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Sample records for damage site mutagenic

  1. Miscoding and mutagenic properties of 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites: Ubiquitous lesions in damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grollman, A.P.; Takeshita, Masaru

    1995-01-01

    More than twenty oxidatively-damaged bases, including 8-oxoguanine, have been found to occur in genomic DNA. Some of these lesions block DNA replication and are potentially lethal; others generate mutations which can initiate carcinogenesis and promote cellular aging. In this report, the authors focus attention on the mutagenicity and repair of 8-oxoguanine. Kasai and Nishimura's discovery that hydroxyl radicals react with guanine residues in DNA to form 8-oxoguanine and the development of sensitive methods for the detection and quantitation of this modified base led to the observation that approximately 1 in 10 5 guanine residues in mammalian DNA are oxidized at the C-8 position. DNA containing 8-oxoguanine and synthetic analogs of the abasic site have been used to investigate the miscoding and mutagenic potential of these ubiquitous lesions. Studies in the laboratory were facilitated by the development of solid state synthetic methods by which these lesions could be introduced at defined positions in DNA. In this paper, the authors review studies in which 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites have been used in model systems to explore various early events in the replication of selectively damaged DNA

  2. Data on the DNA damaging and mutagenic potential of the BH3-mimetics ABT-263/Navitoclax and TW-37

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Maja M.; Shekhar, Tanmay M.; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Unfortunately, the mutagenic activities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy can provoke development of therapy-induced malignancies in cancer survivors. Non-mutagenic anti-cancer therapies may be less likely to trigger subsequent malignant neoplasms. Here we present data regarding the DNA damaging and mutagenic potential of two drugs that antagonize proteins within the Bcl-2 family: ABT-263/Navitoclax and TW-37. Our data reveal that concentrations of these agents that stimulated Bax/Bak-dependen...

  3. Data on the DNA damaging and mutagenic potential of the BH3-mimetics ABT-263/Navitoclax and TW-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Maja M; Shekhar, Tanmay M; Hawkins, Christine J

    2016-03-01

    Unfortunately, the mutagenic activities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy can provoke development of therapy-induced malignancies in cancer survivors. Non-mutagenic anti-cancer therapies may be less likely to trigger subsequent malignant neoplasms. Here we present data regarding the DNA damaging and mutagenic potential of two drugs that antagonize proteins within the Bcl-2 family: ABT-263/Navitoclax and TW-37. Our data reveal that concentrations of these agents that stimulated Bax/Bak-dependent signaling provoked little DNA damage and failed to trigger mutations in surviving cells. The data supplied in this article is related to the research work entitled "Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells" [1].

  4. Data on the DNA damaging and mutagenic potential of the BH3-mimetics ABT-263/Navitoclax and TW-37

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja M. Green

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Unfortunately, the mutagenic activities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy can provoke development of therapy-induced malignancies in cancer survivors. Non-mutagenic anti-cancer therapies may be less likely to trigger subsequent malignant neoplasms. Here we present data regarding the DNA damaging and mutagenic potential of two drugs that antagonize proteins within the Bcl-2 family: ABT-263/Navitoclax and TW-37. Our data reveal that concentrations of these agents that stimulated Bax/Bak-dependent signaling provoked little DNA damage and failed to trigger mutations in surviving cells. The data supplied in this article is related to the research work entitled "Inhibition of Bcl-2 or IAP proteins does not provoke mutations in surviving cells" [1].

  5. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Moore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB, II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR; damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS. First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage

  6. Persistent damaged bases in DNA allow mutagenic break repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jessica M; Correa, Raul; Rosenberg, Susan M; Hastings, P J

    2017-07-01

    Bacteria, yeast and human cancer cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis upregulated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis potentially accelerates adaptation, and may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives cancers, host pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) becomes mutagenic, using low-fidelity DNA polymerases under the control of the SOS DNA-damage response and RpoS general stress response, which upregulate and allow the action of error-prone DNA polymerases IV (DinB), II and V to make mutations during repair. Pol IV is implied to compete with and replace high-fidelity DNA polymerases at the DSB-repair replisome, causing mutagenesis. We report that up-regulated Pol IV is not sufficient for mutagenic break repair (MBR); damaged bases in the DNA are also required, and that in starvation-stressed cells, these are caused by reactive-oxygen species (ROS). First, MBR is reduced by either ROS-scavenging agents or constitutive activation of oxidative-damage responses, both of which reduce cellular ROS levels. The ROS promote MBR other than by causing DSBs, saturating mismatch repair, oxidizing proteins, or inducing the SOS response or the general stress response. We find that ROS drive MBR through oxidized guanines (8-oxo-dG) in DNA, in that overproduction of a glycosylase that removes 8-oxo-dG from DNA prevents MBR. Further, other damaged DNA bases can substitute for 8-oxo-dG because ROS-scavenged cells resume MBR if either DNA pyrimidine dimers or alkylated bases are induced. We hypothesize that damaged bases in DNA pause the replisome and allow the critical switch from high fidelity to error-prone DNA polymerases in the DSB-repair replisome, thus allowing MBR. The data imply that in addition to the indirect stress-response controlled switch to MBR, a direct cis-acting switch to MBR occurs independently of DNA breakage, caused by ROS

  7. Basal, oxidative and alkylative DNA damage, DNA repair efficacy and mutagen sensitivity in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasiak, Janusz; Arabski, Michal; Krupa, Renata; Wozniak, Katarzyna; Rykala, Jan; Kolacinska, Agnieszka; Morawiec, Zbigniew; Drzewoski, Jozef; Zadrozny, Marek

    2004-10-04

    Impaired DNA repair may fuel up malignant transformation of breast cells due to the accumulation of spontaneous mutations in target genes and increasing susceptibility to exogenous carcinogens. Moreover, the effectiveness of DNA repair may contribute to failure of chemotherapy and resistance of breast cancer cells to drugs and radiation. The breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA repair. To evaluate further the role of DNA repair in breast cancer we determined: (1) the kinetics of removal of DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and the anticancer drug doxorubicin, and (2) the level of basal, oxidative and alkylative DNA damage before and during/after chemotherapy in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients and healthy individuals. The level of DNA damage and the kinetics of DNA repair were evaluated by alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Oxidative and alkylative DNA damage were assayed with the use of DNA repair enzymes endonuclease III (Endo III) and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg), recognizing oxidized DNA bases and 3-methyladenine-DNA glycosylase II (AlkA) recognizing alkylated bases. We observed slower kinetics of DNA repair after treatment with hydrogen peroxide and doxorubicin in lymphocytes of breast cancer patients compared to control individuals. The level of basal, oxidative and alkylative DNA damage was higher in breast cancer patients than in the control and the difference was more pronounced when patients after chemotherapy were engaged, but usually the level of DNA damage in these patients was too high to be measured with our system. Our results indicate that peripheral blood lymphocytes of breast cancer patients have more damaged DNA and display decreased DNA repair efficacy. Therefore, these features can be considered as risk markers for breast cancer, but the question whether they are the cause or a consequence of the illness remains open. Nevertheless, our results

  8. Induction of Abasic Sites by the Drinking-Water Mutagen MX in Salmonella TA100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagen X (MX) is a chlorinated furanone that accounts for more of the mutagenic activity of drinking water than any other disinfection by-product. It is one of the most potent base-substitution mutagens in the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, producing primarily GC to TA mu...

  9. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA damage correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazolefungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazole myclobutanil w...

  10. Comparison of BTX Profiles and Their Mutagenicity Assessment at Two Sites of Agra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyoma Singla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the concentrations of three volatile organic compounds (VOCs, namely, acronym for benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX were assessed because of their role in the tropospheric chemistry. Two representative sites, a roadside and a petrol pump, were chosen for sample collection. VOCs were collected using SKC-activated charcoal tubes and SKC personal sampler and characterized by gas chromatograph using flame ionization detector. Among BTX, benzene had the highest concentration. At the roadside, mean concentration of benzene, toluene, o-,m-xylene, and p-xylene were 14.7 ± 2.4 μgm−3, 8.1 ± 1.2 μgm−3, 2.1 ± 0.8 μgm−3, and 5.1 ± 1.2 μgm−3, respectively. At the petrol pump, the mean concentrations of benzene, toluene, o-,m-xylene and p-xylene were 19.5 ± 3.7 μgm−3, 12.9 ± 1.1 μgm−3, 3.6 ± 0.5 μgm−3 and 11.1 ± 1.5 μgm−3, respectively, and were numerically higher by a fraction of 2. Monthly variation of BTX showed maximum concentration in winter. Inter-species ratios and inter-species correlation indicated traffic as the major source of BTX. Extracts of samples were positive in both Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 without metabolic activation suggesting the presence of direct mutagens in ambient air that can cause both frame-shift and base-pair mutation. The mutagenic response was greater for TA100 than TA98 suggesting greater activity for base-pair mutagenicity than frame-shift mutagenicity and was found to be statistically significant.

  11. Multiple Site Damage in Flat Panel Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shrage, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    This report aimed to experimentally verify analytical models that predict the residual strength of representative aircraft structures, such as wide panels, that are subjected to Multiple Site Damage (MSD...

  12. Implications for Damage Recognition during Dpo4-Mediated Mutagenic Bypass of m1G and m3C Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechkoblit, Olga; Delaney, James C.; Essigmann, John M.; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA is susceptible to alkylation damage by a number of environmental agents that modify the Watson-Crick edge of the bases. Such lesions, if not repaired, may be bypassed by Y-family DNA polymerases. The bypass polymerase Dpo4 is strongly inhibited by 1-methylguanine (m1G) and 3-methylcytosine (m3C), with nucleotide incorporation opposite these lesions being predominantly mutagenic. Further, extension following insertion of both correct and incorrect bases, introduces additional base substitution and deletion errors. Crystal structures of the Dpo4 ternary extension complexes with correct and mismatched 3′-terminal primer bases opposite the lesions reveal that both m1G and m3C remain positioned within the DNA template/primer helix. However, both correct and incorrect pairing partners exhibit pronounced primer terminal nucleotide distortion, being primarily evicted from the DNA helix when opposite m1G or misaligned when pairing with m3C. Our studies provide insights into mechanisms related to hindered and mutagenic bypass of methylated lesions and models associated with damage recognition by repair demethylases. PMID:21645853

  13. Implications for Damage Recognition during Dpo4-Mediated Mutagenic Bypass of m1G and m3C Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechkoblit, Olga; Delaney, James C.; Essigmann, John M.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MIT); (MSKCC)

    2012-05-08

    DNA is susceptible to alkylation damage by a number of environmental agents that modify the Watson-Crick edge of the bases. Such lesions, if not repaired, may be bypassed by Y-family DNA polymerases. The bypass polymerase Dpo4 is strongly inhibited by 1-methylguanine (m1G) and 3-methylcytosine (m3C), with nucleotide incorporation opposite these lesions being predominantly mutagenic. Further, extension after insertion of both correct and incorrect bases, introduces additional base substitution and deletion errors. Crystal structures of the Dpo4 ternary extension complexes with correct and mismatched 3'-terminal primer bases opposite the lesions reveal that both m1G and m3C remain positioned within the DNA template/primer helix. However, both correct and incorrect pairing partners exhibit pronounced primer terminal nucleotide distortion, being primarily evicted from the DNA helix when opposite m1G or misaligned when pairing with m3C. Our studies provide insights into mechanisms related to hindered and mutagenic bypass of methylated lesions and models associated with damage recognition by repair demethylases.

  14. Mutagenicity and DNA-damaging potential of clenbuterol and its metabolite 4-amino-3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulić, Ana; Durgo, Ksenija; Pleadin, Jelka; Herceg, Luka; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro toxicity of clenbuterol and its metabolite 4-amino-3,5-dichlorobenzoic acid. Cytotoxicity and pro-oxidative effect of both compounds were studied on human colon adenocarcinoma cell line SW 480. No significant cytotoxic effect of either compound was observed. Results of an Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium did not indicate mutagenic activity of clenbuterol on TA 98 and TA 100 strains, regardless of metabolic activation. Potential mutagenic effects of the highest clenbuterol concentration (2500 ng/ml) were observed on the TA 1535 strain. The obtained results of alkaline comet assay on isolated human lymphocytes suggested that both compounds induced an increase of primary DNA damage in a concentration-dependent manner. 4-ADBA was a slightly more potent inducer of primary DNA damage as compared to clenbuterol. Chromosomal aberration analysis showed that clenbuterol caused a statistically significant increase in the total number of aberrant cells only at the highest concentration tested (3% vs. 0.7% in the negative control). The results of this study might represent a solid frame for designing and planning future studies with both compounds, which should further clarify their mechanisms of action and genotoxic/cytogenetic effects relevant for human risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baohong; He Jiliang; Jin Lifen; Lu Deqiang; Zheng Wei; Lou Jianlin; Deng Hongping

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the synergistic DNA damage effects in human lymphocytes induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR, SAR of 3 W/kg) with four chemical mutagens, i.e. mitomycin C (MMC, DNA crosslinker), bleomycin (BLM, radiomimetic agent), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent), and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, UV-mimetic agent). The DNA damage of lymphocytes exposed to RFR and/or with chemical mutagens was detected at two incubation time (0 or 21 h) after treatment with comet assay in vitro. Three combinative exposure ways were used. Cells were exposed to RFR and chemical mutagens for 2 and 3 h, respectively. Tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) were utilized as DNA damage indexes. The results showed no difference of DNA damage indexes between RFR group and control group at 0 and 21 h incubation after exposure (P > 0.05). There were significant difference of DNA damage indexes between MMC group and RFR + MMC co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment (P 0.05). The experimental results indicated 1.8 GHz RFR (SAR, 3 W/kg) for 2 h did not induce the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects in vitro, but could enhance the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects induced by MMC and 4NQO. The synergistic DNA damage effects of 1.8 GHz RFR with BLM or MMS were not obvious

  16. Mutagenic replication in human cell extracts of DNA containing site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D C; Veaute, X; Kunkel, T A; Fuchs, R P

    1994-08-02

    We have analyzed the effects of site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts on the efficiency and frameshift fidelity of bidirectional replication of double-stranded DNA in a human cell extract. Plasmid vectors were constructed containing the simian virus 40 origin of replication and single AAF adducts at one of three guanines in the Nar I sequence GGCGCC in a lacZ reporter gene. The presence of an AAF adduct diminishes replication efficiency in HeLa cell extracts by 70-80%. Replication product analyses reveal unique termination sites with each damaged vector, suggesting that when the replication fork encounters an AAF adduct, it often stops before incorporation opposite the adduct. We also observed a higher proportion of products representing replication of the undamaged strand compared to the damaged strand. This suggests that the undamaged strand is replicated more readily, either by uncoupling the first fork to encounter the lesion or by replication using the fork arriving from the other direction. Also included among replication products are covalently closed monomer-length molecules resistant to cleavage at the AAF-modified Nar I site. This resistance is characteristic of substrates containing the AAF adduct, suggesting that translesion bypass had occurred. Transformation of Escherichia coli cells with the replicated damaged DNA yielded lacZ alpha revertant frequencies significantly above values obtained with undamaged DNA or with damaged DNA not replicated in vitro. This increase was only seen with the substrate modified at the third guanine position. Analysis of mutant DNA demonstrated the loss of a GC dinucleotide at the Nar I sequence. Generation of this position-dependent AAF-induced frameshift error in a human replication system is consistent with previous observations in E. coli suggesting that, after incorporation of dCMP opposite modified guanine in the third position, realignment of the template-primer occurs to form an intermediate with two

  17. Spermatogenic and mutagenic damage after paternal exposure to systemic indium-114m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyes, K.P.; Hendry, J.H. [Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sharma, H.L.; Jackson, H.; Morris, I.D. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1994-08-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic consequences of systemic administration of {sup 114m}In have been examined. Adult male rats were dosed intraperitoneally with 14.8 or 3.7 MBq/kg {sup 114m}In. Approximately 0.25% of the injected radioactivity was localized within the testis by 24 h and was retained with an effective half-life of 49.5 days. Breeding studies were started 3 days after injection, males being housed with two females for seven consecutive mating trials of 19 days, separated by 2 days. Indium-114m caused a reduction in litter size and an increase in the incidence of pre- and postimplantation losses and dominant lethal mutations. These effects became evident from 24 days but were most marked between 87-126 days after treatment and persisted up to 147 days. When animals were mated 200 days after treatment, no significant changes were observed. In a parallel study, administration of 14.8 MBq/kg {sup 114m}In resulted in decreased testis and epididymal weight and sperm reserves. Maximal reduction occurred between 87-108 days after injection followed by recovery toward control values, but neither organ had reached normal levels at 200 days. A single dose of 3.7 MBq/kg, however, had no effect on reproductive organ weight or sperm content. Male F{sub 1} progeny from the 14.8 MBq/kg group of the second mating period (commencing at 24 days) displayed decreased testis weights and sperm content and provoked a higher incidence of dominant lethal mutations. This effect was not observed in male progeny from any other time or the alternative dose level. 43 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Studying the synergistic damage effects induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR) with four chemical mutagens on human lymphocyte DNA using comet assay in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baohong, Wang; Jiliang, He; Lifen, Jin; Deqiang, Lu; Wei, Zheng; Jianlin, Lou; Hongping, Deng

    2005-10-15

    The aim of this investigation was to study the synergistic DNA damage effects in human lymphocytes induced by 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field radiation (RFR, SAR of 3 W/kg) with four chemical mutagens, i.e. mitomycin C (MMC, DNA crosslinker), bleomycin (BLM, radiomimetic agent), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, alkylating agent), and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, UV-mimetic agent). The DNA damage of lymphocytes exposed to RFR and/or with chemical mutagens was detected at two incubation time (0 or 21 h) after treatment with comet assay in vitro. Three combinative exposure ways were used. Cells were exposed to RFR and chemical mutagens for 2 and 3h, respectively. Tail length (TL) and tail moment (TM) were utilized as DNA damage indexes. The results showed no difference of DNA damage indexes between RFR group and control group at 0 and 21 h incubation after exposure (P>0.05). There were significant difference of DNA damage indexes between MMC group and RFR+MMC co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment (PRFR+4NQO co-exposure group at 0 and 21 h incubation after treatment was observed (PRFR+BLM co-exposure groups and RFR+MMS co-exposure groups was not significantly increased, as compared with corresponding BLM and MMS groups (P>0.05). The experimental results indicated 1.8 GHz RFR (SAR, 3 W/kg) for 2h did not induce the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects in vitro, but could enhance the human lymphocyte DNA damage effects induced by MMC and 4NQO. The synergistic DNA damage effects of 1.8 GHz RFR with BLM or MMS were not obvious.

  19. Accelerated repair and reduced mutagenicity of DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke in human bronchial cells transfected with E.coli formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Foresta

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke (CS is associated to a number of pathologies including lung cancer. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects are partially linked to the presence of reactive oxygen species and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH inducing DNA damage. The bacterial DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG repairs both oxidized bases and different types of bulky DNA adducts. We investigated in vitro whether FPG expression may enhance DNA repair of CS-damaged DNA and counteract the mutagenic effects of CS in human lung cells. NCI-H727 non small cell lung carcinoma cells were transfected with a plasmid vector expressing FPG fused to the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP. Cells expressing the fusion protein EGFP-FPG displayed accelerated repair of adducts and DNA breaks induced by CS condensate. The mutant frequencies induced by low concentrations of CS condensate to the Na(+K(+-ATPase locus (oua(r were significantly reduced in cells expressing EGFP-FPG. Hence, expression of the bacterial DNA repair protein FPG stably protects human lung cells from the mutagenic effects of CS by improving cells' capacity to repair damaged DNA.

  20. Fine and ultrafine atmospheric particulate matter at a multi-influenced urban site: Physicochemical characterization, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landkocz, Yann; Ledoux, Frédéric; André, Véronique; Cazier, Fabrice; Genevray, Paul; Dewaele, Dorothée; Martin, Perrine J; Lepers, Capucine; Verdin, Anthony; Courcot, Lucie; Boushina, Saâd; Sichel, François; Gualtieri, Maurizio; Shirali, Pirouz; Courcot, Dominique; Billet, Sylvain

    2017-02-01

    Particulate Matter (PM) air pollution is one of the major concerns for environment and health. Understanding the heterogeneity and complexity of fine and ultrafine PM is a fundamental issue notably for the assessment of PM toxicological effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of a multi-influenced urban site PM, with or without the ultrafine fraction. For this purpose, PM 2.5-0.3 (PM with aerodynamic diameter ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 μm) and PM 2.5 were collected in Dunkerque, a French coastal industrial city and were extensively characterized for their physico-chemical properties, including inorganic and organic species. In order to identify the possible sources of atmospheric pollution, specific criteria like Carbon Preference Index (CPI) and PAH characteristic ratios were investigated. Mutagenicity assays using Ames test with TA98, TA102 and YG1041 Salmonella strains with or without S9 activation were performed on native PM sample and PM organic extracts and water-soluble fractions. BEAS-2B cell viability and cell proliferation were evaluated measuring lactate dehydrogenase release and mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity after exposure to PM and their extracts. Several contributing sources were identified in PM: soil resuspension, marine emissions including sea-salt or shipping, road traffic and industrial activities, mainly related to steelmaking or petro-chemistry. Mutagenicity of PM was evidenced, especially for PM 2.5 , including ultrafine fraction, in relation to PAHs content and possibly nitro-aromatics compounds. PM induced cytotoxic effects at relatively high doses, while alteration of proliferation with low PM doses could be related to underlying mechanisms such as genotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Liability for on-site nuclear property damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neems, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Typically, liability for on-site property addressed in contracts between operator and its suppliers. Nuclear power plant operators ordinarily protect themselves against risk of nuclear damage to on-site property by insurance. Nuclear liability laws do not specifically address liability for nuclear damage to on-site property. Nuclear plant owners should address risk of damage to on-site property when developing risk management program

  2. In vitro effects of fluor-hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite on colony formation, DNA damage and mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantová, S; Theiszová, M; Letasiová, S; Birosová, L; Palou, T M

    2008-04-30

    The number of biomaterials used in biomedical applications has rapidly increased in the past two decades. Fluorapatite (FA) is one of the inorganic constituents of bone or teeth used for hard-tissue repairs and replacements. Fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) is a new synthetically prepared composite that in its structure contains the same molecular concentration of OH(-) groups and F(-) ions. The aim of this experimental investigation was to evaluate cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of FHA and FA eluates on Chinese hamster V79 cells and to compare them with the effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) eluate. Cytotoxicity of the biomaterials tested was evaluated by use of the cell colony-formation assay and by direct counting of the cells in each colony. Genotoxicity was assessed by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) and mutagenicity was evaluated by the Hprt gene-mutation assay and in bacterial mutagenicity tests using Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The results show that the highest test concentrations of the biomaterials (100% and 75% eluates) induced very weak inhibition of colony growth (about 10%). On the other hand, the reduction of cell number per colony induced by these concentrations was in the range from 43% to 31%. The comet assay showed that biomaterials induced DNA breaks, which increased with increasing test concentrations in the order HAmutagenic effects compared with the positive control (N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine), and DNA breakage was probably the reason for the inhibition of cell division in V79 cell colonies.

  3. On multi-site damage identification using single-site training data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthorpe, R. J.; Manson, G.; Worden, K.

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for developing multi-site damage location systems for engineering structures that can be trained using single-site damaged state data only. The methodology involves training a sequence of binary classifiers based upon single-site damage data and combining the developed classifiers into a robust multi-class damage locator. In this way, the multi-site damage identification problem may be decomposed into a sequence of binary decisions. In this paper Support Vector Classifiers are adopted as the means of making these binary decisions. The proposed methodology represents an advancement on the state of the art in the field of multi-site damage identification which require either: (1) full damaged state data from single- and multi-site damage cases or (2) the development of a physics-based model to make multi-site model predictions. The potential benefit of the proposed methodology is that a significantly reduced number of recorded damage states may be required in order to train a multi-site damage locator without recourse to physics-based model predictions. In this paper it is first demonstrated that Support Vector Classification represents an appropriate approach to the multi-site damage location problem, with methods for combining binary classifiers discussed. Next, the proposed methodology is demonstrated and evaluated through application to a real engineering structure - a Piper Tomahawk trainer aircraft wing - with its performance compared to classifiers trained using the full damaged-state dataset.

  4. Mutagenic replication in human cell extracts of DNA containing site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene adducts.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, D C; Veaute, X; Kunkel, T A; Fuchs, R P

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the effects of site-specific N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) adducts on the efficiency and frameshift fidelity of bidirectional replication of double-stranded DNA in a human cell extract. Plasmid vectors were constructed containing the simian virus 40 origin of replication and single AAF adducts at one of three guanines in the Nar I sequence GGCGCC in a lacZ reporter gene. The presence of an AAF adduct diminishes replication efficiency in HeLa cell extracts by 70-80%. Replicati...

  5. Human somatic, germinal and heritable mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report deals with the general process of variant formation rather than with the consequences of a specific variant being present. It focusses on mutational mechanisms, mutagens, and the method for detecting de novo mutants and estimating mutation rate. It is to human genetics much like disease causation and prevention medicine are to medicine as a whole. The word ''mutagenicity'' is used in the title and throughout the text to connote the causation of all classes of genetic damage. Mutagenicity and the corresponding words mutation, mutagen and mutagenesis can have multiple meaning, sometimes relating to gene mutation, sometimes to heritable mutation, and somtimes to all types of genetic damage. 38 refs., 1 tab

  6. DNA damage bypass operates in the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle and exhibits differential mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Noam; Hendel, Ayal; Vered, Ilan; Carell, Thomas; Reissner, Thomas; de Wind, Niels; Geacinov, Nicholas; Livneh, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) employs low-fidelity DNA polymerases to bypass replication-blocking lesions, and being associated with chromosomal replication was presumed to occur in the S phase of the cell cycle. Using immunostaining with anti-replication protein A antibodies, we show that in UV-irradiated mammalian cells, chromosomal single-stranded gaps formed in S phase during replication persist into the G2 phase of the cell cycle, where their repair is completed depending on DNA polymerase ζ and Rev1. Analysis of TLS using a high-resolution gapped-plasmid assay system in cell populations enriched by centrifugal elutriation for specific cell cycle phases showed that TLS operates both in S and G2. Moreover, the mutagenic specificity of TLS in G2 was different from S, and in some cases overall mutation frequency was higher. These results suggest that TLS repair of single-stranded gaps caused by DNA lesions can lag behind chromosomal replication, is separable from it, and occurs both in the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Such a mechanism may function to maintain efficient replication, which can progress despite the presence of DNA lesions, with TLS lagging behind and patching regions of discontinuity.

  7. Effect of site conditions on ground motion and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R.; Glassmoyer, G.; Andrews, M.; Cranswick, E.

    1989-01-01

    Results of seismologic studies conducted by the U.S. reconnaissance team in conjunction with Soviet colleagues following the tragic earthquakes of December 7, 1988, suggest that site conditions may have been a major factor in contributing to increased damage levels in Leninakan. As the potential severity of these effects in Leninakan had not been previously identified, this chapter presents results intended to provide a preliminary quantification of these effects on both damage and levels of ground motion observed in Leninakan. The article describes the damage distribution geologic setting, ground motion amplification in Leninakan, including analog amplifications and spectral amplifications. Preliminary model estimates for site response are presented. It is concluded that ground motion amplification in the 0.5-2.5-second period range was a major contributing factor to increased damage in Leninakan as compared with Kirovakan. Leninakan is located on thick water saturated alluvial deposits.

  8. Conventional (MG-BR46 Conquista) and transgenic (BRS Valiosa RR) soybeans have no mutagenic effects and may protect against induced-DNA damage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Vinicius P; Silva, João Paulo L; Almeida, Alaor A; Brigagão, Maísa R P L; Azevedo, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the pesticide and metal concentrations as well as the antimutagenic and mutagenic properties of commercial soybeans (Glycine max). Male Swiss mice were fed diets containing 1%, 10%, or 20% (w/w) transgenic soybeans (BRS Valiosa RR) or parental isogenic conventional soybeans (MG-BR46 Conquista). Cyclophosphamide (50 mg kg⁻¹ b.w.) was added in a single dose 24 h before euthanasia as an induction agent. There was no difference in the composition (ash, total fat, protein, moisture, and carbohydrates) of the diets containing the same soybean concentration. The results show that the commercially available Brazilian soybeans tested are free of organochlorine, organophosphate, and carbamate pesticides and contain acceptable heavy metal concentrations. Both cyclophosphamide and soybean treatments were not sufficient to cause detectable oxidative damage on liver by the levels of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl. The transgenic soybeans are also nonmutagenic and have protective effects against DNA damage similar to those of conventional soybeans but to a lesser percentage (64%-101% for conventional and 23%-33% for transgenic diets).

  9. Mutagenicity, stable DNA adducts, and abasic sites induced in Salmonella by phenanthro[3,4-b]- and phenanthro[4,3-b]thiophenes, sulfur analogs of benzo[c]phenanthrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, Carol D. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); King, Leon C.; Nesnow, Stephen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27711 (United States); Umbach, David M. [Biostatistics Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, DHHS, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Kumar, Subodh [Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Laboratory, Great Lakes Center, State University of New York College at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222 (United States); DeMarini, David M. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27711 (United States)], E-mail: demarini.david@epa.gov

    2009-02-10

    Sulfur-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (thia-PAHs or thiaarenes) are common constituents of air pollution and cigarette smoke, but only a few have been studied for health effects. We evaluated the mutagenicity in Salmonella TA98, TA100, and TA104 of two sulfur-containing derivatives of benzo[c]phenanthrene, phenanthro[3,4-b]thiophene (P[3,4-b]T), and phenanthro[4,3-b]thiophene (P[4,3-b]T) as well as their dihydrodiol and sulfone derivatives. In addition, we assessed levels of stable DNA adducts (by {sup 32}P-postlabeling) as well as abasic sites (by an aldehydic-site assay) produced by six of these compounds in TA100. P[3,4-b]T and its 6,7- and 8,9-diols, P[3,4-b]T sulfone, P[4,3-b]T, and its 8,9-diol were mutagenic in TA100. P[3,4-b]T sulfone, the most potent mutagen, was approximately twice as potent as benzo[a]pyrene in both TA98 and TA100. Benzo-ring dihydrodiols were much more potent than K-region dihydrodiols, which had little or no mutagenic activity in any strain. P[3,4-b]T sulfone produced abasic sites and not stable DNA adducts; the other five compounds examined, B[c]P, B[c]P 3,4-diol, P[3,4-b]T, P[3,4-b]T 8,9-diol, and P[4,3-b]T 8,9-diol, produced only stable DNA adducts. P[3,4-b]T sulfone was the only compound that produced significant levels of frameshift mutagenicity and induced mutations primarily at GC sites. In contrast, B[c]P, its 3,4-diol, and the 8,9 diols of the phenanthrothiophenes induced mutations primarily at AT sites. P[3,4-b]T was not mutagenic in TA104, whereas P[3,4-b]T sulfone was. The two isomeric forms (P[3,4-b]T and P[4,3-b]T) are apparently activated differently, with the latter, but not the former, involving a diol pathway. This study is the first illustrating the potential importance of abasic sites in the mutagenicity of thia-PAHs.

  10. Human somatic, germinal and heritable mutagenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report deals with the general process of variant formation rather than with the consequences of a specific variant being present. It focusses on mutational mechanisms, mutagens, and the method for detecting de novo mutants and estimating mutation rate. It is to human genetics much like disease causation and prevention medicine are to medicine as a whole. The word ''mutagenicity'' is used in the title and throughout the text to connote the causation of all classes of genetic damage. Mutagenicity and the corresponding words mutation, mutagen and mutagenesis can have multiple meaning, sometimes relating to gene mutation, sometimes to heritable mutation, and somtimes to all types of genetic damage. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Mutagenic DNA repair in enterobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, S.G.; Chao Ho; Woodgate, R.

