WorldWideScience

Sample records for dark field imaging

  1. Neutron Dark-Field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, David

    2017-09-01

    Neutron imaging is typically used to image and reconstruct objects that are difficult to image using X-Ray imaging techniques. X-Ray absorption is primarily determined by the electron density of the material. This makes it difficult to image objects within materials that have high densities such as metal. However, the neutron scattering cross section primarily depends on the strong nuclear force, which varies somewhat randomly across the periodic table. In this project, an imaging technique known as dark field imaging using a far-field interferometer has been used to study a sample of granite. With this technique, interferometric phase images are generated. The dispersion of the microstructure of the sample dephases the beam, reducing the visibility. Collecting tomographic projections at different autocorrelation lengths (from 100 nanometers to 1.74 micrometers) essentially creates a 3D small angle scattering pattern, enabling mapping of how the microstructure is distributed throughout the sample.

  2. Cutaneous microcirculation in preterm neonates: comparison between sidestream dark field (SDF) and incident dark field (IDF) imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elteren, H. A.; Ince, C.; Tibboel, D.; Reiss, I. K. M.; de Jonge, R. C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Incident dark field imaging (IDF) is a new generation handheld microscope for bedside visualization and quantification of microcirculatory alterations. IDF is the technical successor of sidestream dark field imaging (SDF), currently the most used device for microcirculatory measurements. In

  3. Energy weighted x-ray dark-field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Georg; Zang, Andrea; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Kraus, Manuel; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, Andre; Wandner, Johannes; Weber, Thomas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Wong, Winnie S; Campbell, Michael; Meiser, Jan; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

    2014-10-06

    The dark-field image obtained in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide information about the objects' microstructures on a scale smaller than the pixel size even with low geometric magnification. In this publication we demonstrate that the dark-field image quality can be enhanced with an energy-resolving pixel detector. Energy-resolved x-ray dark-field images were acquired with a 16-energy-channel photon-counting pixel detector with a 1 mm thick CdTe sensor in a Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometer. A method for contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) enhancement is proposed and validated experimentally. In measurements, a CNR improvement by a factor of 1.14 was obtained. This is equivalent to a possible radiation dose reduction of 23%.

  4. Directional x-ray dark-field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Torben H; Bech, Martin; Bunk, Oliver; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-06-21

    We introduce a novel x-ray imaging approach that yields information about the local texture of structures smaller than the image pixel resolution inside an object. The approach is based on a recently developed x-ray dark-field imaging technique, using scattering from sub-micron structures in the sample. We show that the method can be used to determine the local angle and degree of orientation of bone, and fibers in a leaf. As the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube we believe that it can have a great impact on medical diagnostics and non-destructive testing applications.

  5. First experience with x-ray dark-field radiography for human chest imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willer, Konstantin; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Gromann, Lukas B.; De Marco, Fabio; Scherer, Kai H.; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Münzel, Daniela; Renz, Martin; Renger, Bernhard C.; Fischer, Florian; Braun, Christian; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schröter, Tobias; Mohr, Jürgen; Yaroshenko, Andre; Maack, Hanns-Ingo; Pralow, Thomas; van der Heijden, Hendrik; Proksa, Roland; Köhler, Thomas; Wieberneit, Nataly; Rindt, Karsten; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of an experimental X-ray dark-field radiography system for chest imaging in humans and to compare with conventional diagnostic imaging. Materials and Methods: The study was institutional review board (IRB) approved. A single human cadaver (52 years, female, height: 173 cm, weight: 84 kg, chest circumference: 97 cm) was imaged within 24 hours post mortem on the experimental x-ray dark-field system. In addition, the cadaver was imaged on a clinical CT system to obtain a reference scan. The grating-based dark-field radiography setup was equipped with a set of three gratings to enable grating-based dark-field contrast x-ray imaging. The prototype operates at an acceleration voltage of up to 70 kVp and with a field-of-view large enough for clinical chest x-ray (>35 x 35 cm2). Results: It was feasible to extract x-ray dark-field signal of the whole human thorax, clearly demonstrating that human x-ray dark-field chest radiography is feasible. Lung tissue produced strong scattering, reflected in a pronounced x-ray dark-field signal. The ribcage and the backbone are less prominent than the lung but are also distinguishable. Finally, the soft tissue is not present in the dark-field radiography. The regions of the lungs affected by edema, as verified by CT, showed less dark-field signal compared to healthy lung tissue. Conclusion: Our results reveal the current status of translating dark-field imaging from a micro (small animal) scale to a macro (patient) scale. The performance of the experimental x-ray dark-field radiography setup offers, for the first time, obtaining multi-contrast chest x-ray images (attenuation and dark-field signal) from a human cadaver.

  6. Dark field imaging system for size characterization of magnetic micromarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, A.; Haiden, C.; Kokkinis, G.; Keplinger, F.; Giouroudi, I.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a dark field video imaging system for the detection and size characterization of individual magnetic micromarkers suspended in liquid and the detection of pathogens utilizing magnetically labelled E.coli. The system follows dynamic processes and interactions of moving micro/nano objects close to or below the optical resolution limit, and is especially suitable for small sample volumes ( 10 μl). The developed detection method can be used to obtain clinical information about liquid contents when an additional biological protocol is provided, i.e., binding of microorganisms (e.g. E.coli) to specific magnetic markers. Some of the major advantages of our method are the increased sizing precision in the micro- and nano-range as well as the setup's simplicity making it a perfect candidate for miniaturized devices. Measurements can thus be carried out in a quick, inexpensive, and compact manner. A minor limitation is that the concentration range of micromarkers in a liquid sample needs to be adjusted in such a manner that the number of individual particles in the microscope's field of view is sufficient.

  7. A comparison of the quality of image acquisition between the incident dark field and sidestream dark field video-microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-21

    The 'Cytocam' is a third generation video-microscope, which enables real time visualisation of the in vivo microcirculation. Based upon the principle of incident dark field (IDF) illumination, this hand held computer-controlled device was designed to address the technical limitations of its predecessors, orthogonal polarization spectroscopy and sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging. In this manuscript, we aimed to compare the quality of sublingual microcirculatory image acquisition between the IDF and SDF devices. Using the microcirculatory image quality scoring (MIQS) system, (six categories scored as either 0 = optimal, 1 = acceptable, or 10 = unacceptable), two independent raters compared 30 films acquired using the Cytocam IDF video-microscope, to an equal number obtained with an SDF device. Blinded to the origin of the films, the raters were therefore able to score between 0 and 60 for each film analysed. The scores' distributions between the two techniques were compared. The median MIQS (95% CI) given to the SDF camera was 7 (1.5-12), as compared to 1 (0.5-1.0) for the IDF device (p microscope, as compared to the SDF video-microscope.

  8. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Strobl, M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-01-01

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons

  9. Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging: a novel stroboscopic LED ring-based imaging modality for clinical assessment of the microcirculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, P. T.; Khalilzada, M.; Bezemer, R.; Merza, J.; Ince, C.

    2007-01-01

    Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging, a stroboscopic LED ring-based imaging modality, is introduced for clinical observation of the microcirculation. SDF imaging is validated by comparison to Orthogonal Polarization Spectral imaging. Nailfold capillary diameters and red blood cell velocities were

  10. X-ray dark-field vector radiography-a novel technique for osteoporosis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Thomas; Eggl, Elena; Malecki, Andreas; Schaff, Florian; Potdevin, Guillaume; Gordijenko, Olga; Garcia, Eduardo Grande; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J; Noël, Peter B; Bauer, Jan S; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    X-ray dark-field vector radiography (XVR) has emerged as an imaging technique which can efficiently yield dark-field scatter images of high quality, even with conventional X-ray tube sources. The XVR yields direction-dependent information about the X-ray scattering of the trabecular bone microstructure without the requirement of resolving the micrometer size structures directly causing the scattering. In this pilot study, we demonstrated that XVR-based degree of anisotropy correlated with femoral bone strength in the context of osteoporosis.

  11. A comparison of the quality of image acquisition between the incident dark field and sidestream dark field video-microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Gilbert-Kawai; J. Coppel (Jonny); V. Bountziouka (Vassiliki); C. Ince (Can); D. Martin (Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background__ The ‘Cytocam’ is a third generation video-microscope, which enables real time visualisation of the in vivo microcirculation. Based upon the principle of incident dark field (IDF) illumination, this hand held computer-controlled device was designed to address the

  12. A comparison of the quality of image acquisition between the incident dark field and sidestream dark field video-microscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Coppel, Jonny; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Ince, Can; Martin, Daniel; Ahuja, V.; Aref-Adib, G.; Burnham, R.; Chisholm, A.; Clarke, K.; Coates, D.; Coates, M.; Cook, D.; Cox, M.; Dhillon, S.; Dougall, C.; Doyle, P.; Duncan, P.; Edsell, M.; Edwards, L.; Evans, L.; Gardiner, P.; Grocott, M.; Gunning, P.; Hart, N.; Harrington, J.; Harvey, J.; Holloway, C.; Howard, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Imray, C.; Jonas, M.; van der Kaaij, J.; Khosravi, M.; Kolfschoten, N.; Levett, D.; Luery, H.; Luks, A.; Martin, D.; McMorrow, R.; Meale, P.; Mitchell, K.; Montgomery, H.; Morgan, G.; Morgan, J.; Murray, A.; Mythen, M.; Newman, S.; O'Dwyer, M.; Pate, J.; Plant, T.; Pun, M.; Richards, P.; Richardson, A.; Rodway, G.; Simpson, J.; Stroud, C.; Stroud, M.; Stygal, J.; Symons, B.; Szawarski, P.; van Tulleken, A.; van Tulleken, C.; Vercueil, A.; Wandrag, L.; Wilson, M.; Windsor, J.; Basnyat, B.; Clarke, C.; Hornbein, T.; Milledge, J.; West, J.; Abraham, S.; Adams, T.; Anseeuw, W.; Astin, R.; Burdall, O.; Carroll, J.; Cobb, A.; Coppel, J.; Couppis, O.; Court, J.; Cumptsey, A.; Davies, T.; Diamond, N.; Geliot, T.; Gilbert-Kawai, E.; Gilbert-Kawai, G.; Gnaiger, E.; Haldane, C.; Hennis, P.; Horscroft, J.; Jack, S.; Jarvis, B.; Jenner, W.; Jones, G.; Kenth, J.; Kotwica, A.; Kumar, R. B. C.; Lacey, J.; Laner, V.; Mahomed, Z.; Moonie, J.; Mythen, P.; O'Brien, K.; Ruggles-Brice, I.; Salmon, K.; Sheperdigian, A.; Smedley, T.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wight, A.; Wilkinson, C.; Wythe, S.; Feelisch, M.; Hanson, M.; Moon, R.; Peters, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 'Cytocam' is a third generation video-microscope, which enables real time visualisation of the in vivo microcirculation. Based upon the principle of incident dark field (IDF) illumination, this hand held computer-controlled device was designed to address the technical limitations of

  13. Improvement of Sidestream Dark Field Imaging with an Image Acquisition Stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M; Bezemer, Rick; Boerma, E Christiaan; Yong, Ze-Yie; Sjauw, Krishan D; Engstrom, Annemarie E; Koopmans, Matty; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we developed, evaluated in volunteers, and clinically validated an image acquisition stabilizer (IAS) for Sidestream Dark Field (SDF) imaging. The IAS is a stainless steel sterilizable ring which fits around the SDF probe tip. The IAS creates adhesion to the imaged tissue by application of negative pressure. The effects of the IAS on the sublingual microcirculatory flow velocities, the force required to induce pressure artifacts (PA), the time to acquire a stable image, and the duration of stable imaging were assessed in healthy volunteers. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of the SDF setup in combination with the IAS, simultaneous bilateral sublingual imaging of the microcirculation were performed during a lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. One SDF device was operated handheld; the second was fitted with the IAS and held in position by a mechanic arm. Lateral drift, number of losses of image stability and duration of stable imaging of the two methods were compared. Five healthy volunteers were studied. The IAS did not affect microcirculatory flow velocities. A significantly greater force had to applied onto the tissue to induced PA with compared to without IAS (0.25 ± 0.15 N without vs. 0.62 ± 0.05 N with the IAS, p < 0.001). The IAS ensured an increased duration of a stable image sequence (8 ± 2 s without vs. 42 ± 8 s with the IAS, p < 0.001). The time required to obtain a stable image sequence was similar with and without the IAS. In eight mechanically ventilated patients undergoing a LRM the use of the IAS resulted in a significantly reduced image drifting and enabled the acquisition of significantly longer stable image sequences (24 ± 5 s without vs. 67 ± 14 s with the IAS, p = 0.006). The present study has validated the use of an IAS for improvement of SDF imaging by demonstrating that the IAS did not affect microcirculatory perfusion in the microscopic field of view. The IAS

  14. Rapid automatic assessment of microvascular density in sidestream dark field images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bezemer (Rick); J.G. Dobbe (Johannes); S.A. Bartels (Sebastiaan); E. Christiaan Boerma (E.); P.W.G. Elbers (Paul W.); M. Heger (Michal); C. Ince (Can)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and fully automatic method for the assessment of microvascular density and perfusion in sidestream dark field (SDF) images. We modified algorithms previously developed by our group for microvascular density assessment and introduced a new

  15. Orientational imaging of a single plasmonic nanoparticle using dark-field hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nishir; Mahigir, Amirreza; Veronis, Georgios; Gartia, Manas Ranjan

    2017-08-01

    Orientation of plasmonic nanostructures is an important feature in many nanoscale applications such as catalyst, biosensors DNA interactions, protein detections, hotspot of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) experiments. However, due to diffraction limit, it is challenging to obtain the exact orientation of the nanostructure using standard optical microscope. Hyperspectral Imaging Microscopy is a state-of-the-art visualization technology that combines modern optics with hyperspectral imaging and computer system to provide the identification and quantitative spectral analysis of nano- and microscale structures. In this work, initially we use transmitted dark field imaging technique to locate single nanoparticle on a glass substrate. Then we employ hyperspectral imaging technique at the same spot to investigate orientation of single nanoparticle. No special tagging or staining of nanoparticle has been done, as more likely required in traditional microscopy techniques. Different orientations have been identified by carefully understanding and calibrating shift in spectral response from each different orientations of similar sized nanoparticles. Wavelengths recorded are between 300 nm to 900 nm. The orientations measured by hyperspectral microscopy was validated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) electrodynamics calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The combination of high resolution nanometer-scale imaging techniques and the modern numerical modeling capacities thus enables a meaningful advance in our knowledge of manipulating and fabricating shaped nanostructures. This work will advance our understanding of the behavior of small nanoparticle clusters useful for sensing, nanomedicine, and surface sciences.

  16. Dark-field hyperlens: Super-resolution imaging of weakly scattering objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    : We propose a device for subwavelength optical imaging based on a metal-dielectric multilayer hyperlens designed in such a way that only large-wavevector (evanescent) waves are transmitted while all propagating (small-wavevector) waves from the object area are blocked by the hyperlens. We...... numerically demonstrate that as the result of such filtering, the image plane only contains scattered light from subwavelength features of the objects and is completely free from background illumination. Similar in spirit to conventional dark-field microscopy, the proposed dark-field hyperlens is shown...... to enhance the subwavelength image contrast by more than two orders of magnitude. These findings are essential for optical imaging of weakly scattering subwavelength objects, such as real-time dynamic nanoscopy of label-free biological objects....

  17. X-ray dark-field imaging and its application. Laue case analyzer

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, M

    2003-01-01

    A system on X-ray dark-field imaging under development and its application is reported. That comprises an asymmetric monochromator and a Laue case analyzer that has a specified thickness for a given X-ray photon energy or wavelength and a sample locating inbetween these. This system uses Si 4,4,0 diffraction for both X-ray optics element in a parallel arrangement. In order to achieve the dark-field imaging condition the Si Laue analyzer should be 1.075 mm in thickness for the X-ray energy of 35 keV. Since this system is very simple one can expect a variety of applications including material science, biology, palaeontology and clinical medicine where a large view area with size of 100 mm x 100 mm is needed. (author)

  18. Sub-pixel porosity revealed by x-ray scatter dark field imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revol, V. [Photonics Division, Centre Suisse d' Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Technoparkstr. 1, 8005 Zuerich (Switzerland); Physics Institute, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Jerjen, I.; Schuetz, P.; Luethi, T.; Sennhauser, U. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), Ueberlandstr. 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Kottler, C.; Kaufmann, R.; Urban, C. [Photonics Division, Centre Suisse d' Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Technoparkstr. 1, 8005 Zuerich (Switzerland); Straumann, U. [Physics Institute, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    X-ray scatter dark field imaging based on the Talbot-Lau interferometer allows for the measurement of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The latter is related to the variations in the electron density in the sample at the sub- and micron-scale. Therefore, information on features of the object below the detector resolution can be revealed.In this article, it is demonstrated that scatter dark field imaging is particularly adapted to the study of a material's porosity. An interferometer, optimized for x-ray energies around 50 keV, enables the investigation of aluminum welding with conventional laboratory x-ray tubes. The results show an unprecedented contrast between the pool and the aluminum workpiece. Our conclusions are confirmed due to micro-tomographic three-dimensional reconstructions of the same object with a microscopic resolution.

  19. Sub-pixel porosity revealed by x-ray scatter dark field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revol, V.; Jerjen, I.; Schuetz, P.; Luethi, T.; Sennhauser, U.; Kottler, C.; Kaufmann, R.; Urban, C.; Straumann, U.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray scatter dark field imaging based on the Talbot-Lau interferometer allows for the measurement of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The latter is related to the variations in the electron density in the sample at the sub- and micron-scale. Therefore, information on features of the object below the detector resolution can be revealed.In this article, it is demonstrated that scatter dark field imaging is particularly adapted to the study of a material's porosity. An interferometer, optimized for x-ray energies around 50 keV, enables the investigation of aluminum welding with conventional laboratory x-ray tubes. The results show an unprecedented contrast between the pool and the aluminum workpiece. Our conclusions are confirmed due to micro-tomographic three-dimensional reconstructions of the same object with a microscopic resolution.

  20. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  1. Noise Reduction Method for Quantifying Nanoparticle Light Scattering in Low Magnification Dark-Field Microscope Far-Field Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Fan, Jia; Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Bu, Yang; Lyon, Christopher J; Hu, Ye

    2016-12-20

    Nanoparticles have become a powerful tool for cell imaging and biomolecule, cell and protein interaction studies, but are difficult to rapidly and accurately measure in most assays. Dark-field microscope (DFM) image analysis approaches used to quantify nanoparticles require high-magnification near-field (HN) images that are labor intensive due to a requirement for manual image selection and focal adjustments needed when identifying and capturing new regions of interest. Low-magnification far-field (LF) DFM imagery is technically simpler to perform but cannot be used as an alternate to HN-DFM quantification, since it is highly sensitive to surface artifacts and debris that can easily mask nanoparticle signal. We now describe a new noise reduction approach that markedly reduces LF-DFM image artifacts to allow sensitive and accurate nanoparticle signal quantification from LF-DFM images. We have used this approach to develop a "Dark Scatter Master" (DSM) algorithm for the popular NIH image analysis program ImageJ, which can be readily adapted for use with automated high-throughput assay analyses. This method demonstrated robust performance quantifying nanoparticles in different assay formats, including a novel method that quantified extracellular vesicles in patient blood sample to detect pancreatic cancer cases. Based on these results, we believe our LF-DFM quantification method can markedly decrease the analysis time of most nanoparticle-based assays to impact both basic research and clinical analyses.

  2. Noninvasive assessment of the iridial microcirculation in rats using sidestream dark field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, V; Zhou, J; Kelly, M; Alotibi, I; Turek, Z; Whynot, S; Saleh, I Abdo; Lehmann, C

    2013-02-01

    Sidestream dark field imaging represents a novel, noninvasive method to study the microcirculation in humans and animals. To-date, it has been used extensively in various peripheral tissues (e.g. sublingual area, intestinal mucosa), however no data for the ocular vasculature, including the iridial microcirculation, are currently available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the reliability and reproducibility of sidestream dark field imaging within the iridial microcirculation in experimental animals. Male Lewis rats were anaesthetized and the iris microvasculature was observed using an sidestream dark field probe gently placed against a cover slip covering the right eye. All video sequences recorded were analysed off-line by using AVA 3.0 software (MicroVision Medical, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Results are expressed as mean (±SE) or median (interquartile range). Clear images were recorded from each animal and the total number of analysable video sequences was 50. All raw data for selected vessel density parameters passed normality test. The total all and small vessel density (in mm mm(-2) ) were 22,6 (±0,58) and 19,6 (±0,68), respectively. The perfused all and small vessel density were 20,9 (±0,61) and 19,1 (±0,65), respectively. The mean values of all iris vessel density parameters are shown in Figure 4. The DeBacker Score (n/mm) was 15,2 (±0,45), the proportion of perfused vessel was 94,5% (89,8-99,1%), and the MFI was 3 points (3-3). Taken together, these results indicate that SDF imaging provides a reliable and noninvasive method to examine the iridial microvascular bed in vivo and, thus, may provide unique opportunities for the study of the iridial vascular network in various experimental and clinical settings and disease models. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. X-ray dark-field imaging for detection of foreign bodies in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Lauridsen, Torsten; Feidenhans'l, Robert Krarup

    2013-01-01

    Conventional X-ray transmission radiography has long been used for online detection of foreign bodies in food products relying on the absorption contrast between the foreign body and food product. In this paper, we present a novel approach for detection of organic foreign bodies such as paper...... and insects in two food products using X-ray dark-field imaging with a grating interferometer. The ability to detect the foreign bodies is quantified using a measure of the contrast-to-noise ratio....

  4. Contrast enhancement of microsphere-assisted super-resolution imaging in dark-field microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Tang, Yan; Deng, Qinyuan; Zhao, Lixin; Hu, Song

    2017-08-01

    We report a method of boosting the imaging contrast of microsphere-assisted super-resolution visualization by utilizing dark-field illumination (DFI). We conducted experiments on both 10-µm-diameter silica (SiO2) microspheres with refractive index n ∼ 1.46 under no and partial immersion in ethyl alcohol (n ∼ 1.36) and 20-µm-diameter barium titanate glass (BTG, n ∼ 1.9) microspheres with full immersion to show the super-resolution capability. We experimentally demonstrated that the imaging contrast and uniformity were extraordinarily improved in the DFI mode. The intensity profiles in the visualization also numerically confirm the enhanced sharpness for a better imaging quality when applying DFI.

  5. Microbubbles as a scattering contrast agent for grating-based x-ray dark-field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velroyen, A; Bech, M; Malecki, A; Tapfer, A; Yaroshenko, A; Ingrisch, M; Cyran, C C; Auweter, S D; Nikolaou, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-02-21

    In clinically established-absorption-based-biomedical x-ray imaging, contrast agents with high atomic numbers (e.g. iodine) are commonly used for contrast enhancement. The development of novel x-ray contrast modalities such as phase contrast and dark-field contrast opens up the possible use of alternative contrast media in x-ray imaging. We investigate using ultrasound contrast agents, which unlike iodine-based contrast agents can also be administered to patients with renal impairment and thyroid dysfunction, for application with a recently developed novel x-ray dark-field imaging modality. To produce contrast from these microbubble-based contrast agents, our method exploits ultra-small-angle coherent x-ray scattering. Such scattering dark-field x-ray images can be obtained with a grating-based x-ray imaging setup, together with refraction-based differential phase-contrast and the conventional attenuation contrast images. In this work we specifically show that ultrasound contrast agents based on microbubbles can be used to produce strongly enhanced dark-field contrast, with superior contrast-to-noise ratio compared to the attenuation signal. We also demonstrate that this method works well with an x-ray tube-based setup and that the relative contrast gain even increases when the pixel size is increased from tenths of microns to clinically compatible detector resolutions about up to a millimetre.

  6. On the analysis of time-of-flight spin-echo modulated dark-field imaging data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.

    2017-01-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering with spatial resolution, i.e. quantitative Spin-Echo Dark Field Imaging, is an emerging technique coupling neutron imaging with spatially resolved quantitative small angle scattering information. However, the currently achieved relatively large...... modulation periods of the order of millimeters are superimposed to the images of the samples. So far this required an independent reduction and analyses of the image and scattering information encoded in the measured data and is involving extensive curve fitting routines. Apart from requiring a priori......-spatially resolved Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering....

  7. Ex Vivo Perfusion-Simulation Measurements of Microbubbles as a Scattering Contrast Agent for Grating-Based X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Velroyen

    Full Text Available The investigation of dedicated contrast agents for x-ray dark-field imaging, which exploits small-angle scattering at microstructures for contrast generation, is of strong interest in analogy to the common clinical use of high-atomic number contrast media in conventional attenuation-based imaging, since dark-field imaging has proven to provide complementary information. Therefore, agents consisting of gas bubbles, as used in ultrasound imaging for example, are of particular interest. In this work, we investigate an experimental contrast agent based on microbubbles consisting of a polyvinyl-alcohol shell with an iron oxide coating, which was originally developed for multimodal imaging and drug delivery. Its performance as a possible contrast medium for small-animal angiography was examined using a mouse carcass to realistically consider attenuating and scattering background signal. Subtraction images of dark field, phase contrast and attenuation were acquired for a concentration series of 100%, 10% and 1.3% to mimic different stages of dilution in the contrast agent in the blood vessel system. The images were compared to the gold-standard iodine-based contrast agent Solutrast, showing a good contrast improvement by microbubbles in dark-field imaging. This study proves the feasibility of microbubble-based dark-field contrast-enhancement in presence of scattering and attenuating mouse body structures like bone and fur. Therefore, it suggests a strong potential of the use of polymer-based microbubbles for small-animal dark-field angiography.

  8. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine, E-mail: marie-christine.zdora@diamond.ac.uk [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Thibault, Pierre [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zanette, Irene [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  9. Non-Destructive Testing of Archaeological Findings by Grating-Based X-Ray Phase-Contrast and Dark-Field Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Ludwig

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of archaeological findings reveals the remaining secrets of human history. However, it is a challenging task to investigate and simultaneously preserve the unique remains. Available non-destructive examination methods are limited and often insufficient. Thus, we considered X-ray grating interferometry as a non-destructive and advanced X-ray imaging method to retrieve more information about archaeological findings. In addition to the conventional attenuation image, the differential phase and the dark-field image are obtained. We studied the potential of the scattering-sensitive dark-field and the phase-shift sensitive differential phase image to analyse archaeological findings. Hereby, the focus lies on organic remnants. Usually, the organic materials have vanished due to decomposition processes, but the structures are often preserved by mineralisation and penetration of corrosion products. We proved that the combination of the attenuation and the dark-field image in particular, enables a separation of structural properties for fabric remnants. Furthermore, we achieved promising results for the reconstruction of sub-pixel sized fibre orientations of woven fabric remnants by employing the directional dark-field imaging method. We conclude from our results that a further application of X-ray dark-field imaging on wet organic findings and on the distinction of different types of organic remnants at archaeological findings is promising.

  10. Real-time scattered light dark-field microscopic imaging of the dynamic degradation process of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-28

    Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of NaDDC under neutral and alkaline conditions was proposed, and the inhibition effects of metal ions including Zn(II) and Cu(II) were investigated in order to understand the decomposition process in different environments. It was found that Cu(II) forms the most stable complex with NaDDC with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 2, which greatly reduces the toxicity.

  11. Dark-field image contrast in transmission scanning electron microscopy: Effects of substrate thickness and detector collection angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehl, Taylor; Keller, Robert

    2016-12-01

    An annular dark field (ADF) detector was placed beneath a specimen in a field emission scanning electron microscope operated at 30kV to calibrate detector response to incident beam current, and to create transmission images of gold nanoparticles on silicon nitride (SiN) substrates of various thicknesses. Based on the linear response of the ADF detector diodes to beam current, we developed a method that allowed for direct determination of the percentage of that beam current forward scattered to the ADF detector from the sample, i.e. the transmitted electron (TE) yield. Collection angles for the ADF detector region were defined using a masking aperture above the detector and were systematically varied by changing the sample to detector distance. We found the contrast of the nanoparticles, relative to the SiN substrate, decreased monotonically with decreasing inner exclusion angle and increasing substrate thickness. We also performed Monte Carlo electron scattering simulations, which showed quantitative agreement with experimental contrast associated with the nanoparticles. Together, the experiments and Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the decrease in contrast with decreasing inner exclusion angle was due to a rapid increase in the TE yield of the low atomic number substrate. Nanoparticles imaged at low inner exclusion angles (50nm) showed low image contrast in their centers surrounded by a bright high-contrast halo on their edges. This complex image contrast was predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, which we interpreted in terms of mixing of the nominally bright field (BF) and ADF electron signals. Our systematic investigation of inner exclusion angle and substrate thickness effects on ADF t-SEM imaging provides fundamental understanding of the contrast mechanisms for image formation, which in turn suggest practical limitations and optimal imaging conditions for different substrate thicknesses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Counting Tm dopant atoms around GaN dots using high-angle annular dark field images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouvière, J-L; Okuno, H; Jouneau, P H; Bayle-Guillemaud, P; Daudin, B

    2011-01-01

    High resolution Z-contrast STEM imaging is used to study the Tm doping of GaN quantum dots grown in AlN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging allows us to visualize directly individual Tm atoms in the AlN matrix and even to count the number of Tm atoms in a given AlN atomic column. A new visibility coefficient to determine quantitatively the number of Tm atoms in a given atomic column is introduced. It is based on locally integrated intensities rather than on peak intensities of HAADF images. STEM image simulations shows that this new visibility is less sensitive to the defocus-induced blurring or to the position of the Tm atom within the thin lamella. Most of the Tm atoms diffuse out of GaN dots. Tm atoms are found at different positions in the AlN matrix, (i) Above the wetting layer, Tm atoms are spread within a thickness of 14 AlN monolayers (MLs). (ii) Above the quantum dots all the Tm are located in the same plane situated at 2-3 MLs above the apex of the GaN dot, i.e. at a distance of 14 MLs from the wetting layer, (iii) In addition, Tm can diffuse very far from the GaN dot by following threading dislocations lines.

  14. On the analysis of time-of-flight spin-echo modulated dark-field imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Habicht, Klaus; Strobl, Markus

    2017-06-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering with spatial resolution, i.e. quantitative Spin-Echo Dark Field Imaging, is an emerging technique coupling neutron imaging with spatially resolved quantitative small angle scattering information. However, the currently achieved relatively large modulation periods of the order of millimeters are superimposed to the images of the samples. So far this required an independent reduction and analyses of the image and scattering information encoded in the measured data and is involving extensive curve fitting routines. Apart from requiring a priori decisions potentially limiting the information content that is extractable also a straightforward judgment of the data quality and information content is hindered. In contrast we propose a significantly simplified routine directly applied to the measured data, which does not only allow an immediate first assessment of data quality and delaying decisions on potentially information content limiting further reduction steps to a later and better informed state, but also, as results suggest, generally better analyses. In addition the method enables to drop the spatial resolution detector requirement for non-spatially resolved Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

  15. On the analysis of time-of-flight spin-echo modulated dark-field imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Morten; Strobl, Markus; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Habicht, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering with spatial resolution, i.e. quantitative Spin-Echo Dark Field Imaging, is an emerging technique coupling neutron imaging with spatially resolved quantitative small angle scattering information. However, the currently achieved relatively large modulation periods of the order of millimeters are superimposed to the images of the samples. So far this required an independent reduction and analyses of the image and scattering information encoded in the measured data and is involving extensive curve fitting routines. Apart from requiring a priori decisions potentially limiting the information content that is extractable also a straightforward judgment of the data quality and information content is hindered. In contrast we propose a significantly simplified routine directly applied to the measured data, which does not only allow an immediate first assessment of data quality and delaying decisions on potentially information content limiting further reduction steps to a later and better informed state, but also, as results suggest, generally better analyses. In addition the method enables to drop the spatial resolution detector requirement for non-spatially resolved Spin-Echo Modulated Small Angle Neutron Scattering. (paper)

  16. State of the Art of X-ray Speckle-Based Phase-Contrast and Dark-Field Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christine Zdora

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, X-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging have evolved to be invaluable tools for non-destructive sample visualisation, delivering information inaccessible by conventional absorption imaging. X-ray phase-sensing techniques are furthermore increasingly used for at-wavelength metrology and optics characterisation. One of the latest additions to the group of differential phase-contrast methods is the X-ray speckle-based technique. It has drawn significant attention due to its simple and flexible experimental arrangement, cost-effectiveness and multimodal character, amongst others. Since its first demonstration at highly brilliant synchrotron sources, the method has seen rapid development, including the translation to polychromatic laboratory sources and extension to higher-energy X-rays. Recently, different advanced acquisition schemes have been proposed to tackle some of the main limitations of previous implementations. Current applications of the speckle-based method range from optics characterisation and wavefront measurement to biomedical imaging and materials science. This review provides an overview of the state of the art of the X-ray speckle-based technique. Its basic principles and different experimental implementations as well as the the latest advances and applications are illustrated. In the end, an outlook for anticipated future developments of this promising technique is given.

  17. In situ assessment of the renal microcirculation in mechanically ventilated rats using sidestream dark-field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapenko, D; Jor, O; Lehmann, C; Cerny, V

    2015-02-01

    For microcirculation research there is a need for baseline data and feasibility protocols describing microcirculation of various organs. The aim of our study was to examine the reliability and reproducibility of sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging within the renal cortical microcirculation in rats. Renal microcirculation was observed using SDF probe placed on the exposed renal surface via the upper midline laparotomy. Video sequences recorded intermittently in short apneic pauses were analyzed off-line by using AVA 3.0 software (MicroVision Medical, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). Results are expressed as mean (SD) or median (25-75% percentiles). We obtained 60 clear sequences from all recorded analyzable videos from all the animals. The total small vessel and all vessel density (in mm.mm(-2) ) were (28.79 ± 0.40) and (28.95 ± 0.40), respectively. The perfused small and all vessel density were (28.79 ± 0.40) and (28.95 ± 0.40), respectively. The DeBacker Score was (19.14 ± 0.43), the proportion of perfused vessels was 100% (100-100%) and the microvascular flow index was 3.49 (3-3.75). We conclude SDF imaging provides a reliable method to examine the renal microvascular bed in vivo and thus can be used for the study of the renal cortical vascular network in various experimental diseases models and clinical settings. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Dark-field hyperlens for high-contrast sub-wavelength imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    be evanescent in common isotropic media (thus giving rise to the diffraction limit). However, nearly all hyperlenses proposed so far have been suitable only for very strong scatterers – such as holes in a metal film. When weaker scatterers, dielectric objects for example, are imaged then incident light forms...... structure exhibits a cut-off for waves with small transverse wavevectors (low-k waves). This allows the structure to filter out the background illumination, which is contained in low-k waves. We numerically demonstrate that our device achieves superresolution imaging while providing the strong contrast...

  19. X-ray dark-field refraction-contrast imaging of micro-objects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Protopopov, V. V.; Sobota, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 213, 4/6 (2002), s. 267 - 279 ISSN 0030-4018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : X-ray imaging * radiography * refraction Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2002

  20. The role of side stream dark field microvasculature imaging in a rare case of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal endocarditis complicated by heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janak Bechar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sidestream dark field (SDF imaging allows direct visualization of microvascular architecture and function. We examine the role of an SDF imaging device in visualizing the sub-lingual microvasculature as a surrogate for splanchnic microperfusion. We demonstrate good correlation between current monitoring techniques and the SDF imaging device in a rare case of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE sepsis along with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. To the best of our knowledge, VRE endocarditis with concurrent HIT has not been described in literature. The role of SDF imaging may predict the earlier need for escalation of care, improving morbidity and mortality.

  1. The influence of laser scribing on magnetic domain formation in grain oriented electrical steel visualized by directional neutron dark-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, P.; Betz, B.; Hauptmann, J.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-12-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of transformers are directly determined by the bulk magnetic properties of grain oriented electrical steel laminations. The core losses can be improved by post manufacturing methods, so-called domain refinement techniques. All these methods induce mechanical or thermal stress that refines the domain structure. The most commonly used technique is laser scribing due to the no-contact nature and the ease of integration in existing production systems. Here we show how directional neutron dark-field imaging allows visualizing the impact of laser scribing on the bulk and supplementary domain structure. In particular, we investigate the domain formation during magnetization of samples depending on laser treatment parameters such as laser energy and line distances. The directional dark-field imaging findings were quantitatively interpreted in the context with global magnetic hysteresis measurements. Especially we exploit the orientation sensitivity in the dark-field images to distinguish between different domain structures alignment and their relation to the laser scribing process.

  2. Applicability of quantitative optical imaging techniques for intraoperative perfusion diagnostics: a comparison of laser speckle contrast imaging, sidestream dark-field microscopy, and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanne M.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; Dobbe, Iwan J. G. G.; Heeg, Erik; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Strackee, Simon D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2017-08-01

    Patient morbidity and mortality due to hemodynamic complications are a major problem in surgery. Optical techniques can image blood flow in real-time and high-resolution, thereby enabling perfusion monitoring intraoperatively. We tested the feasibility and validity of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and sidestream dark-field microscopy (SDF) for perfusion diagnostics in a phantom model using whole blood. Microvessels with diameters of 50, 100, and 400 μm were constructed in a scattering phantom. Perfusion was simulated by pumping heparinized human whole blood at five velocities (0 to 20 mm/s). Vessel diameter and blood flow velocity were assessed with LSCI, OCT, and SDF. Quantification of vessel diameter was feasible with OCT and SDF. LSCI could only visualize the 400-μm vessel, perfusion units scaled nonlinearly with blood velocity. OCT could assess blood flow velocity in terms of inverse OCT speckle decorrelation time. SDF was not feasible to measure blood flow; however, for diluted blood the measurements were linear with the input velocity up to 1 mm/s. LSCI, OCT, and SDF were feasible to visualize blood flow. Validated blood flow velocity measurements intraoperatively in the desired parameter (mL·g-1) remain challenging.

  3. Quantum Field Theory of Interacting Dark Matter/Dark Energy: Dark Monodromies

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, Guido; Kaloper, Nemanja

    2016-11-28

    We discuss how to formulate a quantum field theory of dark energy interacting with dark matter. We show that the proposals based on the assumption that dark matter is made up of heavy particles with masses which are very sensitive to the value of dark energy are strongly constrained. Quintessence-generated long range forces and radiative stability of the quintessence potential require that such dark matter and dark energy are completely decoupled. However, if dark energy and a fraction of dark matter are very light axions, they can have significant mixings which are radiatively stable and perfectly consistent with quantum field theory. Such models can naturally occur in multi-axion realizations of monodromies. The mixings yield interesting signatures which are observable and are within current cosmological limits but could be constrained further by future observations.

  4. Crystal analyser-based X-ray phase contrast imaging in the dark field: implementation and evaluation using excised tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masami; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Wu, Yanlin; Do, Synho; Sung, Yongjin; Louissaint, Abner; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Ichihara, Shu; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the soft tissue discrimination capability of X-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) using a variety of human tissue specimens. The experimental setup for XDFI comprises an X-ray source, an asymmetrically cut Bragg-type monochromator-collimator (MC), a Laue-case angle analyser (LAA) and a CCD camera. The specimen is placed between the MC and the LAA. For the light source, we used the beamline BL14C on a 2.5-GeV storage ring in the KEK Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan. In the eye specimen, phase contrast images from XDFI were able to discriminate soft-tissue structures, such as the iris, separated by aqueous humour on both sides, which have nearly equal absorption. Superiority of XDFI in imaging soft tissue was further demonstrated with a diseased iliac artery containing atherosclerotic plaque and breast samples with benign and malignant tumours. XDFI on breast tumours discriminated between the normal and diseased terminal duct lobular unit and between invasive and in-situ cancer. X-ray phase, as detected by XDFI, has superior contrast over absorption for soft tissue processes such as atherosclerotic plaque and breast cancer. • X-ray dark field imaging (XDFI) can dramatically increase sensitivity of phase detection. • XDFI can provide enhanced soft tissue discrimination. • With XDFI, abnormal anatomy can be visualised with high spatial/contrast resolution.

  5. Flat-field and Dark Frame Corrections for IRIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, S. H.; Jaeggli, S. A.; Bush, R. I.; Boerner, P.; Wuelser, J.; Tarbell, T. D.; Lites, B. W.; De Pontieu, B.

    2013-12-01

    We discuss the development of flat-field and dark frame corrections for Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) data. Flat-fields for IRIS were taken prior to launch using a lamp filtered to NUV wavelengths; following launch the Sun itself was used as a flat-field source. The solar flat-field for the slit-jaw imagers is constructed using the Chae method, which extracts the moving object and fixed gain patterns from a set of dithered images. The spectrographic flat-fields are produced by significantly defocusing the telescope and averaging many images in a scan to remove solar structure, so that the average spectral profile can be removed. A given dark frame consists of pedestal and dark current components. In IRIS, both are temperature dependent, though they respond to different measured temperatures; the dark current is also exposure time dependent. Each CCD readout port has a slightly different temperature and exposure time response. We have analyzed a series of dark frames over an IRIS orbit to calibrate for these effects. We plan to continue to monitor the flat-field and dark frames regularly for any changes.

  6. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Optical Dark-Field and Electron Energy Loss Imaging and Spectroscopy of Symmetry-Forbidden Modes in Loaded Nanogap Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brintlinger, Todd; Herzing, Andrew A; Long, James P; Vurgaftman, Igor; Stroud, Rhonda; Simpkins, B S

    2015-06-23

    We have produced large numbers of hybrid metal-semiconductor nanogap antennas using a scalable electrochemical approach and systematically characterized the spectral and spatial character of their plasmonic modes with optical dark-field scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy with principal component analysis, and full wave simulations. The coordination of these techniques reveal that these nanostructures support degenerate transverse modes which split due to substrate interactions, a longitudinal mode which scales with antenna length, and a symmetry-forbidden gap-localized transverse mode. This gap-localized transverse mode arises from mode splitting of transverse resonances supported on both antenna arms and is confined to the gap load enabling (i) delivery of substantial energy to the gap material and (ii) the possibility of tuning the antenna resonance via active modulation of the gap material's optical properties. The resonant position of this symmetry-forbidden mode is sensitive to gap size, dielectric strength of the gap material, and is highly suppressed in air-gapped structures which may explain its absence from the literature to date. Understanding the complex modal structure supported on hybrid nanosystems is necessary to enable the multifunctional components many seek.

  8. Dark fluid: A complex scalar field to unify dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbey, Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we examine a model which proposes a common explanation for the presence of additional attractive gravitational effects - generally considered to be due to dark matter - in galaxies and in clusters, and for the presence of a repulsive effect at cosmological scales - generally taken as an indication of the presence of dark energy. We therefore consider the behavior of a so-called dark fluid based on a complex scalar field with a conserved U(1)-charge and associated to a specific potential, and show that it can at the same time account for dark matter in galaxies and in clusters, and agree with the cosmological observations and constraints on dark energy and dark matter

  9. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Harmon

    Full Text Available The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging.

  10. Can dark matter be a scalar field?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, J.F.; Malatrasi, J.L.G. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' Júlio de Mesquita Filho' , Campus Experimental de Itapeva—R. Geraldo Alckmin, 519, Itapeva, SP (Brazil); Pereira, S.H. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' Júlio de Mesquita Filho' , Departamento de Física e Química, Campus de Guaratinguetá, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, 12516-410—Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); Andrade-Oliveira, F., E-mail: jfjesus@itapeva.unesp.br, E-mail: shpereira@gmail.com, E-mail: malatrasi440@gmail.com, E-mail: felipe.oliveira@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Road, PO1 3FX, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a real scalar field as a possible candidate to explain the dark matter in the universe. In the context of a free scalar field with quadratic potential, we have used Union 2.1 SN Ia observational data jointly with a Planck prior over the dark matter density parameter to set a lower limit on the dark matter mass as m ≥0.12 H {sub 0}{sup -1} eV ( c = h-bar =1). For the recent value of the Hubble constant indicated by the Hubble Space Telescope, namely H {sub 0}=73±1.8 km s{sup -1}Mpc{sup -1}, this leads to m ≥1.56×10{sup -33} eV at 99.7% c.l. Such value is much smaller than m ∼ 10{sup -22} eV previously estimated for some models. Nevertheless, it is still in agreement with them once we have not found evidences for a upper limit on the scalar field dark matter mass from SN Ia analysis. In practice, it confirms free real scalar field as a viable candidate for dark matter in agreement with previous studies in the context of density perturbations, which include scalar field self interaction.

  11. Crystal analyser-based X-ray phase contrast imaging in the dark field: implementation and evaluation using excised tissue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masami; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Wu, Yanlin; Do, Synho; Sung, Yongjin; Gupta, Rajiv; Louissaint, Abner; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Ichihara, Shu

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the soft tissue discrimination capability of X-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) using a variety of human tissue specimens. The experimental setup for XDFI comprises an X-ray source, an asymmetrically cut Bragg-type monochromator-collimator (MC), a Laue-case angle analyser (LAA) and a CCD camera. The specimen is placed between the MC and the LAA. For the light source, we used the beamline BL14C on a 2.5-GeV storage ring in the KEK Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan. In the eye specimen, phase contrast images from XDFI were able to discriminate soft-tissue structures, such as the iris, separated by aqueous humour on both sides, which have nearly equal absorption. Superiority of XDFI in imaging soft tissue was further demonstrated with a diseased iliac artery containing atherosclerotic plaque and breast samples with benign and malignant tumours. XDFI on breast tumours discriminated between the normal and diseased terminal duct lobular unit and between invasive and in-situ cancer. X-ray phase, as detected by XDFI, has superior contrast over absorption for soft tissue processes such as atherosclerotic plaque and breast cancer. (orig.)

  12. Crystal analyser-based X-ray phase contrast imaging in the dark field: implementation and evaluation using excised tissue specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Masami [RIST, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Sunaguchi, Naoki [Gunma University, Graduate School of Engineering, Kiryu, Gunma (Japan); Wu, Yanlin [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Department of Materials Structure Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Do, Synho; Sung, Yongjin; Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Louissaint, Abner [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Yuasa, Tetsuya [Yamagata University, Faculty of Engineering, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan); Ichihara, Shu [Nagoya Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We demonstrate the soft tissue discrimination capability of X-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) using a variety of human tissue specimens. The experimental setup for XDFI comprises an X-ray source, an asymmetrically cut Bragg-type monochromator-collimator (MC), a Laue-case angle analyser (LAA) and a CCD camera. The specimen is placed between the MC and the LAA. For the light source, we used the beamline BL14C on a 2.5-GeV storage ring in the KEK Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan. In the eye specimen, phase contrast images from XDFI were able to discriminate soft-tissue structures, such as the iris, separated by aqueous humour on both sides, which have nearly equal absorption. Superiority of XDFI in imaging soft tissue was further demonstrated with a diseased iliac artery containing atherosclerotic plaque and breast samples with benign and malignant tumours. XDFI on breast tumours discriminated between the normal and diseased terminal duct lobular unit and between invasive and in-situ cancer. X-ray phase, as detected by XDFI, has superior contrast over absorption for soft tissue processes such as atherosclerotic plaque and breast cancer. (orig.)

  13. A pre-clinical Talbot-Lau prototype for X-ray dark-field imaging of human-sized objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauke, C; Bartl, P; Leghissa, M; Ritschl, L; Sutter, S M; Weber, T; Zeidler, J; Freudenberger, J; Mertelmeier, T; Radicke, M; Michel, T; Anton, G; Meinel, F G; Baehr, A; Auweter, S; Bondesson, D; Gaass, T; Dinkel, J; Reiser, M; Hellbach, K

    2018-03-26

    Talbot-Lau X-ray interferometry provides information about the scattering and refractive properties of an object { in addition to the object's attenuation features. Until recently, this method was ineligible for imaging human-sized objects as it is challenging to adapt Talbot-Lau interferometers (TLIs) to the relevant X-ray energy ranges. In this work, we present a pre-clinical Talbot-Lau prototype capable of imaging human-sized objects with proper image quality at clinically acceptable dose levels. The TLI is designed to match a setup of clinical relevance as closely as possible. The system provides a scan range of 120X30 cm 2 by using a scanning beam geometry. Its ultimate load is 100 kg. High aspect ratios and fine grid periods of the gratings ensure a reasonable setup length and clinically relevant image quality. The system is installed in a university hospital and is therefore exposed to the external influences of a clinical environment. To demonstrate the system's capabilities, a full-body scan of a euthanized pig was performed. In addition, freshly excised porcine lungs with an extrinsically provoked pneumothorax were mounted into a human thorax phantom and examined with the prototype. Both examination sequences resulted in clinically relevant image quality - even in the case of a skin entrance air kerma of only 0.3mGy which is in the range of human thoracic imaging. The presented case of a pneumothorax and a reader study showed that the prototype's dark-field images provide added value for pulmonary diagnosis. We demonstrated that a dedicated design of a Talbot-Lau interferometer can be applied to medical imaging by constructing a pre-clinical Talbot-Lau prototype. We experienced that the system is feasible for imaging human-sized objects and the phase-stepping approach is suitable for clinical practice. Hence, we conclude that Talbot-Lau X-ray imaging has potential for clinical use and enhances the diagnostic power of medical X-ray imaging. This article is

  14. Conversion of Gravitons into Dark Photons in Cosmological Dark Magnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki, Emi; Soda, Jiro

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that gravitons can convert into photons, and vice versa, in the presence of cosmological magnetic fields. We study this conversion process in the context of atomic dark matter scenario. In this scenario, we can expect cosmological dark magnetic fields, which are free from the stringent constraint from the cosmic microwave observations. We find that gravitons can effectively convert into dark photons in the presence of cosmological dark magnetic fields. The graviton-dark photo...

  15. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also…

  16. Clinical step onward with X-ray dark-field imaging and perspective view of medical applications of synchrotron radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, M.; Hashimoto, E.; Hashizume, H.; Hyodo, K.; Inoue, H.; Kunisada, T.; Maksimenko, A.; Mori, K.; Rubenstein, E.; Roberson, J.; Shimao, D.; Sugiyama, H.; Takeda, K.; Toyofuku, F.; Ueno, E.; Umetani, K.; Wada, H.; Pattanasiriwisawa, W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports, the application of synchrotron radiation to basic medicine at SPring-8 involving instrumentation and medical application of imaging and scattering. Emphasis should be laid on X-ray dark-field imaging (DFI) whose goal is clinical diagnosis of organs that have been invisible by ordinary techniques. Development of this technique is under way both at SPring-8 and KEK. The X-ray optics of DFI comprises a Bragg asymmetric monochro-collimator and a Laue case analyzer with a diffraction index of 440 using the X-ray energy of 35keV (λ=0.0354nm) in a parallel position. This analyzer that can provide with 80mmx80mm view size has 2.15mm thickness. At present the spatial resolution is around 5-10μm. Visibility of some organs such as soft bone tissue at excised human femoral head and breast cancer tissue is under test. This preliminary test shows that the DFI seems feasible in clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, a perspective view of application of synchrotron radiation to clinical medicine in Japan will be given

  17. Scalar field dark matter and the Higgs field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bertolami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility that dark matter corresponds to an oscillating scalar field coupled to the Higgs boson. We argue that the initial field amplitude should generically be of the order of the Hubble parameter during inflation, as a result of its quasi-de Sitter fluctuations. This implies that such a field may account for the present dark matter abundance for masses in the range 10−6–10−4eV, if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is within the range of planned CMB experiments. We show that such mass values can naturally be obtained through either Planck-suppressed non-renormalizable interactions with the Higgs boson or, alternatively, through renormalizable interactions within the Randall–Sundrum scenario, where the dark matter scalar resides in the bulk of the warped extra-dimension and the Higgs is confined to the infrared brane.

