. In order to validate CATHARE2 for these new applications, CEA has initiated an ambitious long-term experimental program. The foreseen experimental facilities range from small-scale loops for physical correlations, to component technology and system demonstration loops. In the short-term perspective, CATHARE2 is being validated against existing experimental data. And in particular from the German power plants Oberhausen I and II. These facilities have both been operated by the German utility Energie Versorgung Oberhausen (E.V.O.) and their power conversion systems resemble to the high-temperature reactor concepts: Oberhausen I is a 13.75-MWe Brayton-cycle air turbine plant, and Oberhausen II is a 50-MWe Brayton-cycle helium turbine plant. The paper presents these two plants, the adopted CATHARE2 modelling and a comparison between experimental data and code results for both steady state and transient cases

  20. Sensor Selection and Data Validation for Reliable Integrated System Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    For new access to space systems with challenging mission requirements, effective implementation of integrated system health management (ISHM) must be available early in the program to support the design of systems that are safe, reliable, highly autonomous. Early ISHM availability is also needed to promote design for affordable operations; increased knowledge of functional health provided by ISHM supports construction of more efficient operations infrastructure. Lack of early ISHM inclusion in the system design process could result in retrofitting health management systems to augment and expand operational and safety requirements; thereby increasing program cost and risk due to increased instrumentation and computational complexity. Having the right sensors generating the required data to perform condition assessment, such as fault detection and isolation, with a high degree of confidence is critical to reliable operation of ISHM. Also, the data being generated by the sensors needs to be qualified to ensure that the assessments made by the ISHM is not based on faulty data. NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing technologies for sensor selection and data validation as part of the FDDR (Fault Detection, Diagnosis, and Response) element of the Upper Stage project of the Ares 1 launch vehicle development. This presentation will provide an overview of the GRC approach to sensor selection and data quality validation and will present recent results from applications that are representative of the complexity of propulsion systems for access to space vehicles. A brief overview of the sensor selection and data quality validation approaches is provided below. The NASA GRC developed Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4) is a model-based procedure for systematically and quantitatively selecting an optimal sensor suite to provide overall health assessment of a host system. S4 can be logically partitioned into three major subdivisions: the knowledge base, the down

  1. International integral experiments databases in support of nuclear data and code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gado, Janos; Hunter, Hamilton; Kodeli, Ivan; Salvatores, Massimo; Sartori, Enrico

    2002-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists. The NSC has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. The databases so far established or in preparation related to nuclear data validation cover the following areas: SINBAD - A Radiation Shielding Experiments database encompassing reactor shielding, fusion blanket neutronics, and accelerator shielding. ICSBEP - International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project Handbook, with more than 2500 critical configurations with different combination of materials and spectral indices. IRPhEP - International Reactor Physics Experimental Benchmarks Evaluation Project. The different projects are described in the following including results achieved, work in progress and planned. (author)

  2. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Nakamura

    2016-06-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM papaya (Carica papaya L. line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976. Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided.

  3. Validity of proxy data obtained by different psychological autopsy information reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, L; Zhang, J

    2010-01-01

    Two informants were interviewed for each of 416 living controls (individuals sampled from the normal population) interviewed in a Chinese case-control psychological autopsy study. The validity of proxy data, obtained using seven psychological autopsy information reconstruction techniques (types 1, 2 and A - E), was evaluated, with living controls' self reports used as the gold-standard. Proxy data for reconstruction technique types 1, 2 and D on the Impulsivity Inventory Scale (total impulsivity score) were no different from the living controls' self report gold standard, whereas data for types A and E were smaller than data from living controls. On the 'acceptance or resignation' sub-scale of the avoidance coping dimension of the Moos Coping Response Inventory, information obtained by reconstruction technique types 1 and D was not significantly different from the living controls' self reports, whereas proxy data from types 2, A and E were smaller than those from the living controls. No statistically significant differences were identified for other proxy data obtained by reconstruction technique types 1, 2, A, D and E. These results indicate that using a second informant does not significantly enhance information reconstruction for the target.

  4. Accuracy of postpartum haemorrhage data in the 2011 Victorian Perinatal Data Collection: Results of a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Margaret; Pollock, Wendy; McDonald, Susan J; Davey, Mary-Ann

    2018-04-01

    The postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) rate in Victoria in 2009 for women having their first birth, based on information reported to the Victorian Perinatal Data Collection (VPDC), was 23.6% (primiparas). Prior to 2009 PPH was collected via a tick box item on the perinatal form. Estimated blood loss (EBL) volume is now collected and it is from this item the PPH rate is calculated. Periodic assessment of data accuracy is essential to inform clinicians and others who rely on these data of their quality and limitations. This paper describes the results of a state-wide validation study of the accuracy of EBL volume and EBL-related data items reported to VPDC. PPH data from a random sample of 1% of births in Victoria in 2011 were extracted from source medical records and compared with information submitted to the VPDC. Accuracy was determined, together with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for dichotomous items. Accuracy of reporting for EBL ≥ 500 mL was 97.2% and for EBL ≥ 1500 mL was 99.7%. Sensitivity for EBL ≥ 500 mL was 89.0% (CI 83.1-93.0) and for EBL ≥ 1500 mL was 71.4% (CI 35.9-91.8). Blood product transfusion, peripartum hysterectomy and procedures to control bleeding were all accurately reported in >99% of cases. Most PPH-related data items in the 2011 VPDC may be considered reliable. Our results suggest EBL ≥ 1500 mL is likely to be under-reported. Changes to policies and practices of recording blood loss could further increase accuracy of reporting. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Complementary techniques: validation of gene expression data by quantitative real time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Maurizio; Mocellin, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Microarray technology can be considered the most powerful tool for screening gene expression profiles of biological samples. After data mining, results need to be validated with highly reliable biotechniques allowing for precise quantitation of transcriptional abundance of identified genes. Quantitative real time PCR (qrt-PCR) technology has recently reached a level of sensitivity, accuracy and practical ease that support its use as a routine bioinstrumentation for gene level measurement. Currently, qrt-PCR is considered by most experts the most appropriate method to confirm or confute microarray-generated data. The knowledge of the biochemical principles underlying qrt-PCR as well as some related technical issues must be beard in mind when using this biotechnology.

  6. Validation of a realistic powder sample using data from DMC at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willendrup, Peter; Filges, Uwe; Keller, Lukas; Farhi, Emmanuel; Lefmann, Kim

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a virtual experiment, carried out by means of a McStas simulation of the powder diffractometer DMC at PSI, using the new powder sample component PowderN. This powder component takes tabulated crystallographic input to define realistic powder lines. The simulated output data from the virtual experiment on the compound Na 2 Ca 3 Al 2 F 14 are compared to real measurement data from the DMC instrument. The agreement is very good with respect to peak positions, widths, background intensity and relative peak intensities. This work represents an important step towards reliable virtual experiments and also act as a validation of the PowderN sample component in McStas

  7. Validation of a realistic powder sample using data from DMC at PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willendrup, Peter [Riso National Laboratory, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)]. E-mail: peter.willendrup@risoe.dk; Filges, Uwe [Laboratory for Development and Methods ETHZ and PSI CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Keller, Lukas [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering ETHZ and PSI CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Farhi, Emmanuel [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) Grenoble, 6 rue J. Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lefmann, Kim [Riso National Laboratory, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2006-11-15

    We present results of a virtual experiment, carried out by means of a McStas simulation of the powder diffractometer DMC at PSI, using the new powder sample component PowderN. This powder component takes tabulated crystallographic input to define realistic powder lines. The simulated output data from the virtual experiment on the compound Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}F{sub 14} are compared to real measurement data from the DMC instrument. The agreement is very good with respect to peak positions, widths, background intensity and relative peak intensities. This work represents an important step towards reliable virtual experiments and also act as a validation of the PowderN sample component in McStas.

  8. The COSIMA-experiments, a data base for validation of two-phase flow computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.; Meyder, R.; Stratmanns, E.

    1985-12-01

    The report presents an overview on the large data base generated with COSIMA. The data base is to be used to validate and develop computer codes for two-phase flow. In terms of fuel rod behavior it was found that during blowdown under realistic conditions only small strains are reached. For clad rupture extremely high rod internal pressure is necessary. Additionally important results were found in the behavior of a fuel rod simulator and on the effect of thermocouples attached on the cladding outer surface. Post-test calculations, performed with the codes RELAP and DRUFAN show a good agreement with the experiments. This however can be improved if the phase separation models in the codes would be updated. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Experimental validation of a linear model for data reduction in chirp-pulse microwave CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, M; Orikasa, K; Bertero, M; Boccacci, P; Conte, F; Piana, M

    2002-04-01

    Chirp-pulse microwave computerized tomography (CP-MCT) is an imaging modality developed at the Department of Biocybernetics, University of Niigata (Niigata, Japan), which intends to reduce the microwave-tomography problem to an X-ray-like situation. We have recently shown that data acquisition in CP-MCT can be described in terms of a linear model derived from scattering theory. In this paper, we validate this model by showing that the theoretically computed response function is in good agreement with the one obtained from a regularized multiple deconvolution of three data sets measured with the prototype of CP-MCT. Furthermore, the reliability of the model as far as image restoration in concerned, is tested in the case of space-invariant conditions by considering the reconstruction of simple on-axis cylindrical phantoms.

  10. Validation of a realistic powder sample using data from DMC at PSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Filges, U.; Keller, L.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a virtual experiment, carried out by means of a McStas simulation of the powder diffractometer DMC at PSI, using the new powder sample component PowderN. This powder component takes tabulated crystallographic input to define realistic powder lines. The simulated output data...... from the virtual experiment on the compound Na2Ca3Al2F14 are compared to real measurement data from the DMC instrument. The agreement is very good with respect to peak positions, widths, background intensity and relative peak intensities. This work represents an important step towards reliable virtual...... experiments and also act as a validation of the PowderN sample component in McStas....

  11. Validation of the mathematical model of the NAPS PHT system flow with test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh Kumar, K.; Vani, K.; Chakraborty, G.; Venkat Raj, V.

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic analysis code to predict the time dependent behaviour of the reactor coolant system flow following the tripping and starting of Primary Circulating Pumps in the different operating modes has been developed for Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) type power plants. The model is comprised of reactor coolant momentum equation, Primary Heat Transport (PHT) pump dynamic equation and pump characteristics. This model forms one of the modules of the integrated system code being developed for transient analysis of 220 MWe PHWR power plants. The Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) PHT system flow transient results for different combinations of pump operation predicted by the model have been compared with the experimental data obtained from a test carried out in NAPS-2 for validation of the model. The predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs

  12. Validation of neutron data libraries by backscattered spectra of Pu-Be Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    El-Agib, I

    1999-01-01

    Elastically backscattered spectra of Pu-Be neutrons have been measured for SiO sub 2 , water, graphite, paraffin oil and Al slabs using a proton recoil spectrometer. The results were compared with the calculated spectra obtained by the three-dimensional Monte-Carlo transport code MCNP-4B and point-wise cross sections from the ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3.1 and BROND-2 data libraries. The good agreement between the measured and calculated results indicates that this procedure can be used for validation of different data libraries. This simple method renders possible the detection of oxygen, carbon and hydrogen in bulk samples. (author)

  13. Validity of Self-reported Healthcare Utilization Data in the Community Health Survey in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Hwayoung; Lee, Kunsei; Chang, Sounghoon; Hovell, Melbourne F; Kim, Young-Taek; Kim, Yuna; Kang, Gilwon; Tak, Yangju; Im, Jeehye

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of Community Health Survey (CHS), we analyzed data from 11,217 participants aged ≥ 19 yr, in 13 cities and counties in 2008. Three healthcare utilization indices (admission, outpatient visits, dental visits) as comparative variables and the insurance benefit claim data of the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service as the gold-standard were used. The sensitivities of admission, outpatient visits, and dental visits in CHS were 54.8%, 52.1%, and 61.0%, respectively. The specificities were 96.4%, 85.6%, and 82.7%, respectively. This is the first study to evaluate the validity of nationwide health statistics resulting from questionnaire surveys and shows that CHS needs a lot of efforts to reflect the true health status, health behavior, and healthcare utilization of the population. PMID:22065895

  14. Ageing nuclear plants inspection, maintenance and performance monitoring eased by Data Validation and Reconciliation (DVR) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quang, A. Tran; Chares, R.

    2012-01-01

    With the long term operation of nuclear power plants, decisions to replace or repair should be optimized from an economical, human resource and safety point of view. In that frame, the operation requires a continuous inspection and testing of systems in order to detect degradations and failures at an early stage. Nevertheless, in spite of the fact that such assiduous vigilance ensures safety, it is not optimized in terms of man power and maintenance costs. Preventive strategies show the same types of drawbacks. On top of that, these maintenance procedures rely on process measurements which accuracy, availability and reliability cannot always be ensured. The present paper introduces a new approach to the maintenance management of ageing installations and suggests a method that overcomes the actual drawbacks. The Reconciliation and Validation of data (DVR) is an advanced and innovative technology that relies on process data statistics, thermodynamic and on-site process knowledge. Benefits of real-time applications are also presented. (author)

  15. Validation of a CFD methodology for positive displacement LVAD analysis using PIV data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvitz, Richard B; Reddy, Varun; Deutsch, Steve; Manning, Keefe B; Paterson, Eric G

    2009-11-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to asses the hydrodynamic performance of a positive displacement left ventricular assist device. The computational model uses implicit large eddy simulation direct resolution of the chamber compression and modeled valve closure to reproduce the in vitro results. The computations are validated through comparisons with experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) data. Qualitative comparisons of flow patterns, velocity fields, and wall-shear rates demonstrate a high level of agreement between the computations and experiments. Quantitatively, the PIV and CFD show similar probed velocity histories, closely matching jet velocities and comparable wall-strain rates. Overall, it has been shown that CFD can provide detailed flow field and wall-strain rate data, which is important in evaluating blood pump performance.

  16. Validation of GPS atmospheric water vapor with WVR data in satellite tracking mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, M.; Heise, S.; Bender, M.; Dick, G.; Ramatschi, M.; Wickert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Slant-integrated water vapor (SIWV) data derived from GPS STDs (slant total delays), which provide the spatial information on tropospheric water vapor, have a high potential for assimilation to weather models or for nowcasting or reconstruction of the 3-D humidity field with tomographic techniques. Therefore, the accuracy of GPS STD is important, and independent observations are needed to estimate the quality of GPS STD. In 2012 the GFZ (German Research Centre for Geosciences) started to operate a microwave radiometer in the vicinity of the Potsdam GPS station. The water vapor content along the line of sight between a ground station and a GPS satellite can be derived from GPS data and directly measured by a water vapor radiometer (WVR) at the same time. In this study we present the validation results of SIWV observed by a ground-based GPS receiver and a WVR. The validation covers 184 days of data with dry and wet humidity conditions. SIWV data from GPS and WVR generally show good agreement with a mean bias of -0.4 kg m-2 and an rms (root mean square) of 3.15 kg m-2. The differences in SIWV show an elevation dependent on an rms of 7.13 kg m-2 below 15° but of 1.76 kg m-2 above 15°. Nevertheless, this elevation dependence is not observed regarding relative deviations. The relation between the differences and possible influencing factors (elevation angles, pressure, temperature and relative humidity) are analyzed in this study. Besides the elevation, dependencies between the atmospheric humidity conditions, temperature and the differences in SIWV are found.

  17. Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Model IMS Model Suite and its Validation against Experimental Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartok, J.

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation presents IMS Lagrangian Dispersion Model, which is a 'new generation' Slovak dispersion model of long-range transport, developed by MicroStep-MIS. It solves trajectory equation for a vast number of Lagrangian 'particles' and stochastic equation that simulates the effects of turbulence. Model contains simulation of radioactive decay (full decay chains of more than 300 nuclides), and dry and wet deposition. Model was integrated into IMS Model Suite, a system in which several models and modules can run and cooperate, e.g. LAM model WRF preparing fine resolution meteorological data for dispersion. The main theme of the work is validation of dispersion model against large scale international campaigns CAPTEX and ETEX, which are two of the largest tracer experiments. Validation addressed treatment of missing data, data interpolation into comparable temporal and spatial representation. The best model results were observed for ETEX I, standard results for CAPTEXes and worst results for ETEX II, known in modelling community for its meteorological conditions that can be hardly resolved by models. The IMS Lagrangian Dispersion Model was identified as capable long range dispersion model for slowly- or nonreacting chemicals and radioactive matter. Influence of input data on simulation quality is discussed within the work. Additional modules were prepared according to praxis requirement: a) Recalculation of concentrations of radioactive pollutant into effective doses form inhalation, immersion in the plume and deposition. b) Dispersion of mineral dust was added and tested in desert locality, where wind and soil moisture were firstly analysed and forecast by WRF. The result was qualitatively verified in case study against satellite observations. (author)

  18. Validation of internet-based self-reported anthropometric, demographic data and participant identity in the Food4Me study

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND In e-health intervention studies, there are concerns about the reliability of internet-based, self-reported (SR) data and about the potential for identity fraud. This study introduced and tested a novel procedure for assessing the validity of internet-based, SR identity and validated anth...

  19. The data requirements for the verification and validation of a fuel performance code - the transuranus perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, A.; Di Marcello, V.; Rondinella, V.; Van De Laar, J.; Van Uffelen, P.

    2013-01-01

    In general, the verification and validation (V and V) of a fuel performance code like TRANSURANUS consists of three basic steps: a) verifying the correctness and numerical stability of the sub-models; b) comparing the sub-models with experimental data; c) comparing the results of the integral fuel performance code with experimental data Only the second and third steps of the V and V rely on experimental information. This scheme can be further detailed according to the physical origin of the data: on one hand, in-reactor ('in-pile') experimental data are generated in the course of the irradiation; on the other hand ex-reactor ('out-of-pile') experimental data are obtained for instance from various postirradiation examinations (PIE) or dedicated experiments with fresh samples. For both categories, we will first discuss the V and V of sub-models of TRANSURANUS related to separate aspects of the fuel behaviour: this includes the radial variation of the composition and fissile isotopes, the thermal properties of the fuel (e.g. thermal conductivity, melting temperature, etc.), the mechanical properties of fuel and cladding (e.g. elastic constants, creep properties), as well as the models for the fission product behaviour. Secondly, the integral code verification will be addressed as it treats various aspects of the fuel behaviour, including the geometrical changes in the fuel and the gas pressure and composition of the free volume in the rod. (authors)

  20. Satellite Validation: A Project to Create a Data-Logging System to Monitor Lake Tahoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rudy A.

    2005-01-01

    Flying aboard the satellite Terra, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is an imaging instrument used to acquire detailed maps of Earth's surface temperature, elevation, emissivity, and reflectance. An automated site consisting of four buoys was established 6 years ago at Lake Tahoe for the validation of ASTERS thermal infrared data. Using Campbell CR23X Dataloggers, a replacement system to be deployed on a buoy was designed and constructed for the measurement of the lake's temperature profile, surrounding air temperature, humidity, wind direction and speed, net radiation, and surface skin temperature. Each Campbell Datalogger has been programmed to control, power, and monitor 14 different temperature sensors, a JPL-built radiometer, and an RM Young 32500 meteorological station. The logger communicates with the radiometer and meteorological station through a Campbell SDM-SIO4 RS232 serial interface, sending polling commands, and receiving filtered data back from the sensors. This data is then cataloged and sent back across a cellular modem network every hour to JPL. Each instrument is wired via a panel constructed with 18 individual plugs that allow for simple installation and expansion. Data sent back from the system are analyzed at JPL, where they are used to calibrate ASTER data.

  1. Injury surveillance in community sport: Can we obtain valid data from sports trainers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekegren, C L; Gabbe, B J; Finch, C F

    2015-06-01

    A lack of available injury data on community sports participants has hampered the development of informed preventive strategies for the broad-base of sports participation. In community sports settings, sports trainers or first-aiders are well-placed to carry out injury surveillance, but few studies have evaluated their ability to do so. The aim of this study was to investigate the reporting rate and completeness of sports trainers' injury records and agreement between sports trainers' and players' reports of injury in community Australian football. Throughout the football season, one sports trainer from each of four clubs recorded players' injuries. To validate these data, we collected self-reported injury data from players via short message service (SMS). In total, 210 discrete injuries were recorded for 139 players, 21% by sports trainers only, 59% by players via SMS only, and 21% by both. Completeness of injury records ranged from 95% to 100%. Agreement between sports trainers and players ranged from K = 0.32 (95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.37) for date of return to football to K = 1.00 for activity when injured. Injury data collected by sports trainers may be of adequate quality for providing an understanding of the profile of injuries. However, data are likely to underestimate injury rates and should be interpreted with caution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Validation and Refinement of a Pain Information Model from EHR Flowsheet Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Bonnie L; Johnson, Steven G; Ali, Samira; Bavuso, Karen M; Cruz, Christopher A; Collins, Sarah; Furukawa, Meg; Hook, Mary L; LaFlamme, Anne; Lytle, Kay; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Rajchel, Tari; Settergren, Theresa Tess; Westman, Kathryn F; Whittenburg, Luann

    2018-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data can reduce costs of research and quality reporting. However, EHR data must be consistent within and across organizations. Flowsheet data provide a rich source of interprofessional data and represents a high volume of documentation; however, content is not standardized. Health care organizations design and implement customized content for different care areas creating duplicative data that is noncomparable. In a prior study, 10 information models (IMs) were derived from an EHR that included 2.4 million patients. There was a need to evaluate the generalizability of the models across organizations. The pain IM was selected for evaluation and refinement because pain is a commonly occurring problem associated with high costs for pain management. The purpose of our study was to validate and further refine a pain IM from EHR flowsheet data that standardizes pain concepts, definitions, and associated value sets for assessments, goals, interventions, and outcomes. A retrospective observational study was conducted using an iterative consensus-based approach to map, analyze, and evaluate data from 10 organizations. The aggregated metadata from the EHRs of 8 large health care organizations and the design build in 2 additional organizations represented flowsheet data from 6.6 million patients, 27 million encounters, and 683 million observations. The final pain IM has 30 concepts, 4 panels (classes), and 396 value set items. Results are built on Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) pain assessment terms and extend the need for additional terms to support interoperability. The resulting pain IM is a consensus model based on actual EHR documentation in the participating health systems. The IM captures the most important concepts related to pain. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  3. Dual Rotating Rake Measurements of Higher-Order Duct Modes: Validation Using Experimental and Numerical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Duane R.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2018-01-01

    A rotating rake mode measurement system was designed to measure acoustic duct modes generated by a fan stage. After analysis of the measured data, the mode coefficient amplitudes and phases were quantified. Early studies using this system found that mode power levels computed from rotating rake measured data would agree with the far-field power levels. However, this agreement required that the sound from the noise sources within the duct propagated outward from the duct exit without reflection and previous studies suggested conditions could exist where significant reflections could occur. This paper shows that mounting a second rake to the rotating system, with an offset in both the axial and the azimuthal directions, measures the data necessary to determine the modes propagating in both directions within a duct. The rotating rake data analysis technique was extended to include the data measured by the second rake. The analysis resulted in a set of circumferential mode coefficients at each of the two rake microphone locations. Radial basis functions were then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode coefficients for the modes propagating in both directions within the duct while accounting for the presence of evanescent modes. The validation of the dual-rotating-rake measurements was conducted using data from a combination of experiments and numerical calculations to compute reflection coefficients and other mode coefficient ratios. Compared to results from analytical and numerical computations, the results from dual-rotating-rake measured data followed the expected trends when frequency, mode number, and duct termination geometry were changed.

  4. A statistical framework for the validation of a population exposure model based on personal exposure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Delphy; Valari, Myrto; Markakis, Konstantinos; Payan, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Currently, ambient pollutant concentrations at monitoring sites are routinely measured by local networks, such as AIRPARIF in Paris, France. Pollutant concentration fields are also simulated with regional-scale chemistry transport models such as CHIMERE (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere) under air-quality forecasting platforms (e.g. Prev'Air http://www.prevair.org) or research projects. These data may be combined with more or less sophisticated techniques to provide a fairly good representation of pollutant concentration spatial gradients over urban areas. Here we focus on human exposure to atmospheric contaminants. Based on census data on population dynamics and demographics, modeled outdoor concentrations and infiltration of outdoor air-pollution indoors we have developed a population exposure model for ozone and PM2.5. A critical challenge in the field of population exposure modeling is model validation since personal exposure data are expensive and therefore, rare. However, recent research has made low cost mobile sensors fairly common and therefore personal exposure data should become more and more accessible. In view of planned cohort field-campaigns where such data will be available over the Paris region, we propose in the present study a statistical framework that makes the comparison between modeled and measured exposures meaningful. Our ultimate goal is to evaluate the exposure model by comparing modeled exposures to monitor data. The scientific question we address here is how to downscale modeled data that are estimated on the county population scale at the individual scale which is appropriate to the available measurements. To assess this question we developed a Bayesian hierarchical framework that assimilates actual individual data into population statistics and updates the probability estimate.

  5. Intelligibility in Context Scale: Normative and Validation Data for English-Speaking Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sharynne; Crowe, Kathryn; Shahaeian, Ameneh

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe normative and validation data on the Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS; McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012c) for English-speaking children. The ICS is a 7-item, parent-report measure of children's speech intelligibility with a range of communicative partners. Data were collected from the parents of 803 Australian English-speaking children ranging in age from 4;0 (years;months) to 5;5 (37.0% were multilingual). The mean ICS score was 4.4 (SD = 0.7) out of a possible total score of 5. Children's speech was reported to be most intelligible to their parents, followed by their immediate family, friends, and teachers; children's speech was least intelligible to strangers. The ICS had high internal consistency (α = .94). Significant differences in scores were identified on the basis of sex and age but not on the basis of socioeconomic status or the number of languages spoken. There were significant differences in scores between children whose parents had concerns about their child's speech (M = 3.9) and those who did not (M = 4.6). A sensitivity of .82 and a specificity of .58 were established as the optimal cutoff. Test-retest reliability and criterion validity were established for 184 children with a speech sound disorder. There was a significant low correlation between the ICS mean score and percentage of phonemes correct (r = .30), percentage of consonants correct (r = .24), and percentage of vowels correct (r = .30) on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology (Dodd, Hua, Crosbie, Holm, & Ozanne, 2002). Thirty-one parents completed the ICS related to English and another language spoken by their child with a speech sound disorder. The significant correlations between the scores suggest that the ICS may be robust between languages. This article provides normative ICS data for English-speaking children and additional validation of the psychometric properties of the ICS. The robustness of the ICS was suggested

  6. CFD Code Validation against Stratified Air-Water Flow Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Terzuoli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressurized thermal shock (PTS modelling has been identified as one of the most important industrial needs related to nuclear reactor safety. A severe PTS scenario limiting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV lifetime is the cold water emergency core cooling (ECC injection into the cold leg during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA. Since it represents a big challenge for numerical simulations, this scenario was selected within the European Platform for Nuclear Reactor Simulations (NURESIM Integrated Project as a reference two-phase problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFDs code validation. This paper presents a CFD analysis of a stratified air-water flow experimental investigation performed at the Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse in 1985, which shares some common physical features with the ECC injection in PWR cold leg. Numerical simulations have been carried out with two commercial codes (Fluent and Ansys CFX, and a research code (NEPTUNE CFD. The aim of this work, carried out at the University of Pisa within the NURESIM IP, is to validate the free surface flow model implemented in the codes against experimental data, and to perform code-to-code benchmarking. Obtained results suggest the relevance of three-dimensional effects and stress the importance of a suitable interface drag modelling.