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen species of enterobacteria have been screened for mutagenic DNA repair activity. In Escherichia coli, mutagenic DNA repair is encoded by the umuDC operon. Synthesis of UmuD and UmuC proteins is induced as part of the SOS response to DNA damage, and after induction, the UmuD protein undergoes an autocatalytic cleavage to produce the carboxy-terminal UmuD' fragment needed for induced mutagenesis. The presence of a similar system in other species was examined by using a combined approach of inducible-mutagenesis assays, cross-reactivity to E. coli UmuD and UmuD' antibodies to test for induction and cleavage of UmuD-like proteins, and hybridization with E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium u mu DNA probes to map umu-like genes. The results indicate a more widespread distribution of mutagenic DNA repair in other species than was previously thought. They also show that umu loci can be more complex in other species than in E. coli. Differences in UV-induced mutability of more than 200-fold were seen between different species of enteric bacteria and even between multiple natural isolates of E. coli, and yet some of the species which display a poorly mutable phenotype still have umu-like genes and proteins. It is suggested that umuDC genes can be curtailed in their mutagenic activities but that they may still participate in some other, unknown process which provides the continued stimulus for their retention

  12. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) I. comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of physical & chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    Mutagenic effectiveness usually means the rate of mutation as related to dose. Mutagenic efficiency refers to the mutation rate in relation to damage. Studies on comparative mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of two physical (gamma rays and fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU and EMS) on two desi (G 130 & H 214), one kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345) chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) have been reported. The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 and 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 and 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU 0.01% 20h and 0.02% 8h) and EMS (0.1% 20h and 0.2% 8h). Results indicated that chemical mutagens, particularly NMU are not only more effective but also efficient than physical mutagens in inducing mutations in chickpea. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency showed differential behaviour depending upon mutagen and varietal type. Chemical mutagens were more efficient than physical in inducing cholorophyll as well as viable and total number of mutations. Among the mutagens NMU was the most potent, while in the physical, gamma rays were more effective. Out of four mutagens, NMU was the most effective and efficient in inducing a high frequency and wide spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in the M2 followed by fast neutrons. While gamma rays showed least effectiveness, EMS was least efficient mutagens. Major differences in the mutagenic response of the four cultivars were observed. The varieties of desi type were more resistant towards mutagenic treatment than kabuli and green seeded type

  13. Liquefaction-induced settlement, site effects and damage in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnitudes 7.4 and 7.2 earthquakes in 1999 caused great destruction in Yalova. The heavy damage to buildings and other civil engineering structures was ... Sirinevler Primary School, Sirinevler Ministry of National Education, Istanbul, Turkey. Emek Geophysical and Geotechnical Company, Büyük¸cekmece, Istanbul, ...

  14. Molecular and genetic mechanisms of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Derstine, P.L.; Griego, V.M.; Matsushita, T.; Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Reynolds, P.R.; Webb, R.B.; Williams-Hill, D.

    1981-01-01

    This program is primarily concerned with elucidation of the nature of DNA lesions produced by environmental and energy related mutagens, their mechanisms of action, and their repair. The main focus is on actions of chemical mutagens and electromagnetic radiations. Synergistic interactions between mutagens and the mutational processes that lead to synergism are being investigated. Mutagens are chosen for study on the basis of their potential for analysis of mutation (as genetic probes), for development of procedures for reducing mutational damage, for their potential importance to risk assessment, and for development of improved mutagen testing systems. Bacterial cells are used because of the rapidity and clarity of scientific results that can be obtained, the detailed genetic maps, and the many well-defined mutand strains available. The conventional tools of microbial and molecular genetics are used, along with intercomparison of genetically related strains. Advantage is taken of tcollective dose commitment will result in more attention being paid to potential releases of radionuclides at relatively short times after disposal

  15. Liquefaction-induced settlement, site effects and damage in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eng., Auckland, New Zealand 8. Ozcep F and Zarif H 2009 Variations of soil liquefaction safety factors depending on several design earthquakes in the City of Yalova (Turkey); Sci. Res. Essays 4 594–604. Özel O, Cranswick E, Meremonte M, Erdik M and Safak, E. 2002 Site effects in Avcilar, west of Istanbul, Turkey, from.

  16. Tornado damage at the Grand Gulf, Mississippi nuclear power plant site: aerial and ground surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.T.; McDonald, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    A tornado struck the Grand Gulf nuclear power generating station, Port Gibson, Mississippi, about 11:30 p.m. on April 17, 1978. Storm damage investigators from the University of Chicago and Texas Tech University were dispatched to survey the damage. The meteorological situation that spawned the Grand Gulf tornado and seven others in the area is discussed. Aerial surveys of the entire damage path and detailed surveys of the plant site are presented. An engineering evaluation of the damage is also presented based primarily on information gained from detailed ground surveys

  17. Stalled repair of lesions when present within a clustered DNA damage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, M.E.; Cunniffe, S.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Ionising radiation produces clustered DNA damages (two or more lesions within one or two helical turns of the DNA) which could challenge the repair mechanism(s) of the cell. Using purified base excision repair (BER) enzymes and synthetic oligonucleotides a number of recent studies have established the excision of a lesion within clustered damage sites is compromised. Evidence will be presented that the efficiency of repair of lesions within a clustered DNA damage site is reduced, relative to that of the isolated lesions, since the lifetime of both lesions is extended by up to four fold. Simple clustered damage sites, comprised of single-strand breaks, abasic sites and base damages, one or five bases 3' or 5' to each other, were synthesised in oligonucleotides and repair carried out in mammalian cell nuclear extracts. The rate of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site within these clustered damage sites is reduced, mainly due to inhibition of the DNA ligase. The mechanism of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site shows some asymmetry. Repair appears to be by the short-patch BER pathway when the lesions are 5' to each other. In contrast, when the lesions are 3' to each other repair appears to proceed along the long-patch BER pathway. The lesions within the cluster are processed sequentially, the single-strand break/abasic site being repaired before excision of 8-oxoG, limiting the formation of double-strand breaks to <2%. Stalled processing of clustered DNA damage extends the lifetime of the lesions to an extent that could have biological consequences, e.g. if the lesions are still present during transcription and/or at replication mutations could arise

  18. Incident laser modulation of a repaired damage site with a rim in fused silica rear subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Xiang Xia; Zu Xiao-Tao; Yuan Xiao-Dong; He Shao-Bo; Jiang Xiao-Dong; Zheng Wan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Local CO 2 laser treatment has proved to be an effective method to prevent the 351-nm laser-induced damage sites in a fused silica surface from exponentially growing, which is responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high fluence laser systems. However, the CO 2 laser induced ablation crater is often surrounded by a raised rim at the edge, which can also result in the intensification of transmitted ultraviolet light that may damage the downstream optics. In this work, the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is developed to simulate the distribution of electrical field intensity in the vicinity of the CO 2 laser mitigated damage site located in the exit subsurface of fused silica. The simulated results show that the repaired damage sites with raised rims cause more notable modulation to the incident laser than those without rims. Specifically, we present a theoretical model of using dimpled patterning to control the rim structure around the edge of repaired damage sites to avoid damage to downstream optics. The calculated results accord well with previous experimental results and the underlying physical mechanism is analysed in detail. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Alkaline azide mutagenicity in cowpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahna, S.K.; Bhargava, Anubha; Mohan, Lalit

    1990-01-01

    Sodium azide is known as a potent mutagen in cereals and legumes. It is very effective in acidic medium in barley. Here an attempt is made to measure the effectiveness of sodium azide in alkaline medium (pH 7.4) on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., variety FS-68). Seeds pre-soaked in distilled water for 5 hours were treated with different concentrations (10 -6 , 10 -5 , 10 -4 and 10 -3 M) of sodium azide (NaN 3 ) for 4 hours at 28± 2 deg. C. Bottles were intermittently shaken, then the seeds were thoroughly washed in running tap water and subsequently planted in pots. The treatment caused significant biological damage such as reduction in seed germination, length of root and shoot, number of nodules and pods per plant and morphological leaf variations. Morphological, as well as chlorophyll mutants, were detected in M 2

  20. A methodology for assessing the impact of mutagens on aquatic ecosystems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knezovich, J.P.; Martinelli, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    Assessments of impacts of hazardous agents (i.e., chemical and physical mutagens) on human health have focused on defining the effects of chronic exposure on individuals, with cancer being the main effect of concern. In contrast, impacts on ecosystems have traditionally been gauged by the assessment of near-term organism mortality, which is clearly not a useful endpoint for assessing the long-term effects of chronic exposures. Impacts on individual organisms that affect the long-term survival of populations are much more important but are also more difficult to define. Therefore, methods that provide accurate measures of sub-lethal effects that are linked to population survival are required so that accurate assessments of environmental damage can be made and remediation efforts, if required, can be initiated. Radioactive substances have entered aquatic environments as a result of research and production activities, intentional disposal, and accidental discharges. At several DOE sites, surface waters and sediments are contaminated with radioactive and mutagenic materials. The accident at the Chernobyl power station in the former Soviet Union (FSU) has resulted in the contamination of biota present in the Kiev Reservoir. This documents presents a methodology which addresses the effects of a direct-acting mutagen (radiation) on aquantic organisms by applying sensitive techniques for assessing damage to genetic material

  1. Soil mutagenicity as a strategy to evaluate environmental and health risks in a contaminated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohren, Roberta de Souza; Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida Vaz; Leal, Karen Alan; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2012-09-01

    Soil can be a storage place and source of pollutants for interfacial environments. This study looked at a site contaminated with wood preservatives as a source of mutagens, defined routes and extent of the dispersion of these contaminants by particle remobilization and atmospheric deposition, considering an evaluation of risk to human health by quantifying mutagenic risk. Soil sampling sites were chosen at gradually increasing distances (150, 500 and 1700m) from SI (industrial area pool) and indoor dust (pool in an area at risk at 385m and at 1700m). Mutagenesis was evaluated in the Salmonella/microsome assay, TA98, TA97a and TA100 strains with and without S9 mix, YGs strains 1041, 1042 and 1024 for nitrocompounds. Acid extracts were analyzed to define the effects of metals and organics for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitroderivates, besides concentrations of these compounds and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Risk to human health was obtained from the relation between the quantified potential of mutagenic risk and estimated soil ingestion for children according to USEPA. Metal concentrations showed a gradient of responses with As, Cr and Cu (total metal) or Cr and Cu (fraction available) higher for SI. However, mutagenic effects of the mixtures did not show this grading. Site SR1700, without a response, was characterized as a reference. In organic extracts, the mutagenesis responses showed the mobility of these compounds from the source. In the surrounding area, a smaller pattern similar to SI was observed at SR150, and at the other sites elevated values of direct mutagenesis at SR500 and diminished effects at SR1700. Tests with YG strains indicated that nitrated compounds have a significant effect on the direct mutagenesis found, except SR500. The investigation of indoor dust in the surrounding area enabled confirmation of the particle resuspension route and atmospheric deposition, showing responses in mutagenicity biomarkers, PAH concentrations and PCP

  2. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Casana

    Full Text Available Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  3. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Jesse; Laugier, Elise Jakoby

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  4. A contribution to the study on the mutagenicity of atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, Philipp

    1986-01-01

    Following a review of the literature, the genotoxic hazards of atmospheric pollutants at various locations (rural sites, motorway tolls, paint shops...) were evaluated by in vitro mutagenicity assays (Ames' test and SOS chromo-test) and analytical methods (gas chromatography and mass spectrometry). Instrumentation and procedures were developed for the sampling of volatile organic pollutants: adsorption on XAD 2 followed by acetone extraction of the compounds trapped. A comparative study allowed to assess the relative mutagenic action of the volatile organic compounds and to establish a mutagenicity scale. (author) [fr

  5. Mutagenicity of complex mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelroy, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of coal-derived complex chemical mixtures on the mutagenicity of 6-aminochrysene (6-AC) was determined with Salmonella typhimurium TA98. Previous results suggested that the mutagenic potency of 6-AC for TA98 in the standard microsomal activation (Ames) assay increased if it was presented to the cells mixed with high-boiling coal liquids (CL) from the solvent refined coal (SRC) process. In this year's work, the apparent mutational synergism of CL and 6-AC was independently verified in a fluctuation bioassay which allowed quantitation of mutational frequencies and cell viability. The results of this assay system were similar to those in the Ames assay. Moreover, the fluctation assay revealed that mutagenesis and cellular toxicity induced by 6-AC were both strongly enhanced if 6-AC was presented to the cells mixed in a high-boiling CL. 4 figures

  6. Site-specific DNA damage at GGG sequence by oxidative stress may accelerate telomere shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, S; Kawanishi, S

    1999-06-25

    Telomere shortening during human aging has been reported to be accelerated by oxidative stress. We investigated the mechanism of telomere shortening by oxidative stress. H2O2 plus Cu(II) caused predominant DNA damage at the 5' site of 5'-GGG-3' in the telomere sequence. Furthermore, H2O2 plus Cu(II) induced 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in telomere sequences more efficiently than that in non-telomere sequences. NO plus O2- efficiently caused base alteration at the 5' site of 5'-GGG-3' in the telomere sequence. It is concluded that the site-specific DNA damage at the GGG sequence by oxidative stress may play an important role in increasing the rate of telomere shortening with aging.

  7. Mismatch repair proteins recruit DNA methyltransferase 1 to sites of oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Bonham, Emily M; Hannon, Brooke E; Amick, Thomas R; Baylin, Stephen B; O'Hagan, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    At sites of chronic inflammation, epithelial cells are exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species and undergo cancer-associated DNA methylation changes, suggesting that inflammation may initiate epigenetic alterations. Previously, we demonstrated that oxidative damage causes epigenetic silencing proteins to become part of a large complex that is localized to GC-rich regions of the genome, including promoter CpG islands that are epigenetically silenced in cancer. However, whether these proteins were recruited directly to damaged DNA or during the DNA repair process was unknown. Here we demonstrate that the mismatch repair protein heterodimer MSH2-MSH6 participates in the oxidative damage-induced recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) to chromatin. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces the interaction of MSH2-MSH6 with DNMT1, suggesting that the recruitment is through a protein-protein interaction. Importantly, the reduction in transcription for genes with CpG island-containing promoters caused by oxidative damage is abrogated by knockdown of MSH6 and/or DNMT1. Our findings provide evidence that the role of DNMT1 at sites of oxidative damage is to reduce transcription, potentially preventing transcription from interfering with the repair process. This study uniquely brings together several factors that are known to contribute to colon cancer, namely inflammation, mismatch repair proteins, and epigenetic changes. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Genotoxic and mutagenic evaluation of water samples from a river under the influence of different anthropogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Nelson Jorge Carvalho; de Carvalho Melo Cavalcante, Ana Amélia; de Oliveira, Maria Geci; Medeiros, Eugênia Cristina Nascimento; Machado, Joseane Lustosa; Evangelista, Sebastiana Ribeiro; Dias, Johnny F; Dos Santos, Carla E I; Duarte, Anaí; da Silva, Fernanda R; da Silva, Juliana

    2016-12-01

    Pollution of aquatic ecosystems is associated with the discharge of mostly industrial and urban effluents, which may cause loss of biodiversity and damage to public health. This study aims to evaluate the toxicity and mutagenicity of water samples collected in the Corrente River, a major waterway in the river basin district of Pedro II, Piauí (Brazil). This river is exposed to intense anthropogenic influence from urban, automotive mechanical and family farm waste, and it is used as the main source of water supply by the population. Water samples were collected during the rainy and dry seasons, at four sites in the Corrente River, and evaluated by physicochemical, microbiological and inorganic elements analyses. The samples were evaluated for mutagenicity using the Allium cepa test (toxicity, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests) and fish (Tilapia rendalli and Hoplias malabaricus). The physicochemical, microbiological and inorganic results show a large contribution to the pollution loads at collection points in the town of Pedro II, demonstrating the influence of urban pollution. The Al, Si, Ti, Cr, Ni and Cu contents were determined by PIXE. These same Corrente River water samples demonstrated mutagenic effect for A. cepa and fish, as well as toxicity in the A. cepa test. The observations of mutagenic effect may suggest that the complex mixture of agents is comprised of both clastogenic and aneugenic agents. This study also showed the need for constant monitoring in places with environmental degradation caused by urban sewage discharges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The detection and analysis of mutagens: Final report, 1968--1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Our main objectives are: to develop and improve the Salmonella test for detecting environmental mutagens; to investigate the relationship between carcinogens and mutagens and to validate the Salmonella test for detecting carcinogens; to uncover significant unsuspected environmental mutagens/carcinogens; to investigate the theory of mutagenesis; to develop new methods for determining DNA damage by particular chemicals in individual people; to understand the role of oxygen radicals in DNA damage, cancer, and aging; and to investigate the role of anti-carcinogens in preventing DNA damage

  10. Role of kidney S9 in the mutagenic properties of 1,2-dibromoethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, B; Duverger-van Bogaert, M

    1994-12-01

    The mutagenic properties of 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) were studied in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay using the strains TA 1535 and TA 100. Kidney S9 fraction alone did not modify the direct mutagenic activity of DBE; but an addition of kidney S9 to liver S9 fraction yielded a higher mutagenic activity of DBE than with liver S9 fraction alone. Moreover, the addition of glutathione (GSH) to kidney S9 increased the mutagenic activity of DBE. Methimazole, a competitive inhibitor of the flavin-containing monooxygenase, reduced mutagenic activity suggesting that this enzyme may contribute to renal damage from DBE. No mutagens could be detected in the urine of rats treated with DBE.

  11. Biological consequences of potential repair intermediates of clustered base damage site in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; O'Neill, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage induced by a single radiation track is a unique feature of ionizing radiation. Using a plasmid-based assay in Escherichia coli, we previously found significantly higher mutation frequencies for bistranded clusters containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) than for either a single 8-oxoG or a single DHT in wild type and in glycosylase-deficient strains of E. coli. This indicates that the removal of an 8-oxoG from a clustered damage site is most likely retarded compared to the removal of a single 8-oxoG. To gain further insights into the processing of bistranded base lesions, several potential repair intermediates following 8-oxoG removal were assessed. Clusters, such as DHT + apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and DHT + GAP have relatively low mutation frequencies, whereas clusters, such as AP + AP or GAP + AP, significantly reduce the number of transformed colonies, most probably through formation of a lethal double strand break (DSB). Bistranded AP sites placed 3' to each other with various interlesion distances also blocked replication. These results suggest that bistranded base lesions, i.e., single base lesions on each strand, but not clusters containing only AP sites and strand breaks, are repaired in a coordinated manner so that the formation of DSBs is avoided. We propose that, when either base lesion is initially excised from a bistranded base damage site, the remaining base lesion will only rarely be converted into an AP site or a single strand break in vivo.

  12. Direct detection and quantification of abasic sites for in vivo studies of DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanming; Liu Lili; Wu Chunying; Bulgar, Alina; Somoza, Eduardo; Zhu Wenxia; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2009-01-01

    Use of chemotherapeutic agents to induce cytotoxic DNA damage and programmed cell death is a key strategy in cancer treatments. However, the efficacy of DNA-targeted agents such as temozolomide is often compromised by intrinsic cellular responses such as DNA base excision repair (BER). Previous studies have shown that BER pathway resulted in formation of abasic or apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and blockage of AP sites led to a significant enhancement of drug sensitivity due to reduction of DNA base excision repair. Since a number of chemotherapeutic agents also induce formation of AP sites, monitoring of these sites as a clinical correlate of drug effect will provide a useful tool in the development of DNA-targeted chemotherapies aimed at blocking abasic sites from repair. Here we report an imaging technique based on positron emission tomography (PET) that allows for direct quantification of AP sites in vivo. For this purpose, positron-emitting carbon-11 has been incorporated into methoxyamine ([ 11 C]MX) that binds covalently to AP sites with high specificity. The binding specificity of [ 11 C]MX for AP sites was demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments. Using [ 11 C]MX as a radiotracer, animal PET studies have been conducted in melanoma and glioma xenografts for quantification of AP sites. Following induction of AP sites by temozolomide, both tumor models showed significant increase of [ 11 C]MX uptake in tumor regions in terms of radioactivity concentration as a function of time, which correlates well with conventional aldehyde reactive probe (ARP)-based bioassays for AP sites.

  13. Mutagenic potentials of crataegus and laxaricin in human blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay was introduced as a microelectrophoretic method for direct visualization of DNA damage in individual cells. Green plants in general contain mutagenic and carcinogenic substances, but there is little information. Due to the increased use and availability of herbal ...

  14. A high-throughput and quantitative method to assess the mutagenic potential of translesion DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, David J.; Camerlengo, Terry L.; Harrison, Jason K.; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Kshetry, Ajay K.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Huang, Kun; Suo, Zucai

    2013-01-01

    Cellular genomes are constantly damaged by endogenous and exogenous agents that covalently and structurally modify DNA to produce DNA lesions. Although most lesions are mended by various DNA repair pathways in vivo, a significant number of damage sites persist during genomic replication. Our understanding of the mutagenic outcomes derived from these unrepaired DNA lesions has been hindered by the low throughput of existing sequencing methods. Therefore, we have developed a cost-effective high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay that uses next-generation DNA sequencing technology for the assessment of the mutagenic profiles of translesion DNA synthesis catalyzed by any error-prone DNA polymerase. The vast amount of sequencing data produced were aligned and quantified by using our novel software. As an example, the high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay was used to analyze the types and frequencies of mutations upstream, downstream and at a site-specifically placed cis–syn thymidine–thymidine dimer generated individually by three lesion-bypass human Y-family DNA polymerases. PMID:23470999

  15. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequen...

  16. Histone peptide AKRHRK enhances H2O2-induced DNA damage and alters its site specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2005-01-01

    Histone proteins are involved in compaction of DNA and the protection of cells from oxygen toxicity. However, several studies have demonstrated that the metal-binding histone reacts with H 2 O 2 , leading to oxidative damage to a nucleobase. We investigated whether histone can accelerate oxidative DNA damage, using a minimal model for the N-terminal tail of histone H4, CH 3 CO-AKRHRK-CONH 2 , which has a metal-binding site. This histone peptide enhanced DNA damage induced by H 2 O 2 and Cu(II), especially at cytosine residues, and induced additional DNA cleavage at the 5'-guanine of GGG sequences. The peptide also enhanced the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and ESR spin-trapping signal from H 2 O 2 and Cu(II). Cyclic redox reactions involving histone-bound Cu(II) and H 2 O 2 , may give rise to multiple production of radicals leading to multiple hits in DNA. It is noteworthy that the histone H4 peptide with specific sequence AKRHRK can cause DNA damage rather than protection under metal-overloaded condition

  17. Site-specific DNA damage at the GGG sequence by UVA involves acceleration of telomere shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, S; Tada-Oikawa, S; Kawanishi, S

    2001-04-17

    Telomere shortening is associated with cellular senescence. We investigated whether UVA, which contributes to photoaging, accelerates telomere shortening in human cultured cells. The terminal restriction fragment (TRF) from WI-38 fibroblasts irradiated with UVA (365-nm light) decreased with increasing irradiation dose. Furthermore, UVA irradiation dose-dependently increased the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in both WI-38 fibroblasts and HL-60 cells. To clarify the mechanism of the acceleration of telomere shortening, we investigated site-specific DNA damage induced by UVA irradiation in the presence of endogenous photosensitizers using (32)P 5'-end-labeled DNA fragments containing the telomeric oligonucleotide (TTAGGG)(4). UVA irradiation with riboflavin induced 8-oxodG formation in the DNA fragments containing telomeric sequence, and Fpg protein treatment led to chain cleavages at the central guanine of 5'-GGG-3' in telomere sequence. The amount of 8-oxodG formation in DNA fragment containing telomere sequence [5'-CGC(TTAGGG)(7)CGC-3'] was approximately 5 times more than that in DNA fragment containing nontelomere sequence [5'-CGC(TGTGAG)(7)CGC-3']. Catalase did not inhibit this oxidative DNA damage, indicating no or little participation of H(2)O(2) in DNA damage. These results indicate that the photoexcited endogenous photosensitizer specifically oxidizes the central guanine of 5'-GGG-3' in telomere sequence to produce 8-oxodG probably through an electron-transfer reaction. It is concluded that the site-specific damage in telomere sequence induced by UVA irradiation may participate in the increase of telomere shortening rate.

  18. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  19. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  20. Epigenetic chromatin modifications in barley after mutagenic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braszewska-Zalewska, Agnieszka; Tylikowska, Marta; Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Szymanowska-Pulka, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    In addition to their normal developmental processes, plants have evolved complex genetic and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms to cope with various environmental stresses. It has been shown that both DNA methylation and histone modifications are involved in DNA damage response to various types of stresses. In this study, we focused on the involvement of two mutagenic agents, chemical (maleic acid hydrazide; MH) and physical (gamma rays), on the global epigenetic modifications of chromatin in barley. Our results indicate that both mutagens strongly influence the level of histone methylation and acetylation. Moreover, we found that gamma irradiation, in contrast to MH, has a more robust influence on the DNA methylation level. This is the first study that brings together mutagenic treatment along with its impact at the level of epigenetic modifications examined using the immunohistochemical method.

  1. Handbook of mutagenicity test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbey, B.J.; Legatov, M.

    1977-01-01

    27 articles are presented on particular techniques of mutagen testing. Background information is given in materials, experimental design, pitfalls and difficults, to enable the reader to perform these tests with minimal additional help. Also included is the use of data from population records, the handling and safety aspects of mutagens and carcinogens and some of the basic statistical concepts to be borne in mind when mutation experiments are designed. (C.F.)

  2. Time-dependent evolution of the excavation damaged zone in the argillaceous Tournemire site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejeb, A.; Cabrera, J.

    2006-01-01

    The experimental Tournemire site enables the assessment of the Excavation Damaged Zones (EDZ) around three structures excavated in argilites: the century-old tunnel, the ten year-old east and west galleries, and the three year-old main gallery. This paper discusses the main experimental results concerning the EDZ characterisation and their interpretation. EDZ fracture analyses from the galleries (cartography) and the radial boreholes (core analyses) allow for accurate structural characterisation of the EDZs. The tunnel has an EDZ with dense, homogeneous fracturing parallel to the wall, resembling onion skins. However, the new galleries do not have an EDZ similar to that of the tunnel. Unsaturated micro-cracks, mainly parallel to the bedding planes are observed on the non covered walls of each gallery. The extent of the EDZ does not seem to be affected by the age of the structure. It is approximately 20 % of the mean radius of the structure. Based on the modelling and experimental characterisation work completed, it is considered that the EDZ in this argillaceous Tournemire site is due to a deferred failure. At first time, when the wall of the structures are not covered the desaturation/re-saturation phenomena induced a tensile failure around the new galleries. During the time, these desaturation/re-saturation phenomena cause a gradual weakening of the material. The EDZ tunnel fractures are explained by this possible hydric damage and a decreasing mechanical strength with the time. These assumptions remain to be confirmed through coupled numerical modelling in unsaturated medium. (authors)

  3. System and method for laser-based, non-evaporative repair of damage sites in the surfaces of fused silica optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, John J.; Bolourchi, Masoud; Bude, Jeffrey D.; Guss, Gabriel M.; Jarboe, Jeffery A.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Nostrand, Michael C; Wegner, Paul J.

    2016-09-06

    A method for repairing a damage site on a surface of an optical material is disclosed. The method may involve focusing an Infrared (IR) laser beam having a predetermined wavelength, with a predetermined beam power, to a predetermined full width ("F/W") 1/e.sup.2 diameter spot on the damage site. The focused IR laser beam is maintained on the damage site for a predetermined exposure period corresponding to a predetermined acceptable level of downstream intensification. The focused IR laser beam heats the damage site to a predetermined peak temperature, which melts and reflows material at the damage site of the optical material to create a mitigated site.

  4. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D. [Institut Curie-Section de Recherche, UMR2027 CNRS, LCR-V28 du CEA, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-07-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using {sup 137}Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage

  5. The impact of locally multiply damaged sites (LMDS) induced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.; Boucher, D.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have shown that ionising radiations produce a specific type of clustered cell damage called locally multiply damaged sites or LMDS. These lesions consist of closely positioned single-strand breaks, (oxidative) base damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in between one helical turn of DNA. As specific markers of radiation-induced damage these lesions are likely to condition biological responses and are thus of great interest for radiation protection. Calculations indicate that there should be more LMDS induced by high than by low LET radiation, and they should be absent in un-irradiated cells. Processes like K-shell activation and local Auger electron emission can be expected to add complex DSB or LMDS, producing significant chromosomal damage. In the discussion of the specificity of ionising radiation in comparison to other genotoxic agents, many arguments have been put forward that these lesions should be particularly deleterious for living cells. Complex lesions of that type should represent big obstacles for DNA repair and give rise to high lethality. Moreover, cellular attempts to repair them could accentuate harm, leading to mutations, genetic instability and cancer. In vitro experiments with oligonucleotides containing an artificially introduced set of base damage and SSB in different combinations have shown that depending on the close positioning of the damage on DNA, repair enzymes, and even whole cell extracts, are unable to repair properly and may stimulate mis-repair. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in conjunction with enzymatic treatments has been used to detect LMDS in mammalian cells after high and low LET radiation. In order to further define the importance of LMDS for radiation induced cellular responses, we studied the induction of LMDS as a function of radiation dose and dose rate in mammalian cells (CHO and MRC5) using 137 Cs gamma-radiation. Using PFGE and specific glycosylases to convert oxidative damage into

  6. Inhibition of protein 4.1 R and NuMA interaction by mutagenization of their binding-sites abrogates nuclear localization of 4.1 R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattagajasingh, Subhendra N; Huang, Shu-Ching; Benz, Edward J

    2009-04-01

    Protein 4.1R(4.1R) is a multifunctional structural protein recently implicated in nuclear assembly and cell division. We earlier demonstrated that 4.1R forms a multiprotein complex with mitotic spindle and spindle pole organizing proteins, such as NuMA, dynein, and dynactin, by binding to residues 1788-1810 of NuMA through amino acids encoded by exons 20 and 21 in 24 kD domain. Employing random-and site-directed mutagenesis combined with glycine- and alanine-scanning, we have identified amino acids of 4.1 R and NuMA that sustain their interaction, and have analyzed the effect of mutating the binding sites on their intracellular colocalization. We found that V762, V765, and V767 of 4.1 R, and 11800, 11801,11803, Tl 804, and M1805 of NuMA are necessary for their interaction. GST-fusion peptides of the 4.1R24 kD domain bound to residues 1785-2115 of NuMA in in vitro binding assays, but the binding was inhibited by alanine substitutions of V762, V765, and V767 of 4.1 R, or residues 1800-1805 of NuMA. Additionally, expression of variants of 4.1 R or NuMA that inhibit their in vitro binding also abrogated nuclear localization of 4.1 Rand colocalization with NuMA. Our findings suggest a crucial role of 4.1 R/NuMA interaction in localization and function of 4.1 R in the nucleus.

  7. Human urinary mutagenicity after wood smoke exposure during traditional temazcal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Alexandra S; Lemieux, Christine L; Yousefi, Paul; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Lam, Nicholas L; Orellana, Carolina Romero; White, Paul A; Smith, Kirk R; Holland, Nina

    2014-09-01

    In Central America, the traditional temazcales or wood-fired steam baths, commonly used by many Native American populations, are often heated by wood fires with little ventilation, and this use results in high wood smoke exposure. Urinary mutagenicity has been previously employed as a non-invasive biomarker of human exposure to combustion emissions. This study examined the urinary mutagenicity in 19 indigenous Mayan families from the highlands of Guatemala who regularly use temazcales (N = 32), as well as control (unexposed) individuals from the same population (N = 9). Urine samples collected before and after temazcal exposure were enzymatically deconjugated and extracted using solid-phase extraction. The creatinine-adjusted mutagenic potency of urine extracts was assessed using the plate-incorporation version of the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with strain YG1041 in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. The post-exposure mutagenic potency of urine extracts were, on average, 1.7-fold higher than pre-exposure samples (P temazcal use (P temazcal were positively associated with urinary mutagenic potency (i.e. P temazcal use contributes to increased excretion of conjugated mutagenic metabolites. Moreover, urinary mutagenic potency is correlated with other metrics of exposure (i.e. exhaled CO, duration of exposure). Since urinary mutagenicity is a biomarker associated with genetic damage, temazcal use may therefore be expected to contribute to an increased risk of DNA damage and mutation, effects associated with the initiation of cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society.