  18. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dark Matter, Elko Fields and Weinberg's Quantum Field Theory Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Adam; Martin, Benjamin

    2012-02-01

    The Elko quantum field was introduced by Ahluwalia and Grumiller, who proposed it as a candidate for dark matter. We study the Elko field in Wemberg's formalism for quantum field theory. We prove that if one takes the symmetry group to be the full Pomcaré group then the Elko field is not a quantum field in the sense of Weinberg. This confirms results of Ahluwalia, Lee and Schritt, who showed using a different approach that the Elko field does not transform covariantly under rotations and hence has a preferred axis.

  20. The Dark Energy Survey Image Processing Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, E.; et al.

    2018-01-09

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a five-year optical imaging campaign with the goal of understanding the origin of cosmic acceleration. DES performs a 5000 square degree survey of the southern sky in five optical bands (g,r,i,z,Y) to a depth of ~24th magnitude. Contemporaneously, DES performs a deep, time-domain survey in four optical bands (g,r,i,z) over 27 square degrees. DES exposures are processed nightly with an evolving data reduction pipeline and evaluated for image quality to determine if they need to be retaken. Difference imaging and transient source detection are also performed in the time domain component nightly. On a bi-annual basis, DES exposures are reprocessed with a refined pipeline and coadded to maximize imaging depth. Here we describe the DES image processing pipeline in support of DES science, as a reference for users of archival DES data, and as a guide for future astronomical surveys.

  1. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Colless, Matthew; Coupon, Jean; Cunha, Carlos E.; Frye, Brenda L.; Gawiser, Eric J.; Gehrels, Neil; Grady, Kevin; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Patrick B.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Shirley; Huterer, Dragan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Lahav, Ofer; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Matthews, Daniel J.; Miquel, Ramon; Moniez, Marc; Moos, H. W.; Moustakas, John; Papovich, Casey; Peacock, John A.; Rhodes, Jason; Ricol, Jean-Stepane; Sadeh, Iftach; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Stern, Daniel K.; Tyson, J. Anthony; Von der Linden, Anja; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zentner, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z's): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z's will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our ''training set'' of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ∼30,000 objects over >∼15 widely-separated regions, each at least ∼20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo

  2. The continuous tower of scalar fields as a system of interacting dark matter–dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce a new parameterisation for the coupling Q in interacting dark matter and dark energy models by connecting said models with the Continuous Tower of Scalar Fields model. Based upon the existence of a dark matter and a dark energy sectors in the Continuous Tower of Scalar Fields, a simplification is considered for the evolution of a single scalar field from the tower, validated in this paper. This allows for the results obtained with the Continuous Tower of Scalar Fields model to match those of an interacting dark matter–dark energy system, considering that the energy transferred from one fluid to the other is given by the energy of the scalar fields that start oscillating at a given time, rather than considering that the energy transference depends on properties of the whole fluids that are interacting.

  3. Geometrization of the electromagnetic field and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, I.B.

    2005-01-01

    A general concept of potential field is introduced. The potential field that one puts in correspondence with dark matter, has fundamental geometrical interpretation (parallel transport) and has intrinsically inherent local symmetry. The equations of dark matter field are derived that are invariant with respect to the local transformations. It is shown how to reduce these equations to the Maxwell equations. Thus, the dark matter field may be considered as generalized electromagnetic field and a simple solution of the old problem is given to connect electromagnetic field with geometrical properties of the physical manifold itself. It is shown that gauge fixing renders generalized electromagnetic field effectively massive while the Maxwell electromagnetic field remains massless. To learn more about interactions between matter and dark matter on the microscopical level (and to recognize the fundamental role of internal symmetry) the general covariant Dirac equation is derived in the Minkowski space-time which describes the interactions of spinor field with dark matter field

  4. Development of hard X-ray dark-field microscope using full-field optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hidekazu; Azuma, Hiroaki; Shimomura, Sho; Tsuji, Takuya; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We develop a dark-field X-ray microscope using full-field optics based on a synchrotron beamline. Our setup consists of a condenser system and a microscope objective with an angular acceptance larger than that of the condenser. The condenser system is moved downstream from its regular position such that the focus of the condenser is behind the objective. The dark-field microscope optics are configured by excluding the converging beam from the condenser at the focal point. The image properties of the system are evaluated by observing and calculating a Siemens star test chart with 10 keV X-rays. Our setup allows easy switching to bright-field imaging. (author)

  5. Individual analysis of inter and intragrain defects in electrically characterized polycrystalline silicon nanowire TFTs by multicomponent dark-field imaging based on nanobeam electron diffraction two-dimensional mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Takanori; Takaishi, Riichiro; Oda, Minoru; Sakuma, Kiwamu; Saitoh, Masumi; Tanaka, Hiroki

    2018-04-01

    We visualize the grain structures for individual nanosized thin film transistors (TFTs), which are electrically characterized, with an improved data processing technique for the dark-field image reconstruction of nanobeam electron diffraction maps. Our individual crystal analysis gives the one-to-one correspondence of TFTs with different grain boundary structures, such as random and coherent boundaries, to the characteristic degradations of ON-current and threshold voltage. Furthermore, the local crystalline uniformity inside a single grain is detected as the difference in diffraction intensity distribution.

  6. Geometrization of the Electromagnetic Field and Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pestov, I B

    2005-01-01

    A general concept of potential field is introduced. The potential field that one puts in correspondence with dark matter, has fundamental geometrical interpretation (parallel transport) and has intrinsically inherent local symmetry. The equations of dark matter field are derived that are invariant with respect to the local transformations. It is shown how to reduce these equations to the Maxwell equations. Thus, the dark matter field may be considered as generalized lectromagnetic field and a simple solution of the old problem is given to connect electromagnetic field with geometrical properties of the physical manifold itself. It is shown that gauge fixing renders generalized electromagnetic field effectively massive while the Maxwell electromagnetic field remains massless. To learn more about interactions between matter and dark matter on the microscopical level (and to recognize the fundamental role of internal symmetry) the general covariant Dirac equation is derived in the Minkowski space--time which des...

  7. N7 dark field two-bar in 0.33NA EUVL: Mitigation of CD Bossung tilts caused by strong coupling between the feature's primary and 1st self-image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, T.; van Adrichem, P.; de Winter, L.; Hsu, S.; Finders, J.; Wittebrood, F.; van de Kerkhof, M.

    2017-03-01

    We report a study into intensity-driven mask 3D effects for N7 dark field two-bars in EUVL. For these features, traditional pupil optimization "rules" are advising to center a symmetric leaf shape illumination at the pupil plane location σY = (-0.64, 0.64). Experimentally determined critical dimension Bossungs for this exposure condition however yield an extreme best focus separation due to an additional Bossung tilt appearing at defocus values beyond 20 nm for the bottom trench. The Bossung tilts are caused by a strong coupling between the primary image of the two-bar and its first local pitch-induced self-image. The coupling to the self-image can be suppressed and, hence, the overlapping process window can be enhanced by the application of asymmetric sources, or by using standard dipole 90Y or leaf shape illuminations in combination with optimally placed sub-resolution assist features.

  8. Dynamical and gravitational instability of an oscillating-field dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Coherent oscillations of a scalar field can mimic the behavior of a perfect fluid with an equation-of-state parameter determined by the properties of the potential, possibly driving accelerated expansion in the early Universe (inflation) and/or in the Universe today (dark energy) or behaving as dark matter. We consider the growth of inhomogeneities in such a field, mapping the problem to that of two coupled anharmonic oscillators. We provide a simple physical argument that oscillating fields with a negative equation-of-state parameter possess a large-scale dynamical instability to growth of inhomogeneities. This instability renders these models unsuitable for explaining cosmic acceleration. We then consider the gravitational instability of oscillating fields in potentials that are close to, but not precisely, harmonic. We use these results to show that if axions make up the dark matter, then the small-scale cutoff in the matter power spectrum is around 10 -15 M + .

  9. X-ray dark-field interface radiography; Roentgen-Interface-Radiographie im Dunkelfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupsch, Andreas; Hentschel, Manfred P.; Lange, Axel; Mueller, Bernd R. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    This article presents an X-ray imaging method for weakly absorbing objects which makes use of the contrast effects created by X-ray refraction at surfaces and interfaces. A slightly curved monocrystal in which the Bragg condition is met locally in a small zone of the irradiated cross-section is used to generate what is referred to as a dark field. Beam components deflected by refraction within this zone appear as brightly luminant structures. Biological and technical structures are used as examples in creating 2D high-resolution images from the synthesis of several dark-field stripes.

  10. Constraining scalar fields with stellar kinematics and collisional dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    The existence and detection of scalar fields could provide solutions to long-standing puzzles about the nature of dark matter, the dark compact objects at the centre of most galaxies, and other phenomena. Yet, self-interacting scalar fields are very poorly constrained by astronomical observations, leading to great uncertainties in estimates of the mass m φ and the self-interacting coupling constant λ of these fields. To counter this, we have systematically employed available astronomical observations to develop new constraints, considerably restricting this parameter space. In particular, by exploiting precise observations of stellar dynamics at the centre of our Galaxy and assuming that these dynamics can be explained by a single boson star, we determine an upper limit for the boson star compactness and impose significant limits on the values of the properties of possible scalar fields. Requiring the scalar field particle to follow a collisional dark matter model further narrows these constraints. Most importantly, we find that if a scalar dark matter particle does exist, then it cannot account for both the dark-matter halos and the existence of dark compact objects in galactic nuclei

  11. Potential use of microbubbles (MBs) as contrast material in x-ray dark field (DF) imaging: How does the DF signal change with the characteristic parameters of the MBs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ran; Qin, Bin; Ge, Yongshuai; Whiting, Bruce; Li, Ke; Villanueva, Flordeliza; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    One of the most exciting aspects of the grating based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) acquisition method is the concurrent generation of the so-called dark field (DF) signal, along with the classical absorption signal and the novel DPC signal. The DF signal is associated with local distribution of small angle scatterers in an image object, while the absorption signal and DPC signal are often used to characterize the relatively uniform structure of the image object. Besides the endogenous image contrast, exogenous contrast media are often used in x-ray imaging to locally enhance the image signal. This paper proposes a potential contrast medium for DF signal enhancement: microbubbles (MBs). MBs have already been developed for clinical use in ultrasound imaging, and recent experimental studies have shown that MBs may also enhance the DF signal, although it remained unclear how the physical characteristics of the MBs quantitatively impact the DF signal. In this paper, a systematic study was performed to investigate the quantitative relationships between the DF signal and the following properties of MBs: size, concentration, shell thickness, size uniformity, and whether gold nanoparticles were attached. The experimental results demonstrated that, an increased MB size (about 4 microns) may generate a stronger DF signal for our DPC imaging system; additionally, a moderately increased shell thickness and the use of gold nanoparticles on the shell surface also resulted in further enhancement of the DF signal. These findings may provide critical information needed for using MBs as the contrast agent of x-ray DF imaging.

  12. Quantum Fields, Dark Matter and Non-Standard Wigner Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, A. B.; Martin, B. M. S.

    2010-12-01

    The Elko field of Ahluwalia and Grumiller is a quantum field for massive spin-1/2 particles. It has been suggested as a candidate for dark matter. We discuss our attempts to interpret the Elko field as a quantum field in the sense of Weinberg. Our work suggests that one should investigate quantum fields based on representations of the full Poincaré group which belong to one of the non-standard Wigner classes.

  13. Dipolar dark matter as an effective field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2017-10-01

    Dipolar dark matter is an alternative model motivated by the challenges faced by the standard cold dark matter model to describe the right phenomenology at galactic scales. A promising realization of dipolar dark matter was recently proposed in the context of massive bigravity theory. The model contains dark matter particles as well as a vector field coupled to the effective composite metric of bigravity. This model is completely safe in the gravitational sector thanks to the underlying properties of massive bigravity. In this work, we investigate the exact decoupling limit of the theory, including the contribution of the matter sector, and prove that it is free of ghosts in this limit. We conclude that the theory is acceptable as an effective field theory below the strong coupling scale.

  14. Quantitative X-ray dark-field and phase tomography using single directional speckle scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongchang, E-mail: hongchang.wang@diamond.ac.uk; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-21

    X-ray dark-field contrast tomography can provide important supplementary information inside a sample to the conventional absorption tomography. Recently, the X-ray speckle based technique has been proposed to provide qualitative two-dimensional dark-field imaging with a simple experimental arrangement. In this letter, we deduce a relationship between the second moment of scattering angle distribution and cross-correlation degradation of speckle and establish a quantitative basis of X-ray dark-field tomography using single directional speckle scanning technique. In addition, the phase contrast images can be simultaneously retrieved permitting tomographic reconstruction, which yields enhanced contrast in weakly absorbing materials. Such complementary tomography technique can allow systematic investigation of complex samples containing both soft and hard materials.

  15. Automated imaging dark adaptometer for investigating hereditary retinal degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Dario F. G.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Regunath, Gopalakrishnan; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    1995-05-01

    We designed and built an automated imaging dark adaptometer (AIDA) to increase accuracy, reliability, versatility and speed of dark adaptation testing in patients with hereditary retinal degenerations. AIDA increases test accuracy by imaging the ocular fundus for precise positioning of bleaching and stimulus lights. It improves test reliability by permitting continuous monitoring of patient fixation. Software control of stimulus presentation provides broad testing versatility without sacrificing speed. AIDA promises to facilitate the measurement of dark adaptation in studies of the pathophysiology of retinal degenerations and in future treatment trials of these diseases.

  16. Mapping misoriented fibers using X-ray dark field tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal; Feidenhans’l, Robert

    2014-01-01

    such tomograms on a highly nonisotropic sample, i.e. a five layer “sandwich” of oriented carbon fibers. The fibers are parallel within the individual sandwich layers, but perpendicular to the fibers in the adjacent layers. We show that by choosing a rotation axis parallel to the grating stepping direction (i.......e. a horizontal rotation axis in most setup configurations) it is possible to produce a darkfield tomogram where fibers parallel to the probed scattering direction appear to have no dark field signal. The method produces a tomogram in the form of a scalar field of dark field scattering values....

  17. The cosmological dark sector as a scalar σ -meson field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Saulo

    2018-03-01

    Previous quantum field estimations of the QCD vacuum in the expanding space-time lead to a dark energy component scaling linearly with the Hubble parameter, which gives the correct figure for the observed cosmological term. Here we show that this behaviour also appears at the classical level, as a result of the chiral symmetry breaking in a low energy, effective σ -model. The dark sector is described in a unified way by the σ condensate and its fluctuations, giving rise to a decaying dark energy and a homogeneous creation of non-relativistic dark particles. The creation rate and the future asymptotic de Sitter horizon are both determined by the σ mass scale.

  18. Extraction of Dysprosium Ions with DTPA Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Probed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and TEM/High-Angle Annular Dark Field Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fernando Menegatti de; Almeida, Sabrina da Nobrega; Uezu, Noemi Saori; Ramirez, Carlos Alberto Ospina; Santos, Antonio Domingues Dos; Toma, Henrique Eisi

    2018-06-01

    The extraction of dysprosium (Dy3+) ions from aqueous solution was carried out successfully, using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (MagNP@DTPA). The process was monitored by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of concentration, proceeding according to a Langmuir isotherm with an equilibrium constant of 2.57 × 10-3 g(MagNP) L-1 and a saturation limit of 63.2 mgDy/gMagNP. The presence of paramagnetic Dy3+ ions attached to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles led to an overall decrease of magnetization. By imaging the nanoparticles surface using scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high resolution elemental analysis, it was possible to probe the binding of the Dy3+ ions to DTPA, and to show their distribution in a region of negative magnetic field gradients. This finding is coherent with the observed decrease of magnetization, associated with the antiferromagnetic coupling between the lanthanide ions and the Fe3O4 core.

  19. Dark Matter Detection Using Helium Evaporation and Field Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey J.; Seidel, George M.; Stein, Derek

    2017-11-01

    We describe a method for dark matter detection based on the evaporation of helium atoms from a cold surface and their subsequent detection using field ionization. When a dark matter particle scatters off a nucleus of the target material, elementary excitations (phonons or rotons) are produced. Excitations which have an energy greater than the binding energy of helium to the surface can result in the evaporation of helium atoms. We propose to detect these atoms by ionizing them in a strong electric field. Because the binding energy of helium to surfaces can be below 1 meV, this detection scheme opens up new possibilities for the detection of dark matter particles in a mass range down to 1 MeV /c2 .

  20. Dark Matter Detection Using Helium Evaporation and Field Ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey J; Seidel, George M; Stein, Derek

    2017-11-03

    We describe a method for dark matter detection based on the evaporation of helium atoms from a cold surface and their subsequent detection using field ionization. When a dark matter particle scatters off a nucleus of the target material, elementary excitations (phonons or rotons) are produced. Excitations which have an energy greater than the binding energy of helium to the surface can result in the evaporation of helium atoms. We propose to detect these atoms by ionizing them in a strong electric field. Because the binding energy of helium to surfaces can be below 1 meV, this detection scheme opens up new possibilities for the detection of dark matter particles in a mass range down to 1  MeV/c^{2}.

  1. Quantitative Assessment of Fat Levels in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Dark Field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Fouad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model for studying conserved pathways for fat storage, aging, and metabolism. The most broadly used methods for imaging fat in C. elegans require fixing and staining the animal. Here, we show that dark field images acquired through an ordinary light microscope can be used to estimate fat levels in worms. We define a metric based on the amount of light scattered per area, and show that this light scattering metric is strongly correlated with worm fat levels as measured by Oil Red O (ORO staining across a wide variety of genetic backgrounds and feeding conditions. Dark field imaging requires no exogenous agents or chemical fixation, making it compatible with live worm imaging. Using our method, we track fat storage with high temporal resolution in developing larvae, and show that fat storage in the intestine increases in at least one burst during development.

  2. HST Imaging of the (Almost) Dark ALFALFA Source AGC 229385

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, Samantha; Salzer, John Joseph; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Janowiecki, Steven; Leisman, Luke; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Cannon, John M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2017-06-01

    We present deep HST imaging photometry of the extreme galaxy AGC 229385. This system was first discovered as an HI source in the ALFALFA all-sky HI survey. It was cataloged as an (almost) dark galaxy because it did not exhibit any obvious optical counterpart in the available wide-field survey data (e.g., SDSS). Deep optical imaging with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope revealed an ultra-low surface brightness stellar component located at the center of the HI detection. With a peak central surface brightness of 26.4 mag/sq. arcsec in g and very blue colors (g-r = -0.1), the stellar component to this gas-rich system is quite enigmatic. We have used our HST images to produce a deep CMD of the resolved stellar population present in AGC 229385. We clearly detect a red-giant branch and use it to infer a distance of 5.50 ± 0.23 Mpc. The CMD is dominated by older stars, contrary to expectations given the blue optical colors obtained from our ground-based photometry. Our new distance is substantially lower than earlier estimates, and shows that AGC 229385 is an extreme dwarf galaxy with one of the highest MHI/L ratios known.

  3. Dark matter deprivation in the field elliptical galaxy NGC 7507

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Richard R.; Salinas, Ricardo; Richtler, Tom

    2015-02-01

    Context. Previous studies have shown that the kinematics of the field elliptical galaxy NGC 7507 do not necessarily require dark matter. This is troubling because, in the context of ΛCDM cosmologies, all galaxies should have a large dark matter component. Aims: Our aims are to determine the rotation and velocity dispersion profile out to larger radii than do previous studies, and, therefore, more accurately estimate of the dark matter content of the galaxy. Methods: We use penalised pixel-fitting software to extract velocities and velocity dispersions from GMOS slit mask spectra. Using Jeans and MONDian modelling, we then produce models with the goal of fitting the velocity dispersion data. Results: NGC 7507 has a two-component stellar halo, with the outer halo counter rotating with respect to the inner halo, with a kinematic boundary at a radius of ~110'' (~12.4 kpc). The velocity dispersion profile exhibits an increase at ~70'' (~7.9 kpc), reminiscent of several other elliptical galaxies. Our best fit models are those under mild anisotropy, which include ~100 times less dark matter than predicted by ΛCDM, although mildly anisotropic models that are completely dark matter free fit the measured dynamics almost equally well. Our MONDian models, both isotropic and anisotropic, systematically fail to reproduce the measured velocity dispersions at almost all radii. Conclusions: The counter-rotating outer halo implies a merger remnant, as does the increase in velocity dispersion at ~70''. From simulations it seems plausible that the merger that caused the increase in velocity dispersion was a spiral-spiral merger. Our Jeans models are completely consistent with a no dark matter scenario, however, some dark matter can be accommodated, although at much lower concentrations than predicted by ΛCDM simulations. This indicates that NGC 7507 may be a dark matter free elliptical galaxy. Regardless of whether NGC 7507 is completely dark matter free or very dark matter poor

  4. On a dark-field signal generated by micrometer-sized calcifications in phase-contrast mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Jürgen; Pelzer, Georg; Ritter, André; Weber, Thomas; Zang, Andrea; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Rauh, Claudia; Haas, Wilhelm; Radicke, Marcus; Sievers, Peter; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Uder, Michael; Wenkel, Evelyn; Wachter, David L

    2013-01-01

    We show that a distribution of micrometer-sized calcifications in the human breast which are not visible in clinical x-ray mammography at diagnostic dose levels can produce a significant dark-field signal in a grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup with a tungsten anode x-ray tube operated at 40 kVp. A breast specimen with invasive ductal carcinoma was investigated immediately after surgery by Talbot–Lau x-ray interferometry with a design energy of 25 keV. The sample contained two tumors which were visible in ultrasound and contrast-agent enhanced MRI but invisible in clinical x-ray mammography, in specimen radiography and in the attenuation images obtained with the Talbot–Lau interferometer. One of the tumors produced significant dark-field contrast with an exposure of 0.85 mGy air-kerma. Staining of histological slices revealed sparsely distributed grains of calcium phosphate with sizes varying between 1 and 40 μm in the region of this tumor. By combining the histological investigations with an x-ray wave-field simulation we demonstrate that a corresponding distribution of grains of calcium phosphate in the form of hydroxylapatite has the ability to produce a dark-field signal which would—to a substantial degree—explain the measured dark-field image. Thus we have found the appearance of new information (compared to attenuation and differential phase images) in the dark-field image. The second tumor in the same sample did not contain a significant fraction of these very fine calcification grains and was invisible in the dark-field image. We conclude that some tumors which are invisible in x-ray absorption mammography might be detected in the x-ray dark-field image at tolerable dose levels. (paper)

  5. Disformal scalar fields and the dark sector of the universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumalacárregui, M.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P. [Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Koivisto, T.S. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and the Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Mota, D.F., E-mail: miguelzuma@am.ub.es, E-mail: t.s.koivisto@uu.nl, E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no, E-mail: pilar@am.ub.es [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-05-01

    Disformal transformations have proven to be very useful to devise models of the dark sector. In the present paper we apply such transformation to a single scalar field theory as a way to drive the field into a slow roll phase. The canonical scalar field Lagrangian, when coupled to a disformal metric, turns out to have relations to bimetric dark matter theories and to describe many specific dark energy models at various limits, thus providing a surprisingly simple parametrisation of a wide variety of models including tachyon, Chaplygin gas, K-essence and dilatonic ghost condensate. We investigate the evolution of the background and linear perturbations in disformal quintessence in order to perform a full comparison of the predictions with the cosmological data. The dynamics of the expansion, in particular the mechanism of the transition to accelerating phase, is described in detail. We then study the effects of disformal quintessence on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and large scale structures (LSS). A likelihood analysis using the latest data on wide-ranging SNIa, CMB and LSS observations is performed allowing variations in six cosmological parameters and the two parameters specifying the model. We find that while a large region of parameter space remains compatible with observations, models featuring either too much early dark energy or too slow transition to acceleration are ruled out.

  6. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  7. Non-invasive Differentiation of Kidney Stone Types using X-ray Dark-Field Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Kai; Braig, Eva; Willer, Konstantin; Willner, Marian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Eiber, Matthias; Haller, Bernhard; Straub, Michael; Schneider, Heike; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of renal calculi is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the stone in question, which is difficult to determine using standard imaging techniques. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of scatter-sensitive X-ray dark-field radiography to differentiate between the most common types of kidney stones in clinical practice. Here, we examine the absorption-to-scattering ratio of 118 extracted kidney stones with a laboratory Talbot-Lau Interferometer. Depending on their chemical composition, microscopic growth structure and morphology the various types of kidney stones show strongly varying, partially opposite contrasts in absorption and dark-field imaging. By assessing the microscopic calculi morphology with high resolution micro-computed tomography measurements, we illustrate the dependence of dark-field signal strength on the respective stone type. Finally, we utilize X-ray dark-field radiography as a non-invasive, highly sensitive (100%) and specific (97%) tool for the differentiation of calcium oxalate, uric acid and mixed types of stones, while additionally improving the detectability of radio-lucent calculi. We prove clinical feasibility of the here proposed method by accurately classifying renal stones, embedded within a fresh pig kidney, using dose-compatible measurements and a quick and simple visual inspection. PMID:25873414

  8. GRAVITATIONAL IMAGING BY ELLIPTIC GALAXIES - THE EFFECTS OF DARK HALOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREIMER, TG; SANDERS, RH

    It has been claimed that some gravitational lenses in which a background quasar is multiply-imaged by a single foreground galaxy support the existence of dark massive halos in elliptical galaxies. We reexamine this claim by considering the lensing effects of spherical galaxies with and without a

  9. Kinematics of radion field: a possible source of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta [IUCAA, Pune (India); SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2016-12-15

    The discrepancy between observed virial and baryonic mass in galaxy clusters have lead to the missing mass problem. To resolve this, a new, non-baryonic matter field, known as dark matter, has been invoked. However, till date no possible constituents of the dark matter components are known. This has led to various models, by modifying gravity at large distances to explain the missing mass problem. The modification to gravity appears very naturally when effective field theory on a lower-dimensional manifold, embedded in a higher-dimensional spacetime is considered. It has been shown that in a scenario with two lower-dimensional manifolds separated by a finite distance is capable to address the missing mass problem, which in turn determines the kinematics of the brane separation. Consequences for galactic rotation curves are also described. (orig.)

  10. Higgs particles interacting via a scalar Dark Matter field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Yajnavalkya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a system of two Higgs particles, interacting via a scalar Dark Matter mediating field. The variational method in the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT is used to derive relativistic wave equations for the two-Higgs system, using a truncated Fock-space trial state. Approximate solutions of the two-body equations are used to examine the existence of Higgs bound states.

  11. Detecting early stage pressure ulcer on dark skin using multispectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Dingrong; Kong, Linghua; Sprigle, Stephen; Wang, Fengtao; Wang, Chao; Liu, Fuhan; Adibi, Ali; Tummala, Rao

    2010-02-01

    We are developing a handheld multispectral imaging device to non-invasively inspect stage I pressure ulcers in dark pigmented skins without the need of touching the patient's skin. This paper reports some preliminary test results of using a proof-of-concept prototype. It also talks about the innovation's impact to traditional multispectral imaging technologies and the fields that will potentially benefit from it.

  12. Dark Energy Studies with LSST Image Simulations, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, John Russell [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-07-26

    This grant funded the development and dissemination of the Photon Simulator (PhoSim) for the purpose of studying dark energy at high precision with the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) astronomical survey. The work was in collaboration with the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC). Several detailed physics improvements were made in the optics, atmosphere, and sensor, a number of validation studies were performed, and a significant number of usability features were implemented. Future work in DESC will use PhoSim as the image simulation tool for data challenges used by the analysis groups.

  13. A Note on Equivalence Among Various Scalar Field Models of Dark Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Jyotirmay Das; Debnath, Ujjal

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we have tried to find out similarities between various available models of scalar field dark energies (e.g., quintessence, k-essence, tachyon, phantom, quintom, dilatonic dark energy, etc). We have defined an equivalence relation from elementary set theory between scalar field models of dark energies and used fundamental ideas from linear algebra to set up our model. Consequently, we have obtained mutually disjoint subsets of scalar field dark energies with similar properties and discussed our observation.

  14. Sidestream dark field images of the microcirculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sandra M; Greisen, Gorm; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon

    2014-01-01

    by the same blinded observer using validated software. Vessels were detected, generating the parameter Total Vessel Density (TVD), and flow was determined by (i) classifying each vessel separately, generating the parameters Perfused Vessel Density (PVD) and Proportion of Perfused Vessels (PPV), and by (ii...... than for PVD (ICC = 0.89, p

  15. Dark-matter-like solutions to Einstein's unified field equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meter, J. R.

    2018-02-01

    Einstein originally proposed a nonsymmetric tensor field, with its symmetric part associated with the spacetime metric and its antisymmetric part associated with the electromagnetic field, as an approach to a unified field theory. Here we interpret it more modestly as an alternative to Einstein-Maxwell theory, approximating the coupling between the electromagnetic field and spacetime curvature in the macroscopic classical regime. Previously it was shown that the Lorentz force can be derived from this theory, albeit with deviation on the scale of a universal length constant ℓ. Here we assume that ℓ is of galactic scale and show that the modified coupling of the electromagnetic field with charged particles allows a non-Maxwellian equilibrium of non-neutral plasma. The resulting electromagnetic field is "dark" in the sense that its modified Lorentz force on the plasma vanishes, yet through its modified coupling to the gravitational field it engenders a nonvanishing, effective mass density. We obtain a solution for which this mass density asymptotes approximately to that of the pseudoisothermal model of dark matter. The resulting gravitational field produces radial acceleration, in the context of a post-Minkowskian approximation, which is negligible at small radius but yields a flat rotation curve at large radius. We further exhibit a family of such solutions which, like the pseudoisothermal model, has a free parameter to set the mass scale (in this case related to the charge density) and a free parameter to set the length scale (in this case an integer multiple of ℓ). Moreover, these solutions are members of a larger family with more general angular and radial dependence. They thus show promise as approximations of generalized pseudoisothermal models, which in turn are known to fit a wide range of mass density profiles for galaxies and clusters.

  16. Jet Definitions in Effective Field Theory and Decaying Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, William Man Yin

    2012-06-01

    In this thesis jet production and cosmological constraints on decaying dark matter are studied. The powerful framework of effective field theory is applied in both cases to further our knowledge of particle physics. We first discuss how to apply the Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) for calculating hadronic jet production rate. By applying SCET power counting, we develop a consistent approach to perform phase space integrations. This approach is then successfully applied to one-loop calculations with regard to a variety of jet algorithms. This allows us to study if the soft contribution can be factorized from the collinear ones. In particular we point out the connection between such factorization and the choice of ultraviolet regulator. We then further our study of the (exclusive) kT and C/A jet algorithms in SCET with the introduction of an additional regulator. Regularizing the virtualities and rapidities of graphs in SCET, we are able to write the next-to-leading-order dijet cross section as the product of separate hard, jet, and soft contributions. We show how to reproduce the Sudakov form factor to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy previously calculated by the coherent branching formalism. Our resummed expression only depends on the renormalization group evolution of the hard function, rather than on that of the hard and jet functions as is usual in SCET. Finally we present a complete analysis of the cosmological constraints on decaying dark matter. For this, we have updated and extended previous analyses to include Lyman-alpha forest, large scale structure, and weak lensing observations. Astrophysical constraints are not considered in this thesis. The bounds on the lifetime of decaying dark matter are dominated by either the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect for the scenario with weak reionization, or CMB polarisation observations when there is significant reionization. For the respective scenarios, the lifetimes for decaying dark matter are

  17. Scalar field dark matter: behavior around black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Osorio, Alejandro; Guzmán, F. Siddhartha; Lora-Clavijo, Fabio D., E-mail: alejandro@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: guzman@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: fadulora@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Cd. Universitaria, 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2011-06-01

    We present the numerical evolution of a massive test scalar fields around a Schwarzschild space-time. We proceed by using hyperboloidal slices that approach future null infinity, which is the boundary of scalar fields, and also demand the slices to penetrate the event horizon of the black hole. This approach allows the scalar field to be accreted by the black hole and to escape toward future null infinity. We track the evolution of the energy density of the scalar field, which determines the rate at which the scalar field is being diluted. We find polynomial decay of the energy density of the scalar field, and use it to estimate the rate of dilution of the field in time. Our findings imply that the energy density of the scalar field decreases even five orders of magnitude in time scales smaller than a year. This implies that if a supermassive black hole is the Schwarzschild solution, then scalar field dark matter would be diluted extremely fast.

  18. Scalar field dark matter: behavior around black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Osorio, Alejandro; Guzmán, F. Siddhartha; Lora-Clavijo, Fabio D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the numerical evolution of a massive test scalar fields around a Schwarzschild space-time. We proceed by using hyperboloidal slices that approach future null infinity, which is the boundary of scalar fields, and also demand the slices to penetrate the event horizon of the black hole. This approach allows the scalar field to be accreted by the black hole and to escape toward future null infinity. We track the evolution of the energy density of the scalar field, which determines the rate at which the scalar field is being diluted. We find polynomial decay of the energy density of the scalar field, and use it to estimate the rate of dilution of the field in time. Our findings imply that the energy density of the scalar field decreases even five orders of magnitude in time scales smaller than a year. This implies that if a supermassive black hole is the Schwarzschild solution, then scalar field dark matter would be diluted extremely fast

  19. Dark field X-ray microscopy for studies of recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahl, Sonja Rosenlund; Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen

    2015-01-01

    We present the recently developed technique of Dark Field X-Ray Microscopy that utilizes the diffraction of hard X-rays from individual grains or subgrains at the (sub)micrometre- scale embedded within mm-sized samples. By magnifying the diffracted signal, 3D mapping of orientations and strains...... inside the selected grain is performed with an angular resolution of 0:005o and a spatial resolution of 200 nm. Furthermore, the speed of the measurements at high- intensity synchrotron facilities allows for fast non-destructive in situ determination of structural changes induced by annealing or other...

  20. HST images of dark giants as dark matter: Part.I The black cocoon stars of Carina Nebula region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celis, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    In an evolutionary scenario, the existence of isolated dark giant objects known as Post M latest spectral type stars (1) (or black cocoon stars) are in the last stage of their life and, as extremely advanced old age objects, they cease to be stars. The photographic images of Carina nebula taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have been used to detect the post M-Iatest stars as dark silhouettes. The luminosity attenuation equation of M late stars (1), A = αS 3 , points out the baryonic dark matter envelopes the oldest red giants that produce earlier dark giants. This equation says that when the red giant star finishes to produce baryonic dark matter, the central star is extinguishing and transforms into dark giants and dusty globules that disperse cool gaseous matter into the interstellar space. These old dark objects have a size from 400 to 600 astronomical units (AU). The advanced dark giants, the dusty dark giants, might not contain a star within the molecular cloud that envelops it. In this case, the dark giants might produce the smaller and less massive dark globules of the Thackeray's globules type (less than 4 solar masses) where, Reupurth et al. (2) found that these globules are now in an advanced stage of disintegration and they found no evidence of star formation in any of these objects. The high-resolution of the Hubble images allows: The observation of isolated dark giants, dusty globules with central dark giants, the observation of partial eclipses or transiting of giant stars and the estimation of linear and angular diameters (ionised cocoons) of giant stellar objects. The dark giants of the image are identified them as objects with observed angular diameter. The large quantity of dark giants in a small sector of the sky suggests that they are densely populated (population stars III) and ubiquitous in the galactic disc. They can be located in isolated form or associated in dense Conglomerations of dark giants. At the same time, conglomerates of

  1. Visualization of neonatal lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation using x-ray dark-field radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Pritzke, Tina; Koschlig, Markus; Kamgari, Nona; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz; Hilgendorff, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and supplementation of oxygen-enriched gas, often needed in postnatal resuscitation procedures, are known to be main risk factors for impaired pulmonary development in the preterm and term neonates. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities lack in sensitivity for the detection of early stage lung injury. The present study reports a new imaging approach for diagnosis and staging of early lung injury induced by MV and hyperoxia in neonatal mice. The imaging method is based on the Talbot-Lau x-ray grating interferometry that makes it possible to quantify the x-ray small-angle scattering on the air-tissue interfaces. This so-called dark-field signal revealed increasing loss of x-ray small-angle scattering when comparing images of neonatal mice undergoing hyperoxia and MV-O2 with animals kept at room air. The changes in the dark field correlated well with histologic findings and provided superior differentiation than conventional x-ray imaging and lung function testing. The results suggest that x-ray dark-field radiography is a sensitive tool for assessing structural changes in the developing lung. In the future, with further technical developments x-ray dark-field imaging could be an important tool for earlier diagnosis and sensitive monitoring of lung injury in neonates requiring postnatal oxygen or ventilator therapy.

  2. Pulmonary emphysema diagnosis using a preclinical small-animal X-ray dark-field scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Meinel, Felix; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian [Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Muenchen (Germany); Bohla, Alexander; Yildirim, Ali Oender; Eickelberg, Oliver [Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide that is difficult to detect using conventional x-ray radiographic methods. For emphysematous lungs with enlarged distal airspaces, x-ray scattering decreases and transmission increases, as has been demonstrated by the proof-of-principle experiments with brilliant x-rays from a synchrotron source. Therefore, combination of the transmission and dark-field signals leads to a novel diagnostic approach for pulmonary emphysema. In this study, images of excised murine lungs with pulmonary emphysema and control lungs were acquired using a compact phase- and dark-field scanner with a polychromatic source and a cone-beam geometry. The data analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups in the per-pixel scatter plot. The main difference was observed in the angle of the distribution to the vertical. The presented study reveals the high potential of the approach for the pulmonary emphysema diagnosis.

  3. arXiv Supplying Dark Energy from Scalar Field Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    We consider the hypothesis that dark matter and dark energy consists of ultra-light self-interacting scalar particles. It is found that the Klein-Gordon equation with only two free parameters (mass and self-coupling) on a Schwarzschild background, at the galactic length-scales has the solution which corresponds to Bose-Einstein condensate, behaving as dark matter, while the constant solution at supra-galactic scales can explain dark energy.

  4. Noise reduction in CCD measurements by improving the quality of dark-reference images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Tobias; Tatlock, Gordon J

    2018-02-13

    This publication is a systematic investigation of the effect the improvement of dark-reference images has on the resulting bright-field images. For this, data were acquired with three different charge-coupled device cameras attached to two different transmission electron microscopes. Multi-frame acquisitions and methods to correct x-ray noise are introduced and quantified as options to improve the dark-reference images. Furthermore, the influence of x-ray noise on transmission electron microscopy measurements is discussed and observations on its composition are shared. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Precision Higgs Physics, Effective Field Theory, and Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Brian Quinn

    The recent discovery of the Higgs boson calls for detailed studies of its properties. As precision measurements are indirect probes of new physics, the appropriate theoretical framework is effective field theory. In the first part of this thesis, we present a practical three-step procedure of using the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) to connect ultraviolet (UV) models of new physics with weak scale precision observables. With this procedure, one can interpret precision measurements as constraints on the UV model concerned. We give a detailed explanation for calculating the effective action up to one-loop order in a manifestly gauge covariant fashion. The covariant derivative expansion dramatically simplifies the process of matching a UV model with the SM EFT, and also makes available a universal formalism that is easy to use for a variety of UV models. A few general aspects of renormalization group running effects and choosing operator bases are discussed. Finally, we provide mapping results between the bosonic sector of the SM EFT and a complete set of precision electroweak and Higgs observables to which present and near future experiments are sensitive. With a detailed understanding of how to use the SM EFT, we then turn to applications and study in detail two well-motivated test cases. The first is singlet scalar field that enables the first-order electroweak phase transition for baryogenesis; the second example is due to scalar tops in the MSSM. We find both Higgs and electroweak measurements are sensitive probes of these cases. The second part of this thesis centers around dark matter, and consists of two studies. In the first, we examine the effects of relic dark matter annihilations on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The magnitude of these effects scale simply with the dark matter mass and annihilation cross-section, which we derive. Estimates based on these scaling behaviors indicate that BBN severely constrains hadronic and radiative dark

  6. An Improved Dark Channel-Based Algorithm for Underwater Image Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Fang; Guo, Jun-Kai; Sung, Chia-Chi; Chang, Herng-Hua

    Underwater imaging is crucial to a wide variety of research and realistic applications in marine biology, water fauna identification and assessment, archaeology, mine detection, oceanic mapping, and autonomous underwater robotics. However, due to specific propagation properties of light in water such as absorption and scattering as well as unstable environment such as light changing and water turbidness, the images captured are highly disturbed with low contrast, blurring, darkness, and color diminishing. This paper proposes a new underwater image restoration algorithm that consists of three major phases: haze removal, color correction, and contrast enhancement. To estimate the transmission coefficient function, we first compute the dark channel map, which is the set of "dark" pixels having very low intensity values in at least one RGB color channel. To accommodate the blue color distortion phenomenon, the red channel value is excluded from the calculation if the peak histogram intensity is smaller than a specified threshold. To optimize the medium transmission map, we adopt the matting Laplacian matrix associated with the sparse linear system to generate a cost function, followed by the guided filtering method to accelerate the computation. Finally, the contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization method is used to enhance the contrast while maintaining the color fidelity. We have applied this new approach to a wide variety of underwater images. Experimental results indicated that this new method is of potential in facilitating the interpretation and perception of underwater images in the fields of ocean engineering, ocean biology, and ocean science.

  7. Primordial black hole dark matter from single field inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Taoso, Marco

    2018-01-01

    We propose a model of inflation capable of generating a population of light black holes (about 10-16- 10-14 solar masses) that might account for a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Universe. The effective potential of the model features an approximate inflection point arising from two-loop order logarithmic corrections in well-motivated and perturbative particle physics examples. This feature decelerates the inflaton before the end of inflation, enhancing the primordial spectrum of scalar fluctuations and triggering efficient black hole production with a peaked mass distribution. At larger field values, inflation occurs thanks to a generic small coupling between the inflaton and the curvature of spacetime. We compute accurately the peak mass and abundance of the primordial black holes using the Press-Schechter and Mukhanov-Sasaki formalisms, showing that the slow-roll approximation fails to reproduce the correct results by orders of magnitude. We study as well a qualitatively similar implementation of the idea, where the approximate inflection point is due to competing terms in a generic polynomial potential. In both models, requiring a significant part of the dark matter abundance to be in the form of black holes implies a small blue scalar tilt with a sizable negative running and a tensor spectrum that may be detected by the next-generation probes of the cosmic microwave background. We also comment on previous works on the topic.

  8. Median filters as a tool to determine dark noise thresholds in high resolution smartphone image sensors for scientific imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, Damien P.; Parisi, Alfio V.; Amar, Abdurazaq; Rummenie, Katherine J.

    2018-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of median filters in the reduction of dark noise in smartphone high resolution image sensors is presented. The Sony Xperia Z1 employed has a maximum image sensor resolution of 20.7 Mpixels, with each pixel having a side length of just over 1 μm. Due to the large number of photosites, this provides an image sensor with very high sensitivity but also makes them prone to noise effects such as hot-pixels. Similar to earlier research with older models of smartphone, no appreciable temperature effects were observed in the overall average pixel values for images taken in ambient temperatures between 5 °C and 25 °C. In this research, hot-pixels are defined as pixels with intensities above a specific threshold. The threshold is determined using the distribution of pixel values of a set of images with uniform statistical properties associated with the application of median-filters of increasing size. An image with uniform statistics was employed as a training set from 124 dark images, and the threshold was determined to be 9 digital numbers (DN). The threshold remained constant for multiple resolutions and did not appreciably change even after a year of extensive field use and exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation. Although the temperature effects' uniformity masked an increase in hot-pixel occurrences, the total number of occurrences represented less than 0.1% of the total image. Hot-pixels were removed by applying a median filter, with an optimum filter size of 7 × 7; similar trends were observed for four additional smartphone image sensors used for validation. Hot-pixels were also reduced by decreasing image resolution. The method outlined in this research provides a methodology to characterise the dark noise behavior of high resolution image sensors for use in scientific investigations, especially as pixel sizes decrease.

  9. A low cost mobile phone dark-field microscope for nanoparticle-based quantitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Hu, Tony Y

    2018-01-15

    Dark-field microscope (DFM) analysis of nanoparticle binding signal is highly useful for a variety of research and biomedical applications, but current applications for nanoparticle quantification rely on expensive DFM systems. The cost, size, limited robustness of these DFMs limits their utility for non-laboratory settings. Most nanoparticle analyses use high-magnification DFM images, which are labor intensive to acquire and subject to operator bias. Low-magnification DFM image capture is faster, but is subject to background from surface artifacts and debris, although image processing can partially compensate for background signal. We thus mated an LED light source, a dark-field condenser and a 20× objective lens with a mobile phone camera to create an inexpensive, portable and robust DFM system suitable for use in non-laboratory conditions. This proof-of-concept mobile DFM device weighs less than 400g and costs less than $2000, but analysis of images captured with this device reveal similar nanoparticle quantitation results to those acquired with a much larger and more expensive desktop DFMM system. Our results suggest that similar devices may be useful for quantification of stable, nanoparticle-based activity and quantitation assays in resource-limited areas where conventional assay approaches are not practical. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electric field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua Reynolds

    The physical user interface is an increasingly significant factor limiting the effectiveness of our interactions with and through technology. This thesis introduces Electric Field Imaging, a new physical channel and inference framework for machine perception of human action. Though electric field sensing is an important sensory modality for several species of fish, it has not been seriously explored as a channel for machine perception. Technological applications of field sensing, from the Theremin to the capacitive elevator button, have been limited to simple proximity detection tasks. This thesis presents a solution to the inverse problem of inferring geometrical information about the configuration and motion of the human body from electric field measurements. It also presents simple, inexpensive hardware and signal processing techniques for makin the field measurements, and several new applications of electric field sensing. The signal processing contribution includes synchronous undersampling, a narrowband, phase sensitive detection technique that is well matched to the capabilities of contemporary microcontrollers. In hardware, the primary contributions are the School of Fish, a scalable network of microcontroller-based transceive electrodes, and the LazyFish, a small footprint integrated sensing board. Connecting n School of Fish electrodes results in an array capable of making heterodyne measurements of any or all n(n - 1) off-diagonal entries in the capacitance matrix. The LazyFish uses synchronous undersampling to provide up to 8 high signal- to-noise homodyne measurements in a very small package. The inverse electrostatics portion of the thesis presents a fast, general method for extracting geometrical information about the configuration and motion of the human body from field measurements. The method is based on the Sphere Expansion, a novel fast method for generating approximate solutions to the Laplace equation. Finally, the thesis describes a variety

  11. Is Sextans dwarf galaxy in a scalar field dark matter halo?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lora, V.; Magaña, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensate/scalar field dark matter model, considers that the dark matter is composed by spinless-ultra-light particles which can be described by a scalar field. This model is an alternative model to the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm, and therefore should be studied at galactic and cosmological scales. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been very useful when studying any dark matter theory, because the dark matter dominates their dynamics. In this paper we study the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy, embedded in a scalar field dark matter halo. We explore how the dissolution time-scale of the stellar substructures in Sextans, constrain the mass, and the self-interacting parameter of the scalar field dark matter boson. We find that for masses in the range (0.12< m φ <8) ×10 -22 eV, scalar field dark halos without self-interaction would have cores large enough to explain the longevity of the stellar substructures in Sextans, and small enough mass to be compatible with dynamical limits. If the self-interacting parameter is distinct to zero, then the mass of the boson could be as high as m φ ≈2×10 -21 eV, but it would correspond to an unrealistic low mass for the Sextans dark matter halo . Therefore, the Sextans dwarf galaxy could be embedded in a scalar field/BEC dark matter halo with a preferred self-interacting parameter equal to zero

  12. Design of Acquisition Schemes and Setup Geometry for Anisotropic X-ray Dark-Field Tomography (AXDT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y; Schaff, F; Wieczorek, M; Pfeiffer, F; Lasser, T

    2017-06-09

    Anisotropic X-ray Dark-field Tomography (AXDT) is a new imaging technique for reconstructing the three-dimensional scattering profile within a sample using the dark-field signal measured in an X-ray grating interferometry setup. As in any tomographic measurement, the acquisition geometry plays a key role in the accurate reconstruction of the scattering information. More- over, the anisotropic nature of the dark-field signal poses additional challenges for designing the acquisition protocols. In this work, we present an efficient approach to measure scattering orientations spread over the unit sphere and prove its efficacy using the knowledge from conventional tomography. In addition, we conclude (using analytical and experimental results) that placing the gratings such that the grating bars make an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the vertical direction is the optimal setup configuration for AXDT.

  13. Effect of particle-size selectivity on quantitative X-ray dark-field computed tomography using a grating interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Hu, Renfang; Wang, Shengxiang; Gao, Kun; Wang, Yan; Tian, Yangchao; Zhu, Peiping

    2017-08-01

    According to the conclusion of Khelashvili et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 51, 221 (2006)], the minus logarithm of the visibility ratio fulfills the line integral condition; consequently the scattering information can be reconstructed quantitatively by conventional computed tomography (CT) algorithms. Based on Fresnel diffraction theory, we analyzed the influence of particle-size selectivity on the performance of an X-ray grating interferometer (GI) applied for dark-field CT. The results state the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of dark-field imaging is sensitive to the particle size, which demonstrate that the X-ray dark-field CT using a GI can efficiently differentiate materials of identical X-ray absorption and help to choose optimal X-ray energy for known particle size, thus extending the application range of grating interferometer.

  14. Featured Image: A New Dark Vortex on Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    This remarkable series of images by the Hubble Space Telescope (click for the full view) track a dark vortex only the fifth ever observed on Neptune as it evolves in Neptunes atmosphere. These Hubble images, presented in a recent study led by Michael Wong (University of California, Berkeley), were taken in 2015 September, 2016 May, 2016 October, and 2017 October; the observations have monitored the evolution of the vortex as it has gradually weakened and drifted polewards. Confirmation of the vortex solved a puzzle that arose in 2015, when astronomers spotted an unexplained outburst of cloud activity on Neptune. This outburst was likely a group of bright companion clouds that form as air flows over high-pressure dark vortices, causing gases to freeze into methane ice crystals. To learn more about what the authors have since learned by studying this vortex, check out the paper below.CitationMichael H. Wong et al 2018 AJ 155 117. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa6d6

  15. How the scalar field of unified dark matter models can cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertacca, Daniele [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, via P Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via F Marzolo, 8 I-35131 Padova (Italy); Diaferio, Antonaldo, E-mail: bertacca@to.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: diaferio@to.infn.it, E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale ' Amedeo Avogadro' , Universita di Torino and INFN Sezione di Torino, via P Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    We use scalar field Lagrangians with a non-canonical kinetic term to obtain unified dark matter models where both the dark matter and the dark energy, the latter mimicking a cosmological constant, are described by the scalar field itself. In this framework, we propose a technique for reconstructing models where the effective speed of sound is small enough that the scalar field can cluster. These models avoid the strong time evolution of the gravitational potential and the large integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect which have been serious drawbacks of models considered previously. Moreover, these unified dark matter scalar field models can be easily generalized to behave as dark matter plus a dark energy component behaving like any type of quintessence fluid.