  7. Development and validation of a dissolution test for lodenafil carbonate based on in vivo data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codevilla, Cristiane Franco; Castilhos, Tamara dos Santos; Cirne, Carolina Araújo; Froehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2014-04-01

    Lodenafil carbonate is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Currently, there is no dissolution test reported for lodenafil carbonate and this drug is not listed in any pharmacopoeia. The present study focused on the development and validation of a dissolution test for lodenafil carbonate tablets, using a simulated absorption profile based on in vivo data. The appropriate conditions were determined after testing sink conditions. Different conditions as medium, surfactant concentration and rotation speed were evaluated. The percentage of dose absorbed was calculated by deconvolution, using the Wagner-Nelson method. According to the obtained results, the use of 0.1 M HCl + 1.5% SLS (900 mL, at 37 + 0.5 °C) as the dissolution medium, paddles at 25 rpm were considered adequate. The samples were quantified by UV spectroscopy at 295 nm and the validation was performed according to international guidelines. The method showed specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision, within the acceptable range. Kinetics of drug release was better described by the first-order model. The proposed dissolution test can be used for the routine quality control of lodenafil carbonate in tablets.

  8. CFD Code Validation against Stratified Air-Water Flow Experimental Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzuoli, F.; Galassi, M.C.; Mazzini, D.; D'Auria, F.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) modelling has been identified as one of the most important industrial needs related to nuclear reactor safety. A severe PTS scenario limiting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lifetime is the cold water emergency core cooling (ECC) injection into the cold leg during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Since it represents a big challenge for numerical simulations, this scenario was selected within the European Platform for Nuclear Reactor Simulations (NURESIM) Integrated Project as a reference two-phase problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) code validation. This paper presents a CFD analysis of a stratified air-water flow experimental investigation performed at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse in 1985, which shares some common physical features with the ECC injection in PWR cold leg. Numerical simulations have been carried out with two commercial codes (Fluent and Ansys CFX), and a research code (NEPTUNE CFD). The aim of this work, carried out at the University of Pisa within the NURESIM IP, is to validate the free surface flow model implemented in the codes against experimental data, and to perform code-to-code benchmarking. Obtained results suggest the relevance of three-dimensional effects and stress the importance of a suitable interface drag modelling

  9. Quantifying the foodscape: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the validity of commercially available business data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Alexandre; Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Block, Jason P.; Walker, Renée; Lalonde, Benoît; Kestens, Yan; Subramanian, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews studies of the validity of commercially available business (CAB) data on food establishments (“the foodscape”), offering a meta-analysis of characteristics associated with CAB quality and a case study evaluating the performance of commonly-used validity indicators describing the foodscape. Existing validation studies report a broad range in CAB data quality, although most studies conclude that CAB quality is “moderate” to “substantial”. We conclude that current studies may underestimate the quality of CAB data. We recommend that future validation studies use density-adjusted and exposure measures to offer a more meaningful characterization of the relationship of data error with spatial exposure. PMID:28358819

  10. The validation and assessment of machine learning: a game of prediction from high-dimensional data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tune H Pers

    Full Text Available In applied statistics, tools from machine learning are popular for analyzing complex and high-dimensional data. However, few theoretical results are available that could guide to the appropriate machine learning tool in a new application. Initial development of an overall strategy thus often implies that multiple methods are tested and compared on the same set of data. This is particularly difficult in situations that are prone to over-fitting where the number of subjects is low compared to the number of potential predictors. The article presents a game which provides some grounds for conducting a fair model comparison. Each player selects a modeling strategy for predicting individual response from potential predictors. A strictly proper scoring rule, bootstrap cross-validation, and a set of rules are used to make the results obtained with different strategies comparable. To illustrate the ideas, the game is applied to data from the Nugenob Study where the aim is to predict the fat oxidation capacity based on conventional factors and high-dimensional metabolomics data. Three players have chosen to use support vector machines, LASSO, and random forests, respectively.

  11. Statistically validated mobile communication networks: the evolution of motifs in European and Chinese data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Palchykov, Vasyl; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Miccichè, Salvatore; Tumminello, Michele; N Mantegna, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Big data open up unprecedented opportunities for investigating complex systems, including society. In particular, communication data serve as major sources for computational social sciences, but they have to be cleaned and filtered as they may contain spurious information due to recording errors as well as interactions, like commercial and marketing activities, not directly related to the social network. The network constructed from communication data can only be considered as a proxy for the network of social relationships. Here we apply a systematic method, based on multiple-hypothesis testing, to statistically validate the links and then construct the corresponding Bonferroni network, generalized to the directed case. We study two large datasets of mobile phone records, one from Europe and the other from China. For both datasets we compare the raw data networks with the corresponding Bonferroni networks and point out significant differences in the structures and in the basic network measures. We show evidence that the Bonferroni network provides a better proxy for the network of social interactions than the original one. Using the filtered networks, we investigated the statistics and temporal evolution of small directed 3-motifs and concluded that closed communication triads have a formation time scale, which is quite fast and typically intraday. We also find that open communication triads preferentially evolve into other open triads with a higher fraction of reciprocated calls. These stylized facts were observed for both datasets. (paper)

  12. Statistically validated mobile communication networks: the evolution of motifs in European and Chinese data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Xia; Palchykov, Vasyl; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Miccichè, Salvatore; Tumminello, Michele; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2014-08-01

    Big data open up unprecedented opportunities for investigating complex systems, including society. In particular, communication data serve as major sources for computational social sciences, but they have to be cleaned and filtered as they may contain spurious information due to recording errors as well as interactions, like commercial and marketing activities, not directly related to the social network. The network constructed from communication data can only be considered as a proxy for the network of social relationships. Here we apply a systematic method, based on multiple-hypothesis testing, to statistically validate the links and then construct the corresponding Bonferroni network, generalized to the directed case. We study two large datasets of mobile phone records, one from Europe and the other from China. For both datasets we compare the raw data networks with the corresponding Bonferroni networks and point out significant differences in the structures and in the basic network measures. We show evidence that the Bonferroni network provides a better proxy for the network of social interactions than the original one. Using the filtered networks, we investigated the statistics and temporal evolution of small directed 3-motifs and concluded that closed communication triads have a formation time scale, which is quite fast and typically intraday. We also find that open communication triads preferentially evolve into other open triads with a higher fraction of reciprocated calls. These stylized facts were observed for both datasets.

  13. Reliability, Validity, Comparability and Practical Utility of Cybercrime-Related Data, Metrics, and Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Kshetri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing pervasiveness, prevalence and severity of cybercrimes, various metrics, measures and statistics have been developed and used to measure various aspects of this phenomenon. Cybercrime-related data, metrics, and information, however, pose important and difficult dilemmas regarding the issues of reliability, validity, comparability and practical utility. While many of the issues of the cybercrime economy are similar to other underground and underworld industries, this economy also has various unique aspects. For one thing, this industry also suffers from a problem partly rooted in the incredibly broad definition of the term “cybercrime”. This article seeks to provide insights and analysis into this phenomenon, which is expected to advance our understanding into cybercrime-related information.

  14. Simulated dose reduction by adding artificial noise to measured raw data: A validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, M.; Gunnarsson, M.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify and validate a noise simulation tool called Dose Tutor (VAMP GmbH) in terms of level and texture of the simulated noise. By adding artificial noise to measured computed tomography (CT) raw data, a scan acquired with a lower dose (mAs) than the actual one can be simulated. A homogeneous polyethylene phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were scanned for different mAs levels, tube voltages, slice thicknesses and reconstruction kernels. The simulated noise levels were compared with the noise levels in real transverse slice images actually acquired with corresponding mAs values. In general, the noise comparisons showed acceptable agreement in magnitude (<20% deviation in pixel standard deviation). Also, the calculated noise power spectra were similar, which indicates that the noise texture is correctly reproduced. In conclusion, this study establishes that the Dose Tutor might be a useful tool for estimating the dose reduction potential for CT protocols. (authors)

  15. Obtaining Valid Safety Data for Software Safety Measurement and Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Victor r.; Zelkowitz, Marvin V.; Layman, Lucas; Dangle, Kathleen; Diep, Madeline

    2010-01-01

    We report on a preliminary case study to examine software safety risk in the early design phase of the NASA Constellation spaceflight program. Our goal is to provide NASA quality assurance managers with information regarding the ongoing state of software safety across the program. We examined 154 hazard reports created during the preliminary design phase of three major flight hardware systems within the Constellation program. Our purpose was two-fold: 1) to quantify the relative importance of software with respect to system safety; and 2) to identify potential risks due to incorrect application of the safety process, deficiencies in the safety process, or the lack of a defined process. One early outcome of this work was to show that there are structural deficiencies in collecting valid safety data that make software safety different from hardware safety. In our conclusions we present some of these deficiencies.

  16. Use of In-Flight Data to Validate Mars Samle Return Autonomous RvD GNC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrena, V.; Colmenarejo, P.; Suatoni, M.

    D is based on RF, camera and LIDAR measurements. It includes design, prototyping and verification at three different levels: algorithms design and verification in a Functional Engineering Simulator, SW demonstrator verified in Real Time Avionics Test Benching and Dynamic Test Benching. Moreover...... and testing of a vision based optical stimulator (ViSOS by DTU) to enhance the on-ground validation capabilities. After checking different alternatives for the proposed HARvD-GNC experiment with PRISMA resources, an efficient but cost-effective approach was chosen. The approach is based on designing MSR......-like dedicated manoeuvres sequencing using the already existing on-board PRISMA GNC/AOCS system (based on relative GPS measurements for the closed-loop execution of the manoeuvres sequencing and acquiring RF and camera images as part of the HARvD-GNC experiment data). This option allows downloading the sensor...

  17. Color Trails Test: normative data and criterion validity for the greek adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinis, Lambros; Malegiannaki, Amaryllis-Chryssi; Christodoulou, Tessa; Panagiotopoulos, Vassillis; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis

    2011-06-01

    The Color Trails Test (CTT) was developed as a culturally fair analog of the Trail Making Test. In the present study, normative data for the CTT were developed for the Greek adult population and further the criterion validity of the CTT was examined in two clinical groups (29 Parkinson's disease [PD] and 25 acute stroke patients). The instrument was applied to 163 healthy participants, aged 19-75. Stepwise linear regression analyses revealed a significant influence of age and education level on completion time in both parts of the CTT (increased age and decreased educational level contributed to slower completion times for both parts), whereas gender did not influence time to completion of part B. Further, the CTT appears to discriminate adequately between the performance of PD and acute stroke patients and matched healthy controls.

  18. Nuclear data for fusion: Validation of typical pre-processing methods for radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, T.; Sublet, J.C.; Morgan, L.; Leadbeater, T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We quantify the effect of processing nuclear data from ENDF to ACE format. • We consider the differences between fission and fusion angular distributions. • C-nat(n,el) at 2.0 MeV has a 0.6% deviation between original and processed data. • Fe-56(n,el) at 14.1 MeV has a 11.0% deviation between original and processed data. • Processed data do not accurately depict ENDF distributions for fusion energies. - Abstract: Nuclear data form the basis of the radiation transport codes used to design and simulate the behaviour of nuclear facilities, such as the ITER and DEMO fusion reactors. Typically these data and codes are biased towards fission and high-energy physics applications yet are still applied to fusion problems. With increasing interest in fusion applications, the lack of fusion specific codes and relevant data libraries is becoming increasingly apparent. Industry standard radiation transport codes require pre-processing of the evaluated data libraries prior to use in simulation. Historically these methods focus on speed of simulation at the cost of accurate data representation. For legacy applications this has not been a major concern, but current fusion needs differ significantly. Pre-processing reconstructs the differential and double differential interaction cross sections with a coarse binned structure, or more recently as a tabulated cumulative distribution function. This work looks at the validity of applying these processing methods to data used in fusion specific calculations in comparison to fission. The relative effects of applying this pre-processing mechanism, to both fission and fusion relevant reaction channels are demonstrated, and as such the poor representation of these distributions for the fusion energy regime. For the nat C(n,el) reaction at 2.0 MeV, the binned differential cross section deviates from the original data by 0.6% on average. For the 56 Fe(n,el) reaction at 14.1 MeV, the deviation increases to 11.0%. We

  19. Validating FMEA output against incident learning data: A study in stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Cao, N; Young, L; Howard, J; Logan, W; Arbuckle, T; Sponseller, P; Korssjoen, T; Meyer, J; Ford, E

    2015-06-01

    Though failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is becoming more widely adopted for risk assessment in radiation therapy, to our knowledge, its output has never been validated against data on errors that actually occur. The objective of this study was to perform FMEA of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning process and validate the results against data recorded within an incident learning system. FMEA on the SBRT treatment planning process was carried out by a multidisciplinary group including radiation oncologists, medical physicists, dosimetrists, and IT technologists. Potential failure modes were identified through a systematic review of the process map. Failure modes were rated for severity, occurrence, and detectability on a scale of one to ten and risk priority number (RPN) was computed. Failure modes were then compared with historical reports identified as relevant to SBRT planning within a departmental incident learning system that has been active for two and a half years. Differences between FMEA anticipated failure modes and existing incidents were identified. FMEA identified 63 failure modes. RPN values for the top 25% of failure modes ranged from 60 to 336. Analysis of the incident learning database identified 33 reported near-miss events related to SBRT planning. Combining both methods yielded a total of 76 possible process failures, of which 13 (17%) were missed by FMEA while 43 (57%) identified by FMEA only. When scored for RPN, the 13 events missed by FMEA ranked within the lower half of all failure modes and exhibited significantly lower severity relative to those identified by FMEA (p = 0.02). FMEA, though valuable, is subject to certain limitations. In this study, FMEA failed to identify 17% of actual failure modes, though these were of lower risk. Similarly, an incident learning system alone fails to identify a large number of potentially high-severity process errors. Using FMEA in combination with incident learning may

  20. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Barrett; Haddad, D.E.; Rockwell, T.K.; Arrowsmith, R.; Madugo, C.; Zielke, O.; Scharer, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter-scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator’s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  1. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    KAUST Repository

    Salisbury, J. Barrett

    2015-10-24

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter- scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator\\'s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  2. Development and validation of MIX: comprehensive free software for meta-analysis of causal research data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeda Noriaki

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analysis has become a well-known method for synthesis of quantitative data from previously conducted research in applied health sciences. So far, meta-analysis has been particularly useful in evaluating and comparing therapies and in assessing causes of disease. Consequently, the number of software packages that can perform meta-analysis has increased over the years. Unfortunately, it can take a substantial amount of time to get acquainted with some of these programs and most contain little or no interactive educational material. We set out to create and validate an easy-to-use and comprehensive meta-analysis package that would be simple enough programming-wise to remain available as a free download. We specifically aimed at students and researchers who are new to meta-analysis, with important parts of the development oriented towards creating internal interactive tutoring tools and designing features that would facilitate usage of the software as a companion to existing books on meta-analysis. Results We took an unconventional approach and created a program that uses Excel as a calculation and programming platform. The main programming language was Visual Basic, as implemented in Visual Basic 6 and Visual Basic for Applications in Excel 2000 and higher. The development took approximately two years and resulted in the 'MIX' program, which can be downloaded from the program's website free of charge. Next, we set out to validate the MIX output with two major software packages as reference standards, namely STATA (metan, metabias, and metatrim and Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Version 2. Eight meta-analyses that had been published in major journals were used as data sources. All numerical and graphical results from analyses with MIX were identical to their counterparts in STATA and CMA. The MIX program distinguishes itself from most other programs by the extensive graphical output, the click-and-go (Excel interface, and the

  3. Validation of two case definitions to identify pressure ulcers using hospital administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester; Jiang, Jason; Eastwood, Cathy A; Wong, Holly; Weaver, Brittany; Quan, Hude

    2017-08-28

    Pressure ulcer development is a quality of care indicator, as pressure ulcers are potentially preventable. Yet pressure ulcer is a leading cause of morbidity, discomfort and additional healthcare costs for inpatients. Methods are lacking for accurate surveillance of pressure ulcer in hospitals to track occurrences and evaluate care improvement strategies. The main study aim was to validate hospital discharge abstract database (DAD) in recording pressure ulcers against nursing consult reports, and to calculate prevalence of pressure ulcers in Alberta, Canada in DAD. We hypothesised that a more inclusive case definition for pressure ulcers would enhance validity of cases identified in administrative data for research and quality improvement purposes. A cohort of patients with pressure ulcers were identified from enterostomal (ET) nursing consult documents at a large university hospital in 2011. There were 1217 patients with pressure ulcers in ET nursing documentation that were linked to a corresponding record in DAD to validate DAD for correct and accurate identification of pressure ulcer occurrence, using two case definitions for pressure ulcer. Using pressure ulcer definition 1 (7 codes), prevalence was 1.4%, and using definition 2 (29 codes), prevalence was 4.2% after adjusting for misclassifications. The results were lower than expected. Definition 1 sensitivity was 27.7% and specificity was 98.8%, while definition 2 sensitivity was 32.8% and specificity was 95.9%. Pressure ulcer in both DAD and ET consultation increased with age, number of comorbidities and length of stay. DAD underestimate pressure ulcer prevalence. Since various codes are used to record pressure ulcers in DAD, the case definition with more codes captures more pressure ulcer cases, and may be useful for monitoring facility trends. However, low sensitivity suggests that this data source may not be accurate for determining overall prevalence, and should be cautiously compared with other

  4. Use of RTIGS data streams for validating the performance of the IGS Ultra-Rapid products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Gottfried; Weber, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The IGS (International GNSS Service) Real-Time Working Group (RTIGS) disseminates for several years raw observation data of a globally distributed steady growing station network in real-time via the internet. This observation data can be used for validating the performance of the IGS predicted orbits and clocks (Ultra-Rapid (IGU)). Therefore, based on pre-processed ITRF- station coordinates, clock corrections w.r.t GPS-Time for GPS-satellites and site-receivers as well as satellite orbits are calculated in quasi real-time and compared to the IGU solutions. The Institute for "Geodesy and Geophysics" of the Technical University of Vienna develops based on the software RTIGS Multicast Receive (RTIGSMR) provided by National Resources Canada (NRCan) the software RTIGU-Control. Using Code-smoothed observations RTIGU-Control calculates in a first step by means of a linear KALMAN-Filter and based on the orbit information of the IGUs real-time clock corrections and clock drifts w.r.t GPS-Time for the GPS-satellites and stations. The second extended KALMAN-Filter (kinematic approach) uses again the Code-smoothed observations corrected for the clock corrections of step 1 to calculate the positions and velocities of the satellites. The calculation interval is set to 30 seconds. The results and comparisons to IGU-products are displayed online but also stored as clock-RINEX- and SP3-files on the ftp-server of the institute, e.g. for validation of the performance of the IGU predicted products. A comparison to the more precise but delayed issued IGS Rapid products (IGR) allows also to validate the performance of RTIGU-Control. To carry out these comparisons the MatLab routine RTIGU-Analyse was established. This routine is for example able to import and process standard clock-RINEX-files of several sources and delivers a variety of comparisons both in graphical or numerical form. Results will become part of this presentation. Another way to analyse the quality and consistency of

  5. Validation and optimisation of an ICD-10-coded case definition for sepsis using administrative health data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Rachel J; Jetté, Nathalie; Sawka, Keri Jo; Diep, Lucy; Goliath, Jade; Roberts, Derek J; Yipp, Bryan G; Doig, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Administrative health data are important for health services and outcomes research. We optimised and validated in intensive care unit (ICU) patients an International Classification of Disease (ICD)-coded case definition for sepsis, and compared this with an existing definition. We also assessed the definition's performance in non-ICU (ward) patients. Setting and participants All adults (aged ≥18 years) admitted to a multisystem ICU with general medicosurgical ICU care from one of three tertiary care centres in the Calgary region in Alberta, Canada, between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2012 were included. Research design Patient medical records were randomly selected and linked to the discharge abstract database. In ICU patients, we validated the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) ICD-10-CA (Canadian Revision)-coded definition for sepsis and severe sepsis against a reference standard medical chart review, and optimised this algorithm through examination of other conditions apparent in sepsis. Measures Sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Results Sepsis was present in 604 of 1001 ICU patients (60.4%). The CIHI ICD-10-CA-coded definition for sepsis had Sn (46.4%), Sp (98.7%), PPV (98.2%) and NPV (54.7%); and for severe sepsis had Sn (47.2%), Sp (97.5%), PPV (95.3%) and NPV (63.2%). The optimised ICD-coded algorithm for sepsis increased Sn by 25.5% and NPV by 11.9% with slightly lowered Sp (85.4%) and PPV (88.2%). For severe sepsis both Sn (65.1%) and NPV (70.1%) increased, while Sp (88.2%) and PPV (85.6%) decreased slightly. Conclusions This study demonstrates that sepsis is highly undercoded in administrative data, thus under-ascertaining the true incidence of sepsis. The optimised ICD-coded definition has a higher validity with higher Sn and should be preferentially considered if used for surveillance purposes. PMID:26700284

  6. Atmospheric correction at AERONET locations: A new science and validation data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Lyapustin, A.I.; Privette, J.L.; Morisette, J.T.; Holben, B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN) and its data set of spectral surface bidirectional reflectance and albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) TERRA and AQUA data. The ASRVN is an operational data collection and processing system. It receives 50 ?? 50 km2; subsets of MODIS level 1B (L1B) data from MODIS adaptive processing system and AERONET aerosol and water-vapor information. Then, it performs an atmospheric correction (AC) for about 100 AERONET sites based on accurate radiative-transfer theory with complex quality control of the input data. The ASRVN processing software consists of an L1B data gridding algorithm, a new cloud-mask (CM) algorithm based on a time-series analysis, and an AC algorithm using ancillary AERONET aerosol and water-vapor data. The AC is achieved by fitting the MODIS top-of-atmosphere measurements, accumulated for a 16-day interval, with theoretical reflectance parameterized in terms of the coefficients of the Li SparseRoss Thick (LSRT) model of the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). The ASRVN takes several steps to ensure high quality of results: 1) the filtering of opaque clouds by a CM algorithm; 2) the development of an aerosol filter to filter residual semitransparent and subpixel clouds, as well as cases with high inhomogeneity of aerosols in the processing area; 3) imposing the requirement of the consistency of the new solution with previously retrieved BRF and albedo; 4) rapid adjustment of the 16-day retrieval to the surface changes using the last day of measurements; and 5) development of a seasonal backup spectral BRF database to increase data coverage. The ASRVN provides a gapless or near-gapless coverage for the processing area. The gaps, caused by clouds, are filled most naturally with the latest solution for a given pixel. The ASRVN products include three parameters of the LSRT model (kL, kG, and kV), surface albedo

  7. Empirical validation of the S-Score algorithm in the analysis of gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archer Kellie J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current methods of analyzing Affymetrix GeneChip® microarray data require the estimation of probe set expression summaries, followed by application of statistical tests to determine which genes are differentially expressed. The S-Score algorithm described by Zhang and colleagues is an alternative method that allows tests of hypotheses directly from probe level data. It is based on an error model in which the detected signal is proportional to the probe pair signal for highly expressed genes, but approaches a background level (rather than 0 for genes with low levels of expression. This model is used to calculate relative change in probe pair intensities that converts probe signals into multiple measurements with equalized errors, which are summed over a probe set to form the S-Score. Assuming no expression differences between chips, the S-Score follows a standard normal distribution, allowing direct tests of hypotheses to be made. Using spike-in and dilution datasets, we validated the S-Score method against comparisons of gene expression utilizing the more recently developed methods RMA, dChip, and MAS5. Results The S-score showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in detecting low-level gene expression changes. Rank ordering of S-Score values more accurately reflected known fold-change values compared to other algorithms. Conclusion The S-score method, utilizing probe level data directly, offers significant advantages over comparisons using only probe set expression summaries.

  8. Validation of secondary commercial data sources for physical activity facilities in urban and nonurban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Euna; Powell, Lisa; Slater, Sandy; Quinn, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    Secondary data are often necessary to assess the availability of commercial physical activity (PA) facilities and examine its association with individual behaviors and outcomes, yet the validity of such sources has been explored only in a limited number of studies. Field data were collected on the presence and attributes of commercial PA facilities in a random sample of 30 urban, 15 suburban, and 15 rural Census tracts in the Chicago metropolitan statistical area and surrounding area. Approximately 40% of PA establishments in the field data were listed for both urban and nonurban tracts in both lists except for nonurban tracts in D&B (35%), which was significantly improved in the combined list of D&B and InfoUSA. Approximately one-quarter of the PA facilities listed in D&B were found on the ground, whereas 40% to 50% of PA facilities listed in InfoUSA were found on the ground. PA establishments that offered instruction programs or lessons or that had a court or pool were less likely to be listed, particularly in the nonurban tracts. Secondary commercial business lists on PA facilities should be used with caution in assessing the built environment.

  9. Sound quality indicators for urban places in Paris cross-validated by Milan data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Paola; Delaitre, Pauline; Lavandier, Catherine; Torchia, Francesca; Aumond, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    A specific smartphone application was developed to collect perceptive and acoustic data in Paris. About 3400 questionnaires were analyzed, regarding the global sound environment characterization, the perceived loudness of some emergent sources and the presence time ratio of sources that do not emerge from the background. Sound pressure level was recorded each second from the mobile phone's microphone during a 10-min period. The aim of this study is to propose indicators of urban sound quality based on linear regressions with perceptive variables. A cross validation of the quality models extracted from Paris data was carried out by conducting the same survey in Milan. The proposed sound quality general model is correlated with the real perceived sound quality (72%). Another model without visual amenity and familiarity is 58% correlated with perceived sound quality. In order to improve the sound quality indicator, a site classification was performed by Kohonen's Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and seven specific class models were developed. These specific models attribute more importance on source events and are slightly closer to the individual data than the global model. In general, the Parisian models underestimate the sound quality of Milan environments assessed by Italian people.

  10. Kepler Data Validation Time Series File: Description of File Format and Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler space mission searches its time series data for periodic, transit-like signatures. The ephemerides of these events, called Threshold Crossing Events (TCEs), are reported in the TCE tables at the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NExScI). Those TCEs are then further evaluated to create planet candidates and populate the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) table, also hosted at the Exoplanet Archive. The search, evaluation and export of TCEs is performed by two pipeline modules, TPS (Transit Planet Search) and DV (Data Validation). TPS searches for the strongest, believable signal and then sends that information to DV to fit a transit model, compute various statistics, and remove the transit events so that the light curve can be searched for other TCEs. More on how this search is done and on the creation of the TCE table can be found in Tenenbaum et al. (2012), Seader et al. (2015), Jenkins (2002). For each star with at least one TCE, the pipeline exports a file that contains the light curves used by TPS and DV to find and evaluate the TCE(s). This document describes the content of these DV time series files, and this introduction provides a bit of context for how the data in these files are used by the pipeline.

  11. Reactivity worth measurements on the CALIBAN reactor: interpretation of integral experiments for the nuclear data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, B.