  8. Mutation epidemiology and its prospects for detecting human germinal mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulvihill, J.J.; Miller, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    No germinal mutagen has been documented in man, with the possible exception of radiation. Nevertheless, results of studies in other species make it prudent and reasonable to believe that exposure of human germ cells to ionizing radiation and certain chemicals will cause mutations that will ultimately result in illness. The proliferation of test systems for mutagens in nonhuman species does not obviate but, in fact, presses the need for a demonstration of environmentally induced germinal mutation in human beings. Guidelines for protection from ionizing radiation in human beings have been largely extrapolated from observations in mice yet, the largest study of human populations exposed to a known mutagen of animals has, to date, shown that man may be more resistant than mice to genetic damage caused by the atomic bombs in Japan. The demonstration of what would seem an obvious biological conclusion - that what causes mutations in nonhuman species causes mutations in man - has been called ''one of the most difficult epidemiological issues ever faced by biomedical science''. Possible strategies have been considered repeatedly since the 1950s. At present, several large projects are under way to monitor certain manifestations of genetic damage, and formal protocols have been developed. Because the hazards of potential mutagens are world-wide and because it is difficult to gather sufficient number of exposed persons to detect significant changes in mutation rates, a WHO consultant group is developing protocols that, if accepted internationally, may provide answers

  9. Spectroscopic study of site selective DNA damage induced by intense soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of DNA damage induced by direct photon impact, we observed the near edge X-ray absorption fine structures (NEXAFS) of DNA nucleobases using monochromatic synchrotron soft X-rays around nitrogen and oxygen K-shell excitation regions. Each spectrum obtained has unique structure corresponding to π* excitation of oxygen or nitrogen 1s electron. These aspects open a way of nucleobase-selective photo-excitation in a DNA molecule using high resolution monochromatized soft X-rays. From the analysis of polarization-dependent intensities of the π* resonance peak, it is clarified that adenine, guanine an uracil form orientated surface structure. Furthermore from the direct measurement of positive ions desorbed from photon irradiated DNA components, it is revealed that the sugar moiety is a fragile site in a DNA molecule. (author)

  10. Spectroscopic study of site selective DNA damage induced by intense soft X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, K

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of DNA damage induced by direct photon impact, we observed the near edge X-ray absorption fine structures (NEXAFS) of DNA nucleobases using monochromatic synchrotron soft X-rays around nitrogen and oxygen K-shell excitation regions. Each spectrum obtained has unique structure corresponding to pi* excitation of oxygen or nitrogen 1s electron. These aspects open a way of nucleobase-selective photo-excitation in a DNA molecule using high resolution monochromatized soft X-rays. From the analysis of polarization-dependent intensities of the pi* resonance peak, it is clarified that adenine, guanine an uracil form orientated surface structure. Furthermore from the direct measurement of positive ions desorbed from photon irradiated DNA components, it is revealed that the sugar moiety is a fragile site in a DNA molecule. (author)

  11. Mutagenic azide metabolite is azidoalanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owais, W.M.; Rosichan, J.L.; Ronald, R.C.; Kleinhofs, A.; Nilan, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sodium axide produces high mutation rates in a number of species. Azide mutagenicity is mediated through a metabolite in barley and bacteria. Many studies showed that azide affects the L-cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Cell-free extracts of Salmonella typhimurium convert azide and O-acetylserine to the mutagenic metabolite. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase was identified as the enzyme responsible for the metabolite biosynthesis. To confirm the conclusion that the azide metabolite is formed through the β-substitution pathway of L-cysteine, we radioactively labeled the azide metabolite using 14 C-labeled precursors. Moreover, the mutagenic azide metabolite was purified and identified as azidoalanine based on mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  13. Heating milk: a study on mutagenicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, H.E.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Jongen, W.M.F.

    1990-01-01

    The mutagenicity of heated milk and model systems was investigated by the Ames mutagenicity assay. Heating varied from pasteurization to in-bottle sterilization to ultra-high-temperature (UHT) heat-treatment. No mutagenic response was found in heated milk or model systems. Early Maillard reaction

  14. Application of mammalian cytogenetics to mutagenicity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewen, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on induction of chromosome damage in germ cells by triethylene melamine (TEM) included determination of frequencies of chromosomal aberrations observed in human leukocytes after treating different stages of the cell cycle with TEM, frequencies of chromatid aberrations in metaphase I oocytes and the female pronuclear chromosomes following treatment of female mice with TEM, and frequencies of labeled diplotene-diakinesis figures and chromosome abberations at various intervals after treatment of primary spermatocytes with TEM and 3 H-thymidine. Studies on effects of low linear energy transfer radiation on mouse oocytes showed that the frequency of aberrations increased as a function of time and remained constant 8 to 9 days post-exposure. It was concluded that cytogenetic procedures were adequate to evaluate certain mutagenic end points

  15. A comprehensive survey of the mutagenic impact of common cancer cytotoxics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikriszt, Bernadett; Póti, Ádám; Pipek, Orsolya; Krzystanek, Marcin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Molnár, János; Ribli, Dezső; Szeltner, Zoltán; Tusnády, Gábor E; Csabai, István; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles; Szüts, Dávid

    2016-05-09

    Genomic mutations caused by cytotoxic agents used in cancer chemotherapy may cause secondary malignancies as well as contribute to the evolution of treatment-resistant tumour cells. The stable diploid genome of the chicken DT40 lymphoblast cell line, an established DNA repair model system, is well suited to accurately assay genomic mutations. We use whole genome sequencing of multiple DT40 clones to determine the mutagenic effect of eight common cytotoxics used for the treatment of millions of patients worldwide. We determine the spontaneous mutagenesis rate at 2.3 × 10(-10) per base per cell division and find that cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide induce extra base substitutions with distinct spectra. After four cycles of exposure, cisplatin induces 0.8 mutations per Mb, equivalent to the median mutational burden in common leukaemias. Cisplatin-induced mutations, including short insertions and deletions, are mainly located at sites of putative intrastrand crosslinks. We find two of the newly defined cisplatin-specific mutation types as causes of the reversion of BRCA2 mutations in emerging cisplatin-resistant tumours or cell clones. Gemcitabine, 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, doxorubicin and paclitaxel have no measurable mutagenic effect. The cisplatin-induced mutation spectrum shows good correlation with cancer mutation signatures attributed to smoking and other sources of guanine-directed base damage. This study provides support for the use of cell line mutagenesis assays to validate or predict the mutagenic effect of environmental and iatrogenic exposures. Our results suggest genetic reversion due to cisplatin-induced mutations as a distinct mechanism for developing resistance.

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  17. Transient absorption and luminescence spectra of K9 glass at sub-damage site by ultraviolet laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z., E-mail: namezhangzhen@126.com [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Huang, J.; Geng, F.; Zhou, X.Y. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Feng, S.Q. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Cheng, X.L., E-mail: chengxl@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Jiang, X.D. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wu, W.D. [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610000 (China); Zheng, W.G.; Tang, Y.J. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Transient absorption and luminescence spectra at sub-damage site of K9 glass by laser irradiation at 355 nm are presented. • As the energy density increases to 2.54 J/cm{sup 2}, the absorption intensity reaches to about 0.2. • The mechanism of two-photon ionization mainly plays a critical role at sub-damage site. • Intensity of Raman spectra is very high at low energy density and decreased with respect to high energy density. -- Abstract: Transient absorption and luminescence spectra at sub-damage site of K9 glass by laser irradiation at 355 nm are presented. The dependence of transient absorption on laser energy and number of pulses was investigated. As the energy density increases to 2.54 and 3.18 J/cm{sup 2}, the transient absorption intensity reaches to about 0.20 range from 400 to 480 nm. With the increase of number of pulses the process of residual absorption appears, which can be used to explain the fatigue effect of K9 glass. The defects in K9 glass were investigated by fluorescence and Raman spectra. The fluorescence band centered at about 410 nm is attributed to oxygen deficiency centers. The mechanism of two-photon ionization plays a critical role at sub-damage site. Compared to the Raman spectra of pristine site, intensity of Raman spectra is very high at a lower energy density, while it decreased at a higher energy density.

  18. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of gamma rays in mungbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, R.D.S.; Singh, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Dry seeds (moisture, 9 per cent) of mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) variety PS 16 were treated with ten doses of gamma rays ( 60 Co) ranging from 10 to 100 kR. Plant survival and pollen fertility in X 1 , and, chlorophyll mutation frequency and mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency were studied in X 2 generation. The plant survival and pollen fertility were reduced gradually with increasing dose. The chlorophyll mutation frequency increased in a linear fashion upto medium doses and was erratic at higher doses. The chlorophyll mutation spectrum included albina xantha, chlorina, virescence, viridis and maculata. Mutagenic effectiveness decreased with increase dose except at 60 kR. Mutagenic efficiency increased upto to 30 kR and thereafter it decreased. The decreasing trend of mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency at increased dose of gamma rays revealed that the biological damage (survival and pollen fertility) increased with increase dose at the faster rate than increase in rate of mutations induced. (author). 8 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Multiple-site damage crack growth behaviour in Fibre Metal Laminate structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.

    2017-01-01

    Fibre metal laminates (FMLs)were developed and refined for their superior crack growth resistance and critical damage size that complimented the damage tolerance design philosophy utilized in the aerospace sector. Robust damage tolerance tools have been developed for FMLs. However, they tend to

  20. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  1. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of EMS, sodium azide and gamma radiation in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshile, J.D.; Apparao, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of Ethyl Methane Sulphonate (EMS), Sodium Azide (SA) and gamma radiation on two cultivars of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L), Vijay and Vishwas were evaluated by the biological damages caused by them in M 1 generation and on the basis of frequency of chlorophyll mutations produced in the M 2 generation. All mutagenic treatments of EMS, SA and gamma radiation decreased germination, seedling height, plant survival and pollen fertility in both the cultivars. The extent of effect was dose dependent. LD 50 values of mutagen were found to be helpful for planning experimental mutagenesis in chickpea. Frequency of chlorophyll mutations in M 2 generation was less in Vijay as compared to Vishwas. Mutagenic effectiveness is inversely proportional to the increasing concentrations/doses of mutagens in both the cultivars, except for gamma radiation treatments in the cultivar Vishwas. All three mutagens (except EMS in the Vijay and gamma radiation in the cultivar Vishwas) exhibited gradual decrease in mutagenic efficiency, with an increase in their concentration/dose. (author)

  2. Assessing Mutagenicity of Methanolic Exteract of Borage Flower (Echium amuenum Using Ames Bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Moosavi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: pyrrolizidine alkaloids have been isolated from Echium amuenum. These alkaloids knowing as hepatotoxic, damage the liver. Mutagenicity of pure pyrrolizidine alkaloids has been identified. Thus, the mutagenic effect of the methanolic flower extract was tested using Amest test. Materials and Methods: The long maceration process (for 48 hrs is carried out in order to extract all constitutes. Thin layer chromatography (TLC method was used to evaluate aflatoxin B1 contamination and histidine amino acid presence. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined with the dilution method. Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 was used to determination of mutagenicity. The genotype was confirmed by using histidine requirement, R- factor presence, rfa and uvrB mutations tests. The mutagenicity assay was performed by four extract concentrations (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1mg/ml. Sodium azide (NaN3 and methanol were used as the mutagens (positive control and negative control, respectively in the absence or presence of liver-metabolizing enzymes. Results: The data indicate that Echium amuenum has not significant mutagenic activity against negative control. The presence of liver-metabolizing enzymes did not exhibit a significant change against the properties of extract. Conclusion: It seems that this extensive used plant in traditional medicine, doesn’t contain mutagenic or genotoxic effect in usual doses.

  3. Modeling the yield of double-strand breaks due to formation of multiply damaged sites in irradiated plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Pogozelski, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    Although double-strand breaks have long been recognized as an important type of DNa lesion, it is well established that this broad class of damage does not correlate well with indicators of the effectiveness of radiation as the cellular level. Assays of double-strand breaks do not distinguish the degree of complexity or clustering of singly damaged sites produced in a single energy deposition event, which is currently hypothesized to be key to understanding cellular end points. As a step toward this understanding, double-strand breaks that are formed proportionally to dose in plasmid DNA are analyzed from the mechanistic aspect to evaluate the yield that arises from multiply damaged sites as hypothesized by Ward (Prog. Nucleic Acid Res. Mol. Biol. 35, 95-125, 1988) and Goodhead (Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 65, 7-17, 1994) as opposed to the yield that arises form single hydroxyl radicals as hypothesized by Siddiqi and Bothe (Radiat. Res. 112, 449-463, 1987). For low-LET radiation such as γ rays, the importance of multiply damaged sites is shown to increase with the solution's hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity. For moderately high-LET radiation such as 100 keV/μm helium ions, a much different behavior is observed. In this case, a large fraction of double-strand breaks are formed as a result of multiply damaged sties over a broad range of scavenging conditions. Results also indicate that the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for common cellular end points correlates more closely with the RBE for multiply damaged sites than with the RBE for total double-strand breaks over a range of LET up to at least 100 keV/μm. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  5. Mutagenicity tests on irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston-Arthur, T.

    1979-01-01

    The mutagenicity of ''standard'' food pellets from three different suppliers was tested after radappertization and after sterilization with steam, respectively. The histidine-deficient mutants G-46 and TA-1530 of salmonella typhimurium were used as indicators in a hostmediated assay. The mutant TA-1530 showed a highly sighificant increase of the back-mutation frequency after feeding with pellets irradiated with 3 Mrad gamma radiation. There were, however, large quantitative differences between the products of different suppliers. (G.G.)

  6. Differences in mutagenic and recombinational DNA repair in enterobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgwick, S.G.; Goodwin, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of recombinational DNA repair and inducible mutagenic DNA repair has been examined in Escherichia coli and 11 related species of enterobacteria. Recombinational repair was found to be a common feature of the DNA repair repertoire of at least 6 genera of enterobacteria. This conclusion is based on observations of (i) damage-induced synthesis of RecA-like proteins, (ii) nucleotide hybridization between E. coli recA sequences and some chromosomal DNAs, and (iii) recA-negative complementation by plasmids showing SOS-inducible expression of truncated E. coli recA genes. The mechanism of DNA damage-induced gene expression is therefore sufficiently conserved to allow non-E. coli regulatory elements to govern expression of these cloned truncated E. coli recA genes. In contrast, the process of mutagenic repair, which uses umuC+ umuD+ gene products in E. coli, appeared less widespread. Little ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis to rifampicin resistance was detected outside the genus Escherichia, and even within the genus induced mutagenesis was detected in only 3 out of 6 species. Nucleotide hybridization showed that sequences like the E. coli umuCD+ gene are not found in these poorly mutable organisms. Evolutionary questions raised by the sporadic incidence of inducible mutagenic repair are discussed

  7. Decision-making system for registration and prioritisation of potentially polluted sites adaptable for management of war damage risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanczos, T.; Pedersen, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    We would like to present a decision-support system developed for identification and storing data concerning with potentially polluted sites and their prioritising. This system could also be adapted for reviewing and evaluation of the war damages. The operation of the system comprises of three procedures: data collection, data handling and the prioritisation of the sites. The relevant data could be collected from different sources, represented mainly by administrative institutions, by sending questionnaires to site owners/operators and by site visits. The collected data should be handled by appropriate database. For this purpose the Contaminated Land Module of the GeoEnviron database application was developed. This application is also designed for providing the preliminary risk assessment scores, which results are used for the site prioritisation. As an example implementation of this system, we shortly present our experiences from testing the system in Slovakia

  8. Mutagenic effect of tritated water on spores of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.; Munakata, N.

    1978-01-01

    The mutagenic effect of tritiated water was observed with spores of Bacillus subtilis polA strain suspended in 50 mCi/ml of tritiated water for various intervals. Dose rate given by tritium beta particles to spore core was estimated to be 400 rad/hr from some assumptions and E. coli data computed by Bockrath et al. and Sands et al. The initial mutation rate was 4.2 x 10 -9 mutants/rad, as compared with 2.4 x 10 -9 mutants/rad for 60 Co γ rays and 3.3 x 10 -9 mutants/rad for 30-kVp x rays. The mutagenic effect of tritiated water on spores is most likely due to beta particle ionizing radiation damage

  9. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isildar, M.; Bakale, G.

    1983-01-01

    The mutagenic and lethal effects of ionizing radiation on histidine-deficient auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium were studied to improve the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The auxotrophs were divided into two groups - one which is sensitive to base-pair substitutions and another sensitive to frameshifts. These groups were composed of parent-daughter pairs in which the chemical mutagenicity enhancing plasmid, pKM101, is absent in the parent strain and present in the daughter. Co-60 #betta#-radiation and 250 kV x-rays were used to irradiate the bacteria. Irradiation of the frameshift - sensitive strains which carry the pKm101 plasmid doubled the absolute number of induced revertants whereas irradiation of the base-pair substitution sensitive strain which also carries the pKm101 plasmid produced nearly no change in the number of induced revertants. A nearly negligible effect on the mutation rate was observed for all parent strains

  10. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; Souza, Tatiana da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Sewage treatment yields sludge, which is often used as a soil amendment in agriculture and crop production. Although the sludge contains elevated concentrations of macro and micronutrients, high levels of inorganic and organic compounds with genotoxic and mutagenic properties are present in sludge. Application of sludge in agriculture is a pathway for direct contact of crops to toxic chemicals. The objective of this study was to compile information related to the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge in different plant species. In addition, data are presented on toxicological effects in animals fed with plants grown in soils supplemented with sewage sludge. Despite the benefits of using sewage sludge as organic fertilizer, the data showcased in this review suggest that this residue can induce genetic damage in plants. This review alerts potential risks to health outcomes after the intake of food cultivated in sewage sludge-amended soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutagenicity in a Molecule: Identification of Core Structural Features of Mutagenicity Using a Scaffold Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Kuo-Hsiang; Su, Bo-Han; Tu, Yi-Shu; Lin, Olivia A.; Tseng, Yufeng J.

    2016-01-01

    With advances in the development and application of Ames mutagenicity in silico prediction tools, the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) has amended its M7 guideline to reflect the use of such prediction models for the detection of mutagenic activity in early drug safety evaluation processes. Since current Ames mutagenicity prediction tools only focus on functional group alerts or side chain modifications of an analog series, these tools are unable to identify mutagenicity derive...

  12. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Aditi

    improved resistance to elastolytic digestion. We further show that the same polyphenols interact with monomeric tropoelastin released by the vascular cells and dramatically increasing their self-assembly in-vitro. In addition, we demonstrate the elastogenic ability of these polyphenols in aiding the crosslinking of tropoelastin released by aneurysmal cells converting it into mature elastin. Finally, we developed a nanoparticle system functionalized with elastin antibody on the surface that, upon systemic delivery, can recognize and bind to sites of damaged elastin in the aorta. We are able to show that this nanoparticle system works in representative animal models for MAC and AAA. These nanoparticles demonstrated spatial and functional specificity for degraded elastin. In conclusion, our work is focused on understanding the role of elastin degradation in vascular calcification and aortic aneurysms. We tested approaches to halt elastin degradation and to regenerate elastin in arteries so that homeostasis can be achieved.

  13. Mutagenicity in a Molecule: Identification of Core Structural Features of Mutagenicity Using a Scaffold Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsiang Hsu

    Full Text Available With advances in the development and application of Ames mutagenicity in silico prediction tools, the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH has amended its M7 guideline to reflect the use of such prediction models for the detection of mutagenic activity in early drug safety evaluation processes. Since current Ames mutagenicity prediction tools only focus on functional group alerts or side chain modifications of an analog series, these tools are unable to identify mutagenicity derived from core structures or specific scaffolds of a compound. In this study, a large collection of 6512 compounds are used to perform scaffold tree analysis. By relating different scaffolds on constructed scaffold trees with Ames mutagenicity, four major and one minor novel mutagenic groups of scaffold are identified. The recognized mutagenic groups of scaffold can serve as a guide for medicinal chemists to prevent the development of potentially mutagenic therapeutic agents in early drug design or development phases, by modifying the core structures of mutagenic compounds to form non-mutagenic compounds. In addition, five series of substructures are provided as recommendations, for direct modification of potentially mutagenic scaffolds to decrease associated mutagenic activities.

  14. Mutagenicity in a Molecule: Identification of Core Structural Features of Mutagenicity Using a Scaffold Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuo-Hsiang; Su, Bo-Han; Tu, Yi-Shu; Lin, Olivia A.; Tseng, Yufeng J.

    2016-01-01

    With advances in the development and application of Ames mutagenicity in silico prediction tools, the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) has amended its M7 guideline to reflect the use of such prediction models for the detection of mutagenic activity in early drug safety evaluation processes. Since current Ames mutagenicity prediction tools only focus on functional group alerts or side chain modifications of an analog series, these tools are unable to identify mutagenicity derived from core structures or specific scaffolds of a compound. In this study, a large collection of 6512 compounds are used to perform scaffold tree analysis. By relating different scaffolds on constructed scaffold trees with Ames mutagenicity, four major and one minor novel mutagenic groups of scaffold are identified. The recognized mutagenic groups of scaffold can serve as a guide for medicinal chemists to prevent the development of potentially mutagenic therapeutic agents in early drug design or development phases, by modifying the core structures of mutagenic compounds to form non-mutagenic compounds. In addition, five series of substructures are provided as recommendations, for direct modification of potentially mutagenic scaffolds to decrease associated mutagenic activities. PMID:26863515

  15. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of water contaminated with tannery effluents, as evaluated by the micronucleus test and comet assay using the fish Oreochromis niloticus and chromosome aberrations in onion root-tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tamie Matsumoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity of metals is important because some metals are potential mutagens able to induce tumors in humans and experimental animals. Chromium can damage DNA in several ways, including DNA double strand breaks (DSBs which generate chromosomal aberrations, micronucleus formation, sister chromatid exchange, formation of DNA adducts and alterations in DNA replication and transcription. In our study, water samples from three sites in the Córrego dos Bagres stream in the Franca municipality of the Brazilian state of São Paulo were subjected to the comet assay and micronucleus test using erythrocytes from the fish Oreochromis niloticus. Nuclear abnormalities of the erythrocytes included blebbed, notched and lobed nuclei, probably due to genotoxic chromium compounds. The greatest comet assay damage occurred with water from a chromium-containing tannery effluent discharge site, supporting the hypothesis that chromium residues can be genotoxic. The mutagenicity of the water samples was assessed using the onion root-tip cell assay, the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities observed being: c-metaphases, stick chromosome, chromosome breaks and losses, bridged anaphases, multipolar anaphases, and micronucleated and binucleated cells. Onion root-tip cell mutagenicity was highest for water samples containing the highest levels of chromium.

  16. Archaeoseismology in Algeria: observed damages related to probable past earthquakes on archaeological remains on Roman sites (Tel Atlas of Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumane, Kahina; Ayadi, Abdelhakim

    2017-04-01

    The seismological catalogue for Algeria exhibits significant lack for the period before 1365. Some attempts led to retrieve ancient earthquakes evidenced by historical documents and achieves. Archaeoseismology allows a study of earthquakes that have affected archaeological sites, based on the analysis of damage observed on remains. We have focused on the Antiquity period that include Roman, Vandal and Byzantine period from B.C 146 to A.D. 533. This will contribute significantly to the understanding of seismic hazard of the Tell Atlas region known as an earthquake prone area. The Tell Atlas (Algeria) experienced during its history many disastrous earthquakes their impacts are graved on landscape and archaeological monuments. On Roman sites such, Lambaesis (Lambèse), Thamugadi (Timgad) Thibilis (Salaoua Announa) or Thevest (Tebessa), damage were observed on monuments and remains related to seismic events following strong shacking or other ground deformation (subsidence, landslide). Examples of observed damage and disorders on several Roman sites are presented as a contribution to Archaeoseismology in Algeria based on effects of earthquakes on ancient structures and monuments. Keywords : Archaeoseismology. Lambaesis. Drop columns. Aspecelium. Ancient earthquakes

  17. Refined boundary effect evaluation method for on-site damage inspection of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu

    This dissertation presents recent development and current capabilities of a dynamics-based and model-independent Boundary Effect Evaluation Method (BEEM) for damage inspection of structures. Damage introduces new boundaries to a structure, and influences of boundaries on steady-state high-frequency dynamic response are localized effects. The BEEM is a signal processing method that takes advantage of these localized effects to perform area-by-area extraction of damage-induced boundary effects from steady-state Operational Deflection Shapes (ODSs) to reveal damage locations. Steady-state ODSs of a structure can be measured using any full-field measurement tool, and the BEEM decomposes an ODS into central and boundary solutions using a sliding-window least-squares data-fitting technique. Numerical and experimental results show that boundary solutions are excellent damage indicators. Experimental results of many one- and two-dimensional structures validate the high sensitivity and accuracy of BEEM for detection and estimation of multiple small defects in structures.

  18. Earthquake damage orientation to infer seismic parameters in archaeological sites and historical earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, Fidel

    2018-01-01

    Studies to provide information concerning seismic parameters and seismic sources of historical and archaeological seismic events are used to better evaluate the seismic hazard of a region. This is of especial interest when no surface rupture is recorded or the seismogenic fault cannot be identified. The orientation pattern of the earthquake damage (ED) (e.g., fallen columns, dropped key stones) that affected architectonic elements of cities after earthquakes has been traditionally used in historical and archaeoseismological studies to infer seismic parameters. However, in the literature depending on the authors, the parameters that can be obtained are contradictory (it has been proposed: the epicenter location, the orientation of the P-waves, the orientation of the compressional strain and the fault kinematics) and authors even question these relations with the earthquake damage. The earthquakes of Lorca in 2011, Christchurch in 2011 and Emilia Romagna in 2012 present an opportunity to measure systematically a large number and wide variety of earthquake damage in historical buildings (the same structures that are used in historical and archaeological studies). The damage pattern orientation has been compared with modern instrumental data, which is not possible in historical and archaeoseismological studies. From measurements and quantification of the orientation patterns in the studied earthquakes, it is observed that there is a systematic pattern of the earthquake damage orientation (EDO) in the proximity of the seismic source (fault trace) (earthquakes is normal to the fault trend (±15°). This orientation can be generated by a pulse of motion that in the near fault region has a distinguishable acceleration normal to the fault due to the polarization of the S-waves. Therefore, the earthquake damage orientation could be used to estimate the seismogenic fault trend of historical earthquakes studies where no instrumental data are available.

  19. Mycobacterial nonhomologous end joining mediates mutagenic repair of chromosomal double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Nicolas C; Gao, Feng; Bongiorno, Paola; Ehrt, Sabine; Schnappinger, Dirk; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described DNA repair pathway best characterized in mycobacteria. Bacterial NHEJ proteins LigD and Ku have been analyzed biochemically, and their roles in linear plasmid repair in vivo have been verified genetically; yet the contributions of NHEJ to repair of chromosomal DNA damage are unknown. Here we use an extensive set of NHEJ- and homologous recombination (HR)-deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis strains to probe the importance of HR and NHEJ in repairing diverse types of chromosomal DNA damage. An M. smegmatis Delta recA Delta ku double mutant has no apparent growth defect in vitro. Loss of the NHEJ components Ku and LigD had no effect on sensitivity to UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, or quinolone antibiotics. NHEJ deficiency had no effect on sensitivity to ionizing radiation in logarithmic- or early-stationary-phase cells but was required for ionizing radiation resistance in late stationary phase in 7H9 but not LB medium. In addition, NHEJ components were required for repair of I-SceI mediated chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs), and in the absence of HR, the NHEJ pathway rapidly mutates the chromosomal break site. The molecular outcomes of NHEJ-mediated chromosomal DSB repair involve predominantly single-nucleotide insertions at the break site, similar to previous findings using plasmid substrates. These findings demonstrate that prokaryotic NHEJ is specifically required for DSB repair in late stationary phase and can mediate mutagenic repair of homing endonuclease-generated chromosomal DSBs.

  20. LBA-ECO CD-04 Logging Damage, km 83 Tower Site, Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the results of a survey of logging damage in a 18 ha plot (300 m N-S, 600 m E-W) east (upwind) of the eddy flux tower at km 83, Tapajos...

  1. New method for estimating clustering of DNA lesions induced by physical/chemical mutagens using fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Ken; Shikazono, Naoya; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We have developed a new method for estimating the localization of DNA damage such as apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (APs) on DNA using fluorescence anisotropy. This method is aimed at characterizing clustered DNA damage produced by DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. A fluorescent probe with an aminooxy group (AlexaFluor488) was used to label APs. We prepared a pUC19 plasmid with APs by heating under acidic conditions as a model for damaged DNA, and subsequently labeled the APs. We found that the observed fluorescence anisotropy (r obs ) decreases as averaged AP density (λ AP : number of APs per base pair) increases due to homo-FRET, and that the APs were randomly distributed. We applied this method to three DNA-damaging agents, 60 Co γ-rays, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), and neocarzinostatin (NCS). We found that r obs -λ AP relationships differed significantly between MMS and NCS. At low AP density (λ AP  < 0.001), the APs induced by MMS seemed to not be closely distributed, whereas those induced by NCS were remarkably clustered. In contrast, the AP clustering induced by 60 Co γ-rays was similar to, but potentially more likely to occur than, random distribution. This simple method can be used to estimate mutagenicity of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.

    1982-01-01

    Using bacteria as a model, the molecular basis of the mutagenic and lethal effects of uv radiation is being studied. Attention is focused on the mechanism of action of uv-1 specific endonucleases in the repair of damaged DNA. The isolation and identification of similar enzymes in human cells are being conducted concurrently

  3. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    concentration of Mg 2. Interestingly, mammalian cell extracts deficient in Fanconi anemia proteins had a 3–9-fold reduction in DNA end-joining...Mavinakere, M., and Campbell, C. Deficient DNA end joining activity in extracts from fanconi anemia fibroblasts. J. Biol. Chem., 276: 9543–9549...suppressive properties of BRCA1 de - rive, at least in part, from its response to tissue-specific DNA damage. In this regard, certain oxidative

  4. MSD in fuselage lap joints: Requirements for inspection intervals for typical fuselage lap joint panels with Multiple Site Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, G. P.

    1992-07-01

    Inspection of failed aircraft structures and fractography on fatigue specimens showed that after a high number of flights, cracks can appear simultaneously in riveted lap joints. When these crack tips approach each other, a mutual interaction causes an unexpected fast crack growth and new coalescence of cracks. The term Multiple Site Damage (MSD) is used when the mutual interaction of two or more damages is noticeable. A model to predict the fatigue life of a riveted lap joint and the minimum necessary inspection interval for safe aircraft operation is presented. The program was developed to simulate the fatigue process and aircraft inspection. Input for this analysis are scatter data for initiation, the stress distribution between frames and the geometry of the structure. Methods that can be used to avoid accidents due to MSD are reviewed. A test program to support the analysis is described.

  5. Multi-method Near-surface Geophysical Surveys for Site Response and Earthquake Damage Assessments at School Sites in Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, R.; Walsh, T. J.; Norman, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    We, Washington Geological Survey (WGS), have been performing multi-method near surface geophysical surveys to help assess potential earthquake damage at public schools in Washington. We have been conducting active and passive seismic surveys, and estimating Shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles, then determining the NEHRP soil classifications based on Vs30m values at school sites in Washington. The survey methods we have used: 1D and 2D MASW and MAM, P- and S-wave refraction, horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (H/V), and 2ST-SPAC to measure Vs and Vp at shallow (0-70m) and greater depths at the sites. We have also run Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys at the sites to check possible horizontal subsurface variations along and between the seismic survey lines and the actual locations of the school buildings. The seismic survey results were then used to calculate Vs30m for determining the NEHRP soil classifications at school sites, thus soil amplification effects on the ground motions. Resulting shear-wave velocity profiles generated from these studies can also be used for site response and liquefaction potential studies, as well as for improvement efforts of the national Vs30m database, essential information for ShakeMap and ground motion modeling efforts in Washington and Pacific Northwest. To estimate casualties, nonstructural, and structural losses caused by the potential earthquakes in the region, we used these seismic site characterization results associated with structural engineering evaluations based on ASCE41 or FEMA 154 (Rapid Visual Screening) as inputs in FEMA Hazus-Advanced Engineering Building Module (AEBM) analysis. Compelling example surveys will be presented for the school sites in western and eastern Washington.

  6. Studies on mutagen-sensitive strains of Drosophila melanogaster. IX. Modification of genetic damage induced by X-irradiation of spermatozoa in N2, air or O2 by 4 autosomal repair-deficient mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, W.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of defects in DNA repair on the recovery of X-ray-induced genetic damage in spermatozoa of Drosophila melanogaster was studied. Basc males were irradiated in N 2 , air or O 2 and mated to females of 4 repair-deficient mutant types. The responses in the different crosses with repair-deficient females were compared to those with repair-proficient mei + females (maternal effects). The main findings are the following: (1) with excision repair-deficient females the frequencies of spontaneous recessive lethals tend to be higher than with mei + females; (2) with excision repair-deficient females the frequencies of recessive lethals induced in N 2 and air and often in O 2 are higher than with mei + females; (3) with post-replication repair-deficient mutants a maternal effect is found for X-ray-induced translocations. The data are discussed and explained. (Auth.)