  16. Investigation Biological And Medical Specimen Using X-Ray Dark Field Imagine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattanasiriwisawa, Wanwisa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Maksimenko, Anton; Kazuyuki, Hyodo; Ando, Masami

    2005-10-01

    X-ray dark-field imaging (DFI) and bright-field imaging (BFI) in the Laue geometry has been successfully demonstrated. Using a Bragg-case asymmetric monochromator which produces an x-ray beam with a 0.3 μrad divergence incident onto an object and a Laue geometry analyzer that can simultaneously provide DFI and BFI. The imaging technique of DFI is quite novel one that we did not have before in that the central bright line satisfying the Bragg condition is removed by the analyzer crystal and the background radiation obscuring the image of the object does not come to record film. This is not the case in BFI and the strong background radiation obscures the real image of the object. X-ray optics comprising two Laue case diffraction wafers working at 35 keV has been successfully applied to some biological samples such as ivory, tusk, horn, tooth and a phantom of breast cancer. Images of ivory and others have shown very clear and informative inside structure. All pieces of the breast cancer phantom provide us with very fine images to simulate cancer

  17. Interacting viscous ghost tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Fahimi, K

    2013-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model with the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models in the framework of Einstein gravity. We consider a spatially non-flat FRW universe filled with interacting viscous ghost dark energy and dark matter. We reconstruct both the dynamics and potential of these scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model, which can describe the accelerated expansion of the universe. Our numerical results show that the interaction and viscosity have opposite effects on the evolutionary properties of the ghost scalar field models. (paper)

  18. Dark sector impact on gravitational collapse of an electrically charged scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakonieczna, Anna [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University,Plac Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Institute of Agrophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences,Doświadczalna 4, 20-290 Lublin (Poland); Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University,Plac Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Nakonieczny, Łukasz [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-04

    Dark matter and dark energy are dominating components of the Universe. Their presence affects the course and results of processes, which are driven by the gravitational interaction. The objective of the paper was to examine the influence of the dark sector on the gravitational collapse of an electrically charged scalar field. A phantom scalar field was used as a model of dark energy in the system. Dark matter was modeled by a complex scalar field with a quartic potential, charged under a U(1)-gauge field. The dark components were coupled to the electrically charged scalar field via the exponential coupling and the gauge field-Maxwell field kinetic mixing, respectively. Complete non-linear simulations of the investigated process were performed. They were conducted from regular initial data to the end state, which was the matter dispersal or a singularity formation in a spacetime. During the collapse in the presence of dark energy dynamical wormholes and naked singularities were formed in emerging spacetimes. The wormhole throats were stabilized by the violation of the null energy condition, which occurred due to a significant increase of a value of the phantom scalar field function in its vicinity. The square of mass parameter of the dark matter scalar field potential controlled the formation of a Cauchy horizon or wormhole throats in the spacetime. The joint impact of dark energy and dark matter on the examined process indicated that the former decides what type of an object forms, while the latter controls the amount of time needed for the object to form. Additionally, the dark sector suppresses the natural tendency of an electrically charged scalar field to form a dynamical Reissner-Nordström spacetime during the gravitational collapse.

  19. Demonstration of symmetric dark holes using two deformable mirrors at the high-contrast imaging testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Groff, Tyler D.; Carlotti, Alexis; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian D.; Kuhnert, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Laboratory (HCIL) at Princeton has developed several important algorithms and technologies for space-based coronagraphy missions to detect earth-like exoplanets. Before June 2013 the HCIL was the only facility with two deformable mirrors (DMs) in series for focal plane wavefront control, which allows for quasi-static speckle correction on both sides of the image plane. From June through August 2013, the High- Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at JPL had a second DM installed. In this paper we report on the results of our Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions project to achieve high contrast in two symmetric dark holes using a shaped pupil (SP) coronagraph at the HCIT. Our previous experiment with a similar SP at the HCIT in 2007 yielded single-sided dark holes. That experiment utilized an iterative, batch-process wavefront estimator and Electric Field Conjugation for wavefront control. Our current tests use the faster Kalman filter estimator and the stroke minimization control algorithm. We use the same ripple-style SPs as in the previous HCIT experiment because that mask manufacturing technique proved successful. Our tests of symmetric dark holes in monochromatic light at the HCIT demonstrate Princeton's steady improvements in wavefront control and estimation techniques for a space-based coronagraphy mission.

  20. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain-reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Grating-based X-ray Dark-field Computed Tomography of Living Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Velroyen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in x-ray attenuating tissue caused by lung disorders like emphysema or fibrosis are subtle and thus only resolved by high-resolution computed tomography (CT. The structural reorganization, however, is of strong influence for lung function. Dark-field CT (DFCT, based on small-angle scattering of x-rays, reveals such structural changes even at resolutions coarser than the pulmonary network and thus provides access to their anatomical distribution. In this proof-of-concept study we present x-ray in vivo DFCTs of lungs of a healthy, an emphysematous and a fibrotic mouse. The tomographies show excellent depiction of the distribution of structural – and thus indirectly functional – changes in lung parenchyma, on single-modality slices in dark field as well as on multimodal fusion images. Therefore, we anticipate numerous applications of DFCT in diagnostic lung imaging. We introduce a scatter-based Hounsfield Unit (sHU scale to facilitate comparability of scans. In this newly defined sHU scale, the pathophysiological changes by emphysema and fibrosis cause a shift towards lower numbers, compared to healthy lung tissue.

  2. Electric Field Imaging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields....

  3. On the velocity fields in elliptical galaxies with dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yuzuru

    1987-01-01

    The tensor virial theorem is used to investigate a dynamical state of an oblate system of luminous matter which is embedded in the more extended dark matter with reasonable density profiles. The relation between the ratio of rotation to random velocities and the ellipticity of a luminous system has been derived. If dark matter is distributed almost spherically, then the rotation velocity in the luminous system with isotropic velocity dispersions is larger than in the isolated system with the same ellipticity. Therefore, the anisotropy in velocity dispersions necessary to be consistent with the observed slow rotations of giant ellipticals should be larger than that for the isolated system without dark matter. (author)

  4. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Erni, R.; Bals, S.; Luysberg, M.; Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  5. Improved visualization of breast cancer features in multifocal carcinoma using phase-contrast and dark-field mammography: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandl, Susanne; Scherer, Kai; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willer, Konstantin; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid D; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bamberg, Fabian; Hellerhoff, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Conventional X-ray attenuation-based contrast is inherently low for the soft-tissue components of the female breast. To overcome this limitation, we investigate the diagnostic merits arising from dark-field mammography by means of certain tumour structures enclosed within freshly dissected mastectomy samples. We performed grating-based absorption, absolute phase and dark-field mammography of three freshly dissected mastectomy samples containing bi- and multifocal carcinoma using a compact, laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer. Preoperative in vivo imaging (digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI), postoperative histopathological analysis and ex vivo digital mammograms of all samples were acquired for the diagnostic verification of our results. In the diagnosis of multifocal tumour growth, dark-field mammography seems superior to standard breast imaging modalities, providing a better resolution of small, calcified tumour nodules, demarcation of tumour boundaries with desmoplastic stromal response and spiculated soft-tissue strands extending from an invasive ductal breast cancer. On the basis of selected cases, we demonstrate that dark-field mammography is capable of outperforming conventional mammographic imaging of tumour features in both calcified and non-calcified tumours. Presuming dose optimization, our results encourage further studies on larger patient cohorts to identify those patients that will benefit the most from this promising additional imaging modality. • X-ray dark-field mammography provides significantly improved visualization of tumour features • X-ray dark-field mammography is capable of outperforming conventional mammographic imaging • X-ray dark-field mammography provides imaging sensitivity towards highly dispersed calcium grains.

  6. Dynamic scattering theory for dark-field electron holography of 3D strain fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubk, Axel; Javon, Elsa; Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Gatel, Christophe; Hÿtch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Dark-field electron holography maps strain in crystal lattices into reconstructed phases over large fields of view. Here we investigate the details of the lattice strain–reconstructed phase relationship by applying dynamic scattering theory both analytically and numerically. We develop efficient analytic linear projection rules for 3D strain fields, facilitating a straight-forward calculation of reconstructed phases from 3D strained materials. They are used in the following to quantify the influence of various experimental parameters like strain magnitude, specimen thickness, excitation error and surface relaxation. - Author-Highlights: • We derive a simple dynamic scattering formalism for dark field electron holography based on a perturbative two-beam theory. • The formalism facilitates the projection of 3D strain fields by a simple weighting integral. • The weighted projection depends analytically on the diffraction order, the excitation error and the specimen thickness. • The weighting integral formalism represents an important prerequisite towards the development of tomographic strain reconstruction techniques

  7. Analysis of dark current images of a CMOS camera during gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Náfrádi, Gábor, E-mail: nafradi@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Czifrus, Szabolcs, E-mail: czifrus@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Kocsis, Gábor, E-mail: kocsis.gabor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Pór, Gábor, E-mail: por@reak.bme.hu [INT, BME, EURATOM Association, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Szepesi, Tamás, E-mail: szepesi.tamas@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, Sándor, E-mail: zoletnik.sandor@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, RMI, EURATOM Association, POB 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Radiation tolerance of a fast framing CMOS camera EDICAM examined. • We estimate the expected gamma dose and spectrum of EDICAM with MCNP. • We irradiate EDICAM by 23.5 Gy in 70 min in a fission rector. • Dose rate normalised average brightness of frames grows linearly with the dose. • Dose normalised average brightness of frames follows the dose rate time evolution. -- Abstract: We report on the behaviour of the dark current images of the Event Detection Intelligent Camera (EDICAM) when placed into an irradiation field of gamma rays. EDICAM is an intelligent fast framing CMOS camera operating in the visible spectral range, which is designed for the video diagnostic system of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out in order to estimate the expected gamma spectrum and dose for an entire year of operation in W7-X. EDICAM was irradiated in a pure gamma field in the Training Reactor of BME with a dose of approximately 23.5 Gy in 1.16 h. During the irradiation, numerous frame series were taken with the camera with exposure times 20 μs, 50 μs, 100 μs, 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms. EDICAM withstood the irradiation, but suffered some dynamic range degradation. The behaviour of the dark current images during irradiation is described in detail. We found that the average brightness of dark current images depends on the total ionising dose that the camera is exposed to and the dose rate as well as on the applied exposure times.

  8. Dark Matter Profiles in Dwarf Galaxies: A Statistical Sample Using High-Resolution Hα Velocity Fields from PCWI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relatores, Nicole C.; Newman, Andrew B.; Simon, Joshua D.; Ellis, Richard; Truong, Phuongmai N.; Blitz, Leo

    2018-01-01

    We present high quality Hα velocity fields for a sample of nearby dwarf galaxies (log M/M⊙ = 8.4-9.8) obtained as part of the Dark Matter in Dwarf Galaxies survey. The purpose of the survey is to investigate the cusp-core discrepancy by quantifying the variation of the inner slope of the dark matter distributions of 26 dwarf galaxies, which were selected as likely to have regular kinematics. The data were obtained with the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager, located on the Hale 5m telescope. We extract rotation curves from the velocity fields and use optical and infrared photometry to model the stellar mass distribution. We model the total mass distribution as the sum of a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo along with the stellar and gaseous components. We present the distribution of inner dark matter density profile slopes derived from this analysis. For a subset of galaxies, we compare our results to an independent analysis based on CO observations. In future work, we will compare the scatter in inner density slopes, as well as their correlations with galaxy properties, to theoretical predictions for dark matter core creation via supernovae feedback.

  9. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  10. Multiscale 3D characterization with dark-field x-ray microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen; Ahl, Sonja Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    Dark-field x-ray microscopy is a new way to three-dimensionally map lattice strain and orientation in crystalline matter. It is analogous to dark-field electron microscopy in that an objective lens magnifies diffracting features of the sample; however, the use of high-energy synchrotron x......, multiscale phenomena in situ is a key step toward formulating and validating multiscale models that account for the entire heterogeneity of materials....

  11. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy of cortical bone reveals details of extrafibrillar crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Henry P; McNally, Elizabeth A; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that most of the mineral in bone is present in the form of "mineral structures", 5-6nm-thick, elongated plates which surround and are oriented parallel to collagen fibrils. Using dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we viewed mineral structures in ion-milled sections of cortical human bone cut parallel to the collagen fibrils. Within the mineral structures we observe single crystals of apatite averaging 5.8±2.7nm in width and 28±19nm in length, their long axes oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Some appear to be composite, co-aligned crystals as thin as 2nm. From their similarity to TEM images of crystals liberated from deproteinated bone we infer that we are viewing sections through platy crystals of apatite that are assembled together to form the mineral structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transducer Field Imaging Using Acoustography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder S. Sandhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A common current practice for transducer field mapping is to scan, point-by-point, a hydrophone element in a 2D raster at various distances from the transducer radiating surface. This approach is tedious, requiring hours of scanning time to generate full cross-sectional and/or axial field distributions. Moreover, the lateral resolution of the field distribution image is dependent on the indexing steps between data points. Acoustography is an imaging process in which an acousto-optical (AO area sensor is employed to record the intensity of an ultrasound wavefield on a two-dimensional plane. This paper reports on the application of acoustography as a simple but practical method for assessing transducer field characteristics. A case study performed on a commercial transducer is reported, where the radiated fields are imaged using acoustography and compared to the corresponding quantities that are predicted numerically.

  13. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  14. Dark matter cosmic string in the gravitational field of a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczny, Łukasz; Nakonieczna, Anna; Rogatko, Marek

    2018-03-01

    We examined analytically and proposed a numerical model of an Abelian Higgs dark matter vortex in the spacetime of a stationary axisymmetric Kerr black hole. In analytical calculations the dark matter sector was modeled by an addition of a U(1)-gauge field coupled to the visible sector. The backreaction analysis revealed that the impact of the dark vortex presence is far more complicated than causing only a deficit angle. The vortex causes an ergosphere shift and the event horizon velocity is also influenced by its presence. These phenomena are more significant than in the case of a visible vortex sector. The area of the event horizon of a black hole is diminished and this decline is larger in comparison to the Kerr black hole with an Abelian Higgs vortex case. After analyzing the gravitational properties for the general setup, we focused on the subset of models that are motivated by particle physics. We retained the Abelian Higgs model as a description of the dark matter sector (this sector contained a heavy dark photon and an additional complex scalar) and added a real scalar representing the real component of the Higgs doublet in the unitary gauge, as well as an additional U(1)-gauge field representing an ordinary electromagnetic field. Moreover, we considered two coupling channels between the visible and dark sectors, which were the kinetic mixing between the gauge fields and a quartic coupling between the scalar fields. After solving the equations of motion for the matter fields numerically we analyzed properties of the cosmic string in the dark matter sector and its influence on the visible sector fields that are directly coupled to it. We found out that the presence of the cosmic string induced spatial variation in the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field and a nonzero electromagnetic field around the black hole.

  15. THE DIFFERENCE IMAGING PIPELINE FOR THE TRANSIENT SEARCH IN THE DARK ENERGY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, R.; Marriner, J.; Childress, M.; Covarrubias, R.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Finley, D. A.; Fischer, J.; Foley, R. J.; Goldstein, D.; Gupta, R. R.; Kuehn, K.; Marcha, M.; Nichol, R. C.; Papadopoulos, A.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Wester, W.; Yuan, F.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Costa, L. N. da; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Eifler, T. F.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2015-11-06

    We describe the operation and performance of the difference imaging pipeline (DiffImg) used to detect transients in deep images from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN) in its first observing season from 2013 August through 2014 February. DES-SN is a search for transients in which ten 3 deg(2) fields are repeatedly observed in the g, r, i, z passbands with a cadence of about 1 week. The observing strategy has been optimized to measure high-quality light curves and redshifts for thousands of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with the goal of measuring dark energy parameters. The essential DiffImg functions are to align each search image to a deep reference image, do a pixel-by-pixel subtraction, and then examine the subtracted image for significant positive detections of point-source objects. The vast majority of detections are subtraction artifacts, but after selection requirements and image filtering with an automated scanning program, there are similar to 130 detections per deg(2) per observation in each band, of which only similar to 25% are artifacts. Of the similar to 7500 transients discovered by DES-SN in its first observing season, each requiring a detection on at least two separate nights, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations predict that 27% are expected to be SNe Ia or core-collapse SNe. Another similar to 30% of the transients are artifacts in which a small number of observations satisfy the selection criteria for a single-epoch detection. Spectroscopic analysis shows that most of the remaining transients are AGNs and variable stars. Fake SNe Ia are overlaid onto the images to rigorously evaluate detection efficiencies and to understand the DiffImg performance. The DiffImg efficiency measured with fake SNe agrees well with expectations from a MC simulation that uses analytical calculations of the fluxes and their uncertainties. In our 8 "shallow" fields with single-epoch 50% completeness depth similar to 23.5, the SN Ia efficiency falls to 1/2 at

  16. Mapping of valence energy losses via energy-filtered annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph T; Nelayah, Jaysen; Srot, Vesna; van Aken, Peter A

    2009-08-01

    The advent of electron monochromators has opened new perspectives on electron energy-loss spectroscopy at low energy losses, including phenomena such as surface plasmon resonances or electron transitions from the valence to the conduction band. In this paper, we report first results making use of the combination of an energy filter and a post-filter annular dark-field detector. This instrumental design allows us to obtain energy-filtered (i.e. inelastic) annular dark-field images in scanning transmission electron microscopy of the 2-dimensional semiconductor band-gap distribution of a GaN/Al(45)Ga(55)N structure and of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoprisms. In comparison to other approaches, the technique is less prone to inelastic delocalization and relativistic artefacts. The mixed contribution of elastic and inelastic contrast is discussed.

  17. Dark-field electron holography for the measurement of geometric phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hytch, M.J.; Houdellier, F.; Huee, F.; Snoeck, E.

    2011-01-01

    The genesis, theoretical basis and practical application of the new electron holographic dark-field technique for mapping strain in nanostructures are presented. The development places geometric phase within a unified theoretical framework for phase measurements by electron holography. The total phase of the transmitted and diffracted beams is described as a sum of four contributions: crystalline, electrostatic, magnetic and geometric. Each contribution is outlined briefly and leads to the proposal to measure geometric phase by dark-field electron holography (DFEH). The experimental conditions, phase reconstruction and analysis are detailed for off-axis electron holography using examples from the field of semiconductors. A method for correcting for thickness variations will be proposed and demonstrated using the phase from the corresponding bright-field electron hologram. -- Highlights: → Unified description of phase measurements in electron holography. → Detailed description of dark-field electron holography for geometric phase measurements. → Correction procedure for systematic errors due to thickness variations.

  18. The Fate of Inhaled Nanoparticles: Detection and Measurement by Enhanced Dark-field Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Robert R; Scabilloni, James F; Wang, Liying; Battelli, Lori A; Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Qian, Yong; Sisler, Jennifer D; Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale W; Hubbs, Ann F

    2018-01-01

    Assessing the potential health risks for newly developed nanoparticles poses a significant challenge. Nanometer-sized particles are not generally detectable with the light microscope. Electron microscopy typically requires high-level doses, above the physiologic range, for particle examination in tissues. Enhanced dark-field microscopy (EDM) is an adaption of the light microscope that images scattered light. Nanoparticles scatter light with high efficiency while normal tissues do not. EDM has the potential to identify the critical target sites for nanoparticle deposition and injury in the lungs and other organs. This study describes the methods for EDM imaging of nanoparticles and applications. Examples of EDM application include measurement of deposition and clearance patterns. Imaging of a wide variety of nanoparticles demonstrated frequent situations where nanoparticles detected by EDM were not visible by light microscopy. EDM examination of colloidal gold nanospheres (10-100 nm diameter) demonstrated a detection size limit of approximately 15 nm in tissue sections. EDM determined nanoparticle volume density was directly proportional to total lung burden of exposed animals. The results confirm that EDM can determine nanoparticle distribution, clearance, transport to lymph nodes, and accumulation in extrapulmonary organs. Thus, EDM substantially improves the qualitative and quantitative microscopic evaluation of inhaled nanoparticles.

  19. The effective field theory of dark matter direct detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, Wick; Katz, Emanuel; Lubbers, Nicholas; Xu, Yiming

    2013-02-01

    We extend and explore the general non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter (DM) direct detection. We describe the basic non-relativistic building blocks of operators and discuss their symmetry properties, writing down all Galilean-invariant operators up to quadratic order in momentum transfer arising from exchange of particles of spin 1 or less. Any DM particle theory can be translated into the coefficients of an effective operator and any effective operator can be simply related to most general description of the nuclear response. We find several operators which lead to novel nuclear responses. These responses differ significantly from the standard minimal WIMP cases in their relative coupling strengths to various elements, changing how the results from different experiments should be compared against each other. Response functions are evaluated for common DM targets — F, Na, Ge, I, and Xe — using standard shell model techniques. We point out that each of the nuclear responses is familiar from past studies of semi-leptonic electroweak interactions, and thus potentially testable in weak interaction studies. We provide tables of the full set of required matrix elements at finite momentum transfer for a range of common elements, making a careful and fully model-independent analysis possible. Finally, we discuss embedding non-relativistic effective theory operators into UV models of dark matter.

  20. Hyperspectral light field image denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Qi, Na; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Dong; Xiong, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    Hyperspectral light field (HSLF) images with enriched spectral and angular information provide better representation of real scenes than conventional 2D images. In this paper, we propose a novel denoising method for HSLF images. The proposed method consists of two main steps. First, we generalize the intrinsic tensor sparsity (ITS) measure previously used for 3D hyperspectral image denoising to the 5D HSLF, by using the global correlation along the spectral dimension and the nonlocal similarity across the spatial and angular dimensions. Second, we further exploit the spatial-angular correlation by integrating light field super-resolution (SR) into the denoising process. In this way, the 5D HSLF can be better recovered. Experimental results validate the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of both objective and subjective quality on a self-collected HSLF dataset, in comparison with directly applying the state-of-the-art denoising methods.

  1. Classification of the micromorphology of breast calcifications in x-ray dark-field mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, Konstantin; Scherer, Kai; Braig, Eva; Ehn, Sebastian; Schock, Jonathan; Wolf, Johannes; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Chabior, Michael; Mayr, Doris; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Aniko; Hellerhof, Karin; Reiser, Maximilian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2017-03-01

    The distant goal of this investigation is to reduce the number of invasive procedures associated with breast micro calcification biopsies, by improving and refining conventional BIRADS micro calcification assessments with x-ray dark-field mammography. The study was institutional review board (IRB) approved. A dedicated grating-based radiography setup (Mo-target, 40 keV, 70 mA) was used to investigate one breast mastectomy and 31 biopsies with dark-field mammography. Comparing the absorption and scattering properties of micro calcifications clusters enables accessing information on the interior morphology on the micron-scale retrieved in a non-invasive manner. Insights underlying the micro morphological nature of breast calcifications were verified by comprehensive high-resolution micro-CT measurements. It was found that Dark-field mammography allows a micro-structural classification of breast micro calcification as ultra-fine, fine, pleomorphic and coarse textured using conventional detectors. Dark-field mammography is thereby highly sensitive to minor structural deviations. Finally, the determined micro-texture of the investigated micro calcifications was correlated with findings obtained from histopathological work up. The presented results demonstrate that dark-field mammography yields the potential to enhance diagnostic validity of current micro calcification analysis - which is yet limited to the exterior appearance of micro calcification clusters - and thereby reduce the number of invasive procedures.

  2. Holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke cosmology with chameleon scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.i [Department of Science of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: mjamil@camp.edu.p [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi 46000 (Pakistan)

    2010-06-07

    We study a cosmological implication of holographic dark energy in the Brans-Dicke gravity. We employ the holographic model of dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat (closed) universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named L. Our analysis shows that one can obtain the phantom crossing scenario if the model parameter {alpha} (of order unity) is tuned accordingly. Moreover, this behavior is achieved by treating the Brans-Dicke scalar field as a Chameleon scalar field and taking a non-minimal coupling of the scalar field with matter. Hence one can generate phantom-like equation of state from a holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe in the Brans-Dicke cosmology framework.

  3. Holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke cosmology with chameleon scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, M.R.; Jamil, Mubasher

    2010-01-01

    We study a cosmological implication of holographic dark energy in the Brans-Dicke gravity. We employ the holographic model of dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat (closed) universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named L. Our analysis shows that one can obtain the phantom crossing scenario if the model parameter α (of order unity) is tuned accordingly. Moreover, this behavior is achieved by treating the Brans-Dicke scalar field as a Chameleon scalar field and taking a non-minimal coupling of the scalar field with matter. Hence one can generate phantom-like equation of state from a holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe in the Brans-Dicke cosmology framework.

  4. Improved visualization of breast cancer features in multifocal carcinoma using phase-contrast and dark-field mammography: an ex vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandl, Susanne; Sztrokay-Gaul, Aniko; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Hellerhoff, Karin [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Scherer, Kai; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willer, Konstantin; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Pfeiffer, Franz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Garching (Germany); Mayr, Doris [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Conventional X-ray attenuation-based contrast is inherently low for the soft-tissue components of the female breast. To overcome this limitation, we investigate the diagnostic merits arising from dark-field mammography by means of certain tumour structures enclosed within freshly dissected mastectomy samples. We performed grating-based absorption, absolute phase and dark-field mammography of three freshly dissected mastectomy samples containing bi- and multifocal carcinoma using a compact, laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer. Preoperative in vivo imaging (digital mammography, ultrasound, MRI), postoperative histopathological analysis and ex vivo digital mammograms of all samples were acquired for the diagnostic verification of our results. In the diagnosis of multifocal tumour growth, dark-field mammography seems superior to standard breast imaging modalities, providing a better resolution of small, calcified tumour nodules, demarcation of tumour boundaries with desmoplastic stromal response and spiculated soft-tissue strands extending from an invasive ductal breast cancer. On the basis of selected cases, we demonstrate that dark-field mammography is capable of outperforming conventional mammographic imaging of tumour features in both calcified and non-calcified tumours. Presuming dose optimization, our results encourage further studies on larger patient cohorts to identify those patients that will benefit the most from this promising additional imaging modality. (orig.)

  5. Pseudocanalization regime for magnetic dark-field hyperlenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repän, Taavi; Novitsky, Andrey; Willatzen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) are the cornerstone of the hyperlens, which brings the superresolution effect from the near-field to the far-field zone. For effective application of the hyperlens it should operate in the so-called canalization regime, where the phase advancement of the propagating...

  6. Trochoidal X-ray Vector Radiography: Directional dark-field without grating stepping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y.; Bachche, S.; Kageyama, M.; Kuribayashi, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Lasser, T.; Momose, A.

    2018-03-01

    X-ray Vector Radiography (XVR) is an imaging technique that reveals the orientations of sub-pixel sized structures within a sample. Several dark-field radiographs are acquired by rotating the sample around the beam propagation direction and stepping one of the gratings to several positions for every pose of the sample in an X-ray grating interferometry setup. In this letter, we present a method of performing XVR of a continuously moving sample without the need of any grating motion. We reconstruct the orientations within a sample by analyzing the change in the background moire fringes caused by the sample moving and simultaneously rotating in plane (trochoidal trajectory) across the detector field-of-view. Avoiding the motion of gratings provides significant advantages in terms of stability and repeatability, while the continuous motion of the sample makes this kind of system adaptable for industrial applications such as the scanning of samples on a conveyor belt. Being the first step in the direction of utilizing advanced sample trajectories to replace grating motion, this work also lays the foundations for a full three dimensional reconstruction of scattering function without grating motion.

  7. Dark-field X-ray microscopy for multiscale structural characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simons, Hugh; King, A.; Ludwig, W.

    2015-01-01

    Many physical and mechanical properties of crystalline materials depend strongly on their internal structure, which is typically organized into grains and domains on several length scales. Here we present dark-field X-ray microscopy; a non-destructive microscopy technique for the three...... of the interactions between crystalline elements is a key step towards the formulation and validation of multiscale models that account for the entire heterogeneity of a material. Furthermore, dark-field X-ray microscopy is well suited to applied topics, where the structural evolution of internal nanoscale elements...

  8. Detection of sub-pixel fractures in X-ray dark-field tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Feidenhans' l, Robert [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark); Willner, Marian; Pfeiffer, Franz [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin [Lund University, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    We present a new method for detecting fractures in solid materials below the resolution given by the detector pixel size by using grating-based X-ray interferometry. The technique is particularly useful for detecting sub-pixel cracks in large samples where the size of the sample is preventing high-resolution μCT studies of the entire sample. The X-ray grating interferometer produces three distinct modality signals: absorption, phase and dark field. The method utilizes the unique scattering features of the dark-field signal. We have used tomograms reconstructed from each of the three signals to detect cracks in a model sample consisting of stearin. (orig.)

  9. Component analysis and synthesis of dark circles under the eyes using a spectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaho, Rina; Hirose, Misa; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Igarashi, Takanori; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes to apply nonlinear estimation of chromophore concentrations: melanin, oxy-hemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and shading to the real hyperspectral image of skin. Skin reflectance is captured in the wavelengths between 400nm and 700nm by hyperspectral scanner. Five-band wavelengths data are selected from skin reflectance. By using the cubic function which obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of light transport in multi-layered tissue, chromophore concentrations and shading are determined by minimize residual sum of squares of reflectance. When dark circles are appeared under the eyes, the subject looks tired and older. Therefore, woman apply cosmetic cares to remove dark circles. It is not clear about the relationship between color and chromophores distribution in the dark circles. Here, we applied the separation method of the skin four components to hyperspectral image of dark circle, and the separated components are modulated and synthesized. The synthesized images are evaluated to know which components are contributed into the appearance of dark circles. Result of the evaluation shows that the cause of dark circles for the one subject was mainly melanin pigmentation.

  10. Dark group: dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macorra, A. de la

    2004-01-01

    We study the possibility that a dark group, a gauge group with particles interacting with the standard model particles only via gravity, is responsible for containing the dark energy and dark matter required by present day observations. We show that it is indeed possible and we determine the constrains for the dark group. The non-perturbative effects generated by a strong gauge coupling constant can de determined and a inverse power law scalar potential IPL for the dark meson fields is generated parameterizing the dark energy. On the other hand it is the massive particles, e.g., dark baryons, of the dark gauge group that give the corresponding dark matter. The mass of the dark particles is of the order of the condensation scale Λ c and the temperature is smaller then the photon's temperature. The dark matter is of the warm matter type. The only parameters of the model are the number of particles of the dark group. The allowed values of the different parameters are severely restricted. The dark group energy density at Λ c must be Ω DGc ≤0.17 and the evolution and acceptable values of dark matter and dark energy leads to a constrain of Λ c and the IPL parameter n giving Λ c =O(1-10 3 ) eV and 0.28≤n≤1.04

  11. Dark energy and bouncing universe from k-fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin U

    2009-09-11

    In this thesis we consider some cosmological implications of k-fields, which are general scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic terms in the action. Cosmological scenarios with k-essence are invoked in order to explain the observed late-time acceleration of the universe. These scenarios avoid the need for fine-tuned initial conditions (the ''coincidence problem'') because of the attractor-like dynamics of the k-essence field {phi}. We carry out a comprehensive study of attractor-like cosmological solutions (''trackers'') involving a k-essence scalar field {phi} and another matter component. The result of this study is a complete classification of k-essence Lagrangians that admit asymptotically stable tracking solutions, among all Lagrangians of the form p=K({phi})L(X). Using this classification, we select the class of models that describe the late-time acceleration and avoid the coincidence problem through the tracking mechanism. In the context of k-essence cosmology, the superluminal epoch does not lead to causality violations. We discuss the implications of superluminal signal propagation for possible causality violations in Lorentz-invariant field theories. Another application of k-fields was made in the new ekpyrotic scenario that attempts to solve the big-bang singularity problem by involving violation of the null energy condition in a model which combines the ekpyrotic/cyclic scenario with the ghost condensate theory and the curvation mechanism of production of adiabatic perturbations of metric. The Lagrangian of this theory, as well as of the ghost condensate model, contains a term with higher derivatives, which was added to the theory to stabilize its vacuum state. We find that this term may affect the dynamics of the cosmological evolution. Moreover, after a proper quantization, this term results in the existence of a new ghost field with negative energy, which leads to a catastrophic vacuum instability. We explain

  12. Imaging Galactic Dark Matter with High-Energy Cosmic Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Kheirandish, Ali; Vincent, Aaron C.

    2017-11-01

    We show that the high-energy cosmic neutrinos seen by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can be used to probe interactions between neutrinos and the dark sector that cannot be reached by current cosmological methods. The origin of the observed neutrinos is still unknown, and their arrival directions are compatible with an isotropic distribution. This observation, together with dedicated studies of Galactic plane correlations, suggests a predominantly extragalactic origin. Interactions between this isotropic extragalactic flux and the dense dark matter (DM) bulge of the Milky Way would thus lead to an observable imprint on the distribution, which would be seen by IceCube as (i) slightly suppressed fluxes at energies below a PeV and (ii) a deficit of events in the direction of the Galactic center. We perform an extended unbinned likelihood analysis using the four-year high-energy starting event data set to constrain the strength of DM-neutrino interactions for two model classes. We find that, in spite of low statistics, IceCube can probe regions of the parameter space inaccessible to current cosmological methods.

  13. Imaging Galactic Dark Matter with High-Energy Cosmic Neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos A; Kheirandish, Ali; Vincent, Aaron C

    2017-11-17

    We show that the high-energy cosmic neutrinos seen by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can be used to probe interactions between neutrinos and the dark sector that cannot be reached by current cosmological methods. The origin of the observed neutrinos is still unknown, and their arrival directions are compatible with an isotropic distribution. This observation, together with dedicated studies of Galactic plane correlations, suggests a predominantly extragalactic origin. Interactions between this isotropic extragalactic flux and the dense dark matter (DM) bulge of the Milky Way would thus lead to an observable imprint on the distribution, which would be seen by IceCube as (i) slightly suppressed fluxes at energies below a PeV and (ii) a deficit of events in the direction of the Galactic center. We perform an extended unbinned likelihood analysis using the four-year high-energy starting event data set to constrain the strength of DM-neutrino interactions for two model classes. We find that, in spite of low statistics, IceCube can probe regions of the parameter space inaccessible to current cosmological methods.

  14. Real-time single image dehazing based on dark channel prior theory and guided filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zan

    2017-10-01

    Images and videos taken outside the foggy day are serious degraded. In order to restore degraded image taken in foggy day and overcome traditional Dark Channel prior algorithms problems of remnant fog in edge, we propose a new dehazing method.We first find the fog area in the dark primary color map to obtain the estimated value of the transmittance using quadratic tree. Then we regard the gray-scale image after guided filtering as atmospheric light map and remove haze based on it. Box processing and image down sampling technology are also used to improve the processing speed. Finally, the atmospheric light scattering model is used to restore the image. A plenty of experiments show that algorithm is effective, efficient and has a wide range of application.

  15. An Improved Aerial Remote Sensing Image Defogging Method Based on Dark Channel Prior Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Feng, W.; Wang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Ding, L.

    2017-09-01

    Aerial remote sensing image is widely used due to its high resolution, abundant information and convenient processing. However, its image quality is easily influenced by clouds and fog. In recent years, fog and haze air pollution is becoming more and more serious in the north of China and its influence on aerial remote sensing image quality is especially obvious. Considering the characters that aerial remote image is usually in huge amount of data and seldom covers sky area, this paper proposes an improved aerial remote sensing image defogging method based on dark channel prior information. First, a 2 % linear stretching is applied to eliminate the haze offset effect and provide a better initial value for later defogging processing. Then the dark channel prior image is obtained by calculating the minimum values of r, g, b channels of each pixel directly. Subsequently, according to the particularity of aerial image, the adaptive threshold t0 is set up to improve the defogging effect. Finally, to improve the color cast phenomenon, a way called automatic color method is introduced to enhance the visual effect of defogged image. Experiments are performed on normal image in fog and on aerial remote sensing image in fog. Experimental results prove that the proposed method can obtain the defogged image with better visual effect and image quality. Moreover, the improved method significantly balances the color information in the defogged image and efficiently avoids the color cast phenomenon.

  16. Ion-beam modification of 2-D materials - single implant atom analysis via annular dark-field electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangert, U., E-mail: Ursel.Bangert@ul.ie [Department of Physics, School of Sciences & Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Stewart, A.; O’Connell, E.; Courtney, E. [Department of Physics, School of Sciences & Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Ramasse, Q.; Kepaptsoglou, D. [SuperSTEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Hofsäss, H.; Amani, J. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-PLatz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Tu, J.-S.; Kardynal, B. [Peter Grünberg Institut 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Functionalisation of two-dimensional (2-D) materials via low energy ion implantation could open possibilities for fabrication of devices based on such materials. Nanoscale patterning and/or electronically doping can thus be achieved, compatible with large scale integrated semiconductor technologies. Using atomic resolution High Angle Annular Dark Field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy supported by image simulation, we show that sites and chemical nature of individual implants/ dopants in graphene, as well as impurities in hBN, can uniquely and directly be identified on grounds of their position and their image intensity in accordance with predictions from Z-contrast theories. Dopants in graphene (e.g., N) are predominantly substitutional. In other 2-Ds, e.g. dichalcogenides, the situation is more complicated since implants can be embedded in different layers and substitute for different elements. Possible configurations of Se-implants in MoS{sub 2} are discussed and image contrast calculations performed. Implants substituting for S in the top or bottom layer can undoubtedly be identified. We show, for the first time, using HAADF contrast measurement that successful Se-integration into MoS{sub 2} can be achieved via ion implantation, and we demonstrate the possibility of HAADF image contrast measurements for identifying impurities and dopants introduced into in 2-Ds. - Highlights: • Ion implantation of 2-dimensional materials. • Targeted and controlled functionalisation of graphene and 2-D dichalcocenides. • Atomic resolution High Angle Dark Field scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Determination of atomic site and elemental nature of dopants in 2-D materials. • Quantitative information from Z-contrast images.

  17. Improved In vivo Assessment of Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice using X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, Andre; Hellbach, Katharina; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Conlon, Thomas M.; Fernandez, Isis Enlil; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meinel, Felix G.; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and progressive lung disease with a median life expectancy of 4-5 years after initial diagnosis. Early diagnosis and accurate monitoring of IPF are limited by a lack of sensitive imaging techniques that are able to visualize early fibrotic changes at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface. Here, we report a new x-ray imaging approach that directly visualizes the air-tissue interfaces in mice in vivo. This imaging method is based on the detection of small-angle x-ray scattering that occurs at the air-tissue interfaces in the lung. Small-angle scattering is detected with a Talbot-Lau interferometer, which provides the so-called x-ray dark-field signal. Using this imaging modality, we demonstrate-for the first time-the quantification of early pathogenic changes and their correlation with histological changes, as assessed by stereological morphometry. The presented radiography method is significantly more sensitive in detecting morphological changes compared with conventional x-ray imaging, and exhibits a significantly lower radiation dose than conventional x-ray CT. As a result of the improved imaging sensitivity, this new imaging modality could be used in future to reduce the number of animals required for pulmonary research studies.

  18. Evolution of Mass and Velocity Field in the Cosmic Web: Comparison between Baryonic and Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weishan; Feng, Long-Long

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cosmic web since z = 5 in grid-based cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the mass and velocity fields of both baryonic and cold dark matter. The tidal tensor of density is used as the main method for web identification, with λ th = 0.2-1.2. The evolution trends in baryonic and dark matter are similar, although moderate differences are observed. Sheets appear early, and their large-scale pattern may have been set up by z = 3. In terms of mass, filaments supersede sheets as the primary collapsing structures from z ˜ 2-3. Tenuous filaments assembled with each other to form prominent ones at z dark matter field, and is even moderately stronger between {\\boldsymbol{ω }} and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}1, and ω and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}3. Compared with dark matter, there is slightly less baryonic matter found residing in filaments and clusters, and its vorticity developed more significantly below 2-3 Mpc. These differences may be underestimated because of the limited resolution and lack of star formation in our simulation. The impact of the change of dominant structures in overdense regions at z ˜ 2-3 on galaxy formation and evolution is shortly discussed.

  19. WEIBULL MULTIPLICATIVE MODEL AND MACHINE LEARNING MODELS FOR FULL-AUTOMATIC DARK-SPOT DETECTION FROM SAR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taravat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a major aspect of marine pollution, oil release into the sea has serious biological and environmental impacts. Among remote sensing systems (which is a tool that offers a non-destructive investigation method, synthetic aperture radar (SAR can provide valuable synoptic information about the position and size of the oil spill due to its wide area coverage and day/night, and all-weather capabilities. In this paper we present a new automated method for oil-spill monitoring. A new approach is based on the combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model and machine learning techniques to differentiate between dark spots and the background. First, the filter created based on Weibull Multiplicative Model is applied to each sub-image. Second, the sub-image is segmented by two different neural networks techniques (Pulsed Coupled Neural Networks and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks. As the last step, a very simple filtering process is used to eliminate the false targets. The proposed approaches were tested on 20 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. The same parameters were used in all tests. For the overall dataset, the average accuracies of 94.05 % and 95.20 % were obtained for PCNN and MLP methods, respectively. The average computational time for dark-spot detection with a 256 × 256 image in about 4 s for PCNN segmentation using IDL software which is the fastest one in this field at present. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very fast, robust and effective. The proposed approach can be applied to the future spaceborne SAR images.

  20. Weibull Multiplicative Model and Machine Learning Models for Full-Automatic Dark-Spot Detection from SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taravat, A.; Del Frate, F.

    2013-09-01

    As a major aspect of marine pollution, oil release into the sea has serious biological and environmental impacts. Among remote sensing systems (which is a tool that offers a non-destructive investigation method), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can provide valuable synoptic information about the position and size of the oil spill due to its wide area coverage and day/night, and all-weather capabilities. In this paper we present a new automated method for oil-spill monitoring. A new approach is based on the combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model and machine learning techniques to differentiate between dark spots and the background. First, the filter created based on Weibull Multiplicative Model is applied to each sub-image. Second, the sub-image is segmented by two different neural networks techniques (Pulsed Coupled Neural Networks and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks). As the last step, a very simple filtering process is used to eliminate the false targets. The proposed approaches were tested on 20 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. The same parameters were used in all tests. For the overall dataset, the average accuracies of 94.05 % and 95.20 % were obtained for PCNN and MLP methods, respectively. The average computational time for dark-spot detection with a 256 × 256 image in about 4 s for PCNN segmentation using IDL software which is the fastest one in this field at present. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very fast, robust and effective. The proposed approach can be applied to the future spaceborne SAR images.

  1. DARK SPOT DETECTION USING INTENSITY AND THE DEGREE OF POLARIZATION IN FULLY POLARIMETRIC SAR IMAGES FOR OIL POLUTION MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zakeri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill surveillance is of great environmental and economical interest, directly contributing to improve environmental protection. Monitoring of oil spills using synthetic aperture radar (SAR has received a considerable attention over the past few years, notably because of SAR data abilities like all-weather and day-and-night capturing. The degree of polarization (DoP is a less computationally complex quantity characterizing a partially polarized electromagnetic field. The key to the proposed approach is making use of DoP as polarimetric information besides intensity ones to improve dark patches detection as the first step of oil spill monitoring. In the proposed approach first simple intensity threshold segmentation like Otsu method is applied to the image. Pixels with intensities below the threshold are regarded as potential dark spot pixels while the others are potential background pixels. Second, the DoP of potential dark spot pixels is estimated. Pixels with DoP below a certain threshold are the real dark-spot pixels. Choosing the threshold is a critical and challenging step. In order to solve choosing the appropriate threshold, we introduce a novel but simple method based on DoP of potential dark spot pixels. Finally, an area threshold is used to eliminate any remaining false targets. The proposed approach is tested on L band NASA/JPL UAVSAR data, covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Comparing the obtained results from the new method with conventional approaches like Otsu, K-means and GrowCut shows better achievement of the proposed algorithm. For instance, mean square error (MSE 65%, Overall Accuracy 20% and correlation 40% are improved.

  2. Dark SPOT Detection Using Intensity and the Degree of Polarization in Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Oil Polution Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, F.; Amini, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spill surveillance is of great environmental and economical interest, directly contributing to improve environmental protection. Monitoring of oil spills using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has received a considerable attention over the past few years, notably because of SAR data abilities like all-weather and day-and-night capturing. The degree of polarization (DoP) is a less computationally complex quantity characterizing a partially polarized electromagnetic field. The key to the proposed approach is making use of DoP as polarimetric information besides intensity ones to improve dark patches detection as the first step of oil spill monitoring. In the proposed approach first simple intensity threshold segmentation like Otsu method is applied to the image. Pixels with intensities below the threshold are regarded as potential dark spot pixels while the others are potential background pixels. Second, the DoP of potential dark spot pixels is estimated. Pixels with DoP below a certain threshold are the real dark-spot pixels. Choosing the threshold is a critical and challenging step. In order to solve choosing the appropriate threshold, we introduce a novel but simple method based on DoP of potential dark spot pixels. Finally, an area threshold is used to eliminate any remaining false targets. The proposed approach is tested on L band NASA/JPL UAVSAR data, covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Comparing the obtained results from the new method with conventional approaches like Otsu, K-means and GrowCut shows better achievement of the proposed algorithm. For instance, mean square error (MSE) 65%, Overall Accuracy 20% and correlation 40% are improved.

  3. Riddles in the Dark: Imaging Inside Mercury's Permanently Shadowed Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, C. M.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Nair, H.; Deutsch, A. N.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Head, J. W.; Harmon, J. K.; Neumann, G. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous lines of evidence independently point to the presence of water ice in Mercury's polar regions: Earth-based radar shows radar-bright regions; Mariner 10 and MESSENGER Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) images reveal that these regions are permanently (south polar region) or persistently (north polar region) shadowed; neutron spectrometry indicates hydrogen-rich material; thermal models support the presence of water ice; and Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) reflectance measurements at 1064 nm show high and low reflectance deposits consistent in location to where models predict surface and buried water ice, respectively. Throughout 2013, MESSENGER executed a campaign dedicated to imaging the permanently shadowed crater floors of Mercury's north polar region using sunlight scattered from nearby terrain. The campaign makes use of the broadband clear filter (central wavelength 700 nm, bandwidth 600 nm) of the MDIS wide-angle camera (WAC) to target and image radar-bright areas within all host craters > 10 km in diameter under multiple lighting conditions. To date, MESSENGER has imaged the interiors of nearly 20 craters that host radar-bright deposits, including the largest such deposits near the north pole that are likely to host surface water ice. The images reveal a variety of surface morphologies, ranging from the smooth crater floor of the fresh Kandinsky crater, to the moderately cratered floor of Tolkien crater, and to the battered floor of Prokofiev crater, in which the permanently shadowed region does not differ morphologically from the rest of the crater floor. Thus, no distinct morphology is identified in association with polar deposits, and craters hosting such material span the typical range of degradation states relative to their illuminated counterparts. MDIS images also reveal albedo differences in craters with floors not fully in permanent shadow. Prokofiev provides a special environment for viewing a radar- and MLA-bright region suspected to host

  4. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Bradly J [Jemez Springs, NM; Guenther, David C [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  5. Laboratory constraints on chameleon dark energy and power-law fields

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Jason H.; Upadhye, Amol; Baumbaugh, Al; Chou, Aaron S.; Mazur, Peter O.; Tomlin, Ray; Weltman, Amanda; Wester, William

    2010-01-01

    We report results from the GammeV Chameleon Afterglow Search---a search for chameleon particles created via photon/chameleon oscillations within a magnetic field. This experiment is sensitive to a wide class of chameleon power-law models and dark energy models not previously explored. These results exclude five orders of magnitude in the coupling of chameleons to photons covering a range of four orders of magnitude in chameleon effective mass and, for individual chameleon models, exclude betw...

  6. Laboratory Constraints on Chameleon Dark Energy and Power-Law Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, J. H.; Baumbaugh, A.; Chou, A. S.; Mazur, P. O.; Tomlin, R.; Wester, W.; Upadhye, A.; Weltman, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report results from a search for chameleon particles created via photon-chameleon oscillations within a magnetic field. This experiment is sensitive to a wide class of unexplored chameleon power-law and dark energy models. These results exclude 5 orders of magnitude in the coupling of chameleons to photons covering a range of 4 orders of magnitude in chameleon effective mass and, for individual models, exclude between 4 and 12 orders of magnitude in chameleon couplings to matter.

  7. PAVEMENT DISTRESS DETECTION WITH PICUCHA METHODOLOGY FOR AREA-SCAN CAMERAS AND DARK IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reus Salini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The PICture Unsupervised Classification with Human Analysis (PICUCHA refers to a hybrid human-artificial intelligence methodology for pavement distresses assessment. It combines the human flexibility to recognize patterns and features in images with the neural network ability to expand such recognition to large volumes of images. In this study, the PICUCHA performance was tested with images taken with area-scan cameras and flash light illumination over a pavement with dark textures. These images are particularly challenging for the analysis because of the lens distortion and non-homogeneous illumination, generating artificial joints that happened at random positions inside the image cells. The chosen images were previously analyzed by other software without success because of the dark coluor. The PICUCHA algorithms could analyze the images with no noticeable problem and without any image pre-processing, such as contrast or brightness adjustments. Because of the special procedure used by the pavement engineer for the key patterns description, the distresses detection accuracy of the PICUCHA for the particular image set could reach 100%.

  8. Improved Diagnostics by Assessing the Micromorphology of Breast Calcifications via X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Kai; Braig, Eva; Ehn, Sebastian; Schock, Jonathan; Wolf, Johannes; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-11-01

    Breast microcalcifications play an essential role in the detection and evaluation of early breast cancer in clinical diagnostics. However, in digital mammography, microcalcifications are merely graded with respect to their global appearance within the mammogram, while their interior microstructure remains spatially unresolved and therefore not considered in cancer risk stratification. In this article, we exploit the sub-pixel resolution sensitivity of X-ray dark-field contrast for clinical microcalcification assessment. We demonstrate that the micromorphology, rather than chemical composition of microcalcification clusters (as hypothesised by recent literature), determines their absorption and small-angle scattering characteristics. We show that a quantitative classification of the inherent microstructure as ultra-fine, fine, pleomorphic and coarse textured is possible. Insights underlying the micromorphological nature of breast calcifications are verified by comprehensive high-resolution micro-CT measurements. We test the determined microtexture of microcalcifications as an indicator for malignancy and demonstrate its potential to improve breast cancer diagnosis, by providing a non-invasive tool for sub-resolution microcalcification assessment. Our results indicate that dark-field imaging of microcalcifications may enhance the diagnostic validity of current microcalcification analysis and reduce the number of invasive procedures.

  9. Combined cosmological tests of a bivalent tachyonic dark energy scalar field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keresztes, Zoltán; Gergely, László Á.

    2014-11-01

    A recently investigated tachyonic scalar field dark energy dominated universe exhibits a bivalent future: depending on initial parameters can run either into a de Sitter exponential expansion or into a traversable future soft singularity followed by a contraction phase. We also include in the model (i) a tiny amount of radiation, (ii) baryonic matter (Ωbh2 = 0.022161, where the Hubble constant is fixed as h = 0.706) and (iii) cold dark matter (CDM). Out of a variety of six types of evolutions arising in a more subtle classification, we identify two in which in the past the scalar field effectively degenerates into a dust (its pressure drops to an insignificantly low negative value). These are the evolutions of type IIb converging to de Sitter and type III hitting the future soft singularity. We confront these background evolutions with various cosmological tests, including the supernova type Ia Union 2.1 data, baryon acoustic oscillation distance ratios, Hubble parameter-redshift relation and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) acoustic scale. We determine a subset of the evolutions of both types which at 1σ confidence level are consistent with all of these cosmological tests. At perturbative level we derive the CMB temperature power spectrum to find the best agreement with the Planck data for ΩCDM = 0.22. The fit is as good as for the ΛCDM model at high multipoles, but the power remains slightly overestimated at low multipoles, for both types of evolutions. The rest of the CDM is effectively generated by the tachyonic field, which in this sense acts as a combined dark energy and dark matter model.

  10. Non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field and bulk viscous dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Behrang; Moshafi, Hossein; Movahed, S. M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Inspired by thermodynamical dissipative phenomena, we consider bulk viscosity for dark fluid in a spatially flat two-component Universe. Our viscous dark energy model represents phantom-crossing which avoids big-rip singularity. We propose a non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field with zero potential leading to accelerated expansion of the Universe in the framework of bulk viscous dark energy model. In this approach, the coupling constant, κ , is related to viscosity coefficient, γ , and the present dark energy density, Ω_DE^0. This coupling is bounded as κ \\in [-1/9H_0^2(1-Ω_DE^0), 0]. We implement recent observational data sets including a joint light-curve analysis (JLA) for SNIa, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) for most luminous astrophysical objects at high redshifts, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) from different surveys, Hubble parameter from HST project, Planck CMB power spectrum and lensing to constrain model free parameters. The joint analysis of JLA + GRBs + BAO + HST shows that Ω_DE^0=0.696± 0.010, γ =0.1404± 0.0014 and H_0=68.1± 1.3. Planck TT observation provides γ =0.32^{+0.31}_{-0.26} in the 68% confidence limit for the viscosity coefficient. The cosmographic distance ratio indicates that current observed data prefer to increase bulk viscosity. The competition between phantom and quintessence behavior of the viscous dark energy model can accommodate cosmological old objects reported as a sign of age crisis in the ΛCDM model. Finally, tension in the Hubble parameter is alleviated in this model.