    2012-01-01

    The good knowledge of nuclear data, input parameters for the neutron transport calculation codes, is necessary to support the advances of the nuclear industry. The purpose of this work is to bring pertinent information regarding the nuclear data integral validation process. Reactivity worth measurements have been performed on the Caliban reactor, they concern four materials of interest for the nuclear industry: gold, lutetium, plutonium and uranium 238. Experiments which have been conducted in order to improve the characterization of the core are also described and discussed, the latter are necessary to the good interpretation of reactivity worth measurements. The experimental procedures are described with their associated uncertainties, measurements are then compared to numerical results. The methods used in numerical calculations are reported, especially the multigroup cross sections generation for deterministic codes. The modeling of the experiments is presented along with the associated uncertainties. This comparison led to an interpretation concerning the qualification of nuclear data libraries. Discrepancies are reported, discussed and justify the need of such experiments. (author) [fr

  12. Validation of the PESTLA model: Field test using data from a sandy soil in Schaijk (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhold AE; Swartjes FA; Hoogenboom FGG; van der Linden AMA

    1993-01-01

    Within the framework of the project "Validation of PESTLA" the Schaijk data set was used to analyse PESTLA model performance. The Schaijk data set contains field data on bentazon behaviour in a coarse textured humic gley soil cropped with maize. PESTLA model input parameters were derived

  13. Validation and Analysis of SRTM and VCL Data Over Tropical Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    The focus of our investigation was on the application of digital topographic data in conducting first-order volcanological and structural studies of tropical volcanoes, focusing on the Java, the Philippines and the Galapagos Islands. Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, served as our test site for SRTM data validation. Volcanoes in humid tropical environments are frequently cloud covered, typically densely vegetated and erode rapidly, so that it was expected that new insights into the styles of eruption of these volcanoes could be obtained from analysis of topographic data. For instance, in certain parts of the world, such as Indonesia, even the regional structural context of volcanic centers is poorly known, and the distribution of volcanic products (e.g., lava flows, pyroclastic flows, and lahars) are not well mapped. SRTM and Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) data were expected to provide new information on these volcanoes. Due to the cancellation of the VCL mission, we did not conduct any lidar studies during the duration of this project. Digital elevation models (DEMs) such as those collected by SRTM provide quantitative information about the time-integrated typical activity on a volcano and allow an assessment of the spatial and temporal contributions of various constructional and destructional processes to each volcano's present morphology. For basaltic volcanoes, P_c?w!m-d and Garbed (2000) have shown that gradual slopes (less than 5 deg.) occur where lava and tephra pond within calderas or in the saddles between adjacent volcanoes, as well as where lava deltas coalesce to form coastal plains. Vent concentration zones (axes of rift zones) have slopes ranging from 10 deg. to 12 deg. Differential vertical growth rates between vent concentration zones and adjacent mostly-lava flanks produce steep constructional slopes up to 40". The steepest slopes (locally approaching 90 deg.) are produced by fluvial erosion, caldera collapse, faulting, and catastrophic avalanches, all of

  14. Can we rely on cancer mortality data? Checking the validity of cervical cancer mortality data for Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primic Zakelj, M.; Pompe Kirn, V.; Skrlec, F.; Selb, J.

    2001-01-01

    Background. Valid inference on cervical cancer mortality is very difficult since - on the basis of death certificates - it is not always possible to distinguish between cervix, corpus and unspecified uterine cancer deaths. Our aim was to estimate the extent to which cervical cancer as the official cause of death reflects the true mortality from cervical cancer in Slovenia. Material and methods. The data on 2245 deaths from cervix, corpus uteri, and uterus-unspecified cancers for the period 1985-1999 were linked to the Cancer Registry of Slovenia database from the mortality database of Slovenia. Results. Officially, in the period 1985-1999, there were 878 cervical cancer deaths. The comparison of these causes of death with the cancer sites registered in the Cancer Registry revealed that they include only 87.7% patients with a previous diagnosis of cervical cancer. Of 650 corpus uteri cancer deaths, 17. 1 % of patients were registered to have cervical cancer, and of 717 unspecified uterine cancer deaths, 31.4% were registered. Taking into account the correctly identified cervical cancer cases among cervical cancer deaths and misclassified cervical cancer deaths as corpus uteri and unspecified uterine, the corrected number of deaths would be 1106. Conclusions. When evaluating the impact of cervical cancer mortality from national mortality rates, the stated underestimation should be taken into account. However, this does not hold for some other cancers. (author)

  15. 3D structure tensor analysis of light microscopy data for validating diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Cornea, Anda; Leigland, Lindsey A; Kohama, Steven G; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2015-05-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (d-MRI) is a powerful non-invasive and non-destructive technique for characterizing brain tissue on the microscopic scale. However, the lack of validation of d-MRI by independent experimental means poses an obstacle to accurate interpretation of data acquired using this method. Recently, structure tensor analysis has been applied to light microscopy images, and this technique holds promise to be a powerful validation strategy for d-MRI. Advantages of this approach include its similarity to d-MRI in terms of averaging the effects of a large number of cellular structures, and its simplicity, which enables it to be implemented in a high-throughput manner. However, a drawback of previous implementations of this technique arises from it being restricted to 2D. As a result, structure tensor analyses have been limited to tissue sectioned in a direction orthogonal to the direction of interest. Here we describe the analytical framework for extending structure tensor analysis to 3D, and utilize the results to analyze serial image "stacks" acquired with confocal microscopy of rhesus macaque hippocampal tissue. Implementation of 3D structure tensor procedures requires removal of sources of anisotropy introduced in tissue preparation and confocal imaging. This is accomplished with image processing steps to mitigate the effects of anisotropic tissue shrinkage, and the effects of anisotropy in the point spread function (PSF). In order to address the latter confound, we describe procedures for measuring the dependence of PSF anisotropy on distance from the microscope objective within tissue. Prior to microscopy, ex vivo d-MRI measurements performed on the hippocampal tissue revealed three regions of tissue with mutually orthogonal directions of least restricted diffusion that correspond to CA1, alveus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We demonstrate the ability of 3D structure tensor analysis to identify structure tensor orientations that

  16. The validity of register data to identify children with atopic dermatitis, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensballe, Lone Graff; Klansø, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas; Haerskjold, Ann; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Simonsen, Jacob

    2017-09-01

    was 84.4% (78.0-89.2) and the specificity 81.6% (75.0-84.4). The algorithms are valid and valuable tools to identify children with atopic dermatitis, wheezing, asthma or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis on a population level using register data. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  17. SeaWiFS data from oceanic waters around New Zealand: Validation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, K.; Boyd, P.; Gall, M.; Pinkerton, M.

    Satellite observations of ocean colour are the only realistic way to measure phytoplankton abundance at regional and global scales. NASA's Sea-viewing Wide Field -o f-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) began operation in September 1997 and is still providing data today. The data are of particular value to New Zealand, which has the fourth largest Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) in the world (some 4 million km2 ). Analysis of moderate resolution (9 km) SeaWiFS monthly Standard Mapped Images has substantially increased knowledge of the dynamics of chlorophyll concentrations around New Zealand. SeaWiFS data over nearly three years shows that northern New Zealand Subtropical and Tasman Sea waters follow a classical cycle of spring and autumn chlorophyll blooms consistent with production being co-limited by nitrate and light. Subantarctic Waters south of New Zealand had a low-magnitude annual cycle of chlorophyll abundance that peaked in early autumn, consistent with production being principally iron-limited. Chlorophyll was generally highest in the Subtropical Front either side of New Zealand where Subtropical and Subantarctic waters mix. NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research) has been receiving and processing high resolution (1.1 km) SeaWiFS data for the NZ region since May 2000. In addition to this, extensive bio-optical data from a number of NIWA cruises are being used to validate the satellite data and assess the accuracy of the ocean products in New Zealand open ocean and coastal waters. The performance of the SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a algorithm (OC4v4) has been investigated by comparing high-precision in situ measurements of the underwater radiation field with measurements of phytoplankton pigment concentration. Analyses of these results suggest that the algorithm may be performing well in the open ocean for chlorophyll- a concentrations below 0.3-0.4 mg m-3 but overestimating by a factor of two or more at higher concentrations. NIWA believes that ocean colour

  18. Validation of coding algorithms for the identification of patients hospitalized for alcoholic hepatitis using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jack X Q; Ross, Erin; Borman, Meredith A; Zimmer, Scott; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Heitman, Steven J; Swain, Mark G; Burak, Kelly W; Quan, Hude; Myers, Robert P

    2015-09-11

    Epidemiologic studies of alcoholic hepatitis (AH) have been hindered by the lack of a validated International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding algorithm for use with administrative data. Our objective was to validate coding algorithms for AH using a hospitalization database. The Hospital Discharge Abstract Database (DAD) was used to identify consecutive adults (≥18 years) hospitalized in the Calgary region with a diagnosis code for AH (ICD-10, K70.1) between 01/2008 and 08/2012. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of AH, defined as a history of heavy alcohol consumption, elevated AST and/or ALT (34 μmol/L, and elevated INR. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the diagnosis field in which the code was recorded (primary vs. secondary) and AH severity. Algorithms that incorporated ICD-10 codes for cirrhosis and its complications were also examined. Of 228 potential AH cases, 122 patients had confirmed AH, corresponding to a positive predictive value (PPV) of 54% (95% CI 47-60%). PPV improved when AH was the primary versus a secondary diagnosis (67% vs. 21%; P codes for ascites (PPV 75%; 95% CI 63-86%), cirrhosis (PPV 60%; 47-73%), and gastrointestinal hemorrhage (PPV 62%; 51-73%) had improved performance, however, the prevalence of these diagnoses in confirmed AH cases was low (29-39%). In conclusion the low PPV of the diagnosis code for AH suggests that caution is necessary if this hospitalization database is used in large-scale epidemiologic studies of this condition.

  19. Validation of Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI in Iranian Sample: Normative Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Poor Naseh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This Study aimed to validate the temperament and character inventory (TCI in an Iranian sample of men and women with different ages. TCI contains subscales designed to measure seven different personality traits and characteristics. Materials and Methods: In the first step, subjects (n=1212 completed the questionnaire. In the second step, to examine the reliability of the questionnaire, 101 randomly chosen subjects were re-tested one to two months after the first test. Also, in order to examine the validity of the questionnaire, 100 subjects were interviewed by two psychologists using a checklist based on the Cloninger's biological theory of personality. The interviewers, who were blind to the subjects scores on the seven subscales, rated each subject for the seven traits and characteristics on a 10-point rating scale (from 1 to 10. Results & Conclusion: The results showed normative data for the subscales novelty seeking (NS, harm avoidance (HA, reward dependence (RD, persistence (Per, self directiveness (SD, cooperation (Co and self transcendence (ST for different gender and age classes. Correlations between the scores and ratings of the test and re-test revealed significant coefficients, confirming reliability for all subscales. A good internal consistency was found for each subscale. The results also showed no significant correlations higher than 0.40 among NS, HA, Per and RD; the temperament subscales were independent from each other. The only significant correlation, higher than 0.40, among the character subscales was between SD and Co. Applied and clinical implication of the present findings will be discussed.

  20. Validation of an explanatory tool for data-fused displays for high-technology future aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Georgina C. L.; Shanks, Craig R.; Selcon, Stephen J.

    1996-05-01

    As the number of sensor and data sources in the military cockpit increases, pilots will suffer high levels of workload which could result in reduced performance and the loss of situational awareness. A DRA research program has been investigating the use of data-fused displays in decision support and has developed and laboratory-tested an explanatory tool for displaying information in air combat scenarios. The tool has been designed to provide pictorial explanations of data that maintain situational awareness by involving the pilot in the hostile aircraft threat assessment task. This paper reports a study carried out to validate the success of the explanatory tool in a realistic flight simulation facility. Aircrew were asked to perform a threat assessment task, either with or without the explanatory tool providing information in the form of missile launch success zone envelopes, while concurrently flying a waypoint course within set flight parameters. The results showed that there was a significant improvement (p less than 0.01) in threat assessment accuracy of 30% when using the explanatory tool. This threat assessment performance advantage was achieved without a trade-off with flying task performance. Situational awareness measures showed no general differences between the explanatory and control conditions, but significant learning effects suggested that the explanatory tool makes the task initially more intuitive and hence less demanding on the pilots' attentional resources. The paper concludes that DRA's data-fused explanatory tool is successful at improving threat assessment accuracy in a realistic simulated flying environment, and briefly discusses the requirements for further research in the area.

  1. A generalized approach for producing, quantifying, and validating citizen science data from wildlife images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Alexandra; Kosmala, Margaret; Lintott, Chris; Packer, Craig

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science has the potential to expand the scope and scale of research in ecology and conservation, but many professional researchers remain skeptical of data produced by nonexperts. We devised an approach for producing accurate, reliable data from untrained, nonexpert volunteers. On the citizen science website www.snapshotserengeti.org, more than 28,000 volunteers classified 1.51 million images taken in a large-scale camera-trap survey in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Each image was circulated to, on average, 27 volunteers, and their classifications were aggregated using a simple plurality algorithm. We validated the aggregated answers against a data set of 3829 images verified by experts and calculated 3 certainty metrics-level of agreement among classifications (evenness), fraction of classifications supporting the aggregated answer (fraction support), and fraction of classifiers who reported "nothing here" for an image that was ultimately classified as containing an animal (fraction blank)-to measure confidence that an aggregated answer was correct. Overall, aggregated volunteer answers agreed with the expert-verified data on 98% of images, but accuracy differed by species commonness such that rare species had higher rates of false positives and false negatives. Easily calculated analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey tests indicated that the certainty metrics were significant indicators of whether each image was correctly classified or classifiable. Thus, the certainty metrics can be used to identify images for expert review. Bootstrapping analyses further indicated that 90% of images were correctly classified with just 5 volunteers per image. Species classifications based on the plurality vote of multiple citizen scientists can provide a reliable foundation for large-scale monitoring of African wildlife. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Validation of large-angle scattering data via shadow-bar experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, S., E-mail: ohnishi@nmri.go.jp [National Maritime Research Institute, 6-38-1, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0004 (Japan); Tamaki, S.; Murata, I. [Osaka University, 1-14-16-1, Yamadaoka, Suita-si, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An experiment to validate large-angle scattering cross section is conducted. • Pieces of Nb foil are set behind a shadow bar to obtain the {sup 92m}Nb production rates. • The results calculated using ENDF/B-VI library data exhibit a 57% overestimation. • The adjustment of cross section in large-angle region makes the C/E close to 1. - Abstract: An experiment emphasizing the influence of large-angle scattering on nuclear data was conducted, in which a Fe shadow bar and a Fe slab target were placed before a deuterium–tritium fusion (DT) neutron source. Two Nb foils were set on both sides of the shadow bar in order to monitor the neutron source intensity and to measure the neutrons scattered from the slab target. The {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92m}Nb reaction rate of the foil was measured following the DT neutron irradiation and calculated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transportation code. The {sup 92m}Nb production rates calculated using data from the JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries agreed with that measured in the experiment, while the result calculated using data from the ENDF/B-VI library exhibited a 57% overestimation. Because the sensitivity of the {sup 92m}Nb production rate to the scattering angular distribution was large in the angular region between scattering direction cosines of −0.9 and −0.4, the scattering angular distribution was adjusted in that region. This adjustment resulted in a calculation-to-experiment ratio close to 1, but had little influence on the existing integral benchmark experiment.

  3. Representation of occupational information across resources and validation of the occupational data for health model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Sripriya; Chen, Elizabeth S; Lindemann, Elizabeth; Aldekhyyel, Ranyah; Wang, Yan; Melton, Genevieve B

    2018-02-01

    Reports by the National Academy of Medicine and leading public health organizations advocate including occupational information as part of an individual's social context. Given recent National Academy of Medicine recommendations on occupation-related data in the electronic health record, there is a critical need for improved representation. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has developed an Occupational Data for Health (ODH) model, currently in draft format. This study aimed to validate the ODH model by mapping occupation-related elements from resources representing recommendations, standards, public health reports and surveys, and research measures, along with preliminary evaluation of associated value sets. All 247 occupation-related items across 20 resources mapped to the ODH model. Recommended value sets had high variability across the evaluated resources. This study demonstrates the ODH model's value, the multifaceted nature of occupation information, and the critical need for occupation value sets to support clinical care, population health, and research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Site characterization and validation - drift and borehole fracture data. Stage 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; Straahle, A.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes the procedures used in mapping fractures intersecting seven scanlines along the southern and eastern boundaries of the Site Characterization and Validation (SCV) site and the procedures used in logging and orienting the fractures intersecting the core from six 'boundary boreholes' that were drilled as part of the site characterization program for the SCV site at the 360 m level in the Stripa mine. Scanline mapping along the mine drifts provided a detailed description of the fracture geomentry on the boundaries of the SCV site. The cores from the boundary boreholes have been logged, reconstructed and oriented using a borehole Televiewer and a borehole TV camera and the true fracture orientations calcilated. This has provide additional data on the fracture geometry within the SCV site. The fractire data from both the scanlines and the core logging are presented in the appendices. In addition, an initial analysis has been completed of the fracture orientations, trace lengths and spacings. Based on the variation in fracture orientations over the SCV site, there are two strong subvertical fracture sets or or clusters and a poorly represented sub-horizontal fracture set. An empirical approach, based on the 'blind zone' concept has been used to correct for orientation bias and to predict the orientations of the fracture system that will be intersected by the C and D boreholes in stage III. (33 figs., 6 tabl., 19 refs.)

  5. Parametric adaptive filtering and data validation in the bar GW detector AURIGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolan, A.; Baggio, L.; Cerdonio, M.; Prodi, G. A.; Vedovato, G.; Vitale, S.

    2002-04-01

    We report on our experience gained in the signal processing of the resonant GW detector AURIGA. Signal amplitude and arrival time are estimated by means of a matched-adaptive Wiener filter. The detector noise, entering in the filter set-up, is modelled as a parametric ARMA process; to account for slow non-stationarity of the noise, the ARMA parameters are estimated on an hourly basis. A requirement of the set-up of an unbiased Wiener filter is the separation of time spans with 'almost Gaussian' noise from non-Gaussian and/or strongly non-stationary time spans. The separation algorithm consists basically of a variance estimate with the Chauvenet convergence method and a threshold on the Curtosis index. The subsequent validation of data is strictly connected with the separation procedure: in fact, by injecting a large number of artificial GW signals into the 'almost Gaussian' part of the AURIGA data stream, we have demonstrated that the effective probability distributions of the signal-to-noise ratio χ2 and the time of arrival are those that are expected.

  6. Parametric adaptive filtering and data validation in the bar GW detector AURIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortolan, A; Baggio, L; Cerdonio, M; Prodi, G A; Vedovato, G; Vitale, S

    2002-01-01

    We report on our experience gained in the signal processing of the resonant GW detector AURIGA. Signal amplitude and arrival time are estimated by means of a matched-adaptive Wiener filter. The detector noise, entering in the filter set-up, is modelled as a parametric ARMA process; to account for slow non-stationarity of the noise, the ARMA parameters are estimated on an hourly basis. A requirement of the set-up of an unbiased Wiener filter is the separation of time spans with 'almost Gaussian' noise from non-Gaussian and/or strongly non-stationary time spans. The separation algorithm consists basically of a variance estimate with the Chauvenet convergence method and a threshold on the Curtosis index. The subsequent validation of data is strictly connected with the separation procedure: in fact, by injecting a large number of artificial GW signals into the 'almost Gaussian' part of the AURIGA data stream, we have demonstrated that the effective probability distributions of the signal-to-noise ratio χ 2 and the time of arrival are those that are expected

  7. Parametric adaptive filtering and data validation in the bar GW detector AURIGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortolan, A [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Via Romea, 4 I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Baggio, L [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Trento, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cerdonio, M [Department of Physics, University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Prodi, G A [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Trento, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vedovato, G [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Via Romea, 4 I-35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Vitale, S [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFN Gruppo Collegato di Trento, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2002-04-07

    We report on our experience gained in the signal processing of the resonant GW detector AURIGA. Signal amplitude and arrival time are estimated by means of a matched-adaptive Wiener filter. The detector noise, entering in the filter set-up, is modelled as a parametric ARMA process; to account for slow non-stationarity of the noise, the ARMA parameters are estimated on an hourly basis. A requirement of the set-up of an unbiased Wiener filter is the separation of time spans with 'almost Gaussian' noise from non-Gaussian and/or strongly non-stationary time spans. The separation algorithm consists basically of a variance estimate with the Chauvenet convergence method and a threshold on the Curtosis index. The subsequent validation of data is strictly connected with the separation procedure: in fact, by injecting a large number of artificial GW signals into the 'almost Gaussian' part of the AURIGA data stream, we have demonstrated that the effective probability distributions of the signal-to-noise ratio {chi}{sup 2} and the time of arrival are those that are expected.

  8. Parametric adaptive filtering and data validation in the bar GW detector AURIGA

    CERN Document Server

    Ortolan, A; Cerdonio, M; Prodi, G A; Vedovato, G; Vitale, S

    2002-01-01

    We report on our experience gained in the signal processing of the resonant GW detector AURIGA. Signal amplitude and arrival time are estimated by means of a matched-adaptive Wiener filter. The detector noise, entering in the filter set-up, is modelled as a parametric ARMA process; to account for slow non-stationarity of the noise, the ARMA parameters are estimated on an hourly basis. A requirement of the set-up of an unbiased Wiener filter is the separation of time spans with 'almost Gaussian' noise from non-Gaussian and/or strongly non-stationary time spans. The separation algorithm consists basically of a variance estimate with the Chauvenet convergence method and a threshold on the Curtosis index. The subsequent validation of data is strictly connected with the separation procedure: in fact, by injecting a large number of artificial GW signals into the 'almost Gaussian' part of the AURIGA data stream, we have demonstrated that the effective probability distributions of the signal-to-noise ratio chi sup 2 ...

  9. Data Validation Package - July 2016 Groundwater Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Joshua [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Campbell, Sam [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Groundwater sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site is conducted every 5 years to monitor disposal cell performance. During this event, samples were collected from eight monitoring wells as specified in the 1997 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for US Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated, http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/sampling-and­ analysis-plan-us-department-energy-office-legacy-management-sites). Planned monitoring locations are shown in Attachment 1, Sampling and Analysis Work Order. A duplicate sample was collected from location 0723. Water levels were measured at all monitoring wells that were sampled and seven additional wells. The analytical data and associated qualifiers can be viewed in environmental database reports and are also available for viewing with dynamic mapping via the GEMS (Geospatial Environmental Mapping System) website at http://gems.lm.doe.gov/#. No issues were identified during the data validation process that require additional action or follow-up.

  10. Validation of a proxy for estrogen receptor status in breast cancer patients using dispensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Dobbins, Timothy A; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2014-06-01

    To assess the performance of a proxy for estrogen receptor (ER) status in breast cancer patients using dispensing data. We derived our proxy using 167 patients. ER+ patients had evidence of at least one dispensing record for hormone therapy during the lookback period, irrespective of diagnosis date and ER- had no dispensing records for hormone therapy during the period. We validated the proxy against our gold standard, ER status from pathology reports or medical records. We assessed the proxy's performance using three lookback periods: 4.5 years, 2 years, 1 year. More than half of our cohort (62%) were >50 years, 54% had stage III/IV breast cancer at recruitment, (46%) were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 and 23% were diagnosed before 2006. Sensitivity and specificity were high for the 4.5 year lookback period (93%, 95% CI: 86-96%; and 95%: 83-99%), respectively) and remained high for the 2-year lookback period (91%: 84-95%; and 95%: 83-99%). Sensitivity decreased (83%: 75.2-89%) but specificity remained high (95%: 83-99%) using the 1-year lookback period and the period is long enough to allow sufficient time for hormone therapy to be dispensed. Our proxy accurately infers ER status in studies of breast cancer treatment based on secondary health data. The proxy is most robust with a minimum lookback period of 2 years. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Gamma Spectrometry Data Validation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, K.; Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-11-01

    This report represents the results of analyses received on or before August 15, 1996 for the first annual Gamma Spectrometry Data Validation Program (May 1996) designed to assess the capability of DOE laboratories and DOE contractors in performing routine gamma spectra analyses. Data reduction of gamma spectra are normally performed with computer codes supplied by commercial manufacturers or are developed in house. Earlier evaluations of commercial codes gave spurious results for complex spectrum. A calibration spectrum, a background spectrum and three sample spectra of increasing complexity were included for each format. The calibration spectrum contained nuclides covering the energy range from 59.5 keV to 1836 keV. The first two samples contained fallout nuclides with halflives of over 30 days. Naturally occurring nuclides were also present. The third sample contained both short and long lived fission product nuclides. The participants were asked to report values and uncertainties as Becquerel per sample with no decay correction. Sixteen software packages were evaluated. In general, the results do not appear to be dependent on the software used. Based on the control limits established for the Program for the three sample spectra, 62%, 63% and 53%, respectively, of the reported results were evaluated as acceptable

  12. Development and validation of factor analysis for dynamic in-vivo imaging data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmied, Lukas; Knoll, Peter; Mirzaei, Siroos; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav

    2018-02-01

    In-vivo optical imaging method provides information about the anatomical structures and function of tissues ranging from single cell to entire organisms. Dynamic Fluorescent Imaging (DFI) is used to examine dynamic events related to normal physiology or disease progression in real time. In this work we improve this method by using factor analysis (FA) to automatically separate overlying structures.The proposed method is based on a previously introduced Transcranial Optical Vascular Imaging (TOVI), which employs natural and sufficient transparency through the intact cranial bones of a mouse. Fluorescent image acquisition is performed after intravenous fluorescent tracer administration. Afterwards FA is used to extract structures with different temporal characteristics from dynamic contrast enhanced studies without making any a priori assumptions about physiology. The method was validated by a dynamic light phantom based on the Arduino hardware platform and dynamic fluorescent cerebral hemodynamics data sets. Using the phantom data FA can separate various light channels without user intervention. FA applied on an image sequence obtained after fluorescent tracer administration is allowing extracting valuable information about cerebral blood vessels anatomy and functionality without a-priory assumptions of their anatomy or physiology while keeping the mouse cranium intact. Unsupervised color-coding based on FA enhances visibility and distinguishing of blood vessels belonging to different compartments. DFI based on FA especially in case of transcranial imaging can be used to separate dynamic structures.

  13. CellProfiler Tracer: exploring and validating high-throughput, time-lapse microscopy image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Carpenter, Anne E

    2015-11-04

    Time-lapse analysis of cellular images is an important and growing need in biology. Algorithms for cell tracking are widely available; what researchers have been missing is a single open-source software package to visualize standard tracking output (from software like CellProfiler) in a way that allows convenient assessment of track quality, especially for researchers tuning tracking parameters for high-content time-lapse experiments. This makes quality assessment and algorithm adjustment a substantial challenge, particularly when dealing with hundreds of time-lapse movies collected in a high-throughput manner. We present CellProfiler Tracer, a free and open-source tool that complements the object tracking functionality of the CellProfiler biological image analysis package. Tracer allows multi-parametric morphological data to be visualized on object tracks, providing visualizations that have already been validated within the scientific community for time-lapse experiments, and combining them with simple graph-based measures for highlighting possible tracking artifacts. CellProfiler Tracer is a useful, free tool for inspection and quality control of object tracking data, available from http://www.cellprofiler.org/tracer/.