  7. BRCA1-associated exclusion of 53BP1 from DNA damage sites underlies temporal control of DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. Ross; Sossick, Alex J.; Boulton, Simon J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Following irradiation, numerous DNA-damage-responsive proteins rapidly redistribute into microscopically visible subnuclear aggregates, termed ionising-radiation-induced foci (IRIF). How the enrichment of proteins on damaged chromatin actually relates to DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we use super-resolution microscopy to examine the spatial distribution of BRCA1 and 53BP1 proteins within single IRIF at subdiffraction-limit resolution, yielding an unprecedented increase in detail that was not previously apparent by conventional microscopy. Consistent with a role for 53BP1 in promoting DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining, 53BP1 enrichment in IRIF is most prominent in the G0/G1 cell cycle phases, where it is enriched in dense globular structures. By contrast, as cells transition through S phase, the recruitment of BRCA1 into the core of IRIF is associated with an exclusion of 53BP1 to the focal periphery, leading to an overall reduction of 53BP1 occupancy at DNA damage sites. Our data suggest that the BRCA1-associated IRIF core corresponds to chromatin regions associated with repair by homologous recombination, and the enrichment of BRCA1 in IRIF represents a temporal switch in the DNA repair program. We propose that BRCA1 antagonises 53BP1-dependent DNA repair in S phase by inhibiting its interaction with chromatin proximal to damage sites. Furthermore, the genomic instability exhibited by BRCA1-deficient cells might result from a failure to efficiently exclude 53BP1 from such regions during S phase. PMID:22553214

  8. Transient absorption and luminescence spectra of K9 glass at sub-damage site by ultraviolet laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Huang, J.; Geng, F.; Zhou, X. Y.; Feng, S. Q.; Cheng, X. L.; Jiang, X. D.; Wu, W. D.; Zheng, W. G.; Tang, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    Transient absorption and luminescence spectra at sub-damage site of K9 glass by laser irradiation at 355 nm are presented. The dependence of transient absorption on laser energy and number of pulses was investigated. As the energy density increases to 2.54 and 3.18 J/cm2, the transient absorption intensity reaches to about 0.20 range from 400 to 480 nm. With the increase of number of pulses the process of residual absorption appears, which can be used to explain the fatigue effect of K9 glass. The defects in K9 glass were investigated by fluorescence and Raman spectra. The fluorescence band centered at about 410 nm is attributed to oxygen deficiency centers. The mechanism of two-photon ionization plays a critical role at sub-damage site. Compared to the Raman spectra of pristine site, intensity of Raman spectra is very high at a lower energy density, while it decreased at a higher energy density.

  9. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajarshi; Mukherjee, Anita

    2009-03-01

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals-sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significant (Ppercentage (%), tail length (mum), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  10. Mutagenic Potential of Physostigmine Salicylate in the Ames Salmonella/ Mammalian Microsome Mutagenicity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Molecular Weight: 413.47 Analytical Data: The test compound was analyzed by the sponsors and the identity confirmed by UV and IR spectroscopy , high pressure...AD-A203 802 Institute Report No. 320 Mutagenic Potential of Physostigmine Salicylate in the Ames Salmonella/Mammalian Microsome Mutagenicity Test...T%&)MS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FiELDI GROUP ISUB-GROUP Physostigmine Salicylate , Mutagenicity, Genetic

  11. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-05-11

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequences for the restriction endonuclease Sapl, an enzyme that cleaves outside of its recognition sequence. The intermediate molecule containing the mutagenic cassette is then digested with Sapl, thereby removing most of the mutagenic cassette, leaving only a three base cohesive overhang that is ligated to generate the final insertion or substitution mutation. A general method for constructing blunt-end target molecules suitable for this approach is also described. Because the mutagenic cassette is excised during this procedure and alters the target only by introducing the desired mutation, the same cassette can be used to introduce a particular codon at all target sites. Each cassette can deposit two different codons, depending on the orientation in which it is inserted into the target molecule. Therefore, a series of eleven cassettes is sufficient to insert all possible amino acids at any constructed target site. Thus codon cassettes are 'off-the-shelf' reagents, and this methodology should be a particularly useful and inexpensive approach for subjecting multiple different positions in a protein sequence to saturation mutagenesis.

  12. An evaluation of the mode of action framework for mutagenic carcinogens case study: Cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Nancy; Keshava, Nagalakshmi; Cimino, Michael; Chu, Margaret; Dearfield, Kerry; Keshava, Channa; Kligerman, Andrew; Owen, Russell; Protzel, Alberto; Putzrath, Resha; Schoeny, Rita

    2008-03-01

    In response to the 2005 revised US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a Risk Assessment Forum's Technical Panel has devised a strategy in which genetic toxicology data combined with other information are assessed to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode of action (MOA). This information is necessary for EPA to decide whether age-dependent adjustment factors (ADAFs) should be applied to the cancer risk assessment. A decision tree has been developed as a part of this approach and outlines the critical steps for analyzing a compound for carcinogenicity through a mutagenic MOA (e.g., data analysis, determination of mutagenicity in animals and in humans). Agents, showing mutagenicity in animals and humans, proceed through the Agency's framework analysis for MOAs. Cyclophosphamide (CP), an antineoplastic agent, which is carcinogenic in animals and humans and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, was selected as a case study to illustrate how the framework analysis would be applied to prove that a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic MOA. Consistent positive results have been seen for mutagenic activity in numerous in vitro assays, in animals (mice, rats, and hamsters) and in humans. Accordingly, CP was processed through the framework analysis and key steps leading to tumor formation were identified as follows: metabolism of the parent compound to alkylating metabolites, DNA damage followed by induction of multiple adverse genetic events, cell proliferation, and bladder tumors. Genetic changes in rats (sister chromatid exchanges at 0.62 mg/kg) can commence within 30 min and in cancer patients, chromosome aberrations at 35 mg/kg are seen by 1 hr, well within the timeframe and tumorigenic dose range for early events. Supporting evidence is also found for cell proliferation, indicating that mutagenicity, associated with cytotoxicity, leads to a proliferative response, which occurs early (48 hr) in the process of tumor induction

  13. Analysis of potential urban unstable areas and landslide-induced damages on Volterra historical site through a remote sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Soldato, Matteo; Bianchini, Silvia; Nolesini, Teresa; Frodella, William; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Multisystem remote sensing techniques were exploited to provide a comprehensive overview of Volterra (Italy) site stability with regards to its landscape, urban fabric and cultural heritage. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques allow precise measurements of Earth surface displacement, as well as the detection of building deformations on large urban areas. In the field of cultural heritage conservation Infrared thermography (IRT) provides surface temperature mapping and therefore detects various potential criticalities, such as moisture, seepage areas, cracks and structural anomalies. Between winter 2014 and spring 2015 the historical center and south-western sectors of Volterra (Tuscany region, central Italy) were affected by instability phenomena. The spatial distribution, typology and effect on the urban fabrics of the landslide phenomena were investigated by analyzing the geological and geomorphological settings, traditional geotechnical monitoring and advanced remote sensing data such as Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI). The ground deformation rates and the maximum settlement values derived from SAR acquisitions of historical ENVISAT and recent COSMO-SkyMed sensors, in 2003-2009 and 2010-2015 respectively, were compared with background geological data, constructive features, in situ evidences and detailed field inspections in order to classify landslide-damaged buildings. In this way, the detected movements and their potential correspondences with recognized damages were investigated in order to perform an assessment of the built-up areas deformations and damages on Volterra. The IRT technique was applied in order to survey the surface temperature of the historical Volterra wall-enclosure, and allowed highlighting thermal anomalies on this cultural heritage element of the site. The obtained results permitted to better correlate the landslide effects of the recognized deformations in the urban fabric, in order to provide useful

  14. Mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of Heterotheca inuloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Nancy J; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Sánchez-Navarrete, Jaime; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Hernández-Ojeda, Sandra; Espinosa-Aguirre, Javier J

    2014-10-23

    The antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of Heterotheca inuloides have been reported before, nevertheless its use as a possible chemopreventive agent has not been documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of H. inuloides extracts using the Ames test. Both, the methanolic and acetonic extracts, were mutagenic in the TA98 but not in TA100 or TA102 strains. On the other hand, the methanolic extract reduced the mutagenicity of norfloxacin, benzo[a]pyrene and 2-aminoanthracene. Quercetin, one of the main components in the methanolic extract, also presented a mutagenic/antimutagenic dual effect and is an inhibitor of Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A. The antigenotoxic properties of H. inuloides could be due to the antioxidant properties previously reported and to its CYP inhibitory effect mediated by quercetin. Further studies with in vivo systems will afford information about H. inuloides beneficial and detrimental properties.

  15. Mutagenicity and water chlorination: prospect and perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, R. B.; Jolley, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: irreversibility of mutations; chromosome mutations; gene mutations; indirect health effects on humans of mutations and selection processes; genetic toxicology; calculation of health costs of mutagen exposure; and relationships between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. (HLW)

  16. Mutagenicity of cosmetic products containing Kathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, T H; Tee, P G; Afshar, M; Connor, K M

    1996-01-01

    A variety of shampoos, conditioners, skin-care lotions, and other cosmetic products contain the biocide Kathon CG, which is a mixture of two heterocyclic isothiazolinones: methylisothiazolinone and methylchloroisothiazolinone. This mixture and the related biocide, Kathon 886, have been shown to be potent sensitizers and bacterial mutagens. Five cosmetic products that list the components of Kathon on their labels and two that do not were screened for mutagenicity with Salmonella typhimurium TA100 without S-9. Five of these products and Kathon 886 were further evaluated in TA100 without and with S-9. Kathon 886, a cosmetic product that contained Kathon, and thin layer chromatography-separated components of Kathon 886 were identified by GC/MS analysis. Three of the five products that listed Kathon were direct acting mutagens with TA100. The remaining two products were considerably more toxic than the other products and could not be evaluated for mutagenicity. The addition of S-9 reduced toxicity but did not eliminate mutagenicity. The mutagenic evaluation of Kathon 886 resulted in a dose response similar to that seen with some cosmetic products but at a 1,000-fold lower concentration, and activity was also reduced by the addition of S-9 mix. S-9 reduced activity both with and without cofactors present. Thin layer chromatography separation of the components and subsequent identification by GC/MS indicated that methylisothiazolinone was nonmutagenic while methylchloroisothiazolinone was mutagenic. Additionally, a dichlorinated compound was identified which was also mutagenic. In light of these findings and the reported skin sensitization by Kathon CG in various cosmetics, we recommend that additional testing be done to assure the safety of products containing Kathon CG.

  17. Mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation and chemical and environmental agents in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.

    1988-01-01

    The studies covered the following problems: an influence of some environmental agents on the mutagenic effectiveness of ionizing radiation, interaction between ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the induction of somatic mutations and also an application of Tradescantia model system for biological monitoring. The studies showed that the pretreatment of Tradescantia plants with sodium fluoride or the modification of the soil composition with dolomite admixture, visibly influences plants radiosensitivity. The analysis of the changes in the dose-response curves suggested that the employed agents were influencing in different ways the repair processes of the DNA. The studies on the interaction between agents proved that the synergistic effect occurs in case of combined action of ionizing radiation with such chemical mutagens as ethyl methansulfonate or 1,2 dibromomethane. It was also discovered that in the range of low doses the effect was proportional to radiation dose and total exposition to chemical mutagen. The field application of Tradescantia method defined the mutagenicity of air pollution in the Cracow area. The highest frequencies of mutations were detected after the Chernobyl accident and after the damage of the filters in the Pharmaceutical Plant. The applied method was evaluated in respect of its usefulness for biological monitoring of environmental pollution. 163 refs. (author)

  18. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic activities were determined for each extract.Results: This is the first study conducted in Colombia that reports the mutagenic and genotoxic activities associated with particulate matter (MP2,5 taken from vehicular emissions in Pamplona, Norte de Santander. The mutagenic assay determined by the Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 showed a high direct mutagenic activity in the analyzed extracts. On the other hand, the genotoxic activity, determined by means of the comet assay, was high too.Conclusion: Particulate material (MP2,5 present in air samples in Pamplona (northeastern Colombia is a risk factor for the exposed population because it can directly induce mutations and also cause genotoxic damage.

  19. Cloning, localization and focus formation at DNA damage sites of canine XLF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2017-01-20

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair processes, especially nonhomologous DNA-end joining (NHEJ), is critical for developing next-generation radiotherapies and chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. The localization, protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications of core NHEJ factors, such as human Ku70 and Ku80, might play critical roles in controlling NHEJ activity. XRCC4-like factor (XLF) is a core NHEJ factor and plays a key role in the Ku-dependent NHEJ repair process in human cells. Recently, companion animals, such as canines, have been proposed to be a good model for many aspects of cancer research, including the development of chemotherapeutics. However, the localization and regulation of core NHEJ factors in canine cells have not been elucidated. Here, we show that the localization of canine XLF changes dynamically during the cell cycle. EYFP-canine XLF localizes in the nuclei of interphase cells and accumulates immediately at microirradiated DSB sites. The structure of a putative human XLF nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a putative 14-3-3 binding motif are evolutionarily conserved in canine, chimpanzee and mouse XLF. However, the putative β-TRCP-recognizable degron of human XLF is not conserved in canine and mouse. Additionally, some vital human XLF phosphorylation sites, including the ATM major phosphorylation site (S251), are not conserved in canine XLF. Our findings might be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms of NHEJ in canine cells and for the development of new radiosensitizers that target XLF.

  20. Radiation exposure and health damage of residents at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolebay, Rakhypbekov; Noso, Yoshihiro; Takechi, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Although the nuclear test site of Semipalatinsk (former Soviet Union and presently the Republic of Kazakhstan) stopped nuclear tests 25 years ago, there are presumably more than 200,000 victims near the site, including persons with a low dose and a high dose. Semey Medical University and Shimane University, together with the Kazakh Scientific Institute for Radiation Medicine and Ecology, have been conducting the measurement of radiation concentration of soil and the thyroid screening of residents. The following were surveyed: (1) chromosomal abnormality for 55 female residents (average 45 years in age) in heavily polluted areas and 25 female residents (average 42 years in age) in non-polluted areas, (2) mental abnormality of residents in polluted areas and non-polluted areas of Semey City, and (3) changes in the frequency of surgery cases for cancer between 1989 and 2014 at Semey Medical University Cancer Center. As for chromosomal abnormality, 3-5 times many mutation cases were observed in heavily polluted areas than in non-polluted areas. The nodules of thyroid gland were four times more frequent in heavily polluted areas. The frequency of a whole variety of cancers was nearly twice in polluted areas compared with in non-polluted areas, most of which were digestive system cancer, lung cancer, and breast cancer in the order. The frequency of mental abnormality has also increased nearly twice as compared to non-polluted areas, and it included neurological disorder, adjustment disorder, neuralgia, moderate depression, and learning disability. These results suggest that some physical effects can be caused by exposure. In the future, this study will investigate the effects of radiation exposure at the nuclear test site. (A.O.)

  1. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  2. Concept and methodology for evaluating core damage frequency considering failure correlation at multi units and sites and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, K.; Teragaki, T.; Nomura, S. [Former Incorporated Administrative Agency, Japan Nuclear Safety Organization (Japan); Abe, H., E-mail: Hiroshi_abe@nsr.go.jp [Former Incorporated Administrative Agency, Japan Nuclear Safety Organization (Japan); Shigemori, M.; Shimomoto, M. [Mizuho Information & Research Institute, 2-3, Kanda-Nishikicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We develop a method to evaluate CDF considering failure correlation at multi units. • We develop a procedure to evaluate correlation coefficient between multi components. • We evaluate CDF at two different BWR units using correlation coefficients. • We confirm the validity of method and correlation coefficient through the evaluation. - Abstract: The Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on March 11, 2011 and caused a large tsunami. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant with six units were overwhelmed by the tsunami and core damage occurred. Authors proposed the concept and method for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) considering failure correlation at the multi units and sites. Based on the above method, one of authors developed the procedure for evaluating the failure correlation coefficient and response correlation coefficient between the multi components under the strong seismic motion. These method and failure correlation coefficients were applied to two different BWR units and their CDF was evaluated by seismic probabilistic risk assessment technology. Through this quantitative evaluation, the validity of the method and failure correlation coefficient was confirmed.

  3. Detection of mutagenic activity in automobile exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Y; Kachi, K; Sato, K; Tahara, I; Takeyoshi, H; Tokiwa, H

    1980-03-01

    Using the Ames Salmonella-microsome system, we detected mutagenic activity in the exhaust from two kinds of 4-cycle gasoline engines of unregulated and regulated cars, and from diesel engines, as well as in the particulates from air collected in tunnels. The mutagenicity of particulates from a car equipped with a catalyst (regulated car), as compared with that from an unregulated car, was reduced very much (down to 500 from 4500 revertants/plate/m3 in tester strain TA98). However, the mutagenicity of the ether-soluble acid and neutral fractions from the condensed water of emissions from a regulated car was still high (down to 2880 from 10 900 revertants/plate/m3 in tester strain TA100). The mutagenic activity of emission exhaust from old diesel car engines was very high; the particulates showed 9140 and 19 600 revertants/plate/m3 from strain TA98 incubated with an activating rat-liver S9 fraction. A small diesel engine of the type used for the generation of electric power or in farm machinery also produced exhaust with highly mutagenic particulates. The mutagenic activity of a methanol extract of particulate air pollutants collected in a highway tunnel showed 39 revertants/plate/m3 toward strain TA98 and 87 toward strain TA100. The ether-soluble neutral fraction yielded 86 revertants/plate/m3 from strain TA98 and 100 from strain TA100. This fraction also contained carcinogenic compounds, including benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[ghi]perylene and chrysene. Very high mutagenic activity was detected, especially in the particulate air pollutants collected at night, in another tunnel on a superhighway: 60-88 revertants/plate/m3 from strain TA100 for the sample collected by day, but 121-238, by night. Night traffic includes many more diesel-powered vehicles compared with gasoline-powered automobiles.

  4. Cloning, localization and focus formation at DNA damage sites of canine XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2017-01-10

    Various chemotherapies and radiation therapies are useful for killing cancer cells mainly by inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair processes is crucial for developing next-generation radiotherapies and chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. XRCC4 plays a critical role in Ku-dependent nonhomologous DNA-end joining (NHEJ) in human cells, and is one of the core NHEJ factors. The localization of core NHEJ factors, such as human Ku70 and Ku80, might play a crucial role in regulating NHEJ activity. Recently, companion animals, such as canines, have been proposed to be a good model in many aspects of cancer research. However, the localization and regulation mechanisms of core NHEJ factors in canine cells have not been elucidated. Here, we show that the expression and subcellular localization of canine XRCC4 changes dynamically during the cell cycle. Furthermore, EYFP-canine XRCC4 accumulates quickly at laser-microirradiated DSB sites. The structure of a putative human XRCC4 nuclear localization signal (NLS) is highly conserved in canine, chimpanzee and mouse XRCC4. However, the amino acid residue corresponding to the human XRCC4 K210, thought to be important for nuclear localization, is not conserved in canine XRCC4. Our findings might be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms of Ku-dependent NHEJ in canine cells and the development of new radiosensitizers that target XRCC4.

  5. Spore membrane(s) as the site of damage within heated Clostridium perfringens spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, R S; Adams, D M

    1976-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens spores were injured by ultrahigh-temperature treatment at 105 C for 5 min. Injury was manifested as an increased sensitivity to polymyxin and neomycin. Since many of the survivors could not germinate normally the ultrahigh-temperature-treated spores were sensitized to and germinated by lysozyme. Polymyxin reportedly acts upon the cell membrane. Neomycin may inhibit protein synthesis and has surface-active properties. Injured spores were increasingly sensitive to known surface-active agents, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate, and Roccal, a quaternary ammonium compound. Injured spores sensitive to polymyxin and neomycin also were osmotically fragile and died during outgrowth in a liquid medium unless the medium was supplemented with 20% sucrose, 10% dextran, or 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone. The results suggested that a spore structure destined to become cell membrane or cell wall was the site of injury. Repair of injury during outgrowth in the presence of protein, deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid and cell wall synthesis inhibitors was consistent with this hypothesis.

  6. Mutagenicity assessment of two herbal medicines, Urtan and Carmint in human leukocytes by single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, M.; Hatami, A.; Kalantari, H.; Kalantar, E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of herbal medicine is an old and still widespread particle, which makes studies their genotoxicity essential. Urtan and Carmint are examples of herbal medicines used in Iran which used for the treatment of hyperplasia, diuretic, urinary diffusion and antispasmodic action, carminative gastrointestinal disfunction respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mutagenicity of these herbal medicines in human leukocytes by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis (SCGE). Both the herbal medicines were used at four concentrations (0.046, 0.092, 0.138 and 0.184/ 100 ml). The results were compared against positive (Cr VI) and negative (no mutagen) control groups. Fluorescence microscope was used to observe the DNA damage in randomly selected cells, which were stained with ethidium bromide. Microscopic observation of the affected cells due to Urtan and Carmint was encouraging as compared to previous studies using SCGE. Both Urtan and Carmint exhibited considerable DNA damage to the blood cells. For example, Urtan at o.184 g/100ml concentration had almost 23% mutagenic effect and as the concentration increased the mutagenic effect also increased. Similarly Carmint exhibited considerable DNA damage on blood cells. Therefore, both the herbal medicines may have some mutagenic effect. (author)

  7. Effects of benzo[a]pyrene on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated and reference site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dawoon; Cho, Youngeun; Collins, Leonard B.; Swenberg, James A.; Di Giulio, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a known genotoxicant that affects both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (mtDNA, nDNA). Here, we examined mtDNA and nDNA damage in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a highly contaminated Superfund site (Elizabeth River, VA, USA) and from a reference site (King's Creek, VA, USA) that were dosed with 10 mg/kg BaP. Using the long amplicon quantitative PCR technique, we observed similar increases in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in King's Creek fish treated with BaP. Killifish from the Elizabeth River showed high levels of basal nDNA and mtDNA damage compared to fish from the reference site, but the level of damage induced due to BaP treatment was much lower in Elizabeth River killifish compared to King's Creek fish. Laboratory-reared offspring from both populations showed increased BaP-induced damage in mtDNA, relative to nDNA. Similar to the adult experiment, the Elizabeth River larvae had higher levels of basal DNA damage than those from the reference site, but were less impacted by BaP exposure. Measurements of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-deoxyguanine by LC-MS/MS) showed no differences among treatment groups, suggesting that the majority of DNA damage is from covalent binding of BaP metabolites to DNA. This study shows for the first time that mitochondria can be an important target of BaP toxicity in fish, indicating that BaP exposures could have important energetic consequences. Results also suggest that multi-generational exposures in the wild may lead to adaptations that dampen DNA damage arising from BaP exposure.

  8. Effects of benzo[a]pyrene on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a creosote-contaminated and reference site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dawoon; Cho, Youngeun; Collins, Leonard B; Swenberg, James A; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2009-10-19

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a known genotoxicant that affects both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (mtDNA, nDNA). Here, we examined mtDNA and nDNA damage in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from a highly contaminated Superfund site (Elizabeth River, VA, USA) and from a reference site (King's Creek, VA, USA) that were dosed with 10 mg/kg BaP. Using the long amplicon quantitative PCR technique, we observed similar increases in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage in King's Creek fish treated with BaP. Killifish from the Elizabeth River showed high levels of basal nDNA and mtDNA damage compared to fish from the reference site, but the level of damage induced due to BaP treatment was much lower in Elizabeth River killifish compared to King's Creek fish. Laboratory-reared offspring from both populations showed increased BaP-induced damage in mtDNA, relative to nDNA. Similar to the adult experiment, the Elizabeth River larvae had higher levels of basal DNA damage than those from the reference site, but were less impacted by BaP exposure. Measurements of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-deoxyguanine by LC-MS/MS) showed no differences among treatment groups, suggesting that the majority of DNA damage is from covalent binding of BaP metabolites to DNA. This study shows for the first time that mitochondria can be an important target of BaP toxicity in fish, indicating that BaP exposures could have important energetic consequences. Results also suggest that multi-generational exposures in the wild may lead to adaptations that dampen DNA damage arising from BaP exposure.

  9. Mutagenicity of Ochratoxin A and Its Hydroquinone Metabolite in the SupF Gene of the Mutation Reporter Plasmid Ps189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Manderville

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a mycotoxin that enhances renal tumor formation in the outer medulla of male rat kidney. Direct DNA damage and subsequent mutagenicity may contribute to these processes. In this study we have determined whether OTA in the absence or presence of activated rat liver microsomes (RLM or redox-active transition metals (Fe(III or Cu(II causes promutagenic DNA damage in the supF gene of the mutation reporter plasmid pS189 replicating in human Ad293 cells. In addition, we have assessed the mutagenicity of the hydroquinone metabolite (OTHQ of OTA in the absence or presence of cysteine without added cofactors. Our results show that oxidation of OTA, either by RLM or by transition metal ions, activates OTA to a directly genotoxic mutagen(s. The Fe(III/OTA system was the most potent mutagen in our experimental system, causing a 32-fold increase in mutant fraction (MF above the spontaneous control MF. The Cu(II/OTA system caused a 9-fold increase in MF, while a 6–10-fold increase in MF was observed for OTA in the presence of RLM. The OTHQ metabolite is also mutagenic, especially in the presence of cysteine, in which a 6-fold increase in MF was observed. Our data provide further insight into OTA bioactivation that may account for its in vivo mutagenicity in male rat kidney.

  10. Mutagenic effects of lead (II) bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslat, A O; Haas, H J

    1989-12-01

    The mutagenicity of lead (II) bromide (a combustion product of the gasoline additives lead (IV) tetraethyl and 1,2-dibromoethane) was investigated using various strains of bacteria. Taking prodigiosin (the red pigment) production as a marker, lead (II) bromide was found to be mutagenic in S. marcescens, leading to the appearance of white mutant colonies that are unable to produce such a pigment. This compound was also found to be mutagenic in E. coli KMBL1851, resulting in the appearance of rifampicin-resistant mutants in addition to Met+ and His+ revertants. Some of the S. marcescens mutants were found to be reversible, able to resynthesize prodigiosin. Differences in the sensitivity to antibiotics as well as in the biochemical properties were detected between the mutants and their corresponding wild types. Lead (II) bromide gave positive results in the Ames test performed with strain TA 1535.

  11. Mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and teratogenicity of thallium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Gerber, G B

    1997-08-01

    The paper reviews the information available concerning the mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic effects of thallium. Data on mutagenic and carcinogenic risks of thallium and its compounds are extremely scanty but what is available does not indicate that thallium could be mutagenic or carcinogenic. At any rate, such risks, if they exist, would be submerged by the general high toxicity of thallium. On the other hand, thallium has some teratogenic properties, especially on cartilage and bone formation, although this seems to be more prominent in chicks than in mammals. Nevertheless, pregnant women should not be exposed to doses of thallium which might produce toxic symptoms; exposure to lower doses such as might occur near thallium-emitting plants is probably not embryotoxic.

  12. Mutagenicity of airborne particulate organic material from urban and industrial areas of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M I; Valent, G U; Coimbrão, C A; Coelho, M C; Sanchez Sanchez, P; Alonso, C D; Martins, M T

    1995-12-01

    The mutagenicity of airborne particulate matter at three different sites within the São Paulo urban area and the Cubatão industrial area, São Paulo State, Brazil, was evaluated using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay over a year's period (June 1990-May 1991). Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected using a Hi-vol sampler and extracted with methylene chloride by ultrasonication. Pooled seasonal extracts were tested using S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100 with and without metabolic activation (S9) and TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 without metabolic activation. Organic extracts of the samples with the highest monthly TSP concentration were also assayed for mutagenicity. All samples collected at São Paulo and Cubatão showed mutagenicity with strain TA98, and in general the addition of S9 did not modify the mutagenic response, suggesting the prevalence of direct-acting frameshift mutagens in the atmosphere of these sites. The mutagenicity detected in the urban areas of São Paulo (mainly downtown) was much higher than in the Cubatão industrial area and similar to the more urbanized cities in the world, where vehicle emissions are the major pollution source. Results obtained with the strains TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 suggested the presence of mononitro- and dinitroarenes contributed to the mutagenicity of these atmospheric samples. A seasonal variation was observed with higher levels of frameshift mutagens during Spring in São Paulo and Summer in Cubatão. During the Winter, more significant responses were found with strain TA100 in the presence of S9 at all sites. Monthly samples presented high levels of mutagenicity during the period of June to November. Results from this research provide support for Air Pollution Control Programs in the detection of the more potent organic mutagenic compounds in the atmosphere and may help in the establishment of priorities for control and regulatory actions.

  13. THE GENOTOXICITY OF AMBIENT OUTDOOR AIR, A REVIEW: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genotoxicity of ambient outdoor air, a review: Salmonella mutagenicityAbstractMutagens in urban air pollution come from anthropogenic sources (especially combustion sources) and are products of airborne chemical reactions. Bacterial mutation tests have been used ...

  14. Legislative and technical aspects of mutagenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, V W; Flamm, W G

    1975-08-01

    A brief account is given of the history of the legislative acts that give responsibility to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ensuring the safety of foods, drugs, and cosmetics. Within the present legislative framework the FDA has the authority to impose regulations which are designed to ensure the safety of all foods, drugs, and cosmetics. The existing legislative authority is adequate for this purpose; however, the difficulty lies instead with technology and the inadequacy of scientific perspective in the emerging area of mutagenicity testing. Earlier efforts in development of mutagenicity screening systems culminated only a few years ago in the proposal to use the host-mediated assay, somatic cell cytogenetics, and dominant lethal tests collectively. Subsequent research efforts indicated that there were serious practical and scientific deficiencies in using this approach. More recently a new proposal, the tier system, has been suggested as an alternative measure. The proposed tier system at FDA consists of three testing levels of increasing complexity. The first tier is an initial screening effort using techniques having maximum sensitivity that are also useful for large-scale, rapid testing. The second tier is designed to identify and confirm that the presumptive mutagens detected in the first tier are truly mutagenic for higher organisms, most especially, for mammals. The third tier would be devoted to explicit genetic tests in mammals designed to ascertain the imposed risk to man by the introduction of a mutagen in our environment. The FDA is currently involved in a number of research activities in the area of mutagenicity safety screening which will explore the adequacies and possible deficiencies of the tier system approach. These efforts are described for our in-house activities, our contract activities, and our cooperative and collaborative activities with other government agencies and institutions.

  15. Assessment of genotoxic, mutagenic, and recombinogenic potential of water resources in the Paranaíba River basin of Brazil: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olegário de Campos Júnior, Edimar; da Silva Oliveira, Rosiane Gomes; Pereira, Boscolli Barbosa; Souto, Henrique Nazareth; Campos, Carlos Fernando; Nepomuceno, Júlio Cesar; Morelli, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to certain pollutants induces a series of alterations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that may result in genotoxic/mutagenic effects in exposed individuals. The present study aimed to monitor genotoxic, mutagenic, and recombinogenic potential and consequently water quality in two streams in the Paranaíba River basin in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using two bioindicator fish (Rhamdia quelen and Geophagus brasiliensis). The micronucleus (MN) test and somatic recombination and mutation test (SMART) were employed to assess DNA damage. The water quality index (WQI) at the reference site control (S1) due to its proximity to the river source was compared to Córrego do Óleo (S2) with respect to chemical parameter levels of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), dissolved-oxygen rates (DO), and total solid and fecal coliform counts. These chemical parameters were above the permitted limits at Córrego do Óleo (S2). At a third site, Córrego Liso (S3), a poor WQI was detected, attributed to the influence of domestic and industrial activities where BOD, DO, total solid, fecal coliform, total phosphorus, and turbidity rates exceeded premissible limits. The MN frequencies and the numbers of MN per cell (CMN) at sites S2 and S3 were significantly higher than those at S1 in both species. It is of interest that the increased frequency of MN was similar to the positive control cyclophosphamide only at S3, suggesting that the effects of water contaminants were most severe at this site. At sites assessed (S2 and S3), there was a significant rise in somatic mutation and recombination in the wings of Drosophila melanogaster, indicating the presence of trace elements, mainly lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), in the effluents in the Paranaíba River basin sites.

  16. Chromium-induced DNA damge is mutagenic in mammalian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.; Dixon, K. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    To study the mutagenic mechanism of hexavalent chromium compounds, a SV40 virus-based shuttle vector system was used for mutation analysis. The plasmid pZ189 allowed us to induce mutations in mammalian cells, identify them in a bacterial system, and then sequence them. Naked DNA pZ189 was treated with Cr{sup 6+}, Cr{sup 5+} and Cr{sup 3+} compounds. The studies showed that DNA strand breaks were induced in the reduction process of Cr{sup 6+} by glutathione. On the average, 0.66 {mu}M Cr{sup 6+} induced about one nick/DNA molecule. The treated DNA also showed a decrease of biological activity upon transformation into E. coli cells. Hydroxyl radical (HO{center_dot}) scavengers, Tris and mannitol, suppressed the Cr-induced DNA damage. The DNA damage caused by the co-incubation of Cr{sup 6+} with glutathione was ionic-strength and pH dependent, which supported the hypothesis that Cr{sup 5+}, an intermediate agent, was the critical agent in Cr reduction causing DNA damage through radical species. Further, Cr{sup 5+} induced DNA damage in a kinetic pattern similar to the co-incubation of Cr{sup 6+} and glutathione. In contrast, Cr{sup 3+}, the final product of Cr{sup 6+} reduction, was not shown to be a DNA-damaging agent in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). To evaluate if the Cr-treated DNA was mutagenic, a mutagenesis assay was carried out in which the chromium-treated plasmid was replicated in CV-1 monkey cells and mutation spectra were analyzed. Mutation frequency increased significantly for both Cr{sup 6+} and Cr{sup 5+} treated DNAs; the frequency was 0.18% and 0.80% for Cr{sup 6+} 1 and 10{mu}M respectively, and 0.14% and 0.21% for Cr{sup 5+} 0.25 and 0.125 {mu}M respectively compared to 0.01% in the untreated vector. The experiments suggested that one mechanism of Cr mutagenesis might be mediated by DNA damage caused by reactive radical species.