  11. Non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field and bulk viscous dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostaghel, Behrang [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moshafi, Hossein [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Department of Physics, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahed, S.M.S. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Inspired by thermodynamical dissipative phenomena, we consider bulk viscosity for dark fluid in a spatially flat two-component Universe. Our viscous dark energy model represents phantom-crossing which avoids big-rip singularity. We propose a non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field with zero potential leading to accelerated expansion of the Universe in the framework of bulk viscous dark energy model. In this approach, the coupling constant, κ, is related to viscosity coefficient, γ, and the present dark energy density, Ω{sub DE}{sup 0}. This coupling is bounded as κ element of [-1/9H{sub 0}{sup 2}(1 - Ω{sub DE}{sup 0}), 0]. We implement recent observational data sets including a joint light-curve analysis (JLA) for SNIa, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) for most luminous astrophysical objects at high redshifts, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) from different surveys, Hubble parameter from HST project, Planck CMB power spectrum and lensing to constrain model free parameters. The joint analysis of JLA + GRBs + BAO + HST shows that Ω{sub DE}{sup 0} = 0.696 ± 0.010, γ = 0.1404 ± 0.0014 and H{sub 0} = 68.1 ± 1.3. Planck TT observation provides γ = 0.32{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26} in the 68% confidence limit for the viscosity coefficient. The cosmographic distance ratio indicates that current observed data prefer to increase bulk viscosity. The competition between phantom and quintessence behavior of the viscous dark energy model can accommodate cosmological old objects reported as a sign of age crisis in the ΛCDM model. Finally, tension in the Hubble parameter is alleviated in this model. (orig.)

  12. Dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, D.; Pietroni, M.; Riotto, A.

    2003-01-01

    It is a puzzle why the densities of dark matter and dark energy are nearly equal today when they scale so differently during the expansion of the universe. This conundrum may be solved if there is a coupling between the two dark sectors. In this Letter we assume that dark matter is made of cold relics with masses depending exponentially on the scalar field associated to dark energy. Since the dynamics of the system is dominated by an attractor solution, the dark matter particle mass is forced to change with time as to ensure that the ratio between the energy densities of dark matter and dark energy become a constant at late times and one readily realizes that the present-day dark matter abundance is not very sensitive to its value when dark matter particles decouple from the thermal bath. We show that the dependence of the present abundance of cold dark matter on the parameters of the model differs drastically from the familiar results where no connection between dark energy and dark matter is present. In particular, we analyze the case in which the cold dark matter particle is the lightest supersymmetric particle

  13. New holographic scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fehri, J. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-08

    Motivated by the work of Granda and Oliveros [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199], we generalize their work to the non-flat case. We study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all results given in [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199] are obtained.

  14. New holographic scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K.; Fehri, J.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Granda and Oliveros [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199], we generalize their work to the non-flat case. We study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all results given in [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199] are obtained.

  15. Search for Chameleon Scalar Fields with the Axion Dark Matter Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybka, G.; Hotz, M.; Rosenberg, L. J; Asztalos, S. J.; Carosi, G.; Hagmann, C.; Kinion, D.; van Bibber, K.; Hoskins, J.; Martin, C.; Sikivie, P.; Tanner, D. B.; Bradley, R.; Clarke, J.

    2010-01-01

    Scalar fields with a 'chameleon' property, in which the effective particle mass is a function of its local environment, are common to many theories beyond the standard model and could be responsible for dark energy. If these fields couple weakly to the photon, they could be detectable through the afterglow effect of photon-chameleon-photon transitions. The ADMX experiment was used in the first chameleon search with a microwave cavity to set a new limit on scalar chameleon-photon coupling β γ excluding values between 2x10 9 and 5x10 14 for effective chameleon masses between 1.9510 and 1.9525 μeV.

  16. Dark Mass Creation During EWPT Via Dark Energy Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.; Casper, Steven

    2013-01-01

    We add Dark Matter Dark Energy terms with a quintessence field interacting with a Dark Matter field to a MSSM EW Lagrangian previously used to calculate the magnetic field created during the EWPT. From the expectation value of the quintessence field we estimate the Dark Matter mass for parameters used in previous work on Dark Matter-Dark Energy interactions.

  17. A Very Low Dark Current Temperature-Resistant, Wide Dynamic Range, Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-07-01

    A very low dark current (VLDC) temperature-resistant approach which best suits a wide dynamic range (WDR) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a lateral over-flow integration capacitor (LOFIC) has been developed. By implementing a low electric field photodiode without a trade-off of full well-capacity, reduced plasma damage, re-crystallization, and termination of silicon-silicon dioxide interface states in the front end of line and back end of line (FEOL and BEOL) in a 0.18 µm, two polycrystalline silicon, three metal (2P3M) process, the dark current is reduced to 11 e-/s/pixel (0.35 e-/s/µm2: pixel area normalized) at 60 °C, which is the lowest value ever reported. For further robustness at low and high temperatures, 1/3-in., 5.6-µm pitch, 800×600 pixel sensor chips with low noise readout circuits designed for a signal and noise hold circuit and a programmable gain amplifier (PGA) have also been deposited with an inorganic cap layer on a micro-lens and covered with a metal hermetically sealed package assembly. Image sensing performance results in 2.4 e-rms temporal noise and 100 dB dynamic range (DR) with 237 ke- full well-capacity. The operating temperature range is extended from -40 to 85 °C while retaining good image quality.

  18. Dark matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in the cosmos is that it is mostly dark. That is, not only is the night sky dark, but also most of the matter and the energy in the universe is dark. For every atom visible in planets, stars and galaxies today there exists at least five or six times as much 'Dark Matter' in the universe. Astronomers and particle physicists today are seeking to unravel the nature of this mysterious but pervasive dark matter, which has profoundly influenced the formation of structure in the universe. Dark energy remains even more elusive, as we lack candidate fields that emerge from well established physics. I will describe various attempts to measure dark matter by direct and indirect means, and discuss the prospects for progress in unravelling dark energy.

  19. Observational constraints on scalar field models of dark energy with barotropic equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergijenko, Olga; Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Durrer, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the parameters of dynamical dark energy in the form of a classical or tachyonic scalar field with barotropic equation of state jointly with other cosmological parameters using the following datasets: the CMB power spectra from WMAP7, the baryon acoustic oscillations in the space distribution of galaxies from SDSS DR7, the power spectrum of luminous red galaxies from SDSS DR7 and the light curves of SN Ia from 2 different compilations: Union2 (SALT2 light curve fitting) and SDSS (SALT2 and MLCS2k2 light curve fittings). It has been found that the initial value of dark energy equation of state parameter is constrained very weakly by most of the data while the other cosmological parameters are well constrained: their likelihoods and posteriors are similar, their forms are close to Gaussian (or half-Gaussian) and the confidence ranges are narrow. The most reliable determinations of the best-fit value and 1σ confidence range for the initial value of the dark energy equation of state parameter are obtained from the combined datasets including SN Ia data from the full SDSS compilation with MLCS2k2 light curve fitting. In all such cases the best-fit value of this parameter is lower than the value of corresponding parameter for current epoch. Such dark energy loses its repulsive properties and in future the expansion of the Universe changes into contraction. We also perform a forecast for the Planck mock data and show that they narrow significantly the confidence ranges of cosmological parameters values, moreover, their combination with SN SDSS compilation with MLCS2k2 light curve fitting may exclude the fields with initial equation of state parameter > −0.1 at 2σ confidence level

  20. Field Sampling from a Segmented Image

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a statistical method for deriving the optimal prospective field sampling scheme on a remote sensing image to represent different categories in the field. The iterated conditional modes algorithm (ICM) is used for segmentation...

  1. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  2. DARK MATTER, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND THE ROTATION CURVE OF THE MILKY WAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Granados, B.; Battaner, E.; Florido, E.; Calvo, J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The study of the disk rotation curve of our Galaxy at large distances provides an interesting scenario for us to test whether magnetic fields should be considered as a non-negligible dynamical ingredient. By assuming a bulge, an exponential disk for the stellar and gaseous distributions, and a dark halo and disk magnetic fields, we fit the rotation velocity of the Milky Way. In general, when the magnetic contribution is added to the dynamics, a better description of the rotation curve is obtained. Our main conclusion is that magnetic fields should be taken into account for the Milky Way dynamics. Azimuthal magnetic field strengths of B φ ∼ 2 μG at distances of ∼2 R 0 (16 kpc) are able to explain the rise-up for the rotation curve in the outer disk.

  3. Field free line magnetic particle imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Erbe, Marlitt

    2014-01-01

    Marlitt Erbe provides a detailed introduction into the young research field of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and field free line (FFL) imaging in particular. She derives a mathematical description of magnetic field generation for FFL imaging in MPI. To substantiate the simulation studies on magnetic FFL generation with a proof-of-concept, the author introduces the FFL field demonstrator, which provides the world's first experimentally generated rotated and translated magnetic FFL field complying with the requirements for FFL reconstruction. Furthermore, she proposes a scanner design of consi

  4. Dark current, breakdown, and magnetic field effects in a multicell, 805 MHz cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Norem

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of dark currents and x rays in a six cell 805 MHz cavity, taken as part of an rf development program for muon cooling, which requires high power, high stored energy, low frequency cavities operating in a strong magnetic field. We have done the first systematic study of the behavior of high power rf in a strong (2.5–4 T magnetic field. Our measurements extend over a very large dynamic range in current and provide good fits to the Fowler-Nordheim field emission model assuming mechanical structures produce field enhancements at the surface. The locally enhanced field intensities we derive at the tips of these emitters are very large, (∼10  GV/m, and should produce tensile stresses comparable to the tensile strength of the copper cavity walls and should be capable of causing breakdown events. We also compare our data with estimates of tensile stresses from a variety of accelerating structures. Preliminary studies of the internal surface of the cavity and window are presented, which show splashes of copper with many sharp cone shaped protrusions and wires which can explain the experimentally measured field enhancements. We discuss a “cold copper” breakdown mechanism and briefly review alternatives. We also discuss a number of effects due to the 2.5 T solenoidal fields on the cavity such as altered field emission due to mechanical deformation of emitters, and dark current ring beams, which are produced from the irises by E×B drifts during the nonrelativistic part of the acceleration process.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of the dark signal in CMOS image sensors affected by neutron radiation from a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; Ma, Wuying; Sheng, Jiangkun; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-12-01

    The CMOS image sensors (CISs) are irradiated with neutron from a nuclear reactor. The dark signal in CISs affected by neutron radiation is studied theoretically and experimentally. The Primary knock-on atoms (PKA) energy spectra for 1 MeV incident neutrons are simulated by Geant4. And the theoretical models for the mean dark signal, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and dark signal distribution versus neutron fluence are established. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental outputs. Finally, the dark signal in the CISs under the different neutron fluence conditions is estimated. This study provides the theoretical and experimental evidence for the displacement damage effects on the dark signal CISs.

  6. Theoretical and experimental study of the dark signal in CMOS image sensors affected by neutron radiation from a nuclear reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The CMOS image sensors (CISs are irradiated with neutron from a nuclear reactor. The dark signal in CISs affected by neutron radiation is studied theoretically and experimentally. The Primary knock-on atoms (PKA energy spectra for 1 MeV incident neutrons are simulated by Geant4. And the theoretical models for the mean dark signal, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU and dark signal distribution versus neutron fluence are established. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental outputs. Finally, the dark signal in the CISs under the different neutron fluence conditions is estimated. This study provides the theoretical and experimental evidence for the displacement damage effects on the dark signal CISs.

  7. Hyperspectral-Enhanced Dark Field Microscopy for Single and Collective Nanoparticle Characterization in Biological Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Zamora-Perez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We review how the hyperspectral dark field analysis gives us quantitative insights into the manner that different nanoscale materials interact with their environment and how this relationship is directly expressed in an optical readout. We engage classification tools to identify dominant spectral signatures within a scene or to qualitatively characterize nanoparticles individually or in populations based on their composition and morphology. Moreover, we follow up the morphological evolution of nanoparticles over time and in different biological environments to better understand and establish a link between the observed nanoparticles’ changes and cellular behaviors.

  8. Icosahedral stereographic projections in three dimensions for use in dark field TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdillon, Antony J

    2013-08-01

    Thermodynamics require that rapidly cooled crystals and quasicrystals are relatively defective. Yet, without convenient 3-dimensional indexation both at crystal poles and in diffraction planes, or Kikuchi maps, it is difficult to identify the defects by dark field transmission electron microscopy. For two phase Al6Mn, these maps are derived. They relate i-Al6Mn to the standard face centered cubic, matrix crystals. An example of their usefulness in determining interfacial characteristics is described. Indices are integral powers on an irrational number. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laboratory constraints on chameleon dark energy and power-law fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Upadhye, Amol; Baumbaugh, Al; Chou, Aaron S.; Mazur, Peter O.; Tomlin, Ray; Weltman, Amanda; Wester, William

    2010-01-01

    We report results from the GammeV Chameleon Afterglow Search - a search for chameleon particles created via photon/chameleon oscillations within a magnetic field. This experiment is sensitive to a wide class of chameleon power-law models and dark energy models not previously explored. These results exclude five orders of magnitude in the coupling of chameleons to photons covering a range of four orders of magnitude in chameleon effective mass and, for individual chameleon models, exclude between 4 and 12 orders of magnitude in chameleon couplings to matter.

  10. Laboratory constraints on chameleon dark energy and power-law fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Upadhye, Amol; /KICP, Chicago; Baumbaugh, Al; Chou, Aaron S.; Mazur, Peter O.; Tomlin, Ray; /Fermilab; Weltman, Amanda; /Cape Town U.; Wester, William; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    We report results from the GammeV Chameleon Afterglow Search - a search for chameleon particles created via photon/chameleon oscillations within a magnetic field. This experiment is sensitive to a wide class of chameleon power-law models and dark energy models not previously explored. These results exclude five orders of magnitude in the coupling of chameleons to photons covering a range of four orders of magnitude in chameleon effective mass and, for individual chameleon models, exclude between 4 and 12 orders of magnitude in chameleon couplings to matter.

  11. Oil Spill Detection by SAR Images: Dark Formation Detection, Feature Extraction and Classification Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos N. Topouzelis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive review of the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar images (SAR for detection of illegal discharges from ships. It summarizes the current state of the art, covering operational and research aspects of the application. Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they seriously effect fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. The amount of pollutant discharges and associated effects on the marine environment are important parameters in evaluating sea water quality. Satellite images can improve the possibilities for the detection of oil spills as they cover large areas and offer an economical and easier way of continuous coast areas patrolling. SAR images have been widely used for oil spill detection. The present paper gives an overview of the methodologies used to detect oil spills on the radar images. In particular we concentrate on the use of the manual and automatic approaches to distinguish oil spills from other natural phenomena. We discuss the most common techniques to detect dark formations on the SAR images, the features which are extracted from the detected dark formations and the most used classifiers. Finally we conclude with discussion of suggestions for further research. The references throughout the review can serve as starting point for more intensive studies on the subject.

  12. Oil Spill Detection by SAR Images: Dark Formation Detection, Feature Extraction and Classification Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topouzelis, Konstantinos N

    2008-10-23

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar images (SAR) for detection of illegal discharges from ships. It summarizes the current state of the art, covering operational and research aspects of the application. Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they seriously effect fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. The amount of pollutant discharges and associated effects on the marine environment are important parameters in evaluating sea water quality. Satellite images can improve the possibilities for the detection of oil spills as they cover large areas and offer an economical and easier way of continuous coast areas patrolling. SAR images have been widely used for oil spill detection. The present paper gives an overview of the methodologies used to detect oil spills on the radar images. In particular we concentrate on the use of the manual and automatic approaches to distinguish oil spills from other natural phenomena. We discuss the most common techniques to detect dark formations on the SAR images, the features which are extracted from the detected dark formations and the most used classifiers. Finally we conclude with discussion of suggestions for further research. The references throughout the review can serve as starting point for more intensive studies on the subject.

  13. Field of Particle Filters Image Inpainting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuzol, Anne; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Nielsen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for solving the image inpainting problem based on a field of locally interacting particle filters. Image inpainting, also known as image completion, is concerned with the problem of filling image regions with new visually plausible data. In order to avoid the difficulty...... of solving the problem globally for the region to be inpainted, we introduce a field of local particle filters. The states of the particle filters are image patches. Global consistency is enforced by a Markov random field image model which connects neighbouring particle filters. The benefit of using locally...... interacting particle filters is that several competing hypotheses on inpainting solutions are kept active, allowing the method to provide globally consistent solutions on problems where other local methods may fail. We provide examples of applications of the developed method. Keywords: Inpainting · Image...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  15. Beam tracking approach for single–shot retrieval of absorption, refraction, and dark-field signals with laboratory  x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittoria, Fabio A.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Kallon, Gibril K. N.; Basta, Dario; Endrizzi, Marco; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-01-01

    We present the translation of the beam tracking approach for x-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, recently demonstrated using synchrotron radiation, to a laboratory setup. A single absorbing mask is used before the sample, and a local Gaussian interpolation of the beam at the detector is used to extract absorption, refraction, and dark–field signals from a single exposure of the sample. Multiple exposures can be acquired when high resolution is needed, as shown here. A theoretical analysis of the effect of polychromaticity on the retrieved signals, and of the artifacts this might cause when existing retrieval methods are used, is also discussed

  16. Beam tracking approach for single–shot retrieval of absorption, refraction, and dark-field signals with laboratory  x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittoria, Fabio A., E-mail: fabio.vittoria.12@ucl.ac.uk; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Harwell Oxford Campus, OX11 0FA Didcot (United Kingdom); Kallon, Gibril K. N.; Basta, Dario; Endrizzi, Marco [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Harwell Oxford Campus, OX11 0FA Didcot (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, WC1H 0AH London (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    We present the translation of the beam tracking approach for x-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, recently demonstrated using synchrotron radiation, to a laboratory setup. A single absorbing mask is used before the sample, and a local Gaussian interpolation of the beam at the detector is used to extract absorption, refraction, and dark–field signals from a single exposure of the sample. Multiple exposures can be acquired when high resolution is needed, as shown here. A theoretical analysis of the effect of polychromaticity on the retrieved signals, and of the artifacts this might cause when existing retrieval methods are used, is also discussed.

  17. Resolution and contrast enhancement in laser scanning microscopy using dark beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehez, Harold; Piché, Michel; De Koninck, Yves

    2013-07-01

    Laser scanning microscopy allows for three-dimensional imaging of cells with molecular specific labeling. However the spatial resolution of optical microscopy is fundamentally limited by the diffraction of light. In the last two decades many techniques have been introduced to enhance the resolution of laser scanning microscopes. However most of these techniques impose strong constraints on the specimen or rely on complex optical systems. These constraints limit the applicability of resolution improvement to various imaging modalities and sample types. To overcome these limitations, we introduce here a novel approach, which we called Switching LAser Mode (SLAM) microscopy, to enhance resolution and contrast in laser scanning microscopy. SLAM microscopy relies on subtracting images obtained with dark and bright modes, and exploits the smaller dimensions of the dark spot of the azimuthally polarized TE 01 mode. With this approach, resolution is improved by a factor of two in confocal microscopy. The technique is not based on complex nonlinear processes and thus requires laser power similar to that used in conventional imaging, minimizing photo-damage. The flexibility of the approach enables retrofitting in commercial confocal and two-photon microscopes and opens avenues for resolution enhancement in fluorescence-independent microscopy.

  18. Reconstructing interacting entropy-corrected holographic scalar field models of dark energy in the non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K; Khaledian, M S [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: MS.Khaledian@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics (CAMP), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-02-15

    Here we consider the entropy-corrected version of the holographic dark energy (DE) model in the non-flat universe. We obtain the equation of state parameter in the presence of interaction between DE and dark matter. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting entropy-corrected holographic DE model.

  19. Is the cosmological dark sector better modeled by a generalized Chaplygin gas or by a scalar field?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, Sergio del; Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Fabris, Julio C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Zimdahl, Winfried [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    Both scalar fields and (generalized) Chaplygin gases have been widely used separately to characterize the dark sector of the universe. Here we investigate the cosmological background dynamics for a mixture of both these components and quantify the fractional abundances that are admitted by observational data from supernovae of type Ia and from the evolution of the Hubble rate. Moreover, we study how the growth rate of (baryonic) matter perturbations is affected by the dark-sector perturbations. (orig.)

  20. Dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Dark energy research aims to illuminate the mystery of the observed cosmic acceleration, one of the fundamental problems in physics and astronomy today. This book presents a systematic and detailed review of the current state of dark energy research, with the focus on the examination of the major observational techniques for probing dark energy. It can be used as a textbook to train students and others who wish to enter this extremely active field in cosmology.

  1. Interaction of Gravitational field and Brans-Dicke field in R/W universe containing Dark Energy like fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kangujam Priyokumar; Dewri, Mukunda; Singh, Koijam Manihar

    2016-01-01

    On studying some new models of Robertson-Walker universes with a Brans-Dicke scalar field, it is found that most of these universes contain a dark energy like fluid which confirms the present scenario of the expansion of the universe. In one of the cases, the exact solution of the field equations gives a universe with a false vacuum, while in another it reduces to that of dust distribution in the Brans-Dicke cosmology when the cosmological constant is not in the picture. In one particular model it is found that the universe may undergo a Big Rip in the future, and thus it will be very interesting to investigate such models further. (paper)

  2. Manipulation of Nanoparticles Using Dark-Field-Illumination Optical Tweezers with Compensating Spherical Aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Hua, Zhou; Run-Zhe, Tao; Zhi-Bin, Hu; Min-Cheng, Zhong; Zi-Qiang, Wang; Yin-Mei, Li; Jun, Cai

    2009-01-01

    Based on our previous investigation of optical tweezers with dark field illumination [Chin. Phys. Lett. 25(2008)329], nanoparticles at large trap depth are better viewed in wide field and real time for a long time, but with poor forces. Here we present the mismatched tube length to compensate for spherical aberration of an oil-immersion objective in a glass-water interface in an optical tweezers system for manipulating nanoparticles. In this way, the critical power of stable trapping particles is measured at different trap depths. It is found that trap depth is enlarged for trapping nanoparticles and trapping forces are enhanced at large trap depth. According to the measurement, 70-nm particles are manipulated in three dimensions and observed clearly at large appropriate depth. This will expand applications of optical tweezers in a nanometre-scale colloidal system. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. Appreciating the image of God in all humanity: Towards a pastoral response to skin lightening as image enhancement to exit dark skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah K. Tenai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The practice of skin lightening is prevalent amongst dark-skinned people globally. Various current studies that map this practice and that seek motivations behind the practice are examined. It is observed that through shrewd marketing, dark-skinned people are offered a promise of a better quality of life, obtained by a lighter skin, through the use of skin lighteners. In spite of the severe health risks involved, the promise is ostensibly irresistible to some dark-skinned persons. A pastoral response is offered that affirms the full personhood and complete humanity of dark-skinned people as fully human and whole in their dark skins. Keywords: Skin lightening, Dark skin, Image of God

  4. Real-time image dehazing using local adaptive neighborhoods and dark-channel-prior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Jesus A.; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Kober, Vitaly; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    A real-time algorithm for single image dehazing is presented. The algorithm is based on calculation of local neighborhoods of a hazed image inside a moving window. The local neighborhoods are constructed by computing rank-order statistics. Next the dark-channel-prior approach is applied to the local neighborhoods to estimate the transmission function of the scene. By using the suggested approach there is no need for applying a refining algorithm to the estimated transmission such as the soft matting algorithm. To achieve high-rate signal processing the proposed algorithm is implemented exploiting massive parallelism on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Computer simulation results are carried out to test the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of dehazing efficiency and speed of processing. These tests are performed using several synthetic and real images. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with those obtained with existing dehazing algorithms.

  5. Proton imaging of stochastic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, A. F. A.; Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; White, T. G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Gregori, G.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent laser-plasma experiments (Fox et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 111, 2013, 225002; Huntington et al., Nat. Phys., vol. 11(2), 2015, 173-176 Tzeferacos et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 24(4), 2017a, 041404; Tzeferacos et al., 2017b, arXiv:1702.03016 [physics.plasm-ph]) report the existence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, whose statistical characterisation is essential for a complete understanding of the physical processes these experiments are attempting to investigate. In this paper, we show how a proton-imaging diagnostic can be used to determine a range of relevant magnetic-field statistics, including the magnetic-energy spectrum. To achieve this goal, we explore the properties of an analytic relation between a stochastic magnetic field and the image-flux distribution created upon imaging that field. This `Kugland image-flux relation' was previously derived (Kugland et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. vol. 83(10), 2012, 101301) under simplifying assumptions typically valid in actual proton-imaging set-ups. We conclude that, as with regular electromagnetic fields, features of the beam's final image-flux distribution often display a universal character determined by a single, field-scale dependent parameter - the contrast parameter s/{\\mathcal{M}}lB$ - which quantifies the relative size of the correlation length B$ of the stochastic field, proton displacements s$ due to magnetic deflections and the image magnification . For stochastic magnetic fields, we establish the existence of four contrast regimes, under which proton-flux images relate to their parent fields in a qualitatively distinct manner. These are linear, nonlinear injective, caustic and diffusive. The diffusive regime is newly identified and characterised. The nonlinear injective regime is distinguished from the caustic regime in manifesting nonlinear behaviour, but as in the linear regime, the path-integrated magnetic field experienced by the beam can be extracted uniquely. Thus, in the linear and

  6. Interacting new agegraphic tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledian, M.S.; Felegary, F.; Azarmi, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-29

    We study the correspondence between the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the interacting new agegraphic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  7. Interacting new agegraphic tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K.; Khaledian, M.S.; Felegary, F.; Azarmi, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the interacting new agegraphic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  8. Nonlinear emission from dark anapole modes and route to all-dielectric metamaterial near-field lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero

    2016-08-29

    By employing ab-initio simulations of Maxwell-Bloch equations with a source of quantum noise, we study a new laser concept based on photonic dark-matter nanostructures that emit only in the near-field, with no far-field radiation pattern

  9. IOT Overview: Wide-Field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, F. J.

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) instrument at La Silla has been the workhorse of wide-field imaging instruments at ESO for several years. In this contribution I will summarize the issues relating to its productivity for the community both in terms of the quality and quantity of data that has come out of it. Although only surveys of limited scope have been completed using WFI, it is ESO's stepping-stone to the new generation of survey telescopes.

  10. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale.

  11. Dark-field microspectroscopic analysis of gold nanorods in spiral Ganglion neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J.; Brown, W. G. A.; Needham, K.; Nayagam, B. A.; Yu, A.; McArthur, S. L.; Stoddart, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneous samples of spiral ganglion neuron primary cells were incubated with gold nanorods in order to investigate the photothermal processes induced by exposure to 780 nm laser light. Dark-field microspectroscopy was used to analyze the distribution and spectrum of nanorods in the neurons. The scattering data showed a typical gold nanorod spectrum, while a shift in the peak position suggested changes in the refractive index of the nanorod environment. The relationship between gold nanorods distribution and local temperature has also been examined with an open pipette microelectrode placed in the surrounding bath of the neurons. These temperature measurements confirm that the gold nanorods provide efficient localized heating under 780 nm laser exposure.

  12. Tackling non-linearities with the effective field theory of dark energy and modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios

    2017-12-01

    We present the extension of the effective field theory framework to the mildly non-linear scales. The effective field theory approach has been successfully applied to the late time cosmic acceleration phenomenon and it has been shown to be a powerful method to obtain predictions about cosmological observables on linear scales. However, mildly non-linear scales need to be consistently considered when testing gravity theories because a large part of the data comes from those scales. Thus, non-linear corrections to predictions on observables coming from the linear analysis can help in discriminating among different gravity theories. We proceed firstly by identifying the necessary operators which need to be included in the effective field theory Lagrangian in order to go beyond the linear order in perturbations and then we construct the corresponding non-linear action. Moreover, we present the complete recipe to map any single field dark energy and modified gravity models into the non-linear effective field theory framework by considering a general action in the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism. In order to illustrate this recipe we proceed to map the beyond-Horndeski theory and low-energy Hořava gravity into the effective field theory formalism. As a final step we derived the 4th order action in term of the curvature perturbation. This allowed us to identify the non-linear contributions coming from the linear order perturbations which at the next order act like source terms. Moreover, we confirm that the stability requirements, ensuring the positivity of the kinetic term and the speed of propagation for scalar mode, are automatically satisfied once the viability of the theory is demanded at linear level. The approach we present here will allow to construct, in a model independent way, all the relevant predictions on observables at mildly non-linear scales.

  13. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  14. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  15. Underwater image enhancement based on the dark channel prior and attenuation compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingwen; Xue, Lulu; Tang, Ruichun; Guo, Lingrui

    2017-10-01

    Aimed at the two problems of underwater imaging, fog effect and color cast, an Improved Segmentation Dark Channel Prior (ISDCP) defogging method is proposed to solve the fog effects caused by physical properties of water. Due to mass refraction of light in the process of underwater imaging, fog effects would lead to image blurring. And color cast is closely related to different degree of attenuation while light with different wavelengths is traveling in water. The proposed method here integrates the ISDCP and quantitative histogram stretching techniques into the image enhancement procedure. Firstly, the threshold value is set during the refinement process of the transmission maps to identify the original mismatching, and to conduct the differentiated defogging process further. Secondly, a method of judging the propagating distance of light is adopted to get the attenuation degree of energy during the propagation underwater. Finally, the image histogram is stretched quantitatively in Red-Green-Blue channel respectively according to the degree of attenuation in each color channel. The proposed method ISDCP can reduce the computational complexity and improve the efficiency in terms of defogging effect to meet the real-time requirements. Qualitative and quantitative comparison for several different underwater scenes reveals that the proposed method can significantly improve the visibility compared with previous methods.

  16. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3

  17. Mass Profile Decomposition of the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0416-2403: Insights on the Dark-matter Inner Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziatella, M.; Bonamigo, M.; Grillo, C.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.; Caminha, G.; Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Lombardi, M.; Munari, E.

    2017-12-01

    We present a high-resolution dissection of the two-dimensional total mass distribution in the core of the Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1‑2403, at z = 0.396. We exploit HST/WFC3 near-IR (F160W) imaging, VLT/Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer spectroscopy, and Chandra data to separate the stellar, hot gas, and dark-matter mass components in the inner 300 kpc of the cluster. We combine the recent results of our refined strong lensing analysis, which includes the contribution of the intracluster gas, with the modeling of the surface brightness and stellar mass distributions of 193 cluster members, of which 144 are spectroscopically confirmed. We find that, moving from 10 to 300 kpc from the cluster center, the stellar to total mass fraction decreases from 12% to 1% and the hot gas to total mass fraction increases from 3% to 9%, resulting in a baryon fraction of approximatively 10% at the outermost radius. We measure that the stellar component represents ∼30%, near the cluster center, and 15%, at larger clustercentric distances, of the total mass in the cluster substructures. We subtract the baryonic mass component from the total mass distribution and conclude that within 30 kpc (∼3 times the effective radius of the brightest cluster galaxy) from the cluster center the surface mass density profile of the total mass and global (cluster plus substructures) dark-matter are steeper and that of the diffuse (cluster) dark-matter is shallower than an NFW profile. Our current analysis does not point to a significant offset between the cluster stellar and dark-matter components. This detailed and robust reconstruction of the inner dark-matter distribution in a larger sample of galaxy clusters will set a new benchmark for different structure formation scenarios.

  18. Dark current spectroscopy of space and nuclear environment induced displacement damage defects in pinned photodiode based CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are envisioned for an increasing number of high-end scientific imaging applications such as space imaging or nuclear experiments. Indeed, the performance of high-end CMOS image sensors has dramatically increased in the past years thanks to the unceasing improvements of microelectronics, and these image sensors have substantial advantages over CCDs which make them great candidates to replace CCDs in future space missions. However, in space and nuclear environments, CMOS image sensors must face harsh radiation which can rapidly degrade their electro-optical performances. In particular, the protons, electrons and ions travelling in space or the fusion neutrons from nuclear experiments can displace silicon atoms in the pixels and break the crystalline structure. These displacement damage effects lead to the formation of stable defects and to the introduction of states in the forbidden bandgap of silicon, which can allow the thermal generation of electron-hole pairs. Consequently, non ionizing radiation leads to a permanent increase of the dark current of the pixels and thus a decrease of the image sensor sensitivity and dynamic range. The aim of the present work is to extend the understanding of the effect of displacement damage on the dark current increase of CMOS image sensors. In particular, this work focuses on the shape of the dark current distribution depending on the particle type, energy and fluence but also on the image sensor physical parameters. Thanks to the many conditions tested, an empirical model for the prediction of the dark current distribution induced by displacement damage in nuclear or space environments is experimentally validated and physically justified. Another central part of this work consists in using the dark current spectroscopy technique for the first time on irradiated CMOS image sensors to detect and characterize radiation-induced silicon bulk defects. Many types of defects are detected and two of them are identified

  19. Dark matter and dark radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, Lotty; Buckley, Matthew R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We explore the feasibility and astrophysical consequences of a new long-range U(1) gauge field ('dark electromagnetism') that couples only to dark matter, not to the standard model. The dark matter consists of an equal number of positive and negative charges under the new force, but annihilations are suppressed if the dark-matter mass is sufficiently high and the dark fine-structure constant α-circumflex is sufficiently small. The correct relic abundance can be obtained if the dark matter also couples to the conventional weak interactions, and we verify that this is consistent with particle-physics constraints. The primary limit on α-circumflex comes from the demand that the dark matter be effectively collisionless in galactic dynamics, which implies α-circumflex -3 for TeV-scale dark matter. These values are easily compatible with constraints from structure formation and primordial nucleosynthesis. We raise the prospect of interesting new plasma effects in dark-matter dynamics, which remain to be explored.

  20. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Using Dark Field X-Ray Microscopy To Study In-Operando Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Electrolyte Supported Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sierra, J. X.; Poulsen, H. F.; Jørgensen, P. S.

    Dark Field X-Ray Microscopy is a promising technique to study the structure of materials in nanometer length scale. In combination with x-ray diffraction technique, the microstructure evolution of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia electrolyte based solid oxide cell was studied running at extreme operati...

  2. Cosmological dynamics of D-BIonic and DBI scalar field and coincidence problem of dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpanich, Sirachak; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Mizuno, Shuntaro

    2017-05-01

    We study the cosmological dynamics of a D-BIonic and Dirac-Born-Infeld scalar field, which is coupled to matter fluid. For the exponential potential and the exponential couplings, we find a new analytic scaling solution yielding the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Since it is shown to be an attractor for some range of the coupling parameters, the density parameter of matter fluid can be the observed value, as in the coupled quintessence with a canonical scalar field. Contrary to the usual coupled quintessence, where the value of the matter coupling giving the observed density parameter is too large to satisfy the observational constraint from the cosmic microwave background, we show that the D-BIonic theory can give a similar solution with a much smaller value of matter coupling. As a result, together with the fact that the D-BIonic theory has a screening mechanism, the D-BIonic theory can solve the so-called coincidence problem as well as the dark energy problem.

  3. Field Imaging Spectroscopy. Applications in Earthquake Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragona, D.; Minster, B.; Rockwell, T. K.; Fialko, Y.; Jussila, J.; Blom, R.

    2005-12-01

    Field Imaging Spectroscopy in the visible and infrared sections of the spectrum can be used as a technique to assist paleoseismological studies. Submeter range hyperspectral images of paleoseismic excavations can assist the analyisis and interpretation of the earthquake history of a site. They also provide an excellent platform for storage of the stratigraphic and structural information collected from such a site. At the present, most field data are collected descriptively. This greatly enhances the range of information that can be recorded in the field. The descriptions are documented on hand drawn field logs and/or photomosaics constructed from individual photographs. Recently developed portable hyperspectral sensors acquire high-quality spectroscopic information at high spatial resolution (pixel size ~ 0.5 mm at 50 cm) over frequencies ranging from the visible band to short wave infrared. The new data collection and interpretation methodology that we are developing (Field Imaging Spectroscopy) makes available, for the first time, a tool to quantitatively analyze paleoseismic and stratigraphic information. The reflectance spectra of each sub-millimeter portion of the material are stored in a 3-D matrix (hyperspectral cube) that can be analyzed by visual inspection, or by using a large variety of algorithms. The reflectance spectrum is related to the chemical composition and physical properties of the surface therefore hyperspectral images are capable of revealing subtle changes in texture, composition and weathering. For paleoseismic studies, we are primarily interested in distinguishing changes between layers at a given site (spectral stratigraphy) rather than the precise composition of the layers, although this is an added benefit. We have experimented with push-broom (panoramic) portable scanners, and acquired data form portions of fault exposures and cores. These images were processed using well-known imaging processing algorithms, and the results have being

  4. Electric field imaging of single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Naoya; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Findlay, Scott D.; Kohno, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takao; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), single atoms can be imaged by detecting electrons scattered through high angles using post-specimen, annular-type detectors. Recently, it has been shown that the atomic-scale electric field of both the positive atomic nuclei and the surrounding negative electrons within crystalline materials can be probed by atomic-resolution differential phase contrast STEM. Here we demonstrate the real-space imaging of the (projected) atomic electric field distribution inside single Au atoms, using sub-Å spatial resolution STEM combined with a high-speed segmented detector. We directly visualize that the electric field distribution (blurred by the sub-Å size electron probe) drastically changes within the single Au atom in a shape that relates to the spatial variation of total charge density within the atom. Atomic-resolution electric field mapping with single-atom sensitivity enables us to examine their detailed internal and boundary structures. PMID:28555629

  5. Searching for an oscillating massive scalar field as a dark matter candidate using atomic hyperfine frequency comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Hees, A.; Guéna, J.; Abgrall, M.; Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2016-01-01

    We use six years of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but pr...

  6. Dark Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Dark spots (left) and 'fans' appear to scribble dusty hieroglyphics on top of the Martian south polar cap in two high-resolution Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera images taken in southern spring. Each image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  7. Automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy features in ultra-wide field retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenkova, Anastasia; Sowmya, Arcot; Kalloniatis, Michael; Ly, Angelica; Ho, Arthur

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major cause of irreversible vision loss. DR screening relies on retinal clinical signs (features). Opportunities for computer-aided DR feature detection have emerged with the development of Ultra-WideField (UWF) digital scanning laser technology. UWF imaging covers 82% greater retinal area (200°), against 45° in conventional cameras3 , allowing more clinically relevant retinopathy to be detected4 . UWF images also provide a high resolution of 3078 x 2702 pixels. Currently DR screening uses 7 overlapping conventional fundus images, and the UWF images provide similar results1,4. However, in 40% of cases, more retinopathy was found outside the 7-field ETDRS) fields by UWF and in 10% of cases, retinopathy was reclassified as more severe4 . This is because UWF imaging allows examination of both the central retina and more peripheral regions, with the latter implicated in DR6 . We have developed an algorithm for automatic recognition of DR features, including bright (cotton wool spots and exudates) and dark lesions (microaneurysms and blot, dot and flame haemorrhages) in UWF images. The algorithm extracts features from grayscale (green "red-free" laser light) and colour-composite UWF images, including intensity, Histogram-of-Gradient and Local binary patterns. Pixel-based classification is performed with three different classifiers. The main contribution is the automatic detection of DR features in the peripheral retina. The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation on 25 UWF retinal images with 167 bright lesions, and 61 other images with 1089 dark lesions. The SVM classifier performs best with AUC of 94.4% / 95.31% for bright / dark lesions.

  8. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  9. Shape from focus for large image fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, Pavel; Hamarová, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 33 (2015), s. 9747-9751 ISSN 1559-128X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12301S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape from focus * large image fields * optically rough surface Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2015

  10. DARK SUN” IMAGE FROM NERVAL TO HİLMİ YAVUZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhalim AYDIN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available “Dark Sun” image occurs in the various works of Gerard de Nerval. In his poem “El Desdichado”, on one hand it symbolizes the women he lost, on the other hand it refers to ‘Melancholia’ painting of Albrecht DURER. The same image scatters dark lights on forehead of DURER in Voyage en Orient (The voyage in Orient; and in Aurélia it is shown as a sign which announces the doomsday. Some comments have also been made that Nerval indicated his own tragic end with ‘dark sun’. When we take into consideration the poet’s life in a general approach, it is necessary to evaluate the image as a clear reflection of morbid psychic situation. Therefore, ‘dark sun’ image symbolizes unhappiness, uneasiness and melancholy primarily by Nerval and in Western culture. “Nur-u Siyah” (dark light image in orient culture has been employed in a line which continues from the tradition until today, from Şebüsteri to Şeyh Galip and from A. Halet Çelebi to Hilmi Yavuz. Althought they have the same meaning with a tiny difference (sun-divine light which arises from perception process, their imaginary figures in both civilizations are totally contrary to each other. So, “nur-u siyah” is the symbol of happiness, serenity, meanwhile, it is a symbol of the position which sufi has tried to reach with pantheism (Vahdet-i Vücud. In this article, it is tried to explain both civilizations’ usage of these images and then shifting to our era, to Hilmi YAVUZ, it will be tried to make an introduction to the using styles of “dark sun” and “nur -u siyah” or the other words which symbolizes them. “Kara Güneş” (le Soleil Noir imgesi Gerard de Nerval’in çeşitli eserlerinde geçer. “El Desdichado” şiirinde bir yandan kaybettiği kadınları simgelerken, diğer yandan da Albrecht Dürer’in “Melancholia” tablosuna göndermede bulunur. Aynı imge yazarın Voyage en Orient (Doğu’da Yolculuk’ında Dürer’in alnına “karanlık

  11. Imaging of hemoglobin oxygen saturation ratio in the face by spectral camera and its application to evaluate dark circles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kumiko; Masuda, Yuji; Hirao, Tetsuji

    2013-11-01

    Contact-type spectrophotometers have been widely used to measure skin color to determine the color values and melanin and hemoglobin contents. Recently, a spectral camera was introduced to evaluate two-dimensional color distribution. However, its application to skin color measurement has been limited. The original spectral imaging system developed for facial skin consisted of a spectral camera and an original lighting unit for uniform irradiation of the face. The distribution of skin chromophores in the face, including melanin and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, was calculated from the reflectance data for each pixel of the spectral images. In addition, to create a mean spectral image of the group, a face morphing technology for spectral data was proposed. Using the system, we determined the characteristics of the dark circles around the eyes and also evaluated the effects of an anti-dark circle cosmetic. This system enabled the sensitive detection of skin chromophores in the face. Melanin content increased and hemoglobin oxygen saturation ratio decreased locally in the infraorbital areas of women with dark circles compared with those of women without dark circles. In addition, we were able to detect improvement in the dark circles after 6 weeks' use of anti-dark circle cosmetic products by visualizing the distribution of the relative concentrations of melanin and hemoglobin oxygen saturation ratio. Using a spectral camera, we developed a non-contact image-processing system that was capable of capturing a wide area of the face to visualize the distribution of the relative concentrations of skin chromophores in the face. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Dark Polar Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  13. Dark-field study of rear-side density structure in laser-accelerated foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamper, J.A.; Gold, S.H.; Obenschain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Sica, L.

    1981-01-01

    A dark-field, laser-probing diagnostic has produced the first high-resolution photographs of density structure on the rear side of laser-accelerated foils. This diagnostic allows the preferential sampling of the steep-gradient region of an expanding plasma and permits two-dimensional, multiple-time recordings on a single photograph. The studies are aimed at understanding the early-time physics of target implosions for inertial-confinement fusion. Both long (500 psec) and short (150 psec) probe pulses were used to study the rear-side plasmas of thin foils accelerated by the rocket-like reaction to a hot plasma ablated from the front side by the laser radiation. The longer pulse results, both for angular scatter and the life-time of small, transverse structure, imply a relatively cold (1 eV) rear side plasma. The short pulses provide high resolution photographs of the complete structure. One of these was a vortex-like structure, suggestive of the remnants of a hydrodynamic instability. These observations are relevant to two of the basic requirements of inertial-confinement fusion: cold fuel isentrope and implosion symmetry

  14. Laser Field Imaging Through Fourier Transform Heterodyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Galbraith, A.E.; Strauss, C.E.; Grubler, A.C.

    1999-04-05

    The authors present a detection process capable of directly imaging the transverse amplitude, phase, and Doppler shift of coherent electromagnetic fields. Based on coherent detection principles governing conventional heterodyned RADAR/LADAR systems, Fourier Transform Heterodyne incorporates transverse spatial encoding of the reference local oscillator for image capture. Appropriate selection of spatial encoding functions allows image retrieval by way of classic Fourier manipulations. Of practical interest: (1) imaging may be accomplished with a single element detector/sensor requiring no additional scanning or moving components, (2) as detection is governed by heterodyne principles, near quantum limited performance is achievable, (3) a wide variety of appropriate spatial encoding functions exist that may be adaptively configured in real-time for applications requiring optimal detection, and (4) the concept is general with the applicable electromagnetic spectrum encompassing the RF through optical.

  15. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  16. AKARI/IRC source catalogues and source counts for the IRAC Dark Field, ELAIS North and the AKARI Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, H.; Serjeant, S.; Pearson, C.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Dryer, B.; Barrufet, L.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first detailed analysis of three extragalactic fields (IRAC Dark Field, ELAIS-N1, ADF-S) observed by the infrared satellite, AKARI, using an optimized data analysis toolkit specifically for the processing of extragalactic point sources. The InfaRed Camera (IRC) on AKARI complements the Spitzer Space Telescope via its comprehensive coverage between 8-24 μm filling the gap between the Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS instruments. Source counts in the AKARI bands at 3.2, 4.1, 7, 11, 15 and 18 μm are presented. At near-infrared wavelengths, our source counts are consistent with counts made in other AKARI fields and in general with Spitzer/IRAC (except at 3.2 μm where our counts lie above). In the mid-infrared (11 - 18 μm), we find our counts are consistent with both previous surveys by AKARI and the Spitzer peak-up imaging survey with the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS). Using our counts to constrain contemporary evolutionary models, we find that although the models and counts are in agreement at mid-infrared wavelengths there are inconsistencies at wavelengths shortward of 7 μm, suggesting either a problem with stellar subtraction or indicating the need for refinement of the stellar population models. We have also investigated the AKARI/IRC filters, and find an active galactic nucleus selection criteria out to z < 2 on the basis of AKARI 4.1, 11, 15 and 18 μm colours.

  17. Very low field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herreros, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging at very low field (from 1 mT to 10 mT). A new kind of sensor called 'mixed sensor' has been used to achieve a good detectivity at low frequencies. Combining a superconducting loop and a giant magnetoresistance, those detectors have a competitive equivalent field noise compared to existing devices (Tuned coils, SQUIDs and Atomic Magnetometers). They have been combined with flux transformers to increase the coupling between the sample and the sensor. A complete study has been performed to adapt it to mixed sensors and then maximize the gain. This set has been incorporated in an existing small MRI device to test its robustness in real conditions. In parallel, several MRI sequences (GE, SE, FLASH, EPI,...) have been integrated and adapted to very low field requirements. They have been used to perform in-vivo three dimensional imaging and relaxometry studies on well known products to test their reliability. Finally, a larger setup adapted for full-head imaging has been designed and built to perform images on a larger working volume. (author) [fr

  18. "Molecular" MR imaging at high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang; Wang, Ping; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Dortch, Richard; Gochberg, Daniel F

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) have contributed considerably to clinical radiology, and a variety of MR techniques have been developed to evaluate pathological processes as well as normal tissue biology at the cellular and molecular level. However, in comparison to nuclear imaging, MRI has relatively poor sensitivity for detecting true molecular changes or for detecting the presence of targeted contrast agents, though these remain under active development. In recent years very high field (7T and above) MRI systems have been developed for human studies and these provide new opportunities and technical challenges for molecular imaging. We identify 5 types of intrinsic contrast mechanisms that do not require the use of exogenous agents but which can provide molecular and cellular information. We can derive information on tissue composition by (i) imaging different nuclei, especially sodium (ii) exploiting chemical shift differences as in MRS (iii) exploiting specific relaxation mechanisms (iv) exploiting tissue differences in the exchange rates of molecular species such as amides or hydroxyls and (v) differences in susceptibility. The increased signal strength at higher fields enables higher resolution images to be acquired, along with increased sensitivity to detecting subtle effects caused by molecular changes in tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulations of multi-contrast x-ray imaging using near-field speckles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE, United Kingdom and Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Thibault, Pierre [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Herzen, Julia; Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zanette, Irene [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    X-ray dark-field and phase-contrast imaging using near-field speckles is a novel technique that overcomes limitations inherent in conventional absorption x-ray imaging, i.e. poor contrast for features with similar density. Speckle-based imaging yields a wealth of information with a simple setup tolerant to polychromatic and divergent beams, and simple data acquisition and analysis procedures. Here, we present a simulation software used to model the image formation with the speckle-based technique, and we compare simulated results on a phantom sample with experimental synchrotron data. Thorough simulation of a speckle-based imaging experiment will help for better understanding and optimising the technique itself.

  20. Magnetic fields and star formation: evidence from imaging polarimetry of the Serpens Reflection Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren-Smith, R.F.; Draper, P.W.; Scarrott, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    CCD imaging of the Serpens bipolar reflection nebula shows it to be surrounded by dark material having spiral density structure. Multi-colour polarization mapping also reveals details of the surrounding magnetic field, indicating that this also has spiral structure. These observations are discussed along with current ideas about the role of magnetic fields during star formation. An interpretation involving the non-axisymmetric magnetically braked collapse of a protostellar cloud is proposed and a resulting magnetic field configuration is described which can account for the observations. Evidence is also discussed for the formation of a binary star system within the nebula, resulting from the fragmentation of a magnetized protostellar disc.

  1. Imaging spectrometer wide field catadioptric design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisp,; Michael, P [Danville, CA

    2008-08-19

    A wide field catadioptric imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The catadioptric design has zero Petzval field curvature. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system with a catadioptric lens and a dioptric lens for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through the system for receiving the light to the detector array.

  2. Elliptical field-of-view PROPELLER imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Ajit; Pipe, James G

    2009-09-01

    Traditionally two-dimensional scans are designed to support an isotropic field-of-view (iFOV). When imaging elongated objects, significant savings in scan time can potentially be achieved by supporting an elliptical field-of-view (eFOV). This work presents an empirical closed-form solution to adapt the PROPELLER trajectory for an eFOV. The proposed solution is built on the geometry of the PROPELLER trajectory permitting the scan prescription and data reconstruction to remain largely similar to standard PROPELLER. The achieved FOV is experimentally validated by the point spread function (PSF) of a phantom scan. The details of potential savings in scan time and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance in comparison to iFOV scans for both phantom and in-vivo images are also described.

  3. Flat-Fielding Solar Spectroscopic Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, H. P.

    1999-05-01

    A key problem for the analysis of the spectral-spatial datacubes produced by the many operational and planned solar spectroscopic imagers (e.g., SUMER and CDS on SOHO; the SOLIS Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM)) is how to obtain a suitable "flat-field" image for fixed-pattern correction of each slice (long-slit spectrum) of the data. We describe here some algorithms developed for flat-fielding NASA/NSO Spectromagnetograph (SPM) and NSO Near-Infrared Magnograph (NIM 1) data both for analysis of He I 1083 nm data and as prototype procedures for the future VSM. The 1083 nm line is a severe test since the line is very weak, and similarly stringent requirements need to be met for precision spectral polarimetry from the VSM. The procedures remove spectrum lines from ``raw'' flat-fields derived by integrating spectra as the solar image is scanned to give an equivalent exposure to each spatial element along the spectrograph slit with the exact instrument configuration that is used in the observations. We find this preferable to other techniques such as moving the grating to nearby continuum or image defocussing, both of which change fringe patterns and/or the way optical impurities such as dust are imaged. An iterative fitting procedure is described which works well on the SPM data but is less satisfactory for NIM 1 because, in the latter case, the detector readout introduces a columnar pattern parallel to the spectrum lines which is removed by the SPM algorithm. The orientation of read-out and spectrum will be the same as NIM-1 for the VSM. We describe initial attempts to use a new least-squares spline technique (Thijsse, Hollanders, and Hendrikse, 1998, Computers in Physics 12, 393) to address this difficulty.