  14. The cross-validated AUC for MCP-logistic regression with high-dimensional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dingfeng; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Ying

    2013-10-01

    We propose a cross-validated area under the receiving operator characteristic (ROC) curve (CV-AUC) criterion for tuning parameter selection for penalized methods in sparse, high-dimensional logistic regression models. We use this criterion in combination with the minimax concave penalty (MCP) method for variable selection. The CV-AUC criterion is specifically designed for optimizing the classification performance for binary outcome data. To implement the proposed approach, we derive an efficient coordinate descent algorithm to compute the MCP-logistic regression solution surface. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed method and its comparison with the existing methods including the Akaike information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC) or Extended BIC (EBIC). The model selected based on the CV-AUC criterion tends to have a larger predictive AUC and smaller classification error than those with tuning parameters selected using the AIC, BIC or EBIC. We illustrate the application of the MCP-logistic regression with the CV-AUC criterion on three microarray datasets from the studies that attempt to identify genes related to cancers. Our simulation studies and data examples demonstrate that the CV-AUC is an attractive method for tuning parameter selection for penalized methods in high-dimensional logistic regression models.

  15. Development, Demonstration and Validation of the Deep Space Orbit Determination Software Using Lunar Prospector Tracking Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunji Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The deep space orbit determination software (DSODS is a part of a flight dynamic subsystem (FDS for the Korean Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO, a lunar exploration mission expected to launch after 2018. The DSODS consists of several sub modules, of which the orbit determination (OD module employs a weighted least squares algorithm for estimating the parameters related to the motion and the tracking system of the spacecraft, and subroutines for performance improvement and detailed analysis of the orbit solution. In this research, DSODS is demonstrated and validated at lunar orbit at an altitude of 100 km using actual Lunar Prospector tracking data. A set of a priori states are generated, and the robustness of DSODS to the a priori error is confirmed by the NASA planetary data system (PDS orbit solutions. Furthermore, the accuracy of the orbit solutions is determined by solution comparison and overlap analysis as about tens of meters. Through these analyses, the ability of the DSODS to provide proper orbit solutions for the KPLO are proved.

  16. Validation of an LES Model for Soot Evolution against DNS Data in Turbulent Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael

    2012-11-01

    An integrated modeling approach for soot evolution in turbulent reacting flows is validated against three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data in a set of n-heptane nonpremixed temporal jet flames. As in the DNS study, the evolution of the soot population is described statistically with the Hybrid Method of Moments (HMOM). The oxidation of the fuel and formation of soot precursors are described with the Radiation Flamelet/Progress Variable (RFPV) model that includes an additional transport equation for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) to account for the slow chemistry governing these species. In addition, the small-scale interactions between soot, chemistry, and turbulence are described with a presumed subfilter PDF approach that accounts for the very large spatial intermittency characterizing soot in turbulent reacting flows. The DNS dataset includes flames at three different Damköhler numbers to study the influence of global mixing rates on the evolution of PAH and soot. In this work, the ability of the model to capture these trends quantitatively as Damköhler number varies is investigated. In order to reliably assess the LES approach, the LES is initialized from the filtered DNS data after an initial transitional period in an effort to minimize the hydrodynamic differences between the DNS and the LES.

  17. Application of Kramers-Kronig relationships for titanium impedance data validation in a Ringer's solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the applicability of Kramers-Kronig (KK relationships to assess the validity of real and imaginary impedance measurements for titanium in a Ringer's solution using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS method. Nyquist and Bode plots showed a capacitive behaviour with a high impedance modulus including two time constants. Two procedures were employed in the implementation of the KK integral relationships based on an equivalent circuit which satisfies KK relationships and an ohmic resistance shunted to the measured EIS data. The titanium's EIS data satisfied the KK relationships.

    Este artículo estudia la aplicabilidad de las relaciones de Kramers-Kronig (KK al estudio de la validez de las medidas de impedancia (EIS, parte real y parte imaginaria, del titanio en contacto con la solución de Ringer. Los diagramas de Nyquist y Bode muestran un comportamiento capacitivo, con un módulo de impedancia elevado y con dos constantes de tiempo. En la implementación de las integrales de KK se emplearon dos procedimientos, que se basan en un circuito equivalente que cumple las relaciones de KK y en una resistencia óhmica en paralelo añadida a los datos de impedancia medidos. Los resultados de impedancia del titanio satisfacen las relaciones de KK.

  18. A Systematic Review of Validated Methods for Identifying Cerebrovascular Accident or Transient Ischemic Attack Using Administrative Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Susan E.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Tjia, Jennifer; Cutrona, Sarah L.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Dodd, Katherine S.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To perform a systematic review of the validity of algorithms for identifying cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) using administrative and claims data. Methods PubMed and Iowa Drug Information Service (IDIS) searches of the English language literature were performed to identify studies published between 1990 and 2010 that evaluated the validity of algorithms for identifying CVAs (ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, intracranial hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage) and/or TIAs in administrative data. Two study investigators independently reviewed the abstracts and articles to determine relevant studies according to pre-specified criteria. Results A total of 35 articles met the criteria for evaluation. Of these, 26 articles provided data to evaluate the validity of stroke, 7 reported the validity of TIA, 5 reported the validity of intracranial bleeds (intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage), and 10 studies reported the validity of algorithms to identify the composite endpoints of stroke/TIA or cerebrovascular disease. Positive predictive values (PPVs) varied depending on the specific outcomes and algorithms evaluated. Specific algorithms to evaluate the presence of stroke and intracranial bleeds were found to have high PPVs (80% or greater). Algorithms to evaluate TIAs in adult populations were generally found to have PPVs of 70% or greater. Conclusions The algorithms and definitions to identify CVAs and TIAs using administrative and claims data differ greatly in the published literature. The choice of the algorithm employed should be determined by the stroke subtype of interest. PMID:22262598

  19. Using gamification to drive patient’s personal data validation in a Personal Health Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Giunti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gamification is a term used to describe using game elements in non-game environments to enhance user experience. It has been incorporated with commercial success into several platforms (Linkedin, Badgeville, Facebook this has made some researchers theorize that it could also be used in education as a tool to increase student engagement and to drive desirable learning behaviors on them. While in the past years some game elements have been incorporated to healthcare there is still little evidence on how effective they are. Game elements provide engagement consistent with various theories of motivation, positive psychology (e.g., flow, and also provide instant feedback. Feedback is more effective when it provides sufficient and specific information for goal achievement and is presented relatively close in time to the event being evaluated. Feedback can reference individual progress, can make social comparisons, or can refer to task criteria. Electronic personal health record systems (PHRs support patient centered healthcare by making medical records and other relevant information accessible to patients, thus assisting patients in health self-management. A particularly difficult data set that is often difficult to capture are those regarding social and cultural background information. This data set is not only useful to help better healthcare system management, it is also relevant as it is used for epidemiological and preventive purposes. We used gamified mechanics that involve instant feedback to test if they would increase patient’s personal data validation and completion in our PHR as well as overall PHR use. On our presentation we will describe our results and the story behind them.

  20. Validation and Variation of Upper Layer Thickness in South China Sea from Satellite Altimeter Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Jung Kuo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite altimeter data from 1993 to 2005 has been used to analyze the seasonal variation and the interannual variability of upper layer thickness (ULT in the South China Sea (SCS. Base on in-situ measurements, the ULT is defined as the thickness from the sea surface to the depth of 16°C isotherm which is used to validate the result derived from satellite altimeter data. In comparison with altimeter and in-situ derived ULTs yields a correlation coefficient of 0.92 with a slope of 0.95 and an intercept of 6 m. The basin averaged ULT derived from altimeter is 160 m in winter and 171 m in summer which is similar to the in-situ measurements of 159 m in winter and 175 m in summer. Both results also show similar spatial patterns. It suggests that the sea surface height data derived from satellite sensors are usable for study the variation of ULT in the semi-closed SCS. Furthermore, we also use satellite derived ULT to detect the development of eddy. Interannual variability of two meso-scale cyclonic eddies and one anticyclonic eddy are strongly influenced by El Niño events. In most cases, there are highly positive correlations between ULT and sea surface temperature except the periods of El Niño. During the onset of El Niño event, ULT is deeper when sea surface temperature is lower.

  1. Computer code ENDSAM for random sampling and validation of the resonance parameters covariance matrices of some major nuclear data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevnik, Lucijan; Žerovnik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Methods for random sampling of correlated parameters. • Link to open-source code for sampling of resonance parameters in ENDF-6 format. • Validation of the code on realistic and artificial data. • Validation of covariances in three major contemporary nuclear data libraries. - Abstract: Methods for random sampling of correlated parameters are presented. The methods are implemented for sampling of resonance parameters in ENDF-6 format and a link to the open-source code ENDSAM is given. The code has been validated on realistic data. Additionally, consistency of covariances of resonance parameters of three major contemporary nuclear data libraries (JEFF-3.2, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0u2) has been checked.

  2. Experimental Peptide Identification Repository (EPIR): an integrated peptide-centric platform for validation and mining of tandem mass spectrometry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dan Bach; Brønd, Jan Christian; Nielsen, Peter Aagaard

    2004-01-01

    LC MS/MS has become an established technology in proteomic studies, and with the maturation of the technology the bottleneck has shifted from data generation to data validation and mining. To address this bottleneck we developed Experimental Peptide Identification Repository (EPIR), which...... is an integrated software platform for storage, validation, and mining of LC MS/MS-derived peptide evidence. EPIR is a cumulative data repository where precursor ions are linked to peptide assignments and protein associations returned by a search engine (e.g. Mascot, Sequest, or PepSea). Any number of datasets can...

  3. Convergence among Data Sources, Response Bias, and Reliability and Validity of a Structured Job Analysis Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jack E.; Hakel, Milton D.

    1979-01-01

    Examined are questions pertinent to the use of the Position Analysis Questionnaire: Who can use the PAQ reliably and validly? Must one rely on trained job analysts? Can people having no direct contact with the job use the PAQ reliably and validly? Do response biases influence PAQ responses? (Author/KC)

  4. Validity limits of fuel rod performance calculations from radiochemical data at operating LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaenker, H.; Nebel, D.

    1986-01-01

    There are various calculational models for the assessment of the fuel rod performance on the basis of the activities of gaseous and volatile fission products in the reactor coolant. The most important condition for the applicability of the calculational models is that a steady state release of the fission products into the reactor coolant takes place. It is well known that the models are not applicable during or shortly after reactor transients. The fact that 'unsteady states' caused by the fuel defection processes themselves can also occur in rare cases at steady reactor operation has not been taken into account so far. A test of validity is suggested with the aid of which the applicability of the calculational models can be checked in any concrete case, and the misleading of the reactor operators by gross misinterpretation of the radiochemical data can be avoided. The criteria of applicability are the fission product total activity, the slope tan α in the relationship lg (R/sub i//B/sub i/) proportional to lg lambda/sub i/ for the gaseous and volatile fission products, and the activity of the nonvolatile isotope 239 Np. (author)

  5. Accounting for sensor calibration, data validation, measurement and sampling uncertainties in monitoring urban drainage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand-Krajewski, J L; Bardin, J P; Mourad, M; Béranger, Y

    2003-01-01

    Assessing the functioning and the performance of urban drainage systems on both rainfall event and yearly time scales is usually based on online measurements of flow rates and on samples of influent effluent for some rainfall events per year. In order to draw pertinent scientific and operational conclusions from the measurement results, it is absolutely necessary to use appropriate methods and techniques in order to i) calibrate sensors and analytical methods, ii) validate raw data, iii) evaluate measurement uncertainties, iv) evaluate the number of rainfall events to sample per year in order to determine performance indicator with a given uncertainty. Based an previous work, the paper gives a synthetic review of required and techniques, and illustrates their application to storage and settling tanks. Experiments show that, controlled and careful experimental conditions, relative uncertainties are about 20% for flow rates in sewer pipes, 6-10% for volumes, 25-35% for TSS concentrations and loads, and 18-276% for TSS removal rates. In order to evaluate the annual pollutant interception efficiency of storage and settling tanks with a given uncertainty, efforts should first be devoted to decrease the sampling uncertainty by increasing the number of sampled events.

  6. Validation of the ATLAS hadronic calibration with the LAr End-Cap beam tests data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillari, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter and the large number of expected particles per event require a clustering algorithm that is able to suppress noise and pile-up efficiently. Therefore the cluster reconstruction is the essential first step in the hadronic calibration. The identification of electromagnetic components within a hadronic cluster using cluster shape variables is the next step in the hadronic calibration procedure. Finally the energy density of individual cells is used to assign the proper weight to correct for the invisible energy deposits of hadrons due to the non-compensating nature of the ATLAS calorimeter and to correct for energy losses in material non instrumented with read-out. The weighting scheme employs the energy density in individual cells. Therefore the validation of the Monte Carlo simulation, which is used to define the weighting parameters and energy correction algorithms, is an essential step in the hadronic calibration procedure. Pion data, obtained in a beam test corresponding to the pseudorapidity region 2.5 < |η| < 4.0 in ATLAS and in the energy range 40 GeV ≤ E ≤ 200 GeV, have been compared with Monte Carlo simulations, using the full ATLAS hadronic calibration procedure.

  7. A new approach for the validation of skeletal muscle modelling using MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böl, Markus; Sturmat, Maike; Weichert, Christine; Kober, Cornelia

    2011-05-01

    Active and passive experiments on skeletal muscles are in general arranged on isolated muscles or by consideration of the whole muscle packages, such as the arm or the leg. Both methods exhibit advantages and disadvantages. By applying experiments on isolated muscles it turns out that no information about the surrounding tissues are considered what leads to insufficient specifications of the isolated muscle. Especially, the muscle shape and the fibre directions of an embedded muscle are completely different to that of the same isolated muscle. An explicit advantage, in contrast, is the possibility to study the mechanical characteristics in an unique, isolated way. On the other hand, by applying experiments on muscle packages the aforementioned pros and cons reverse. In such situation, the whole surrounding tissue is considered in the mechanical characteristics of the muscle which are much more difficult to identify. However, an embedded muscle reflects a much more realistic situation as in isolated condition. Thus, in the proposed work to our knowledge, we, for the first time, suggest a technique that allows to study characteristics of single skeletal muscles inside a muscle package without any computation of the tissue around the muscle of interest. In doing so, we use magnetic resonance imaging data of an upper arm during contraction. By applying a three-dimensional continuum constitutive muscle model we are able to study the biceps brachii inside the upper arm and validate the modelling approach by optical experiments.

  8. Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector and the Lightning Imaging Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated datasets, and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data an the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA:s Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. A quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available is also introduced. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in sc)iirce location, Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated datasets, and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three-station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg.

  9. Safety Performance Indicator for alcohol in road accidents--international comparison, validity and data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assum, Terje; Sørensen, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Safety Performance Indicators, SPIs, are developed for various areas within road safety such as speed, car occupant protection, alcohol and drugs, vehicle safety, etc. SPIs can be used to indicate the road safety situation and to compare road safety performance between countries and over time and to understand the process leading to accidents, helping to select the measures to reduce them. This article describes an alcohol SPI defined as the percentage of fatalities resulting from accidents involving at least one driver impaired by alcohol. The calculation of the alcohol SPI for 26 European countries shows that the SPI varies from 4.4% in Bulgaria to 72.2% in Italy. These results raise the question if the results reflect the real situation or if there is a methodological explanation. To answer this question three different studies were carried out: comparison with other alcohol SPIs, in-depth studies of data quality in seven selected countries, and a study of correlations between the SPI and influencing factors. These studies indicate clearly that there is a need to improve quality of the data used for the alcohol SPI. Most importantly, the total number of drivers involved in fatal accidents, the number tested for alcohol and the number not tested, should be reported, in addition to the number of alcohol positive and negative drivers among those tested. Until these improvements are made, the validity of this SPI seems poor and comparison of the alcohol SPI results across countries should be made with caution. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Validation of a case definition to define chronic dialysis using outpatient administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Fiona M; James, Matthew T; Chin, Rick; Klarenbach, Scott W; Manns, Braden J; Quinn, Robert R; Ravani, Pietro; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2011-03-01

    Administrative health care databases offer an efficient and accessible, though as-yet unvalidated, approach to studying outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The objective of this study is to determine the validity of outpatient physician billing derived algorithms for defining chronic dialysis compared to a reference standard ESRD registry. A cohort of incident dialysis patients (Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 2008) and prevalent chronic dialysis patients (Jan 1, 2008) was selected from a geographically inclusive ESRD registry and administrative database. Four administrative data definitions were considered: at least 1 outpatient claim, at least 2 outpatient claims, at least 2 outpatient claims at least 90 days apart, and continuous outpatient claims at least 90 days apart with no gap in claims greater than 21 days. Measures of agreement of the four administrative data definitions were compared to a reference standard (ESRD registry). Basic patient characteristics are compared between all 5 patient groups. 1,118,097 individuals formed the overall population and 2,227 chronic dialysis patients were included in the ESRD registry. The three definitions requiring at least 2 outpatient claims resulted in kappa statistics between 0.60-0.80 indicating "substantial" agreement. "At least 1 outpatient claim" resulted in "excellent" agreement with a kappa statistic of 0.81. Of the four definitions, the simplest (at least 1 outpatient claim) performed comparatively to other definitions. The limitations of this work are the billing codes used are developed in Canada, however, other countries use similar billing practices and thus the codes could easily be mapped to other systems. Our reference standard ESRD registry may not capture all dialysis patients resulting in some misclassification. The registry is linked to on-going care so this is likely to be minimal. The definition utilized will vary with the research objective.

  11. Validation of a case definition to define chronic dialysis using outpatient administrative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klarenbach Scott W

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Administrative health care databases offer an efficient and accessible, though as-yet unvalidated, approach to studying outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The objective of this study is to determine the validity of outpatient physician billing derived algorithms for defining chronic dialysis compared to a reference standard ESRD registry. Methods A cohort of incident dialysis patients (Jan. 1 - Dec. 31, 2008 and prevalent chronic dialysis patients (Jan 1, 2008 was selected from a geographically inclusive ESRD registry and administrative database. Four administrative data definitions were considered: at least 1 outpatient claim, at least 2 outpatient claims, at least 2 outpatient claims at least 90 days apart, and continuous outpatient claims at least 90 days apart with no gap in claims greater than 21 days. Measures of agreement of the four administrative data definitions were compared to a reference standard (ESRD registry. Basic patient characteristics are compared between all 5 patient groups. Results 1,118,097 individuals formed the overall population and 2,227 chronic dialysis patients were included in the ESRD registry. The three definitions requiring at least 2 outpatient claims resulted in kappa statistics between 0.60-0.80 indicating "substantial" agreement. "At least 1 outpatient claim" resulted in "excellent" agreement with a kappa statistic of 0.81. Conclusions Of the four definitions, the simplest (at least 1 outpatient claim performed comparatively to other definitions. The limitations of this work are the billing codes used are developed in Canada, however, other countries use similar billing practices and thus the codes could easily be mapped to other systems. Our reference standard ESRD registry may not capture all dialysis patients resulting in some misclassification. The registry is linked to on-going care so this is likely to be minimal. The definition

  12. Copper benchmark experiment at the Frascati Neutron Generator for nuclear data validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelone, M., E-mail: maurizio.angelone@enea.it; Flammini, D.; Loreti, S.; Moro, F.; Pillon, M.; Villari, R.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A benchmark experiment was performed using pure copper with 14 MeV neutrons. • The experiment was performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). • Activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters and scintillators were used to measure reactions rates (RR), nuclear heating and neutron spectra. • The paper presents the RR measurements and the post analysis using MCNP5 and JEFF-3.1.1, JEFF-3.2 and FENDL-3.1 libraries. • C/Es are presented showing the need for deep revision of Cu cross sections. - Abstract: A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper block (dimensions 60 × 70 × 60 cm{sup 3}), aimed at testing and validating the recent nuclear data libraries for fusion applications, was performed at the 14-MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) as part of a F4E specific grant (F4E-FPA-395-01) assigned to the European Consortium on Nuclear Data and Experimental Techniques. The relevant neutronics quantities (e.g., reaction rates, neutron flux spectra, doses, etc.) were measured using different experimental techniques and the results were compared to the calculated quantities using fusion relevant nuclear data libraries. This paper focuses on the analyses carried-out by ENEA through the activation foils techniques. {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au, {sup 186}W(n,γ){sup 187}W, {sup 115}In(n,n′){sup 115}In, {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58}Co, {sup 27}Al(n,α){sup 24}Na, {sup 93}Nb(n,2n){sup 92}Nb{sup m} activation reactions were used. The foils were placed at eight different positions along the Cu block and irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons. Activation measurements were performed by means of High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Detailed simulation of the experiment was carried-out using MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the European JEFF-3.1.1 and 3.2 nuclear cross-sections data files for neutron transport and IRDFF-v1.05 library for the reaction rates in activation foils. The calculated reaction rates (C) were compared to the experimental quantities (E) and

  13. Validating alternative methodologies to estimate the hydrological regime of temporary streams when flow data are unavailable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Pilar; Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Cid, Núria; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic life in temporary streams is strongly conditioned by the temporal variability of the hydrological conditions that control the occurrence and connectivity of diverse mesohabitats. In this context, the software TREHS (Temporary Rivers' Ecological and Hydrological Status) has been developed, in the framework of the LIFE Trivers project, to help managers for adequately implement the Water Framework Directive in this type of water bodies. TREHS, using the methodology described in Gallart et al (2012), defines six temporal 'aquatic states', based on the hydrological conditions representing different mesohabitats, for a given reach at a particular moment. Nevertheless, hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary streams are often non-existent or scarce. The scarcity of flow data makes frequently impossible the characterization of temporary streams hydrological regimes and, as a consequence, the selection of the correct periods and methods to determine their ecological status. Because of its qualitative nature, the TREHS approach allows the use of alternative methodologies to assess the regime of temporary streams in the lack of observed flow data. However, to adapt the TREHS to this qualitative data both the temporal scheme (from monthly to seasonal) as well as the number of aquatic states (from 6 to 3) have been modified. Two alternatives complementary methodologies were tested within the TREHS framework to assess the regime of temporary streams: interviews and aerial photographs. All the gauging stations (13) belonging to the Catalan Internal Catchments (NE, Spain) with recurrent zero flows periods were selected to validate both methodologies. On one hand, non-structured interviews were carried out to inhabitants of villages and small towns near the gauging stations. Flow permanence metrics for input into TREHS were drawn from the notes taken during the interviews. On the other hand, the historical series of available aerial photographs (typically 10

  14. Retrievals of Cloud Droplet Size from the RSP Data: Validation Using in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Sinclair, Kenneth; Wasilewski, Andrzej P.; Ziemba, Luke; Crosbie, Ewan; Hair, John; Hu, Yongxiang; Hostetler, Chris; Stamnes, Snorre

    2016-01-01

    latter case the distributions retrieved from the RSP data were consistent with the multi-layer cloud structures observed in the correlative High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) profiles. The comparison results provide a rare validation of polarimetric droplet size retrieval techniques, which can be used for analysis of satellite data on global scale.

  15. Calibration/validation strategy for GOES-R L1b data products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbright, Jon P.; Kline, Elizabeth; Pogorzala, David; MacKenzie, Wayne; Williams, Ryan; Mozer, Kathryn; Carter, Dawn; Race, Randall; Sims, Jamese; Seybold, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R series (GOES-R) will be the next generation of NOAA geostationary environmental satellites. The first satellite in the series is planned for launch in November 2016. The satellite will carry six instruments dedicated to the study of the Earth's weather, lightning mapping, solar observations, and space weather monitoring. Each of the six instruments require specialized calibration plans to achieve their product quality requirements. In this talk we will describe the overall on-orbit calibration program and data product release schedule of the GOES-R program, as well as an overview of the strategies of the individual instrument science teams. The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is the primary Earth-viewing weather imaging instrument on GOES-R. Compared to the present on-orbit GOES imagers, ABI will provide three times the spectral bands, four times the spatial resolution, and operate five times faster. The increased data demands and product requirements necessitate an aggressive and innovative calibration campaign. The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) will provide continuous rapid lightning detection information covering the Americas and nearby ocean regions. The frequency of lightning activity points to the intensification of storms and may improve tornado warning lead time. The calibration of GLM will involve intercomparisons with ground-based lightning detectors, an airborne field campaign, and a ground-based laser beacon campaign. GOES-R also carries four instruments dedicated to the study of the space environment. The Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) and the Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) will study solar activity that may affect power grids, communication, and spaceflight. The Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS) and the Magnetometer (MAG) study the in-situ space weather environment. These instruments follow a calibration and validation (cal/val) program that relies on

  16. Validation of a Robust Neural Real-Time Voltage Estimator for Active Distribution Grids on Field Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertl, Michael; Douglass, Philip James; Heussen, Kai

    2018-01-01

    network approach for voltage estimation in active distribution grids by means of measured data from two feeders of a real low voltage distribution grid. The approach enables a real-time voltage estimation at locations in the distribution grid, where otherwise only non-real-time measurements are available......The installation of measurements in distribution grids enables the development of data driven methods for the power system. However, these methods have to be validated in order to understand the limitations and capabilities for their use. This paper presents a systematic validation of a neural...

  17. Rodent Research-1 (RR1) NASA Validation Flight: Mouse liver transcriptomic proteomic and epigenomic data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RR-1 is a validation flight to evaluate the hardware operational and science capabilities of the Rodent Research Project on the ISS. RNA DNA and protein were...

  18. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    KAUST Repository

    Salisbury, J. Barrett; Haddad, D.E.; Rockwell, T.; Arrowsmith, J R.; Madugo, C.; Zielke, Olaf; Scharer, K.