  17. Damage to DNA and lipids in Boletus edulis exposed to heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, Christian; Andersen, Rolf A; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2005-12-01

    This study investigates the potential of emissions from a zinc smelter to induce oxidative damage to DNA and lipids in Boletus edulis, the king bolete. Concentrations of cadmium, zinc, copper, and mercury were determined in 16 fruit bodies collected near the smelter (exposed group), as well as in 15 reference samples. Frequency of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA (a pre-mutagenic DNA base modification) and concentration of lipid hydroperoxides were chosen as damage parameters. Concentrations of the four metals, as well as oxidative damage to DNA and lipids were significantly elevated in the exposed group (Mann-Whitney, Pmetals and AP sites or lipid hydroperoxides in the reference group (significant only for mercury and lipid hydroperoxides; Pmetals determined in the present study, may induce dose-response relationships of a hormetic ('J-shaped') nature.

  18. Single cell gel electrophoresis as a tool to assess genetic damage in Heleobia cf. australis (Mollusca: Gastropoda as sentinel for industrial and domestic pollution in Montevideo bay (Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Villar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in aquatic organisms in polluted areas is an important issue because contamination may alter their health at sublethal levels. Although molluscs have been widely used to monitor water pollution, there are no records of in vivo genotoxicity studies. Heleobia cf. australis, is distributed in almost all Uruguayan coastal ecosystems, including highly polluted sites. The comet assay is a damage genetic biomarker based on the migration of negatively charged DNA fragments produced by mutagenic agents in individual cells. Live individuals were collected in the Montevideo Bay (impacted area and Laguna Garzón (control to analyze the presence of mutagenic agents in the former site through comet assay. Cells from organisms of the impacted area showed significantly higher levels of genetic damage than those obtained in the control population, measured by percentage of DNA in the tail. Although preliminary, this approach supports the idea that H. cf. australis could be used as a sentinel to evaluate the presence of mutagenic agents in estuarine environments, alerting to the impact of contamination in its early stages.

  19. Computational study of hydration at the TD damaged site of DNA in complex with repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2000-02-01

    An analysis of the distribution of water around DNA surface focusing on the role of the distribution of water molecules in the proper recognition of damaged site by repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V was performed. The native DNA dodecamer, dodecamer with the thymine dimer (TD) and complex of DNA and part of repair enzyme T4 Endonuclease V were examined throughout the 500 ps of molecular dynamics simulation. During simulation the number of water molecules close to the DNA atoms and the residence time were calculated. There is an increase in number of water molecules lying in the close vicinity to TD if compared with those lying close to two native thymines (TT). Densely populated area with water molecules around TD is one of the factors detected by enzyme during scanning process. The residence time was found higher for molecule of the complex and the six water molecules were found occupying the stabile positions between the TD and catalytic center close to atoms P, C3' and N3. These molecules originate water mediated hydrogen bond network that contribute to the stability of complex required for the onset of repair process. (author)

  20. Exploratory monitoring of air pollutants for mutagenicity activity with the Tradescantia stamen hair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, L A; Van't Hof, J; Hayes, C G; Burton, R M; de Serres, F J

    1978-12-01

    The Tradescantia genetic system developed by the late Dr. Arnold H. Sparrow for the study of effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to chemical mutagen detection. Early radiobiological data demonstrated that the stamen hairs were sensitive to as little as 0.25 rad of x-rays and that the number of cells showing a phenotypic change in pigmentation from blue to pink plateaus after approximately 21 days of chronic, low-level irradiation. Exposures to the air pollutants SO(2), NO(2), and O(3) and to vapors of mutagens such as 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) demonstrated the usefulness of the system as a detector of chemical mutagens. A significant number of phenotypic changes was observed following exposures to as little as 0.14 ppm of DBE. The maximum sensitivity of the system is obtained with long-term or chronic exposures because the response increases linearly in proportion to the duration of exposure up to 21 days. To monitor industrial sites for atmospheric mutagens a mobile laboratory was designed to support plant culture in the field. Environment-controlled growth chambers were installed in a trailer so that both ambient air fumigations and concurrent clean-air control exposures could be made. Sites monitored by the mobile laboratory were: Elizabeth, N. J.; Charleston, W. Va.; Birmingham, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Houston, Tex.; Upland, Calif.; Magna, Utah; and Grand Canyon, Ariz. The latter site at Grand Canyon served as a clean air control study. Atmospheric contaminants from petroleum and chemical processing plants generated a significant number of phenotypic pigment changes that were 17 to 31% above the control levels; contaminants from steel and copper smelters, automotive combustion products and photochemical compounds were negative. Chemical analyses are underway to identify the atmospheric mutagens at the sites that showed a positive response.

  1. Mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter as an indicative measure of atmospheric pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducatti, Adriana; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2003-09-09

    Mutagenic activity of organic extracts of airborne particulate matter at four different sites within the urban area of the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, was investigated using the Salmonella/microsome assay, with the Kado microsuspension method. The extracts were obtained by sonication, sequentially extracted according to polarity, with cyclohexane (CX) and dichloromethane (DCM) solvents. The different fractions were tested for mutagenicity with the Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6, without S9 mix metabolic activation. A positive frameshift mutagenic response was observed for non-polar (CX) and/or moderately polar (DCM) compounds at the different sites. The responses varied at different seasons of the year, and the highest revertants per m3 (rev/m3) values were observed at the site subject to the strongest influence of automotive vehicles (site 3) in spring (17.13 rev/m3) in DCM fractions, and in summer (13.01 rev/m3) in CX fractions. The responses observed for the TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 strains suggest the contribution of nitrocompounds to the mutagenic activity observed. Although there appears to be an indicative association between the increased mass per unit volume of air (TSP) and the mutagenicity of organic extracts of airborne particulate matter in the present study, the Salmonella/microsome assay was a sensitive method to define areas contaminated by genotoxic compounds, even in samples that present TPS values acceptable by the environmental quality standards established by law.

  2. Predictive Models for Carcinogenicity and Mutagenicity ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity are endpoints of major environmental and regulatory concern. These endpoints are also important targets for development of alternative methods for screening and prediction due to the large number of chemicals of potential concern and the tremendous cost (in time, money, animals) of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays. Both mutagenicity and carcinogenicity involve complex, cellular processes that are only partially understood. Advances in technologies and generation of new data will permit a much deeper understanding. In silico methods for predicting mutagenicity and rodent carcinogenicity based on chemical structural features, along with current mutagenicity and carcinogenicity data sets, have performed well for local prediction (i.e., within specific chemical classes), but are less successful for global prediction (i.e., for a broad range of chemicals). The predictivity of in silico methods can be improved by improving the quality of the data base and endpoints used for modelling. In particular, in vitro assays for clastogenicity need to be improved to reduce false positives (relative to rodent carcinogenicity) and to detect compounds that do not interact directly with DNA or have epigenetic activities. New assays emerging to complement or replace some of the standard assays include VitotoxTM, GreenScreenGC, and RadarScreen. The needs of industry and regulators to assess thousands of compounds necessitate the development of high-t

  3. Organic emissions from coal pyrolysis: mutagenic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A G; Wornat, M J; Mitra, A; Sarofim, A F

    1987-01-01

    Four different types of coal have been pyrolyzed in a laminar flow, drop tube furnace in order to establish a relationship between polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) evolution and mutagenicity. Temperatures of 900K to 1700K and particle residence times up to 0.3 sec were chosen to best simulate conditions of rapid rate pyrolysis in pulverized (44-53 microns) coal combustion. The specific mutagenic activity (i.e., the activity per unit sample weight) of extracts from particulates and volatiles captured on XAD-2 resin varied with coal type according to the order: subbituminous greater than high volatile bituminous greater than lignite greater than anthracite. Total mutagenic activity (the activity per gram of coal pyrolyzed), however, varied with coal type according to the order: high volatile bituminous much greater than subbituminous = lignite much greater than anthracite, due primarily to high organic yield during high volatile bituminous coal pyrolysis. Specific mutagenic activity peaked in a temperature range of 1300K to 1500K and generally appeared at higher temperatures and longer residence times than peak PAC production. PMID:3311724

  4. Mutagenic Effect on Alternating Current Magnetic Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obringer, John

    1997-01-01

    .... Statistical analysis of the data indicated that there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the mutagenic rate of phages grown in the presence of A/C E-fields compared to the controls except at a field strength of 1053 V/M...

  5. Mutagenic Potential of Alternating Current Electric Fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obringer, John

    1997-01-01

    .... Statistical analysis of the data indicated that there was no significant difference (p=> 0.05) in the mutagenic rate of phages grown in the presence of A/C E-fields compared to the controls except at a field-strength of 1053 V/M...

  6. Simultaneous Determination of Mutagenicity and Toxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A demonstration of cytotoxicity is required (measurement of cell number, culture confluency and inhibition of mitotic index) for in vitro cytogenetic assays. The study therefore investigated whether delayed cytotoxicity can be used to simultaneously predict mutagenicity and cytotoxicty. Chinese hamster lung cells were ...

  7. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimicrobial properties of brown propolis essential oil from the Brazilian Cerrado biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio H. Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological, and particularly antimicrobial, activities have been demonstrated for the essential oil of propolis samples worlwide, yet their mutagenic effects remain unknown. To correlate antimicrobial effects with mutagenic risks, the present study evaluated the antifungal and antibacterial activities of the essential oil obtained from brown propolis collected from the Cerrado biome in Midwest Brazil (EOP, testing it against nine pathogenic microorganisms. Evaluation of mutagenic potential was based on the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART performed on wing cells of standard (ST and high-bioactivation (HB crosses of Drosophila melanogaster. EOP was extracted by hydrodistillation, and sesquiterpenes were characterized by GC–MS as its major constituents. The crude oil proved active against Cryptococcus neoformans and Enterococcus faecalis, as did two of its major constituents, spathulenol and (E-nerolidol – the latter being also active against Staphylococcus aureus – isolated using chromatographic procedures. No significant increase in the number of somatic mutations was observed in the offspring of ST or HB crosses – the latter exhibiting enhanced levels of metabolizing enzymes of the cytochrome P450 type – treated with 0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.2% EOP. These findings revealed no mutagenic activity of EOP, even when tested against the HB strain, and demonstrated that its antimicrobial activities are not associated with DNA damage induction (investigated with SMART, suggesting the potential of EOP as a natural preservative.

  8. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of the mutagenic potential of carbamazepine: does melatonin have anti-mutagenic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awara, W M; El-Gohary, M; El-Nabi, S H; Fadel, W A

    1998-01-16

    The mutagenic potential of carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy has been evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. Analysis of chromosome aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), mitotic and proliferation indices (PRI) were performed. The in vivo study was carried out on 30 patients with idiopathic epilepsy end undergoing treatment with CBZ for different periods starting from 6 months up to 15 years. Plasma CBZ levels were also determined for each patient. The results showed that the total CA and SCEs were significantly increased in CBZ-treated patients. There was no significant correlation between CA and either duration of treatment or the plasma CBZ levels for each patient. The mitotic and proliferation indices were found to be slightly but non-significantly decreased compared to control values. On the other hand, in vitro analysis showed a significant dose-dependent increase in CA and SCEs in human lymphocyte cultures treated with CBZ (4-12 microg/ml). The mitotic and proliferation indices were also found to be decreased but only significantly in case of high doses of CBZ (12 microg/ml). Pretreatment of human lymphocytes with melatonin (0.5 mM) exhibited a significant decrease in the frequencies of CBZ-induced CA and SCEs as compared with non-treated cultures. The depressed mitotic and proliferation indices were also found to be improved in cultures pretreated with melatonin. In conclusion, these observations suggest that CBZ monotherapy may lead to chromosome damaging effects (genotoxic) and the use of melatonin as anti-mutagenic agent for human protection against CBZ-induced chromosome damage should be considered.

  9. Molecular Modeling of the Major DNA Adduct Formed from Food Mutagen Ochratoxin A in NarI Two-Base Deletion Duplexes: Impact of Sequence Context and Adduct Ionization on Conformational Preference and Mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Preetleen; Sharma, Purshotam; Manderville, Richard A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2017-08-21

    Exposure to ochratoxin A (OTA), a possible human carcinogen, leads to many different DNA mutations. As a first step toward understanding the structural basis of OTA-induced mutagenicity, the present work uses a robust computational approach and a slipped mutagenic intermediate model previously studied for C 8 -dG aromatic amine adducts to analyze the conformational features of postreplication two-base deletion DNA duplexes containing OT-dG, the major OTA lesion at the C 8 position of guanine. Specifically, a total of 960 ns of molecular dynamics simulations (excluding trial simulations) were carried out on four OT-dG ionization states in three sequence contexts within oligomers containing the NarI recognition sequence, a known hotspot for deletion mutations induced by related adducts formed from known carcinogens. Our results indicate that the structural properties and relative stability of the competing "major groove" and "stacked" conformations of OTA adducted two-base deletion duplexes depend on both the OTA ionization state and the sequence context, mainly due to conformation-dependent deviations in discrete local (hydrogen-bonding and stacking) interactions at the lesion site, as well as DNA bending. When the structural characteristics of the OT-dG adducted two-base deletion duplexes are compared to those associated with previously studied C 8 -dG adducts, a greater understanding of the effects of the nucleobase-carcinogen linkage, and size of the carcinogenic moiety on the conformational preferences of damaged DNA is obtained. Most importantly, our work predicts key structural features for OT-dG-adducted deletion DNA duplexes, which in turn allow us to develop hypotheses regarding OT-dG replication outcomes. Thus, our computational results are valuable for the design and interpretation of future biochemical studies on the potentially carcinogenic OT-dG lesion.

  10. Comparison of the mutagenic activity of XAD4 and blue rayon extracts of surface water and related drinking water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummrow, Fábio; Rech, Celia M; Coimbrão, Carlos A; Roubicek, Deborah A; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de A

    2003-11-10

    The combination of mutagenicity tests and selective extraction methodologies can be useful to indicate the possible classes of genotoxic organic contaminants in water samples. Treated and source water samples from two sites were analyzed: a river under the influence of an azo dye-processing plant discharge and a reservoir not directly impacted with industrial discharges, but contaminated with untreated domestic sewage. Organic extraction was performed in columns packed with XAD4 resin, that adsorbs a broad class of mutagenic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), arylamines, nitrocompounds, quinolines, antraquinones, etc., including the halogenated disinfection by-products; and with blue rayon that selectively adsorbs polycyclic planar structures. The organic extracts were tested for mutagenicity with the Salmonella assay using TA98 and TA100 strains and the potencies were compared. A protocol for cleaning the blue rayon fibers was developed and the efficiency of the reused fibers was analyzed with spiked samples. For the river water samples under the influence of the azo-type dye-processing plant, the mutagenicity was much higher for both blue rayon and XAD4 extracts when compared to the water from the reservoir not directly impacted with industrial discharges. For the drinking water samples, although both sites showed mutagenic responses with XAD4, only samples from the site under the influence of the industrial discharge showed mutagenic activity with the blue rayon extraction, suggesting the presence of polycyclic compounds in those samples. As expected, negative results were found with the blue rayon extracts of the drinking water collected from the reservoir not contaminated with industrial discharges. In this case, it appears that using the blue rayon to extract drinking water samples and comparing the results with the XAD resin extracts we were able to distinguish the mutagenicity caused by industrial contaminants from the halogenated

  11. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  12. The contribution to site core damage frequency from independent occurrences of initiators in two or more units: How low is it?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-San; Park, Jin Hee; Lim, Ho Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Stutzke estimated the site risk by summing the contribution from common cause initiators and the contribution from single-unit initiators. He considered some kinds of multi-unit accident sequences caused by single-unit initiators. However, the contribution from independent occurrences of initiators in two or more units at a site was not taken into account. The purpose of this study is to estimate the contribution to site core damage frequency (CDF) from simultaneous occurrences of independent initiators in two or more units at the same site. Some assumptions and methods used in this analysis are firstly described, and the results and conclusions of the analysis are described. In this study, the contribution to site core damage frequency (CDF) from simultaneous occurrences of independent initiators in two or more units at the same site was estimated. A Korean six-unit site was selected as the reference site and the at-power internal events Level 1 PSA model for an OPR1000 unit at the reference site was used as the base model, and was modified to deal with some major dependencies between units at the site. Specifically, the availability of the AAC D/G, dependencies between offsite power recovery actions in different unis, and inter-unit CCF modeling for risk-significant components such as diesel generators were taken into account. As a result, the sum of dual-unit CDF due to independent occurrences of initiators in two units at the reference site was estimated to be sufficiently low to be neglected.

  13. Genotoxic and mutagenic potential of camphorquinone in L5178/TK+/-mouse lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, J; Ziemann, C; Leyhausen, G; Geurtsen, W

    2018-03-01

    Camphorquinone (CQ) is the most important photoinitiator used in dental composite resins. Sparse data indicate a mutagenic potential of CQ. Therefore, it was aim of this study to evaluate the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity of CQ in L5178Y TK +/- mouse lymphoma cells. L5178Y/TK +/- cells were exposed to different concentrations of non-irradiated CQ (0.25-2.5mM). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by propidium iodide assay, determination of suspension growth rate, relative total growth and the mitotic index. Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) were quantified by 2',7'-dichlorofluoresceine diacetate (DCFH-DA). Early induction of DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA base lesions was assessed using the 8-hydroxyguanine DNA-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-modified alkaline comet assay, whereas mutagenicity of CQ was determined in the mouse lymphoma TK assay (MLA), according to OECD Guideline No. 490. CQ (0.5-2.5mM) induced concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth associated with increased ROS/RNS production, amounting to 2342%±1108% of controls after 90min at 2.5mM. Additionally, CQ concentration-dependently caused direct DNA-damage, i.e. formation of DNA strand breaks and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Whereas the MLA indicated lack of mutagenicity of CQ after a 4h of treatment, CQ concentration-dependently increased total mutant frequency (MF) after 24h (about 2-fold at 2.5mM). But, based on the global evaluation factor concept, increase in MF did not reach biologically relevance. CQ induced concentration-dependent, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in L5178Y/TK +/- cells, most likely due to oxidative stress, but without mediating obvious biological relevant mutagenicity. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutagenicity of acrolein and acrolein-induced DNA adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-yu; Zhu, Mao-xiang; Xie, Jian-ping

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein mutagenicity relies on DNA adduct formation. Reaction of acrolein with deoxyguanosine generates alpha-hydroxy-1, N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (alpha-HOPdG) and gamma-hydroxy-1, N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (gamma-HOPdG) adducts. These two DNA adducts behave differently in mutagenicity. gamma-HOPdG is the major DNA adduct and it can lead to interstrand DNA-DNA and DNA-peptide/protein cross-links, which may induce strong mutagenicity; however, gamma-HOPdG can be repaired by some DNA polymerases complex and lessen its mutagenic effects. alpha-HOPdG is formed much less than gamma-HOPdG, but difficult to be repaired, which contributes to accumulation in vivo. Results of acrolein mutagenicity studies haven't been confirmed, which is mainly due to the conflicting mutagenicity data of the major acrolein adduct (gamma-HOPdG). The minor alpha-HOPdG is mutagenic in both in vitro and in vivo test systems. The role of alpha-HOPdG in acrolein mutagenicity needs further investigation. The inconsistent result of acrolein mutagenicity can be attributed, at least partially, to a variety of acrolein-DNA adducts formation and their repair in diverse detection systems. Recent results of detection of acrolein-DNA adduct in human lung tissues and analysis of P53 mutation spectra in acrolein-treated cells may shed some light on mechanisms of acrolein mutagenicity. These aspects are covered in this mini review.

  15. Mutagenicity potential of commercial broth cubes at varying concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Torres, Nelson Velasquez; Talain, Augusto Nicolas.

    1997-01-01

    Today, there has been a growing concern on the mutagenicity potential of environmental chemical systems. These environmental chemicals such as pesticides, food additives, synthetic drugs, water and atmospheric pollutants are possible causes of mutagenic activity. Meat products and some meat flavorings, were also reported to exhibit mutagenic activity. And since these products are normal part of the daily human diet, there is a need for extensive studies regarding the possible mutagenic activity associated with these products. This study aimed to evaluate the mutagenicity potential of commercial broth cubes at varying concentration. The researchers sought to answer the following questions: 1. Do beef, pork and chicken broth cubes exhibit mutagenic activity? 2. Are there significant differences in the mutagenic activity among the three samples? 3. Are these significant differences in the mutagenic activity exhibited by each of the samples compared to that of Mitomycin-C (positive control)? 4. Which of the sample of each specific concentration exhibit the greatest mutagenic activity? Three specific concentrations of beef, pork and chicken broth cubes were prepared and their mutagenicity potential was evaluated by using the Micronucleus test. The formation of micro nucleated polychromatic and micro nucleated normo chromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow cells of mice treated with these samples were detected using a Carl-Zeiss photo microscope. The statistical tool used to test the validity of the null hypothesis was analysis of variance using randomized complete block design and independent T- test. (author)

  16. Mutagenic effects of heavy ions in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.; Krasavin, E. A.; Kozubek, S.

    1994-10-01

    Various mutagenic effects by heavy ions were studied in bacteria, irradiated at accelerators in Dubna, Prague, Berkeley or Darmstadt. Endpoints investigated are histidine reversion (B. subtilis, S. typhimurium), azide resistance (B. subtilis), mutation in the lactose operon (E. coli), SOS chromotest (E. coli) and λ-prophage induction (E. coli). It was found that the cross sections of the different endpoints show a similar dependence on energy. For light ions (Z = 26) it increases with energy up to a maximum or saturation. The increment becomes steeper with increasing Z. This dependence on energy suggests a ``mutagenic belt'' inside the track that is restricted to an area where the density of departed energy is low enough not to kill the cell, but high enough to induce mutations.

  17. Mutagen and Oncogen Study on JP-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    B-42 was not mutagenic for Salmonella in the Ames-type assay. The chemical was toxic to most of the bacteria strains at concentrations above 1 pl per...unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in human diploid WI-38 cells blocked in G, phase. MATERIALS Test Compound The test compound was received on June 15, 1977. The...compound was a colorless liquid. Indicator Cells Diploid WI-38 cells derived from human embryonic lung were used in this assay. Media Growth medium

  18. Highly mutagenic exocyclic DNA adducts are substrates for the human nucleotide incision repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Prorok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxygen free radicals induce lipid peroxidation (LPO that damages and breaks polyunsaturated fatty acids in cell membranes. LPO-derived aldehydes and hydroxyalkenals react with DNA leading to the formation of etheno(ε-bases including 1,N(6-ethenoadenine (εA and 3,N(4-ethenocytosine (εC. The εA and εC residues are highly mutagenic in mammalian cells and eliminated in the base excision repair (BER pathway and/or by AlkB family proteins in the direct damage reversal process. BER initiated by DNA glycosylases is thought to be the major pathway for the removal of non-bulky endogenous base damage. Alternatively, in the nucleotide incision repair (NIR pathway, the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP endonucleases can directly incise DNA duplex 5' to a damaged base in a DNA glycosylase-independent manner. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have characterized the substrate specificity of human major AP endonuclease 1, APE1, towards εA, εC, thymine glycol (Tg and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG residues when present in duplex DNA. APE1 cleaves oligonucleotide duplexes containing εA, εC and Tg, but not those containing 8oxoG. Activity depends strongly on sequence context. The apparent kinetic parameters of the reactions suggest that APE1 has a high affinity for DNA containing ε-bases but cleaves DNA duplexes at an extremely slow rate. Consistent with this observation, oligonucleotide duplexes containing an ε-base strongly inhibit AP site nicking activity of APE1 with IC(50 values in the range of 5-10 nM. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the reaction products demonstrated that APE1-catalyzed cleavage of εA•T and εC•G duplexes generates, as expected, DNA fragments containing 5'-terminal ε-base residue. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The fact that ε-bases and Tg in duplex DNA are recognized and cleaved by APE1 in vitro, suggests that NIR may act as a backup pathway to BER to remove a large variety of genotoxic base lesions in human cells.

  19. Exploratory research on mutagenic activity of coal-related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warshawsky, D.; Schoeny, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The following samples were found to be mutagenic for strains TA1538, TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium: ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16, and ETTM-17. ETTM-13 was marginally mutagenic for TA1537. ETTM-14 was slightly mutagenic for TA1537, TA1538, and TA98. Mutagenicity by all samples was demonstrated only in the presence of hepatic enzyme extracts (S9) which provided metabolic activation. ETTM-11 was shown to be the most mutagenic sample assayed thus far; specific activity was 2.79 x 10/sup 4/ TA98 revertants/mg sample. Fractionation by serial extractions with increasingly polar organic solvents was done at least 2 x with ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16 and ETTM-17. For some samples highly mutagenic fractions were observed.

  20. Mutagenic activity of phthalate esters in bacterial liquid suspension assays.

    OpenAIRE

    Seed, J L

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenic activities of several phthalate esters have been evaluated in an 8-azaguanine resistance assay in Salmonella typhimurium. Three phthalate esters were found to be mutagenic: dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate. A number of other phthalate esters were not found to be mutagenic, including di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di-n-octyl phthalate, diallyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate and diisodecyl phthalate. A metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, 2-ethylhe...

  1. Browning reaction systems as sources of mutagens and antimutagens.

    OpenAIRE

    Powrie, W D; Wu, C H; Molund, V P

    1986-01-01

    Heated food systems contain hundreds of chemical compounds, some being mutagenic and others being antimutagenic. Studies have indicated that foods exposed to drying, frying, roasting, baking, and broiling conditions possess net mutagenic activity as assessed by the Ames/Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test and the chromosome aberration assay with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. With the above-mentioned heat treatment of food, nonenzymic browning reactions are generally proceeding at rapi...

  2. Formation of mutagens in beef and beef extract during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commoner, B; Vithayathil, A J; Dolara, P; Nair, S; Madyastha, P; Cuca, G C

    1978-09-08

    Mutagens, distinguishable from benzo[a]pyrene and from mutagenic amino acid and protein pyrolysis products, are formed when ground beef is cooked in a home hamburger cooking appliance or when beef stock is concentrated, by boiling, to a paste known commercially as beef extract. "Well-done" hamburgers contain about 0.14 part per million of the mutagens, and beef bouillon cubes which contain beef extract about 0.1 part per million. Since such mutagens may be potentially carcionogenic and are formed during ordinary cooking procedures, their occurrence raises questions about possible risks to human health.

  3. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and mutagenicity in bus drivers and mail carriers exposed to urban air pollution in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ase Marie; Wallin, Håkan; Binderup, Mona Lise; Dybdahl, Marianne; Autrup, Herman; Loft, Steffen; Knudsen, Lisbeth Ehlert

    2004-01-10

    Previous studies in Denmark have shown that bus drivers and tramway employees were at an increased risk for developing several types of cancer and that bus drives from central Copenhagen have high levels of biomarkers of DNA damage. The present study evaluates 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations and mutagenic activity in urine as biomarkers of exposure in non-smoking bus drivers in city and rural areas on a work day and a day off and in non-smoking mail carriers working outdoors (in the streets) and indoors (in the office). Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected on a working day and a day off from 60 non-smoking bus drivers in city and rural areas and from 88 non-smoking mail carriers working outdoors (in the streets) and indoors (in the office). The concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene was measured by means of HPLC and the mutagenic activity was assessed by the Ames assay with Salmonella tester strain YG1021 and S9 mix. The N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) phenotype was used as a biomarker for susceptibility to mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds. Bus drivers excreted more 1-hydroxypyrene in urine than did mail carriers. The differences were slightly smaller when NAT2 phenotype, cooking at home, exposure to vehicle exhaust, and performing physical exercise after work were included. The NAT2 slow acetylators had 29% (1.29 [CI: 1.15-1.98]) higher 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in urine than the fast acetylators. Male bus drivers had 0.92 revertants/mol creatinine [CI: 0.37-1.47] and female bus drivers 1.90 revertants/mol creatinine [CI: 1.01-2.79] higher mutagenic activity in urine than mail carriers. The present study indicates that bus drivers are more exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and mutagens than mail carriers. Mail carriers who worked outdoors had higher urinary concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene, a marker of exposure to PAH, than those working indoors. The individual levels of urinary mutagenic activity were not correlated to excretion of 1

  4. Cytotoxic, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity effects of guanylhydrazone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhatti, Valéria Rodrigues; da Silva, Juliana; Martins, Tales Leandro Costa; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Rosa, Renato Moreira; Villela, Izabel; Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; da Silva Santos, Selma; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia; Machado, Carlos Renato; Saffi, Jenifer; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have reported that guanylhydrazones display a variety of desirable biological properties, such as antihypertensive, antibacterial, and antimalarial behaviour. They furthermore promote anti-pneumocystosis and anti-trypanosomiasis, exhibit antitumor activity, and show significant cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. In this work, we have evaluated the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity of two guanylhydrazones derivatives, (E)-2-[(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl) methylene] hydrazine carboxymidamide hydrochloride (2,3-DMeB) and (E)-2-[(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) methylene] hydrazine carboxymidamide hydrochloride (3,4-DMeB), in different biological models. Both 2,3-DMeB and 3,4-DMeB induce weak cytotoxic and mutagenic effects in bacteria and yeast. The genotoxicity of these compounds was determined in a fibroblast cell line (V79) using alkaline comet assay, as well as a modified comet assay with bacterial enzymes formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). Both guanylhydrazone derivatives induced DNA damage. Treatment of V79 cells with EndoIII and FPG proteins demonstrated a significant effect of 2,3-DMeB and 3,4-DMeB with respect to oxidized bases. In addition, the derivatives induced a significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells at high doses. The antifungal and anti-trypanosomal properties of these guanylhydrazone derivatives were also evaluated, and the obtained results suggest that 2,3-DMeB is more effective than 3,4-DMeB. The biological activity of 2,3-DMeB and 3,4-DMeB may thus be related, at least in part, to their oxidative potential, as well as to their ability to interact with DNA. Considering the previously reported in vitro antitumor activity of guanylhydrazone derivatives in combination with the lack of acute toxicity and the fact that DNA damage is only observed at high doses should render both compounds good candidates for in vivo studies on antitumor activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  5. Brief communication: On-site data collection of damage caused by flash floods: Experiences from Braunsbach, Germany, in May/June 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudan, Jonas; Rözer, Viktor; Sieg, Tobias; Vogel, Kristin; Thieken, Annegret

    2017-04-01

    At the end of May and beginning of June 2016, several municipalities in Southern Germany suffered from severe flash floods and debris flows which have been triggered by intense rainfall in Central Europe. Overall, the insured losses of these events amounted to EUR 1.2 billion in Germany. Especially the strong and unexpected flash flood on May 29th in Braunsbach (Baden Wurttemberg) - a small village counting about 1,000 residents - attracted media and policymakers due to its devastating character. The understanding of damage caused by flash floods requires ex-post collection of relevant but yet sparsely available information, linking process intensities to damage by using adequate methods of data gathering. Thus, on-site data collection was carried out after the flash flood event in Braunsbach, using open source software as helpful and efficient tool for data acquisition and evaluation. A digital survey was designed and conducted by a team of five researchers who investigated all buildings affected by water and debris flows. The collected data includes an estimation of a particular damage class, the inundation depth, and other relevant information. A post - hoc data analysis was done with R 3.3.1 and QGIS 2.14.3, performing both, a Random Forest Model (RF) and Random Generalized Linear Model (RGLM) as well as preparing a Spearman's rank correlation matrix. For visual interpretation and better overview of the study area and analysis results, a "process intensity" map was created, revealing important links of damage driving factors. We find that not only the water depth, which is often considered as only damage driving factor in riverine flood loss modelling, but also the exposition of a building to the flow direction and susceptible building parts like e.g. shop windows seem to be risk factors in flash-flood prone regions. Although no significant correlations were found, the analyses indicate that also building material (i.e. half-timbered or masonry) and structural

  6. Mutagenicity of halogenated olefins and their derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Herbert S.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of a series of haloalkanes, haloethanols and haloacetaldehydes to induce mutations in Salmonella typhrimurium and preferentially to inhibit the growth of DNA polymerase-deficient E. coli (pol A+/pol A−) was investigated. For the haloalkanes investigated, the order of reactivities towards the E. coli pol A+/pol A−, was: 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane > 1,1-dibromoethane > 1,1,2,2-tetrachlorethane > 1,2-dibromoethane = 1,5 dibromopentane > 1,2-dibromo-2-methylpropane > 1-bromo-2-chloroethane > 1,2-dichloroethane. In the standard Salmonella mutagenicity assay the order of these substances was 1,2-dibromoethane = 1,5-dibromopentane > 1,2-dibromo-2-methylpropane ≥ 1-bromo-2-chloroethane > 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane = 1,1-dibromoethane > 1,2-dichloroethane. 1,1,2,2-Tetrabromoethane was negative in the standard assay but strongly mutagenic when tested in suspension. It would appear that the discrepancy between the two procedures is due to the fact that bactericidal mutagens cannot be scored reliably in the standard Salmonella assay. The order of reactivity of 2-haloethanols in E. coli pol. A+/pol A−, was 2-iodo > 2-bromo-> 2-chloroethanol. In the Salmonella assay the order was 2-bromo-> 2 iodo- >2-chloro-ethanol. 2-Fluoroethanol and ethanol were devoid of activity in both assays. For the 2-haloacetaldehydes the reactivities in the E. coli system were 2-bromoethylacetate > 2-bromoacetaldehyde = acetaldehyde > 2-chloroacetaldehyde while in the Salmonella system the order was 2-bromoethylacetate > 2-chloroacetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde had minimal activity, while 2-bromoacetaldehyde was without activity but strongly bactericidal. ImagesFIGURE 2. AFIGURE 2. BFIGURE 2. C PMID:348460

  7. Mutagenicity testing of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E D; Coppinger, W J; Valencia, R; Iavicoli, J

    1984-01-01

    The mutagenic potential of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (diEGBE) was examined with a Tier I battery of in vitro assays followed by a Tier II in vivo Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal assay. The in vitro battery consisted of: the Salmonella mutagenicity test, the L5178Y mouse lymphoma test, a cytogenetics assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells and the unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay in rat hepatocytes. Results of the Salmonella mutagenicity test, the cytogenetics test, and the rat hepatocyte assay were negative at concentrations up to 20 microL/plate, 7.92 microL/mL, and 4.4 microL/mL, respectively. Toxicity was clearly demonstrated at all high doses. A weak, but dose-related increase in the mutation frequency (4-fold increase over the solvent control at 5.6 microL/mL with 12% survival) was obtained in the L5178Y lymphoma test in the absence of metabolic activation. Results of the mouse lymphoma assay were negative in the presence of the S-9 activation system. The significance of the mouse lymphoma assay were negative in the presence of the S-9 activation system. The significance of the mouse lymphoma assay results were assessed by performing the Tier II sex-linked recessive lethal assay in Drosophila in which the target tissue is maturing germinal cells. Both feeding (11,000 ppm for 3 days) and injection (0.3 microL of approximately 14,000 ppm solution) routes of administration were employed in the Drosophila assay. Approximately 11,000 individual crosses with an equal number of negative controls were performed for each route of administration. diEGBE produced no increase in recessive lethals under these conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6389113

  8. Assessing chemical mutagens: the risk to humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewen, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: chromosomal aberrations induced by x radiation, tritiated thymidine, maleic hydrazide, and nitrogen mustard; removal of pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation in amphibian cells following uv radiation; effects of 4-nitroquinoline-oxide on leukocytes from XP and normal patients; DNA as a target for alkylating agents; sensitivity of spermatogonia to chemical mutagens; chromosomal aberrations induced by 8-ethoxycaffeine, methoxycaffeine, cytosine arabinoside, streptonigrin, bleomycin, and phleomycin; effects of MMS and triethylenemelamine on germ cells; and use of chromosomal aberrations for improving risk estimates for ionizing radiation

  9. FTIR analysis and evaluation of carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM1.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ismael Luís; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Agudelo-Castañeda, Dayana Milena; Silva E Silva, Gabriel; Balzaretti, Naira; Braga, Marcel Ferreira; Oliveira, Luís Felipe Silva

    2016-01-15

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) represent a group of organic compounds of significant interest due to their presence in airborne particulates of urban centers, wide distribution in the environment, and mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. These compounds, associated with atmospheric particles of size PM1.0) using infrared spectrometry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risks of the studied NPAHs associated with PM1.0 samples were also determined for two sampling sites: Canoas and Sapucaia do Sul. The results showed that NPAH standard spectra can effectively identify NPAHs in PM1.0 samples. The transmittance and emissivity sample spectra showed broader bands and lower relative intensity than the standard NPAH spectra. The carcinogenic risk and the total mutagenic risk were calculated using the toxic equivalent factors and mutagenic potency factors, respectively. Canoas showed the highest total carcinogenic risk, while Sapucaia do Sul had the highest mutagenic risk. The seasonal analysis suggested that in the study area the ambient air is more toxic during the cold periods. These findings might of significant importance for the decision and policy making authorities.