  4. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-05

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  5. Light field imaging and application analysis in THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongfei; Su, Bo; He, Jingsuo; Zhang, Cong; Wu, Yaxiong; Zhang, Shengbo; Zhang, Cunlin

    2018-01-01

    The light field includes the direction information and location information. Light field imaging can capture the whole light field by single exposure. The four-dimensional light field function model represented by two-plane parameter, which is proposed by Levoy, is adopted in the light field. Acquisition of light field is based on the microlens array, camera array and the mask. We calculate the dates of light-field to synthetize light field image. The processing techniques of light field data include technology of refocusing rendering, technology of synthetic aperture and technology of microscopic imaging. Introducing the technology of light field imaging into THz, the efficiency of 3D imaging is higher than that of conventional THz 3D imaging technology. The advantages compared with visible light field imaging include large depth of field, wide dynamic range and true three-dimensional. It has broad application prospects.

  6. PREVALENCE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN PATIENTS WITH ATROPHIC GASTRITIS AND ROLE OF DARK FIELD MICROSCOPY IN DIAGNOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ananthamurugan; Saleem; Gopal; Sunil Shivekar; Kaviraj; Balamurugan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the most common human pathogen which causes chronic gastritis, leading to serious complications. The aim was to study the incidence of H. pylori infection and the risk factors associated with chronic atrophic gastritis using simple diagnostic procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biopsy samples were collected from 146 chronic atrophic gastritis patients. Rapid Urease Test (RUT) and dark field microscopy were used to diagnose the presence of H. p...

  7. Synthesis and systematic evaluation of dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library and its application in cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongdong; Teoh, Chai Lean; Kang, Nam-Young; Yu, Xiaotong; Sahu, Srikanta; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report a new strategy for constructing a dye library with large Stokes shifts. By coupling a dark donor with BODIPY acceptors of tunable high quantum yield, a novel dark resonance energy transfer (DRET)-based library, named BNM, has been synthesized. Upon excitation of the dark donor (BDN) at 490 nm, the absorbed energy is transferred to the acceptor (BDM) with high efficiency, which was tunable in a broad range from 557 nm to 716 nm, with a high quantum yield of up to 0.8. It is noteworthy to mention that the majority of the non-radiative energy loss of the donor was converted into the acceptor's fluorescence output with a minimum leak of donor emission. Fluorescence imaging tested in live cells showed that the BNM compounds are cell-permeable and can also be employed for live-cell imaging. This is a new library which can be excited through a dark donor allowing for strong fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths. Thus, the BNM library is well suited for high-throughput screening or multiplex experiments in biological applications by using a single laser excitation source. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Automatic detection of Martian dark slope streaks by machine learning using HiRISE images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yexin; Di, Kaichang; Xin, Xin; Wan, Wenhui

    2017-07-01

    Dark slope streaks (DSSs) on the Martian surface are one of the active geologic features that can be observed on Mars nowadays. The detection of DSS is a prerequisite for studying its appearance, morphology, and distribution to reveal its underlying geological mechanisms. In addition, increasingly massive amounts of Mars high resolution data are now available. Hence, an automatic detection method for locating DSSs is highly desirable. In this research, we present an automatic DSS detection method by combining interest region extraction and machine learning techniques. The interest region extraction combines gradient and regional grayscale information. Moreover, a novel recognition strategy is proposed that takes the normalized minimum bounding rectangles (MBRs) of the extracted regions to calculate the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) feature and train a DSS classifier using the Adaboost machine learning algorithm. Comparative experiments using five different feature descriptors and three different machine learning algorithms show the superiority of the proposed method. Experimental results utilizing 888 extracted region samples from 28 HiRISE images show that the overall detection accuracy of our proposed method is 92.4%, with a true positive rate of 79.1% and false positive rate of 3.7%, which in particular indicates great performance of the method at eliminating non-DSS regions.

  9. A machine vision system for automated non-invasive assessment of cell viability via dark field microscopy, wavelet feature selection and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ning; Flaschel, Erwin; Friehs, Karl; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm

    2008-10-21

    Cell viability is one of the basic properties indicating the physiological state of the cell, thus, it has long been one of the major considerations in biotechnological applications. Conventional methods for extracting information about cell viability usually need reagents to be applied on the targeted cells. These reagent-based techniques are reliable and versatile, however, some of them might be invasive and even toxic to the target cells. In support of automated noninvasive assessment of cell viability, a machine vision system has been developed. This system is based on supervised learning technique. It learns from images of certain kinds of cell populations and trains some classifiers. These trained classifiers are then employed to evaluate the images of given cell populations obtained via dark field microscopy. Wavelet decomposition is performed on the cell images. Energy and entropy are computed for each wavelet subimage as features. A feature selection algorithm is implemented to achieve better performance. Correlation between the results from the machine vision system and commonly accepted gold standards becomes stronger if wavelet features are utilized. The best performance is achieved with a selected subset of wavelet features. The machine vision system based on dark field microscopy in conjugation with supervised machine learning and wavelet feature selection automates the cell viability assessment, and yields comparable results to commonly accepted methods. Wavelet features are found to be suitable to describe the discriminative properties of the live and dead cells in viability classification. According to the analysis, live cells exhibit morphologically more details and are intracellularly more organized than dead ones, which display more homogeneous and diffuse gray values throughout the cells. Feature selection increases the system's performance. The reason lies in the fact that feature selection plays a role of excluding redundant or misleading

  10. A machine vision system for automated non-invasive assessment of cell viability via dark field microscopy, wavelet feature selection and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friehs Karl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell viability is one of the basic properties indicating the physiological state of the cell, thus, it has long been one of the major considerations in biotechnological applications. Conventional methods for extracting information about cell viability usually need reagents to be applied on the targeted cells. These reagent-based techniques are reliable and versatile, however, some of them might be invasive and even toxic to the target cells. In support of automated noninvasive assessment of cell viability, a machine vision system has been developed. Results This system is based on supervised learning technique. It learns from images of certain kinds of cell populations and trains some classifiers. These trained classifiers are then employed to evaluate the images of given cell populations obtained via dark field microscopy. Wavelet decomposition is performed on the cell images. Energy and entropy are computed for each wavelet subimage as features. A feature selection algorithm is implemented to achieve better performance. Correlation between the results from the machine vision system and commonly accepted gold standards becomes stronger if wavelet features are utilized. The best performance is achieved with a selected subset of wavelet features. Conclusion The machine vision system based on dark field microscopy in conjugation with supervised machine learning and wavelet feature selection automates the cell viability assessment, and yields comparable results to commonly accepted methods. Wavelet features are found to be suitable to describe the discriminative properties of the live and dead cells in viability classification. According to the analysis, live cells exhibit morphologically more details and are intracellularly more organized than dead ones, which display more homogeneous and diffuse gray values throughout the cells. Feature selection increases the system's performance. The reason lies in the fact that feature

  11. Unmixing hyperspectral images using Markov random fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eches, Olivier; Dobigeon, Nicolas; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new spectral unmixing strategy based on the normal compositional model that exploits the spatial correlations between the image pixels. The pure materials (referred to as endmembers) contained in the image are assumed to be available (they can be obtained by using an appropriate endmember extraction algorithm), while the corresponding fractions (referred to as abundances) are estimated by the proposed algorithm. Due to physical constraints, the abundances have to satisfy positivity and sum-to-one constraints. The image is divided into homogeneous distinct regions having the same statistical properties for the abundance coefficients. The spatial dependencies within each class are modeled thanks to Potts-Markov random fields. Within a Bayesian framework, prior distributions for the abundances and the associated hyperparameters are introduced. A reparametrization of the abundance coefficients is proposed to handle the physical constraints (positivity and sum-to-one) inherent to hyperspectral imagery. The parameters (abundances), hyperparameters (abundance mean and variance for each class) and the classification map indicating the classes of all pixels in the image are inferred from the resulting joint posterior distribution. To overcome the complexity of the joint posterior distribution, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used to generate samples asymptotically distributed according to the joint posterior of interest. Simulations conducted on synthetic and real data are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Image Filtering with Field Programmable Gate Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arūnas Šlenderis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The research examined the use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGA in image filtering. Experimental and theoretical researches were reviewed. Experiments with Cyclone III family FPGA chip with implemented NIOS II soft processor were considered. Image filtering was achieved with symmetrical and asymmetrical finite impulse response filters with convolution kernel. The system, which was implemented with 3×3 symmetrical filter, which was implemented using the hardware description language, uses 59% of logic elements of the chip and 10 multiplication elements. The system with asymmetrical filter uses the same amount of logic elements and 13 multiplication elements. Both filter systems consume approx. 545 mW of power. The system, which is designed for filter implementation in C language, uses 65% of all logical elements and consumes 729 mW of power.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Padgett, Deborah L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Terebey, Susan; Angione, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Rebull, Luisa M. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Leisawitz, David, E-mail: wliu@ipac.caltech.edu [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 605, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  14. Convergence analysis in near-field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Gang; Li, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of the direct and inverse modeling of the diffraction by a perfectly conducting grating surface in the near-field regime. It is motivated by our effort to analyze recent significant numerical results, in order to solve a class of inverse rough surface scattering problems in near-field imaging. In a model problem, the diffractive grating surface is assumed to be a small and smooth deformation of a plane surface. On the basis of the variational method, the direct problem is shown to have a unique weak solution. An analytical solution is introduced as a convergent power series in the deformation parameter by using the transformed field and Fourier series expansions. A local uniqueness result is proved for the inverse problem where only a single incident field is needed. On the basis of the analytic solution of the direct problem, an explicit reconstruction formula is presented for recovering the grating surface function with resolution beyond the Rayleigh criterion. Error estimates for the reconstructed grating surface are established with fully revealed dependence on such quantities as the surface deformation parameter, measurement distance, noise level of the scattering data, and regularity of the exact grating surface function. (paper)

  15. Conformal Gravity: Dark Matter and Dark Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Nesbet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This short review examines recent progress in understanding dark matter, dark energy, and galactic halos using theory that departs minimally from standard particle physics and cosmology. Strict conformal symmetry (local Weyl scaling covariance, postulated for all elementary massless fields, retains standard fermion and gauge boson theory but modifies Einstein–Hilbert general relativity and the Higgs scalar field model, with no new physical fields. Subgalactic phenomenology is retained. Without invoking dark matter, conformal gravity and a conformal Higgs model fit empirical data on galactic rotational velocities, galactic halos, and Hubble expansion including dark energy.

  16. WISH: Wide-field Imaging Durvayor for High-redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toru

    2015-08-01

    We introduce the concept and current status of WISH project and discuss the science cases. WISH is a proposed space science mission for JAXA, which is dedicated for the deep and wide-field near-infrared imaging surveys. The mission contains the 1.5m cooled telescope as well as the imager with the FoV of ~850 square arcmin. The main goal of WISH is to detect and study galaxies at z=8-15 in the earliest history of structure formation in the universe. The key feature is to conduct WISH Ultra Deep Survey, which images in total of 100 square degrees in 6 broad-band filters at 0.9-4.5 micron down to 28AB magnitude. While more than 10^5 galaxies at z=8-9, 10^4 galaxies at z=11-12 will be detected, WISH-UDS is designed to constrain UV luminosity function at z=15. Depending on the models of the earliest evolution history, 1-1000 galaxies at z~15 (~100 galaxies for the moderate cases) will be detected. The UV spectral properties as well as the clustering properties of galaxies at z=8-15 can be studied as well; UV slope can be measured up to z=15, and the stellar and dark-matter-halo masses can be obtained up to z=9. WISH UDS can provide excellent opportunities for studying SNe at high redshift. Up to ~7000 type Ia SNe at z>1 can be detected and the distance modulus can be constrained with the precision of 0.9-1.5% at z>1.5. More than 100 Super Luminous SNe at z>6, and 10 SLSN at z>10 can also be detected, which allow us to study the earliest history of massive star formation in the universe. WISH imaging surveys as well as WISHSpec, which is an optional parallel-operation simple IFU spectrograph, also provide unique opportunities in various astronomical fields. WISH mission proposal was submitted to JAXA in February 2015 for the first down selection of JAXA Large Strategic Science Mission targeting the launch date in 2020-22. International collaborations including SAO (G.Fazio et al.), LAM (D. Burgarella et al.) and Canada (M.Sawicki et al.) are also actively coordinated.

  17. The Wide Field Imager instrument for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Barbera, Marco; Emberger, Valentin; Fürmetz, Maria; Manhart, Markus; Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Treberspurg, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    ESA's next large X-ray mission ATHENA is designed to address the Cosmic Vision science theme 'The Hot and Energetic Universe'. It will provide answers to the two key astrophysical questions how does ordinary matter assemble into the large-scale structures we see today and how do black holes grow and shape the Universe. The ATHENA spacecraft will be equipped with two focal plane cameras, a Wide Field Imager (WFI) and an X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU). The WFI instrument is optimized for state-of-the-art resolution spectroscopy over a large field of view of 40 amin x 40 amin and high count rates up to and beyond 1 Crab source intensity. The cryogenic X-IFU camera is designed for high-spectral resolution imaging. Both cameras share alternately a mirror system based on silicon pore optics with a focal length of 12 m and large effective area of about 2 m2 at an energy of 1 keV. Although the mission is still in phase A, i.e. studying the feasibility and developing the necessary technology, the definition and development of the instrumentation made already significant progress. The herein described WFI focal plane camera covers the energy band from 0.2 keV to 15 keV with 450 μm thick fully depleted back-illuminated silicon active pixel sensors of DEPFET type. The spatial resolution will be provided by one million pixels, each with a size of 130 μm x 130 μm. The time resolution requirement for the WFI large detector array is 5 ms and for the WFI fast detector 80 μs. The large effective area of the mirror system will be completed by a high quantum efficiency above 90% for medium and higher energies. The status of the various WFI subsystems to achieve this performance will be described and recent changes will be explained here.

  18. Wide-Field Lensing Mass Maps from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C; Vikram, V; Jain, B; Bacon, D; Amara, A; Becker, M R; Bernstein, G; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S; Brout, D; Busha, M; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Hartley, W; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Kovács, A; Lahav, O; Lin, H; Melchior, P; Peiris, H; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E; Sánchez, C; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Wechsler, R; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Bauer, A H; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Merritt, K W; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-07-31

    We present a mass map reconstructed from weak gravitational lensing shear measurements over 139  deg2 from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. The mass map probes both luminous and dark matter, thus providing a tool for studying cosmology. We find good agreement between the mass map and the distribution of massive galaxy clusters identified using a red-sequence cluster finder. Potential candidates for superclusters and voids are identified using these maps. We measure the cross-correlation between the mass map and a magnitude-limited foreground galaxy sample and find a detection at the 6.8σ level with 20 arc min smoothing. These measurements are consistent with simulated galaxy catalogs based on N-body simulations from a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant. This suggests low systematics uncertainties in the map. We summarize our key findings in this Letter; the detailed methodology and tests for systematics are presented in a companion paper.

  19. Dark Barchan Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    13 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows north polar sand dunes in the summertime. During winter and early spring, north polar dunes are covered with bright frost. When the frost sublimes away, the dunes appear darker than their surroundings. To a geologist, sand has a very specific meaning. A sand grain is defined independently of its composition; it is a particle with a size between 62.5 and 2000 microns. Two thousand microns equals 2 millimeters. The dunes are dark because they are composed of sand grains made of dark minerals and/or rock fragments. Usually, dark grains indicate the presence of unoxidized iron, for example, the dark volcanic rocks of Hawaii, Iceland, and elsewhere. This dune field is located near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Dune slip faces indicate winds that blow from the upper left toward lower right. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  20. Cardiac MRI. T2-mapping versus T2-weighted dark-blood TSE imaging for myocardial edema visualization in acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassenstein, K.; Nensa, F.; Schlosser, T.; Umutlu, L.; Lauenstein, T. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Bruder, O. [Elisabeth Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Angiology; Maderwald, S.; Ladd, M.E. [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of T2 mapping for the detection of myocardial edema in acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and to compare this diagnostic accuracy with that of the current standard for myocardial edema imaging, which is T2w dark-blood TSE imaging. Materials and Methods: 29 patients with AMI were examined at 1.5 T. For the visualization of myocardial edema, T2 maps, calculated from three T2w SSFP images, and T2w dark-blood TSE images were acquired in standard short- and long-axis views. Cine SSFP images were acquired for the analysis of left ventricular (LV) function and late gadolinium enhancement images (LGE) for the visualization of myocardial necrosis. The T2 maps as well as the T2w dark-blood TSE images were evaluated twice independently from the cine SSFP and LGE images. The presence or absence of myocardial edema was rated visually for each LV segment. As the standard of reference, the infarct zone was defined based on the cine SSFP and the LGE images. Results: In this segment-based analysis, T2 mapping showed a sensitivity of 82 % and a specificity of 94 % for the detection of edema in the infarct zone. T2w dark-blood TSE imaging revealed a sensitivity of 50 % and a specificity of 98 %. T2 mapping showed a higher intra-rater agreement compared to T2w dark-blood TSE imaging ({kappa}: 0.87 vs. 0.76). Conclusions: T2 mapping allows for the visualization of myocardial edema in AMI with a high sensitivity and specificity, and features better diagnostic accuracy in terms of a higher sensitivity compared to T2w dark-blood TSE imaging. (orig.)

  1. Rotation curves of high-resolution LSB and SPARC galaxies with fuzzy and multistate (ultralight boson) scalar field dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, T.; Fernández-Hernández, L. M.; Matos, T.; Rodríguez-Meza, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Cold dark matter (CDM) has shown to be an excellent candidate for the dark matter (DM) of the Universe at large scales; however, it presents some challenges at the galactic level. The scalar field dark matter (SFDM), also called fuzzy, wave, Bose-Einstein condensate, or ultralight axion DM, is identical to CDM at cosmological scales but different at the galactic ones. SFDM forms core haloes, it has a natural cut-off in its matter power spectrum, and it predicts well-formed galaxies at high redshifts. In this work we reproduce the rotation curves of high-resolution low surface brightness (LSB) and SPARC galaxies with two SFDM profiles: (1) the soliton+NFW profile in the fuzzy DM (FDM) model, arising empirically from cosmological simulations of real, non-interacting scalar field (SF) at zero temperature, and (2) the multistate SFDM (mSFDM) profile, an exact solution to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations for a real, self-interacting SF, with finite temperature into the SF potential, introducing several quantum states as a realistic model for an SFDM halo. From the fits with the soliton+NFW profile, we obtained for the boson mass 0.212 c2) < 27.0 and for the core radius 0.326 < rc/kpc < 8.96. From the combined analysis with the LSB galaxies, we obtained mψ = 0.554 × 10-23 eV, a result in tension with the severe cosmological constraints. Also, we show the analytical mSFDM model fits the observations as well as or better than the empirical soliton+NFW profile, and it reproduces naturally the wiggles present in some galaxies, being a theoretically motivated framework additional or alternative to the FDM profile.

  2. The Gravity of Dark Vortices: Effective Field Theory for Branes and Strings Carrying Localized Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Williams, M

    2015-01-01

    A Nielsen-Olesen vortex usually sits in an environment that expels the flux that is confined to the vortex, so flux is not present both inside and outside. We construct vortices for which this is not true, where the flux carried by the vortex also permeates the `bulk' far from the vortex. The idea is to mix the vortex's internal gauge flux with an external flux using off-diagonal kinetic mixing. Such `dark' vortices could play a phenomenological role in models with both cosmic strings and a dark gauge sector. When coupled to gravity they also provide explicit ultra-violet completions for codimension-two brane-localized flux, which arises in extra-dimensional models when the same flux that stabilizes extra-dimensional size is also localized on space-filling branes situated around the extra dimensions. We derive simple formulae for observables such as defect angle, tension, localized flux and on-vortex curvature when coupled to gravity, and show how all of these are insensitive to much of the microscopic detail...

  3. Infrared image detail enhancement based on the gradient field specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenda; Xu, Zhijun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Fan; Han, Xizhen

    2014-07-01

    Human vision is sensitive to the changes of local image details, which are actually image gradients. To enhance faint infrared image details, this article proposes a gradient field specification algorithm. First we define the image gradient field and gradient histogram. Then, by analyzing the characteristics of the gradient histogram, we construct a Gaussian function to obtain the gradient histogram specification and therefore obtain the transform gradient field. In addition, subhistogram equalization is proposed based on the histogram equalization to improve the contrast of infrared images. The experimental results show that the algorithm can effectively improve image contrast and enhance weak infrared image details and edges. As a result, it can give qualified image information for different applications of an infrared image. In addition, it can also be applied to enhance other types of images such as visible, medical, and lunar surface.

  4. Negatively Charged and Dark Excitons in CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals Revealed by High Magnetic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canneson, Damien; Shornikova, Elena V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Rogge, Tobias; Mitioglu, Anatolie A; Ballottin, Mariana V; Christianen, Peter C M; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Bayer, Manfred; Biadala, Louis

    2017-10-11

    The optical properties of colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite (CsPbBr 3 ) nanocrystals are examined by time-resolved and polarization-resolved spectroscopy in high magnetic fields up to 30 T. We unambiguously show that at cryogenic temperatures the emission is dominated by recombination of negatively charged excitons with radiative decay time of 300 ps. The additional long-lived emission, which decay time shortens from 40 down to 8 ns and in which the decay time shortens and relative amplitude increases in high magnetic fields, evidences the presence of a dark exciton. We evaluate g-factors of the bright exciton g X = +2.4, the electron g e = +2.18, and the hole g h = -0.22.

  5. WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds: gas-bearing dark matter minihalos?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Elizabeth A.; Oosterloo, Tom; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Cannon, John M.; Faerman, Yakov; Janesh, William; Janowiecki, Steven; Munoz, Ricardo; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John Joseph; Sternberg, Amiel

    A long standing problem in cosmology is the mismatch between the number of low mass dark matter halos predicted by simulations and the number of low mass galaxies observed in the Local Volume. We recently presented a set of isolated ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) identified within the

  6. Wide-Field, Deep UV Raman Hyperspectral Imager, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS), teaming with the University of South Carolina, proposes a revolutionary wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging system capable of...

  7. Accounting for Readout Dark in ACS/WFC Superbiases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, J. E.; Grogin, N. A.; Coe, D.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the properties of excess dark current accumulated during the 100-second full-frame readout of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) detectors. This excess dark current, called "readout dark", gives rise to ambient background gradients and hot columns in each ACS/WFC image. We present an analysis of simulated readout dark images developed in ACS ISR 2014-02, and find that the results from the simulated data cannot be fully reconciled with the results from observed bias images. We develop a new method to estimate the readout dark noise properties in ACS/WFC observations instead of using simulated images. While readout dark signal is removed from science images during the bias correction step in CALACS, the additional noise from the readout dark is currently not taken into account. We will update the ERR extensions of superbias images to include the appropriate noise from the ambient readout dark gradient and stable hot columns. We will also flag unstable hot columns in the DQ extensions of the superbiases. A new reference file pipeline for ACS/WFC that will implement these changes is currently under construction.

  8. The Dark Universe Through Einstein's Lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Deborah [SLAC; Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

    2013-07-23

    Bard's talk explains the phenomenon known as gravitational lensing and how astrophysicists use it to explore the 95 percent of the universe that remains unseen: dark matter and dark energy. One of the most surprising predictions made by Einstein's theory of relativity is that light doesn't travel through the universe in a straight line. The gravitational field of massive objects will deflect the path of light traveling past, giving some very dramatic effects. We see multiple images of quasars, galaxies smeared into arcs and circles and magnified images of the most distant objects in the universe. This explains how gravitational lensing was first observed and discusses how scientists use this phenomenon to study everything from exoplanets to dark matter to the structure of the universe and the mysterious dark energy.

  9. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng

    2014-02-01

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels' intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

  10. Strain relief and AlSb buffer layer morphology in GaSb heteroepitaxial films grown on Si as revealed by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajargah, S. Hosseini; Couillard, M.; Cui, K.; Tavakoli, S. Ghanad; Robinson, B.; Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S.; Botton, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    The interfacial misfit (IMF) dislocation array of an epitaxial GaSb film on a Si substrate has been imaged with high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The mismatch strain accommodation through dislocation formation has been investigated using geometric phase analysis (GPA) on HAADF-STEM images with atomic resolution to probe the defects' local strain distribution. These measurements indicate that the lattice parameter of the epitaxial film recovers its bulk value within three unit cells from the interface due to the relaxation through IMF dislocations. The atomic number contrast of the HAADF-STEM images and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry illustrate the formation of islands of AlSb buffer layer along the interface. The role of the AlSb buffer layer in facilitating the GaSb film growth on Si is further elucidated by investigating the strain field of the islands with the GPA.

  11. Complex scalar field dark matter and its impact on detectability of the stochastic gravitational wave background from inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Li, Bohua; Shapiro, Paul

    2017-01-01

    We consider an alternative dark matter candidate to WIMP-CDM, ultralight bosonic dark matter (m >=10-22 eV) described by a complex scalar field (SFDM). In a ΛSFDM universe, SFDM starts relativistic, evolving from a maximal stiff equation of state to radiation-like, before becoming nonrelativistic at late times. The SFDM particle parameters, mass and selfinteraction coupling strength, are therefore constrained by cosmological observables, esp. Neff, the effective number of neutrino species during BBN, and the redshift of matter-radiation equality. Furthermore, since the energy density contributed by the stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) from inflation is amplified during the stiff phase, this makes possible the detection of this SGWB at high frequencies by current experiments, e.g. aLIGO/Virgo and eLISA. We show that, for SFDM particle parameters that satisfy those cosmological constraints, the amplified SGWB is detectable by aLIGO, for values of tensor-to-scalar ratio r currently allowed by CMB polarization measurements, for a broad range of possible reheat temperatures. A nondetection by aLIGO O1 would provide a new kind of cosmological constraint on SFDM. Also, a wider range of parameters and reheat temperatures will be probed by aLIGO O5.

  12. Snake instability of dark solitons across the BEC-BCS crossover: An effective-field-theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, G.; Van Alphen, W.; Klimin, S. N.; Tempere, J.

    2017-09-01

    In the present article the snake instability mechanism for dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases is studied in the context of a recently developed effective field theory [S. N. Klimin et al., Eur. Phys. J. B 88, 122 (2015), 10.1140/epjb/e2015-60213-4]. This theoretical treatment has proven to be suitable to study stable dark solitons in quasi-one-dimensional setups across the BEC-BCS crossover. In this paper the nodal plane of the stable soliton solution is perturbed by adding a transverse modulation. The numerical solution of the system of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the amplitude of the perturbation leads to an estimate of the growth rate and characteristic length scale of the instability, which are calculated for a wide range of interaction regimes and compared to other theoretical predictions. The behavior of the maximum transverse size that the atomic cloud can have in order to preserve the stability is described across the BEC-BCS crossover. The analysis of the effects of spin imbalance on this critical length reveals a stabilization of the soliton with increasing imbalance and therefore provides the experimental community with a method to achieve the realization of stable solitons in real three-dimensional configurations, without reducing the system dimensionality.

  13. WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds: gas-bearing dark matter minihalos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Elizabeth A.; Oosterloo, Tom; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Cannon, John M.; Faerman, Yakov; Janesh, William; Janowiecki, Steven; Munoz, Ricardo; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John Joseph; Sternberg, Amiel

    2015-01-01

    A long standing problem in cosmology is the mismatch between the number of low mass dark matter halos predicted by simulations and the number of low mass galaxies observed in the Local Volume. We recently presented a set of isolated ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) identified within the dataset of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) HI line survey that are consistent with representing low-mass gas-bearing dark matter halos within the Local Volume (Adams+ 2013). At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have HI masses of ~10^5 Msun and indicative dynamical masses of 10^7-10^8 Msun. The HI diameters of the UCHVCs range from 4' to 20', or 1 to 6 kpc at a distance of 1 Mpc.We have selected the most compact and isolated UCHVCs with the highest average column densities as representing the best galaxy candidates. These systems have been observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to enable higher spatial resolution (~60") studies of the HI distribution. The HI morphology revealed by the WSRT data offers clues to the environment and origin of the UCHVCs, the kinematics of the HI allow the underlying mass distribution to be constrained, and the combination of spatial and spectral resolution allow the detection of a cold neutral medium component to the HI. The WSRT HI observations discriminate among the selected galaxy candidates for those objects that are most likely gas-bearing dark matter halos.One UCHVC, AGC198606, is of particular interest as it is located 16 km/s and 1.2 degrees from Leo T and has similar HI properties within the ALFALFA dataset. The WSRT HI observations reveal a smooth HI morphology and a velocity gradient along the HI major axis of the system consistent with rotation. These properties are consistent with the hypothesis that this object is a gas-bearing low-mass dark matter halo.

  14. A free-form lensing model of A370 revealing stellar mass dominated BCGs, in Hubble Frontier Fields images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Jose M.; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Broadhurst, Tom; Lam, Daniel; Vega-Ferrero, Jesús; Zheng, Wei; Lee, Slanger; Morishita, Takahiro; Bernstein, Gary; Lim, Jeremy; Silk, Joseph; Ford, Holland

    2018-02-01

    We derive a free-form mass distribution for the unrelaxed cluster A370 (z = 0.375), using the first release of the Hubble Frontier Fields images (76 orbits) and GLASS spectroscopy. Starting from a reliable set of 10 multiply lensed systems, we produce a free-form lens model that identifies ≈80 multiple images. Good consistency is found between models using independent subsamples of these lensed systems, with detailed agreement for the well-resolved arcs. The mass distribution has two very similar concentrations centred on the two prominent brightest cluster galaxies (or BCGs), with mass profiles that are accurately constrained by a uniquely useful system of long radially lensed images centred on both BCGs. We show that the lensing mass profiles of these BCGs are mainly accounted for by their stellar mass profiles, with a modest contribution from dark matter within r normal galaxies for which dark matter should dominate over stars. Growth via merging between BCGs is, however, consistent with this finding, so that stars still dominate over dark matter. We do not observe any significant offset between the positions of the peaks of the dark matter distribution and the light distribution.

  15. Between Fan Pilgrimage and Dark Tourism: Competing Agendas in Overseas Field Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorran, Chris

    2015-01-01

    An overseas field learning itinerary can be a powerful pedagogical tool for both directing student attention and complicating preexisting spatial narratives. However, one must beware of using the itinerary to replace one narrative with another. This paper examines the itinerary negotiation for a 15-day overseas field module conducted three…

  16. A New Dark Vortex on Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael H.; Tollefson, Joshua; Hsu, Andrew I.; de Pater, Imke; Simon, Amy A.; Hueso, Ricardo; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Patrick; Luszcz-Cook, Statia; Hammel, Heidi; Delcroix, Marc; de Kleer, Katherine; Orton, Glenn S.; Baranec, Christoph

    2018-03-01

    An outburst of cloud activity on Neptune in 2015 led to speculation about whether the clouds were convective in nature, a wave phenomenon, or bright companions to an unseen dark vortex (similar to the Great Dark Spot studied in detail by Voyager 2). The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) finally answered this question by discovering a new dark vortex at 45 degrees south planetographic latitude, named SDS-2015 for “southern dark spot discovered in 2015.” SDS-2015 is only the fifth dark vortex ever seen on Neptune. In this paper, we report on imaging of SDS-2015 using HST’s Wide Field Camera 3 across four epochs: 2015 September, 2016 May, 2016 October, and 2017 October. We find that the size of SDS-2015 did not exceed 20 degrees of longitude, more than a factor of two smaller than the Voyager dark spots, but only slightly smaller than previous northern-hemisphere dark spots. A slow (1.7–2.5 deg/year) poleward drift was observed for the vortex. Properties of SDS-2015 and its surroundings suggest that the meridional wind shear may be twice as strong at the deep level of the vortex as it is at the level of cloud-tracked winds. Over the 2015–2017 period, the dark spot’s contrast weakened from about -7 % to about -3 % , while companion clouds shifted from offset to centered, a similar evolution to some historical dark spots. The properties and evolution of SDS-2015 highlight the diversity of Neptune’s dark spots and the need for faster cadence dark spot observations in the future.

  17. NASA's Dark Matter and Dark Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J.K.

    2013-10-15

    We present an overview of selected high value scientific results and prospects for future advances from NASA's “Dark” missions, i.e., those covering dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE). This includes current missions HST, Chandra, Swift, GALEX, Suzaku, Fermi, and future missions JWST and WFIRST. These missions and earlier ones, such as WMAP, have brought about a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental properties of the universe – its age, rate of expansion, deceleration history, and composition (i.e., relative mix of luminous matter, dark matter, and dark energy). The next chapters in this story will be written by JWST and WFIRST. JWST was the highest priority of the 2000 Decadal Survey. It will observe in the near and medium infrared, and revolutionize our understanding of the high redshift universe. WFIRST is the highest ranked large space mission of the 2010 Decadal Survey. It is a NASA observatory designed to perform wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopic surveys of the NIR sky (0.7 – 2.5μ). WFIRST will: (i) measure the expansion history of the universe, and thereby constrain dark energy, (ii) find Earth-like planets around other stars using microlensing, and (iii) perform surveys that are ∼100 times more sensitive than current NIR surveys.

  18. The Dark Energy Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  19. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Honscheid, K. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Antonik, M.; Brooks, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L. [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Beaufore, L. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bernstein, G. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bernstein, R. A. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Campa, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energèticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Castander, F. J., E-mail: diehl@fnal.gov [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai, IEEC-CSIC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5 par-2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  20. New holographic reconstruction of scalar-field dark-energy models in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit [Pailan College of Management and Technology, Kolkata (India); Pasqua, Antonio [University of Trieste, Department of Physics, Trieste (Italy); Khurshudyan, Martiros [Yerevan State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Yerevan (Armenia); Potsdam-Golm Science Park, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Motivated by the work of Yang et al. (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:191, 2011), we report on a study of the new holographic dark energy (NHDE) model with energy density given by ρ{sub D} = (3φ{sup 2})/(4ω)(μH{sup 2} + νH) in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. We have studied the correspondence between the quintessence, the DBI-essence, and the tachyon scalar-field models with the NHDE model in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. Deriving an expression of the Hubble parameter H and, accordingly, ρ{sub D} in the context of chameleon Brans-Dicke chameleon cosmology, we have reconstructed the potentials and dynamics for these scalar-field models. Furthermore, we have examined the stability for the obtained solutions of the crossing of the phantom divide under a quantum correction of massless conformally invariant fields, and we have seen that the quantum correction could be small when the phantom crossing occurs and the obtained solutions of the phantom crossing could be stable under the quantum correction. It has also been noted that the potential increases as the matter. chameleon coupling gets stronger with the evolution of the universe. (orig.)

  1. New holographic reconstruction of scalar-field dark-energy models in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Pasqua, Antonio; Khurshudyan, Martiros

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Yang et al. (Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:191, 2011), we report on a study of the new holographic dark energy (NHDE) model with energy density given by ρ D = (3φ 2 )/(4ω)(μH 2 + νH) in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. We have studied the correspondence between the quintessence, the DBI-essence, and the tachyon scalar-field models with the NHDE model in the framework of chameleon Brans-Dicke cosmology. Deriving an expression of the Hubble parameter H and, accordingly, ρ D in the context of chameleon Brans-Dicke chameleon cosmology, we have reconstructed the potentials and dynamics for these scalar-field models. Furthermore, we have examined the stability for the obtained solutions of the crossing of the phantom divide under a quantum correction of massless conformally invariant fields, and we have seen that the quantum correction could be small when the phantom crossing occurs and the obtained solutions of the phantom crossing could be stable under the quantum correction. It has also been noted that the potential increases as the matter. chameleon coupling gets stronger with the evolution of the universe. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative Image Restoration in Bright Field Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Sánchez Miranda, Manuel de Jesús

    2017-11-07

    Bright field (BF) optical microscopy is regarded as a poor method to observe unstained biological samples due to intrinsic low image contrast. We introduce quantitative image restoration in bright field (QRBF), a digital image processing method that restores out-of-focus BF images of unstained cells. Our procedure is based on deconvolution, using a point spread function modeled from theory. By comparing with reference images of bacteria observed in fluorescence, we show that QRBF faithfully recovers shape and enables quantify size of individual cells, even from a single input image. We applied QRBF in a high-throughput image cytometer to assess shape changes in Escherichia coli during hyperosmotic shock, finding size heterogeneity. We demonstrate that QRBF is also applicable to eukaryotic cells (yeast). Altogether, digital restoration emerges as a straightforward alternative to methods designed to generate contrast in BF imaging for quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential brain imaging using near field radiomety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomou, A; Karanasiou, I S; Uzunoglu, N K

    2009-01-01

    During the past decades there has been a tremendous increase throughout the scientific community for developing methods of understanding human brain functionality, as diagnosis and treatment of diseases and malfunctions could be effectively developed through understanding of how the brain works. In parallel, research effort is driven on minimizing drawbacks of existing imaging techniques including potential risks from radiation and invasive attributes of the imaging methodologies. Towards that direction, we are proposing a near filed radiometry imaging system for intracranial applications. The methodology is based on the fact that human tissues emit chaotic thermal type radiation at temperatures above the absolute zero. Using a phase shifted antenna array system, resolution, detection depth and sensitivity are increased. Several different setups are theoretically investigated and compared, so as to make the proposed system useful for clinical applications. Combining previous research as well as new findings, the possibility of using the proposed system as a complementary method for brain imaging is discussed in the present paper.

  4. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A new compact large field of view (FOV multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second.

  5. Near Field Imaging at Microwave and Millemeter Wave Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-06-03

    Near field imaging at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies is useful for a wide variety of applications including concealed weapon detection, through-wall and inner-wall imaging, ground penetrating radar imaging, radar cross section analysis, and non-destructive evaluation of materials. A variety of novel imaging techniques have been developed for many of these applications at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) . These techniques make use of wideband holographic wavefront reconstruction methods, and have been developed to optimize the image quality and resolution. This paper will summarize several of these techniques and show imaging results for several interesting application areas.

  6. Dark matter and dark energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Caldwell, Robert

    2009-01-01

    "Observations continue to indicate that the Universe is dominated by invisible components - dark matter and dark energy. Shedding light on this cosmic darkness is a priority for astronomers and physicists" (3 pages)

  7. Non-invasive terahertz field imaging inside parallel plate waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We present a non-invasive broadband air photonic method of imaging of the electric field of THz pulses propagating inside a tapered parallel plate waveguide. The method is based on field-enhanced second harmonic generation of the fundamental laser beam in an external electric field. We apply...

  8. Current status on image processing in medical fields in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Kazuhiko

    1979-01-01

    Information on medical images are classified in the two patterns. 1) off-line images on films-x-ray films, cell image, chromosome image etc. 2) on-line images detected through sensors, RI image, ultrasonic image, thermogram etc. These images are divided into three characteristic, two dimensional three dimensional and dynamic images. The research on medical image processing have been reported in several meeting in Japan and many fields on images have been studied on RI, thermogram, x-ray film, x-ray-TV image, cancer cell, blood cell, bacteria, chromosome, ultrasonics, and vascular image. Processing on TI image useful and easy because of their digital displays. Software on smoothing, restoration (iterative approximation), fourier transformation, differentiation and subtration. Image on stomach and chest x-ray films have been processed automatically utilizing computer system. Computed Tomography apparatuses have been already developed in Japan and automated screening instruments on cancer cells and recently on blood cells classification have been also developed. Acoustical holography imaging and moire topography have been also studied in Japan. (author)

  9. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  10. A STUDY OF THE CHAMELEON-I DARK CLOUD AND T-ASSOCIATION .6. INTERSTELLAR POLARIZATION, GRAIN ALIGNMENT AND MAGNETIC-FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WHITTET, DCB; GERAKINES, PA; CARKNER, AL; HOUGH, JH; MARTIN, PG; PRUSTI, T; KILKENNY, D

    1994-01-01

    We present new measurements of optical and near-infrared linear polarization towards 39 field stars reddened by dust in the Chamaeleon I dark cloud. New and previously published data are combined in a detailed investigation of the wavelength dependence of interstellar polarization in the cloud. The

  11. Super-resolution near field imaging device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging device comprising at least a first and a second elongated coupling element, each having a first transverse dimension at a first end and a second transverse dimension at a second end and being adapted for guiding light between their respective first and second ends, each...... of the matrix and the second ends of the coupling elements are located at or in a vicinity of the second side of the matrix. The second transverse dimension is larger than the first transverse dimension. A microscope objective system and a microscope comprising the super-resolution imaging device are also...

  12. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images.

  13. Dark Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Bali-Hudáková, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the variability of the demand and the development of new trends in the fields of the tourism industry. Special attention is devoted to a new arising trend of the Dark Tourism. This trend has appeared in the end of the 20th century and it has gained the attraction of media, tourists, tourism specialists and other stakeholders. First part of the thesis is concerned with the variety of the tourism industry and the ethic question of the tourism development. The other par...

  14. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Finlay, Chris; Hesse, M.

    2017-01-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagneticmain field. Observations from...... the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine...

  15. New design of InGaAs guided-mode resonance photodiode for SWIR low dark current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdun, Michaël.; Portier, Benjamin; Jaworowicz, Katarzyna; Jaeck, Julien; Dupuis, Christophe; Haidar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a full-dielectric guided mode resonant photodiode. It has been designed to enhance the absorption by excitation of several resonances in the SWIR domain. The device consists of an InP/InGaAs/InP P-i-N heterojunction containing an active layer as thin as 90 nm on top of a subwavelength lamellar grating and a gold mirror. We successfully compared the electro-optical characterizations of individual pixels with electro-magnetic simulations. In particular, we observe near perfect collection of the photo-carriers and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 71% around 1.55 μm. Moreover, compared with InGaAs resonator state-of-the-art detector, we show a broader spectral response in the 1.2-1.7 μm range, thus paving the way for SWIR low dark current imaging.

  16. Frozen lattice and absorptive model for high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A comparison study in terms of integrated intensity and atomic column position measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alania, M; Lobato, I; Van Aert, S

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, both the frozen lattice (FL) and the absorptive potential (AP) approximation models are compared in terms of the integrated intensity and the precision with which atomic columns can be located from an image acquired using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The comparison is made for atoms of Cu, Ag, and Au. The integrated intensity is computed for both an isolated atomic column and an atomic column inside an FCC structure. The precision has been computed using the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), which provides a theoretical lower bound on the variance with which parameters can be estimated. It is shown that the AP model results into accurate measurements for the integrated intensity only for small detector ranges under relatively low angles and for small thicknesses. In terms of the attainable precision, both methods show similar results indicating picometer range precision under realistic experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The problem with the traveller's gaze: Images of the Dark Continent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper interrogates the image of Africa presented by Paul Theroux in his travel novel, The Lower River. In the analysis of the novel, I argue that Theroux's narrative is a reconstruction of the Western colonizing discourse in contemporary literature. His narrative seeks to construct an image of Africa for the consumption of ...

  18. Interacting viscous entropy-corrected holographic scalar field models of dark energy with time-varying G in modified FRW cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adabi, Farzin; Karami, Kayoomars; Felegary, Fereshte; Azarmi, Zohre

    2012-01-01

    We study the entropy-corrected version of the holographic dark energy (HDE) model in the framework of modified Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology. We consider a non-flat universe filled with an interacting viscous entropy-corrected HDE (ECHDE) with dark matter. Also included in our model is the case of the variable gravitational constant G. We obtain the equation of state and the deceleration parameters of the interacting viscous ECHDE. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting viscous ECHDE model with time-varying G. (research papers)

  19. Dark energy and dark matter in galaxy halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetradis, N.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the dark matter is coupled through its mass to a scalar field associated with the dark energy of the Universe. In order for such a field to play a role at the present cosmological distances, it must be effectively massless at galactic length scales. We discuss the effect of the field on the distribution of dark matter in galaxy halos. We show that the profile of the distribution outside the galaxy core remains largely unaffected and the approximately flat rotation curves persist. The dispersion of the dark matter velocity is enhanced by a potentially large factor relative to the case of zero coupling between dark energy and dark matter. The counting rates in terrestrial dark matter detectors are similarly enhanced. Existing bounds on the properties of dark matter candidates can be extended to the coupled case, by taking into account the enhancement factor

  20. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Min Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1D. After the U(1D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3→2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  1. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  2. Arctic Clouds Infrared Imaging Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J. A. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI), a passive thermal imaging system, was deployed at the North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to July 2014 for measuring spatial-temporal cloud statistics. Thermal imaging of the sky from the ground provides high radiometric contrast during night and polar winter when visible sensors and downward-viewing thermal sensors experience low contrast. In addition to demonstrating successful operation in the Arctic for an extended period and providing data for Arctic cloud studies, a primary objective of this deployment was to validate novel instrument calibration algorithms that will allow more compact ICI instruments to be deployed without the added expense, weight, size, and operational difficulty of a large-aperture onboard blackbody calibration source. This objective was successfully completed with a comparison of the two-year data set calibrated with and without the onboard blackbody. The two different calibration methods produced daily-average cloud amount data sets with correlation coefficient = 0.99, mean difference = 0.0029 (i.e., 0.29% cloudiness), and a difference standard deviation = 0.054. Finally, the ICI instrument generally detected more thin clouds than reported by other ARM cloud products available as of late 2015.

  3. Near-field nano-imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang (Inventor); Ho, Seng-Tiong (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An imaging device. In one embodiment, the imaging device includes a plurality of first electrode strips in parallel to each other along a first direction x, wherein each first electrode strip has an elongated body with a first surface and an opposite, second surface and a thickness n.sub.1. The imaging device also includes a plurality of second electrode strips in parallel to each other along a second direction y that is substantially perpendicular to the first direction x, wherein each second electrode strip has an elongated body with a first surface and an opposite, second surface and a thickness n.sub.2. The plurality of second electrode strips are positioned apart from the plurality of first electrode strips along a third direction z that is substantially perpendicular to the first direction x and the second direction y such that the plurality of first electrode strips and the plurality of second electrode strips are crossing each other accordingly to form a corresponding number of crossing points. And at each crossing point, a semiconductor component is filled between the second surface of a corresponding first electrode strip and the first surface of a corresponding second electrode strip to form an addressable pixel.

  4. Medical diagnostic through image: Whose field?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaja, G.V.

    1997-01-01

    This article refers the process to be carried out, to obtain an integral diagnostic with the help of x rays, mammography, axial computerized mammography and ultrasonic. It includes information of the academic preparation of doctors in Costa Rica, and the need of more specialization in the radiologic field. (S. Grainger) [es

  5. Real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging system with a 32 × 32 0.13?m CMOS low dark-count single-photon avalanche diode array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.U.; Arlt, J.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Buts, A.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.

    2010-01-01

    A compact real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system based on an array of low dark count 0.13?m CMOS singlephoton avalanche diodes (SPADs) is demonstrated. Fast background-insensitive fluorescence lifetime determination is achieved by use of a recently proposed algorithm called

  6. Mechanical setup for optical aperture synthesis for wide field imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, P.T.M.; Ouwerkerk, B.R.; Brug, H. van; Dool, T.C. van den; Avoort, C. van der

    2004-01-01

    Homothetic mapping is a technique that combines the images from several telescopes so that it looks like as though they came form a single large telescope. This technique enables a much wider interferometric field of image than current techniques can provide. To investigate the feasibility, a

  7. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...

  8. TAURUS - a wide field imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, P.D.; Taylor, K.

    1983-01-01

    TAURUS, an imaging Fabry-Perot system developed by the Royal Greenwich Observatory and Imperial College London, is described. The imaging process is explained and the technique is compared with grating spectrographs. It is argued that TAURUS is superior for obtaining field information from extended emission line sources. (Auth.)

  9. Improved field free line magnetic particle imaging using saddle coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Marlitt; Sattel, Timo F; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel tracer-based imaging method detecting the distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles in vivo in three dimensions and in real time. Conventionally, MPI uses the signal emitted by SPIO tracer material located at a field free point (FFP). To increase the sensitivity of MPI, however, an alternative encoding scheme collecting the particle signal along a field free line (FFL) was proposed. To provide the magnetic fields needed for line imaging in MPI, a very efficient scanner setup regarding electrical power consumption is needed. At the same time, the scanner needs to provide a high magnetic field homogeneity along the FFL as well as parallel to its alignment to prevent the appearance of artifacts, using efficient radon-based reconstruction methods arising for a line encoding scheme. This work presents a dynamic FFL scanner setup for MPI that outperforms all previously presented setups in electrical power consumption as well as magnetic field quality.

  10. Improved field-mapping and artifact correction in multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Brady; Shi, Xinwei; Weber, Hans; Hargreaves, Brian A

    2017-11-01

    To develop a method for improved B 0 field-map estimation, deblurring, and image combination for multispectral imaging near metal. A goodness-of-fit field-map estimation technique is proposed that uses only the multispectral imaging (MSI) data to estimate the field map. Using the improved field map, a novel deblurring technique is proposed that also employs a new image combination scheme to reduce the effects of noise and other residual MSI artifacts. The proposed field-map estimation and deblurring techniques are compared to the current methods in phantoms and/or in vivo from subjects with knee, hip, and spinal metallic implants. Phantom experiments validate that the goodness-of-fit field-map estimation is less sensitive to noise and bias than the conventional center-of-mass technique, which reduces distortion in the deblurring methods. The new deblurring approach also is substantially less sensitive to noise and distortion than the current deblurring method, as demonstrated in phantoms and in vivo, and is able to find a good tradeoff between deblurring and distortion. The proposed methods not only enable field-mapping with reduced noise sensitivity but are able to create deblurred images with less distortion and better signal-to-noise ratio with no additional scan time, thereby enabling improved visualization of underlying anatomy near metallic implants. Magn Reson Med 78:2022-2034, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Complex Scalar Field Dark Matter and the Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background from Inflation: New Cosmological Constraints and Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bohua; Shapiro, Paul R.; Rindler-Daller, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    We consider an alternative to WIMP cold dark matter (CDM), ultralight bosonic dark matter (m≥10-22 eV) described by a complex scalar field (SFDM), of which the comoving particle number density is conserved after particle production during standard reheating (w=p/ρ=0). In a ΛSFDM universe, SFDM starts relativistic, evolving from stiff (w=1) to radiation-like (w=1/3), before becoming nonrelativistic at late times (w=0). Thus, before the familiar radiation-dominated phase, there is an even earlier phase of stiff-SFDM-domination, during which the expansion rate is higher than in ΛCDM. The transitions between these phases, determined by SFDM particle mass m, and coupling strength λ, of a quartic self-interaction, are therefore constrained by cosmological observables, particularly Neff, the effective number of neutrino species during BBN, and zeq, the redshift of matter-radiation equality. Furthermore, since the homogeneous energy density contributed by the stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) from inflation is amplified during the stiff phase, relative to the other components, the SGWB can contribute a radiation-like component large enough to affect these observables. This same amplification makes possible detection of this SGWB at high frequencies by current laser interferometer experiments, e.g., aLIGO/Virgo, eLISA. For SFDM particle parameters that satisfy these cosmological constraints, the amplified SGWB is detectable by aLIGO, for values of tensor-to-scalar ratio r currently allowed by CMB polarization measurements, for a broad range of possible reheat temperatures Tre. For a given r, if SFDM parameters marginally satisfy cosmological constraints (maximizing total SGWB energy density), the SGWB is maximally detectable when modes that reenter the horizon when reheating ends have frequencies in the 10-50 Hz aLIGO band today. For example, if r=0.01, the maximally detectable model for (λ/(mc2)2, m)=(10-18 eV-1cm3, 8×10-20 eV) has Tre=104 GeV, for

  12. Deep Imaging of the HCG 95 Field. I. Ultra-diffuse Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong Dong; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Zhao, Hai Bin; Pan, Zhi Zheng; Li, Bin; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Guo, KeXin; An, Fang Xia; Li, Yu Bin

    2017-09-01

    We present a detection of 89 candidates of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in a 4.9 degree2 field centered on the Hickson Compact Group 95 (HCG 95) using deep g- and r-band images taken with the Chinese Near Object Survey Telescope. This field contains one rich galaxy cluster (Abell 2588 at z = 0.199) and two poor clusters (Pegasus I at z = 0.013 and Pegasus II at z = 0.040). The 89 candidates are likely associated with the two poor clusters, giving about 50-60 true UDGs with a half-light radius {r}{{e}}> 1.5 {kpc} and a central surface brightness μ (g,0)> 24.0 mag arcsec-2. Deep z\\prime -band images are available for 84 of the 89 galaxies from the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey (DECaLS), confirming that these galaxies have an extremely low central surface brightness. Moreover, our UDG candidates are spread over a wide range in g - r color, and ˜26% are as blue as normal star-forming galaxies, which is suggestive of young UDGs that are still in formation. Interestingly, we find that one UDG linked with HCG 95 is a gas-rich galaxy with H I mass 1.1× {10}9 M ⊙ detected by the Very Large Array, and has a stellar mass of {M}\\star ˜ 1.8× {10}8 M ⊙. This indicates that UDGs at least partially overlap with the population of nearly dark galaxies found in deep H I surveys. Our results show that the high abundance of blue UDGs in the HCG 95 field is favored by the environment of poor galaxy clusters residing in H I-rich large-scale structures.