    2015-01-01

    trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance

  19. Ensemble Kalman filter regularization using leave-one-out data cross-validation

    KAUST Repository

    Rayo Schiappacasse, Lautaro Jeró nimo; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the classical leave-one-out cross-validation method for selecting a regularization parameter for the Tikhonov problem is implemented within the EnKF framework. Following the original concept, the regularization parameter is selected

  20. Mathematical Capture of Human Crowd Behavioral Data for Computational Model Building, Verification, and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    throughout the experimental runs. Reliable and validated measures of anxiety ( Spielberger , 1983), as well as custom-constructed questionnaires about...Crowd modeling and simulation technologies. Transactions on modeling and computer simulation, 20(4). Spielberger , C. D. (1983

  1. Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) cloud screening algorithms; validation against collocated MODIS and CALIOP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, T. E.; O'Dell, C. W.; Frankenberg, C.; Partain, P.; Cronk, H. Q.; Savtchenko, A.; Nelson, R. R.; Rosenthal, E. J.; Chang, A. Y.; Fisher, B.; Osterman, G.; Pollock, R. H.; Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Gunson, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission is to retrieve the column-averaged carbon dioxide (CO2) dry air mole fraction (XCO2) from satellite measurements of reflected sunlight in the near-infrared. These estimates can be biased by clouds and aerosols within the instrument's field of view (FOV). Screening of the most contaminated soundings minimizes unnecessary calls to the computationally expensive Level 2 (L2) XCO2 retrieval algorithm. Hence, robust cloud screening methods have been an important focus of the OCO-2 algorithm development team. Two distinct, computationally inexpensive cloud screening algorithms have been developed for this application. The A-Band Preprocessor (ABP) retrieves the surface pressure using measurements in the 0.76 μm O2 A-band, neglecting scattering by clouds and aerosols, which introduce photon path-length (PPL) differences that can cause large deviations between the expected and retrieved surface pressure. The Iterative Maximum A-Posteriori (IMAP) Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) Preprocessor (IDP) retrieves independent estimates of the CO2 and H2O column abundances using observations taken at 1.61 μm (weak CO2 band) and 2.06 μm (strong CO2 band), while neglecting atmospheric scattering. The CO2 and H2O column abundances retrieved in these two spectral regions differ significantly in the presence of cloud and scattering aerosols. The combination of these two algorithms, which key off of different features in the spectra, provides the basis for cloud screening of the OCO-2 data set. To validate the OCO-2 cloud screening approach, collocated measurements from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), aboard the Aqua platform, were compared to results from the two OCO-2 cloud screening algorithms. With tuning to allow throughputs of ≃ 30 %, agreement between the OCO-2 and MODIS cloud screening methods is found to be

  2. Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) cloud screening algorithms: validation against collocated MODIS and CALIOP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas E.; O'Dell, Christopher W.; Frankenberg, Christian; Partain, Philip T.; Cronk, Heather Q.; Savtchenko, Andrey; Nelson, Robert R.; Rosenthal, Emily J.; Chang, Albert Y.; Fisher, Brenden; Osterman, Gregory B.; Pollock, Randy H.; Crisp, David; Eldering, Annmarie; Gunson, Michael R.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission is to retrieve the column-averaged carbon dioxide (CO2) dry air mole fraction (XCO2) from satellite measurements of reflected sunlight in the near-infrared. These estimates can be biased by clouds and aerosols, i.e., contamination, within the instrument's field of view. Screening of the most contaminated soundings minimizes unnecessary calls to the computationally expensive Level 2 (L2) XCO2 retrieval algorithm. Hence, robust cloud screening methods have been an important focus of the OCO-2 algorithm development team. Two distinct, computationally inexpensive cloud screening algorithms have been developed for this application. The A-Band Preprocessor (ABP) retrieves the surface pressure using measurements in the 0.76 µm O2 A band, neglecting scattering by clouds and aerosols, which introduce photon path-length differences that can cause large deviations between the expected and retrieved surface pressure. The Iterative Maximum A Posteriori (IMAP) Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) Preprocessor (IDP) retrieves independent estimates of the CO2 and H2O column abundances using observations taken at 1.61 µm (weak CO2 band) and 2.06 µm (strong CO2 band), while neglecting atmospheric scattering. The CO2 and H2O column abundances retrieved in these two spectral regions differ significantly in the presence of cloud and scattering aerosols. The combination of these two algorithms, which are sensitive to different features in the spectra, provides the basis for cloud screening of the OCO-2 data set.To validate the OCO-2 cloud screening approach, collocated measurements from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), aboard the Aqua platform, were compared to results from the two OCO-2 cloud screening algorithms. With tuning of algorithmic threshold parameters that allows for processing of ≃ 20-25 % of all OCO-2 soundings

  3. Model validation studies of water flow and radionuclide transport in vegetated soils using lysimeter data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, A.; Jining Chen [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Model Uncertainty and Validation was one of the four themes of BIOMOVS II which had been identified by the programme's steering committee. It arose out of a concern that biosphere assessment models are generally simplified representations of highly complex environmental systems which, therefore, include a degree of uncertainty in their outputs. This uncertainty may be due to inadequate representations of the physical, chemical and biological processes; issues associated with scaling up highly non-linear systems; problems of model identification, in particular user interpretation. Therefore, during the course of the 5 year (1991-1996) BIOMOVS II programme a number of working sub-groups reestablished to address these issues. This document is the final report of the Prediction of Upward Migration of Radionuclides in Lysimeters sub-group which was established towards the end of the programme, late in 1994. It describes the 'blind' application of various hydrological and radiochemical transport models to experiment data derived from vegetated lysimeters. In order to investigate soil-to-plant transfer processes affecting the radionuclide migration from contaminated near surface water tables into arable crops, a lysimeter experiment has been undertaken at Imperial College, funded by UK Nirex Ltd. Detailed observations of climate, soil hydrology, plant growth and radiochemical migration were collected on the uptake of various radionuclides by a winter wheat crop. A selected set of data was made available to members of BIOMOVS II in order to allow them to test relevant components of current versions of assessment code. This was a challenging task owing to the rather unusual experimental design, in particular, the introduction of radionuclides at the base of the lysimeter, 5 cm below a fixed water table, and their subsequent upward migration through the soil. The comprehensive hydrological data set available provided various modelers, particularly those

  4. Model validation studies of water flow and radionuclide transport in vegetated soils using lysimeter data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, A.; Jining Chen

    1996-09-01

    Model Uncertainty and Validation was one of the four themes of BIOMOVS II which had been identified by the programme's steering committee. It arose out of a concern that biosphere assessment models are generally simplified representations of highly complex environmental systems which, therefore, include a degree of uncertainty in their outputs. This uncertainty may be due to inadequate representations of the physical, chemical and biological processes; issues associated with scaling up highly non-linear systems; problems of model identification, in particular user interpretation. Therefore, during the course of the 5 year (1991-1996) BIOMOVS II programme a number of working sub-groups reestablished to address these issues. This document is the final report of the Prediction of Upward Migration of Radionuclides in Lysimeters sub-group which was established towards the end of the programme, late in 1994. It describes the 'blind' application of various hydrological and radiochemical transport models to experiment data derived from vegetated lysimeters. In order to investigate soil-to-plant transfer processes affecting the radionuclide migration from contaminated near surface water tables into arable crops, a lysimeter experiment has been undertaken at Imperial College, funded by UK Nirex Ltd. Detailed observations of climate, soil hydrology, plant growth and radiochemical migration were collected on the uptake of various radionuclides by a winter wheat crop. A selected set of data was made available to members of BIOMOVS II in order to allow them to test relevant components of current versions of assessment code. This was a challenging task owing to the rather unusual experimental design, in particular, the introduction of radionuclides at the base of the lysimeter, 5 cm below a fixed water table, and their subsequent upward migration through the soil. The comprehensive hydrological data set available provided various modelers, particularly those involved in tritium

  5. Validation of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Ice Surface Temperature Environmental Data Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghui Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of the surface temperature is critical to understanding and forecasting Arctic climate change; as surface temperature integrates changes in the surface energy budget. The sea-ice surface temperature (IST has been measured with optical and thermal infrared sensors for many years. With the IST Environmental Data Record (EDR available from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites; we can continue to monitor and investigate Arctic climate change. This work examines the quality of the VIIRS IST EDR. Validation is performed through comparisons with multiple datasets; including NASA IceBridge measurements; air temperature from Arctic drifting ice buoys; Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS IST; MODIS IST simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO; and surface air temperature from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Results show biases of −0.34; −0.12; 0.16; −3.20; and −3.41 K compared to an aircraft-mounted downward-looking pyrometer; MODIS; MODIS SNO; drifting buoy; and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis; respectively; root-mean-square errors of 0.98; 1.02; 0.95; 4.89; and 6.94 K; and root-mean-square errors with the bias removed of 0.92; 1.01; 0.94; 3.70; and 6.04 K. Based on the IceBridge and MODIS results; the VIIRS IST uncertainty (RMSE meets or exceeds the JPSS system requirement of 1.0 K. The product can therefore be considered useful for meteorological and climatological applications.

  6. Production and validation of nuclear data for reactor and fuel cycle applications; Production et validation des donnees nucleaires pour les applications reacteurs et cycle du combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakas, C [Framatome ANP GmbH NBTT, Erlangen (Germany); Verwaerde, D [Electricite de France EDF, 75 - Paris (France); Toubon, H [Cogema, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France); and others

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this technical meeting is the improvement of the existing nuclear data and the production of new data of interest for the upstream and downstream of the fuel cycle (enrichment, fabrication, management, storage, transport, reprocessing), for the industrial reactors, the research reactors and the new reactor concepts (criticality, dimensioning, exploitation), for the instrumentation systems (external and internal sensors), the radioprotection, the residual power, the structures (neutron bombardment effect on vessels, rods etc..), and for the activation of steel structures (Fr, Ni, Co). The expected result is the collection of more reliable and accurate data in a wider spectrum of energies and temperatures thanks to more precise computer codes and measurement techniques. This document brings together the communications presented at this meeting and dealing with: the process of production and validation of nuclear data; the measurement facilities and the big international programs; the users needs and the industrial priorities; the basic nuclear data (BND) needs at Cogema; the expression and evaluation of BND; the evaluation work: the efficient cross-sections; the processing of data and the creation of activation libraries; from the integral measurement to the qualification and the feedback on nuclear data. (J.S.)

  7. Novel experimental measuring techniques required to provide data for CFD validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, H.-M.

    2008-01-01

    CFD code validation requires experimental data that characterize the distributions of parameters within large flow domains. On the other hand, the development of geometry-independent closure relations for CFD codes have to rely on instrumentation and experimental techniques appropriate for the phenomena that are to be modelled, which usually requires high spatial and time resolution. The paper reports about the use of wire-mesh sensors to study turbulent mixing processes in single-phase flow as well as to characterize the dynamics of the gas-liquid interface in a vertical pipe flow. Experiments at a pipe of a nominal diameter of 200 mm are taken as the basis for the development and test of closure relations describing bubble coalescence and break-up, interfacial momentum transfer and turbulence modulation for a multi-bubble-class model. This is done by measuring the evolution of the flow structure along the pipe. The transferability of the extended CFD code to more complicated 3D flow situations is assessed against measured data from tests involving two-phase flow around an asymmetric obstacle placed in a vertical pipe. The obstacle, a half-moon-shaped diaphragm, is movable in the direction of the pipe axis; this allows the 3D gas fraction field to be recorded without changing the sensor position. In the outlook, the pressure chamber of TOPFLOW is presented, which will be used as the containment for a test facility, in which experiments can be conducted in pressure equilibrium with the inner atmosphere of the tank. In this way, flow structures can be observed by optical means through large-scale windows even at pressures of up to 5 MPa. The so-called 'Diving Chamber' technology will be used for Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) tests. Finally, some important trends in instrumentation for multi-phase flows will be given. This includes the state-of-art of X-ray and gamma tomography, new multi-component wire-mesh sensors, and a discussion of the potential of other non

  8. Inversion, error analysis, and validation of GPS/MET occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Steiner

    Full Text Available The global positioning system meteorology (GPS/MET experiment was the first practical demonstration of global navigation satellite system (GNSS-based active limb sounding employing the radio occultation technique. This method measures, as principal observable and with millimetric accuracy, the excess phase path (relative to propagation in vacuum of GNSS-transmitted radio waves caused by refraction during passage through the Earth's neutral atmosphere and ionosphere in limb geometry. It shows great potential utility for weather and climate system studies in providing an unique combination of global coverage, high vertical resolution and accuracy, long-term stability, and all-weather capability. We first describe our GPS/MET data processing scheme from excess phases via bending angles to the neutral atmospheric parameters refractivity, density, pressure and temperature. Special emphasis is given to ionospheric correction methodology and the inversion of bending angles to refractivities, where we introduce a matrix inversion technique (instead of the usual integral inversion. The matrix technique is shown to lead to identical results as integral inversion but is more directly extendable to inversion by optimal estimation. The quality of GPS/MET-derived profiles is analyzed with an error estimation analysis employing a Monte Carlo technique. We consider statistical errors together with systematic errors due to upper-boundary initialization of the retrieval by a priori bending angles. Perfect initialization and properly smoothed statistical errors allow for better than 1 K temperature retrieval accuracy up to the stratopause. No initialization and statistical errors yield better than 1 K accuracy up to 30 km but less than 3 K accuracy above 40 km. Given imperfect initialization, biases >2 K propagate down to below 30 km height in unfavorable realistic cases. Furthermore, results of a statistical validation of GPS/MET profiles through comparison

  9. Novel experimental measuring techniques required to provide data for CFD validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    CFD code validation requires experimental data that characterize distributions of parameters within large flow domains. On the other hand, the development of geometry-independent closure relations for CFD codes have to rely on instrumentation and experimental techniques appropriate for the phenomena that are to be modelled, which usually requires high spatial and time resolution. The presentation reports about the use of wire-mesh sensors to study turbulent mixing processes in the single-phase flow as well as to characterize the dynamics of the gas-liquid interface in a vertical pipe flow. Experiments at a pipe of a nominal diameter of 200 mm are taken as the basis for the development and test of closure relations describing bubble coalescence and break-up, interfacial momentum transfer and turbulence modulation for a multi-bubble-class model. This is done by measuring the evolution of the flow structure along the pipe. The transferability of the extended CFD code to more complicated 3D flow situations is assessed against measured data from tests involving two-phase flow around an asymmetric obstacle placed in a vertical pipe. The obstacle, a half-moon-shaped diaphragm, is movable in the direction of the pipe axis; this allows the 3D gas fraction field to be recorded without changing the sensor position. In the outlook, the pressure chamber of TOPFLOW is presented, which will be used as the containment for a test facility, in which experiments can be conducted in pressure equilibrium with the inner atmosphere of the tank. In this way, flow structures can be observed by optical means through large-scale windows even at pressures of up to 5 MPa. The so-called 'Diving Chamber' technology will be used for Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) tests. Finally, some important trends in instrumentation for multi-phase flows will be given. This includes the state-of-art of X-ray and gamma tomography, new multi-component wire-mesh sensors, and a discussion of the potential of

  10. aMAP is a validated pipeline for registration and segmentation of high-resolution mouse brain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedworok, Christian J.; Brown, Alexander P. Y.; Jorge Cardoso, M.; Osten, Pavel; Ourselin, Sebastien; Modat, Marc; Margrie, Troy W.

    2016-01-01

    The validation of automated image registration and segmentation is crucial for accurate and reliable mapping of brain connectivity and function in three-dimensional (3D) data sets. While validation standards are necessarily high and routinely met in the clinical arena, they have to date been lacking for high-resolution microscopy data sets obtained from the rodent brain. Here we present a tool for optimized automated mouse atlas propagation (aMAP) based on clinical registration software (NiftyReg) for anatomical segmentation of high-resolution 3D fluorescence images of the adult mouse brain. We empirically evaluate aMAP as a method for registration and subsequent segmentation by validating it against the performance of expert human raters. This study therefore establishes a benchmark standard for mapping the molecular function and cellular connectivity of the rodent brain. PMID:27384127

  11. Experimental Space Shuttle Orbiter Studies to Acquire Data for Code and Flight Heating Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, T. P.; Holden, M. S.; MacLean, M. G.; Campbell, Charles

    2010-01-01

    thin-film resolution in both the span and chord direction in the area of peak heating. Additional objectives of this first study included: obtaining natural or tripped turbulent wing leading edge heating levels, assessing the effectiveness of protuberances and cavities placed at specified locations on the orbiter over a range of Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers to evaluate and compare to existing engineering and computational tools, obtaining cavity floor heating to aid in the verification of cavity heating correlations, acquiring control surface deflection heating data on both the main body flap and elevons, and obtain high speed schlieren videos of the interaction of the orbiter nose bow shock with the wing leading edge. To support these objectives, the stainless steel 1.8% scale orbiter model in addition to the sensors on the wing leading edge was instrumented down the windward centerline, over the wing acreage on the port side, and painted with temperature sensitive paint on the starboard side wing acreage. In all, the stainless steel 1.8% scale Orbiter model was instrumented with over three-hundred highly sensitive thin-film heating sensors, two-hundred of which were located in the wing leading edge shock interaction region. Further experimental studies will also be performed following the successful acquisition of flight data during the Orbiter Entry Boundary Layer Flight Experiment and HYTHIRM on STS-119 at specific data points simulating flight conditions and geometries. Additional instrumentation and a protuberance matching the layout present during the STS-119 boundary layer transition flight experiment were added with testing performed at Mach number and Reynolds number conditions simulating conditions experienced in flight. In addition to the experimental studies, CUBRC also performed a large amount of CFD analysis to confirm and validate not only the tunnel freestream conditions, but also 3D flows over the orbiter acreage, wing leading edge, and

  12. Soil process modelling in CZO research: gains in data harmonisation and model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gaans, Pauline; Andrianaki, Maria; Kobierska, Florian; Kram, Pavel; Lamacova, Anna; Lair, Georg; Nikolaidis, Nikos; Duffy, Chris; Regelink, Inge; van Leeuwen, Jeroen P.; de Ruiter, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Various soil process models were applied to four European Critical Zone observatories (CZOs), the core research sites of the FP7 project SoilTrEC: the Damma glacier forefield (CH), a set of three forested catchments on geochemically contrasing bedrocks in the Slavkov Forest (CZ), a chronosequence of soils in the former floodplain of the Danube of Fuchsenbigl/Marchfeld (AT), and the Koiliaris catchments in the north-western part of Crete, (GR). The aim of the modelling exercises was to apply and test soil process models with data from the CZOs for calibration/validation, identify potential limits to the application scope of the models, interpret soil state and soil functions at key stages of the soil life cycle, represented by the four SoilTrEC CZOs, contribute towards harmonisation of data and data acquisition. The models identified as specifically relevant were: The Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM), a fully coupled, multiprocess, multi-scale hydrologic model, to get a better understanding of water flow and pathways, The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a deterministic, continuous time (daily time step) basin scale model, to evaluate the impact of soil management practices, The Rothamsted Carbon model (Roth-C) to simulate organic carbon turnover and the Carbon, Aggregation, and Structure Turnover (CAST) model to include the role of soil aggregates in carbon dynamics, The Ligand Charge Distribution (LCD) model, to understand the interaction between organic matter and oxide surfaces in soil aggregate formation, and The Terrestrial Ecology Model (TEM) to obtain insight into the link between foodweb structure and carbon and nutrient turnover. With some exceptions all models were applied to all four CZOs. The need for specific model input contributed largely to data harmonisation. The comparisons between the CZOs turned out to be of great value for understanding the strength and limitations of the models, as well as the differences in soil conditions

  13. Validation of Isotope Data in the World of Interdisciplinary Science: A Cautionary Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, T.; Skulan, J.; Anbar, A.

    2007-05-01

    Isotope geoscientists, as well as their colleagues in the geologic, hydrologic and biologic science communities, generally have great confidence in both the precision and accuracy of their isotopic data. Moreover, isotope geoscientists are increasingly realizing the potential of their isotope tracing techniques to be used in applied studies in other research disciplines, such as clinical medicine and forensic science. However, researchers in these other disciplines may not have the same confidence in the quality of isotope data as applied to their field of study, due to either lack of familiarity with the techniques or cultural differences in research approach. For example, in a recent attempt to publish a manuscript in which we described the use of Ca stable isotopes in urine to assess the effects of bedrest on bone loss in human subjects, we were confronted by a reviewer who challenged the validity of our isotope data as measured in the urine matrix. In response to this reviewer's concerns, we developed a supplemental study to demonstrate that we were indeed obtaining `the right answer` on the urine samples with the double-spiking, thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique used for the study. First, using the two urine samples from the dataset that had the lightest and heaviest Ca isotope compositions observed in the study (i.e., δ44Ca of -1.72‰ and +0.36‰ relative to seawater), we generated a series of mixtures of the lighter sample with seawater (δ44Ca = 0‰) and the heavier sample with NIST SRM 915a (δ44Ca = -2.01‰). In each case, the amount of standard added to each sample was minute, thus maintaining the urine matrix. Measured Ca isotope compositions agreed with those calculated assuming a simple mixing relationship, confirming the lack of a matrix effect on the accuracy of the data. Second, in order to test the robustness of the double spiking approach, we analyzed the two urine samples under optimally-spiked, under-spiked and over

  14. Application of aerosol speciation data as an in situ dust proxy for validation of the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Patrick

    The Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) predicts concentrations of mineral dust aerosols in time and space, but validation is challenging with current in situ particulate matter (PM) concentration measurements. Measured levels of ambient PM often contain anthropogenic components as well as windblown mineral dust. In this study, two approaches to model validation were performed with data from preexisting air quality monitoring networks: using hourly concentrations of total PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM 2.5); and using a daily averaged speciation-derived soil component. Validation analyses were performed for point locations within the cities of El Paso (TX), Austin (TX), Phoenix (AZ), Salt Lake City (UT) and Bakersfield (CA) for most of 2006. Hourly modeled PM 2.5 did not validate at all with hourly observations among the sites (combined R hourly values). Aerosol chemical speciation data distinguished between mineral (soil) dust from anthropogenic ambient PM. As expected, statistically significant improvements in correlation among all stations (combined R = 0.16, N = 343 daily values) were found when the soil component alone was used to validate DREAM. The validation biases that result from anthropogenic aerosols were also reduced using the soil component. This is seen in the reduction of the root mean square error between hourly in situ versus hourly modeled (RMSE hourly = 18.6 μg m -3) and 24-h in situ speciation values versus daily averaged observed (RMSE soil = 12.0 μg m -3). However, the lack of a total reduction in RMSE indicates there is still room for improvement in the model. While the soil component is the theoretical proxy of choice for a dust transport model, the current sparse and infrequent sampling is not ideal for routine hourly air quality forecast validation.

  15. A validation study for the gas migration modelling of the compacted bentonite using existing experiment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, Y.; Mori, K.; Tada, K.; Shimura, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Hayashi, H.

    2010-01-01

    gas to enter the water-saturated bentonite without propagation of pressure-induced pathway. In this validation study, we have adopted here two computer codes GETFLOWS and Code B right which are based on different conceptual models, respectively. GETFLOWS is the conventional non-isothermal multi-phase fluid-flow code. However pressure-induced macroscopic pathway propagation of porous media is incorporated by changing porosity and permeability explicitly depending on the pore pressure distribution. Code B right is so called coupled THM code and can be applied to non-isothermal two-phase flow in deformable porous media. Automatic inversion code namely UCODE-2005, which was developed by U.S Geological Survey, was used with GETFLOWS. Good matching was attained reasonably between the simulated and observed flow rate in both GETFLOWS and Code-Bright. However when we neglected the pressure-induced pathway propagations, any combinations of flow parameters could not provide a reasonable match between simulated and observed results. This also means that the capillary threshold for gas entry into water-saturated bentonite exists, suggesting consideration of unconventional two phase flow. On the other hand, the identified residual water saturation eventually, which can reproduce observed behaviour well, became extremely high. When we consider long-term behaviour including the re-saturation period after closure of disposal system, it is not available directly as the parameter of the unsaturated bentonite. The identified residual water saturation is only applicable to the fully-water saturated environments. The future work will focus on the gas flow in unsaturated bentonite using experimental data from not only laboratory but also in-situ data. In addition, we are planning to develop the modelling technique of long-term water and gas migration behaviour in the EBS which includes both re-saturation and gas migration phase considering the contribution of THMC coupled phenomena

  16. The F4E programme on nuclear data validation and nuclear instrumentation techniques for TBM in ITER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Leichtle, D.; Angelone, M.; Batistoni, P.; Calderoni, P.; Fischer, U.; Izquierdo, J.; Klix, A.; Kodeli, I.; Kuc, T.; Lilley, S.; Majerle, Mitja; Packer, L.; Pillon, M.; Pohorecki, W.; Snoj, L.; Villari, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, 9-10 (2014), s. 2169-2173 ISSN 0920-3796 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear data * TBM * neutronic sensors * validation experiments Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.152, year: 2014

  17. Capitalizing on Citizen Science Data for Validating Models and Generating Hypotheses Describing Meteorological Drivers of Mosquito-Borne Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, R. A.; Low, R.; Paull, S.; Anyamba, A.; Soebiyanto, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature and precipitation are important drivers of mosquito population dynamics, and a growing set of models have been proposed to characterize these relationships. Validation of these models, and development of broader theories across mosquito species and regions could nonetheless be improved by comparing observations from a global dataset of mosquito larvae with satellite-based measurements of meteorological variables. Citizen science data can be particularly useful for two such aspects of research into the meteorological drivers of mosquito populations: i) Broad-scale validation of mosquito distribution models and ii) Generation of quantitative hypotheses regarding changes to mosquito abundance and phenology across scales. The recently released GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper (GO-MHM) app engages citizen scientists in identifying vector taxa, mapping breeding sites and decommissioning non-natural habitats, and provides a potentially useful new tool for validating mosquito ubiquity projections based on the analysis of remotely sensed environmental data. Our early work with GO-MHM data focuses on two objectives: validating citizen science reports of Aedes aegypti distribution through comparison with accepted scientific data sources, and exploring the relationship between extreme temperature and precipitation events and subsequent observations of mosquito larvae. Ultimately the goal is to develop testable hypotheses regarding the shape and character of this relationship between mosquito species and regions.

  18. CANDU radiotoxicity inventories estimation: A calculated experiment cross-check for data verification and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, Alexandru Octavian; Cepraga, Dan Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    This paper is related to the Clearance Potential Index, Ingestion and Inhalation Hazard Factors of the nuclear spent fuel and radioactive wastes. This study required a complex activity that consisted of various phases such us: the acquisition, setting up, validation and application of procedures, codes and libraries. The paper reflects the validation phase of this study. Its objective was to compare the measured inventories of selected actinide and fission products radionuclides in an element from a Pickering CANDU reactor with inventories predicted using a recent version of the ORIGEN-ARP from SCALE 5 coupled with the time dependent cross sections library, CANDU 28.lib, produced by the sequence SAS2H of SCALE 4.4a. In this way, the procedures, codes and libraries for the characterization of radioactive material in terms of radioactive inventories, clearance, and biological hazard factors are being qualified and validated, in support for the safety management of the radioactive wastes. (authors)

  19. The Validation of a Beta-Binomial Model for Overdispersed Binomial Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongphil; Lee, Ji-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The beta-binomial model has been widely used as an analytically tractable alternative that captures the overdispersion of an intra-correlated, binomial random variable, X . However, the model validation for X has been rarely investigated. As a beta-binomial mass function takes on a few different shapes, the model validation is examined for each of the classified shapes in this paper. Further, the mean square error (MSE) is illustrated for each shape by the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) based on a beta-binomial model approach and the method of moments estimator (MME) in order to gauge when and how much the MLE is biased.