  10. Cip29 is phosphorylated following activation of the DNA damage response in Xenopus egg extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Holden

    Full Text Available Acting through a complex signalling network, DNA lesions trigger a range of cellular responses including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, altered gene expression and cell death, which help to limit the mutagenic effects of such DNA damage. RNA processing factors are increasingly being recognised as important targets of DNA damage signalling, with roles in the regulation of gene expression and also more directly in the promotion of DNA repair. In this study, we have used a Xenopus laevis egg extract system to analyse the DNA damage-dependent phosphorylation of a putative RNA export factor, Cip29. We have found that Cip29 is rapidly phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks in this experimental system. We show that the DNA damage-inducible modification of Cip29 is dependent on the activity of the key double-strand break response kinase, ATM, and we have identified a conserved serine residue as a damage-dependent phosphorylation site. Finally, we have determined that Cip29 is not required for efficient DNA end-joining in egg extracts. Taken together, these data identify Cip29 as a novel target of the DNA damage response and suggest that the damage-dependent modification of Cip29 may relate to a role in the regulation of gene expression after DNA damage.

  11. Comparing the use of 4.6 um lasers versus 10.6 um lasers for mitigating damage site growth on fused silica surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2010-10-21

    The advantage of using mid-infrared (IR) 4.6 {micro}m lasers, versus far-infrared 10.6 {micro}m lasers, for mitigating damage growth on fused silica is investigated. In contrast to fused silica's high absorption at 10.6 {micro}m, silica absorption at 4.6 {micro}m is two orders of magnitude less. The much reduced absorption at 4.6 {micro}m enables deep heat penetration into fused silica when it is heated using the mid-IR laser, which in turn leads to more effective mitigation of damage sites with deep cracks. The advantage of using mid-IR versus far-IR laser for damage growth mitigation under non-evaporative condition is quantified by defining a figure of merit (FOM) that relates the crack healing depth to laser power required. Based on our FOM, we show that for damage cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation using a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation using a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser.

  12. Mutagenicity of quinones: pathways of metabolic activation and detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesis, P L; Levin, D E; Smith, M T; Ernster, L; Ames, B N

    1984-01-01

    The mutagenicity of various quinones, a class of compounds widely distributed in nature, is demonstrated in the Salmonella TA104 tester strain. The metabolic pathways by which four quinones, menadione, benzo[a]pyrene 3,6-quinone, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, and danthron, caused mutagenicity in this test system were investigated in detail as were the detoxification pathways. The two-electron reduction of these quinones by NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (DT-diaphorase) was not mutagenic, whereas the one-electron reduction, catalyzed by NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase, was mutagenic, except for danthron, which was only slightly mutagenic. The mutagenicity of the quinones via this pathway was found to be attributable to the generation of oxygen radicals. The cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase also played a significant role in the detoxification and bioactivation of these quinones. For example, phenanthrenequinone was converted to a nonmutagenic metabolite in a cytochrome P-450-dependent reaction, whereas danthron was converted to a highly mutagenic metabolite. These studies show the complexity of metabolic pathways involved in the mutagenicity of quinones. PMID:6584903

  13. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals. Mutagenic effectiveness ...

  14. Mutagenicity of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmochowska, Barbara [Department of Carbohydrate Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Piosik, Jacek; Woziwodzka, Anna [Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, 80-822 Gdansk (Poland); Sikora, Karol; Wisniewski, Andrzej [Department of Carbohydrate Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, 80-822 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} A series of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties, with configuration D-galacto, D-gluco and D-manno, was synthesized and characterized. {yields} The quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties revealed potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. {yields} The N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. {yields} We suggest that quaternary ammonium salts may be more hazardous than previously supposed. - Abstract: Quaternary ammonium salts are widely used in industrial, agricultural, healthcare and domestic applications. They are believed to be safe compounds, with little or no health hazard to humans. However, in this report, we demonstrate that a series of newly synthesized quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties reveal potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. D-Gluco- and D-galacto-derivatives were found to have a higher mutagenic potential than D-manno-derivatives. Among the former groups of compounds, the N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. These results suggest that the safety of quaternary ammonium salts may be lower than previously supposed, indicating a need for testing such compounds for their mutagenicity.

  15. Studies on the Genotoxic and Mutagenic Potentials of Mefloquine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The detection of mefloquine mutagenicity has not been achieved by the use of Salmonella typhimurium his TA1535, TA1537 as tester strains. With the introduction of improved and more sensitive strains, it is of interest to evaluate the current mutagenic and genotoxic status of the drug. This study presents data on ...

  16. Studies on the Genotoxic and Mutagenic Potentials of Mefloquine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The detection of mefloquine mutagenicity has not been achieved by the use of. Salmonella typhimurium his TA1535, TA1537 as tester strains. With the introduction of improved and more sensitive strains, it is of interest to evaluate the current mutagenic and genotoxic status of the drug. This study presents data on ...

  17. Is Tobacco Smoke a Germ-Cell Mutagen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although no international organization exists to declare whether an agent is a germ-cell mutagen, tobacco smoke may be a human germ-cell mutagen. In the mouse, tobacco smoke induces a significant increase in the mutation frequency at an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus....

  18. Mutagenicity of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmochowska, Barbara; Piosik, Jacek; Woziwodzka, Anna; Sikora, Karol; Wisniewski, Andrzej; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A series of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties, with configuration D-galacto, D-gluco and D-manno, was synthesized and characterized. → The quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties revealed potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. → The N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. → We suggest that quaternary ammonium salts may be more hazardous than previously supposed. - Abstract: Quaternary ammonium salts are widely used in industrial, agricultural, healthcare and domestic applications. They are believed to be safe compounds, with little or no health hazard to humans. However, in this report, we demonstrate that a series of newly synthesized quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties reveal potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. D-Gluco- and D-galacto-derivatives were found to have a higher mutagenic potential than D-manno-derivatives. Among the former groups of compounds, the N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. These results suggest that the safety of quaternary ammonium salts may be lower than previously supposed, indicating a need for testing such compounds for their mutagenicity.

  19. Mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials of fruit juices of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials of fruit juices of five medicinal plants in Allium cepa L.: Possible influence of DPPH free radical scavengers. ... Testing the mutagenic activity, onions were suspended in solution of different concentrations of FDFJ alone in tap water for 48 h. Thereafter, root tips were prepared and ...

  20. MUTAGEN: Multi-user tool for annotating GENomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugger, K.; Redder, P.; Skovgaard, Marie

    2003-01-01

    MUTAGEN is a free prokaryotic annotation system. It offers the advantages of genome comparison, graphical sequence browsers, search facilities and open-source for user-specific adjustments. The web-interface allows several users to access the system from standard desktop computers. The Sulfolobus...... acidocaldarius genome, and several plasmids and viruses have so far been analysed and annotated using MUTAGEN....

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxic, apoptotic, mutagenic, and chemopreventive activities of semi-synthetic esters of gallic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I C; Polaquini, C R; Regasini, L O; Ferreira, H; Pavan, F R

    2017-07-01

    Gallic acid and its derivatives are phenolic compounds widely used as food supplements in the form of capsules, liquid extracts, and ointments owing to their good antioxidant properties. Besides, these compounds are potent inhibitors of fungi, bacteria, and some viruses and possess strong antiproliferative and chemopreventive activities. However, gallic acid derivatives are also known to exert harmful effects like mutagenicity and cytotoxicity. The present study aimed to understand and explore the toxicological risks of these compounds. For this, a series of alkyl gallates with side chains varying from five to eight carbons (pentyl, hexyl, heptyl, and octyl gallates) were evaluated for their cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic potential. In addition, the genotoxic effects of alkyl gallates were measured in HepG2 cells using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)/comet assay and the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) test. In both the tests, the substances did not induce any significant differences when compared to the control group. In addition, alkyl gallates exhibited a chemopreventive effect, thereby considerably reducing the mutagenicity caused by H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that alkyl gallates are non-genotoxic, non-mutagenic, and pro-apoptotic agents, which may serve as suitable and promising candidates for preventing chemically-induced chromosomal damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lead induces DNA damage and alteration of ALAD and antioxidant genes mRNA expression in construction site workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Zertashia; Riaz, Sadaf; Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar; Jahan, Sarwat; Ahmad, Malik Waqar; Ullah, Muhammad Abaid; Wazir, Hizbullah; Mahjabeen, Ishrat

    2018-01-16

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are considered as possible mechanisms involved in lead toxicity. To test this hypothesis, DNA damage and expression variations of aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 2a (OGG1-2a) genes was studied in a cohort of 100 exposed workers and 100 controls with comet assay and real-time polymerse chain reaction (PCR). Results indicated that increased number of comets was observed in exposed workers versus controls (p < 0.001). After qPCR analysis, significant down-regulation in ALAD (p < 0.0001), SOD2 (p < 0.0001), and OGG1-2a (p < 0.0001) level was observed in exposed workers versus controls. Additionally, a positive spearmen correlation was observed between ALAD versus SOD2 (r = 0.402**, p < 0.001), ALAD versus OGG1-2a (r = 0.235*, p < 0.05), and SOD2 versus OGG1-2a (r = 0.292*, p < 0.05). This study showed that lead exposure induces DNA damage, which is accompanied by an elevated intensity of oxidative stress and expression variation of lead-related gene.

  3. Mutagenic activity of heated potato/oil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, A; Wootton, M; Baker, R S; Arlauskas, A; Bonin, T M

    1983-01-01

    Mutagens detected with Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98 in the presence of liver S9 mix were extracted from potato slices, but not pure potato starch, after frying in oil. No mutagenic activity was detected using strain TA 100, in the presence or absence of S9 mix with either fried potato slices or potato starch. Mutagenic activity was detected at frying temperatures of 140 degrees C and above. The mutagenic activity was limited to the outer portion of the fried potato slices and increased with frying time and temperature. Mutagenic activity ratios for extraction with both (NH4)2SO4/NH4OH and Na2SO4/NaOH were similar.

  4. Site specific X-ray induced changes in organic and metal organic compounds and their influence on global radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Desiree Ellen

    2012-07-15

    The aim of this work was to systematically investigate the effects of specific and global X-ray radiation damage to biological samples and obtain a conclusive model to describe the underlying principles. Based on the systematic studies performed in this work, it was possible to propose two conclusive mechanisms to describe X-ray induced photoreduction and global radiation damage. The influence of chemical composition, temperature and solvent on X-ray induced photoreduction was investigated by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction of two B12 cofactors - cyano- and methylcobalamin - as well as iron(II) and iron(III) complexes. The obtained results revealed that X-ray induced photoreduction is a ligand dependent process, with a redox reaction taking place within the complex. It could further be shown that selective hydrogen abstraction plays an important role in the process of X-ray induced photoreduction. Based on the experimental results of this work, a model to describe X-ray induced photoreduction of metal organic complexes could be proposed. The process of X-ray induced hydrogen abstraction was further investigated in a combined X-ray and neutron diffraction study on the amino acids L-serine and L-alanine, which were used as model compounds for proteins, and the nucleoside deoxythymidine (thymidine) as a model for DNA. A damage mechanism for L-serine could be found. It involves the abstraction of two hydrogen atoms, one from the hydroxyl group and one from the adjacent methylene group. Such a hydrogen abstraction results in the formation of a carbonyl group. X-ray diffraction measurements on cyano- and methylcobalamin as well as on three metal amino acid complexes, containing nickel(II) and copper(II), respectively, were conducted to investigate the contribution of X-ray induced photoreduction to global radiation damage. Results from these measurements combined with the results from L-serine, L-alanine and thymidine allowed

  5. Mutagenicity, antioxidant potential, and antimutagenic activity against hydrogen peroxide of cashew (Anacardium occidentale) apple juice and cajuina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo Cavalcante, Ana Amélia; Rubensam, Gabriel; Picada, Jaqueline N; Gomes da Silva, Evandro; Fonseca Moreira, José Claúdio; Henriques, João A P

    2003-01-01

    Fresh and processed cashew (Anacardium occidentale) apple juice (CAJ) are among the most popular drinks in Brazil. Besides their nutritional benefits, these juices have antibacterial and antitumor potential. The chemical constituents of both the fresh juice and the processed juice (cajuina) were analyzed and characterized as complex mixtures containing high concentrations of vitamin C, various carotenoids, phenolic compounds, and metals. In the present study, these beverages exhibited direct and rat liver S9-mediated mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA97a, TA98, and TA100, which detect frameshifts and base pair substitution. No mutagenicity was observed with strain TA102, which detects oxidative and alkylating mutagens and active forms of oxygen. Both CAJ and cajuina showed antioxidant activity as determined by a total radical-trapping potential assay. To test whether this antioxidant potential might result in antimutagenesis, we used a variation of the Salmonella/microsome assay that included pre-, co-, and posttreatment of hydrogen peroxide-exposed Salmonella typhimurium strain TA102 with the juices. CAJ and cajuina protected strain TA102 against mutation by oxidative damage in co- and posttreatments. The antimutagenic effects during cotreatment with hydrogen peroxide may be due to scavenging free radicals and complexing extracellular mutagenic compounds. The protective effects in posttreatment may be due to stimulation of repair and/or reversion of DNA damage. The results indicate that CAJ and cajuina have mutagenic, radical-trapping, antimutagenic, and comutagenic activity and that these properties can be related to the chemical constituents of the juices. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of (−-hinokinin a trypanosomicidal compound measured by Salmonella microsome and comet assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Flávia Aparecida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan (−-hinokinin (HK was derived by partial synthesis from (−-cubebin, isolated from the dry seeds of the pepper, Piper cubeba. Considering the good trypanosomicidal activity of HK and recalling that natural products are promising starting points for the discovery of novel potentially therapeutic agents, the aim of the present study was to investigate the (anti mutagenic∕ genotoxic activities of HK. Methods The mutagenic∕ genotoxic activities were evaluated by the Ames test on Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA97a, TA100 and TA102, and the comet assay, so as to assess the safe use of HK in the treatment of Chagas’ disease. The antimutagenic ∕antigenotoxic potential of HK were also tested against the mutagenicity of a variety of direct and indirect acting mutagens, such as 4- nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPD, sodium azide (SA, mitomycin C (MMC, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF, by the Ames test, and doxorubicin (DXR by the comet assay. Results The mutagenicity∕genotoxicity tests showed that HK did not induce any increase in the number of revertants or extent of DNA damage, demonstrating the absence of mutagenic and genotoxic activities. On the other hand, the results on the antimutagenic potential of HK showed a strong inhibitory effect against some direct and indirect-acting mutagens. Conclusions Regarding the use of HK as an antichagasic drug, the absence of mutagenic effects in animal cell and bacterial systems is encouraging. In addition, HK may be a new potential antigenotoxic ∕ antimutagenic agent from natural sources. However, the protective activity of HK is not general and varies with the type of DNA damage-inducing agent used.

  7. Mitotic catastrophe is the mechanism of lethality for mutations that confer mutagen sensitivity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, S H; May, G S

    1994-01-16

    We have examined the consequences of treatment with DNA-damaging agents of uvs mutants and the bimD6 mutant of Aspergillus nidulans. We first established that wild-type Aspergillus undergoes a cell cycle delay following treatment with the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or ultraviolet light (UV). We have also determined that strains carrying the bimD6, uvsB110, uvsH77, uvsF201 and the uvsC114 mutations, all of which cause an increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, undergo a cell-cycle delay following DNA damage. These mutations therefore do not represent nonfunctional checkpoints in Aspergillus. However, all of the mutant strains accumulated nuclear defects after a period of delay following mutagen treatment. The nuclear defects in the uvsB110 and bimD6 strains following MMS treatment were shown to be dependent on passage through mitosis after DNA damage, as the defects were prevented with benomyl. Checkpoint controls responding to DNA damage thus only temporarily halt cell-cycle progression in response to DNA damage. The conditional bimD6 mutation also results in a defective mitosis at restrictive temperatures. This mitotic defect is similar to that seen with MMS treatment at temperatures permissive for the mitotic defect. Thus the bimD gene product may perform dual roles, one in DNA repair and the other during the mitotic cell cycle in the absence of damage.

  8. Efficacy of plastic mesh tubes in reducing herbivory damage by the invasive nutria (Myocastor coypus) in an urban restoration site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffels, Trevor R.; Systma, Mark D.; Carter, Jacoby; Taylor, Jimmy D.

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of stream corridors is becoming an increasingly important component of urban landscape planning, and the high cost of these projects necessitates the need to understand and address potential ecological obstacles to project success. The nutria(Myocastor coypus) is an invasive, semi-aquatic rodent native to South America that causes detrimental ecological impacts in riparian and wetland habitats throughout its introduced range, and techniques are needed to reduce nutria herbivory damage to urban stream restoration projects. We assessed the efficacy of standard Vexar® plastic mesh tubes in reducing nutria herbivory damage to newly established woody plants. The study was conducted in winter-spring 2009 at Delta Ponds, a 60-ha urban waterway in Eugene, Oregon. Woody plants protected by Vexar® tubes demonstrated 100% survival over the 3-month initial establishment period, while only 17% of unprotected plantings survived. Nutria demonstrated a preference for black cottonwood (Populus balsamifera ssp trichocarpa) over red osier dogwood (Cornussericea) and willow (Salix spp). Camera surveillance showed that nutria were more active in unprotected rather than protected treatments. Our results suggest that Vexar® plastic mesh tubing can be an effective short-term herbivory mitigation tool when habitat use by nutria is low. Additionally, planting functionally equivalent woody plant species that are less preferred by nutria, and other herbivores, may be another method for reducing herbivory and improving revegetation success. This study highlights the need to address potential wildlife damage conflicts in the planning process for stream restoration in urban landscapes.

  9. Damage estimates for European and U.S.sites using the U.S. high-cycle fatigue data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, H.J. [Wind Energy Technology, Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper uses two high-cycle fatigue data bases, one for typical U.S. blade materials and one for European materials, to analyze the service lifetime of a wind turbine blade subjected to the WISPER load spectrum for northern European sites and the WISPER protocol load spectrum for U.S. wind farm sites. The U.S. data base contains over 2200 data points that were obtained using coupon testing procedures. These data are used to construct a Goodman diagram that is suitable for analyzing wind turbine blades. This result is compared to the Goodman diagram derived from the European fatigue data base FACT. The LIFE2 fatigue analysis code for wind turbines is then used to predict the service lifetime of a turbine blade subjected to the two loading histories. The results of this study indicate that the WISPER load spectrum from northern European sites significantly underestimates the WISPER protocol load spectrum from a U.S. wind farm site, i.e., the WISPER load spectrum significantly underestimates the number and magnitude of the loads observed at a U.S. wind farm site. Further, the analysis demonstrate that the European and the U.S. fatigue material data bases are in general agreement for the prediction of tensile failures. However, for compressive failures, the two data bases are significantly different, with the U.S. data base predicting significantly shorter service lifetimes than the European data base. (au) 14 refs.

  10. Cytotoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic and mutagenic/antimutagenic effects of the venom of the wasp Polybia paulista.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Márcia M; Santos, Lucilene D; Palma, Mario S; Marin-Morales, Maria A

    2013-09-01

    Hymenoptera venoms are constituted by a complex mixture of chemically or pharmacologically bioactive agents, such as phospholipases, hyaluronidases and mastoparans. Venoms can also contain substances that are able to inhibit and/or diminish the genotoxic or mutagenic action of other compounds that are capable of promoting damages in the genetic material. Thus, the present study aimed to assess the effect of the venom of Polybia paulista, a neotropical wasp, by assays with HepG2 cells maintained in culture. The cytotoxic potential of the wasp venom, assessed by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay (MTT assay), was tested for the concentrations of 10 μg/mL, 5 μg/mL and 1 μg/mL. As these concentrations were not cytotoxic, they were used to evaluate the genotoxic (comet assay) and mutagenic potential (micronucleus test) of the venom. In this study, it was verified that these concentrations induced damages in the DNA of the exposed cells, and it was necessary to test lower concentrations until it was found those that were not considered genotoxic and mutagenic. The concentrations of 1 ng/mL, 100 pg/mL and 10 pg/mL, which did not induce genotoxicity and mutagenicity, were used in four different treatments (post-treatment, pre-treatment, simultaneous treatment with and without incubation), in order to evaluate if these concentrations were able to inhibit or decrease the genotoxic and mutagenic action of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). None of the concentrations was able to inhibit and/or decrease the MMS activity. The genotoxic and mutagenic activity of the venom of P. paulista could be caused by the action of phospholipase, mastoparan and hyaluronidase, which are able to disrupt the cell membrane and thereby interact with the genetic material of the cells or even facilitate the entrance of other compounds of the venom that can act on the DNA. Another possible explanation for the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of the venom can be the presence of substances able

  11. Nitroarenes as Antitubercular Agents: Stereoelectronic Modulation to Mitigate Mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landge, Sudhir; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Kumar, Anupriya; Neres, João; Murugan, Kannan; Sadler, Claire; Fellows, Mick D; Humnabadkar, Vaishali; Vachaspati, Prakash; Raichurkar, Anandkumar; Sharma, Sreevalli; Ravishankar, Sudha; Guptha, Supreeth; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K; Balganesh, Tanjore S; Ugarkar, Bheemarao G; Balasubramanian, V; Bandodkar, Balachandra S; Panda, Manoranjan

    2016-02-04

    Nitroarenes are less preferred in drug discovery due to their potential to be mutagenic. However, several nitroarenes were shown to be promising antitubercular agents with specific modes of action, namely, nitroimidazoles and benzothiazinones. The nitro group in these compounds is activated through different mechanisms, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic, in mycobacteria prior to binding to the target of interest. From a whole-cell screening program, we identified a novel lead nitrobenzothiazole (BT) series that acts by inhibition of decaprenylphosphoryl-β-d-ribose 2'-epimerase (DprE1) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The lead was found to be mutagenic to start with. Our efforts to mitigate mutagenicity resulted in the identification of 6-methyl-7-nitro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3-benzothiazoles (cBTs), a novel class of antitubercular agents that are non-mutagenic and exhibit an improved safety profile. The methyl group ortho to the nitro group decreases the electron affinity of the series, and is hence responsible for the non-mutagenic nature of these compounds. Additionally, the co-crystal structure of cBT in complex with Mtb DprE1 established the mode of binding. This investigation led to a new non-mutagenic antitubercular agent and demonstrates that the mutagenic nature of nitroarenes can be solved by modulation of stereoelectronic properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Browning reaction systems as sources of mutagens and antimutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powrie, W D; Wu, C H; Molund, V P

    1986-08-01

    Heated food systems contain hundreds of chemical compounds, some being mutagenic and others being antimutagenic. Studies have indicated that foods exposed to drying, frying, roasting, baking, and broiling conditions possess net mutagenic activity as assessed by the Ames/Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test and the chromosome aberration assay with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. With the above-mentioned heat treatment of food, nonenzymic browning reactions are generally proceeding at rapid rates and are involved in the development of mutagens. Caramelization and Maillard reactions are two important pathways in the nonenzymic browning of food and are responsible for the formation of volatile aromatic compounds, intermediate nonvolatile compounds, and brown pigments called melanoidins. Heated sugar-amino acid mixtures possessed mutagenic activities which have been assessed by short-term bioassays. Purified Maillard and caramelization reaction products such as reductones, dicarbonyls, pyrazines, and furan derivatives have exhibited mutagenicity and clastogenicity. The water-insoluble fraction (WIF) of instant coffee and a model-system melanoidin (MSM) have been shown to inhibit the mutagenicity of known carcinogens--aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), and benzo(a)pyrene (BP)--in aqueous dispersion. WIF and MSM were found to be effective binding agents for the carcinogens.

  13. Mutagenic effects of ion implanted rice seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang

    1996-04-01

    Dry seeds of rice were implanted with 15∼30 keV N + , H + , Ar + ion beam of various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam could induce the variation on the chromosome structure and inhibit mitosis in root tip cell. The chromosomal aberration rate of cells tended to be increased with increase of implanted ion dose. Compared with 60 Co γ-rays, ion implantation induced lower rate of cells with chromosome aberration. However, there was a similar inhibitory effect on mitosis between ion beam and γ-rays. The electrophoretic banding patterns of peroxidase enzymes were altered by both mutagens and varied. Frequency of the chlorophyll mutation implanted by ion beam was higher than that induced by γ-rays. Mutation frequencies of heading date and plant height were similar between ion beam implanting and γ-rays irradiation. (11 tabs., 2 figs.)

  14. Mutagenic effects of ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-01-01

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 75 keV nitrogen and carbon ions with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam dose. The rate of cells with chromosomal aberration was lower than that induced with γ-rays. Frequency of the mutation induced by implantation of N + and C + ions were higher than those induced by γ-rays. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and in M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of C + ion was higher than those induced by implantation of N + ion. Mutagenic effects Feng 1 x Riyuan and Riyuan x Feng 2 by implantation of N + and C + were higher than that of Jining and Feng 2

  15. Characterization and Mutagenicity of Biomass Smoke from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although wildfire smoke is known to cause adverse health effects, less is known about the relative effects of wildfire smoke from different fuel types or combustion conditions. In this study, we describe a novel in-tandem application of controlled combustion and cryo-trapping techniques that utilize an automated tube furnace system to simulate wildfire combustion and facilitates the efficient collection of the resulting smoke emissions. The furnace sustained stable flaming and smoldering biomass (red oak, peat) burning conditions consistently for ~60 min. The multi-stage cryo-trapping system collected up to 90% of the biomass combustion emissions at -70°C. Condensates were extracted and assessed for mutagenicity in Salmonella strain TA98+/-S9. Carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were monitored continuously during the combustion process and used to calculate the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) and emission factors (EFs). We found that the MCE during smoldering conditions was 71% and 74% and during flaming conditions was 96% and 99% for peat and red oak, respectively. Red oak smoldering EFs for CO and PM were 209 g/kg and 147 g/kg, whereas flaming EFs were 16 g/kg and 0.6 g/kg, respectively. Peat smoldering EFs for CO and PM were 301 g/kg and 59 g/kg, respectively, whereas peat flaming EFs were 47 g/kg and 3 g/kg. The ranking of the fuels based on mutagenicity-emission factor in TA98+S9 (revertants x 105/kg fuel)

  16. Mutagenicity of anthraquinone and hydroxylated anthraquinones in the Ames/Salmonella microsome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, D F; Fink, R C; Schaefer, F L; Mulcahy, R J; Stark, A A

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenicity of anthracene, anthraquinone, and four structurally similar compounds of each was evaluated in the Ames/Salmonella microsome assay. Anthraquinone was shown to be mutagenic for strains TA1537, TA1538, and TA98 in the absence of rat liver homogenate. The four anthraquinone derivatives tested were mutagenic for TA1537 exclusively. None of the anthracenes exhibited mutagenic activity. PMID:7103489

  17. Mutagenicity of anthraquinone and hydroxylated anthraquinones in the Ames/Salmonella microsome system.

    OpenAIRE

    Liberman, D F; Fink, R C; Schaefer, F L; Mulcahy, R J; Stark, A A

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenicity of anthracene, anthraquinone, and four structurally similar compounds of each was evaluated in the Ames/Salmonella microsome assay. Anthraquinone was shown to be mutagenic for strains TA1537, TA1538, and TA98 in the absence of rat liver homogenate. The four anthraquinone derivatives tested were mutagenic for TA1537 exclusively. None of the anthracenes exhibited mutagenic activity.

  18. Mutagenic activity of vinyl compounds and derived epoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmon, V F; Baden, J M

    1980-07-01

    Many vinyl compounds, such as vinyl chloride and some inhalational anesthetics, are known to be mutagens. In the present study, 10 vinyl compounds or derived epoxides, widely used in industry, were assayed in the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome system. 3 strains of histidine-dependent S. typhimurium, TA1535, TA98 and TA100 were used. Of the 10 compounds, 4 were mutagens. They were 9-vinylanthracene, vinylcarbazole, 3-vinyl-7-oxabicyclo[4.1.0]heptane and 3-epoxyethyl-7-oxabicyclo[4.1.0]-heptane. The study confirmed the overall genotoxicity of vinyl compounds and epoxides and the need to carefully screen them for mutagenic/carcinogenic effects.