  13. Core or Cusps: The Central Dark Matter Profile of a Strong Lensing Cluster with a Bright Central Image at Redshift 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Lin, Huan; Bacon, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Nord, Brian; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Amara, Adam; Birrer, Simon; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; More, Anupreeta; Papovich, Casey; Romer, Kathy K.; Tessore, Nicolas; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Allam, Sahar; Annis, James; Benoit-Lévy, Aurlien; Brooks, David; Burke, David L.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Castander, Francisco Javier J.; D’Andrea, Chris B.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H. Thomas; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Flaugher, Brenna; Frieman, Josh; Gerdes, David W.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Gruen, Daniel; Gschwend, Julia; Gutierrez, Gaston; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuhlmann, Steve; Lahav, Ofer; Li, Ting S.; Lima, Marcos; Maia, Marcio A. G.; March, Marisa; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Martini, Paul; Melchior, Peter; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrs A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Sanchez, Eusebio; Scarpine, Vic; Schindler, Rafe; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, Mathew; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Tucker, Douglas L.; Walker, Alistair R.

    2017-07-10

    We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.

  14. Electric field effects in scanning tunneling microscope imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Quaade, Ulrich; Grey, Francois

    1998-01-01

    We present a high-voltage extension of the Tersoff-Hamann theory of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which includes the effect of the electric field between the tip and the sample. The theoretical model is based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and has no adjustable...... parameters. We use the method to calculate theoretical STM images of the monohydrate Si(100)-H(2x1) surface with missing hydrogen defects at -2V and find an enhanced corrugation due to the electric field, in good agreement with experimental images....

  15. Image Formation in Second-Harmonic Near-Field Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Lozovski, Valeri Z.; Pedersen, Kjeld

    1999-01-01

    A macroscopic self-consistent approach that enables one to rigorously describe image formation in scanning near-field optical second-harmonic generation microscopy is developed. The self-consistent second-harmonic field is determined by taking into account both the linear and nonlinear...... results calculated for a rectangular object are presented and compared with experimental observations. It is demonstrated that the optical contrast and the spatial resolution are significantly better in the second-harmonic images than in the images obtained at the fundamental frequency....

  16. Terahertz field imaging inside tapered parallel plate waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    We present a non-invasive broadband air photonic method of terahertz field imaging inside a tapered parallel plate waveguide. The method is based on the terahertz-enhanced second harmonic generation of the fundamental laser beam in an external electric field. We also demonstrate the direct...

  17. THz near-field imaging of biological tissues employing synchrotronradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Ulrich; Holldack, Karsten; Martin, Michael C.; Fried,Daniel

    2004-12-23

    Terahertz scanning near-field infrared microscopy (SNIM) below 1 THz is demonstrated. The near-field technique benefits from the broadband and highly brilliant coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) from an electron storage ring and from a detection method based on locking onto the intrinsic time structure of the synchrotron radiation. The scanning microscope utilizes conical wave guides as near-field probes with apertures smaller than the wavelength. Different cone approaches have been investigated to obtain maximum transmittance. Together with a Martin-Puplett spectrometer the set-up enables spectroscopic mapping of the transmittance of samples well below the diffraction limit. Spatial resolution down to about lambda/40 at 2 wavenumbers (0.06 THz) is derived from the transmittance spectra of the near-field probes. The potential of the technique is exemplified by imaging biological samples. Strongly absorbing living leaves have been imaged in transmittance with a spatial resolution of 130 mu-m at about 12 wave numbers (0.36 THz). The THz near-field images reveal distinct structural differences of leaves from different plants investigated. The technique presented also allows spectral imaging of bulky organic tissues. Human teeth samples of various thicknesses have been imaged between 2 and 20 wavenumbers (between 0.06and 0.6 THz). Regions of enamel and dentin within tooth samples are spatially and spectrally resolved, and buried caries lesions are imaged through both the outer enamel and into the underlying dentin.

  18. Plenoptic Imaging for Three-Dimensional Particle Field Diagnostics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hall, Elise Munz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising emerging technology for single-camera, 3D diagnostics of particle fields. In this work, recent developments towards quantitative measurements of particle size, positions, and velocities are discussed. First, the technique is proven viable with measurements of the particle field generated by the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water. Next, well cont rolled experiments are used to verify diagnostic uncertainty. Finally, an example is presented of 3D plenoptic imaging of a laboratory scale, explosively generated fragment field.

  19. The problem with the traveller's gaze: Images of the Dark Continent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipenga

    New Names, Helon Habila argues that some modern African writers “tend to perform Africa” by pushing an ... American writer, paints an image of modern day Malawi that is deplorable and overtly racist. In The Lower ..... Africa is being justified by the same stereotypes that justified slavery and colonization, as evidenced in ...

  20. Determining 3D flow fields via multi-camera light field imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Tadd T; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R; Daily, David J; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-03-06

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture (1). Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet.

  1. Dark clouds in particle physics and cosmology: the issues of dark matter and dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinmin

    2011-01-01

    Unveiling the nature of dark matter and dark energy is one of the main tasks of particle physics and cosmology in the 21st century. We first present an overview of the history and current status of research in cosmology, at the same time emphasizing the new challenges in particle physics. Then we focus on the scientific issues of dark energy, dark matter and anti-matter, and review the recent progress made in these fields. Finally, we discuss the prospects for future research on the experimental probing of dark matter and dark energy in China. (authors)

  2. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, David; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Béché, Armand

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. A strain value of 5.4%60.1% has been determined which is consi......The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are greatly influenced by their strain state. Dark field electron holography has been used to measure the strain in InAs quantum dots grown in InP with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. A strain value of 5.4%60.1% has been determined which...

  3. Interactions between dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated interacting dark energy cosmologies both concerning their impact on the background evolution of the Universe and their effects on cosmological structure growth. For the former aspect, we have developed a cosmological model featuring a matter species consisting of particles with a mass that increases with time. In such model the appearance of a Growing Matter component, which is negligible in early cosmology, dramatically slows down the evolution of the dark energy scalar field at a redshift around six, and triggers the onset of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, therefore addressing the Coincidence Problem. We propose to identify this Growing Matter component with cosmic neutrinos, in which case the present dark energy density can be related to the measured average mass of neutrinos. For the latter aspect, we have implemented the new physical features of interacting dark energy models into the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2, and we present the results of a series of high-resolution simulations for a simple realization of dark energy interaction. As a consequence of the new physics, cold dark matter and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of cold dark matter halos are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with Λ CDM . Also, the baryon fraction in halos in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the Λ CDM model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter space of such scenarios

  4. Interactions between dark energy and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, Marco

    2009-03-20

    We have investigated interacting dark energy cosmologies both concerning their impact on the background evolution of the Universe and their effects on cosmological structure growth. For the former aspect, we have developed a cosmological model featuring a matter species consisting of particles with a mass that increases with time. In such model the appearance of a Growing Matter component, which is negligible in early cosmology, dramatically slows down the evolution of the dark energy scalar field at a redshift around six, and triggers the onset of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, therefore addressing the Coincidence Problem. We propose to identify this Growing Matter component with cosmic neutrinos, in which case the present dark energy density can be related to the measured average mass of neutrinos. For the latter aspect, we have implemented the new physical features of interacting dark energy models into the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2, and we present the results of a series of high-resolution simulations for a simple realization of dark energy interaction. As a consequence of the new physics, cold dark matter and baryon distributions evolve differently both in the linear and in the non-linear regime of structure formation. Already on large scales, a linear bias develops between these two components, which is further enhanced by the non-linear evolution. We also find, in contrast with previous work, that the density profiles of cold dark matter halos are less concentrated in coupled dark energy cosmologies compared with {lambda}{sub CDM}. Also, the baryon fraction in halos in the coupled models is significantly reduced below the universal baryon fraction. These features alleviate tensions between observations and the {lambda}{sub CDM} model on small scales. Our methodology is ideally suited to explore the predictions of coupled dark energy models in the fully non-linear regime, which can provide powerful constraints for the viable parameter

  5. Search for Low-Mass Dark Matter wtih SuperCDMS Soudan and Study of Shorted Electric Field Configurations in CDMS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneck, Kristiana [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The area of dark matter is one of the most interesting and exciting topics in physics today. Existing at the intersection of particle physics and astrophysics, the existence of a new dark matter particle can be used to explain many astrophysical and cosmological observations, as well as to reconcile outstanding issues in the standard model of particle physics. Experiments such as SuperCDMS are built to detect dark matter in the lab by looking for low-energy nuclear recoils produced by collisions between dark matter particles and atoms in terrestrial detectors. SuperCDMS Soudan is particularly well-suited to follow up on possible hints of low-mass dark matter seen by other recent experiments because of its low thresholds and excellent background discrimination. Analyzing SuperCDMS Soudan data to look for low-mass dark matter comes with particular challenges because of the low signal-to-noise very near threshold. However, with a detailed background model developed by scaling high-energy events down into the low-energy signal region, SuperCDMS Soudan produced worldleading limits on the existence of low-mass dark matter. In addition, a few SuperCDMS Soudan detectors experienced cold hardware problems that can affect the data collected. Of particular interest is one detector considered for the low-mass WIMP search that has one of its charge electrodes shorted to chassis ground. Three events were observed in this detector upon unblinding the SuperCDMS Soudan low-energy data, even though <1 event was expected based on pre-unblinding calulations. However, the data collected by the shorted detector may have been compromised since an electrode shorted to ground will modify the electric field in the detector. The SuperCDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC) provides an excellent way to model the effects of the modified electric field, so a new model of the expected backgrounds in the low-mass WIMP search is developed using the DMC to try to explain how the short may have affected the

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging with nonlinear gradient fields signal encoding and image reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Schultz, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades magnetic resonance imaging has become one of the most important imaging modalities in medicine. For a reliable diagnosis of pathologies further technological improvements are of primary importance. This text deals with a radically new approach of image encoding: The fundamental principle of gradient linearity is challenged by investigating the possibilities of acquiring anatomical images with the help of nonlinear gradient fields. Besides a thorough theoretical analysis with a focus on signal encoding and image reconstruction, initial hardware implementations are tested using phantom as well as in-vivo measurements. Several applications are presented that give an impression about the implications that this technological advancement may have for future medical diagnostics.   Contents n  Image Reconstruction in MRI n  Nonlinear Gradient Encoding: PatLoc Imaging n  Presentation of Initial Hardware Designs n  Basics of Signal Encoding and Image Reconstruction in PatLoc Imaging n ...

  7. Extended depth of field imaging through multicore optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Antony; Ploschner, Martin; Maksymov, Ivan S; Gibson, Brant C

    2018-03-05

    Compact microendoscopes use multicore optical fibers (MOFs) to visualize hard-to-reach regions of the body. These devices typically have a large numerical aperture (NA) and are fixed-focus, leading to blurry images from a shallow depth of field with little focus control. In this work, we demonstrate a method to digitally adjust the collection aperture and therefore extend the depth of field of lensless MOF imaging probes. We show that the depth of field can be more than doubled for certain spatial frequencies, and observe a resolution enhancement of up to 78% at a distance of 50μm from the MOF facet. Our technique enables imaging of complex 3D objects at a comparable working distance to lensed MOFs, but without the requirement of lenses, scan units or transmission matrix calibration. Our approach is implemented in post processing and may be used to improve contrast in any microendoscopic probe utilizing a MOF and incoherent light.

  8. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2016-01-01

    The technology and techniques for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field may be used for (illuminating) volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology, electric field sensor (e-sensor), and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasistatic generator), and current e-sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-sensor) are discussed. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. This new EFI capability is demonstrated to reveal characterization of electric charge distribution, creating a new field of study that embraces areas of interest including electrostatic discharge mitigation, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, dielectric morphology of structures, inspection of containers, inspection for hidden objects, tether integrity, organic molecular memory, and medical diagnostic and treatment efficacy applications such as cardiac polarization wave propagation and electromyography imaging.

  9. WFIRST: Astrometry with the Wide-Field Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Andrea; WFIRST Astrometry Working Group

    2018-01-01

    The wide field of view and stable, sharp images delivered by WFIRST's Wide-Field Imager make it an excellent instrument for astrometry, one of five major discovery areas identified in the 2010 Decadal Survey. Compared to the Hubble Space Telescope, WFIRST's wider field of view with similar image quality will provide hundreds more astrometric targets per image as well as background galaxies and stars with precise positions in the Gaia catalog. In addition, WFIRST will operate in the infrared, a wavelength regime where the most precise astrometry has so far been achieved with adaptive optics images from large ground-based telescopes. WFIRST will provide at least a factor of three improvement in astrometry over the current state of the art in this wavelength range, while spanning a field of view thousands of times larger. WFIRST is thus poised to make major contributions to multiple science topics in which astrometry plays an important role, without major alterations to the planned mission or instrument. We summarize a few of the most compelling science cases where WFIRST astrometry could prove transformational.

  10. New interactions in the dark sector mediated by dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookfield, Anthony W.; Bruck, Carsten van de; Hall, Lisa M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Cosmological observations have revealed the existence of a dark matter sector, which is commonly assumed to be made up of one particle species only. However, this sector might be more complicated than we currently believe: there might be more than one dark matter species (for example, two components of cold dark matter or a mixture of hot and cold dark matter) and there may be new interactions between these particles. In this paper we study the possibility of multiple dark matter species and interactions mediated by a dark energy field. We study both the background and the perturbation evolution in these scenarios. We find that the background evolution of a system of multiple dark matter particles (with constant couplings) mimics a single fluid with a time-varying coupling parameter. However, this is no longer true on the perturbative level. We study the case of attractive and repulsive forces as well as a mixture of cold and hot dark matter particles

  11. Fingerprinting Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sapone, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Dark energy perturbations are normally either neglected or else included in a purely numerical way, obscuring their dependence on underlying parameters like the equation of state or the sound speed. However, while many different explanations for the dark energy can have the same equation of state, they usually differ in their perturbations so that these provide a fingerprint for distinguishing between different models with the same equation of state. In this paper we derive simple yet accurate approximations that are able to characterize a specific class of models (encompassing most scalar field models) which is often generically called "dark energy". We then use the approximate solutions to look at the impact of the dark energy perturbations on the dark matter power spectrum and on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  12. Medical Imaging Field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Identification of Specialties within the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if specialty areas are emerging in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profession due to advancements made in the medical sciences, imaging technology, and clinical applications used in MRI that would require new developments in education/training programs and national registry examinations. In this…

  13. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fittinghoff D.N.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n′ reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  14. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and FERMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E greater than100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99 confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) x 10(sup -8) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (VERITAS,greater than 220 GeV) and approximately 2 x 10(sup -6) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be less than 16% from VERITAS data and less than 1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 50. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of approximately (2-5.5)microG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark

  15. Exact image theory for field calculation in layered biological medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanen, E.; Lindell, I.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method based on the exact image theory to calculate the near field distribution of a horn antenna in direct contact with the skin is introduced. Being exact, the method is not restricted by parameter values and can be applied in optimization of horn aperture function to produce focus fields in the human body. The method observes the effect of the skin layer and can be applied for an arbitrary aperture function. The optimization is demonstrated with few examples

  16. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  17. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING POLARIMETRY OF GGD 27: CIRCULAR POLARIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hough, James H. [University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Nagata, Tetsuya [Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kusakabe, Nobuhiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Saito, Hiro, E-mail: jungmi.kwon@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

    2016-06-20

    Near-infrared imaging polarimetry in the J , H , and K{sub s} bands was carried out for GGD 27 in the dark cloud Lynds 291. Details of an infrared reflection nebula associated with the optical nebulosity GGD 27 and the infrared nebula GGD 27 IRS are presented. Aperture photometry of 1263 point-like sources, detected in all three bands, was used to classify them based on a color–color diagram, and the linear polarization of several hundred sources was determined, with the latter used to map the magnetic field structure around GGD 27. This field, around GGD 27 IRS, appears to be associated with the extended CO outflow of IRAS 18162–2048; however, there are partly distorted or bent components in the field. The Chandrasekhar–Fermi method gives an estimate of the magnetic field strength as ∼90 μ G. A region associated with GGD 27 IRS is discovered to have a circular polarization in the range of ∼2%–11% in the K{sub s} band. The circular polarization has an asymmetric positive/negative pattern and extends out to ∼ 120″ or 1.0 pc. The circular and linear polarization patterns are explained as resulting from a combination of dense inner and fainter outer lobes, suggesting episodic outflow.

  18. On the pinned field image binarization for signature generation in image ownership verification method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hsuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The issue of pinned field image binarization for signature generation in the ownership verification of the protected image is investigated. The pinned field explores the texture information of the protected image and can be employed to enhance the watermark robustness. In the proposed method, four optimization schemes are utilized to determine the threshold values for transforming the pinned field into a binary feature image, which is then utilized to generate an effective signature image. Experimental results show that the utilization of optimization schemes can significantly improve the signature robustness from the previous method (Lee and Chang, Opt. Eng. 49 (9, 097005, 2010. While considering both the watermark retrieval rate and the computation speed, the genetic algorithm is strongly recommended. In addition, compared with Chang and Lin's scheme (J. Syst. Softw. 81 (7, 1118-1129, 2008, the proposed scheme also has better performance.

  19. Intergrowth structure of α-phase in β-type TmAlB{sub 4} compound studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yubuta, Kunio, E-mail: yubuta@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Mori, Takao [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Borrmann, Horst; Grin, Yuri [Max-Plank-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stöffe, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Okada, Shigeru [Department of Science and Engineering, Kokushikan University, Tokyo 154-8515 (Japan); Shishido, Toetsu [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Nanostructure of a ThMoB{sub 4}-type (β-type) TmAlB{sub 4} compound, in which YCrB{sub 4}-type (α-type) domains are locally intergrown, is studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Z-contrast images by HAADF-STEM directly represent the arrangements of Tm atoms located at centers of heptagonal atomic columns of B atoms as bright dots, and give us detailed information of intergrowth of type domains in the matrix of the β-type phase, which coherently occurs. Structural and bonding analyses for β-TmAlB{sub 4} point out the closeness in atomic interactions and energy of the α- and β-type structures which support the easy formation of such nanostructure intergrowths. From combination between HAADF-STEM and electronic structure calculation, a detailed local crystal structure with intrinsic building defects is effectively revealed. - Graphical abstract: Nanostructure of a ThMoB{sub 4}-type (β-type) TmAlB{sub 4} compound, in which YCrB{sub 4}-type (α-type) domains are locally intergrown, is studied by high-angle annular detector dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). Z-contrast images by HAADF-STEM directly represent arrangements of Tm atoms located at centers of heptagonal atomic columns of B atoms as bright dots, and give us detailed information of the characteristic intergrowth structure of type domains in the matrix of the β-type phase. - Highlights: • HAADF-STEM images directly represent arrangements of Tm atoms as bright dots. • The α-type planar domains coherently intergrown in the β-type matrix. • Bright strips appear at overlapped regions of Tm hexagons along interfaces between α- and β-type domains.

  20. Weighted bi-prediction for light field image coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Caroline; Nunes, Paulo; Ducla Soares, Luís.

    2017-09-01

    Light field imaging based on a single-tier camera equipped with a microlens array - also known as integral, holoscopic, and plenoptic imaging - has currently risen up as a practical and prospective approach for future visual applications and services. However, successfully deploying actual light field imaging applications and services will require developing adequate coding solutions to efficiently handle the massive amount of data involved in these systems. In this context, self-similarity compensated prediction is a non-local spatial prediction scheme based on block matching that has been shown to achieve high efficiency for light field image coding based on the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. As previously shown by the authors, this is possible by simply averaging two predictor blocks that are jointly estimated from a causal search window in the current frame itself, referred to as self-similarity bi-prediction. However, theoretical analyses for motion compensated bi-prediction have suggested that it is still possible to achieve further rate-distortion performance improvements by adaptively estimating the weighting coefficients of the two predictor blocks. Therefore, this paper presents a comprehensive study of the rate-distortion performance for HEVC-based light field image coding when using different sets of weighting coefficients for self-similarity bi-prediction. Experimental results demonstrate that it is possible to extend the previous theoretical conclusions to light field image coding and show that the proposed adaptive weighting coefficient selection leads to up to 5 % of bit savings compared to the previous self-similarity bi-prediction scheme.

  1. Particle-Image Velocimeter Having Large Depth of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Brent

    2009-01-01

    An instrument that functions mainly as a particle-image velocimeter provides data on the sizes and velocities of flying opaque particles. The instrument is being developed as a means of characterizing fluxes of wind-borne dust particles in the Martian atmosphere. The instrument could also adapted to terrestrial use in measuring sizes and velocities of opaque particles carried by natural winds and industrial gases. Examples of potential terrestrial applications include monitoring of airborne industrial pollutants and airborne particles in mine shafts. The design of this instrument reflects an observation, made in field research, that airborne dust particles derived from soil and rock are opaque enough to be observable by use of bright field illumination with high contrast for highly accurate measurements of sizes and shapes. The instrument includes a source of collimated light coupled to an afocal beam expander and an imaging array of photodetectors. When dust particles travel through the collimated beam, they cast shadows. The shadows are magnified by the beam expander and relayed to the array of photodetectors. Inasmuch as the images captured by the array are of dust-particle shadows rather of the particles themselves, the depth of field of the instrument can be large: the instrument has a depth of field of about 11 mm, which is larger than the depths of field of prior particle-image velocimeters. The instrument can resolve, and measure the sizes and velocities of, particles having sizes in the approximate range of 1 to 300 m. For slowly moving particles, data from two image frames are used to calculate velocities. For rapidly moving particles, image smear lengths from a single frame are used in conjunction with particle- size measurement data to determine velocities.

  2. Electric Potential and Electric Field Imaging with Dynamic Applications & Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Ed

    2017-01-01

    The technology and methods for remote quantitative imaging of electrostatic potentials and electrostatic fields in and around objects and in free space is presented. Electric field imaging (EFI) technology may be applied to characterize intrinsic or existing electric potentials and electric fields, or an externally generated electrostatic field made be used for volumes to be inspected with EFI. The baseline sensor technology (e-Sensor) and its construction, optional electric field generation (quasi-static generator), and current e- Sensor enhancements (ephemeral e-Sensor) are discussed. Critical design elements of current linear and real-time two-dimensional (2D) measurement systems are highlighted, and the development of a three dimensional (3D) EFI system is presented. Demonstrations for structural, electronic, human, and memory applications are shown. Recent work demonstrates that phonons may be used to create and annihilate electric dipoles within structures. Phonon induced dipoles are ephemeral and their polarization, strength, and location may be quantitatively characterized by EFI providing a new subsurface Phonon-EFI imaging technology. Results from real-time imaging of combustion and ion flow, and their measurement complications, will be discussed. Extensions to environment, Space and subterranean applications will be presented, and initial results for quantitative characterizing material properties are shown. A wearable EFI system has been developed by using fundamental EFI concepts. These new EFI capabilities are demonstrated to characterize electric charge distribution creating a new field of study embracing areas of interest including electrostatic discharge (ESD) mitigation, manufacturing quality control, crime scene forensics, design and materials selection for advanced sensors, combustion science, on-orbit space potential, container inspection, remote characterization of electronic circuits and level of activation, dielectric morphology of

  3. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED IMAGING: A Descriptive Review of Characteristics of Retinoschisis, Retinal Detachment, and Schisis Detachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vincent Y; Wehmeier, Jarrod M; Shah, Gaurav K

    2016-08-01

    Retinoschisis and retinal detachments are primarily differentiated based on characteristic examination findings. In diagnostically challenging cases, noncontact wide-field infrared imaging can help diagnosis and visualize the extent/margins of retinoschisis, retinal detachment, or combined schisis detachments by comparing reflectivity patterns. This is a retrospective, observational, descriptive case series of 14 eyes of 14 nonconsecutive patients, ranging from 28 to 89 years old (mean 61), diagnosed with retinoschisis, retinal detachment, or schisis detachment from May 5, 2014 to March 4, 2015. Patients with secondary retinoschisis and/or retinal detachment from other causes were not included in the study. Heidelberg Wide-Field Module lens and Heidelberg Spectralis HRA+OCT machine (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) were used to obtain noncontact, wide-field infrared images on each study eye. Seven eyes with retinal detachments, four with retinoschises, and three with schisis detachments were imaged using this novel wide-field infrared technique. Retinoschisis appears light and translucent with prominent vasculature, retinal detachments appear dark and opaque, and combined retinoschisis/retinal detachment exhibit mixed reflectivity patterns. Wide-field infrared imaging provides a quick, noncontact, noninvasive method to accurately diagnose and to monitor for progression of retinoschisis, retinal detachment, or combined schisis detachments.

  4. Inter-annual and geographical variations in the extent of bare ice and dark ice on the Greenland ice sheet derived from MODIS satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigen eShimada

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Areas of dark ice have appeared on the Greenland ice sheet every summer in recent years. These are likely to have a great impact on the mass balance of the ice sheet because of their low albedo. We report annual and geographical variations in the bare ice and dark ice areas that appeared on the Greenland Ice Sheet from 2000 to 2014 by using MODIS satellite images. The July monthly mean of the extent of bare ice showed a positive trend over these 15 years, and large annual variability ranging from 89,975 km2 to 279,075 km2, 5% and 16% of the entire ice sheet, respectively. The extent of dark ice also showed a positive trend and varied annually, ranging from 3,575 km2 to 26,975 km2, 4% and 10% of the bare ice extent. These areas are geographically varied, and their expansion is the greatest on the western side, particularly the southwestern side of the ice sheet. The bare ice extent correlates strongly with the monthly mean air temperature in July, suggesting that the extent was determined by snow melt. The dark ice extent also correlates with the air temperature; however, the correlation is weaker. The dark ice extent further correlates negatively with solar radiation. This suggests that the extent of dark ice is not only controlled by snow melt on the ice, but also by changes in the surface structures of the bare ice surface, such as cryoconite holes, which are associated with impurities appearing on the ice surface.

  5. Inter-annual and geographical variations in the extent of bare ice and dark ice on the Greenland ice sheet derived from MODIS satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Rigen; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Aoki, Teruo

    2016-04-01

    Areas of dark ice have appeared on the Greenland ice sheet every summer in recent years. These are likely to have a great impact on the mass balance of the ice sheet because of their low albedo. We report annual and geographical variations in the bare ice and dark ice areas that appeared on the Greenland Ice Sheet from 2000 to 2014 by using MODIS satellite images. The July monthly mean of the extent of bare ice showed a positive trend over these 15 years, and large annual variability ranging from 89,975 km2 to 279,075 km2, 5% and 16% of the entire ice sheet, respectively. The extent of dark ice also showed a positive trend and varied annually, ranging from 3,575 km2 to 26,975 km2, 4% and 10% of the bare ice extent. These areas are geographically varied, and their expansion is the greatest on the western side, particularly the southwestern side of the ice sheet. The bare ice extent correlates strongly with the monthly mean air temperature in July, suggesting that the extent was determined by snow melt. The dark ice extent also correlates with the air temperature; however, the correlation is weaker. The dark ice extent further correlates negatively with solar radiation. This suggests that the extent of dark ice is not only controlled by snow melt on the ice, but also by changes in the surface structures of the bare ice surface, such as cryoconite holes, which are associated with impurities appearing on the ice surface.

  6. Quantification of the neutron dark-field imaging signal in grating interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grünzweig, C.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Jefimovs, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Gasser, U.; Bunk, O.; David, C.; Lehmann, E.; Donath, T.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 12 (2012), "125104-1"-"125104-6" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neutron scattering (including small - angle scattering ) * atom and neutron interferometry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  7. The Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI): A Powerful New Integral Field Spectrograph for the Keck Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Patrick; KCWI Team

    2013-01-01

    The Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) is a new facility instrument being developed for the W. M. Keck Observatory and funded for construction by the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). KCWI is a bench-mounted spectrograph for the Keck II right Nasmyth focal station, providing integral field spectroscopy over a seeing-limited field up to 20"x33" in extent. Selectable Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings provide high efficiency and spectral resolution in the range of 1000 to 20000. The dual-beam design of KCWI passed a Preliminary Design Review in summer 2011. The detailed design of the KCWI blue channel (350 to 700 nm) is now nearly complete, with the red channel (530 to 1050 nm) planned for a phased implementation contingent upon additional funding. KCWI builds on the experience of the Caltech team in implementing the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI), in operation since 2009 at Palomar Observatory. KCWI adds considerable flexibility to the CWI design, and will take full advantage of the excellent seeing and dark sky above Mauna Kea with a selectable nod-and-shuffle observing mode. The KCWI team is lead by Caltech (project management, design and implementation) in partnership with the University of California at Santa Cruz (camera optical and mechanical design) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (program oversight and observatory interfaces).

  8. Near-field acoustic imaging based on Laplacian sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Daudet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    We present a sound source identification method for near-field acoustic imaging of extended sources. The methodology is based on a wave superposition method (or equivalent source method) that promotes solutions with sparse higher order spatial derivatives. Instead of promoting direct sparsity, as...

  9. A field cancellation signal extraction method for magnetic particle imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, V.; Straub, M.; Mahlke, M.; Hubertus, S.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Kiessling, F.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) signal detection and excitation happens at the same time. This concept, however, leads to a strong coupling of the drive (excitation) field (DF) with the receive chain. As the induced DF signal is several orders of magnitude higher, special measures have to

  10. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Paz, R.L.; Floris, R.; Norman, D.; Enzmann, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty-one high-field MR imaging studies (1.5 T, General Electric Signa) of the spinal cord were performed in 42 patients (27 female, 15 male; mean age, 40 years) with clinically definitive (n = 34) or probable (n = 8) multiple sclerosis and suspected spinal cord lesions. MR imaging showed focal spinal cord abnormalities in 38 (75%) of 51 studies. T2-weighted images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 38 studies, T1-weighted images were abnormal (showing areas of low signal intensity or mass effect) in 16 (42%) of 38, and GRASS images were abnormal (showing foci of high signal intensity) in 9 (82%) of 11 cases. Brain MR imaging showed periventricular lesions typical of multiple sclerosis in 34 (81%) of 42 studies. Spinal cord studies were positive in eight cases with normal brain MR images, and brain studies were positive in 13 instances of normal spinal cord MR images. Four lesions were at the cervicomedullary junction, 44 in the cervical spinal cord, and three in the thoracic cord. Mass effect in cord lesions, simulating neoplasm, was seen in seven patients during the acute symptomatic phase. Serial studies in three patients with decreasing symptoms showed a reduction after 3-4 weeks and resolution of the mass effect after 2-6 months

  11. On the integration of image sources in exact image method of field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, I. V.

    1988-01-01

    Convergence conditions of image integration in the exact image method of field calculation have been investigated, and the method is extended to include more general media than previously considered. It is demonstrated that the integral is well behaved and the method works best when the field is calculated in a medium with less loss. If the medium has more loss, it is shown that the image line may enter the improper half-space and still produce valid results. Means of correctly selecting the integration path branch for the case of crossing branch cuts of the Green function in complex integration planes are proposed.

  12. Wide-field single photon counting imaging with an ultrafast camera and an image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanda, Gianmarco; Sergent, Nicolas; Green, Mark; Levitt, James A.; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Suhling, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    We are reporting a method for wide-field photon counting imaging using a CMOS camera with a 40 kHz frame rate coupled with a three-stage image intensifier mounted on a standard fluorescence microscope. This system combines high frame rates with single photon sensitivity. The output of the phosphor screen, consisting of single-photon events, is collected by a CMOS camera allowing to create a wide-field image with parallel positional and timing information of each photon. Using a pulsed excitation source and a luminescent sample, the arrival time of hundreds of photons can be determined simultaneously in many pixels with microsecond resolution.

  13. Late forming dark matter in theories of neutrino dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Subinoy; Weiner, Neal

    2011-01-01

    We study the possibility of late forming dark matter, where a scalar field, previously trapped in a metastable state by thermal or finite density effects, goes through a phase transition near the era matter-radiation equality and begins to oscillate about its true minimum. Such a theory is motivated generally if the dark energy is of a similar form, but has not yet made the transition to dark matter, and, in particular, arises automatically in recently considered theories of neutrino dark energy. If such a field comprises the present dark matter, the matter power spectrum typically shows a sharp break at small, presently nonlinear scales, below which power is highly suppressed and previously contained acoustic oscillations. If, instead, such a field forms a subdominant component of the total dark matter, such acoustic oscillations may imprint themselves in the linear regime.

  14. The mean field theory in EM procedures for blind Markov random field image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J

    1993-01-01

    A Markov random field (MRF) model-based EM (expectation-maximization) procedure for simultaneously estimating the degradation model and restoring the image is described. The MRF is a coupled one which provides continuity (inside regions of smooth gray tones) and discontinuity (at region boundaries) constraints for the restoration problem which is, in general, ill posed. The computational difficulty associated with the EM procedure for MRFs is resolved by using the mean field theory from statistical mechanics. An orthonormal blur decomposition is used to reduce the chances of undesirable locally optimal estimates. Experimental results on synthetic and real-world images show that this approach provides good blur estimates and restored images. The restored images are comparable to those obtained by a Wiener filter in mean-square error, but are most visually pleasing.

  15. Dark stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maselli, Andrea; Pnigouras, Pantelis; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2017-01-01

    to the formation of compact objects predominantly made of dark matter. Considering both fermionic and bosonic (scalar φ4) equations of state, we construct the equilibrium structure of rotating dark stars, focusing on their bulk properties and comparing them with baryonic neutron stars. We also show that these dark...... objects admit the I-Love-Q universal relations, which link their moments of inertia, tidal deformabilities, and quadrupole moments. Finally, we prove that stars built with a dark matter equation of state are not compact enough to mimic black holes in general relativity, thus making them distinguishable...

  16. Wide-field high-performance geosynchronous imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, H. John; Jenstrom, Del; Wilson, Mark; Hinkal, Sanford; Kirchman, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) Program and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are sponsoring the Advanced Geosynchronous Studies (AGS) to develop technologies and system concepts for Earth observation from geosynchronous orbit. This series of studies is intended to benefit both MTPE science and the NOAA GOES Program. Within the AGS program, advanced imager trade studies have investigated two candidate concepts for near-term advanced geosynchronous imagers. One concept uses a scan mirror to direct the line of sight from a 3-axis stabilized platform. Another eliminates the need for a scan mirror by using an agile spacecraft bus to scan the entire instrument. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the optical design trades and system issues encountered in evaluating the two scanning approaches. The imager design started with a look at first principles: what is the most efficient way to image the Earth in those numerous spectral bands of interest to MTPE scientists and NOAA weather forecasters. Optical design trades included rotating filter wheels and dispersive grating instruments. The design converged on a bandpass filter instrument using four focal planes to cover the spectral range 0.45 to 13.0 micrometers. The first imager design uses a small agile spacecraft supporting an afocal optical telescope. Dichroic beamsplitters feed refractive objectives to four focal planes. The detectors are a series of long linear and rectangular arrays which are scanned in a raster fashion over the 17 degree Earth image. The use of the spacecraft attitude control system to raster the imager field-of-view (FOV) back and forth over the Earth eliminates the need for a scan mirror. However, the price paid is significant energy and time required to reverse the spacecraft slew motions at the end of each scan line. Hence, it is desired to minimize the number of scan lines needed to cover the full Earth disk. This desire, coupled with the ground

  17. Near-field millimeter - wave imaging of nonmetallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A near-field millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging system has been designed and built in the 94-GHz range for on-line inspection of nonmetallic (dielectric) materials. The imaging system consists of a transceiver block coupled to an antenna that scans the material to be imaged; a reflector plate is placed behind the material. A quadrature IF mixer in the transceiver block enables measurement of in-phase and quadrature-phase components of reflected signals with respect to the transmitted signal. All transceiver components, with the exception of the Gunn-diode oscillator and antenna, were fabricated in uniform blocks and integrated and packaged into a compact unit (12.7 x 10.2 x 2.5 cm). The objective of this work is to test the applicability of a near-field compact mm-wave sensor for on-line inspection of sheetlike materials such as paper, fabrics, and plastics. This paper presents initial near-field mm-wave images of paper and fabric samples containing known artifacts

  18. The application of mean field theory to image motion estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Hanauer, G G

    1995-01-01

    Previously, Markov random field (MRF) model-based techniques have been proposed for image motion estimation. Since motion estimation is usually an ill-posed problem, various constraints are needed to obtain a unique and stable solution. The main advantage of the MRF approach is its capacity to incorporate such constraints, for instance, motion continuity within an object and motion discontinuity at the boundaries between objects. In the MRF approach, motion estimation is often formulated as an optimization problem, and two frequently used optimization methods are simulated annealing (SA) and iterative-conditional mode (ICM). Although the SA is theoretically optimal in the sense of finding the global optimum, it usually takes many iterations to converge. The ICM, on the other hand, converges quickly, but its results are often unsatisfactory due to its "hard decision" nature. Previously, the authors have applied the mean field theory to image segmentation and image restoration problems. It provides results nearly as good as SA but with much faster convergence. The present paper shows how the mean field theory can be applied to MRF model-based motion estimation. This approach is demonstrated on both synthetic and real-world images, where it produced good motion estimates.

  19. MR imaging of the knee with high-field-strength surface coil imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, R.; Halford, H.H.; Brooks, T.; Geldmeier, R.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study of high-resolution surface coil imaging of the knee in a high-field-strength (1.5-T) MR imaging system will be performed to assess the ability of MR to detect bony, ligamentous and cartilaginous abnormalities of the knee. Coronal spin-echo images (echo time [TE], 25 msec; repetition time [TR] 1,000 msec) and sagittal multiecho images (TE, 25, 70 msec; TR, 1,000, 2,000 msec) are displayed demonstrating normal anatomy, meniscal and ligamentous injuries, and miscellaneous lesions such as osteomyelitis. A minimum of 100 patients are examined, and arthroscopic correlation will be available in at least 60% of the patients

  20. Periodically modulated dark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingying; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Wenxian

    2018-04-01

    Phenomena of electromagnetically induced transparency (PEIT) may be interpreted by the Autler-Townes Splitting (ATS), where the coupled states are split by the coupling laser field, or by the quantum destructive interference (QDI), where the atomic phases caused by the coupling laser and the probe laser field cancel. We propose modulated experiments to explore the PEIT in an alternative way by periodically modulating the coupling and the probe fields in a Λ-type three-level system initially in a dark state. Our analytical and numerical results rule out the ATS interpretation and show that the QDI interpretation is more appropriate for the modulated experiments. Interestingly, dark state persists in the double-modulation situation where control and probe fields never occur simultaneously, which is significant difference from the traditional dark state condition. The proposed experiments are readily implemented in atomic gases, artificial atoms in superconducting quantum devices, or three-level meta-atoms in meta-materials.

  1. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  2. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a powerful clinical tool for imaging the human body (1). This technique is based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons (2, 3) in a static magnetic field B{sub 0}. An applied radiofrequency pulse causes the protons to precess about B{sub 0} at their Larmor frequency {nu}{sub 0} = ({gamma}/2{pi})B{sub 0}, where {gamma} is the gyromagnetic ratio; {gamma}/2{pi} = 42.58 MHz/tesla. The precessing protons generate an oscillating magnetic field and hence a voltage in a nearby coil that is amplified and recorded. The application of three-dimensional magnetic field gradients specifies a unique magnetic field and thus an NMR frequency in each voxel of the subject, so that with appropriate encoding of the signals one can acquire a complete image (4). Most clinical MRI systems involve magnetic fields generated by superconducting magnets, and the current trend is to higher magnetic fields than the widely used 1.5-T systems (5). Nonetheless, there is ongoing interest in the development of less expensive imagers operating at lower fields. Commercially available 0.2-T systems based on permanent magnets offer both lower cost and a more open access than their higher-field counterparts, at the expense of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution. At the still lower field of 0.03 mT maintained by a conventional, room-temperature solenoid, Connolly and co-workers (6, 7) obtain good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by prepolarizing the protons in a field B{sub p} of 0.3 T. Prepolarization (8) enhances the magnetic moment of an ensemble of protons over that produced by the lower precession field; after the polarizing field is removed, the higher magnetic moment produces a correspondingly larger signal during its precession in B{sub 0}. Using the same method, Stepisnik et al. (9) obtained MR images in the Earth's magnetic field ({approx} 50 {micro}T). Alternatively, one can enhance the signal

  3. A Multispectral Micro-Imager for Lunar Field Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jorge; Farmer, Jack; Sellar, Glenn; Allen, Carlton

    2009-01-01

    Field geologists routinely assign rocks to one of three basic petrogenetic categories (igneous, sedimentary or metamorphic) based on microtextural and mineralogical information acquired with a simple magnifying lens. Indeed, such observations often comprise the core of interpretations of geological processes and history. The Multispectral Microscopic Imager (MMI) uses multi-wavelength, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a substrate-removed InGaAs focal-plane array to create multispectral, microscale reflectance images of geological samples (FOV 32 X 40 mm). Each pixel (62.5 microns) of an image is comprised of 21 spectral bands that extend from 470 to 1750 nm, enabling the discrimination of a wide variety of rock-forming minerals, especially Fe-bearing phases. MMI images provide crucial context information for in situ robotic analyses using other onboard analytical instruments (e.g. XRD), or for the selection of return samples for analysis in terrestrial labs. To further assess the value of the MMI as a tool for lunar exploration, we used a field-portable, tripod-mounted version of the MMI to image a variety of Apollo samples housed at the Lunar Experiment Laboratory, NASA s Johnson Space Center. MMI images faithfully resolved the microtextural features of samples, while the application of ENVI-based spectral end member mapping methods revealed the distribution of Fe-bearing mineral phases (olivine, pyroxene and magnetite), along with plagioclase feldspars within samples. Samples included a broad range of lithologies and grain sizes. Our MMI-based petrogenetic interpretations compared favorably with thin section-based descriptions published in the Lunar Sample Compendium, revealing the value of MMI images for astronaut and rover-mediated lunar exploration.

  4. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What You See Ain't What. You Got, Resonance, Vol.4,. No.9,1999. Dark Matter. 2. Dark Matter in the Universe. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this.

  5. Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

  6. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K{sub a}-band system.

  7. Near-field millimeter-wave imaging for weapon detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.

    1992-11-01

    Various millimeter-wave imaging systems capable of imaging through clothing for the detection of contraband metal, plastic, or ceramic weapons, have been developed at PNL. Two dimensional scanned holographic systems, developed at 35, 90, and 350 GHz, are used to obtain high resolution images of metal and plastic targets concealed by clothing. Coherent single-frequency amplitude and phase data, which is gathered over a two-dimensional scanned aperture, is reconstructed to the target plane using a holographic wavefront reconstruction technique. Practical weapon detection systems require high-speed scanning. To achieve this goal, a 35 GHz linear sequentially switched array has been built and integrated into a high speed linear scanner. This system poses special challenges on calibration / signal processing of the holographic system. Further, significant improvements in speed are required to achieve real time operation. Toward this goal, a wideband scanned system which allows for a two-dimensional image formation from a one-dimensional scanned (or array) system has been developed . Signal / image processing techniques developed and implemented for this technique are a variation on conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques which eliminate far-field and narrow bandwidth requirements. Performance of this technique is demonstrated with imaging results obtained from a K[sub a]-band system.

  8. Entropy-Based Dark Frame Subtraction

    OpenAIRE

    Goesele, Michael; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    2001-01-01

    Noise due to dark current is a serious limitation for taking long exposure time images with a CCD digital camera. Current solutions have serious drawbacks: interpolation of pixels with high dark current leads to smoothing effects or other artifacts -- especially if a large number of pixels are corrupted. Due to the exponential temperature dependence of the dark current, dark frame subtraction works best for temperature controlled high end CCD imaging systems. On the ...

  9. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki H.; Xie, Gan Q.

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  10. Laboratory Calibration of a Field Imaging Spectrometer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxi Tong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new Field Imaging Spectrometer System (FISS based on a cooling area CCD was developed. This paper describes the imaging principle, structural design, and main parameters of the FISS sensor. The FISS was spectrally calibrated with a double grating monochromator to determine the center wavelength and FWHM of each band. Calibration results showed that the spectral range of the FISS system is 437–902 nm, the number of channels is 344 and the spectral resolution of each channel is better than 5 nm. An integrating sphere was used to achieve absolute radiometric calibration of the FISS with less than 5% calibration error for each band. There are 215 channels with signal to noise ratios (SNRs greater than 500 (62.5% of the bands. The results demonstrated that the FISS has achieved high performance that assures the feasibility of its practical use in various fields.

  11. Far-field superresolution by imaging of resonance scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-10-31

    We show that superresolution imaging in the far-field region of the sources and receivers is theoretically and practically possible if migration of resonant multiples is employed. A resonant multiple is one that bounces back and forth between two scattering points; it can also be the multiple between two smoothly varying interfaces as long as the reflection wave paths partially overlap and reflect from the same Fresnel zone. For a source with frequency f, compared to a one-way trip, N round trips in propagating between two scatterers increase the effective frequency by 2N × f and decrease the effective wavelength by λ/(2N). Thus, multiples can, in principle, be used as high-frequency probes to estimate detailed properties of layers. Tests with both synthetic and field data validate this claim. Improved resolution by multiple imaging is not only feasible for crustal reflections, but might be applicable to mantle and core reverberations recorded by earthquake seismologists.

  12. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V; Houel, Julien; Brunner, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D; Warburton, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10(7) and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920-980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance.

  13. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Warburton, Richard J.; Brunner, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2013-01-01

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10 7 and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920–980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance

  14. Development of dark-striped field mice, Apodemus agrarius coreae, as a biological dosimeter in a radio-ecological monitoring system: 2. Survival rates and hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Sun; Kim, Chong Soon; Nishmura, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Regarding the management of nuclear power plants and the installation of facilities for radiation waste storage: social concerns over radiation safety are increasing. To understand how environmental radiation affects on human beings, the development of an reasonable monitoring system is required. The existing radio-environmental surveillance systems can be classified into physical and biological monitoring systems. The wild small animals and livestocks were reported to be effective biological indicators of environmental radiation This study investigated the possibility of using dark-striped field mice as a biological dosimetric model to assess the effect of radiation on the human environments. For this study, the criteria for the biological dosimeters of environmental radiation were established as the following: first, it should be an animal from a clear background of species; second, it should inhabit a broad range of areas and in considerable numbers; third, it should maintain identical ecological characteristics; fourth, it should be cohabitating with humans; fifth, it should have been consuming food found in their habitat; and finally, it should indicate a clear doseresponse relationship with high sensitivity. Based on such criteria, this study investigated the possibility of using dark-striped field mice as an effective biological dosimeter. Primarily, their species were classified based on their morphological external characteristics and isoenzymic patterns. The taxonomically classified darkstriped field mice, A. agrarius coreae, were then irradiated to investigate their radiation sensitivity based on the survival rate and hematology in this study

  15. A dark-field microscope for background-free detection of resonance fluorescence from single semiconductor quantum dots operating in a set-and-forget mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Houel, Julien; Warburton, Richard J. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Brunner, Daniel [Instituto de Física Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos, IFISC (CSIC-UIB), Campus Universitat Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Ludwig, Arne [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Reuter, Dirk [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department Physik, Universität Paderborn, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Optically active quantum dots, for instance self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, are potentially excellent single photon sources. The fidelity of the single photons is much improved using resonant rather than non-resonant excitation. With resonant excitation, the challenge is to distinguish between resonance fluorescence and scattered laser light. We have met this challenge by creating a polarization-based dark-field microscope to measure the resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot at low temperature. We achieve a suppression of the scattered laser exceeding a factor of 10{sup 7} and background-free detection of resonance fluorescence. The same optical setup operates over the entire quantum dot emission range (920–980 nm) and also in high magnetic fields. The major development is the outstanding long-term stability: once the dark-field point has been established, the microscope operates for days without alignment. The mechanical and optical designs of the microscope are presented, as well as exemplary resonance fluorescence spectroscopy results on individual quantum dots to underline the microscope's excellent performance.

  16. Analysis of Craniofacial Images using Computational Atlases and Deformation Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2008-01-01

    purposes. The basis for most of the applications is non-rigid image registration. This approach brings one image into the coordinate system of another resulting in a deformation field describing the anatomical correspondence between the two images. A computational atlas representing the average anatomy...... of asymmetry. The analyses are applied to the study of three different craniofacial anomalies. The craniofacial applications include studies of Crouzon syndrome (in mice), unicoronal synostosis plagiocephaly and deformational plagiocephaly. Using the proposed methods, the thesis reveals novel findings about...... the craniofacial morphology and asymmetry of Crouzon mice. Moreover, a method to plan and evaluate treatment of children with deformational plagiocephaly, based on asymmetry assessment, is established. Finally, asymmetry in children with unicoronal synostosis is automatically assessed, confirming previous results...

  17. Unified dark energy-dark matter model with inverse quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoldi, Stefano; Guendelman, Eduardo I.

    2013-01-01

    We consider a model where both dark energy and dark matter originate from the coupling of a scalar field with a non-canonical kinetic term to, both, a metric measure and a non-metric measure. An interacting dark energy/dark matter scenario can be obtained by introducing an additional scalar that can produce non constant vacuum energy and associated variations in dark matter. The phenomenology is most interesting when the kinetic term of the additional scalar field is ghost-type, since in this case the dark energy vanishes in the early universe and then grows with time. This constitutes an ''inverse quintessence scenario'', where the universe starts from a zero vacuum energy density state, instead of approaching it in the future

  18. Xenophobic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Kumar, Jason; Sanford, David

    2013-07-01

    We consider models of xenophobic dark matter, in which isospin-violating dark matter-nucleon interactions significantly degrade the response of xenon direct detection experiments. For models of near-maximal xenophobia, with neutron-to-proton coupling ratio fn/fp≈-0.64, and dark matter mass near 8 GeV, the regions of interest for CoGeNT and CDMS-Si and the region of interest identified by Collar and Fields in CDMS-Ge data can be brought into agreement. This model may be tested in future direct, indirect, and collider searches. Interestingly, because the natural isotope abundance of xenon implies that xenophobia has its limits, we find that this xenophobic model may be probed in the near future by xenon experiments. Near-future data from the LHC and Fermi-LAT may also provide interesting alternative probes of xenophobic dark matter.