  20. Using big-data to validate theories of rehabilitation in aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kiran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. While the evidence for efficacy of rehabilitation of language disorders is fairly robust and conclusive (Allen, et al., 2012; Brady, et al., 2012; Kelly, Brady, & Enderby, 2010; Cherney, et al., 2008, a major limitation identified by these reviews is that the sample size of patients in each of the interventions have been modest (5-20 patients. As technology moves our field forward, we can now collect and analyze larger sets of data to validate theories of rehabilitation. As a first step, we report data from a recently completed study examining the effectiveness of software platform (Constant Therapy to deliver, monitor and analyze treatment for individuals with aphasia (Des Roches et al., 2015. Methods. Fifty one individuals with language and cognitive deficits were administered standardized tests (Western Aphasia Battery, Boston Naming Test, Pyramids and Palm Trees, and Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test prior to initiation and following completion of therapy. Forty-two experimental patients used the iPad-based therapy once a week with the clinician and up to six days a week for home practice. Nine control patients practiced therapy on the iPad once per week with the clinician only. Thirty-eight therapy tasks were divided into language and cognitive activities that were developed (Des Roches et al., 2015, 28 of these tasks included buttons that revealed a hint to assist the patient answer the item. The assigned therapy tasks were tailored to that individual’s language and cognitive impairment profile based on an initial baseline assessment. Each task was practiced until accuracy on task reached 100% on multiple occasions at which point that task was replaced with the task at the next level of difficulty. The 51 patients each completed a 10 week program leading to total of 3327 therapy sessions across patients. Analysis and Results: Mixed regression models showed that both the experimental and control groups improved but

  1. Political Representation and Gender Inequalities Testing the Validity of Model Developed for Pakistan using a Data Set of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Najeebullah Khan; Adnan Hussein; Zahid Awan; Bakhtiar Khan

    2012-01-01

    This study measured the impacts of six independent variables (political rights, election system type, political quota, literacy rate, labor force participation and GDP per capita at current price in US dollar) on the dependent variable (percentage of women representation in national legislature) using multiple linear regression models. At a first step we developed and tested the model without of sample data of Pakistan. For model construction and validation ten years data from the year 1999 a...

  2. Use of integral experiments in support to the validation of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclaire, Nicolas; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Haeck, Wim

    2017-09-01

    For many years now, IRSN has developed its own Monte Carlo continuous energy capability, which allows testing various nuclear data libraries. In that prospect, a validation database of 1136 experiments was built from cases used for the validation of the APOLLO2-MORET 5 multigroup route of the CRISTAL V2.0 package. In this paper, the keff obtained for more than 200 benchmarks using the JEFF-3.1.1 and JEFF-3.2 libraries are compared to benchmark keff values and main discrepancies are analyzed regarding the neutron spectrum. Special attention is paid on benchmarks for which the results have been highly modified between both JEFF-3 versions.

  3. Preliminary data on validity of the Drug Addiction Treatment Efficacy Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelic, Andrej; Mlakar, Janez; Pregelj, Peter

    2013-09-01

    This study describes the validation process for the Slovenian version of the Drug Addiction Treatment Efficacy Questionnaire (DATEQ). DATEQ was constructed from the questionnaires used at the Centre for the Treatment of Drug Addiction, Ljubljana University Psychiatric Hospital, and within the network of Centres for the Prevention and Treatment of Drug Addiction in Slovenia during the past 14 years. The Slovenian version of the DATEQ was translated to English using the 'forward-backward' procedure by its authors and their co-workers. The validation process included 100 male and female patients with established addiction to illicit drugs who had been prescribed opioid substitution therapy. The DATEQ questionnaire was used in the study, together with clinical evaluation to measure psychological state and to evaluate the efficacy of treatment in the last year. To determinate the validity of DATEQ the correlation with the clinical assessments of the outcome was calculated using one-way ANOVA. The F value was 44.4, p<0.001 (sum of squares: between groups 210.4, df=2, within groups 229.7, df=97, total 440.1, df=99). At the cut-off 4 the sensitivity is 81% and specificity 83%. The validation process for the Slovenian DATEQ version shows metric properties similar to those found in international studies of similar questionnaires, suggesting that it measures the same constructs, in the same way and as similar questionnaires. However, the relatively low sensitivity and specificity suggests caution when using DATEQ as the only measure of outcome.

  4. A Validation of the Health and Social Costs of Asthma Using Questionnaire Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Brookman

    2017-04-01

    Societal cost factors are not adequately captured within existing tools, our findings will inform the development of a new RUM which will be piloted and validated according to best practice guidelines. Capturing the societal costs of asthma will allow more accurate estimates of the total costs of asthma in the UK.

  5. Measurement and data analysis methods for field-scale wind erosion studies and model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeck, T.M.; Sterk, G.; Funk, R.F.; Rajot, J.L.; Stout, J.E.; Scott Van Pelt, R.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate and reliable methods of measuring windblown sediment are needed to confirm, validate, and improve erosion models, assess the intensity of aeolian processes and related damage, determine the source of pollutants, and for other applications. This paper outlines important principles to

  6. A New Method for Analyzing Content Validity Data Using Multidimensional Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueming; Sireci, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    Validity evidence based on test content is of essential importance in educational testing. One source for such evidence is an alignment study, which helps evaluate the congruence between tested objectives and those specified in the curriculum. However, the results of an alignment study do not always sufficiently capture the degree to which a test…

  7. 78 FR 32255 - HHS-Operated Risk Adjustment Data Validation Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... States'') is assigned a host (in accordance with the Department Foreign Visitor Management Policy... general public. Visitors to the complex are required to show a valid U.S. Government issued photo... lobby, and the cafeteria. If a visitor is found outside of those areas without proper escort, they may...

  8. Validation of Remote Sensing Retrieval Products using Data from a Wireless Sensor-Based Online Monitoring in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuhong; Cheng, Xiao; Yang, Rongjin; Liu, Qiang; Qiu, Yubao; Zhang, Jialin; Cai, Erli; Zhao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Of the modern technologies in polar-region monitoring, the remote sensing technology that can instantaneously form large-scale images has become much more important in helping acquire parameters such as the freezing and melting of ice as well as the surface temperature, which can be used in the research of global climate change, Antarctic ice sheet responses, and cap formation and evolution. However, the acquirement of those parameters is impacted remarkably by the climate and satellite transit time which makes it almost impossible to have timely and continuous observation data. In this research, a wireless sensor-based online monitoring platform (WSOOP) for the extreme polar environment is applied to obtain a long-term series of data which is site-specific and continuous in time. Those data are compared and validated with the data from a weather station at Zhongshan Station Antarctica and the result shows an obvious correlation. Then those data are used to validate the remote sensing products of the freezing and melting of ice and the surface temperature and the result also indicated a similar correlation. The experiment in Antarctica has proven that WSOOP is an effective system to validate remotely sensed data in the polar region. PMID:27869668

  9. Melt pond fraction and spectral sea ice albedo retrieval from MERIS data – Part 1: Validation against in situ, aerial, and ship cruise data

    OpenAIRE

    Istomina, L.; Heygster, G.; Huntemann, M.; Schwarz, P.; Birnbaum, G.; Scharien, R.; Polashenski, C.; Perovich, D.; Zege, E.; Malinka, A.; Prikhach, A.; Katsev, I.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of melt ponds on the Arctic sea ice strongly affects the energy balance of the Arctic Ocean in summer. It affects albedo as well as transmittance through the sea ice, which has consequences for the heat balance and mass balance of sea ice. An algorithm to retrieve melt pond fraction and sea ice albedo from Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) data is validated against aerial, shipborne and in situ campaign data. The results show the best correlation fo...

  10. Model validation of solar PV plant with hybrid data dynamic simulation based on fast-responding generator method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Dawei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a significant number of large-scale solar photovoltaic (PV plants have been put into operation or been under planning around the world. The model accuracy of solar PV plant is the key factor to investigate the mutual influences between solar PV plants and a power grid. However, this problem has not been well solved, especially in how to apply the real measurements to validate the models of the solar PV plants. Taking fast-responding generator method as an example, this paper presents a model validation methodology for solar PV plant via the hybrid data dynamic simulation. First, the implementation scheme of hybrid data dynamic simulation suitable for DIgSILENT PowerFactory software is proposed, and then an analysis model of solar PV plant integration based on IEEE 9 system is established. At last, model validation of solar PV plant is achieved by employing hybrid data dynamic simulation. The results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in solar PV plant model validation.

  11. Validation and upgrading of the recommended cross-section data of charged particle reactions: Gamma emitter radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, S.; Tarkanyi, F.; Hermanne, A.

    2005-01-01

    An upgrade and validation test of the recommended cross-section database for production of gamma emitter radioisotopes by charged particle induced reactions, published by the IAEA in 2001, was performed. Experimental microscopic cross-section data published earlier or measured recently and not yet included in the evaluation work were collected and added to the primary database in order to improve the quality of the recommended data. The newly compiled experimental data in general supported the previous recommended data, but in a few cases they influenced the decision and resulted in different selected cross-section data sets. A Spline fitting method was used to calculate the recommended data from the selected data sets. Integral thick target yields were deduced from the newly calculated recommended cross-sections and were critically compared with the available experimental yield data

  12. Validation of RNAi Silencing Efficiency Using Gene Array Data shows 18.5% Failure Rate across 429 Independent Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyöngyi Munkácsy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available No independent cross-validation of success rate for studies utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA for gene silencing has been completed before. To assess the influence of experimental parameters like cell line, transfection technique, validation method, and type of control, we have to validate these in a large set of studies. We utilized gene chip data published for siRNA experiments to assess success rate and to compare methods used in these experiments. We searched NCBI GEO for samples with whole transcriptome analysis before and after gene silencing and evaluated the efficiency for the target and off-target genes using the array-based expression data. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to assess silencing efficacy and Kruskal–Wallis tests and Spearman rank correlation were used to evaluate study parameters. All together 1,643 samples representing 429 experiments published in 207 studies were evaluated. The fold change (FC of down-regulation of the target gene was above 0.7 in 18.5% and was above 0.5 in 38.7% of experiments. Silencing efficiency was lowest in MCF7 and highest in SW480 cells (FC = 0.59 and FC = 0.30, respectively, P = 9.3E−06. Studies utilizing Western blot for validation performed better than those with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR or microarray (FC = 0.43, FC = 0.47, and FC = 0.55, respectively, P = 2.8E−04. There was no correlation between type of control, transfection method, publication year, and silencing efficiency. Although gene silencing is a robust feature successfully cross-validated in the majority of experiments, efficiency remained insufficient in a significant proportion of studies. Selection of cell line model and validation method had the highest influence on silencing proficiency.

  13. Validity of Principal Diagnoses in Discharge Summaries and ICD-10 Coding Assessments Based on National Health Data of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukanya, Chongthawonsatid

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the validity of the principal diagnoses on discharge summaries and coding assessments. Data were collected from the National Health Security Office (NHSO) of Thailand in 2015. In total, 118,971 medical records were audited. The sample was drawn from government hospitals and private hospitals covered by the Universal Coverage Scheme in Thailand. Hospitals and cases were selected using NHSO criteria. The validity of the principal diagnoses listed in the "Summary and Coding Assessment" forms was established by comparing data from the discharge summaries with data obtained from medical record reviews, and additionally, by comparing data from the coding assessments with data in the computerized ICD (the data base used for reimbursement-purposes). The summary assessments had low sensitivities (7.3%-37.9%), high specificities (97.2%-99.8%), low positive predictive values (9.2%-60.7%), and high negative predictive values (95.9%-99.3%). The coding assessments had low sensitivities (31.1%-69.4%), high specificities (99.0%-99.9%), moderate positive predictive values (43.8%-89.0%), and high negative predictive values (97.3%-99.5%). The discharge summaries and codings often contained mistakes, particularly the categories "Endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases", "Symptoms, signs, and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings not elsewhere classified", "Factors influencing health status and contact with health services", and "Injury, poisoning, and certain other consequences of external causes". The validity of the principal diagnoses on the summary and coding assessment forms was found to be low. The training of physicians and coders must be strengthened to improve the validity of discharge summaries and codings.

  14. Work Ability Index: Validation of the Greek Version and Descriptive Data in Heavy Industry Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Merekoulias, Georgios; Gnardellis, Charalambos; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Validation of the Greek version of Work Ability Index (WAI). Study Design: A cross sectional survey of 943 workers from a shipyard industry. Place and Duration of Study: University of Patras, Medical School, Public Health Department, HSY occupational health department, Greece in 2006-07. Methodology: The translation and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire was performed according to the international standards. The following aspects of the questionnaire were evaluated: construct val...

  15. Validations and improvements of airfoil trailing-edge noise prediction models using detailed experimental data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamruzzaman, M.; Lutz, Th.; Würz, W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an extensive assessment and a step by step validation of different turbulent boundary-layer trailing-edge noise prediction schemes developed within the European Union funded wind energy project UpWind. To validate prediction models, measurements of turbulent boundary-layer pr...... with measurements in the frequency region higher than 1 kHz, whereas they over-predict the sound pressure level in the low-frequency region. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......-layer properties such as two-point turbulent velocity correlations, the spectra of the associated wall pressure fluctuations and the emitted trailing-edge far-field noise were performed in the laminar wind tunnel of the Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart. The measurements were...... carried out for a NACA 643-418 airfoil, at Re  =  2.5 ×106, angle of attack of −6° to 6°. Numerical results of different prediction schemes are extensively validated and discussed elaborately. The investigations on the TNO-Blake noise prediction model show that the numerical wall pressure fluctuation...

  16. MASADA: A MODELING AND SIMULATION AUTOMATED DATA ANALYSIS FRAMEWORK FOR CONTINUOUS DATA-INTENSIVE VALIDATION OF SIMULATION MODELS

    CERN Document Server

    Foguelman, Daniel Jacob; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Complex networked computer systems are usually subjected to upgrades and enhancements on a continuous basis. Modeling and simulation of such systems helps with guiding their engineering processes, in particular when testing candi- date design alternatives directly on the real system is not an option. Models are built and simulation exercises are run guided by specific research and/or design questions. A vast amount of operational conditions for the real system need to be assumed in order to focus on the relevant questions at hand. A typical boundary condition for computer systems is the exogenously imposed workload. Meanwhile, in typical projects huge amounts of monitoring information are logged and stored with the purpose of studying the system’s performance in search for improvements. Also research questions change as systems’ operational conditions vary throughout its lifetime. This context poses many challenges to determine the validity of simulation models. As the behavioral empirical base of the sys...

  17. MASADA: A Modeling and Simulation Automated Data Analysis framework for continuous data-intensive validation of simulation models

    CERN Document Server

    Foguelman, Daniel Jacob; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Complex networked computer systems are usually subjected to upgrades and enhancements on a continuous basis. Modeling and simulation of such systems helps with guiding their engineering processes, in particular when testing candi- date design alternatives directly on the real system is not an option. Models are built and simulation exercises are run guided by specific research and/or design questions. A vast amount of operational conditions for the real system need to be assumed in order to focus on the relevant questions at hand. A typical boundary condition for computer systems is the exogenously imposed workload. Meanwhile, in typical projects huge amounts of monitoring information are logged and stored with the purpose of studying the system’s performance in search for improvements. Also research questions change as systems’ operational conditions vary throughout its lifetime. This context poses many challenges to determine the validity of simulation models. As the behavioral empirical base of the sys...

  18. Thai SF-36 health survey: tests of data quality, scaling assumptions, reliability and validity in healthy men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lynette L-Y; Seubsman, Sam-Ang; Sleigh, Adrian

    2008-07-18

    Since its translation to Thai in 2000, the SF-36 Health Survey has been used extensively in many different clinical settings in Thailand. Its popularity has increased despite the absence of published evidence that the translated instrument satisfies scoring assumptions, the psychometric properties required for valid interpretation of the SF-36 summated ratings scales. The purpose of this paper was to examine these properties and to report on the reliability and validity of the Thai SF-36 in a non-clinical general population. 1345 distance-education university students who live in all areas of Thailand completed a questionnaire comprising the Thai SF-36 (Version 1). Median age was 31 years. Psychometric tests recommended by the International Quality of Life Assessment Project were used. Data quality was satisfactory: questionnaire completion rate was high (97.5%) and missing data rates were low (Vitality scale correlated better with the Mental Health scale than with itself, possibly because a healthy mental state is central to the concept of vitality in Thailand. The summated ratings method can be used for scoring the Thai SF-36. The instrument was found to be reliable and valid for use in a general non-clinical population. Version 2 of the SF-36 could improve ceiling and floor effects in the role functioning scales. Further work is warranted to refine items that measure the concepts of social functioning, vitality and mental health to improve the reliability and discriminant validity of these scales.

  19. Thai SF-36 health survey: tests of data quality, scaling assumptions, reliability and validity in healthy men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleigh Adrian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its translation to Thai in 2000, the SF-36 Health Survey has been used extensively in many different clinical settings in Thailand. Its popularity has increased despite the absence of published evidence that the translated instrument satisfies scoring assumptions, the psychometric properties required for valid interpretation of the SF-36 summated ratings scales. The purpose of this paper was to examine these properties and to report on the reliability and validity of the Thai SF-36 in a non-clinical general population. Methods 1345 distance-education university students who live in all areas of Thailand completed a questionnaire comprising the Thai SF-36 (Version 1. Median age was 31 years. Psychometric tests recommended by the International Quality of Life Assessment Project were used. Results Data quality was satisfactory: questionnaire completion rate was high (97.5% and missing data rates were low ( Conclusion The summated ratings method can be used for scoring the Thai SF-36. The instrument was found to be reliable and valid for use in a general non-clinical population. Version 2 of the SF-36 could improve ceiling and floor effects in the role functioning scales. Further work is warranted to refine items that measure the concepts of social functioning, vitality and mental health to improve the reliability and discriminant validity of these scales.

  20. Generating Vegetation Leaf Area Index Earth System Data Record from Multiple Sensors. Part 2; Implementation, Analysis and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sangram; Samanta, Arindam; Schull, Mitchell A.; Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Milesi, Cristina; Nemani, Ramajrushna R,; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of a new global monthly leaf area index (LAI) data set for the period July 1981 to December 2006 derived from AVHRR Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data is described. The physically based algorithm is detailed in the first of the two part series. Here, the implementation, production and evaluation of the data set are described. The data set is evaluated both by direct comparisons to ground data and indirectly through inter-comparisons with similar data sets. This indirect validation showed satisfactory agreement with existing LAI products, importantly MODIS, at a range of spatial scales, and significant correlations with key climate variables in areas where temperature and precipitation limit plant growth. The data set successfully reproduced well-documented spatio-temporal trends and inter-annual variations in vegetation activity in the northern latitudes and semi-arid tropics. Comparison with plot scale field measurements over homogeneous vegetation patches indicated a 7% underestimation when all major vegetation types are taken into account. The error in mean values obtained from distributions of AVHRR LAI and high-resolution field LAI maps for different biomes is within 0.5 LAI for six out of the ten selected sites. These validation exercises though limited by the amount of field data, and thus less than comprehensive, indicated satisfactory agreement between the LAI product and field measurements. Overall, the intercomparison with short-term LAI data sets, evaluation of long term trends with known variations in climate variables, and validation with field measurements together build confidence in the utility of this new 26 year LAI record for long term vegetation monitoring and modeling studies.

  1. Determination of methylmercury in marine sediment samples: Method validation and occurrence data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for MeHg determination at trace level in marine sediments is completely validated. • Validation is performed according to ISO-17025 and Eurachem guidelines. • The extraction efficiency of four sample preparation procedures is evaluated. • The uncertainty budget is used as a tool for evaluation of main uncertainty contributors. • Comparison with independent methods yields good agreement within stated uncertainty. - Abstract: The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment samples is a difficult task due to the extremely low MeHg/THg (total mercury) ratio and species interconversion. Here, we present the method validation of a cost-effective fit-for-purpose analytical procedure for the measurement of MeHg in sediments, which is based on aqueous phase ethylation, followed by purge and trap and hyphenated gas chromatography–pyrolysis–atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC–Py–AFS) separation and detection. Four different extraction techniques, namely acid and alkaline leaching followed by solvent extraction and evaporation, microwave-assisted extraction with 2-mercaptoethanol, and acid leaching, solvent extraction and back extraction into sodium thiosulfate, were examined regarding their potential to selectively extract MeHg from estuarine sediment IAEA-405 certified reference material (CRM). The procedure based on acid leaching with HNO 3 /CuSO 4 , solvent extraction and back extraction into Na 2 S 2 O 3 yielded the highest extraction recovery, i.e., 94 ± 3% and offered the possibility to perform the extraction of a large number of samples in a short time, by eliminating the evaporation step. The artifact formation of MeHg was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP–MS), using isotopically enriched Me 201 Hg and 202 Hg and it was found to be nonexistent. A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 and Eurachem guidelines was followed

  2. Determination of methylmercury in marine sediment samples: Method validation and occurrence data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia, E-mail: e.vasileva-veleva@iaea.org

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for MeHg determination at trace level in marine sediments is completely validated. • Validation is performed according to ISO-17025 and Eurachem guidelines. • The extraction efficiency of four sample preparation procedures is evaluated. • The uncertainty budget is used as a tool for evaluation of main uncertainty contributors. • Comparison with independent methods yields good agreement within stated uncertainty. - Abstract: The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment samples is a difficult task due to the extremely low MeHg/THg (total mercury) ratio and species interconversion. Here, we present the method validation of a cost-effective fit-for-purpose analytical procedure for the measurement of MeHg in sediments, which is based on aqueous phase ethylation, followed by purge and trap and hyphenated gas chromatography–pyrolysis–atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC–Py–AFS) separation and detection. Four different extraction techniques, namely acid and alkaline leaching followed by solvent extraction and evaporation, microwave-assisted extraction with 2-mercaptoethanol, and acid leaching, solvent extraction and back extraction into sodium thiosulfate, were examined regarding their potential to selectively extract MeHg from estuarine sediment IAEA-405 certified reference material (CRM). The procedure based on acid leaching with HNO{sub 3}/CuSO{sub 4}, solvent extraction and back extraction into Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} yielded the highest extraction recovery, i.e., 94 ± 3% and offered the possibility to perform the extraction of a large number of samples in a short time, by eliminating the evaporation step. The artifact formation of MeHg was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP–MS), using isotopically enriched Me{sup 201}Hg and {sup 202}Hg and it was found to be nonexistent. A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 and

  3. Texas Panhandle soil-crop-beef food chain for uranium: a dynamic model validated by experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, W.J.; Wallwork-Barber, K.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Gallegos, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Long-term simulations of uranium transport in the soil-crop-beef food chain were performed using the BIOTRAN model. Experimental data means from an extensive Pantex beef cattle study are presented. Experimental data were used to validate the computer model. Measurements of uranium in air, soil, water, range grasses, feed, and cattle tissues are compared to simulated uranium output values in these matrices when the BIOTRAN model was set at the measured soil and air values. The simulations agreed well with experimental data even though metabolic details for ruminants and uranium chemical form in the environment remain to be studied

  4. Predicting DMS-IV cluster B personality disorder criteria from MMPI-2 and Rorschach data: a test of incremental validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, M A; Hilsenroth, M J; Castlebury, F; Fowler, J C; Baity, M R

    2001-02-01

    Despite their frequent conjoint clinical use, the incremental validity of Rorschach (Rorschach, 1921/1942) and MMPI (Hathaway & McKinley, 1943) data has not been adequately established, nor has any study to date explored the incremental validity of these tests for predicting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV]; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) personality disorders (PDs). In a reanalysis of existing data, we used select Rorschach variables and the MMPI PD scales to predict DSM-IV antisocial, borderline, histrionic, and narcissistic PD criteria in a sample of treatment-seeking outpatients. The correlational findings revealed alimited relation between Rorschach and MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989) variables, with only 5 of 30 correlations reaching significance (p psychological characteristics of the DSM-IV Cluster B PDs.

  5. ValWorkBench: an open source Java library for cluster validation, with applications to microarray data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancarlo, R; Scaturro, D; Utro, F

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of the number of clusters in a dataset, in particular microarrays, is a fundamental task in biological data analysis, usually performed via validation measures. Unfortunately, it has received very little attention and in fact there is a growing need for software tools/libraries dedicated to it. Here we present ValWorkBench, a software library consisting of eleven well known validation measures, together with novel heuristic approximations for some of them. The main objective of this paper is to provide the interested researcher with the full software documentation of an open source cluster validation platform having the main features of being easily extendible in a homogeneous way and of offering software components that can be readily re-used. Consequently, the focus of the presentation is on the architecture of the library, since it provides an essential map that can be used to access the full software documentation, which is available at the supplementary material website [1]. The mentioned main features of ValWorkBench are also discussed and exemplified, with emphasis on software abstraction design and re-usability. A comparison with existing cluster validation software libraries, mainly in terms of the mentioned features, is also offered. It suggests that ValWorkBench is a much needed contribution to the microarray software development/algorithm engineering community. For completeness, it is important to mention that previous accurate algorithmic experimental analysis of the relative merits of each of the implemented measures [19,23,25], carried out specifically on microarray data, gives useful insights on the effectiveness of ValWorkBench for cluster validation to researchers in the microarray community interested in its use for the mentioned task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of putative reference genes for normalization of Q-RT-PCR data from paraffin-embedded lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Tina Marie; de Stricker, Karin; Møller, Michael Boe

    2009-01-01

    Normalization of quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) data to appropriate tissue-specific reference genes is an essential part of interpreting the results. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate reference genes for normalizing gene expressions in lymphatic tissue...... was 0.93 (Pnormalization with the appropriate reference genes. Thus, we show that formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lymphoid samples are suitable for Q-RT-PCR when using thoroughly validated reference genes....

  7. Analysis of progressive distorsion. Validation of the method based on effective primary stress. Discussion of Anderson's experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulin, Didier.

    1981-02-01

    An empirical rule usable for design by analysis against progressive distorsion has been set up from experiments conducted in C.E.N. Saclay. This rule is checked with experimental data obtained by W.F. ANDERSON, this experiment is sufficiently different from the Saclay one to evaluate the merits of the rule. The satisfactory results achieved, are another validation of the efficiency diagram on which the method is based [fr

  8. A Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) for synthesising high-frequency sensor data for validation of deterministic ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Hamilton P; Carey, Cayelan C.; Arvola, Lauri; Arzberger, Peter; Brewer, Carol A.; Cole, Jon J; Gaiser, Evelyn; Hanson, Paul C.; Ibelings, Bas W; Jennings, Eleanor; Kratz, Tim K; Lin, Fang-Pang; McBride, Christopher G.; de Motta Marques, David; Muraoka, Kohji; Nishri, Ami; Qin, Boqiang; Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Ryder, Elizabeth; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Zhu, Guangwei; Trolle, Dennis; Brookes, Justin D

    2014-01-01

    A Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON; www.gleon.org) has formed to provide a coordinated response to the need for scientific understanding of lake processes, utilising technological advances available from autonomous sensors. The organisation embraces a grassroots approach to engage researchers from varying disciplines, sites spanning geographic and ecological gradients, and novel sensor and cyberinfrastructure to synthesise high-frequency lake data at scales ranging from local to global. The high-frequency data provide a platform to rigorously validate process- based ecological models because model simulation time steps are better aligned with sensor measurements than with lower-frequency, manual samples. Two case studies from Trout Bog, Wisconsin, USA, and Lake Rotoehu, North Island, New Zealand, are presented to demonstrate that in the past, ecological model outputs (e.g., temperature, chlorophyll) have been relatively poorly validated based on a limited number of directly comparable measurements, both in time and space. The case studies demonstrate some of the difficulties of mapping sensor measurements directly to model state variable outputs as well as the opportunities to use deviations between sensor measurements and model simulations to better inform process understanding. Well-validated ecological models provide a mechanism to extrapolate high-frequency sensor data in space and time, thereby potentially creating a fully 3-dimensional simulation of key variables of interest.