  19. Mutagenic effectiveness and efficiency of gamma rays and ethyl methanesulhonate in Indian mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Singh, Basudeo

    1986-01-01

    Mutagenic effectiveness is a measure of the frequency of mutations induced by unit dose of a mutagen while mutagenic efficiency gives the proportion of mutations in relation to other associated undesirable biological effects such as gross chromosomal aberrations, lethality and sterility induced by the mutagen in question (Konzak, et al., 1965). The usefulness of any mutagen in plant breeding depends not only on its mutagenic effectiveness but also on its mutagenic efficiency. The efficiency and effectiveness of ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) in relation to gamma rays in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Coss] was studied. (author)

  20. BCR-ABL promotes the frequency of mutagenic single-strand annealing DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Margret S.; Reddy, Mamatha M.; Gonneville, Jeffrey R.; DeRoo, Scott C.; Podar, Klaus; Griffin, James D.; Weinstock, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular oxidative stress in cells transformed by the BCR-ABL oncogene is associated with increased DNA double-strand breaks. Imprecise repair of these breaks can result in the accumulation of mutations, leading to therapy-related drug resistance and disease progression. Using several BCR-ABL model systems, we found that BCR-ABL specifically promotes the repair of double-strand breaks through single-strand annealing (SSA), a mutagenic pathway that involves sequence repeats. Moreover, our results suggest that mutagenic SSA repair can be regulated through the interplay between BCR-ABL and extrinsic growth factors. Increased SSA activity required Y177 in BCR-ABL, as well as a functional PI3K and Ras pathway downstream of this site. Furthermore, our data hint at a common pathway for DSB repair whereby BCR-ABL, Tel-ABL, Tel-PDGFR, FLT3-ITD, and Jak2V617F all increase mutagenic repair. This increase in SSA may not be sufficiently suppressed by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the stromal microenvironment. Therefore, drugs that target growth factor receptor signaling represent potential therapeutic agents to combat tyrosine kinase-induced genomic instability. PMID:19571320

  1. An active site aromatic triad in Escherichia coli DNA Pol IV coordinates cell survival and mutagenesis in different DNA damaging agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Benson

    Full Text Available DinB (DNA Pol IV is a translesion (TLS DNA polymerase, which inserts a nucleotide opposite an otherwise replication-stalling N(2-dG lesion in vitro, and confers resistance to nitrofurazone (NFZ, a compound that forms these lesions in vivo. DinB is also known to be part of the cellular response to alkylation DNA damage. Yet it is not known if DinB active site residues, in addition to aminoacids involved in DNA synthesis, are critical in alkylation lesion bypass. It is also unclear which active site aminoacids, if any, might modulate DinB's bypass fidelity of distinct lesions. Here we report that along with the classical catalytic residues, an active site "aromatic triad", namely residues F12, F13, and Y79, is critical for cell survival in the presence of the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. Strains expressing dinB alleles with single point mutations in the aromatic triad survive poorly in MMS. Remarkably, these strains show fewer MMS- than NFZ-induced mutants, suggesting that the aromatic triad, in addition to its role in TLS, modulates DinB's accuracy in bypassing distinct lesions. The high bypass fidelity of prevalent alkylation lesions is evident even when the DinB active site performs error-prone NFZ-induced lesion bypass. The analyses carried out with the active site aromatic triad suggest that the DinB active site residues are poised to proficiently bypass distinctive DNA lesions, yet they are also malleable so that the accuracy of the bypass is lesion-dependent.

  2. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of emerging edible plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, G C; Chen, H Y; Peng, H H

    2001-11-01

    This study evaluates the toxic, mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of emerging edible plants that are consumed as new leafy vegetables in Taiwan. Among eight plant extracts, only the extracts of Sol (Solanum nigrum L.) showed cytotoxicity to Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in the absence of S9 mix. The toxicity of extracts from different parts of the Sol plant, such as leaf and stem, immature fruit and mature fruit, towards S. typhimurium TA100 and human lymphocytes was also assayed. The immature fruit extracts of Sol exhibited strong cytotoxicity with dose dependence and induced significant DNA damage in human lymphocytes based on the comet assay. However, no mutagenicity was found in eight plant extracts to TA98 or TA100 either with or without the S9 mixture. Sol and Sec [Sechium edule (Jacq.) Swartz] extracts showed the strongest inhibitory effect towards the mutagenicity of 2-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) in S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100; the ID(50) was less then 1 mg/plate. Cra [Crassocephalum creidioides (Benth.) S. Moore] extracts also expressed moderate antimutagenic activities towards IQ and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) either in TA98 or in TA100; the ID(50) was 1.63-2.41 mg/plate. The extracts from Bas (Basella alba L.), Bou (Boussingaultia gracilis Miers var. pseudobaselloides Bailey), Cen (Centella asiatica L. Urban), Cor (Corchorus olitorius L.) and Por (Portulaca oleracea L.) showed weak to moderate inhibition of mutagenicity of IQ. However, the potential antimutagenicity of these plant extracts towards B[a]P was weaker than that towards IQ. For a direct mutagen, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO), only the Sol extracts showed strong inhibitory effects in the TA100 system. The antimutagenic activity of water extracts of Sec was partly reduced by heating at 100 degrees C for 20 min. The heat-stable antimutagens in Sec extracts could be produced in the plant extract preparation process. Fractions with molecular weights above 30,000 showed the

  3. [Genetic control of the sensitivity of Aspergillus nidulans to mutagenic factors. VII. Inheritance of cross-sensitivity to different mutagenic factors by uvs-mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evseeva, G V; Kameneva, S V

    1977-01-01

    To study the inheritance of the sensitivity to UV, X-rays, methylmethanesulphonate (MMS), nitrosoguanidine (NG) and nitrous acid (NA) in five uvs mutants of Aspergillus nidulans, having multiple sensitivity to these factors, the sensitivity of recombinants obtained from crossing uvs mutants with uvs+ strain, resistant to all the factors analysed, and uvs leads to uvs+ revertants is investigated. Four uvs mutants (15, 17, 19 and 26) are found to have a nomogenic control of sensitivity to different mutagens. In one mutant (uvs11) the sensitivity to five factors is controlled by two non-linked mutations, one of them determining the sensitivity to UV, NG, NA, and the other--to X-rays and MMC. Phenotypic manifestations of uvs mutations is modified by cell genotype, both chromosomal and cytoplasmic factors being responsible for the modification. Phenotypic modification of uvs mutation results in the change to some (but not to all) mutagenic factors. It suggests, that not the product of uvs gene, but some other components of the reparation complex are modified. Otherwise, reparation of different DNA damages can be carried out by a single enzyme acting in different reparation complexes.

  4. Evaluation of mutagenic/antimutagenic activity of conjugated linoleic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of mutagenic/antimutagenic activity of conjugated linoleic acid in mice by micronucleus test. LBD Carvalho-Silva, MDV Oliveira, DT Konichi, MR Maróstica JR, PCB Lollo, J Amaya-Farfán ...

  5. In vitro evaluation of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of sitagliptin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro evaluation of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of sitagliptin alone and in combination with artificial sweeteners. Komal Najam, Imran Altaf, M Ashraf, M. Adil Rasheed, Faiza Saleem, Neelma Munir, Rasheeda Bashir ...

  6. Chemical mutagens: principles and methods for their detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Serres, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the development and validation of short-term assays designed to detect the mutagenic effects of environmental chemicals. Topics considered include the grasshopper neuroblast short-term assay for evaluating the effects of environmental chemicals on chromosomes and cell kinetics, a comparison of the mutagenic responses of lung-derived and skin-derived human diploid fibroblast populations, the L-arabinose resistance test with Salmonella typhimurium, the Bacillus subtilis multigene sporulation test for the detection of environmental mutagens, the L5178Y/TK gene mutation assay system, the induction of bacteriophage lambda by DNA-interacting chemicals, the granuloma pouch assay, the use of multiply marked Escherichia coli K12 strains in the host-mediated assay, and the detection of mutagens in human feces as an approach to the discovery of causes of colon cancer.

  7. Study of Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay of (E ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study of Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay of (E)-piplartine by the Ames test. AA Morandim-Giannetti, F Cotinguiba, LO Regasini, MC Frigieri, EA Varanda, A Coqueiro, MJ Kato, VS Bolzani, M Furlan ...

  8. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii cells. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlcek, D.; Podstavkova, S.; Dubovsky, J.

    1978-01-01

    The effect was investigated of single and combined actions of alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) and UV-radiation on the survival of cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation following mutagen activity. In particular, the single phases were investigated of the total lethal effect, i.e., the death of cells before division and their death after division. The most pronounced changes in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation were noted in cell death before division. In dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens, the effect of the combined action on the survival of cells changed from an additive (alkylnitrosourea + UV-radiation) to a protective effect (UV-radiation + alkylnitrosourea). (author)

  9. Mutagenic Activity of Indigofera truxillensis and I. suffruticosa Aerial Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Regina Calvo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigofera truxillensis and I. suffruticosa, are used as a source of indigo dye and to treat several diseases. The mutagenic activity of the methanolic extracts from aerial parts, glycerolipid, flavonoid and alkaloid fractions of the extract were evaluated by means of Salmonella/microsome assays using TA100, TA98, TA102 and TA97a strains. The methanolic extract of I. truxillensis showed mutagenic activity in the TA98 strain without S9 while glycerolipid fraction was devoid of activity. The flavonoid and alkaloid fractions of both plants showed mutagenicity. Chemical analysis of flavonoid fractions of I. truxillensis and I. suffruticosa resulted in the identification of kaempferol, quercetin and their derivatives. The alkaloid fraction of both the species contained indigo and indirubin and indigo was found mainly responsible for the mutagenic activity.

  10. Evaluation of mutagenic activity in an extract of pepper tree stem bark (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Maria Cleide Ribeiro Dantas; Barca, Francisco Napoleão Túlio Varela; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo

    2003-01-01

    An extract (decoction) from pepper tree stem bark (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi) is widely used in Brazil as a topical antiinflammatory agent and to cicatrize wounds. The extract contains catechin, tannins, terpenes, flavonoids, and saponins; of these components, both mutagenic potential and antioxidant properties have been ascribed to flavonoids. The mutagenicity of some flavonoids is believed to be associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species and seems to depend on the number and position of hydroxyl groups. In the present study, we evaluated an extract of S. terebinthifolius in a series of cell-free and bacterial assays in order to determine its genotoxic potential. The extract was negative in a cell-free plasmid DNA test, indicating that it did not directly break DNA. Positive results, however, were obtained in the SOS chromotest, in a forward mutagenesis assay employing CC104 and CC104mutMmutY strains of Escherichia coli, and in the Salmonella reversion assay, using strains TA97, TA98, TA100, and TA102. All the bacterial tests were performed without exogenous metabolic activation due to the topical use of this preparation. The results indicate that pepper tree stem bark extract produces DNA damage and mutation in bacteria, and that oxidative damage may be responsible for the genotoxicity. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Mutagenicity of Flavonoids Assayed by Bacterial Reverse Mutation (Ames Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aparecida Varanda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mutagenicity of ten flavonoids was assayed by the Ames test, in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA100 and TA102, with the aim of establishing hydroxylation pattern-mutagenicity relationship profiles. The compounds assessed were: quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, fisetin, chrysin, galangin, flavone, 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone. In the Ames assay, quercetin acted directly and its mutagenicity increased with metabolic activation. In the presence of S9 mix, kaempferol and galangin were mutagenic in the TA98 strain and kaempferol showed signs of mutagenicity in the other strains. The absence of hydroxyl groups, as in flavone, only signs of mutagenicity were shown in strain TA102, after metabolization and, among monohydroxylated flavones (3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 7-hydroxyflavone, the presence of hydroxyl groups only resulted in minor changes. Luteolin and fisetin also showed signs of mutagenicity in strain TA102. Finally, chrysin, which has only two hydroxy groups, at the 5-OH and 7-OH positions, also did not induce mutagenic activity in any of the bacterial strains used, under either activation condition. All the flavonoids were tested at concentrations varying from 2.6 to 30.7 nmol/plate for galangin and 12.1 to 225.0 nmol/plate for other flavonoids. In light of the above, it is necessary to clarify the conditions and the mechanisms that mediate the biological effects of flavonoids before treating them as therapeutical agents, since some compounds can be biotransformed into more genotoxic products; as is the case for galangin, kaempferol and quercetin.

  12. ASSESMENT OF BIOCHEMICAL ATTRIBUTES OF PRAECITRULLUS FISTULOSUS TREATED WITH MUTAGENS

    OpenAIRE

    Mehreen Khan

    2016-01-01

    Plants are well known to have certain primary and secondary metabolites collectively are known as biochemicals that plays an important role for human health as their medicinal properties. The aim of present study was to enhance and evaluate biochemical profile of Praecitrullus fistulosus by induced mutagenesis to cause genetic variations, plant leaves were treated with different chemical and physical mutagens. Colchicine and Ethidium bromide were used as chemical mutagens. While Ultraviolet (...

  13. The effect of Aspergillus niger mutagenization on citric acid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Walisch

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The industrial A. niger strain producing citric acid was mutagenized with the use of new chemical mutagens: free nitroxyl radicals. Strains of higher citric acid production yield were obtained. Citric acid was produced in a shorter time compared to the initial strain. During 6-12 months of storage most of the strains preserved their positive features which proves that mutants with profitable biotechnological properties were obtained. These mutants are used in industrial process.

  14. Mutagenic activity and heterocyclic amine content of the human diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M.G.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Cunningham, P.L.; Felton, J.S.

    1993-01-15

    The mutagenic activity and the mass amount of heterocyclic amines responsible for the mutagenic activity have been measured in some cooked foods. Cooked meats are the predominant source of mutagenic activity in the diet with values ranging from 0 to 10,000 revertants per gram reported in the Ames/Salmonelia test with strain TA98. Several heterocyclic amines are present and have been quantified using solid-phase extraction followed by HPLC. Frying at higher temperatures and for longer times produces the greatest mutagenic response, and concomitantly, the largest amounts of heterocyclic amines. Most of the mutagenic activity in fried meat samples can be accounted for by MelQx, DiMelQx and IQ, although other heterocylic amines are present and PHIP mutagenic activity becomes significant at higher temperatures. Non-meat products such as baked breads can also form significant mutagenic activity, particularly when overcooked. Commercially prepared hamburgers made from meat substitutes such as tofu, wheat gluten or tempeh and fried at 210{degrees}C have up to 10% of the mutagenic activity of a fried beef patty cooked under the same conditions. When detected, amounts of heterocyclic amines in fried beef patties range from a total of 0.35 ng/g for commercial beef hamburgers to 142 ng/g for a beef patty cooked over a barbecue. Dietary intake is expected to have a large range, from less than one microgram per day to over 50 micrograms per day based on current knowledge of known heterocyclic amine chemicals and heterocyclic amine-containing foods.

  15. Mutagenicity of comfrey (Symphytum Officinale) in rat liver

    OpenAIRE

    Mei, N; Guo, L; Fu, P P; Heflich, R H; Chen, T

    2005-01-01

    Comfrey is a rat liver toxin and carcinogen that has been used as a vegetable and herbal remedy by humans. In order to evaluate the mechanisms underlying its carcinogenicity, we examined the mutagenicity of comfrey in the transgenic Big Blue rat model. Our results indicate that comfrey is mutagenic in rat liver and the types of mutations induced by comfrey suggest that its tumorigenicity results from the genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the plant.

  16. Mutagenicity of comfrey (Symphytum Officinale) in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Guo, L; Fu, P P; Heflich, R H; Chen, T

    2005-03-14

    Comfrey is a rat liver toxin and carcinogen that has been used as a vegetable and herbal remedy by humans. In order to evaluate the mechanisms underlying its carcinogenicity, we examined the mutagenicity of comfrey in the transgenic Big Blue rat model. Our results indicate that comfrey is mutagenic in rat liver and the types of mutations induced by comfrey suggest that its tumorigenicity results from the genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the plant.

  17. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.

    1999-01-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  18. Hybrid lentivirus-phiC31-int-NLS vector allows site-specific recombination in murine and human cells but induces DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Grandchamp

    Full Text Available Gene transfer allows transient or permanent genetic modifications of cells for experimental or therapeutic purposes. Gene delivery by HIV-derived lentiviral vector (LV is highly effective but the risk of insertional mutagenesis is important and the random/uncontrollable integration of the DNA vector can deregulate the cell transcriptional activity. Non Integrative Lentiviral Vectors (NILVs solve this issue in non-dividing cells, but they do not allow long term expression in dividing cells. In this context, obtaining stable expression while avoiding the problems inherent to unpredictable DNA vector integration requires the ability to control the integration site. One possibility is to use the integrase of phage phiC31 (phiC31-int which catalyzes efficient site-specific recombination between the attP site in the phage genome and the chromosomal attB site of its Streptomyces host. Previous studies showed that phiC31-int is active in many eukaryotic cells, such as murine or human cells, and directs the integration of a DNA substrate into pseudo attP sites (pattP which are homologous to the native attP site. In this study, we combined the efficiency of NILV for gene delivery and the specificity of phiC31-int for DNA substrate integration to engineer a hybrid tool for gene transfer with the aim of allowing long term expression in dividing and non-dividing cells preventing genotoxicity. We demonstrated the feasibility to target NILV integration in human and murine pattP sites with a dual NILV vectors system: one which delivers phiC31-int, the other which constitute the substrate containing an attB site in its DNA sequence. These promising results are however alleviated by the occurrence of significant DNA damages. Further improvements are thus required to prevent chromosomal rearrangements for a therapeutic use of the system. However, its use as a tool for experimental applications such as transgenesis is already applicable.

  19. Depletion of cellular adenosine triphosphate and hepatocellular damage in rat after subchronic exposure to leachate from anthropogenic recycling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintunde, J K; Oboh, G

    2015-11-01

    One of the major hazards arising from recycling sites is the generation of leachate containing mixed metal. This study evaluated the toxic effects of leachate obtained from Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRSL) on male liver functions using hepatic indices and biomarker of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in rat via the oral route. Concentrations of heavy metals analysis showed that lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium, manganese, and iron were 1.5-, 2-, 2.5-, 1.36-, 19.61-, and 8.89-folds, respectively, higher than acceptable limits set by regulatory authority World Health Organization. Copper, zinc, and cobalt were 5.9-, 300-, and 1.02-folds, respectively, lower than permissible limits. The EOMABRSL was administered at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% concentrations to adult male rats for 60 days. Following exposure, plasma and livers were collected for several biochemistry assays. Exposure of animals to EOMABRSL resulted in 27.51, 28.14, 63.93, 28.42, and 40.16% increase in aspartate aminotransferase activity, whereas it elevated alanine aminotransferase activity by 5.35, 22.33, 88.68, 183.02, and 193.08%, respectively, when compared with the control. Similarly, γ-glutamyl transferase activity increased by 111.22, 114.19, 122.96, 573.14, and 437.02%, respectively, when compared with the control. EOMABRSL administration significantly decreased catalase activity and reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase with concomitant increase in malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide levels. Also, significant (p health hazards in subjects with occupational or environmental exposure. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Anti-mutagenic activity of Salvia merjamie extract against gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Khalid Mashay

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is an anti-cancer drug with clinically uses in the treatment of various neoplasms, including breast, ovarian, non-small cell lung, pancreaticand cervical cancers, T-cell malignancies, germ cell tumours, and hepatocellular carcinomas. However, it has also been reported to have many adverse effects. Naturally occurring anti-mutagenic effects, especially those of plant origin, have recently become a subject of intensive research. The present study was therefore designed to investigate the anti-mutagenic effects of Salvia merjamie (Family: Lamiaceae) plant extracts against the mutagenic effects of gemcitabine. The anti-mutagenic properties of Salvia merjamie were tested in Inbred SWR/J male and female mice bone marrow cells. The mice were treated in four groups; a control group treated with 30 mg/kg body weight gemcitabine and three treatment groups, each with 30 mg/kg body weight gemcitabine together with, respectively, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight Salvia merjamie extract. Chromosomal aberration and mitotic index assays were performed with the results demonstrating that Salvia merjamie extract protects bone marrow cells in mice against gemcitabine induced mutagenicity. This information can be used for the development of a potential therapeutic anti-mutagenic agents.

  1. Study of anti mutagenic and mutagenic effect of different chemicals on clinically isolated strains of pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.M.; Durrani, F.; Janjua, M.

    1994-01-01

    This project was undertaken to study the effect of twelve different compounds to test their anti mutagenic and mutagenic activity against clinically isolated strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of these compounds was estimated by counting the number of rifampicin resistant colonies growing in a particular time in a compound. The results were interpreted by plotting graphs between 10g N/NO (Rif R Colonies/ ml) and time to estimate the forward mutation rat. The results revealed that acridine, Basic fuchsin, Caffeine, cycloheximide, Ethidium bromide and Histidine probably have an anti mutagenic effect, while Cysteine, folic acid, Ethyl methane, suplphonate, Manganous Chloride and N-nitrosodietylamine acted as mutagen. Ecoli was used as control through out the study. (author)

  2. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    Free radicals produced during the radiolysis of water gives rise to a plethora of DNA damages including single strand breaks, sites of base loss and a wide variety of purine and pyrimidine base lesions. All these damages are processed in cells by base excision repair. The oxidative DNA glycosylases which catalyze the first step in the removal of a base damage during base excision repair evolved primarily to protect the cells from the deleterious mutagenic effects of single free radical-induced DNA lesions arising during oxidative metabolism. This is evidenced by the high spontaneous mutation rate in bacterial mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases. However, when a low LET photon transverses the DNA molecule, a burst of free radicals is produced during the radiolysis of water that leads to the formation of clustered damages in the DNA molecule, that are recognized by the oxidative DNA glycosylases. When substrates containing two closely opposed sugar damages or base and sugar damages are incubated with the oxidative DNA glycosylases in vitro, one strand is readily incised by the lyase activity of the DNA glycosylase. Whether or not the second strand is incised depends on the distance between the strand break resulting from the incised first strand and the remaining DNA lesion on the other strand. If the lesions are more than two or three base pairs apart, the second strand is readily cleaved by the DNA glycosylase, giving rise to a double strand break. Even if the entire base excision repair system is reconstituted in vitro, whether or not a double strand break ensues depends solely upon the ability of the DNA glycosylase to cleave the second strand. These data predicted that cells deficient in the oxidative DNA glycosylases would be radioresistant while those that overproduce an oxidative DNA glycosylase would be radiosensitive. This prediction was indeed borne in Escherichia coli that is, mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radioresistant

  3. Updated synthesis of the knowledge about the impact on marine environment of the radioactive releases from Fukushima Dai-ichi damaged site - October 26, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    A strong radioactive contamination of the marine environment close to the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant has been observed since March 21. The high concentration of some nuclides ( 131 I, 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 132 Te, 132 I) comes from three possible sources: the liquid effluents from the damaged site, the atmospheric fallouts, and the weathering of contaminated soils. This information note presents and comments the most recent informations gathered by the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) since the previous information note from July 11 and devoted to the same topic. It presents the estimation of the relative contribution of each contamination source and the evolution with time of the marine contamination. The mapping of 137 Cs concentrations in surface seawater allows to estimate the amount of total 137 Cs in the marine environment and its evolution with time. 137 Cs and 134 Cs concentrations were measured both in samples of surface coastal sediments and in river fishes and seafood products (mainly fishes and molluscs). Results are reported in graphs showing their evolution with time. (J.S.)

  4. Size of and damage on shoots of Passiflora suberosa (Passifloraceae influence oviposition site selection of Heliconius erato phyllis (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elna Mugrabi-Oliveira

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition site selection of Heliconius erato phyllis (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae was studied when size of and damage on shoots were variable in a natural population of Passiflora suberosa Linnaeus (Passifloraceae, and through sequential and simultaneous choice experiments performed under insectary conditions. Females showed marked oviposition preference for undamaged and largest shoots of P. suberosa. Eggs were mostly laid on the terminal buds of intact shoots under natural conditions. In simultaneous choice trials, females preferred to oviposit on shoots from which leaves (ten were removed but the terminal bud maintained to those where leaves were kept but the terminal bud was cut out. In sequential choice trials, they did not lay eggs on shoots from which the terminal bud was removed. Females preferred to oviposit on large to short intact shoots in both sequential and simultaneous choice trials. Females laid eggs preferentially on shoots with the greatest leaf area when most plants were intact in the field during early spring. Later in fall, when mostly large, old shoots were damaged or in a reproductive stage (less desirable for oviposition, oviposition intensity was highest on the shortest, youngest shoots of P. suberosa. Thus, females might rank these quality attributes higher than size while selecting shoots for oviposition. The consequences of ovipositing selectively on intact, large shoots of P. suberosa are discussed from the view point of H. erato phyllis larval performance.

  5. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    features of energy transfer of the radiations that affect the character of induced DNA damage, and the efficiency inducible and constitutive cell repair systems. The growth of relative biological efficiency of heavy charged particles is determined by the growth of the damage yield of the DNA participating in the formation of radiation-induced effects, and higher efficiency of inducible repair systems. It was established that the LET value ( L max) for which the maximum (according to the applied irradiation criteria) coefficients of relative biological efficiency are observed varies depending on the character of the registered radiation induced effect. It was demonstrated that for gene mutations and induction of precision excision of mobile elements the values of L max are realized in a LET range of ≈20 keV/μm. For lethal effects of irradiation and induction of deletion mutations the value of L max is ≈ 100 and 50 keV/μm, respectively. The differences in the L max for the studied radiation gene effectis are determined by the different type of DNA damage participating in the mutation process. A molecular model of the formation of gene mutations in Escherichia coli cells under the action of ionizing radiation was proposed. Basic DNA radiation damage and main repair ways were considered in the framework of this model. The basis is the idea of the decisive role of mutagenic, error-prone, branch of SOS repair in fixing premutation DNA damage into point mutations. It was demonstrated that the central mechanism in this process is the formation of an inducible multi-enzymatic complex including the DNA polymerase V (Umu C), RecA-protease, SSB proteins, subunits of DNA polymerase III, performing erroneous DNA synthesis on the damaged matrix. A mathematical model of induction of gene mutations under ultraviolet cell irradiation was developed based on the molecular model.

  6. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and mutagenicity in bus drivers and mail carriers exposed to urban air pollution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Wallin, Håkan; Binderup, Mona Lise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies in Denmark have shown that bus drivers and tramway employees were at an increased risk for developing several types of cancer and that bus drives from central Copenhagen have high levels of biomarkers of DNA damage.AIMS: The present study evaluates 1-hydroxypyrene...... concentrations and mutagenic activity in urine as biomarkers of exposure in non-smoking bus drivers in city and rural areas on a work day and a day off and in non-smoking mail carriers working outdoors (in the streets) and indoors (in the office). METHODS: Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected...... on a working day and a day off from 60 non-smoking bus drivers in city and rural areas and from 88 non-smoking mail carriers working outdoors (in the streets) and indoors (in the office). The concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene was measured by means of HPLC and the mutagenic activity was assessed by the Ames...

  7. Host DNA damage response factors localize to merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication sites to support efficient viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sabrina H; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B; You, Jianxin

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR

  8. Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

  9. Mutagenicity of irradiated solutions of nuclei acid bases and nucleosides in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmer, J.; Schubert, J.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides and a nucleotide, saturated with either N 2 , N 2 O or O 2 , were irradiated and tested for mutagenicity towards Salmonella typhimurium, with and without pre-incubation. Irradiated solutions of the nuclei acid bases were all non-mutagenic. Irradiated solutions of the nucleosides showed mutagenicity in S. typhimurium TA100 (pre-incubation assay). Generally, the mutagenicity followed the order: N 2 O > N 2 > O 2 . The results show that the formation of mutagenic radiolytic products is initiated by attack of mainly solutions of the nucleotide thymidine-5'-monophosphate, no mutagenicity could be detected. (orig.)

  10. Impaired recovery and mutagenic SOS-like responses in ataxia telangiectasia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, G. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Abrahams, P.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Chen, Y.Q. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)); Schouten, R. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Cornelis, J.J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France)); Lowe, J.E. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK)); Eb, A.J. van der (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Rommelaere, J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France))

    1989-01-01

    Radiosensitive fibroblasts from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) were studied for their proficiency in two putative eukaryotic SOS-like responses, namely the enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis of damaged viruses infecting pre-irradiated versus mock-treated cells. A previous report indicated that, unlike normal human cells, a line of AT fibroblasts (AT5BIVA) could not be induced to express ER of damaged parvovirus H-1, a single-stranded DNA virus, by UV- or X-irradiation. In the present study, AT5BIVA fibroblasts were also distinguished from normal cells by the inability of the former to achieve enhanced mutagenesis of damaged H-1 virus upon cell UV-irradiation. In contrast, dose-response and time-course experiments revealed normal levels of ER of Herpes simplex virus 1, a double-stranded DNA virus, in X- or UV-irradiated AT5BIVA cells. Taken together, these data point to a possible deficiency of AT cells in a conditioned mutagenic process that contributes to a greater extent to the recovery of damaged single-stranded than double-stranded DNA. Such a defect may concern the replication of damaged DNA or the generation of signals promoting the latter process and may be related to the lack of radiation-induced delay that is typical of AT cell DNA synthesis. (author).

  11. Two nitro derivatives of azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide: Electronic properties and their relation to mutagenic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostojić, Bojana D., E-mail: bostojic@chem.bg.ac.rs; Đorđević, Dragana S.

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Molecular properties of nitro isomers of azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide are investigated. • Stability, ionization potential, electron affinity, and polarizability are determined. • High quality DFT methods are employed. • Nitroreduction, oxidation, and polarizability are not crucial for mutagenicity. • Dipole moment and electronic charge distribution are important for characterization. - Abstract: The equilibrium geometries, relative energies, IR and Raman spectra, vertical ionization potentials (IP), vertical electron affinities (EA), dipole moments (μ), electronic dipole polarizabilities (α), and molecular electrostatic potentials (MEP) of two species that show very high mutagenicity, 1-nitro-6-azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide (1-N-6-ABPO) and 3-nitro-6-azabenzo[a]pyrene N-oxide (3-N-6-ABPO), are investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional with different basis sets. The 3-N-6-ABPO isomer was estimated to be much more mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA98 (396 000 revertants/nmol) than 1-N-6-ABPO (36 100 revertants/nmol) (Fukuhara et al., 1992). The results show that for both isomers the structural, energetic, and vibrational properties are similar. The orientation of the nitro group with respect to the plane of the aromatic system as well as the nitroreduction and oxidation reaction and polarizability seem not be important for the determination of different mutagenic behavior of these isomers. However, the dipole moment of 3-N-6-ABPO is about 3 times that of 1-N-6-ABPO. The larger dipole moment and the different electronic charge distribution of 3-N-6-ABPO compared to 1-N-6-ABPO imply stronger electrostatic and inductive molecular interactions so that the active site of the enzyme involved in the mutagenic activation can more effectively bind 3-N-6-ABPO compared to 1-N-6-ABPO.

  12. Imaging San Jacinto Fault damage zone structure using dense linear arrays: application of ambient noise tomography, Rayleigh wave ellipticity, and site amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The San Jacinto fault is presently the most seismically active component of the San Andreas Transform system in Southern California. To study the damage zone structure, two dense linear geophone arrays (BS and RR) were deployed across the Clark segment of the San Jacinto Fault between Anza and Hemet during winter 2015 and Fall 2016, respectively. Both arrays were 2 km long with 20 m station spacing. Month-long three-component ambient seismic noise data were recorded and used to calculate multi-channel cross-correlation functions. All three-component noise records of each array were normalized simultaneously to retain relative amplitude information between different stations and different components. We observed clear Rayleigh waves and Love waves on the cross-correlations of both arrays at 0.3 - 1 s period. The phase travel times of the Rayleigh waves on both arrays were measured by frequency-time analysis (FTAN), and inverted for Rayleigh wave phase velocity profiles of the upper 500 m depth. For both arrays, we observe prominent asymmetric low velocity zones which narrow with depth. At the BS array near the Hemet Stepover, an approximately 250m wide slow zone is observed to be offset by 75m to the northeast of the surface fault trace. At the RR array near the Anza segment of the fault, a similar low velocity zone width and offset are observed, along with a 10% across-fault velocity contrast. Analyses of Rayleigh wave ellipticity (H/V ratio), Love wave phase travel times, and site amplification are in progress. By using multiple measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations, we can obtain strong constraints on the local damage zone structure of the San Jacinto Fault. The results contribute to improved understanding of rupture directivity, maximum earthquake magnitude and more generally seismic hazard associated with the San Jacinto fault zone.