  19. Superresolution near-field imaging with surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Liu, Zhaolun; Schuster, Gerard

    2018-02-01

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulae and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve superresolution imaging of subwavelength scatterers if they are located less than about 1/2 of the shear wavelength from the source line. We also show that the TRM operation for a single frequency is equivalent to natural migration, which uses the recorded data to approximate the Green's functions for migration, and only costs O(N4) algebraic operations for post-stack migration compared to O(N6) operations for natural pre-stack migration. Here, we assume the sources and receivers are on an N × N grid and there are N2 trial image points on the free surface. Our theoretical predictions of superresolution are validated with tests on synthetic data. The field-data tests suggest that hidden faults at the near surface can be detected with subwavelength imaging of surface waves by using the TRM operation if they are no deeper than about 1/2 the dominant shear wavelength.

  20. Surface wave multipath signals in near-field microwave imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Paul M; Shubitidze, Fridon; Fanning, Margaret W; Kmiec, Maciej; Epstein, Neil R; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-01-01

    Microwave imaging techniques are prone to signal corruption from unwanted multipath signals. Near-field systems are especially vulnerable because signals can scatter and reflect from structural objects within or on the boundary of the imaging zone. These issues are further exacerbated when surface waves are generated with the potential of propagating along the transmitting and receiving antenna feed lines and other low-loss paths. In this paper, we analyze the contributions of multi-path signals arising from surface wave effects. Specifically, experiments were conducted with a near-field microwave imaging array positioned at variable heights from the floor of a coupling fluid tank. Antenna arrays with different feed line lengths in the fluid were also evaluated. The results show that surface waves corrupt the received signals over the longest transmission distances across the measurement array. However, the surface wave effects can be eliminated provided the feed line lengths are sufficiently long independently of the distance of the transmitting/receiving antenna tips from the imaging tank floor. Theoretical predictions confirm the experimental observations.

  1. Surface Wave Multipath Signals in Near-Field Microwave Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Meaney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave imaging techniques are prone to signal corruption from unwanted multipath signals. Near-field systems are especially vulnerable because signals can scatter and reflect from structural objects within or on the boundary of the imaging zone. These issues are further exacerbated when surface waves are generated with the potential of propagating along the transmitting and receiving antenna feed lines and other low-loss paths. In this paper, we analyze the contributions of multi-path signals arising from surface wave effects. Specifically, experiments were conducted with a near-field microwave imaging array positioned at variable heights from the floor of a coupling fluid tank. Antenna arrays with different feed line lengths in the fluid were also evaluated. The results show that surface waves corrupt the received signals over the longest transmission distances across the measurement array. However, the surface wave effects can be eliminated provided the feed line lengths are sufficiently long independently of the distance of the transmitting/receiving antenna tips from the imaging tank floor. Theoretical predictions confirm the experimental observations.

  2. Superresolution Near-field Imaging with Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-10-21

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulas and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve superresolution imaging of subwavelength scatterers if they are located less than about 1/2 of the shear wavelength from the source line. We also show that the TRM operation for a single frequency is equivalent to natural migration, which uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration, and only costs O(N4) algebraic operations for poststack migration compared to O(N6) operations for natural prestack migration. Here, we assume the sources and receivers are on an N × N grid and there are N2 trial image points on the free surface. Our theoretical predictions of superresolution are validated with tests on synthetic data. The field-data tests suggest that hidden faults at the near surface can be detected with subwavelength imaging of surface waves by using the TRM operation if they are no deeper than about 1/2 the dominant shear wavelength.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging in degraded visual field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oran, A.; Ozdur, I.; Ozharar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging at degraded visual environments is one of the biggest challenges in today’s imaging technologies. Especially military and commercial rotary wing aviation is suffering from impaired visual field in sandy, dusty, marine and snowy environments. For example during landing the rotor churns up the particles and creates dense clouds of highly scattering medium, which limits the vision of the pilot and may result in an uncontrolled landing. The vision in such environments is limited because of the high ratio of scattered photons over the ballistic photons which have the image information. We propose to use optical spatial filtering (OSF) method in order to eliminate the scattered photons and only collect the ballistic photons at the receiver. OSF is widely used in microscopy, to the best of our knowledge this will be the first application of OSF for macroscopic imaging. Our experimental results show that most of the scattered photons are eliminated using the spatial filtering in a highly scattering impaired visual field. The results are compared with a standard broad area photo detector which shows the effectiveness of spatial filtering. (paper)

  4. Wide-field ultraviolet imager for astronomical transient studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Joice; Ambily, S.; Prakash, Ajin; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Nirmal, K.; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah

    2018-03-01

    Though the ultraviolet (UV) domain plays a vital role in the studies of astronomical transient events, the UV time-domain sky remains largely unexplored. We have designed a wide-field UV imager that can be flown on a range of available platforms, such as high-altitude balloons, CubeSats, and larger space missions. The major scientific goals are the variability of astronomical sources, detection of transients such as supernovae, novae, tidal disruption events, and characterizing active galactic nuclei variability. The instrument has a 80 mm aperture with a circular field of view of 10.8 degrees, an angular resolution of ˜22 arcsec, and a 240 - 390 nm spectral observation window. The detector for the instrument is a Microchannel Plate (MCP)-based image intensifier with both photon counting and integration capabilities. An FPGA-based detector readout mechanism and real time data processing have been implemented. The imager is designed in such a way that its lightweight and compact nature are well fitted for the CubeSat dimensions. Here we present various design and developmental aspects of this UV wide-field transient explorer.

  5. Real-time Image Generation for Compressive Light Field Displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzstein, G; Lanman, D; Hirsch, M; Raskar, R

    2013-01-01

    With the invention of integral imaging and parallax barriers in the beginning of the 20th century, glasses-free 3D displays have become feasible. Only today—more than a century later—glasses-free 3D displays are finally emerging in the consumer market. The technologies being employed in current-generation devices, however, are fundamentally the same as what was invented 100 years ago. With rapid advances in optical fabrication, digital processing power, and computational perception, a new generation of display technology is emerging: compressive displays exploring the co-design of optical elements and computational processing while taking particular characteristics of the human visual system into account. In this paper, we discuss real-time implementation strategies for emerging compressive light field displays. We consider displays composed of multiple stacked layers of light-attenuating or polarization-rotating layers, such as LCDs. The involved image generation requires iterative tomographic image synthesis. We demonstrate that, for the case of light field display, computed tomographic light field synthesis maps well to operations included in the standard graphics pipeline, facilitating efficient GPU-based implementations with real-time framerates.

  6. Wide Field Imaging of the Hubble Deep Field-South Region III: Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palunas, Povilas; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hill, Robert S.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Rhodes, Jason; Teplitz, Harry I.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2002-01-01

    We present 1/2 square degree uBVRI imaging around the Hubble Deep Field - South. These data have been used in earlier papers to examine the QSO population and the evolution of the correlation function in the region around the HDF-S. The images were obtained with the Big Throughput Camera at CTIO in September 1998. The images reach 5 sigma limits of u approx. 24.4, B approx. 25.6, V approx. 25.3, R approx. 24.9 and I approx. 23.9. We present a catalog of approx. 22,000 galaxies. We also present number-magnitude counts and a comparison with other observations of the same field. The data presented here are available over the world wide web.

  7. A strategy for field shape evaluation in digital portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, P.H.; Quist, M.; Weistra, J.; Vossepoel, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Digital portal imagers allow accurate measurement of the field shape in radiotherapy. A strategy is introduced to determine origin and magnitude of discrepancies between the prescribed and measured field outline. After measurement of the actual detector position relative to the beam a conversion is made from pixels in the image matrix to mm in the plane of the isocenter, without using information from the imaged field. Using a distance transform a quick check is performed: the outline is accepted if all outline points deviate less then a predefined minimum (usually 5 mm). Subsequent evaluation starts if somewhere in the outline this minimum is exceeded. The collimator defined parts in the field outline are discriminated from the shielding blocks using an enclosing rectangle of the portal outline. This rectangle is found by minimization of the area as a function of rotation. If more than one solution is available, minimization of the entropy of the field outline projections determines which rectangle corresponds best to the field outline. A check for the validity of the determined collimator parts is performed with a separate linear fit through these parts. An outline part is accepted as a collimator outline part if it is longer than a predefined length. Using this procedure the position for each of the collimator jaws can be individually measured and compared with its prescription, thus allowing discrimination between symmetric and asymmetric collimator set-ups. Using the distance transform again, for each of the detected (secondary) shielding blocks the largest discrepancy or the area giving underdosage or overdosage can be computed to evaluate their shape and position. Parameter(s) and criteria that should be used to evaluate the field set-up are specified in clinical protocols. For standard shielding blocks usually only a maximum tolerated difference is specified, whereas for mantle fields also maximum allowed over- and underdose areas are specified. The

  8. High-field MR imaging in pediatric congenital heart disease: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien; Khan, Sarah N.; Moriarty, John M.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Renella, Pierangelo; Boechat, M.I.; Finn, J.P.; Satou, Gary; Ayad, Ihab; Patel, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) at any field strength mandates evaluation of both vascular and dynamic cardiac anatomy for which diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and cardiac cine are crucial. To determine whether high-resolution (HR) CEMRA and steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine can be performed reliably at 3.0 T in children with CHD and to compare the image quality to similar techniques performed at 1.5 T. Twenty-eight patients with a median age of 5 months and average weight 9.0 ± 7.8 kg with suspected or known CHD were evaluated at 3.0 T. SSFP cine (n = 86 series) and HR-CEMRA (n = 414 named vascular segments) were performed and images were scored for image quality and artifacts. The findings were compared to those of 28 patients with CHD of similar weight who were evaluated at 1.5 T. Overall image quality on HR-CEMRA was rated as excellent or good in 96% (397/414) of vascular segments at 3.0 T (k = 0.49) and in 94% (349/371) of vascular segments at 1.5 T (k = 0.36). Overall image quality of SSFP was rated excellent or good in 91% (78/86) of cine series at 3.0 T (k = 0.55) and in 81% (87/108) at 1.5 T (k = 0.47). Off-resonance artifact was common at both field strengths, varied over the cardiac cycle and was more prevalent at 3.0 T. At 3.0 T, off-resonance dark band artifact on SSFP cine was absent in 3% (3/86), mild in 69% (59/86), moderate in 27% (23/86) and severe in 1% (1/86) of images; at 1.5 T, dark band artifact was absent in 16% (17/108), mild in 69% (75/108), moderate in 12% (13/108) and severe in 3% (3/108) of cine images. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of both SSFP cine and HR-CEMRA images were significantly higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T (P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and SSFP cine were higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Artifacts on SSFP cine were

  9. High-field MR imaging in pediatric congenital heart disease: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Cardiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Khan, Sarah N.; Moriarty, John M.; Mohajer, Kiyarash; Renella, Pierangelo; Boechat, M.I.; Finn, J.P. [University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Satou, Gary [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ayad, Ihab; Patel, Swati [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Anesthesia, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-08-03

    Comprehensive assessment of pediatric congenital heart disease (CHD) at any field strength mandates evaluation of both vascular and dynamic cardiac anatomy for which diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) and cardiac cine are crucial. To determine whether high-resolution (HR) CEMRA and steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine can be performed reliably at 3.0 T in children with CHD and to compare the image quality to similar techniques performed at 1.5 T. Twenty-eight patients with a median age of 5 months and average weight 9.0 ± 7.8 kg with suspected or known CHD were evaluated at 3.0 T. SSFP cine (n = 86 series) and HR-CEMRA (n = 414 named vascular segments) were performed and images were scored for image quality and artifacts. The findings were compared to those of 28 patients with CHD of similar weight who were evaluated at 1.5 T. Overall image quality on HR-CEMRA was rated as excellent or good in 96% (397/414) of vascular segments at 3.0 T (k = 0.49) and in 94% (349/371) of vascular segments at 1.5 T (k = 0.36). Overall image quality of SSFP was rated excellent or good in 91% (78/86) of cine series at 3.0 T (k = 0.55) and in 81% (87/108) at 1.5 T (k = 0.47). Off-resonance artifact was common at both field strengths, varied over the cardiac cycle and was more prevalent at 3.0 T. At 3.0 T, off-resonance dark band artifact on SSFP cine was absent in 3% (3/86), mild in 69% (59/86), moderate in 27% (23/86) and severe in 1% (1/86) of images; at 1.5 T, dark band artifact was absent in 16% (17/108), mild in 69% (75/108), moderate in 12% (13/108) and severe in 3% (3/108) of cine images. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of both SSFP cine and HR-CEMRA images were significantly higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T (P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and SSFP cine were higher at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Artifacts on SSFP cine were

  10. Reduction of dark-band-like metal artifacts caused by dental implant bodies using hypothetical monoenergetic imaging after dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi; Ike, Makiko; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Goto, Tazuko K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of hypothetical monoenergetic images after dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for assessment of the bone encircling dental implant bodies. Seventy-two axial images of implantation sites clipped out from image data scanned using DECT in dual-energy mode were used. Subjective assessment on reduction of dark-band-like artifacts (R-DBAs) and diagnosability of adjacent bone condition (D-ABC) in 3 sets of DECT images-a fused image set (DE120) and 2 sets of hypothetical monoenergetic images (ME100, ME190)-was performed and the results were statistically analyzed. With regards to R-DBAs and D-ABC, significant differences among DE120, ME100, and ME190 were observed. The ME100 and ME190 images revealed more artifact reduction and diagnosability than those of DE120. DECT imaging followed by hypothetical monoenergetic image construction can cause R-DBAs and increase D-ABC and may be potentially used for the evaluation of postoperative changes in the bone encircling implant bodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The impact of ΛCDM substructure and baryon-dark matter transition on the image positions of quad galaxy lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomer, Matthew R.; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2018-04-01

    The positions of multiple images in galaxy lenses are related to the galaxy mass distribution. Smooth elliptical mass profiles were previously shown to be inadequate in reproducing the quad population. In this paper, we explore the deviations from such smooth elliptical mass distributions. Unlike most other work, we use a model-free approach based on the relative polar image angles of quads, and their position in 3D space with respect to the fundamental surface of quads (FSQ). The FSQ is defined by quads produced by elliptical lenses. We have generated thousands of quads from synthetic populations of lenses with substructure consistent with Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) simulations, and found that such perturbations are not sufficient to match the observed distribution of quads relative to the FSQ. The result is unchanged even when subhalo masses are increased by a factor of 10, and the most optimistic lensing selection bias is applied. We then produce quads from galaxies created using two components, representing baryons and dark matter. The transition from the mass being dominated by baryons in inner radii to being dominated by dark matter in outer radii can carry with it asymmetries, which would affect relative image angles. We run preliminary experiments using lenses with two elliptical mass components with non-identical axial ratios and position angles, perturbations from ellipticity in the form of non-zero Fourier coefficients a4 and a6, and artificially offset ellipse centres as a proxy for asymmetry at image radii. We show that combination of these effects is a promising way of accounting for quad population properties. We conclude that the quad population provides a unique and sensitive tool for constraining detailed mass distribution in the centres of galaxies.

  12. Large-area full field x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using 2D tiled gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Tobias J.; Koch, Frieder J.; Kunka, Danays; Meyer, Pascal; Tietze, Sabrina; Engelhardt, Sabine; Zuber, Marcus; Baumbach, Tilo; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Prade, Friedrich; Pfeiffer, Franz; Reichert, Klaus-Martin; Hofmann, Andreas; Mohr, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Grating-based x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging (DPCI) is capable of acquiring information based on phase-shift and dark-field signal, in addition to conventional x-ray absorption-contrast. Thus DPCI gives an advantage to investigate composite materials with component wise similar absorption properties like soft tissues. Due to technological challenges in fabricating high quality gratings over a large extent, the field of view (FoV) of the imaging systems is limited to a grating area of a couple of square centimeters. For many imaging applications (e.g. in medicine), however, a FoV that ranges over several ten centimeters is needed. In this manuscript we propose to create large area gratings of theoretically any extent by assembling a number of individual grating tiles. We discuss the precision needed for alignment of each microstructure tile in order to reduce image artifacts and to preserve minimum 90% of the sensitivity obtainable with a monolithic grating. To achieve a reliable high precision alignment a semiautomatic assembly system consisting of a laser autocollimator, a digital microscope and a force sensor together with positioning devices was built. The setup was used to tile a first four times four analyzer grating with a size of 200 mm  ×  200 mm together with a two times two phase grating. First imaging results prove the applicability and quality of the tiling concept.

  13. Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Canine Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Adamiak* and M. Jaskólska and A. Pomianowski1

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented study was to evaluate selected surface spine coil, and low-field magnetic resonance (MR selected sequences in diagnosing hydrocephalus in dogs. This paper discusses 19 dogs (14 canine patients with hydrocephalus and 5 healthy dogs, of five breeds, subjected to low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of hydrocephalus. Area of the lateral ventricles and brain were examined in dogs with hydrocephalus using low-field MRI (at 0.25 Tesla. The MRI of FSE REL, SE, FLAIR, STIR, 3D HYCE, T3DT1, GE STIR 3D and 3D SHARC sequences with an indication of the most effective sequences are described. Additionally, coils for MR were compared, and models for infusion anesthesia were described. As a result of performed study all estimated sequences were diagnostically useful. However, spinal coil No. 2 (ESAOTE was the most optimal for examining and positioning the cranium.

  14. Agegraphic dark energy as a quintessence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingfei; Liu, Hongya; Zhang, Xin

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a dark energy model characterized by the age of the universe, dubbed ''agegraphic dark energy'', was proposed by Cai. In this paper, a connection between the quintessence scalar-field and the agegraphic dark energy is established, and accordingly, the potential of the agegraphic quintessence field is constructed. (orig.)

  15. Dark matter model with non-Abelian gauge symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hao; Li Chongsheng; Cao Qinghong; Li Zhao

    2010-01-01

    We propose a dark-matter model in which the dark sector is gauged under a new SU(2) group. The dark sector consists of SU(2) dark gauge fields, two triplet dark Higgs fields, and two dark fermion doublets (dark-matter candidates in this model). The dark sector interacts with the standard model sector through kinetic and mass mixing operators. The model explains both PAMELA and Fermi LAT data very well and also satisfies constraints from both the dark-matter relic density and standard model precision observables. The phenomenology of the model at the LHC is also explored.

  16. HUBBLE FINDS NEW DARK SPOT ON NEPTUNE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a new great dark spot, located in the northern hemisphere of the planet Neptune. Because the planet's northern hemisphere is now tilted away from Earth, the new feature appears near the limb of the planet. The spot is a near mirror-image to a similar southern hemisphere dark spot that was discovered in 1989 by the Voyager 2 probe. In 1994, Hubble showed that the southern dark spot had disappeared. Like its predecessor, the new spot has high altitude clouds along its edge, caused by gasses that have been pushed to higher altitudes where they cool to form methane ice crystal clouds. The dark spot may be a zone of clear gas that is a window to a cloud deck lower in the atmosphere. Planetary scientists don t know how long lived this new feature might be. Hubble's high resolution will allow astronomers to follow the spot's evolution and other unexpected changes in Neptune's dynamic atmosphere. The image was taken on November 2, 1994 with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, when Neptune was 2.8 billion miles (4.5 billion kilometers) from Earth. Hubble can resolve features as small as 625 miles (1,000 kilometers) across in Neptune's cloud tops. Credit: H. Hammel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and NASA

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  19. Dark coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavela, M.B.; Hernández, D.; Honorez, L. Lopez; Mena, O.; Rigolin, S.

    2009-01-01

    The two dark sectors of the universe—dark matter and dark energy—may interact with each other. Background and linear density perturbation evolution equations are developed for a generic coupling. We then establish the general conditions necessary to obtain models free from non-adiabatic instabilities. As an application, we consider a viable universe in which the interaction strength is proportional to the dark energy density. The scenario does not exhibit ''phantom crossing'' and is free from instabilities, including early ones. A sizeable interaction strength is compatible with combined WMAP, HST, SN, LSS and H(z) data. Neutrino mass and/or cosmic curvature are allowed to be larger than in non-interacting models. Our analysis sheds light as well on unstable scenarios previously proposed

  20. Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    It's a dark, dark universe out there, and I don't mean because the night sky is black. After all, once you leave the shadow of the Earth and get out into space, you're surrounded by countless lights glittering everywhere you look. But for all of Sagan's billions and billions of stars and galaxies, it's a jaw-dropping fact that the ordinary kind of…

  1. Relic abundance of mass-varying cold dark matter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2005-01-01

    In models of coupled dark energy and dark matter the mass of the dark matter particle depends on the cosmological evolution of the dark energy field. In this Letter we exemplify in a simple model the effects of this mass variation on the relic abundance of cold dark matter

  2. Gas identification field test based on FTIR imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chensheng; Liu, Xingchao; Zhang, Zhijie; Yu, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Gas detection and identification is based on the spectral absorption peak feature, which is acquired by the spectrometer. FTIR imaging spectrometer has the advantages of high spectral resolution and good sensitivity, which are both suitable for the unknown or mixture gas identification applications, such as plume pollution monitoring, chemical agents detection and leakage detection. According to the application requirement, a dual band FTIR imaging spectrometer has been developed and verified. This FTIR imaging spectrometer combines the infrared thermal imaging sensor and Michelson interferometer to form the three dimensional data cube. Based on this instrument, the theoretical analysis and algorithm is introduced, and the numerical method is explained to illuminate the basic idea in gas identification based on spectral features. After that, the field verification test is setup and completed. Firstly, the FTIR imaging spectrometer is used to detect SF6, NH3 and the mixture gas, while the gas is exhausted out from the storage vase with a specific speed. Secondly, the instrument is delivered to the industrial area to monitor the plume emission, and analyze the components in plume. Finally, the instrument is utilized to monitoring the oil spill in ocean, and the practical maritime trial is realized. Further, the gas concentration evaluation method is discussed. Quantitative issue in gas identification is an important topic. The test results show that, based on the gas identification method introduced in this paper, FTIR imaging spectrometer can be utilized to identify the unknown gas or mixture gas in real time. The instrument will play a key role in environmental emergency and monitoring application.

  3. A tracer-kinetic field theory for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourbron, Steven

    2014-04-01

    Dynamic imaging data are currently analyzed with a tracer-kinetic theory developed for individual time curves measured over whole organs. The assumption is that voxels represent isolated systems which all receive indicator through the same arterial inlet. This leads to well-known systematic errors, but also fails to exploit the spatial structure of the data. In this study, a more general theoretical framework is developed which makes full use of the specific structure of image data. The theory encodes the fact that voxels receive indicator from their immediate neighbors rather than from an upstream arterial input. This results in a tracer-kinetic field theory where the tissue parameters are functions of space which can be measured by analyzing the temporal and spatial patterns in the concentrations. The implications are evaluated through a number of field models for common tissue types. The key benefits of a tracer-kinetic field theory are that: 1) long-standing systematic errors can be corrected, specifically the issue of bolus dispersion and the contamination of large-vessel blood flow on tissue perfusion measurements; 2) additional tissue parameters can be measured that characterize convective or diffusive exchange between voxels; 3) the need to measure a separate arterial input function can be eliminated.

  4. Near field ice detection using infrared based optical imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moati, Hazem; Morris, Jonathan; Zeng, Yousheng; Corie, Martin Wesley; Yanni, Victor Garas

    2018-02-01

    If not detected and characterized, icebergs can potentially pose a hazard to oil and gas exploration, development and production operations in arctic environments as well as commercial shipping channels. In general, very large bergs are tracked and predicted using models or satellite imagery. Small and medium bergs are detectable using conventional marine radar. As icebergs decay they shed bergy bits and growlers, which are much smaller and more difficult to detect. Their low profile above the water surface, in addition to occasional relatively high seas, makes them invisible to conventional marine radar. Visual inspection is the most common method used to detect bergy bits and growlers, but the effectiveness of visual inspections is reduced by operator fatigue and low light conditions. The potential hazard from bergy bits and growlers is further increased by short detection range (<1 km). As such, there is a need for robust and autonomous near-field detection of such smaller icebergs. This paper presents a review of iceberg detection technology and explores applications for infrared imagers in the field. Preliminary experiments are performed and recommendations are made for future work, including a proposed imager design which would be suited for near field ice detection.

  5. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Matched field processing (MFP is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method.

  6. Improved MR imaging in extremely inhomogenous radiofrequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, N.; Nunnally, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    A previous study developed a method for acquiring images in extremely inhomogeneous radio-frequency fields with use of adiabatic pulses. Since adiabatic pulses most suited to section selection are the inversion type, the method is prone to artifacts from receiver and analog-to-digital converter (ADC) saturation and subtraction errors. These problems are substantially reduced by using a pseudo-noise-modulated selective (PNMS) prepulse to randomize the unwanted spin magnetization. To compute the PNMS pulse shape, the frequency spectrum of a wave form with constant amplitude and random phase was determined by means of Fourier transformation and then inverted after a consecutive number of points were set to zero in the center. The performance of the prepulse with the imaging sequence was tested on a 1.8-T system. Results are presented

  7. Adiabatic instability in coupled dark energy/dark matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Rachel; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Trodden, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We consider theories in which there exists a nontrivial coupling between the dark matter sector and the sector responsible for the acceleration of the Universe. Such theories can possess an adiabatic regime in which the quintessence field always sits at the minimum of its effective potential, which is set by the local dark matter density. We show that if the coupling strength is much larger than gravitational, then the adiabatic regime is always subject to an instability. The instability, which can also be thought of as a type of Jeans instability, is characterized by a negative sound speed squared of an effective coupled dark matter/dark energy fluid, and results in the exponential growth of small scale modes. We discuss the role of the instability in specific coupled cold dark matter and mass varying neutrino models of dark energy and clarify for these theories the regimes in which the instability can be evaded due to nonadiabaticity or weak coupling.

  8. Near-field acoustic imaging based on Laplacian sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Daudet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    , as in standard compressive sensing or basis pursuit approaches, solutions with a piecewise constant gradient or curvature are promoted, suitable for modeling extended sources that are subject to smooth spatial variations. The obtained results are compared to Least Squares and Compressive Sensing solutions......We present a sound source identification method for near-field acoustic imaging of extended sources. The methodology is based on a wave superposition method (or equivalent source method) that promotes solutions with sparse higher order spatial derivatives. Instead of promoting direct sparsity...

  9. Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager will flight-prove and optimized a prototype imager for advanced Heliophysics science analysis.The Wide Field-of-View...

  10. Influence of microlens array manufacturing errors on light-field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ning; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Bin; Wang, Fu-Qiang; Tan, He-Ping

    2018-03-01

    A microlens array (MLA) is a key optical element for four-dimensional light-field analysis in a light-field camera. MLA manufacturing errors affect light-field imaging, but their effects, especially on the physical imaging process and image-degradation mechanism, have not entirely been studied. In this paper, we develop a manufacturing-error model for MLA and quantitatively analyze raw images and refocused images using image quality evaluation indexes. The results indicate that manufacturing errors cause changes in image features including brightness, resolution, and spot position. The image-features undergo changes and the degree of degradation caused by different error types showed great differences.

  11. A phase field method for joint denoising, edge detection, and motion estimation in image sequence processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preusser, T.; Droske, M.; Garbe, C. S.; Telea, A.; Rumpf, M.

    2007-01-01

    The estimation of optical flow fields from image sequences is incorporated in a Mumford-Shah approach for image denoising and edge detection. Possibly noisy image sequences are considered as input and a piecewise smooth image intensity, a piecewise smooth motion field, and a joint discontinuity set

  12. Dark matter axions '96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses why axions have been postulated to exist, what cosmology implies about their presence as cold dark matter in the galactic halo, how axions might be detected in cavities wherein strong magnetic fields stimulate their conversion into photons, and relations between axions' energy spectra and galactic halos' properties

  13. Image-based Exploration of Large-Scale Pathline Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Nagoor, Omniah H.

    2014-05-27

    While real-time applications are nowadays routinely used in visualizing large nu- merical simulations and volumes, handling these large-scale datasets requires high-end graphics clusters or supercomputers to process and visualize them. However, not all users have access to powerful clusters. Therefore, it is challenging to come up with a visualization approach that provides insight to large-scale datasets on a single com- puter. Explorable images (EI) is one of the methods that allows users to handle large data on a single workstation. Although it is a view-dependent method, it combines both exploration and modification of visual aspects without re-accessing the original huge data. In this thesis, we propose a novel image-based method that applies the concept of EI in visualizing large flow-field pathlines data. The goal of our work is to provide an optimized image-based method, which scales well with the dataset size. Our approach is based on constructing a per-pixel linked list data structure in which each pixel contains a list of pathlines segments. With this view-dependent method it is possible to filter, color-code and explore large-scale flow data in real-time. In addition, optimization techniques such as early-ray termination and deferred shading are applied, which further improves the performance and scalability of our approach.

  14. Utility of 1% Tropicamide in Improving the Quality of Images for Tele-Screening of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Dark Irides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaee, Touka; Ansari-Astaneh, Mohammad-Reza; Pourreza, Hamidreza; Faal Hosseini, Fatemeh; Vatanparast, Maryam; Shoeibi, Nasser; Jami, Vajihe

    2017-08-01

    To compare the quality of fundus photographs taken before and after instillation of one drop of tropicamide. The 45º fundus photographs were taken with a non-mydriatic fundus camera in three conditions of the pupil; pre-mydriatic, 10 minutes after one drop of tropicamide, and fully dilated. Two photographs were taken in each condition; one centered on the macula and the other on the optic disc. Two vitreoretinal specialists graded the images. A total of 1768 fundus photographs of 149 diabetic patients with dark irides were included. There were more ungradable images (38.1% and 50.3%, graders 1 and 2, respectively) in the non-mydriatic state than partially- (4.6% and 11.5%) or fully-dilated (15.4% and 10.0%) conditions (p dark irides. Instillation of only one drop of tropicamide improves the quality of fundus photographs, which is not furthered by adding more drops. This strategy can be used in tele-ophthalmology programs.

  15. Fundamentals and applications of neutron imaging (applications part 10). Applications of neutron imaging to medical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Wakao, Hiromi; Ogura, Kouichi; Yanagie, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Hisao

    2007-01-01

    Described is the application of neutron (Nt) imaging in 3 objects, small animals and excised organs, odontology, and BNCT (boron Nt capture therapy). Nt radiography (NR) uses the fast and thermal Nt. For the former Nt, NR is done by transferring the permeation image on In-leaf to X-ray film or by direct imaging on nitro-cellulose film; and for the latter, by imaging on X-ray film through Gd-converter, by transfer of the image on In- or Dy-leaf to the film or by use of (BaFBr-Gd 2 O 3 ) Nt imaging plate. NR in animals can image air-containing organs like the lung. For human excised organs, NR can give images of wet tissues in hard organs like malignant tumors in the bone due to a large and small Nt cross sections of H and Ca, respectively. Excised gallstones (cholesterol- and Ca-derived) have been subjected to NR. NR of the pancreatic cancer has been reported with fast Nt. Many studies of NR have been reported in odontology, involving animals', human normal, treated and prosthetic teeth. NR can give information different in nature from X-ray radiography and further development of NR in odontology is expected as one of nondestructive tests. In BNCT-related field, NCAR (NC autoradiography) has been applied for seeing the distribution of 10 B in the tumor-bearing mouse given a B compound. Thermal and cold Nts are irradiated on the mouse whole body section and yielded ( 4 He+ 7 Li) radioactivity is detected by CR-39 plastic track detector undergone with various etching treatments. The distribution in the body and tumor can be observed by NCAR and by the recently-developed, versatile high speed image acquisition microscope, respectively. Micro-dosimetry on the CR-39 is thought possible by the latter microscope. (R.T.)

  16. Hybrid Imaging for Extended Depth of Field Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahreddine, Ramzi Nicholas

    An inverse relationship exists in optical systems between the depth of field (DOF) and the minimum resolvable feature size. This trade-off is especially detrimental in high numerical aperture microscopy systems where resolution is pushed to the diffraction limit resulting in a DOF on the order of 500 nm. Many biological structures and processes of interest span over micron scales resulting in significant blurring during imaging. This thesis explores a two-step computational imaging technique known as hybrid imaging to create extended DOF (EDF) microscopy systems with minimal sacrifice in resolution. In the first step a mask is inserted at the pupil plane of the microscope to create a focus invariant system over 10 times the traditional DOF, albeit with reduced contrast. In the second step the contrast is restored via deconvolution. Several EDF pupil masks from the literature are quantitatively compared in the context of biological microscopy. From this analysis a new mask is proposed, the incoherently partitioned pupil with binary phase modulation (IPP-BPM), that combines the most advantageous properties from the literature. Total variation regularized deconvolution models are derived for the various noise conditions and detectors commonly used in biological microscopy. State of the art algorithms for efficiently solving the deconvolution problem are analyzed for speed, accuracy, and ease of use. The IPP-BPM mask is compared with the literature and shown to have the highest signal-to-noise ratio and lowest mean square error post-processing. A prototype of the IPP-BPM mask is fabricated using a combination of 3D femtosecond glass etching and standard lithography techniques. The mask is compared against theory and demonstrated in biological imaging applications.

  17. The dark universe dark matter and dark energy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    According to the standard cosmological model, 95% of the present mass density of the universe is dark: roughly 70% of the total in the form of dark energy and 25% in the form of dark matter. In a series of four lectures, I will begin by presenting a brief review of cosmology, and then I will review the observational evidence for dark matter and dark energy. I will discuss some of the proposals for dark matter and dark energy, and connect them to high-energy physics. I will also present an overview of an observational program to quantify the properties of dark energy.

  18. Interacting dark sector with transversal interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2015-03-26

    We investigate the interacting dark sector composed of dark matter, dark energy, and dark radiation for a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background by introducing a three-dimensional internal space spanned by the interaction vector Q and solve the source equation for a linear transversal interaction. Then, we explore a realistic model with dark matter coupled to a scalar field plus a decoupled radiation term, analyze the amount of dark energy in the radiation era and find that our model is consistent with the recent measurements of cosmic microwave background anisotropy coming from Planck along with the future constraints achievable by CMBPol experiment.

  19. Dark Matter Reality Check: Chandra Casts Cloud On Alternative Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    New evidence from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory challenges an alternative theory of gravity that eliminates the need for dark matter. The observation also narrows the field for competing forms of dark matter, the elusive material thought to be the dominant form of matter in the universe. An observation of the galaxy NGC 720 shows it is enveloped in a slightly flattened, or ellipsoidal cloud of hot gas that has an orientation different from that of the optical image of the galaxy. The flattening is too large to be explained by theories in which stars and gas are assumed to contain most of the mass in the galaxy. "The shape and orientation of the hot gas cloud require it to be confined by an egg-shaped dark matter halo," said David Buote of the University of California, Irvine, and lead author of a report on this research in the 2002 September 20 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "This means that dark matter is not just an illusion due to a shortcoming of the standard theory of gravity - it is real." According to the generally accepted standard theory of gravity, the hot X-ray cloud would need an additional source of gravity - a halo of dark matter - to keep the hot gas from expanding away. The mass of dark matter required would be about five to ten times the mass of the stars in the galaxy. If the dark matter tracked the optical light from the stars in the galaxy, the hot X-ray cloud would be more round than it is. The flattened shape of the hot gas cloud requires a flattened dark matter halo. An alternative theory of gravity called MOND, for Modified Newtonian Dynamics, was proposed in 1983 by Mordecai Milgrom of the Weizmann Institute in Israel, and has remained viable over the years. MOND does away with the need for dark matter by modifying the theory where the acceleration produced by gravity is very small, such as the outskirts of galaxies. However, MOND cannot explain the Chandra observation of NGC 720. This is apparently the first dynamical evidence that

  20. Water deficit in field-grown Gossypium hirsutum primarily limits net photosynthesis by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, Daryl R; Snider, John L; Collins, Guy D; Perry, Calvin D; Whitaker, Jared; Byrd, Seth A

    2014-11-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve irrigation efficiency and drought tolerance of agronomic crops; however, a clear understanding of the physiological mechanisms that interact to decrease source strength and drive yield loss has not been attained. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms contributing to inhibition of net carbon assimilation under drought stress, three cultivars of Gossypium hirsutum were grown in the field under contrasting irrigation regimes during the 2012 and 2013 growing season near Camilla, Georgia, USA. Physiological measurements were conducted on three sample dates during each growing season (providing a broad range of plant water status) and included, predawn and midday leaf water potential (ΨPD and ΨMD), gross and net photosynthesis, dark respiration, photorespiration, and chlorophyll a fluorescence. End-of-season lint yield was also determined. ΨPD ranged from -0.31 to -0.95MPa, and ΨMD ranged from -1.02 to -2.67MPa, depending upon irrigation regime and sample date. G. hirsutum responded to water deficit by decreasing stomatal conductance, increasing photorespiration, and increasing the ratio of dark respiration to gross photosynthesis, thereby limiting PN and decreasing lint yield (lint yield declines observed during the 2012 growing season only). Conversely, even extreme water deficit, causing a 54% decline in PN, did not negatively affect actual quantum yield, maximum quantum yield, or photosynthetic electron transport. It is concluded that PN is primarily limited in drought-stressed G. hirsutum by decreased stomatal conductance, along with increases in respiratory and photorespiratory carbon losses, not inhibition or down-regulation of electron transport through photosystem II. It is further concluded that ΨPD is a reliable indicator of drought stress and the need for irrigation in field-grown cotton. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Dark Sectors 2016 Workshop: Community Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Jim; et al.

    2016-08-30

    This report, based on the Dark Sectors workshop at SLAC in April 2016, summarizes the scientific importance of searches for dark sector dark matter and forces at masses beneath the weak-scale, the status of this broad international field, the important milestones motivating future exploration, and promising experimental opportunities to reach these milestones over the next 5-10 years.

  2. Dark Sectors 2016 Workshop: Community Report

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Jim; Echenard, Bertrand; Essig, Rouven; Graham, Matthew; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaros, John; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mardon, Jeremy; Morrissey, David; Nelson, Tim; Perelstein, Maxim; Pyle, Matt; Ritz, Adam; Schuster, Philip; Shuve, Brian; Toro, Natalia; Van De Water, Richard G.; Akerib, Daniel; An, Haipeng; Aniol, Konrad; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Asner, David M.; Back, Henning O.; Baker, Keith; Baltzell, Nathan; Banerjee, Dipanwita; Batell, Brian; Bauer, Daniel; Beacham, James; Benesch, Jay; Bjorken, James; Blinov, Nikita; Boehm, Celine; Bondi, Mariangela; Bonivento, Walter; Bossi, Fabio; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Budnik, Ran; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bukhari, Masroor H.; Bunker, Raymond; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cartaro, Concetta; Cassel, David; Cavoto, Gianluca; Celentano, Andrea; Chaterjee, Animesh; Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Chiodini, Gabriele; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Church, Eric D.; Cooke, D.A.; Cooley, Jodi; Cooper, Robert; Corliss, Ross; Crivelli, Paolo; Curciarello, Francesca; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Davoudiasl, Hooman; De Napoli, Marzio; De Vita, Raffaella; Denig, Achim; deNiverville, Patrick; Deshpande, Abhay; Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Dobrescu, Bogdan; Donskov, Sergey; Dupre, Raphael; Estrada, Juan; Fegan, Stuart; Ferber, Torben; Field, Clive; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Filippi, Alessandra; Fornal, Bartosz; Freyberger, Arne; Friedland, Alexander; Galon, Iftach; Gardner, Susan; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Gninenko, Sergei; Golutvin, Andrey; Gori, Stefania; Grab, Christoph; Graziani, Enrico; Griffioen, Keith; Haas, Andrew; Harigaya, Keisuke; Hearty, Christopher; Hertel, Scott; Hewett, JoAnne; Hime, Andrew; Hitlin, David; Hochberg, Yonit; Holt, Roy J.; Holtrop, Maurik; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hsu, Lauren; Ilten, Phil; Incandela, Joe; Inguglia, Gianluca; Irwin, Kent; Jaegle, Igal; Johnson, Robert P.; Kahn, Yonatan; Kalicy, Grzegorz; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Khachatryan, Vardan; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Krasnikov, N.V.; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuflik, Eric; Kurinsky, Noah; Laha, Ranjan; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Li, Dale; Lin, Tongyan; Lisanti, Mariangela; Liu, Kun; Liu, Ming; Loer, Ben; Loomba, Dinesh; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mandaglio, Giuseppe; Mans, Jeremiah; Marciano, W.J.; Markiewicz, Thomas; Marsicano, Luca; Maruyama, Takashi; Matveev, Victor A.; McKeen, David; McKinnon, Bryan; McKinsey, Dan; Merkel, Harald; Mock, Jeremy; Monzani, Maria Elena; Moreno, Omar; Nantais, Corina; Paul, Sebouh; Peskin, Michael; Poliakov, Vladimir; Polosa, Antonio D.; Pospelov, Maxim; Rachek, Igor; Radics, Balint; Raggi, Mauro; Randazzo, Nunzio; Ratcliff, Blair; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rizzo, Thomas; Robinson, Alan; Rubbia, Andre; Rubin, David; Rueter, Dylan; Saab, Tarek; Santopinto, Elena; Schnee, Richard; Shelton, Jessie; Simi, Gabriele; Simonyan, Ani; Sipala, Valeria; Slone, Oren; Smith, Elton; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Solt, Matthew; Sorensen, Peter; Soreq, Yotam; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spencer, James; Stepanyan, Stepan; Strube, Jan; Sullivan, Michael; Tadepalli, Arun S.; Tait, Tim; Taiuti, Mauro; Tanedo, Philip; Tayloe, Rex; Thaler, Jesse; Tran, Nhan V.; Tulin, Sean; Tully, Christopher G.; Uemura, Sho; Ungaro, Maurizio; Valente, Paolo; Vance, Holly; Vavra, Jerry; Volansky, Tomer; von Krosigk, Belina; Whitbeck, Andrew; Williams, Mike; Wittich, Peter; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Xue, Wei; Yoon, Jong Min; Yu, Hai-Bo; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Tien-Tien; Zhang, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Zhong, Yiming; Zurek, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This report, based on the Dark Sectors workshop at SLAC in April 2016, summarizes the scientific importance of searches for dark sector dark matter and forces at masses beneath the weak-scale, the status of this broad international field, the important milestones motivating future exploration, and promising experimental opportunities to reach these milestones over the next 5-10 years.

  3. Novel Probes of Gravity and Dark Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; et al.

    2013-09-20

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has stimulated theorists to consider dark energy or modifications to Einstein's General Relativity as possible explanations. The last decade has seen advances in theories that go beyond smooth dark energy -- modified gravity and interactions of dark energy. While the theoretical terrain is being actively explored, the generic presence of fifth forces and dark sector couplings suggests a set of distinct observational signatures. This report focuses on observations that differ from the conventional probes that map the expansion history or large-scale structure. Examples of such novel probes are: detection of scalar fields via lab experiments, tests of modified gravity using stars and galaxies in the nearby universe, comparison of lensing and dynamical masses of galaxies and clusters, and the measurements of fundamental constants at high redshift. The observational expertise involved is very broad as it spans laboratory experiments, high resolution astronomical imaging and spectroscopy and radio observations. In the coming decade, searches for these effects have the potential for discovering fundamental new physics. We discuss how the searches can be carried out using experiments that are already under way or with modest adaptations of existing telescopes or planned experiments. The accompanying paper on the Growth of Cosmic Structure describes complementary tests of gravity with observations of large-scale structure.

  4. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Part 11 of this article we learnt that there are compelling evidences from dynamics of spiral galaxies, like our own, that there must be non-luminous matter in them. In this second part we will see that even clusters of galaxies must harbour dark matter. As if this was not enough, it turns out that if our knowledge of the ...

  5. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide. Over the last twenty years, astronomers have been forced to postulate the presence of large quantities of 'dark matter' to explain their observations. They are ...

  6. Dark Matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interests include cinema, stamps and sketching. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Dark Matter. 1. What You See Ain'/ What You Got. Bikram Phookun and Biman Nath. The study of gas clouds orbiting in the outer regions of spiral galaxies has revealed that their gravitational at- traction is much larger than the stars alone can provide.

  7. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  8. Multimodal Ultrawide-Field Imaging Features in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Rao, Rajesh C

    2015-06-01

    A 45-year-old woman was referred for bilateral irregular fundus pigmentation. Dilated fundus examination revealed irregular hypopigmentation posterior to the equator in both eyes, confirmed by fundus autofluorescence. A thickened choroid was seen on enhanced-depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI SD-OCT). Systemic evaluation revealed sensorineural deafness, telecanthus, and a white forelock. Further investigation revealed a first-degree relative with Waardenburg syndrome. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by a group of features including telecanthus, a broad nasal root, synophrys of the eyebrows, piedbaldism, heterochromia irides, and deafness. Choroidal hypopigmentation is a unique feature that can be visualized with ultrawide-field fundus autofluorescence. The choroid may also be thickened and its thickness measured with EDI SD-OCT. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. First SN Discoveries from the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F.; Achitouv, I.; Ahn, E.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Alonso, D.; Amara, A.; Annis, J.; Antonik, M.; Aragon-Salamanca, A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashall, C.; Asorey, J.; Bacon, D.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Barbary, K.; Barkhouse, W.; Baruah, L.; Bauer, A.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, M.; Bender, R.; Benoist, C.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernardi, M.; Bernstein, G.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R.; Bertin, E.; Beynon, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Biswas, R.; Blake, C.; Bloom, J. S.; Bocquet, S.; Brandt, C.; Bridle, S.; Brooks, D.; Brown, P. J.; Brunner, R.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Burkert, A.; Busha, M.; Campa, J.; Campbell, H.; Cane, R.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carollo, M.; Carrasco-Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Carter, M.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Chen, Y.; Chiu, I.; Chue, C.; Clampitt, J.; Clerkin, L.; Cohn, J.; Colless, M.; Copeland, E.; Covarrubias, R. A.; Crittenden, R.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C.; da Costa, L.; d'Andrea, C.; Das, S.; Das, R.; Davis, T. M.; Deb, S.; DePoy, D.; Derylo, G.; Desai, S.; de Simoni, F.; Devlin, M.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J.; Dodelson, S.; Doel, P.; Dolag, K.; Efstathiou, G.; Eifler, T.; Erickson, B.; Eriksen, M.; Estrada, J.; Etherington, J.; Evrard, A.; Farrens, S.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Ferreira, P. C.; Finley, D.; Fischer, J. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Furlanetto, C.; Garcia-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gelman, M.; Gerdes, D.; Giannantonio, T.; Gilhool, S.; Gill, M.; Gladders, M.; Gladney, L.; Glazebrook, K.; Gray, M.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R.; Gupta, R.; Gutierrez, G.; Habib, S.; Hall, E.; Hansen, S.; Hao, J.; Heitmann, K.; Helsby, J.; Henderson, R.; Hennig, C.; High, W.; Hirsch, M.; Hoffmann, K.; Holhjem, K.; Honscheid, K.; Host, O.; Hoyle, B.; Hu, W.; Huff, E.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; James, D.; Jarvis, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M.; Jouvel, S.; Kacprzak, T.; Karliner, I.; Katsaros, J.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kim, A.; Kim-Vy, T.; King, L.; Kirk, D.; Kochanek, C.; Kopp, M.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Kovacs, E.; Krause, E.; Kravtsov, A.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kunder, A.; Kuropatkin, N.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Leistedt, B.; Levi, M.; Lewis, P.; Liddle, A.; Lidman, C.; Lilly, S.; Lin, H.; Liu, J.; Lopez-Arenillas, C.; Lorenzon, W.; LoVerde, M.; Ma, Z.; Maartens, R.; Maccrann, N.; Macri, L.; Maia, M.; Makler, M.; Manera, M.; Maraston, C.; March, M.; Markovic, K.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J.; Marshall, S.; Martini, P.; Marti Sanahuja, P.; Mayers, J.; McKay, T.; McMahon, R.; Melchior, P.; Merritt, K. W.; Merson, A.; Miller, C.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Moore, T.; Mortonson, M.; Mosher, J.; Mould, J.; Mukherjee, P.; Neilsen, E.; Ngeow, C.; Nichol, R.; Nidever, D.; Nord, B.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R.; Old, L.; Olsen, J.; Ostrovski, F.; Paech, K.; Papadopoulos, A.; Papovich, C.; Patton, K.; Peacock, J.; Pellegrini, P. S. S.; Peoples, J.; Percival, W.; Perlmutter, S.; Petravick, D.; Plazas, A.; Ponce, R.; Poole, G.; Pope, A.; Refregier, A.; Reyes, R.; Ricker, P.; Roe, N.; Romer, K.; Roodman, A.; Rooney, P.; Ross, A.; Rowe, B.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sabiu, C.; Saglia, R.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, A.; Sanchez, C.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Santiago, B.; Saro, A.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Schmitt, R. L.; Schubnell, M.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Sevilla, I.; Sharp, R.; Sheldon, E.; Sheth, R.; Smith, R. C.; Smith, M.; Snigula, J.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Song, J.; Soumagnac, M.; Spinka, H.; Stebbins, A.; Stoughton, C.; Suchyta, E.; Suhada, R.; Sullivan, M.; Sun, F.; Suntzeff, N.; Sutherland, W.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Szepietowski, R.; Talaga, R.; Tarle, G.; Tarrant, E.; Balan, S. Thaithara; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Tucker, D.; Uddin, S. A.; Ural, S.; Vikram, V.; Voigt, L.; Walker, A. R.; Walker, T.; Wechsler, R.; Weinberg, D.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.; Wetzstein, M.; White, M.; Wilcox, H.; Wilman, D.; Yanny, B.; Young, J.; Zablocki, A.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) report the discovery of the first set of supernovae (SN) from the project. Images were observed as part of the DES Science Verification phase using the newly-installed 570-Megapixel Dark Energy Camera on the CTIO Blanco 4-m telescope by observers J. Annis, E. Buckley-Geer, and H. Lin. SN observations are planned throughout the observing campaign on a regular cadence of 4-6 days in each of the ten 3-deg2 fields in the DES griz filters.

  10. Dark energy from gravitoelectromagnetic inflation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membiela, A.; Bellini, M.

    2008-01-01

    Gravitoelectromagnetic Inflation (GI) was introduced to describe in a unified manner electromagnetic, gravitatory and inflation fields from a 5D vacuum state. On the other hand, the primordial origin and evolution of dark energy is today unknown. In this letter we show using GI that the zero modes of some redefined vector fields B i = A i /a produced during inflation could be the source of dark energy in the Universe.