  9. The jmzQuantML programming interface and validator for the mzQuantML data standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Da; Krishna, Ritesh; Jones, Andrew R

    2014-03-01

    The mzQuantML standard from the HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has recently been released, capturing quantitative data about peptides and proteins, following analysis of MS data. We present a Java application programming interface (API) for mzQuantML called jmzQuantML. The API provides robust bridges between Java classes and elements in mzQuantML files and allows random access to any part of the file. The API provides read and write capabilities, and is designed to be embedded in other software packages, enabling mzQuantML support to be added to proteomics software tools (http://code.google.com/p/jmzquantml/). The mzQuantML standard is designed around a multilevel validation system to ensure that files are structurally and semantically correct for different proteomics quantitative techniques. In this article, we also describe a Java software tool (http://code.google.com/p/mzquantml-validator/) for validating mzQuantML files, which is a formal part of the data standard. © 2014 The Authors. Proteomics published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Analysis and classification of data sets for calibration and validation of agro-ecosystem models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kersebaum, K. C.; Boote, K. J.; Jorgenson, J. S.; Nendel, C.; Bindi, M.; Frühauf, C.; Gaiser, T.; Hoogenboom, G.; Kollas, C.; Olesen, J. E.; Rötter, R. P.; Ruget, F.; Thorburn, P. J.; Trnka, Miroslav; Wegener, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, Oct 15 (2015), s. 402-417 ISSN 1364-8152 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : field experiments * data quality * crop modeling * data requirement * minimum data * software Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.207, year: 2015

  11. The benchmark experiment on slab beryllium with D–T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Y., E-mail: nieyb@ciae.ac.cn [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ren, J.; Ruan, X.; Bao, J. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Han, R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Inner Mongolia, Tongliao 028000 (China); Huang, H.; Li, X. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ding, Y. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu, H.; Liu, P.; Zhou, Z. [Science and Technology on Nuclear Data Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for beryllium are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from pure beryllium slab are measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4B calculations with the evaluated data from different libraries. - Abstract: Beryllium is the most favored neutron multiplier candidate for solid breeder blankets of future fusion power reactors. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. In order to validate the evaluated nuclear data on beryllium, in the present study, a benchmark experiment has been performed at China Institution of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Neutron leakage spectra from pure beryllium slab samples were measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by MCNP-4B simulation, using the evaluated data of beryllium from the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated spectra, it was found that the calculation results based on CENDL-3.1 caused overestimation in the energy range from about 3–12 MeV at 61°, while at 121°, all the libraries led to underestimation below 3 MeV.

  12. The benchmark experiment on slab beryllium with D–T neutrons for validation of evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Y.; Ren, J.; Ruan, X.; Bao, J.; Han, R.; Zhang, S.; Huang, H.; Li, X.; Ding, Y.; Wu, H.; Liu, P.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluated data for beryllium are validated by a high precision benchmark experiment. • Leakage neutron spectra from pure beryllium slab are measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. • The experimental results are compared with the MCNP-4B calculations with the evaluated data from different libraries. - Abstract: Beryllium is the most favored neutron multiplier candidate for solid breeder blankets of future fusion power reactors. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. In order to validate the evaluated nuclear data on beryllium, in the present study, a benchmark experiment has been performed at China Institution of Atomic Energy (CIAE). Neutron leakage spectra from pure beryllium slab samples were measured at 61° and 121° using time-of-flight method. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by MCNP-4B simulation, using the evaluated data of beryllium from the CENDL-3.1, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0 libraries. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated spectra, it was found that the calculation results based on CENDL-3.1 caused overestimation in the energy range from about 3–12 MeV at 61°, while at 121°, all the libraries led to underestimation below 3 MeV.

  13. Report on workshop "Study of the polar atmosphere and cryosphere using satellite data with surface validation observations including unmanned one"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kanzawa

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available The workshop was organized to discuss algorithms to derive parameters of the polar atmosphere and cryosphere using satellite data received mainly at Syowa Station (69°S, 40°E, Antarctica, i.e., the data from NOAA, MOS (Marine Observation Satellite-1,ERS (European Remote Sensing Satellite-1,JERS (Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 with validation data at the surface. It was held on 16 March 1993 at the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR, total number of participants being about 40. The contents of the workshop are as follows : The present status of receipt and utilization of the satellite data of NOAA, MOS-1,ERS-1,JERS-1; The Atmosphere; Sea ice; The Cryosphere; Introduction to the satellite data analysis system at the Information Science Center at NIPR.

  14. Development of the Knee Quality of Life (KQoL-26 26-item questionnaire: data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atwell Chris

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article describes the development and validation of a self-reported questionnaire, the KQoL-26, that is based on the views of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury of the knee that assesses the impact of their knee problem on the quality of their lives. Methods Patient interviews and focus groups were used to derive questionnaire content. The instrument was assessed for data quality, reliability, validity, and responsiveness using data from a randomised trial and patient survey about general practitioners' use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury. Results Interview and focus group data produced a 40-item questionnaire designed for self-completion. 559 trial patients and 323 survey patients responded to the questionnaire. Following principal components analysis and Rasch analysis, 26 items were found to contribute to three scales of knee-related quality of life: physical functioning, activity limitations, and emotional functioning. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.60–0.82. Cronbach's alpha and test retest reliability estimates were 0.91–0.94 and 0.80–0.93 respectively. Hypothesised correlations with the Lysholm Knee Scale, EQ-5D, SF-36 and knee symptom questions were evidence for construct validity. The instrument produced highly significant change scores for 65 trial patients indicating that their knee was a little or somewhat better at six months. The new instrument had higher effect sizes (range 0.86–1.13 and responsiveness statistics (range 1.50–2.13 than the EQ-5D and SF-36. Conclusion The KQoL-26 has good evidence for internal reliability, test-retest reliability, validity and responsiveness, and is recommended for use in randomised trials and other evaluative studies of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury.

  15. Validation of Case Finding Algorithms for Hepatocellular Cancer From Administrative Data and Electronic Health Records Using Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Yvonne; Hou, Jason; Richardson, Peter; El-Serag, Hashem; Davila, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    Accurate identification of hepatocellular cancer (HCC) cases from automated data is needed for efficient and valid quality improvement initiatives and research. We validated HCC International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes, and evaluated whether natural language processing by the Automated Retrieval Console (ARC) for document classification improves HCC identification. We identified a cohort of patients with ICD-9 codes for HCC during 2005-2010 from Veterans Affairs administrative data. Pathology and radiology reports were reviewed to confirm HCC. The positive predictive value (PPV), sensitivity, and specificity of ICD-9 codes were calculated. A split validation study of pathology and radiology reports was performed to develop and validate ARC algorithms. Reports were manually classified as diagnostic of HCC or not. ARC generated document classification algorithms using the Clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System. ARC performance was compared with manual classification. PPV, sensitivity, and specificity of ARC were calculated. A total of 1138 patients with HCC were identified by ICD-9 codes. On the basis of manual review, 773 had HCC. The HCC ICD-9 code algorithm had a PPV of 0.67, sensitivity of 0.95, and specificity of 0.93. For a random subset of 619 patients, we identified 471 pathology reports for 323 patients and 943 radiology reports for 557 patients. The pathology ARC algorithm had PPV of 0.96, sensitivity of 0.96, and specificity of 0.97. The radiology ARC algorithm had PPV of 0.75, sensitivity of 0.94, and specificity of 0.68. A combined approach of ICD-9 codes and natural language processing of pathology and radiology reports improves HCC case identification in automated data.

  16. Development of the knee quality of life (KQoL-26) 26-item questionnaire: data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Andrew M; Brealey, Stephen; Robling, Michael; Atwell, Chris; Russell, Ian; Gillespie, William; King, David

    2008-07-10

    This article describes the development and validation of a self-reported questionnaire, the KQoL-26, that is based on the views of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury of the knee that assesses the impact of their knee problem on the quality of their lives. Patient interviews and focus groups were used to derive questionnaire content. The instrument was assessed for data quality, reliability, validity, and responsiveness using data from a randomised trial and patient survey about general practitioners' use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury. Interview and focus group data produced a 40-item questionnaire designed for self-completion. 559 trial patients and 323 survey patients responded to the questionnaire. Following principal components analysis and Rasch analysis, 26 items were found to contribute to three scales of knee-related quality of life: physical functioning, activity limitations, and emotional functioning. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.60-0.82. Cronbach's alpha and test retest reliability estimates were 0.91-0.94 and 0.80-0.93 respectively. Hypothesised correlations with the Lysholm Knee Scale, EQ-5D, SF-36 and knee symptom questions were evidence for construct validity. The instrument produced highly significant change scores for 65 trial patients indicating that their knee was a little or somewhat better at six months. The new instrument had higher effect sizes (range 0.86-1.13) and responsiveness statistics (range 1.50-2.13) than the EQ-5D and SF-36. The KQoL-26 has good evidence for internal reliability, test-retest reliability, validity and responsiveness, and is recommended for use in randomised trials and other evaluative studies of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury.

  17. Using Measured Plane-of-Array Data Directly in Photovoltaic Modeling: Methodology and Validation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Janine; Freestate, David; Riley, Cameron; Hobbs, William

    2016-11-01

    Measured plane-of-array (POA) irradiance may provide a lower-cost alternative to standard irradiance component data for photovoltaic (PV) system performance modeling without loss of accuracy. Previous work has shown that transposition models typically used by PV models to calculate POA irradiance from horizontal data introduce error into the POA irradiance estimates, and that measured POA data can correlate better to measured performance data. However, popular PV modeling tools historically have not directly used input POA data. This paper introduces a new capability in NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM) to directly use POA data in PV modeling, and compares SAM results from both POA irradiance and irradiance components inputs against measured performance data for eight operating PV systems.

  18. Results of a monitoring programme in the environs of Berkeley aimed at collecting Chernobyl data for foodchain model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.; Darley, P.J.; Shaer, J.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a fallout measurement programme which was carried out in the environs of Berkeley Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom following the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986 are presented in this report. The programme was aimed at establishing a time-dependent data base of concentrations of Chernobyl fallout radionuclides in selected agricultural products. Results were obtained for milk, grass, silage, soil and wheat over an eighteen month period from May 1986. It is intended to use the data to validate the CEGB's dynamic foodchain model, which is incorporated in the FOODWEB module of the NECTAR environmental code. (author)

  19. A Generic Approach for Inversion of Surface Reflectance over Land: Overview, Application and Validation Using MODIS and LANDSAT8 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermote, E.; Roger, J. C.; Justice, C. O.; Franch, B.; Claverie, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a generic approach developed to derive surface reflectance over land from a variety of sensors. This technique builds on the extensive dataset acquired by the Terra platform by combining MODIS and MISR to derive an explicit and dynamic map of band ratio's between blue and red channels and is a refinement of the operational approach used for MODIS and LANDSAT over the past 15 years. We will present the generic approach and the application to MODIS and LANDSAT data and its validation using the AERONET data.

  20. Target motion measurement without implanted markers and its validation by comparison with manually obtained data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vences, Lucia; Wulf, Joern; Vordermark, Dirk; Sauer, Otto; Berlinger, Kajetan; Roth, Michael

    2005-01-01

    For an effective radiotherapy the exact tumor location must be determined. The localization has to take into account patient's setup position as well as internal organ motion. Among the different localization methods, the use of a computer tomography (CT) scanner in the therapy room has been proposed recently. Achieving a CT with the patient on the therapy couch, a patient's treatment position is captured. We present a method to locate tumor considering internal organ motion and displacements due to respiration. We tested the method with prostate and lung patients. The method found the most probable tumor position as well as, for high-mobility tumors located in the lung, its trajectory during the respiratory cycle. The results of this novel method were validated by comparison with manually determined target position

  1. Satisfaction with life scale in a representative sample of Spanish adults: validation and normative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Carmelo; Duque, Almudena; Hervás, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) is a measure widely used to assess life satisfaction. This paper aims to test its psychometric properties, factor structure, and distribution scores across age, gender, education, and employment status. For this purpose, a representative sample of the Spanish population (N = 2,964) was used. Although analyses showed no significant differences across age or gender, participants with higher education level and those who held an occupation were more satisfied with their lives. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a unifactorial structure with significant correlations between the SWLS, and subjective happiness and social support. The internal consistency of the scale was .88. Thus, our results indicate that the Spanish version of the SWLS is a valid and reliable measure of life satisfaction within the Spanish context.

  2. Sharing privacy-sensitive access to neuroimaging and genetics data: a review and preliminary validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwate, Anand D; Plis, Sergey M; Turner, Jessica A; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    The growth of data sharing initiatives for neuroimaging and genomics represents an exciting opportunity to confront the "small N" problem that plagues contemporary neuroimaging studies while further understanding the role genetic markers play in the function of the brain. When it is possible, open data sharing provides the most benefits. However, some data cannot be shared at all due to privacy concerns and/or risk of re-identification. Sharing other data sets is hampered by the proliferation of complex data use agreements (DUAs) which preclude truly automated data mining. These DUAs arise because of concerns about the privacy and confidentiality for subjects; though many do permit direct access to data, they often require a cumbersome approval process that can take months. An alternative approach is to only share data derivatives such as statistical summaries-the challenges here are to reformulate computational methods to quantify the privacy risks associated with sharing the results of those computations. For example, a derived map of gray matter is often as identifiable as a fingerprint. Thus alternative approaches to accessing data are needed. This paper reviews the relevant literature on differential privacy, a framework for measuring and tracking privacy loss in these settings, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this framework to calculate statistics on data distributed at many sites while still providing privacy.

  3. Sharing privacy-sensitive access to neuroimaging and genetics data: a review and preliminary validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand D. Sarwate

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The growth of data sharing initiatives for neuroimaging and genomics represents an exciting opportunity to confront the ``small $N$'' problem that plagues contemporary neuroimaging studies while further understanding the role genetic markers play in in the function of the brain. When it is possible, open data sharing provides the most benefits. However some data cannot be shared at all due to privacy concerns and/or risk of re-identification. Sharing other data sets is hampered by the proliferation of complex data use agreements (DUAs which preclude truly automated data mining. These DUAs arise because of concerns about the privacy and confidentiality for subjects; though many do permit direct access to data, they often require a cumbersome approval process that can take months. An alternative approach is to only share data derivatives such as statistical summaries -- the challenges here are to reformulate computational methods to quantify the privacy risks associated with sharing the results of those computations. For example, a derived map of gray matter is often as identifiable as a fingerprint. Thus alternative approaches to accessing data are needed. This paper reviews the relevant literature on differential privacy, a framework for measuring and tracking privacy loss in these settings, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this framework to calculate statistics on data distributed at many sites while still providing privacy.

  4. Sharing privacy-sensitive access to neuroimaging and genetics data: a review and preliminary validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwate, Anand D.; Plis, Sergey M.; Turner, Jessica A.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    The growth of data sharing initiatives for neuroimaging and genomics represents an exciting opportunity to confront the “small N” problem that plagues contemporary neuroimaging studies while further understanding the role genetic markers play in the function of the brain. When it is possible, open data sharing provides the most benefits. However, some data cannot be shared at all due to privacy concerns and/or risk of re-identification. Sharing other data sets is hampered by the proliferation of complex data use agreements (DUAs) which preclude truly automated data mining. These DUAs arise because of concerns about the privacy and confidentiality for subjects; though many do permit direct access to data, they often require a cumbersome approval process that can take months. An alternative approach is to only share data derivatives such as statistical summaries—the challenges here are to reformulate computational methods to quantify the privacy risks associated with sharing the results of those computations. For example, a derived map of gray matter is often as identifiable as a fingerprint. Thus alternative approaches to accessing data are needed. This paper reviews the relevant literature on differential privacy, a framework for measuring and tracking privacy loss in these settings, and demonstrates the feasibility of using this framework to calculate statistics on data distributed at many sites while still providing privacy. PMID:24778614

  5. Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) salinity data validation over Malaysia coastal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reba, M N M; Rosli, A Z; Rahim, N A

    2014-01-01

    The study of sea surface salinity (SSS) plays an important role in the marine ecosystem, estimation of global ocean circulation and observation of fisheries, aquaculture, coral reef and sea grass habitats. The new challenge of SSS estimation is to exploit the ocean surface brightness temperature (Tb) observed by the Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) onboard the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite that is specifically designed to provide the best retrieval of ocean salinity and soil moisture using the L band of 1.4 GHz radiometer. Tb observed by radiometer is basically a function of the dielectric constant, sea surface temperature (SST), wind speed (U), incidence angle, polarization and SSS. Though, the SSS estimation is an ill-posed inversion problem as the relationship between the Tb and SSS is non-linear function. Objective of this study is to validate the SMOS SSS estimates with the ground-truth over the Malaysia coastal water. The LM iteratively determines the SSS of SMOS by the reduction of the sum of squared errors between Tb SMOS and Tb simulation (using in-situ) based on the updated geophysical triplet in the direction of the minimum of the cost function. The minimum cost function is compared to the desired threshold at each iteration and this recursive least square process updates the SST, U and SSS until the cost function converged. The designed LM's non-linear inversion algorithm simultaneously estimates SST, U and SSS and thus, map of SSS over Malaysia coastal water is produced from the regression model and accuracy assessment between the SMOS and in-situ retrieved SSS. This study found a good agreement in the validation with R square of 0.9 and the RMSE of 0.4. It is concluded that the non-linear inversion method is effective and practical to extract SMOS SSS, U and SST simultaneously

  6. Nuclear power plant performance monitoring using Data Validation and Reconciliation (DVR). Application at the Brazilian Angra 2 PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Quang, Anh Tho; Closon, Hervé; Chares, Robert; Azola, Edson

    2011-01-01

    Operational decisions related to plant performance monitoring mainly result from raw process measurement analysis. When first signs of sub-optimal behavior occur, traditional methods mainly focus on the observation of selective pieces of information. The main disadvantages of these methods are: Investigation efforts are required to localize the problems, entailing time losses and costs; Validity and reliability of the pieces of information cannot be checked as long as the measurements are observed individually. The problem is not the lack of methods and techniques but rather a lack of reliable and consistent data and information across the entire plant. To overcome drawbacks of traditional methods, measurements are considered as interacting with one another. When related to the other measurements of the plant, the observed information becomes of an interest: its incoherency to the others identifies and localizes a problem. The Data Validation and Reconciliation technology (DVR) is based on an advanced process data coherency treatment. By using all available plant information and by closing the plant heat and mass balances based on rigorous thermodynamics, the method generates: A single set of reliable and most accurate plant process data; Alarms for incoherent measurements, highlighting potential problems; Alarms for equipment and process performance degradation; Alarms for faulty and drifting measurements. The use of the advanced DVR software package VALI offers various benefits as it allows to base operational decisions on reliable and accurate data. (author)

  7. Statistically validated mobile communication networks: Evolution of motifs in European and Chinese data

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Xia; Palchykov, Vasyl; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, Janos; Miccichè, Salvatore; Tumminello, Michele; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2014-01-01

    Big data open up unprecedented opportunities to investigate complex systems including the society. In particular, communication data serve as major sources for computational social sciences but they have to be cleaned and filtered as they may contain spurious information due to recording errors as well as interactions, like commercial and marketing activities, not directly related to the social network. The network constructed from communication data can only be considered as a proxy for the ...

  8. Model validation and error estimation of tsunami runup using high resolution data in Sadeng Port, Gunungkidul, Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basith, Abdul; Prakoso, Yudhono; Kongko, Widjo

    2017-07-01

    A tsunami model using high resolution geometric data is indispensable in efforts to tsunami mitigation, especially in tsunami prone areas. It is one of the factors that affect the accuracy results of numerical modeling of tsunami. Sadeng Port is a new infrastructure in the Southern Coast of Java which could potentially hit by massive tsunami from seismic gap. This paper discusses validation and error estimation of tsunami model created using high resolution geometric data in Sadeng Port. Tsunami model validation uses the height wave of Tsunami Pangandaran 2006 recorded by Tide Gauge of Sadeng. Tsunami model will be used to accommodate the tsunami numerical modeling involves the parameters of earthquake-tsunami which is derived from the seismic gap. The validation results using t-test (student) shows that the height of the tsunami modeling results and observation in Tide Gauge of Sadeng are considered statistically equal at 95% confidence level and the value of the RMSE and NRMSE are 0.428 m and 22.12%, while the differences of tsunami wave travel time is 12 minutes.

  9. System to monitor data analyses and results of physics data validation between pulses at DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, S.; Schachter, J.M.; Schissel, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    A data analysis monitoring (DAM) system has been developed to monitor between pulse physics analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility (http://nssrv1.gat.com:8000/dam). The system allows for rapid detection of discrepancies in diagnostic measurements or the results from physics analysis codes. This enables problems to be detected and possibly fixed between pulses as opposed to after the experimental run has concluded, thus increasing the efficiency of experimental time. An example of a consistency check is comparing the experimentally measured neutron rate and the expected neutron emission, RDD0D. A significant difference between these two values could indicate a problem with one or more diagnostics, or the presence of unanticipated phenomena in the plasma. This system also tracks the progress of MDSplus dispatched data analysis software and the loading of analyzed data into MDSplus. DAM uses a Java Servlet to receive messages, C Language Integrated Production System to implement expert system logic, and displays its results to multiple web clients via Hypertext Markup Language. If an error is detected by DAM, users can view more detailed information so that steps can be taken to eliminate the error for the next pulse

  10. A NEW SYSTEM TO MONITOR DATA ANALYSES AND RESULTS OF PHYSICS DATA VALIDATION BETWEEN PULSES AT DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FLANAGAN, A; SCHACHTER, J.M; SCHISSEL, D.P

    2003-01-01

    A Data Analysis Monitoring (DAM) system has been developed to monitor between pulse physics analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility (http://nssrv1.gat.com:8000/dam). The system allows for rapid detection of discrepancies in diagnostic measurements or the results from physics analysis codes. This enables problems to be detected and possibly fixed between pulses as opposed to after the experimental run has concluded thus increasing the efficiency of experimental time. An example of a consistency check is comparing the experimentally measured neutron rate and the expected neutron emission, RDD0D. A significant difference between these two values could indicate a problem with one or more diagnostics, or the presence of unanticipated phenomena in the plasma. This new system also tracks the progress of MDSplus dispatched data analysis software and the loading of analyzed data into MDSplus. DAM uses a Java Servlet to receive messages, CLIPS to implement expert system logic, and displays its results to multiple web clients via HTML. If an error is detected by DAM, users can view more detailed information so that steps can be taken to eliminate the error for the next pulse

  11. Approaches to ascertaining comorbidity information: validation of routine hospital episode data with clinician-based case note review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Martin; Robertson, Lynn M; Ali, Tariq; Clark, Laura E; Fluck, Nicholas; Johnston, Marjorie; Marks, Angharad; Prescott, Gordon J; Smith, William Cairns S; Black, Corri

    2014-04-21

    In clinical practice, research, and increasingly health surveillance, planning and costing, there is a need for high quality information to determine comorbidity information about patients. Electronic, routinely collected healthcare data is capturing increasing amounts of clinical information as part of routine care. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of routine hospital administrative data to determine comorbidity, as compared with clinician-based case note review, in a large cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. A validation study using record linkage. Routine hospital administrative data were compared with clinician-based case note review comorbidity data in a cohort of 3219 patients with chronic kidney disease. To assess agreement, we calculated prevalence, kappa statistic, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Subgroup analyses were also performed. Median age at index date was 76.3 years, 44% were male, 67% had stage 3 chronic kidney disease and 31% had at least three comorbidities. For most comorbidities, we found a higher prevalence recorded from case notes compared with administrative data. The best agreement was found for cerebrovascular disease (κ = 0.80) ischaemic heart disease (κ = 0.63) and diabetes (κ = 0.65). Hypertension, peripheral vascular disease and dementia showed only fair agreement (κ = 0.28, 0.39, 0.38 respectively) and smoking status was found to be poorly recorded in administrative data. The patterns of prevalence across subgroups were as expected and for most comorbidities, agreement between case note and administrative data was similar. Agreement was less, however, in older ages and for those with three or more comorbidities for some conditions. This study demonstrates that hospital administrative comorbidity data compared moderately well with case note review data for cerebrovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, however there was

  12. The validity of open-source data when assessing jail suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amanda L; Scott, Jacqueline; Mellow, Jeff

    2018-05-09

    The Bureau of Justice Statistics' Deaths in Custody Reporting Program is the primary source for jail suicide research, though the data is restricted from general dissemination. This study is the first to examine whether jail suicide data obtained from publicly available sources can help inform our understanding of this serious public health problem. Of the 304 suicides that were reported through the DCRP in 2009, roughly 56 percent (N = 170) of those suicides were identified through the open-source search protocol. Each of the sources was assessed based on how much information was collected on the incident and the types of variables available. A descriptive analysis was then conducted on the variables that were present in both data sources. The four variables present in each data source were: (1) demographic characteristics of the victim, (2) the location of occurrence within the facility, (3) the location of occurrence by state, and (4) the size of the facility. Findings demonstrate that the prevalence and correlates of jail suicides are extremely similar in both open-source and official data. However, for almost every variable measured, open-source data captured as much information as official data did, if not more. Further, variables not found in official data were identified in the open-source database, thus allowing researchers to have a more nuanced understanding of the situational characteristics of the event. This research provides support for the argument in favor of including open-source data in jail suicide research as it illustrates how open-source data can be used to provide additional information not originally found in official data. In sum, this research is vital in terms of possible suicide prevention, which may be directly linked to being able to manipulate environmental factors.

  13. Optimizing Training Population Data and Validation of Genomic Selection for Economic Traits in Soft Winter Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Hoffstetter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Genomic selection (GS is a breeding tool that estimates breeding values (GEBVs of individuals based solely on marker data by using a model built using phenotypic and marker data from a training population (TP. The effectiveness of GS increases as the correlation of GEBVs and phenotypes (accuracy increases. Using phenotypic and genotypic data from a TP of 470 soft winter wheat lines, we assessed the accuracy of GS for grain yield, Fusarium Head Blight (FHB resistance, softness equivalence (SE, and flour yield (FY. Four TP data sampling schemes were tested: (1 use all TP data, (2 use subsets of TP lines with low genotype-by-environment interaction, (3 use subsets of markers significantly associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL, and (4 a combination of 2 and 3. We also correlated the phenotypes of relatives of the TP to their GEBVs calculated from TP data. The GS accuracy within the TP using all TP data ranged from 0.35 (FHB to 0.62 (FY. On average, the accuracy of GS from using subsets of data increased by 54% relative to using all TP data. Using subsets of markers selected for significant association with the target trait had the greatest impact on GS accuracy. Between-environment prediction accuracy was also increased by using data subsets. The accuracy of GS when predicting the phenotypes of TP relatives ranged from 0.00 to 0.85. These results suggest that GS could be useful for these traits and GS accuracy can be greatly improved by using subsets of TP data.

  14. Use of integral experiments in support to the validation of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclaire Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years now, IRSN has developed its own Monte Carlo continuous energy capability, which allows testing various nuclear data libraries. In that prospect, a validation database of 1136 experiments was built from cases used for the validation of the APOLLO2-MORET 5 multigroup route of the CRISTAL V2.0 package. In this paper, the keff obtained for more than 200 benchmarks using the JEFF-3.1.1 and JEFF-3.2 libraries are compared to benchmark keff values and main discrepancies are analyzed regarding the neutron spectrum. Special attention is paid on benchmarks for which the results have been highly modified between both JEFF-3 versions.