  11. Dark blood versus bright blood T2* acquisition in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for thalassaemia major (TM) patients: Evaluation of feasibility, reproducibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liguori, Carlo; Di Giampietro, Ilenia; Pitocco, Francesca; De Vivo, Aldo Eros; Schena, Emiliano; Mortato, Luca; Pirro, Federica; Cianciulli, Paolo; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of dark blood (DB) versus bright blood (BB) sequences. To assess the intra and inter-observer variability and inter-study reproducibility between BB versus DB. To evaluate image quality level in the two sequences. Methods: In a setting of 138 patients we performed CMR using cardiac gated Gradient-multiecho single breath-hold BB and DB sequences in the middle ventricular septum. Each acquisition was repeated during the same exam. Truncation method was used to account for background noise. Image quality (IQ) was assessed using a 5 point grading scale and image analysis was conducted by 2 experienced observers. Results: Compared with the conventional BB acquisition, the coefficient of correlation and significance of the DB technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001), inter-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001) and inter-study reproducibility (p < 0.001). The variability is also lower for DB sequences for T2* values <14 ms. Assessment of artifacts showed a superior score for DB versus BB scans (4 versus 3, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in terms of inter observer and inter study variability using DB sequences was obtained. The greatest disparity between them was seen in inter-study reproducibility and higher IQ in DB was seen. Study demonstrates better performance of DB imaging compared to BB in presence of comparable effectiveness

  12. Dark blood versus bright blood T2* acquisition in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for thalassaemia major (TM) patients: Evaluation of feasibility, reproducibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Carlo, E-mail: c.liguori@unicampus.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Di Giampietro, Ilenia; Pitocco, Francesca; De Vivo, Aldo Eros [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Schena, Emiliano [Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Mortato, Luca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy); Pirro, Federica [Department of Biomaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of Sacred Herart, Largo A. Gemelli 1, 00135 Rome (Italy); Cianciulli, Paolo [Thalassemia Unit, Ospedale Sant Eugenio, Piazzale dell’Umanesimo 10, 00143 Rome (Italy); Zobel, Bruno Beomonte [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Campus Bio Medico University, via Alvaro del Portillo 200, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of dark blood (DB) versus bright blood (BB) sequences. To assess the intra and inter-observer variability and inter-study reproducibility between BB versus DB. To evaluate image quality level in the two sequences. Methods: In a setting of 138 patients we performed CMR using cardiac gated Gradient-multiecho single breath-hold BB and DB sequences in the middle ventricular septum. Each acquisition was repeated during the same exam. Truncation method was used to account for background noise. Image quality (IQ) was assessed using a 5 point grading scale and image analysis was conducted by 2 experienced observers. Results: Compared with the conventional BB acquisition, the coefficient of correlation and significance of the DB technique was superior for intra-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001), inter-observer reproducibility (p < 0.001) and inter-study reproducibility (p < 0.001). The variability is also lower for DB sequences for T2* values <14 ms. Assessment of artifacts showed a superior score for DB versus BB scans (4 versus 3, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement in terms of inter observer and inter study variability using DB sequences was obtained. The greatest disparity between them was seen in inter-study reproducibility and higher IQ in DB was seen. Study demonstrates better performance of DB imaging compared to BB in presence of comparable effectiveness.

  13. Full-Field Indentation Damage Measurement Using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías López-Alba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on full-field indentation measurements to characterize and quantify the effect of contact in thin plates is presented. The proposed method has been employed to evaluate the indentation damage generated in the presence of bending deformation, resulting from the contact between a thin plate and a rigid sphere. For this purpose, the 3D Digital Image Correlation (3D-DIC technique has been adopted to quantify the out of plane displacements at the back face of the plate. Tests were conducted using aluminum thin plates and a rigid bearing sphere to evaluate the influence of the thickness and the material behavior during contact. Information provided by the 3D-DIC technique has been employed to perform an indirect measurement of the contact area during the loading and unloading path of the test. A symmetrical distribution in the contact damage region due to the symmetry of the indenter was always observed. In the case of aluminum plates, the presence of a high level of plasticity caused shearing deformation as the load increased. Results show the full-field contact damage area for different plates’ thicknesses at different loads. The contact damage region was bigger when the thickness of the specimen increased, and therefore, bending deformation was reduced. With the proposed approach, the elastic recovery at the contact location was quantified during the unloading, as well as the remaining permanent indentation damage after releasing the load. Results show the information obtained by full-field measurements at the contact location during the test, which implies a substantial improvement compared with pointwise techniques.

  14. A spectral k-means approach to bright-field cell image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Laura; Wan, Justin W L

    2010-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of bright-field cell images is important to cell biologists, but difficult to complete due to the complex nature of the cells in bright-field images (poor contrast, broken halo, missing boundaries). Standard approaches such as level set segmentation and active contours work well for fluorescent images where cells appear as round shape, but become less effective when optical artifacts such as halo exist in bright-field images. In this paper, we present a robust segmentation method which combines the spectral and k-means clustering techniques to locate cells in bright-field images. This approach models an image as a matrix graph and segment different regions of the image by computing the appropriate eigenvectors of the matrix graph and using the k-means algorithm. We illustrate the effectiveness of the method by segmentation results of C2C12 (muscle) cells in bright-field images.

  15. Dark Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    13 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. The dominant winds responsible for these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest). They are located near 76.6oN, 257.2oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper right.

  16. Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

  17. Gravity's dark side: Doing without dark matte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite decades of searching, the 'dark matter' thought to hold galaxies together is still nowhere to be found. Matthew Chalmers describes how some physicists think it makes more sense to change our theory of gravity instead. Einstein's general theory of relativity is part of the bedrock of modern physics. It describes in elegant mathematical terms how matter causes space-time to curve, and therefore how objects move in a gravitational field. Since it was published in 1916, general relativity has passed every test asked of it with flying colours, and to many physicists the notion that it is wrong is sacrilege. But the motivation for developing an alternative theory of gravity is compelling. Over the last few years cosmologists have arrived at a simple yet extraordinarily successful model of universe. The trouble is that it requires most of the cosmos to be filled with mysterious stuff that we cannot see. In particular, general relativity - or rather its non-relativistic limit otherwise known as Newtonian gravity - can only correctly describe the dynamics of galaxies if we invoke huge quantities of 'dark matter'. Furthermore, an exotic entity called dark energy is necessary to account for the recent discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. Indeed, in the standard model of cosmology, visible matter such as stars, planets and physics textbooks accounts for just 4% of the total universe. (U.K.)

  18. Turning off the lights: How dark is dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Samuel D.; Yu Haibo; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    We consider current observational constraints on the electromagnetic charge of dark matter. The velocity dependence of the scattering cross section through the photon gives rise to qualitatively different constraints than standard dark matter scattering through massive force carriers. In particular, recombination epoch observations of dark matter density perturbations require that ε, the ratio of the dark matter to electronic charge, is less than 10 -6 for m X =1 GeV, rising to ε -4 for m X =10 TeV. Though naively one would expect that dark matter carrying a charge well below this constraint could still give rise to large scattering in current direct detection experiments, we show that charged dark matter particles that could be detected with upcoming experiments are expected to be evacuated from the Galactic disk by the Galactic magnetic fields and supernova shock waves and hence will not give rise to a signal. Thus dark matter with a small charge is likely not a source of a signal in current or upcoming dark matter direct detection experiments.

  19. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A DARK AURORAL OVAL ON SATURN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The ultraviolet image was obtained by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope with the European Faint Object Camera (FOC) on June 1992. It represents the sunlight reflected by the planet in the near UV (220 nm). * The image reveals a dark oval encircling the north magnetic pole of Saturn. This auroral oval is the first ever observed for Saturn, and its darkness is unique in the solar system (L. Ben-Jaffel, V. Leers, B. Sandel, Science, Vol. 269, p. 951, August 18, 1995). The structure represents an excess of absorption of the sunlight at 220 nm by atmospheric particles that are the product of the auroral activity itself. The large tilt of the northern pole of Saturn at the time of observation, and the almost perfect symmetry of the planet's magnetic field, made this observation unique as even the far side of the dark oval across the pole is visible! * Auroral activity is usually characterized by light emitted around the poles. The dark oval observed for Saturn is a STUNNING VISUAL PROOF that transport of energy and charged particles from the magnetosphere to the atmosphere of the planet at high latitudes induces an auroral activity that not only produces auroral LIGHT but also UV-DARK material near the poles: auroral electrons are probably initiating hydrocarbon polymer formation in these regions. Credits: L. Ben Jaffel, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris-CNRS, France, B. Sandel (Univ. of Arizona), NASA/ESA, and Science (magazine).

  1. Brief History of Ultra-light Scalar Dark Matter Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jae-Weon

    2018-01-01

    dark matter, BEC dark matter, wave dark matter, or ultra-light axion. In this model ultra-light scalar dark matter particles with mass m = O(10-22eV condense in a single Bose-Einstein condensate state and behave collectively like a classical wave. Galactic dark matter halos can be described as a self-gravitating coherent scalar field configuration called boson stars. At the scale larger than galaxies the dark matter acts like cold dark matter, while below the scale quantum pressure from the uncertainty principle suppresses the smaller structure formation so that it can resolve the small scale crisis of the conventional cold dark matter model.

  2. Dark Martian Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    30 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, windblown sand dunes in a crater in the Hesperia region of Mars. The steepest slopes on the dunes -- their slipfaces -- point toward the south-southwest, indicating that the winds responsible for the dunes blew from the north-northeast (top/upper right). Location near: 12.4oS, 236.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  3. Relations of image quality in on-line portal images and individual patient parameters for pelvic field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuvel, F. van den; Neve, W. de; Coghe, M.; Verellen, D.; Storme, G.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the present study involving 566 pelvic fields on 13 patients were: 1. To study the machine- and patient-related factors influencing image quality. 2. To study the factors related to machine, patient and patient set-up, influencing the errors of field set-up. 3. To develop a method for predicting the camera settings. The OPI device consisted of a fluorescent screen scanned by a video camera. An image quality score on a scale 0-5 was given for 546/566 fields. In a univariate analysis, open field subtraction adversely affected the score. The image score of anterior fields was significantly better than that of posterior fields. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression showed that, in addition to anterior or posterior field and subtraction, gender was also a significant predictor of image score. Errors requiring field adjustments were detected on 289/530 (54.5%) evaluable fields or 229/278 (82.4%) evaluable patient set-ups. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the probability of performing an adjustment was significantly related to gender, image quality and AP-PA diameter. The magnitude of adjustments made in the lateral direction correlated significantly with patient bulk. The camera kV level with gain held constant showed an exponential dependency on dose rate at the image detector plate and can thus be predicted by treatment planning. (orig.)

  4. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  5. High Resolution Multispectral Flow Imaging of Cells with Extended Depth of Field, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proposed is the development the extended depth of field (EDF) or confocal like imaging capabilities of a breakthrough multispectral high resolution imaging flow...

  6. Study of non-canonical scalar field model using various parametrizations of dark energy equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mamon, Abdulla; Das, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    In this present work, we try to build up a cosmological model using a non-canonical scalar field within the framework of a spatially flat FRW space-time. In this context, we have considered four different parametrizations of the equation of state parameter of the non-canonical scalar field. Under this scenario, analytical solutions for various cosmological parameters have been found out. It has been found that the deceleration parameter shows a smooth transition from a positive value to some negative value which indicates that the universe was undergoing an early deceleration followed by late time acceleration which is essential for the structure formation of the universe. With these four parametrizations, the future evolution of the models are also discussed. It has been found that one of the models (Generalized Chaplygin gas model, GCG) mimics the concordance ΛCDM in the near future, whereas two other models (CPL and JBP) diverge due to future singularity. Finally, we have studied these theoretical models with the latest datasets from SN Ia + H(z) + BAO/CMB. (orig.)

  7. The Keck Cosmic Web Imager: a capable new integral field spectrograph for the W. M. Keck Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Patrick; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Martin, Chris; Moore, Anna; Adkins, Sean; Epps, Harland; Bartos, Randy; Cabak, Jerry; Cowley, Dave; Davis, Jack; Delacroix, Alex; Fucik, Jason; Hilliard, David; James, Ean; Kaye, Steve; Lingner, Nicole; Neill, James D.; Pistor, Christoph; Phillips, Drew; Rockosi, Connie; Weber, Bob

    2012-09-01

    The Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) is a new facility instrument being developed for the W. M. Keck Observatory and funded for construction by the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). KCWI is a bench-mounted spectrograph for the Keck II right Nasmyth focal station, providing integral field spectroscopy over a seeing-limited field up to 20"x33" in extent. Selectable Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings provide high efficiency and spectral resolution in the range of 1000 to 20000. The dual-beam design of KCWI passed a Preliminary Design Review in summer 2011. The detailed design of the KCWI blue channel (350 to 700 nm) is now nearly complete, with the red channel (530 to 1050 nm) planned for a phased implementation contingent upon additional funding. KCWI builds on the experience of the Caltech team in implementing the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI), in operation since 2009 at Palomar Observatory. KCWI adds considerable flexibility to the CWI design, and will take full advantage of the excellent seeing and dark sky above Mauna Kea with a selectable nod-and-shuffle observing mode. In this paper, models of the expected KCWI sensitivity and background subtraction capability are presented, along with a detailed description of the instrument design. The KCWI team is lead by Caltech (project management, design and implementation) in partnership with the University of California at Santa Cruz (camera optical and mechanical design) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (program oversight and observatory interfaces).

  8. Review of near-field optics and superlenses for sub-diffraction-limited nano-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Adams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Near-field optics and superlenses for imaging beyond Abbe’s diffraction limit are reviewed. A comprehensive and contemporary background is given on scanning near-field microscopy and superlensing. Attention is brought to recent research leveraging scanning near-field optical microscopy with superlenses for new nano-imaging capabilities. Future research directions are explored for realizing the goal of low-cost and high-performance sub-diffraction-limited imaging systems.

  9. Pelvic endometriosis: a comparison between low-field (0.2 T) and high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaif, Karine; Ajzen, Sergio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: kminaif@uol.com.br; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Minami, Cintia Cristina Satie; Sales, Danilo Moulin; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis. Unit of Abdomen; Ruano, Jose Maria Cordeiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology. Sector of Videlaparoscopy; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of General Gynecology

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to compare low-field (0.2 T) with high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pelvic endometriosis and adenomyosis. Materials and methods: twenty-seven female patients with clinically suspected endometriosis were prospectively evaluated by means of high-field and low-field magnetic resonance imaging. The reading of the images was performed by a single radiologist, initiating by the low-field, followed by the high-field images. High-field magnetic resonance imaging was utilized as the golden-standard. Results: among the 27 patients included in the present study, 18 (66.7%) had some type of lesion suggesting the presence of endometriosis demonstrated at high-field images. In 14 of these patients the diagnosis was correctly established by low-field magnetic resonance imaging. Endometriomas, tubal lesions, and endometriotic foci > 7 mm identified at the high-field images were also identified at low-field images with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Among the nine patients diagnosed with adenomyosis by high-field images, eight were correctly diagnosed by low-field images with 88.9% accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: low-field magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a low sensitivity in the detection of small endometriotic foci, high sensitivity in the detection of endometriomas and large endometriotic foci, and high accuracy in the detection of adenomyosis when compared with high-field magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  10. Neutrinos and dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrempp, L.

    2008-02-15

    From the observed late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion arises the quest for the nature of Dark Energy. As has been widely discussed, the cosmic neutrino background naturally qualifies for a connection with the Dark Energy sector and as a result could play a key role for the origin of cosmic acceleration. In this thesis we explore various theoretical aspects and phenomenological consequences arising from non-standard neutrino interactions, which dynamically link the cosmic neutrino background and a slowly-evolving scalar field of the dark sector. In the considered scenario, known as Neutrino Dark Energy, the complex interplay between the neutrinos and the scalar field not only allows to explain cosmic acceleration, but intriguingly, as a distinct signature, also gives rise to dynamical, time-dependent neutrino masses. In a first analysis, we thoroughly investigate an astrophysical high energy neutrino process which is sensitive to neutrino masses. We work out, both semi-analytically and numerically, the generic clear-cut signatures arising from a possible time variation of neutrino masses which we compare to the corresponding results for constant neutrino masses. Finally, we demonstrate that even for the lowest possible neutrino mass scale, it is feasible for the radio telescope LOFAR to reveal a variation of neutrino masses and therefore to probe the nature of Dark Energy within the next decade. A second independent analysis deals with the recently challenged stability of Neutrino Dark Energy against the strong growth of hydrodynamic perturbations, driven by the new scalar force felt between neutrinos. Within the framework of linear cosmological perturbation theory, we derive the equation of motion of the neutrino perturbations in a model-independent way. This equation allows to deduce an analytical stability condition which translates into a comfortable upper bound on the scalar-neutrino coupling which is determined by the ratio of the densities in cold dark

  11. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto, E-mail: aguirre@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  12. Three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and systems for near-field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed three-dimensional holographic (synthetic aperture) radar imaging techniques and systems for a wide variety of near-field applications. These applications include radar cross-section (RCS) imaging, personnel screening, standoff concealed weapon detection, concealed threat detection, through-barrier imaging, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Sequentially-switched linear arrays are used for many of these systems to enable high-speed data acquisition and 3-D imaging. In this paper, the techniques and systems will be described along with imaging results that demonstrate the utility of near-field 3-D radar imaging for these compelling applications.

  13. Laser Probes of the Dark Sector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Dark matter, dark energy, and gravity are fundamental components of the standard cosmological model, and their macroscopic effects on the evolution of the universe are well documented. However, the quantum properties of these fields remain largely unknown. An ongoing suite of laser experiments at Fermilab have conducted searches for axion-like dark matter, tested particle models of dark energy, and plans to test certain predictions of black hole thermodynamics---namely the holographic principle. I will present the results from the GammeV search for milli-eV axion-like particles and will discuss in detail the recently completed CHASE search for chameleon dark energy.

  14. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord vascular lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, C.; Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging (1.5T) was performed in 20 patients with spinal cord vascular malformations and hemangioblastomas. MR imaging findings were correlated with data obtained by other imaging modalities (myelography, CT and selective angiography). A diagnosis of vascular legions was suspected or established in 15 patients. Seven had a history of embolization or surgery prior to MR imaging. Six of seven hemangioblastomas were detected on MR imaging. The diagnosis was incorrect in one case because of the small size of the hemangioblastoma nodule, although the cystic part of the lesion was correctly identified. In three cases, the diagnosis was made first on MR imaging and then confirmed on angiography and surgery. Eleven vascular malformations were studied. Malformative thrombosis was found in four of the 11, as suggested by high-intensity signals on T1- and T2-weighted images

  15. Image reconstruction in k-space from MR data encoded with ambiguous gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Gerrit; Gallichan, Daniel; Weber, Hans; Witschey, Walter R T; Honal, Matthias; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the limits of image reconstruction in k-space are explored when non-bijective gradient fields are used for spatial encoding. The image space analogy between parallel imaging and imaging with non-bijective encoding fields is partially broken in k-space. As a consequence, it is hypothesized and proven that ambiguities can only be resolved partially in k-space, and not completely as is the case in image space. Image-space and k-space based reconstruction algorithms for multi-channel radiofrequency data acquisitions are programmed and tested using numerical simulations as well as in vivo measurement data. The hypothesis is verified based on an analysis of reconstructed images. It is found that non-bijective gradient fields have the effect that densely sampled autocalibration data, used for k-space reconstruction, provide less information than a separate scan of the receiver coil sensitivity maps, used for image space reconstruction. Consequently, in k-space only the undersampling artifact can be unfolded, whereas in image space, it is also possible to resolve aliasing that is caused by the non-bijectivity of the gradient fields. For standard imaging, reconstruction in image space and in k-space is nearly equivalent, whereas there is a fundamental difference with practical consequences for the selection of image reconstruction algorithms when non-bijective encoding fields are involved. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Extended depth of field integral imaging using multi-focus fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Yongri; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Peihua

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for depth of field extension in integral imaging by realizing the image fusion method on the multi-focus elemental images. In the proposed method, a camera is translated on a 2D grid to take multi-focus elemental images by sweeping the focus plane across the scene. Simply applying an image fusion method on the elemental images holding rich parallax information does not work effectively because registration accuracy of images is the prerequisite for image fusion. To solve this problem an elemental image generalization method is proposed. The aim of this generalization process is to geometrically align the objects in all elemental images so that the correct regions of multi-focus elemental images can be exacted. The all-in focus elemental images are then generated by fusing the generalized elemental images using the block based fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that the depth of field of synthetic aperture integral imaging system has been extended by realizing the generation method combined with the image fusion on multi-focus elemental images in synthetic aperture integral imaging system.

  17. Extracting 220 Hz information from 55 Hz field data by near-field superresolution imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2016-05-31

    Field experiments are used to unequivocally demonstrate seismic superresolution imaging of subwavelength objects in the near-field region of the source. The field test is for a conventional hammer source striking a metal plate near subwavelength scatterers and the seismic data are recorded by vertical-component geophones in the far-field locations of the sources. Time-reversal mirrors (TRMs) are then used to refocus the scattered energy with subwavelength resolution to the position of the original source. A spatial resolution of lambda/10, where lambda is the dominant wavelength associated with the data, is seen in the field tests that exceeds the Abbe resolution limit of lambda/2.

  18. The Dark Matter of Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jennifer L

    2016-09-06

    The inside of the cell is full of important, yet invisible species of molecules and proteins that interact weakly but couple together to have huge and important effects in many biological processes. Such "dark matter" inside cells remains mostly hidden, because our tools were developed to investigate strongly interacting species and folded proteins. Example dark-matter species include intrinsically disordered proteins, posttranslational states, ion species, and rare, transient, and weak interactions undetectable by biochemical assays. The dark matter of biology is likely to have multiple, vital roles to regulate signaling, rates of reactions, water structure and viscosity, crowding, and other cellular activities. We need to create new tools to image, detect, and understand these dark-matter species if we are to truly understand fundamental physical principles of biology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High-field-strength MR imaging of endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawin, M.; McCarthy, S.M.; Comite, F.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve women with proven endometriosis were evaluated with MR imaging, utilizing a 1.5-T system. Axial and sagittal T1, proton density, and T2-weighted images were acquired. Laparoscopies were performed within a 1-month interval of the study in all cases. MR imaging accurately identified seven endometriomas but missed lesions in two cases. Areas with endometriotic implants were accurately localized five cases. The authors conclude that MR imaging is extremely useful in identifying sites of endometriosis and, therefore, promises to obviate repeated laparoscopies to monitor patients' response to therapy

  20. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Blas, C.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.; Bittoun, J.

    1986-01-01

    In 60 patients with spinal cord tumors, MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-T unit (GE Signa) and a planar surface coil, 5-mm-thick sections, and spin-echo pulse sequences (TE/TR = 25/600 and 25-100/2,000-2,500 msec). There were 32 astrocytomas, 13 ependymomas, and five hemangioblastomas. Ten patients were not operated on. Surgical follow-up was available in 35 patients. The MR imaging results were correlated with findings on CT, myelography, intraoperative US, surgery, and pathologic examination. In all cases the tumor appeared markedly inhomogeneous. Four imaging patterns corresponding to structural abnormalities were observed: low signal intensity of the tumor core on both T1- and T2-weighted images; hypointensity on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (low-protein cyst, syrinx, edema); isointensity on T1-weighted and slight hypertensity on T2-weighted images (high-protein tumoral necrotic cyst); and high spinal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images (chronic hemorrhage). MR imaging contributes the most information in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors and delineation of their extent, and consequently has a potential impact on surgical management

  1. Decaying dark matter from dark instantons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Erlich, Joshua; Primulando, Reinard

    2010-01-01

    We construct an explicit, TeV-scale model of decaying dark matter in which the approximate stability of the dark matter candidate is a consequence of a global symmetry that is broken only by instanton-induced operators generated by a non-Abelian dark gauge group. The dominant dark matter decay channels are to standard model leptons. Annihilation of the dark matter to standard model states occurs primarily through the Higgs portal. We show that the mass and lifetime of the dark matter candidate in this model can be chosen to be consistent with the values favored by fits to data from the PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments.

  2. The mystery of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalatbari, Azar

    2015-01-01

    As only 0.5 per cent (the shining part) of the Universe is seen by telescopes, and corresponds to a tenth of ordinary matter or 5 per cent of the cosmos, astrophysicists postulated that the remaining 95 per cent are made of dark matter and dark energy. But always more researchers put the existence of this dark matter and energy into question again. They notably think of giving up Newton's law of universal gravitation, and also the basic assumption of cosmology, i.e. the homogeneous character of the Universe. The article recalls the emergence of the notion of dark matter to explain the fact that stars stay within a galaxy, whereas with their observed speed and the application of the gravitational theory they should escape their galaxy. Then, the issue has been to find evidence of the existence of dark matter. Neutrinos were supposed to be a clue, but only for a while. The notion of dark energy was introduced more recently by researchers who, by the observation of supernovae, noticed that the Universe expansion was accelerated in time. Then, after having discussed the issues raised by the possible existence of dark energy, the article explains how and why a new non homogeneous cosmology emerged. It also evokes current and future researches in this field. In an interview, an astrophysicist outlines why we should dare to modify Newton's law

  3. For Whose Eyes Only? The Gatekeeping of Sexual Images in the Field of Teen Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittenden, Tara

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which gatekeepers shape the field of teen sexuality by controlling access to sexual images. I question who decides whether an image is "appropriate" for young adults and how such judgements shape the wider cultural field. The ways in which gatekeepers have attempted to shield teens from certain sexual images…

  4. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical c...

  5. Dark matter from unification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi Tuomas

    2013-01-01

    We consider a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM), which leads to unification of the SM coupling constants, breaks electroweak symmetry dynamically by a new strongly coupled sector and leads to novel dark matter candidates. In this model, the coupling constant unification requires...... eigenstates of this sector and determine the resulting relic density. The results are constrained by available data from colliders and direct and indirect dark matter experiments. We find the model viable and outline briefly future research directions....... the existence of electroweak triplet and doublet fermions singlet under QCD and new strong dynamics underlying the Higgs sector. Among these new matter fields and a new right handed neutrino, we consider the mass and mixing patterns of the neutral states. We argue for a symmetry stabilizing the lightest mass...

  6. Polarization resolved imaging with a reflection near-field optical microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Xiao, Mufei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Using a rigorous microscopic point-dipole description of probe-sample interactions, we study imaging with a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope. Optical content, topographical artifacts, sensitivity window-i.e., the scale on which near-field optical images represent mainly optical...... contrast-and symmetry properties are considered for optical images obtained in constant-distance mode for different polarization configurations. We demonstrate that images obtained in cross-polarized detection mode are free of background and topographical artifacts and that the cross-circular polarization...... configuration is preferable to the cross-linear one, since it ensures more isotropic (in the surface plane) near-field imaging of surface features. The numerical results are supported with experimental near-field images obtained by using a reflection microscope with an uncoated fiber tip....

  7. New Explorations in the Field of Leadership Research: A Walk on the Dark Side of Personality & Implications for Leadership (In)Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benson, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    ... positives. The increasing number of corporate scandals, ethical breaches, and failed organizations suggests that we have neglected a very important and fruitful side of leadership research -- the dark side...

  8. Multiframe super resolution reconstruction method based on light field angular images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shubo; Yuan, Yan; Su, Lijuan; Ding, Xiaomin; Wang, Jichao

    2017-12-01

    The plenoptic camera can directly obtain 4-dimensional light field information from a 2-dimensional sensor. However, based on the sampling theorem, the spatial resolution is greatly limited by the microlenses. In this paper, we present a method of reconstructing high-resolution images from the angular images. First, the ray tracing method is used to model the telecentric-based light field imaging process. Then, we analyze the subpixel shifts between the angular images extracted from the defocused light field data and the blur in the angular images. According to the analysis above, we construct the observation model from the ideal high-resolution image to the angular images. Applying the regularized super resolution method, we can obtain the super resolution result with a magnification ratio of 8. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observation model.

  9. An EUV Wide-Field Imager and Spectrometer for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Leon; Savage, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The Coronal Spectrographic Imager in the EUV, COSIE, combines a wide-field solar coronal EUV imager (EUVC) and an on-disk EUV imaging spectrometer (EUVS). Located on the International Space Station (ISS), the goal of the mission is to enhance our understanding of the dynamics of the Transition Corona (the region in which the coronal magnetic field transitions from closed to open), and to provide improved detection and tracking of solar eruptive events for space weather research.

  10. Dark Slope Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    13 March 2004 Martian slope streaks occur in the regions most heavily mantled by fine, dry dust, particularly Tharsis, Arabia, and the knobby areas between Amazonis and Cerberus. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some examples of dark slope streaks off of buttes, mesas, and massifs in a dust-mantled crater in central Arabia Terra. New slope streaks form from time to time in the modern martian environment; the streaks in this image probably formed within the past decade. To create them, dust slid or avalanched down the slopes in an almost liquid-like manner. The image is located near 6.8oN, 321.7oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  11. Decoupling dark energy from matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brax, Philippe; van de Bruck, Carsten; Davis, Anne-Christine; Martin, Jérôme

    2009-09-01

    We examine the embedding of dark energy in high energy models based upon supergravity and extend the usual phenomenological setting comprising an observable sector and a hidden supersymmetry breaking sector by including a third sector leading to the acceleration of the expansion of the universe. We find that gravitational constraints on the non-existence of a fifth force naturally imply that the dark energy sector must possess an approximate shift symmetry. When exact, the shift symmetry provides an example of a dark energy sector with a runaway potential and a nearly massless dark energy field whose coupling to matter is very weak, contrary to the usual lore that dark energy fields must couple strongly to matter and lead to gravitational inconsistencies. Moreover, the shape of the potential is stable under one-loop radiative corrections. When the shift symmetry is slightly broken by higher order terms in the Kähler potential, the coupling to matter remains small. However, the cosmological dynamics are largely affected by the shift symmetry breaking operators leading to the appearance of a minimum of the scalar potential such that dark energy behaves like an effective cosmological constant from very early on in the history of the universe.

  12. Proton irradiation experiment for x-ray charge-coupled devices of the monitor of all-sky x-ray image mission onboard the international space station. 2. Degradation of dark current and identification of electron trap level

    CERN Document Server

    Miyata, E; Kamiyama, D

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a charge-coupled device (CCD) to be used for the Japanese X-ray mission, the monitor of all-sky X-ray image (MAXI), onboard the international space station (ISS). A temperature dependence of the dark current as a function of incremental dose is studied. We found that the protons having energy of >292 keV seriously increased the dark current of the devices. In order to improve the radiation tolerance of the devices, we have developed various device architectures to minimize the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, nitride oxide enables us to reduce the dark current significantly and therefore we adopted nitride oxide for the flight devices. We also compared the dark current of a device in operation and that out of operation during the proton irradiation. The dark current of the device in operation became twofold that out of operation, and we thus determined that devices would be turned off during the passage of the radiation belt. The temperature dependenc...

  13. Can dark matter decay in dark energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, S. H.; Jesus, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the interaction between dark energy and dark matter from a thermodynamical perspective. By assuming they have different temperatures, we study the possibility of occurring a decay from dark matter into dark energy, characterized by a negative parameter Q. We find that, if at least one of the fluids has nonvanishing chemical potential, for instance μ x dm =0 or μ x =0 and μ dm >0, the decay is possible, where μ x and μ dm are the chemical potentials of dark energy and dark matter, respectively. Using recent cosmological data, we find that, for a fairly simple interaction, the dark matter decay is favored with a probability of ∼93% over the dark energy decay. This result comes from a likelihood analysis where only background evolution has been considered.

  14. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  15. High-field MR imaging of the tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Burk, J.M.; Herman, L.J.; Mosure, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging was used to investigate normal anatomy and pathologic conditions of the tendons. Tendons of experimental animals, cadaver joints, normal volunteers, and patients with suspected tendon pathology were studied. Tendon anatomy is easily identified because of the hypointensity of the tendons contrasting with the hyperintendensity of the surrounding fat. Pathologic conditions including posttraumatic and postsurgical tendon rupture, peritendinous scarring, tendinitis, and tenosynovitis are well seen with MR imaging. A detailed study of normal and abnormal tendon anatomy of the finger, wrist, shoulder, knee, and ankle is displayed, including MR images, gross specimens, and line drawings

  16. Unification of dark energy and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yanagida, T.T.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scenario in which dark energy and dark matter are described in a unified manner. The ultralight pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone (pNG) boson, A, naturally explains the observed magnitude of dark energy, while the bosonic supersymmetry partner of the pNG boson, B, can be a dominant component of dark matter. The decay of B into a pair of electron and positron may explain the 511 keV γ ray from the Galactic Center

  17. Dark matter that can form dark stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Hyung Do; Scopel, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The first stars to form in the Universe may be powered by the annihilation of weakly interacting dark matter particles. These so-called dark stars, if observed, may give us a clue about the nature of dark matter. Here we examine which models for particle dark matter satisfy the conditions for the formation of dark stars. We find that in general models with thermal dark matter lead to the formation of dark stars, with few notable exceptions: heavy neutralinos in the presence of coannihilations, annihilations that are resonant at dark matter freeze-out but not in dark stars, some models of neutrinophilic dark matter annihilating into neutrinos only and lighter than about 50 GeV. In particular, we find that a thermal DM candidate in standard Cosmology always forms a dark star as long as its mass is heavier than ≅ 50 GeV and the thermal average of its annihilation cross section is the same at the decoupling temperature and during the dark star formation, as for instance in the case of an annihilation cross section with a non-vanishing s-wave contribution

  18. High-field MR imaging of tethered cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.; Bicetre, L.; Blass, C.; Doyon, D.; Pariente, D.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging examinations of 12 patients with tethered cord syndrome have been performed on a 1.5-T MR imaging unit. Patients ranged in age from 3 to 60 years. MR findings were compared with those of myelography and metrizamide CT in all cases. Five patients underwent surgical control and postoperative MR imaging. Sagittal and axial sections were obtained using a spin-echo multisection, multiecho technique. T1-axial weighted images (SE 600/25) were sufficient to locate the position of the tip of the conus. They also allowed identification of extraspinal and intraspinal lipomas and clear-cut demarcation form associated tethered cord. Drawbacks of MR imaging were lack of precise depiction of the bone structures and the fact that clear identification of abnormal roots was problematic. The craniovertebral junction was always checked; two asymptomatic Chiari malformations were visualized. This study leads the authors to conclude that MR imaging should be used as the examination of first choice in the management of tethered cord syndrome

  19. Solid-State 1H CRAMPS NMR Imaging with Pulsed Rotating Magnetic Field Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y. H.; Xiong, J. C.; Lock, H.; Buszko, M. L.; Haase, J. A.; Maciel, G. E.

    By synchronizing a pulsed rotating magnetic field gradient with the rotation of a sample undergoing magic-angle spinning, a series of transverse-plane 1H NMR images was obtained. Both spatial-spatial two-dimensional images and spatial-spectral two-dimensional images are presented. The TREV-8 and BR-24 CRAMPS techniques were used for line narrowing in obtaining these images. Results are shown for both "soft" and "hard" solids.

  20. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of the surface. A direct correlation with the optical image is obtained. We demonstrate that this reflection setup is suitable for dielectric samples. Images in fluorescence have been obtained o­n Lan...

  1. Mapping the Tidal Destruction of the Hercules Dwarf: A Wide-field DECam Imaging Search for RR Lyrae Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garling, Christopher; Willman, Beth; Sand, David J.; Hargis, Jonathan; Crnojević, Denija; Bechtol, Keith; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Strader, Jay; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Nie, Jundan; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Zhimin; Peng, Xiyan

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the hypothesized tidal disruption of the Hercules ultra-faint dwarf galaxy (UFD). Previous tidal disruption studies of the Hercules UFD have been hindered by the high degree of foreground contamination in the direction of the dwarf. We bypass this issue by using RR Lyrae stars, which are standard candles with a very low field-volume density at the distance of Hercules. We use wide-field imaging from the Dark Energy Camera on CTIO to identify candidate RR Lyrae stars, supplemented with observations taken in coordination with the Beijing–Arizona Sky Survey on the Bok Telescope. Combining color, magnitude, and light-curve information, we identify three new RR Lyrae stars associated with Hercules. All three of these new RR Lyrae stars lie outside its published tidal radius. When considered with the nine RR Lyrae stars already known within the tidal radius, these results suggest that a substantial fraction of Hercules’ stellar content has been stripped. With this degree of tidal disruption, Hercules is an interesting case between a visibly disrupted dwarf (such as the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy) and one in dynamic equilibrium. The degree of disruption also shows that we must be more careful with the ways we determine object membership when estimating dwarf masses in the future. One of the three discovered RR Lyrae stars sits along the minor axis of Hercules, but over two tidal radii away. This type of debris is consistent with recent models that suggest Hercules’ orbit is aligned with its minor axis.

  2. Electrodynamics of a Cosmic Dark Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Balakin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic Dark Fluid is considered as a non-stationary medium, in which electromagnetic waves propagate, and magneto-electric field structures emerge and evolve. A medium-type representation of the Dark Fluid allows us to involve in its analysis the concepts and mathematical formalism elaborated in the framework of classical covariant electrodynamics of continua, and to distinguish dark analogs of well-known medium-effects, such as optical activity, pyro-electricity, piezo-magnetism, electro- and magneto-striction and dynamo-optical activity. The Dark Fluid is assumed to be formed by a duet of a Dark Matter (a pseudoscalar axionic constituent and Dark Energy (a scalar element; respectively, we distinguish electrodynamic effects induced by these two constituents of the Dark Fluid. The review contains discussions of 10 models, which describe electrodynamic effects induced by Dark Matter and/or Dark Energy. The models are accompanied by examples of exact solutions to the master equations, correspondingly extended; applications are considered for cosmology and space-times with spherical and pp-wave symmetries. In these applications we focused the attention on three main electromagnetic phenomena induced by the Dark Fluid: first, emergence of Longitudinal Magneto-Electric Clusters; second, generation of anomalous electromagnetic responses; third, formation of Dark Epochs in the Universe history.

  3. Electromagnetic Scattered Field Evaluation and Data Compression Using Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report on Project #727625 between The Ohio State University and NASA, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. Under this project, a data compression technique for scattered field data of electrically large targets is developed. The technique was applied to the scattered fields of two targets of interest. The backscattered fields of the scale models of these targets were measured in a ra compact range. For one of the targets, the backscattered fields were also calculated using XPATCH computer code. Using the technique all scattered field data sets were compressed successfully. A compression ratio of the order 40 was achieved. In this report, the technique is described briefly and some sample results are included.

  4. Non-invasive method of field imaging in parallel plate waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We present a new non-invasive air-photonic-based method of terahertz (THz) field imaging inside a parallel plate waveguide. The method is based on THz field-enhanced second harmonic generation of the fundamental laser beam in an external electric field. We also demonstrate the direct measurements...

  5. Towards Motion-Insensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Dynamic Field Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is frequently used for both clinical diagnosis and brain research. This is due to the great versatility of the technique and the excellent ability to distinguish different types of soft tissue. The image quality is, however, heavily degraded when...... image quality degradation for certain brain imaging sequences through this effect. It has previously been shown that magnetic field sensors (field probes) can be applied to stabilize the B0 field during scanning. However, the field probes are placed around the head, while it is the B0-fluctuations...... the subject being scanned moves, which in many cases is impossible to avoid. Subject motion during scanning is therefore one of the big challenges for the method. Techniques to correct for image quality degradation due to subject motion are under rapid development. A promising approach is to monitor the head...

  6. Nanohybrids Near-Field Optical Microscopy: From Image Shift to Biosensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayla El-Kork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-Field Optical Microscopy is a valuable tool for the optical and topographic study of objects at a nanometric scale. Nanoparticles constitute important candidates for such type of investigations, as they bear an important weight for medical, biomedical, and biosensing applications. One, however, has to be careful as artifacts can be easily reproduced. In this study, we examined hybrid nanoparticles (or nanohybrids in the near-field, while in solution and attached to gold nanoplots. We found out that they can be used for wavelength modulable near-field biosensors within conditions of artifact free imaging. In detail, we refer to the use of topographic/optical image shift and the imaging of Local Surface Plasmon hot spots to validate the genuineness of the obtained images. In summary, this study demonstrates a new way of using simple easily achievable comparative methods to prove the authenticity of near-field images and presents nanohybrid biosensors as an application.

  7. Dark matter and the equivalence principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1993-01-01

    A survey is presented of the current understanding of dark matter invoked by astrophysical theory and cosmology. Einstein's equivalence principle asserts that local measurements cannot distinguish a system at rest in a gravitational field from one that is in uniform acceleration in empty space. Recent test-methods for the equivalence principle are presently discussed as bases for testing of dark matter scenarios involving the long-range forces between either baryonic or nonbaryonic dark matter and ordinary matter.

  8. To make a further explanation on some questions about optical imaging using a light field camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yun; Xu, Xiping; Yin, Peng

    2017-08-01

    In traditional optics, the focusing should be done before the exposuring. However, a light field camera makes it a reality to take a photograph before the focusing. The principle of a light field camera consists of some fundamental theories on optical imaging, including pinhole imaging, depth of focus, digital refocusing, synthetic aperture imaging, etc. It is easier for students to understand the above theories through learning the theory and experiment of a light field camera. Meanwhile it also involves some optical knowledge for a light field camera during the acquisition and processing images. In the paper, we will discuss the similarities and differences on optical properties among the pinhole, the convex lens and the light field camera. Our intention is to make these optical theories much easier to understand for students in our teaching work.

  9. Image-domain full waveform inversion: Field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2014-08-05

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is the result of cycle skipping which degrades the low-wavenumber update in the absence of low-frequencies and long-offset data. An image-domain objective function is defined as the normed difference between the predicted and observed common image gathers (CIGs) in the subsurface offset domain. This new objective function is not constrained by cycle skipping at the far subsurface offsets. To test the effectiveness of this method, we apply it to marine data recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive to the initial model and the absence of low-frequency data compared with conventional FWI. The liability, however, is that it is almost an order of magnitude more expensive than standard FWI.

  10. A study of the stellar population in the Lynds 1641 dark cloud - deep near-infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, K.M.; Margulis, M.; Strom, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Deep H and K photometry of a selection of IRAS point sources in the L1641 cloud is presented. Using these data in combination with IRAS data and previously published near-infrared photometry for sources in this region, it is found that the L1641 cloud contains newly born stars embedded within cores of unusually large visual extinction. A comparison of the properties of cores in L1641 with those in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming complex reveals that L1641 contains cores with higher visual extinctions, larger ammonia (J, K) = (1, 1) line widths, greater kinetic temperatures, and probably higher optical depths at 100 microns than any cores in Taurus-Auriga. These results are qualitatively consistent with recent suggestions that the process of protostellar collapse in cores in the L1641 cloud is dominated by gravity while this process is dominated by magnetic fields in Taurus-Auriga. 20 refs

  11. High speed color imaging through scattering media with a large field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Huichang; He, Hexiang; Xie, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-09-01

    Optical imaging through complex media has many important applications. Although research progresses have been made to recover optical image through various turbid media, the widespread application of the technology is hampered by the recovery speed, requirement on specific illumination, poor image quality and limited field of view. Here we demonstrate that above-mentioned drawbacks can be essentially overcome. The realization of high speed color imaging through turbid media is successfully carried out by taking into account the media memory effect, the point spread function, the exit pupil of the optical system, and the optimized signal to noise ratio. By retrieving selected speckles with enlarged field of view, high quality image is recovered with a responding speed only determined by the frame rates of the image capturing devices. The immediate application of the technique is expected to register static and dynamic imaging under human skin to recover information with a wearable device.

  12. Holographic and light-field imaging for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Hong, Jong-Young; Jang, Changwon; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Chang-Kun

    2017-02-01

    We discuss on the recent state of the augmented reality (AR) display technology. In order to realize AR, various seethrough three-dimensional (3D) display techniques have been reported. We describe the AR display with 3D functionality such as light-field display and holography. See-through light-field display can be categorized by the optical elements which are used for see-through property: optical elements controlling path of the light-fields and those generating see-through light-field. Holographic display can be also a good candidate for AR display because it can reconstruct wavefront information and provide realistic virtual information. We introduce the see-through holographic display using various optical techniques.

  13. Dipolar dark matter with massive bigravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchet, Luc; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Massive gravity theories have been developed as viable IR modifications of gravity motivated by dark energy and the problem of the cosmological constant. On the other hand, modified gravity and modified dark matter theories were developed with the aim of solving the problems of standard cold dark matter at galactic scales. Here we propose to adapt the framework of ghost-free massive bigravity theories to reformulate the problem of dark matter at galactic scales. We investigate a promising alternative to dark matter called dipolar dark matter (DDM) in which two different species of dark matter are separately coupled to the two metrics of bigravity and are linked together by an internal vector field. We show that this model successfully reproduces the phenomenology of dark matter at galactic scales (i.e. MOND) as a result of a mechanism of gravitational polarisation. The model is safe in the gravitational sector, but because of the particular couplings of the matter fields and vector field to the metrics, a ghost in the decoupling limit is present in the dark matter sector. However, it might be possible to push the mass of the ghost beyond the strong coupling scale by an appropriate choice of the parameters of the model. Crucial questions to address in future work are the exact mass of the ghost, and the cosmological implications of the model

  14. Bose-Einstein-condensed scalar field dark matter and the gravitational wave background from inflation: New cosmological constraints and its detectability by LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bohua; Shapiro, Paul R.; Rindler-Daller, Tanja

    2017-09-01

    We consider an alternative to weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) cold dark matter (CDM)—ultralight bosonic dark matter (m ≳10-22 eV /c2) described by a complex scalar field (SFDM) with a global U (1 ) symmetry—for which the comoving particle number density or charge density is conserved after particle production during standard reheating. We allow for a repulsive self-interaction. In a Λ SFDM universe, SFDM starts out relativistic, evolving from stiff (w =1 ) to radiation-like (w =1 /3 ), before becoming nonrelativistic at late times (w =0 ). Thus, before the familiar radiation-dominated era, there is an earlier era of stiff-SFDM domination. During both the stiff-SFDM-dominated and radiation-dominated eras, the expansion rate is higher than in Λ CDM . The SFDM particle mass m and quartic self-interaction coupling strength λ are therefore constrained by cosmological observables, particularly Neff, the effective number of neutrino species during big bang nucleosynthesis, and zeq, the redshift of matter-radiation equality. Furthermore, since the stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) from inflation is amplified during the stiff-SFDM-dominated era, it can contribute a radiation-like component large enough to affect these observables by further boosting the expansion rate after the stiff era ends. Remarkably, this same amplification makes detection of the SGWB possible at high frequencies by current laser interferometer experiments, e.g., aLIGO/Virgo and LISA. For SFDM particle parameters that satisfy these cosmological constraints, the amplified SGWB is detectable by LIGO for a broad range of reheat temperatures Treheat, for values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r currently allowed by cosmic microwave background polarization measurements. For a given r and λ /(m c2)2, the marginally allowed Λ SFDM model for each Treheat has the smallest m that satisfies the cosmological constraints, and maximizes the present SGWB energy density for that

  15. Magnetic field measurements of a clinical MR imager at 1.5 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhech, A.; Tellez, I.; Esteva, M.; Marrufo, O.; Jimenez, L.; Vazquez, F.; Taboada, J.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical environment is mandatory to run periodically measurements of uniformity of the magnetic field produced by the magnet to assure good image quality. The phase difference method was used to measure the magnetic field uniformity of the 1.5 T scanner of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia MVS. The uniformity field values showed that the imager performance is reasonably good for clinical imaging. Some concern was raised since results may not be good enough for magnetic resonance spectroscopy runs.

  16. Processing the image gradient field using a topographic primal sketch approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambaruto, A M

    2015-03-01

    The spatial derivatives of the image intensity provide topographic information that may be used to identify and segment objects. The accurate computation of the derivatives is often hampered in medical images by the presence of noise and a limited resolution. This paper focuses on accurate computation of spatial derivatives and their subsequent use to process an image gradient field directly, from which an image with improved characteristics can be reconstructed. The improvements include noise reduction, contrast enhancement, thinning object contours and the preservation of edges. Processing the gradient field directly instead of the image is shown to have numerous benefits. The approach is developed such that the steps are modular, allowing the overall method to be improved and possibly tailored to different applications. As presented, the approach relies on a topographic representation and primal sketch of an image. Comparisons with existing image processing methods on a synthetic image and different medical images show improved results and accuracy in segmentation. Here, the focus is on objects with low spatial resolution, which is often the case in medical images. The methods developed show the importance of improved accuracy in derivative calculation and the potential in processing the image gradient field directly. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Development of Automated Image Analysis Tools for Verification of Radiotherapy Field Accuracy with AN Electronic Portal Imaging Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei

    1995-01-01

    The successful management of cancer with radiation relies on the accurate deposition of a prescribed dose to a prescribed anatomical volume within the patient. Treatment set-up errors are inevitable because the alignment of field shaping devices with the patient must be repeated daily up to eighty times during the course of a fractionated radiotherapy treatment. With the invention of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), patient's portal images can be visualized daily in real-time after only a small fraction of the radiation dose has been delivered to each treatment field. However, the accuracy of human visual evaluation of low-contrast portal images has been found to be inadequate. The goal of this research is to develop automated image analysis tools to detect both treatment field shape errors and patient anatomy placement errors with an EPID. A moments method has been developed to align treatment field images to compensate for lack of repositioning precision of the image detector. A figure of merit has also been established to verify the shape and rotation of the treatment fields. Following proper alignment of treatment field boundaries, a cross-correlation method has been developed to detect shifts of the patient's anatomy relative to the treatment field boundary. Phantom studies showed that the moments method aligned the radiation fields to within 0.5mm of translation and 0.5^ circ of rotation and that the cross-correlation method aligned anatomical structures inside the radiation field to within 1 mm of translation and 1^ circ of rotation. A new procedure of generating and using digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at megavoltage energies as reference images was also investigated. The procedure allowed a direct comparison between a designed treatment portal and the actual patient setup positions detected by an EPID. Phantom studies confirmed the feasibility of the methodology. Both the moments method and the cross -correlation technique were

  18. Dark Sky Protection and Education - Izera Dark Sky Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Mrozek, Tomasz; Zakowicz, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Darkness of the night sky is a natural component of our environment and should be protected against negative effects of human activities. The night darkness is necessary for balanced life of plants, animals and people. Unfortunately, development of human civilization and technology has led to the substantial increase of the night-sky brightness and to situation where nights are no more dark in many areas of the World. This phenomenon is called "light pollution" and it can be rank among such problems as chemical pollution of air, water and soil. Besides the environment, the light pollution can also affect e.g. the scientific activities of astronomers - many observatories built in the past began to be located within the glow of city lights making the night observations difficult, or even impossible.In order to protect the natural darkness of nights many so-called "dark sky parks" were established, where the darkness is preserved, similar to typical nature reserves. The role of these parks is not only conservation but also education, supporting to make society aware of how serious the problem of the light pollution is.History of the dark sky areas in Europe began on November 4, 2009 in Jizerka - a small village situated in the Izera Mountains, when Izera Dark Sky Park (IDSP) was established - it was the first transboundary dark sky park in the World. The idea of establishing that dark sky park in the Izera Mountains originated from a need to give to the society in Poland and Czech Republic the knowledge about the light pollution. Izera Dark Sky Park is a part of the astro-tourism project "Astro Izery" that combines tourist attraction of Izera Valley and astronomical education under the wonderful starry Izera sky. Besides the IDSP, the project Astro Izery consists of the set of simple astronomical instruments (gnomon, sundial), natural educational trail "Solar System Model", and astronomical events for the public. In addition, twice a year we organize a 3-4 days

  19. Mirror images: D W Winnicott in the visual field

    OpenAIRE

    Lebeau, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores Winnicott's contribution to our understanding of the image, with particular reference to Gerhard Richter's Mirror. In light of the recent 'turn to Winnicott' in cultural and film studies, it argues for the importance of thinking between Winnicott and Jacques Lacan and for the concept of the mirror as a key starting point for that thinking.

  20. Spin imaging in solids using synchronously rotating field gradients and samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wind, R.A.; Yannoni, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    A method for spin-imaging in solids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is described. With this method, the spin density distribution of a two- or three-dimensional object such as a solid can be constructed resulting in an image of the sample. This method lends itself to computer control to map out an image of the object. This spin-imaging method involves the steps of placing a solid sample in the rf coil field and the external magnetic field of an NMR spectrometer. A magnetic field gradient is superimposed across the sample to provide a field gradient which results in a varying DC field that has different values over different parts of the sample. As a result, nuclei in different parts of the sample have different resonant NMR frequencies. The sample is rotated about an axis which makes a particular angle of 54.7 degrees with the static external magnetic field. The magnetic field gradient which has a spatial distribution related to the sample spinning axis is then rotated synchronously with the sample. Data is then collected while performing a solid state NMR line narrowing procedure. The next step is to change the phase relation between the sample rotation and the field gradient rotation. The data is again collected as before while the sample and field gradient are synchronously rotated. The phase relation is changed a number of times and data collected each time. The spin image of the solid sample is then reconstructed from the collected data