  15. Genomic prediction in animals and plants: simulation of data, validation, reporting, and benchmarking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daetwyler, H.D.; Calus, M.P.L.; Pong-Wong, R.; Los Campos, De G.; Hickey, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The genomic prediction of phenotypes and breeding values in animals and plants has developed rapidly into its own research field. Results of genomic prediction studies are often difficult to compare because data simulation varies, real or simulated data are not fully described, and not all relevant

  16. A formal method for rule analysis and validation in distributed data aggregation service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.N. Serbanescu (Vlad); F. Pop; V. Cristea; G. Antoniu

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractThe usage of Cloud Serviced has increased rapidly in the last years. Data management systems, behind any Cloud Service, are a major concern when it comes to scalability, flexibility and reliability due to being implemented in a distributed way. A Distributed Data Aggregation Service

  17. Dry/Wet Conditions Monitoring Based on TRMM Rainfall Data and Its Reliability Validation over Poyang Lake Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghu Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Local dry/wet conditions are of great concern in regional water resource and floods/droughts disaster risk management. Satellite-based precipitation products have greatly improved their accuracy and applicability and are expected to offer an alternative to ground rain gauges data. This paper investigated the capability of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM rainfall data for monitoring the temporal and spatial variation of dry/wet conditions in Poyang Lake basin during 1998–2010, and validated its reliability with rain gauges data from 14 national meteorological stations in the basin. The results show that: (1 the daily TRMM rainfall data does not describe the occurrence and contribution rates of precipitation accurately, but monthly TRMM data have a good linear relationship with rain gauges rainfall data; (2 both the Z index and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI based on monthly TRMM rainfall data oscillate around zero and show a consistent interannual variability as compared with rain gauges data; (3 the spatial pattern of moisture status, either in dry months or wet months, based on both the Z index and SPI using TRMM data, agree with the observed rainfall. In conclusion, the monthly TRMM rainfall data can be used for monitoring the variation and spatial distribution of dry/wet conditions in Poyang Lake basin.

  18. Data supporting the validation of a simulation model for multi-component gas separation in polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Lorena; Roizard, Denis; Bounaceur, Roda; Favre, Eric

    2016-12-01

    The article describes data concerning the separation performances of polymeric hollow-fiber membranes. The data were obtained using a model for simulating gas separation, described in the research article entitled "Interplay of inlet temperature and humidity on energy penalty for CO 2 post-combustion capture: rigorous analysis and simulation of a single stage gas permeation process" (L. Giordano, D. Roizard, R. Bounaceur, E. Favre, 2016) [1]. The data were used to validate the model by comparison with literature results. Considering a membrane system based on feed compression only, data from the model proposed and that from literature were compared with respect to the molar composition of permeate stream, the membrane area and specific energy requirement, varying the feed pressure and the CO 2 separation degree.

  19. Numerical Validation of a Vortex Model against ExperimentalData on a Straight-Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Dyachuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic blade motion during operation of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs imposes challenges on the simulations models of the aerodynamics of VAWTs. A two-dimensional vortex model is validated against the new experimental data on a 12-kW straight-bladed VAWT, which is operated at an open site. The results on the normal force on one blade are analyzed. The model is assessed against the measured data in the wide range of tip speed ratios: from 1.8 to 4.6. The predicted results within one revolution have a similar shape and magnitude as the measured data, though the model does not reproduce every detail of the experimental data. The present model can be used when dimensioning the turbine for maximum loads.

  20. Modeling of GIC Impacts in Different Time Scales, and Validation with Measurement Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, K.; Birchfield, A.; Overbye, T. J.; Gannon, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) have mostly been associated with geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs) originating from natural events such as solar coronal mass ejections. There is another, man-made, phenomenon that can induce GICs in the bulk power grid. Detonation of nuclear devices at high altitudes can give rise to electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) that induce electric fields at the earth's surface. EMPs cause three types of waves on different time scales, the slowest of which, E3, can induce GICs similar to the way GMDs do. The key difference between GMDs and EMPs is the rise time of the associated electric field. E3 electric fields are in the msec. to sec. range, whereas GMD electric fields are slower (sec. to min.). Similarly, the power grid and its components also operate and respond to disturbances in various time frames, right from electromagnetic transients (eg. lightning propagation) in the micro second range to steady state power flow ( hours). Hence, different power system component models need to be used to analyze the impacts of GICs caused by GMDs, and EMPs. For instance, for the slower GMD based GICs, a steady-state (static) analysis of the system is sufficient. That is, one does not need to model the dynamic components of a power system, such as the rotating machine of a generator, or generator controls such as exciters, etc. The latter become important in the case of an E3 EMP wave, which falls in the power system transient stability time frame of msec. to sec. This talk will first give an overview of the different time scales and models associated with power system operations, and where GMD and EMPs fit in. This is helpful to develop appropriate system models and test systems for analyzing impacts of GICs from various sources, and developing mitigation measures. Example test systems developed for GMD and EMP analysis, and their key modeling and analysis differences will be presented. After the modeling is discussed, results of validating

  1. CALIPSO satellite validation using an elastic backscattering Lidar system and the AERONET sun photometer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Fabio Juliano da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol and clouds play an important role in the Earth's climate process through their direct and indirect contributions to the radiation budget. The largest difficulty in predicting the climate change processes is associated with uncertainties in the distribution and properties of aerosols and clouds, as well as their interactions on a global scale. The CALIPSO mission was developed as part of the NASA program, in collaboration with the French space agency CNES, with the main goal to develop studies that will help to quantify the uncertainties about aerosols and clouds. The CALIPSO satellite carried a Lidar system on board, named CALIOP, as a primary instrument, able to provide the aerosol and cloud vertical profiles and distribution, as well as their interactions. Once the optical properties measured by CALIOP are retrieved, using a complex set of algorithms, it is necessary to study and develop methodologies in order to assess the accuracy of the CALIOP products. In this context, a validation methodology was developed in order to verify the assumed values of the Lidar Ratio selected by the CALIOP algorithms, using two ground-based remote sensing instruments, an elastic backscatter Lidar system (MSP) installed at IPEN in Sao Paulo and the AERONET sun photometers operating at five different locations in Brazil, Rio Branco - Acre (RB), Alta Floresta - Mato Grosso (AF), Cuiaba - Mato Grosso (CB), Campo Grande - Mato Grosso do Sul (CG) e Sao Paulo - Sao Paulo (SP). Those days when the CALIOP system and ground-based instruments spatially coincided, were selected and analyzed under cloud-free conditions, as well as days when the trajectories of air masses indicated the transport of air parcels from the CALIOP track towards the ground-based sensors. The Lidar Ratio values from the Aeronet/Caliop proposed model was determined and showed good consistency with those initially assumed by the CALIOP Algorithm. Based on the quantitative comparison, a mean difference of -2

  2. Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis to Select Benchmark Experiments for the Validation of Computer Codes and Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, K.R.; Rearden, B.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methodologies under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were applied to determine whether existing benchmark experiments adequately cover the area of applicability for the criticality code and data validation of PuO 2 and mixed-oxide (MOX) powder systems. The study examined three PuO 2 powder systems and four MOX powder systems that would be useful for establishing mass limits for a MOX fuel fabrication facility. Using traditional methods to choose experiments for criticality analysis validation, 46 benchmark critical experiments were identified as applicable to the PuO 2 powder systems. However, only 14 experiments were thought to be within the area of applicability for dry MOX powder systems.The applicability of 318 benchmark critical experiments, including the 60 experiments initially identified, was assessed. Each benchmark and powder system was analyzed using the Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) one-dimensional (TSUNAMI-1D) or TSUNAMI three-dimensional (TSUNAMI-3D) sensitivity analysis sequences, which will be included in the next release of the SCALE code system. This sensitivity data and cross-section uncertainty data were then processed with TSUNAMI-IP to determine the correlation of each application to each experiment in the benchmarking set. Correlation coefficients are used to assess the similarity between systems and determine the applicability of one system for the code and data validation of another.The applicability of most of the experiments identified using traditional methods was confirmed by the TSUNAMI analysis. In addition, some PuO 2 and MOX powder systems were determined to be within the area of applicability of several other benchmarks that would not have been considered using traditional methods. Therefore, the number of benchmark experiments useful for the validation of these systems exceeds the number previously expected. The TSUNAMI analysis

  3. Valid statistical approaches for analyzing sholl data: Mixed effects versus simple linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Machelle D; Sethi, Sunjay; Lein, Pamela J; Keil, Kimberly P

    2017-03-01

    The Sholl technique is widely used to quantify dendritic morphology. Data from such studies, which typically sample multiple neurons per animal, are often analyzed using simple linear models. However, simple linear models fail to account for intra-class correlation that occurs with clustered data, which can lead to faulty inferences. Mixed effects models account for intra-class correlation that occurs with clustered data; thus, these models more accurately estimate the standard deviation of the parameter estimate, which produces more accurate p-values. While mixed models are not new, their use in neuroscience has lagged behind their use in other disciplines. A review of the published literature illustrates common mistakes in analyses of Sholl data. Analysis of Sholl data collected from Golgi-stained pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus of male and female mice using both simple linear and mixed effects models demonstrates that the p-values and standard deviations obtained using the simple linear models are biased downwards and lead to erroneous rejection of the null hypothesis in some analyses. The mixed effects approach more accurately models the true variability in the data set, which leads to correct inference. Mixed effects models avoid faulty inference in Sholl analysis of data sampled from multiple neurons per animal by accounting for intra-class correlation. Given the widespread practice in neuroscience of obtaining multiple measurements per subject, there is a critical need to apply mixed effects models more widely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation of spent nuclear fuel nuclide composition data using percentage differences and detailed analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Cheol [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). School of Energy Systems Engineering

    2017-06-15

    Nuclide composition data of spent nuclear fuels are important in many nuclear engineering applications. In reactor physics, nuclear reactor design requires the nuclide composition and the corresponding cross sections. In analyzing the radiological health effects of a severe accident on the public and the environment, the nuclide composition in the reactor inventory is among the important input data. Nuclide composition data need to be provided to analyze the possible environmental effects of a spent nuclear fuel repository. They will also be the basis for identifying the origin of unidentified spent nuclear fuels or radioactive materials.

  5. The validation and assessment of machine learning: a game of prediction from high-dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune Hannes; Albrechtsen, A; Holst, C

    2009-01-01

    In applied statistics, tools from machine learning are popular for analyzing complex and high-dimensional data. However, few theoretical results are available that could guide to the appropriate machine learning tool in a new application. Initial development of an overall strategy thus often...... the ideas, the game is applied to data from the Nugenob Study where the aim is to predict the fat oxidation capacity based on conventional factors and high-dimensional metabolomics data. Three players have chosen to use support vector machines, LASSO, and random forests, respectively....

  6. Swiss population-based reference data for six symptom validity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Giger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Los resultados encontrados en la evaluación de la validez de los síntomas (SVT deberían ser inmunes a las variables sociodemográficas. Así, los sujetos sanos y cooperadores deberían superar los tests de SVT. El ob- jetivo de este estudio es obtener datos de referencia de una serie de pruebas utilizadas en la evaluación de la validez de los síntomas, en una muestra representativa de 100 ciudadanos suizos, germano-hablantes, de entre 18 y 60 años: Medical Symptom Validity Test, Structured Inventory of Malingered Symptomatology, Amsterdam Short-Term Memory Test, Emotional Numbing Test, Reliable Digit Span y Maximum Span Forward. Los análisis de regresión múltiple reflejaron que las variables edad e inteligencia verbal afectaron a los resultados de varias de las pruebas, mientras que no fue así para las variables sexo y nivel educativo. La tasa de resultados positivos osciló entre el 1% (Emotional Numbing Test, Structured Inventory of Malin- gered Symptomatology y el 4% (Maximum Span Forward. Una cuestión relevante que se desprende de este estudio es si dichos resultados positivos en las muestras de referencia

  7. Documentation and evaluation of model validation data used in scenario S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.; Arvela, H.; Suomela, M.

    1996-01-01

    Most radioactive fallout received in Finland after the Chernobyl nuclear accident originated in the first major release and spread over the test region between April 27 and 29, 1986. Most radioactive material was deposited with heavy showers which caused an uneven areal distribution. Deposition continued with varying intensity until May 12. At the end of April the growing season had not yet begun in Finland. Estimation of the mean deposition density was one of the modelling tasks. To avoid a biased starting point for foodchain assessments due to modellers' own deposition estimates, the mean deposition density of 137 Cs in each subregion used in the scenario was given as input information. The model validation test was started as a blind test. All regional information in the scenario description was coded, and the first maps of subregions were schematic to hide the actual test area. The blind test idea was gradually cancelled in the course of the exercise. The geographical region S was revealed after deposition estimates were made. At the same time, sources of information in the open literature became available to the modellers. After the blind test phase, communication was encouraged between modellers and the compiler of the scenario description at the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) to avoid unnecessary misinterpretations of input information. Clarifications and additional information provided in the course of model calculations are included in the present scenario description. 100 refs, 31 figs, 67 tabs

  8. Data requirements of GREAT-ER: Modelling and validation using LAS in four UK catchments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Oliver R.; Munday, Dawn K.; Whelan, Mick J.; Holt, Martin S.; Fox, Katharine K.; Morris, Gerard; Young, Andrew R.

    2009-01-01

    Higher-tier environmental risk assessments on 'down-the-drain' chemicals in river networks can be conducted using models such as GREAT-ER (Geography-referenced Regional Exposure Assessment Tool for European Rivers). It is important these models are evaluated and their sensitivities to input variables understood. This study had two primary objectives: evaluate GREAT-ER model performance, comparing simulated modelled predictions for LAS (linear alkylbenzene sulphonate) with measured concentrations, for four rivers in the UK, and investigate model sensitivity to input variables. We demonstrate that the GREAT-ER model is very sensitive to variability in river discharges. However it is insensitive to the form of distributions used to describe chemical usage and removal rate in sewage treatment plants (STPs). It is concluded that more effort should be directed towards improving empirical estimates of effluent load and reducing uncertainty associated with usage and removal rates in STPs. Simulations could be improved by incorporating the effect of river depth on dissipation rates. - Validation of GREAT-ER.

  9. Data requirements of GREAT-ER: Modelling and validation using LAS in four UK catchments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Oliver R., E-mail: oliver.price@unilever.co [Safety and Environmental Assurance Centre, Unilever, Colworth Science Park, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Munday, Dawn K. [Safety and Environmental Assurance Centre, Unilever, Colworth Science Park, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Whelan, Mick J. [Department of Natural Resources, School of Applied Sciences, Cranfield University, College Road, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Holt, Martin S. [ECETOC, Ave van Nieuwenhuyse 4, Box 6, B-1160 Brussels (Belgium); Fox, Katharine K. [85 Park Road West, Birkenhead, Merseyside CH43 8SQ (United Kingdom); Morris, Gerard [Environment Agency, Phoenix House, Global Avenue, Leeds LS11 8PG (United Kingdom); Young, Andrew R. [Wallingford HydroSolutions Ltd, Maclean building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxon OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Higher-tier environmental risk assessments on 'down-the-drain' chemicals in river networks can be conducted using models such as GREAT-ER (Geography-referenced Regional Exposure Assessment Tool for European Rivers). It is important these models are evaluated and their sensitivities to input variables understood. This study had two primary objectives: evaluate GREAT-ER model performance, comparing simulated modelled predictions for LAS (linear alkylbenzene sulphonate) with measured concentrations, for four rivers in the UK, and investigate model sensitivity to input variables. We demonstrate that the GREAT-ER model is very sensitive to variability in river discharges. However it is insensitive to the form of distributions used to describe chemical usage and removal rate in sewage treatment plants (STPs). It is concluded that more effort should be directed towards improving empirical estimates of effluent load and reducing uncertainty associated with usage and removal rates in STPs. Simulations could be improved by incorporating the effect of river depth on dissipation rates. - Validation of GREAT-ER.

  10. Statistical Validation of Calibrated Wind Data Collected From NOAA's Hurricane Hunter Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, K.; Sears, I. T.; Holmes, M.; Henning, R. G.; Damiano, A. B.; Parrish, J. R.; Flaherty, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining accurate in situ meteorological measurements from the NOAA G-IV Hurricane Hunter Aircraft currently requires annual wind calibration flights. This project attempts to demonstrate whether an alternate method to wind calibration flights can be implemented using data collected from many previous hurricane, winter storm, and surveying flights. Wind derivations require using airplane attack and slip angles, airplane pitch, pressure differentials, dynamic pressures, ground speeds, true air speeds, and several other variables measured by instruments on the aircraft. Through the use of linear regression models, future wind measurements may be fit to past statistical models. This method of wind calibration could replace the need for annual wind calibration flights, decreasing NOAA expenses and providing more accurate data. This would help to ensure all data users have reliable data and ultimately contribute to NOAA's goal of building of a Weather Ready Nation.

  11. Harmonisation and updatability based on valid fundamental data of the German electricity mix. 3. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebahn, Peter; Patyk, Andreas; Fritsche, Uwe R.

    2008-01-01

    Almost every product requires electricity for its manufacture, and the electricity mix used for this is a point of interest in life cycle assessments. Energy-related processes play an important role in life cycle assessments, which in turn are of major significance for product valuations. The Life Cycle Data Network has now carried out a study dedicated to generating a fundamental data record on ''Germany's electricity mix'' which describes the electricity mix supplied by German public power plants. This is the first time that a standardised data record has been made available which was compiled by common accord of all players concerned, whose data stem from quality assured sources and which can be updated year by year. (orig./GL)

  12. GPM GROUND VALIDATION NOAA UHF 449 PROFILER RAW DATA SPC FORMAT MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NOAA UHF 449 Profiler Raw SPC foramt data was collected during the NASA supported Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The Ultra High...

  13. Validation and augmentation of Inrix arterial travel time data using independent sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Travel time data is a key input to Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) applications. Advancement in vehicle : tracking and identification technologies and proliferation of location-aware and connected devices has made network-wide travel time da...

  14. Validation of a Climate-Data Record of the "Clear-Kky" Surface Temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Box, Jason E.; Koenig, Lora S.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Shuman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperatures on the Greenland Ice Sheet have been studied on the ground, using automatic weather station (AWS) data from the Greenland-Climate Network (GC-Net), and from analysis of satellite sensor data. Using Advanced Very High Frequency Radiometer (AVHRR) weekly surface temperature maps, warming of the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet has been documented since 1981. We extended and refined this record using higher-resolution Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from March 2000 to the present. We developed a daily and monthly climate-data record (CDR) of the "clear-sky" surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet using an ice-surface temperature (1ST) algorithm developed for use with MODIS data. Validation of this CDR is ongoing. MODIS Terra swath data are projected onto a polar stereographic grid at 6.25-km resolution to develop binary, gridded daily and mean-monthly 1ST maps. Each monthly map also has a color-coded image map that is available to download. Also included with the monthly maps is an accompanying map showing number of days in the month that were used to calculate the mean-monthly 1ST. This is important because no 1ST decision is made by the algorithm for cells that are considered cloudy by the internal cloud mask, so a sufficient number of days must be available to produce a mean 1ST for each grid cell. Validation of the CDR consists of several facets: 1) comparisons between ISTs and in-situ measurements; 2) comparisons between ISTs and AWS data; and 3) comparisons of ISTs with surface temperatures derived from other satellite instruments such as the Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Previous work shows that Terra MODIS ISTs are about 3 C lower than in-situ temperatures measured at Summit Camp, during the winter of 2008-09 under clear skies. In this work we begin to compare surface temperatures derived from AWS data with ISTs from the MODIS CDR. The

  15. Exploiting proteomic data for genome annotation and gene model validation in Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, James C.; Sugden, Deana; Francis-McIntyre, Sue; Riba Garcia, Isabel; Gaskell, Simon J.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Baker, Scott E.; Beynon, Robert J.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Proteomic data is a potentially rich, but arguably unexploited, data source for genome annotation. Peptide identifications from tandem mass spectrometry provide prima facie evidence for gene predictions and can discriminate over a set of candidate gene models. Here we apply this to the recently sequenced Aspergillus niger fungal genome from the Joint Genome Institutes (JGI) and another predicted protein set from another A.niger sequence. Tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) were ac...

  16. Analysis of Whole-Sky Imager Data to Determine the Validity of PCFLOS models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    included in the data sample. 2-5 3.1. Data arrangement for a r x c contingency table ....................... 3-2 3.2. ARIMA models estimated for each...satellites. This model uses the multidimen- sional Boehm Sawtooth Wave Model to establish climatic probabilities through repetitive simula- tions of...analysis techniques to develop an ARIMAe model for each direction at the Columbia and Kirtland sites. Then, the models can be compared and analyzed to

  17. Omega Hawaii Antenna System: Modification and Validation Tests. Volume 2. Data Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-19

    a benchmark because of potential hotel construction . DS 5-1 DATA SHEET 5 (DS-5) RADIO FIELD INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS OMEGA STATION: HAWAII SITE NO. C 1A...27.5 1008 11.05 26.5 1007 Ft 11.80 28.1 COMMENT Not considered for a benchmark because of potential hotel construction . DS 5-5 DATA SHEET 5 (DS-5) RADIO

  18. Integral measurements on Caliban and Prospero assemblies for nuclear data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Richard, B.; Ducauze-Philippe, M.; Cartier, J.

    2011-01-01

    How can the quality of nuclear data libraries be checked? Performing reference experiments also called benchmarks allows the testing of evaluated data. During these experiments, integral values such as reaction rates or neutron effective multiplication coefficients are measured. In this paper, the principles of benchmark construction are explained and illustrated with several works performed on the CALIBAN et PROSPERO critical assemblies operated by the Valduc center: benchmarks for dosimetry, activation reactions studies, neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  19. ASTER GDEM validation using LiDAR data over coastal regions of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René

    2011-01-01

    Elevation data from airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) campaigns are used in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) global digital elevation model (GDEM) in Greenland. The LiDAR elevation data set is characterized...... of Greenland and the effect of the number of scenes used to generate the ASTER GDEM as well as relief are associated with the GDEM accuracy....

  20. Protocol for Validation of the Land Surface Reflectance Fundamental Climate Data Record using AERONET: Application to the Global MODIS and VIIRS Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, J. C.; Vermote, E.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface reflectance is a fundamental climate data record at the basis of the derivation of other climate data records (Albedo, LAI/Fpar, Vegetation indices) and a key parameter in the understanding of the land-surface-climate processes. It is essential that a careful validation of its uncertainties is performed on a global and continuous basis. One approach is the direct comparison of this product with ground measurements but that approach presents several issues related to scale, the episodic nature of ground measurements and the global representativeness. An alternative is to compare the surface reflectance product to reference reflectance determined from Top of atmosphere reflectance corrected using accurate radiative transfer code and very detailed measurements of the atmosphere obtained over the AERONET sites (Vermote and al, 2014, RSE) which allows to test for a large range of aerosol characteristics; formers being important inputs for atmospheric corrections. However, the application of this method necessitates the definition of a very detailed protocol for the use of AERONET data especially as far as size distribution and absorption are concerned, so that alternative validation methods or protocols could be compared. This paper describes the protocol we have been working on based on our experience with the AERONET data and its application to the MODIS and VIIRS record.

  1. Validation of MODIS integrated water vapor product against reference GPS data at the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero-Martínez, Javier; Antón, Manuel; Ortiz de Galisteo, José Pablo; Cachorro, Victoria E.; Costa, Maria João; Román, Roberto; Bennouna, Yasmine S.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the water vapor product from MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument, on-board Aqua and Terra satellites, is compared against GPS water vapor data from 21 stations in the Iberian Peninsula as reference. GPS water vapor data is obtained from ground-based receiver stations which measure the delay caused by water vapor in the GPS microwave signals. The study period extends from 2007 until 2012. Regression analysis in every GPS station show that MODIS overestimates low integrated water vapor (IWV) data and tends to underestimate high IWV data. R2 shows a fair agreement, between 0.38 and 0.71. Inter-quartile range (IQR) in every station is around 30-45%. The dependence on several parameters was also analyzed. IWV dependence showed that low IWV are highly overestimated by MODIS, with high IQR (low precision), sharply decreasing as IWV increases. Regarding dependence on solar zenith angle (SZA), performance of MODIS IWV data decreases between 50° and 90°, while night-time MODIS data (infrared) are quite stable. The seasonal cycles of IWV and SZA cause a seasonal dependence on MODIS performance. In summer and winter, MODIS IWV tends to overestimate the reference IWV value, while in spring and autumn the tendency is to underestimate. Low IWV from coastal stations is highly overestimated (∼60%) and quite imprecise (IQR around 60%). On the contrary, high IWV data show very little dependence along seasons. Cloud-fraction (CF) dependence was also studied, showing that clouds display a negligible impact on IWV over/underestimation. However, IQR increases with CF, except in night-time satellite values, which are quite stable.

  2. CSRL application to nuclear power plant diagnosis and sensor data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Punch, W.F. III; Hajek, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    During operational abnormalities, plant operators rely on the information provided by the plant sensors and associated alarms. The sensors' usefulness however, is quickly diminished by their large number and the extremely difficult task of interpreting and comprehending the provided information. Malfunction diagnosis can be further complicated by the existence of conflicting data which can lead to an incorrect diagnostic conclusion. Thus, the value of an operator aid to assist plant personnel in interpreting the available data and diagnosing the plant malfunctions is obvious. Recent work at the Ohio State University Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research (OSU-LAIR) and the Nuclear Engineering department has concentrated on the problem of performing expert system diagnosis using potentially invalid sensor data. That is, the authors have been developing expert systems that can perform diagnostic problem solving despite the existence of some conflicting data in the domain. This work has resulted in enhancement of a programming tool, CSRL, that allows domain experts to create a diagnostic system that will be, to some degree, tolerant of bad data. The domain of Boiling Water Nuclear Power Plants was chosen as a test domain to show usefulness of the ideas under real world conditions

  3. CSRL application to nuclear power plant diagnosis and sensor data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, S.; Punch, W.F. III; Hajek, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    During operational abnormalities, plant operators rely on the information provided by the plant sensors and associated alarms. The sensors' usefulness however, is quickly diminished by their large number and the extremely difficult task of interpreting and comprehending the provided information. Malfunction diagnosis can be further complicated by the existence of conflicting data which can lead to an incorrect diagnostic conclusion. Thus, the value of an operator aid to assist plant personnel in interpreting the available data and diagnosing the plant malfunctions is obvious. Recent work at the Ohio State University Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research (OSU-LAIR) and the Nuclear Engineering Department has concentrated on the problem of performing expert system diagnosis using potentially invalid sensor data. Expert systems have been developed that can perform diagnostic problem solving despite the existence of some conflicting data in the domain. This work has resulted in enhancement of a programming tool, CSRL, that allows domain experts to create a diagnostic system that will be, to some degree, tolerant of bad data. The domain of Boiling Water Nuclear Power Plants was chosen as a test domain to show usefulness of the ideas under real world conditions

  4. Assessing and minimizing contamination in time of flight based validation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Kristin P.; Rosenfield, Paul; Blair, Brenton; Kaplan, Alan; Ruz, Jaime; Glenn, Andrew; Wurtz, Ronald

    2017-10-01

    Time of flight experiments are the gold standard method for generating labeled training and testing