  13. In vivo evaluation of mutagenic and recombinagenic activities of Brazilian propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carmem Regine Faleiro; Plentz, Luciana Ciarelli; Marcucci, Maria Cristina; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Lehmann, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Propolis is a resinous, complex mixture of compounds collected by the bee species Apis mellifera. This study investigated the genotoxicity of green and brown propolis collected in southeast Brazil using the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. The effect of five concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 7.5 mg/mL) of both propolis types was analyzed in standard (ST) and high-bioactivation (HB) crosses, which have normal and high levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes, respectively. The results show that the types of propolis evaluated have no mutagenic action, in either cross. Moreover, chromatography findings revealed that the propolis types analyzed have different chemical compositions. Brown propolis had lower levels of polyphenols (∼7.2 mg/mL), compared to the green type (34.9 mg/g). Taken together, the findings of the present study and literature reports point to the safety in consuming low amounts of propolis, considering the risk of genetic damage, and confirm the absence of mutagenic and recombinagenic actions of the propolis types investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutagenic/recombinogenic effects of four lipid peroxidation products in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Eşref; Turna, Fatma; Kaya, Bülent; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, Ricard

    2013-03-01

    The human diet is an important factor in the development of different diseases. Lipid peroxidation during frying in edible vegetable liquid oils of food components is a mechanism leading to the formation of free radicals. Such radicals induce tissue damage and are implicated in diverse pathological conditions, including aging, atherosclerosis, brain disorders, cancer, lung disorders and various liver disorders. In the present study, we decided to investigate the genotoxic effects of four lipid peroxidation products in the in vivo Drosophila wing somatic mutation and recombination test. In this test, point mutation, chromosome breakage and mitotic recombination produce single spots; while twin spots are produced only by mitotic recombination. Drosophila is a suitable eukaryotic organism for mutagenicity studies and also its metabolism is quite similar to that of mammalians. Since conflicting data exist on the possible risk of several lipid peroxidation products for humans, we have selected four of them, namely acrolein, crotonaldehyde, 4-hydroxy-hexenal (4-HHE) and 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE). Especially at the highest concentrations tested all exert both mutagenic and recombinogenic effects in the Drosophila SMART assay, showing a direct dose-effect relationship. This is the first study reporting genotoxicity data in Drosophila for these compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective Effect of Prolactin against Methylmercury-Induced Mutagenicity and Cytotoxicity on Human Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Carmem Silva-Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exhibits cytotoxic and mutagenic properties as a result of its effect on tubulin. This toxicity mechanism is related to the production of free radicals that can cause DNA damage. Methylmercury (MeHg is one of the most toxic of the mercury compounds. It accumulates in the aquatic food chain, eventually reaching the human diet. Several studies have demonstrated that prolactin (PRL may be differently affected by inorganic and organic mercury based on interference with various neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of PRL secretion. This study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of PRL on human lymphocytes exposed to MeHg in vitro, including observation of the kinetics of HL-60 cells (an acute myeloid leukemia lineage treated with MeHg and PRL at different concentrations, with both treatments with the individual compounds and combined treatments. All treatments with MeHg produced a significant increase in the frequency of chromatid gaps, however, no significant difference was observed in the chromosomal breaks with any treatment. A dose-dependent increase in the mitotic index was observed for treatments with PRL, which also acts as a co-mitogenic factor, regulating proliferation by modulating the expression of genes that are essential for cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton organization. These properties contribute to the protective action of PRL against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of MeHg.

  16. Evaluation of mutagenicity of wastewater in the vicinity of pesticide industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Reshma; Malik, Abdul

    2013-03-01

    Pesticide industrial wastewater samples were taken from the Chinhat industrial area nearby Lucknow city, India. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of pesticides lindane, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, chlorpyriphos, monocrotophos, dimethoate and malathion. A pesticide mixture and wastewater extracts were studied to determine the mutagenicity by Ames Salmonella test, survival of DNA repair defective E. coli K-12 mutants and bacteriophage λ systems. Wastewater samples were concentrated with XAD-resins as an adsorbent and liquid-liquid extraction procedure. The XAD concentrated sample exhibited maximum mutagenic activity in comparison to liquid-liquid extracted sample. TA98 strain was the most responsive strain for both test samples with (+S9) and without (-S9) metabolic activation, while other strains exhibited weak response. A significant decline of DNA repair defective E. coli K-12 mutants, bacteriophage λ was observed with test samples in the survival. The intracellular damage was highest when treated with XAD concentrated sample as compared to liquid-liquid extract after 6h treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutagenic activity as a parameter to assess ambient air quality for protection of the environment and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2003-11-01

    Atmospheric pollution has significant effects on maintaining the integrity of ecosystems and on the population's quality of life. Epidemiological studies have clearly associated related health problems, especially respiratory diseases, with exposure to air pollution. Organic compounds adsorbed to the airborne particulate matter are mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay, and a considerable number of them are known to be carcinogenic to rodents. Studies performed at four sites within the urban area of Porto Alegre, capital of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, identified higher mutagenic activity at the sites with heavier vehicle traffic in assays without and with metabolic activation. The responses varied at different seasons of the year, and the highest revertants per cubic meter (rev/m(3)) values were observed in spring for moderately polar compounds, and in summer for non-polar ones. A pilot study was also performed in the region under the influence of a industrial petrochemical area. Most of the sites studied within the industrial area, as compared to others sampled in the nearby environment, presented higher levels of mutagenic activity independent of total suspended particulates (TSP) concentration in the sample. In the urban and industrial regions, the observed mutagenic activities were strongly associated with the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The responses observed in the TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP(6) strains suggest the activity of nitrocompounds in both studies. The Salmonella/microsome assay is a sensitive method to define areas contaminated by these compounds, even in samples with TSP values that are consistent with the legal environmental quality standards.

  18. Mutagenicity studies on alcohol extracts from gamma-irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishidate, M. Jr.; Yoshikawa, Kunie; Sofuni, Toshio; Iwahara, Shigeo; Sibuya, Tohru.

    1981-01-01

    The alcohol extracts freshly prepared from gamma-irradiated potatoes were examined for their mutagenic activity in bacterial and mammalian cell systems. Negative results were obtained from all following test systems: Mutation assays with Salmonella typhimurium His - strains such as TA 100, TA 98, TA 1535, TA 1537, and streptomycin-dependent mutant (SM sup(d)) strain, TA 100 - 10, inductests with Escherichia coli strains, K 12 GY 5027 and K 12 C600, chromosomal aberration tests with Chinese hamster cells in culture, as well as micronucleus tests in mice. In addition, no difference in the mutagenic activities was found between extracts prepared from the irradiated and the unirradiated potatoes, suggesting that no mutagenic substance was produced in potatoes following gamma-irradiation. (author)

  19. Mutagenicity of a Glutathione Conjugate of Butadiene Diepoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hee; Loecken, Elisabeth M.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2013-01-01

    The mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of the important commodity chemical 1,3-butadiene are attributed to the epoxide products. We confirmed our previous work showing that expression of rat glutathione (GSH) transferase 5-5 enhances the mutagenicity of butadiene diepoxide in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535. A GSH-butadiene diepoxide was isolated and fully characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR as S-(2-hydroxy-3,4-epoxybutyl)GSH. The conjugate had a t1/2 of 2.6 h (pH 7.4, 37 °C) and was considerably more mutagenic than butadiene diepoxide or monoepoxide in S. typhimurium. We propose that the GSH conjugate may be a major species involved in butadiene genotoxicity, not a detoxication product. PMID:20879737

  20. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Stel JJ van der; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    De mutagene en antimutagene eigenschappen van bioflavonoiden werden in de bacteriele mutageniteitstest van Ames met Salmonella typhimurium stammen TA98 en TA100 onderzocht. De volgorde van mutagene activiteit voor beide stammen in aanwezigheid van metabole activering was

  1. Study on increasing mutagenic efficiency of radiation breeding for rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Xianguo; Pang Boliang; Zhu Xiaoqi

    1993-04-01

    Increasing mutagenic efficiency and improving selection method are of important topics for crop mutation breeding. Investigation on the radiation breeding for rice (Oryza Sativa L.) showed that the crossing in combination with gamma ray irradiation or laser irradiation and proper selection of dosage rate can increase mutagenic efficiency. According to the correlation of phenotype in M 1 generation and mutation frequency in M 2 for rice, the materials with certain characters were chose as seeds, thus the works of generation selections will be reduced

  2. Mutagenicity of a Glutathione Conjugate of Butadiene Diepoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Hee; Loecken, Elisabeth M.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of the important commodity chemical 1,3-butadiene are attributed to the epoxide products. We confirmed our previous work showing that expression of rat glutathione (GSH) transferase 5-5 enhances the mutagenicity of butadiene diepoxide in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535. A GSH-butadiene diepoxide was isolated and fully characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR as S-(2-hydroxy-3,4-epoxybutyl)GSH. The conjugate had a t1/2 of 2.6 h (pH 7.4, 37 °C) and was consi...

  3. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    OpenAIRE

    Samiei, Mohammad; Asgary, Saeed; Farajzadeh, Malak; Bargahi, Nasrin; Abdolrahimi, Majid; Kananizadeh, Usef; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the pres...

  4. Mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter from the urban area of Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria Ferrão Vargas

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter collected from three different sites within the urban area of Porto Alegre, Brazil, was investigated using a Salmonella/microsome assay. Samples were extracted by sonication, sequentially, with cyclohexane (CX, and dichloromethane (DCM, for a rough fractionation by polarity. The different fractions were tested for mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, with and without metabolic activation (S9 mix fraction, and TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6, without metabolic activation. Mutagenic response was observed for frameshift strain TA98 in assays with and without metabolization for two sites (sites 2 and 3, which had considerable risk of environmental contamination by nonpolar (CX and/or moderately polar (DCM compounds. However, the values of revertants/m3 (rev/m3 were highest on the site subject to automobile exhaust (site 3 in assays without (9.56 rev/m3 and with metabolization (5.08 rev/m3. Maximum mutagenic activity was detected in the moderately polar fraction, decreasing after metabolization. Nevertheless, the nonpolar fractions (CX gave higher mutagenic activity in the presence of metabolization than in the absence of the S9 mix fraction. The responses observed for TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 strains suggest the activity of nitrocompounds.Foi investigada a atividade mutagênica de material particulado de amostras de ar coletadas em três diferentes locais dentro da área urbana da cidade de Porto Alegre, Brasil, através do ensaio Salmonella/microssoma. As amostras foram extraídas, em ultra-som, por fracionamento seqüencial de acordo com a polaridade, utilizando os solventes ciclohexano (CX e diclorometano (DCM. As diferentes frações foram testadas para mutagenicidade com as linhagens de Salmonella typhimurium TA98, em presença e ausência de ativação metabólica, e TA98NR e TA98/1,8-DNP6 em ausência de metabolização. Observou-se resposta mutagênica positiva, do tipo erro

  5. Characterisation of Beaver Habitat Parameters That Promote the Use of Culverts as Dam Construction Sites: Can We Limit the Damage to Forest Roads?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Tremblay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of forest roads as foundations for dam construction by beavers is a recurrent problem in the management of forest road networks. In order to limit the damage to forest roads, our goal was to calculate the probability of beaver dam installation on culverts, according to surrounding habitat parameters, which could allow for improvement in the spatial design of new roads that minimise conflicts with beavers. Comparisons of culverts with (n = 77 and without (n = 51 dams in northwestern Quebec showed that catchment surface, cumulate length of all local streams within a 2-km radius, and road embankment height had a negative effect on the probability of dam construction on culverts, while flow level and culvert diameter ratio had a positive effect. Nevertheless, predicted probabilities of dam construction on culverts generally exceeded 50%, even on sites that were less favourable to beavers. We suggest that it would be more reasonable to take their probable subsequent presence into account at the earliest steps of road conception. Installing mitigation measures such as pre-dams during road construction would probably reduce the occurrence of conflicts with beavers and thus reduce the maintenance costs of forest roads.

  6. Spontaneous and mutagen-induced deletions: mechanistic studies in Salmonella tester strain TA102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, D.E.; Marnett, L.J.; Ames, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    Salmonella tester strain TA102 carries the hisG428 ochre mutation on the multicopy plasmid pAQ1. DNA sequence analysis of 45 spontaneous revertants of hisG428 on the chromosome in the presence of pKM101 (strain TA103) indicates that hisG428 revertants fall into three major categories: (i) small, in-frame deletions (3 or 6 base pairs) that remove part or all of the ochre triplet; (ii) base substitution mutations at the ochre site; (iii) extragenic ochre suppressors. Deletion revertants are identified in a simple phenotypic screen by their resistance to the inhibitory histidine analog thiazolealanine, which feedback inhibits the wild-type hisG enzyme but not the enzyme resulting from the deletions. The effect of various genetic backgrounds on the generation of spontaneous deletion revertants was examined. The presence of a uvrB mutation or a recA mutation suppressed the generation of spontaneous deletion revertants to approximately 1/2.5. When hisG428 was in multiple copies on pAQ1, the frequency of spontaneous deletion revertants increased by 40-fold, which is the approximate copy number of pAQ1. Mutagenic agents that induce single-strand breaks in DNA (e.g., x-rays, bleomycin, and nalidixic acid) induced deletion revertants in TA102. These agents induced deletion revertants only in hisG428 on pAQ1 and only in the presence of pKM101. Deletion revertants were not induced by frameshift mutagens (i.e., ICR-191 and 9aminoacridine). These results indicate that different pathways exist for the generation of spontaneous and mutagen-induced deletion revertants of hisG428. 41 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  7. Topology of evolving, mutagenized viral populations: quasispecies expansion, compression, and operation of negative selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojosnegros, Samuel; Agudo, Rubén; Sierra, Macarena; Briones, Carlos; Sierra, Saleta; González-López, Claudia; Domingo, Esteban; Cristina, Juan

    2008-07-17

    The molecular events and evolutionary forces underlying lethal mutagenesis of virus (or virus extinction through an excess of mutations) are not well understood. Here we apply for the first time phylogenetic methods and Partition Analysis of Quasispecies (PAQ) to monitor genetic distances and intra-population structures of mutant spectra of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) quasispecies subjected to mutagenesis by base and nucleoside analogues. Phylogenetic and PAQ analyses have revealed a highly dynamic variation of intrapopulation diversity of FMDV quasispecies. The population diversity first suffers striking expansions in the presence of mutagens and then compressions either when the presence of the mutagenic analogue was discontinued or when a mutation that decreased sensitivity to a mutagen was selected. The pattern of mutations found in the populations was in agreement with the behavior of the corresponding nucleotide analogues with FMDV in vitro. Mutations accumulated at preferred genomic sites, and dn/ds ratios indicate the operation of negative (or purifying) selection in populations subjected to mutagenesis. No evidence of unusually elevated genetic distances has been obtained for FMDV populations approaching extinction. Phylogenetic and PAQ analysis provide adequate procedures to describe the evolution of viral sequences subjected to lethal mutagenesis. These methods define the changes of intra-population structure more precisely than mutation frequencies and Shannon entropies. PAQ is very sensitive to variations of intrapopulation genetic distances. Strong negative (or purifying) selection operates in FMDV populations subjected to enhanced mutagenesis. The quantifications provide evidence that extinction does not imply unusual increases of intrapopulation complexity, in support of the lethal defection model of virus extinction.

  8. Topology of evolving, mutagenized viral populations: quasispecies expansion, compression, and operation of negative selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierra Saleta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular events and evolutionary forces underlying lethal mutagenesis of virus (or virus extinction through an excess of mutations are not well understood. Here we apply for the first time phylogenetic methods and Partition Analysis of Quasispecies (PAQ to monitor genetic distances and intra-population structures of mutant spectra of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV quasispecies subjected to mutagenesis by base and nucleoside analogues. Results Phylogenetic and PAQ analyses have revealed a highly dynamic variation of intrapopulation diversity of FMDV quasispecies. The population diversity first suffers striking expansions in the presence of mutagens and then compressions either when the presence of the mutagenic analogue was discontinued or when a mutation that decreased sensitivity to a mutagen was selected. The pattern of mutations found in the populations was in agreement with the behavior of the corresponding nucleotide analogues with FMDV in vitro. Mutations accumulated at preferred genomic sites, and dn/ds ratios indicate the operation of negative (or purifying selection in populations subjected to mutagenesis. No evidence of unusually elevated genetic distances has been obtained for FMDV populations approaching extinction. Conclusion Phylogenetic and PAQ analysis provide adequate procedures to describe the evolution of viral sequences subjected to lethal mutagenesis. These methods define the changes of intra-population structure more precisely than mutation frequencies and Shannon entropies. PAQ is very sensitive to variations of intrapopulation genetic distances. Strong negative (or purifying selection operates in FMDV populations subjected to enhanced mutagenesis. The quantifications provide evidence that extinction does not imply unusual increases of intrapopulation complexity, in support of the lethal defection model of virus extinction.

  9. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of bioflavonoids and structural analogues in the Ames/Salmonella test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohn GR; Van der Stel JJ; Stavenuiter JFC; Hamzink MRJ; Kreijl CF; LEO; LBO

    1996-01-01

    The mutagenic and antimutagenic properties of bioflavonoids were determined in the bacterial mutagenicity test of Ames, using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. The decreasing order of mutagenic activity found in both strains was quercetin>myricetin-kaempferol>morin hydrate. The

  10. REVIEW OF THE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM MUTAGENICITY OF BENZIDINE, BENZIDINE ANALOGUES, AND BENZIDINE-BASED DYES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mutagenicity of benzidine analogues (including benzidine-based dyes) was reviewed with a primary emphasis on evaluating results of the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. Many of these amines are mutagenic in tester strains TA98 and TA100 but require exogenous mammalian ...

  11. Mutagenicity of heated sugar-casein systems : effect of the Maillard :reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, C.M.J.; Alink, G.M.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Jongen, W.M.F.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of mutagens after the heating of sugar-casein model systems at 120 C was examined by the Ames test, using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100. Several sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, tagatose, lactose, and lactulose) were compared in their mutagenicities. Mutagenicity could be

  12. 40 Years of the Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: Implications for 21st Century Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay was developed and introduced by Bruce Ames and colleagues in 1971. Since then, it has become the standard assay for hazard identification of mutagens worldwide. It is a first-tier test for mutagenic activity in the pharmaceutical and chemi...

  13. Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D.

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents constitute a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial ...

  14. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial fo...

  15. A comprehensive survey of the mutagenic impact of common cancer cytotoxics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szikriszt, Bernadett; Poti, Adam; Pipek, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    , hydroxyurea, doxorubicin and paclitaxel have no measurable mutagenic effect. The cisplatin-induced mutation spectrum shows good correlation with cancer mutation signatures attributed to smoking and other sources of guanine-directed base damage. Conclusion: This study provides support for the use of cell line......Background: Genomic mutations caused by cytotoxic agents used in cancer chemotherapy may cause secondary malignancies as well as contribute to the evolution of treatment-resistant tumour cells. The stable diploid genome of the chicken DT40 lymphoblast cell line, an established DNA repair model......-10 per base per cell division and find that cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide induce extra base substitutions with distinct spectra. After four cycles of exposure, cisplatin induces 0.8 mutations per Mb, equivalent to the median mutational burden in common leukaemias. Cisplatin-induced mutations...

  16. 2-O-α-glucopytanosyl L-ascorbic acid reduced mutagenicity at HPRT locus of mouse splenocytes following BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Minoru; Nagata, Kanji; Ono, Koji

    2006-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), normal tissue surrounding the tumor cells sometimes take up boron compounds resulting in radiation-induced damage to normal tissue. We have previously reported the evidence for increased the mutagenicity of thermal neutron in the presence of boron. In addition, we described the biological radio-protective effects of the ascorbic acid for mutation induction following BNCT in vitro. Here, we investigated these radio-protective effects of ascorbic acid for mutation induction in mouse splenocytes on HPRT locus following a BNCT study in vivo. (author)

  17. What are sister chromatid exchanges. [Applications of SCE test in investigations of properties of carcinogens and mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, S. M.

    1977-05-01

    Methods for detecting sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and some applications of the SCE test in investigations of the properties of carcinogens and mutagens are discussed. The relations of SCEs to chromosome aberration formation, DNA repair processes, and mutation were studied. It was concluded that SCEs are not simply related to chromosome aberrations or to any one known repair mechanism. They may involve a recombination event, often instituted at the replication fork, but also provoked by any unrepaired damage in the replicated DNA. The molecular mechanism of SCE is unknown and the investigation of the relationship of SCE to mutation is only beginning to yield information.

  18. Mutagenicity, genotoxicity and gene expression of Rad51C, Xiap, P53 and Nrf2 induced by antimalarial extracts of plants collected from the middle Vaupés region, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Viviana Barbosa

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: These results revealed that the T002 extract was the safest as it had antimalarial activity and was not cytotoxic on HepG2 cells. Moreover, it was not mutagenic and it only produced category 1 damage on the DNA. Also, the extract did not induce a change in the expression of the tested genes.

  19. Distinct pathways for repairing mutagenic lesions induced by methylating and ethylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Kentaro; Kaneto, Satomi; Nakano, Kota; Watanabe, Shinji; Takahashi, Eizo; Arimoto, Sakae; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Schaaper, Roel M; Negishi, Kazuo; Negishi, Tomoe

    2013-05-01

    DNA alkylation damage can be repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER) or by direct removal of alkyl groups from modified bases by O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT; E.C. 2.1.1.63). DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is also likely involved in this repair. We have investigated alkylation-induced mutagenesis in a series of NER- or AGT-deficient Escherichia coli strains, alone or in combination with defects in the MutS, MutL or MutH components of MMR. All strains used contained the F'prolac from strain CC102 (F'CC102) episome capable of detecting specifically lac GC to AT reverse mutations resulting from O(6)-alkylguanine. The results showed the repair of O(6)-methylguanine to be performed by AGT ≫ MMR > NER in order of importance, whereas the repair of O(6)-ethylguanine followed the order NER > AGT > MMR. Studies with double mutants showed that in the absence of AGT or NER repair pathways, the lack of MutS protein generally increased mutant frequencies for both methylating and ethylating agents, suggesting a repair or mutation avoidance role for this protein. However, lack of MutL or MutH protein did not increase alkylation-induced mutagenesis under these conditions and, in fact, reduced mutagenesis by the N-alkyl-N-nitrosoureas MNU and ENU. The combined results suggest that little or no alkylation damage is actually corrected by the mutHLS MMR system; instead, an as yet unspecified interaction of MutS protein with alkylated DNA may promote the involvement of a repair system other than MMR to avoid a mutagenic outcome. Furthermore, both mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of MMR were detected, revealing a dual function of the MMR system in alkylation-exposed cells.

  20. Lethal and mutagenic effects of 8-methoxypsoralen-induced lesions on plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramio, J M; Bauluz, C; de Vidania, R

    1987-01-01

    The genotoxic effect of 8-methoxypsoralen damages (monoadducts and crosslinks) on plasmid DNA was studied. pBR322 DNA was treated with several concentrations of 8-methoxypsoralen plus fixed UVA light irradiation. After transformation into E. coli cells with different repair capacities (uvrA, recA and wild-type), plasmid survival and mutagenesis in ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant genes were analysed. Results showed that crosslinks were extremely lethal in all 3 strains; indeed, it seemed that they were not repaired even in proficient bacteria. Monoadducts were also found to be lethal although they were removed to some extent by the excision-repair pathway (uvrA-dependent). Damaged plasmid DNA appeared to induce mutagenic repair, but only in the wild-type strain. In order to study the influence of the SOS response on plasmid recovery, preirradiation of the host cells was also performed. Preirradiation of the uvrA or wild-type strains significantly increased plasmid recovery. Consistent with the expectations of SOS repair, no effect was observed in preirradiated recA cells. Plasmid recovery in the excision-deficient strain was mainly achieved by the mutagenic repair of some fraction of the lesions, probably monoadducts. The greatest increase in plasmid recovery was found in the wild-type strain. This likely involved the repair of monoadducts and some fraction of the crosslinks. We conclude that repair in preirradiated repair-proficient cells is carried out mainly by an error-free pathway, suggesting enhancement of the excision repair promoted by the induction of SOS functions.

  1. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  2. The molecular properties of nitrobenzanthrone isomers and their mutagenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Bojana D; Stanković, Branislav; Ðorđević, Dragana S

    2014-06-01

    The mutagenic activity of five mono-substituted nitrobenzanthrones (NBA) has been determined in the Ames assay (Takamura-Enya et al., 2006). In the present study, a theoretical investigation of the electronic properties of all mono-substituted NBA isomers and their relation to mutagenic activity are presented. Equilibrium geometries, vertical ionization potentials (VIP), vertical electron affinities (VEA), relative energies, dipole moments and electronic dipole polarizabilities, and the IR and Raman spectra of NBA isomers calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods are presented. The position of the nitro group affects the spectral features of the IR and Raman spectra of the NBA isomers. The results show that a good linear relationship exists between the summation of Raman activities (∑ARaman) over all the 3N-6 vibrational modes and the mutagenic activity of the NBA isomers in Salmonella typhimurium strains. The spectroscopic results suggest that the unknown mutagenic activities of 4-NBA, 5-NBA, 6-NBA, 8-NBA and 10-NBA are predicted to follow the order 4-NBA>10-NBA>5-NBA>8-NBA>6-NBA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness and efficiency of chemical mutagens in cowpea (Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... A study was undertaken in a cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) variety CO 6 to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of chemical mutagens; ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (DES) and sodium azide (SA). EMS treatments were found highly effective than the other chemicals.

  4. In vitro evaluation of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of sitagliptin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Hajvery University Lahore, 3Quality Operation. Laboratory (QOL), University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, 4Depertment of Biotechnology, Lahore College for Women ... Revised accepted: 11 July 2017. Abstract. Purpose: To determine the in vitro genotoxicity and mutagenicity of sitagliptin alone and in combination.

  5. Mutagenicity study of the new cephalosporin antibiotic cefditoren pivoxil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Y; Hayashi, H; Ando, M; Tatebayashi, T

    1996-08-01

    The mutagenicity of a cephalosporin antibiotic, (-)-(6R,7R)-2,2-dimethylpropionyloxymethyl 7-[(Z)-2-(2-aminothiazol-4-yl)-2-methoxyiminoacetamido]-3-[(Z)-2- (4-methylthiazol-5-yl) ethenyl]-8-oxo-5-thia-1-azabicyclo[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylate (cefditoren pivoxil, CAS 117467-28-4, CDTR-PI), was evaluated by various mutagenicity tests as follows: the reverse mutation assay in bacteria, the chromosomal aberration test with Chinese hamster CHL cells, the micronucleus test with mice, the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus gene mutation test with L5178Y cells, the chromosomal aberration test with human lymphocytes, the unscheduled DNA synthesis test with rat stomach mucosa cells, and the cell transformation test with BALB/3T3 cells. CDTR-PI induced the structural chromosomal aberrations considered direct action in the chromosomal aberration test with CHL cells at concentrations of 150 micrograms/ml and more, but in none of the other mutagenicity tests even in excessive doses. Evaluation for clastogenicity with metabolites of CDTR-PI and checking for formaldehyde generation in the culture medium appeared to verify that the original source of the clastogenicity of this antibiotic was a formaldehyde generated from a pivoxil radical of CDTR-PI. The carcinogenicity of formaldehyde has been reported as negative in rats administered orally for 2 years. These results suggested the CDTR-PI would reveal neither mutagenicity nor carcinogenicity under clinical conditions.

  6. (Anti)mutagenic and immunomodulatory properties of quercetin glycosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valentová, Kateřina; Šíma, Petr; Rybková, Z.; Křižan, Jiří; Malachová, K.; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 5 (2016), s. 1492-1499 ISSN 0022-5142 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/0767; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14096 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : quercetin glycosides * (anti)mutagenicity * mice Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.463, year: 2016

  7. Mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials of fruit juices of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of freeze dried fruit juices (FDFJ) of Morinda elliptica Ridl. (Rubiaceae), Morinda citrifolia L. (Rubiaceae), Averrhoa bilimbi L. (Oxalidaceae), Phyllantus acidus (L.) Skeels (Phyllantaceae) and Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) in Allium cepa L was evaluated. Testing the ...

  8. Mutagenic and Genotoxic Screening of Eight Commonly used Skin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three mutation mechanisms (forward, backward and silent mutations) were identified. The introduction of liver enzymes (S9 mix) made no significant difference in the number of characteristics altered (p>0.05). The results of this study revealed that the eight bleaching creams were mutagenic in bacteria and could be said to ...

  9. 28. Annual Meeting of the European Environmental Mutagen Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The 28 th Annual Meeting of the European Environmental Mutagen Society took place in Salzburg from September 7 th till September 11 th , 1998. A lot of presentations also dealt with many radiation effects on cells, chromosomal aberrations and genetic effects caused by radioactive irradiation. In vivo and in vitro experiments concerning radiation injuries and carcinomas are analyzed. (Cecil)

  10. The Lack of Mutagenic Potential of a Guanine-Rich Triplex Forming Oligonucleotide in Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amer F; Fellows, Mick D; Ying, Liming; Gooderham, Nigel J; Priestley, Catherine C

    2017-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) bind in the major groove of DNA duplex in a sequence-specific manner imparted by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds. There have been several reports demonstrating the ability of guanine-rich TFOs to induce targeted mutagenesis on an exogenous plasmid or an endogenous chromosomal locus. In particular, a 30mer guanine-rich triplex forming oligonucleotide, AG30, optimally designed to target the supFG1 reporter gene was reported to be mutagenic in the absence of DNA reactive agents in cultured cells and in vivo Here, we investigated the mutagenic potential of AG30 using the supFG1 shuttle vector forward mutation assay under physiological conditions. We also assessed the triplex binding potential of AG30 alongside cytotoxic and mutagenic assessment. In a cell free condition, AG30 was able to bind its polypurine target site in the supFG1 gene in the absence of potassium chloride and also aligned with a 5-fold increase in the mutant frequency when AG30 was pre-incubated with the supFG1 plasmid in the absence of potassium prior to transfection into COS-7 cells. However, when we analyzed triplex formation of AG30 and the supFG1 target duplex at physiological potassium levels, triplex formation was inhibited due to the formation of competing secondary structures. Subsequent assessment of mutant frequency under physiological conditions, by pre-transfecting COS-7 cells with the supFG1 plasmid prior to AG30 treatment led to a very small increase (1.4-fold) in the mutant frequency. Transfection of cells with even higher concentrations of AG30 did result in an elevated mutagenic response but this was also seen with a scrambled sequence, and was therefore considered unlikely to be biologically relevant as an associated increase in cytotoxicity was also apparent. Our findings also provide further assurance on the low potential of triplex-mediated mutation as a consequence of unintentional genomic DNA binding by therapeutic antisense oligonucleotides.

  11. Genotoxic and mutagenic effects of passive smoking and urban air pollutants in buccal mucosa cells of children enrolled in public school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Deborah Navit de Carvalho; Sposito, Juliana Caroline Vivian; Crispim, Bruno do Amaral; Nascimento, André Vieira do; Grisolia, Alexeia Barufatti

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear abnormalities (micronuclei and meta-nuclear changes) have been used as biomarkers to identify cell damages. As children are more vulnerable to the adverse effects of pollution when compared to adults, assessing genetic damage caused by environmental influences is of great interest. As such, the objective was to determine metanuclear (karyolysis, pycnosis, karyorrhexis, binucleated cells, chromosome bridges and micronuclei) in cells from the oral mucosa of children associated with the school environment, gender, exposure to cigarette smoke and vehicular traffic. Analyses of nuclear abnormalities were performed in exfoliated buccal cells of children from two public schools located in Dourados - MS. The data were analyzed through Kruskal-Wallis test considering a significance level of 5% (p mutagenic and genotoxic agent, suggesting that such contaminants are related to clastogenic and aneugenic effects on DNA. Moreover, female children had higher amounts of nuclear abnormalities when compared to male children. With regards to the school environment, the study results indicated statistical differences in of term chromosomal abnormalities for schools A and B. Thus, it was possible to determine that children exposed to cigarette smoke are susceptible to further genetic damage than unexposed children, and female children may be more susceptible to genotoxic and mutagenic agents. This study contributes to the current knowledge on the mutagenic characteristics of human cells, supporting the adoption of preventive Public Health measures.

  12. Mutagenic effects of alkylating agents on prophage lambda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresler, S.; Kalinin, V.L.; Kuznetsova, L.V.

    1984-06-01

    An evaluation was made of the relative contribution of repair and reparative mechanisms to the mutagenic potency of several alkylating agents on thermoinducible prophage lambdacI857 ind/sup -/ in several stains of E. coli. Following treatment of lysogenic E. coli with the mutagens and heat induction, 0.02 N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU) induced c mutations with a high frequency (ca. 10%) in both wild type E. coli and cells with repair mutations (recA13, lexA102, uvrA6, umuC36, xthA9, recF143, polA1, uvrD3, uvrD502). It appears that NUM-induced mutations are stabilized as replicative errors due to mismatched, altered bases. Delay in induction following exposure to NMU improves prophage survival and diminishes c mutant formation, regardless of the E. coli genotype. Evidently, carbamoylation is not involved in NMU mutagenicity since 0.02 M KNCO is nonmutagenic and is virtually without effect on prophage viability. Replicative mechanisms are also involved in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (15%) and ethyl methanesulfonate (2%) induced mutations, since the maximum yield of mutants was independent of recA/sup +/ genotype. However, the mutagenicity of methyl methanesulfonate was abolished by the recA mutation, indicating that the mutagenicity of this agent is repair-dependent. Mitomycin C (0.1%) and acridine mustard (0.3%) induce c mutations regardless of recA/sup +/ and, therefore, appear to do so by intercalation. 26 references, 6 figures.

  13. 6-Thioguanine and S⁶-methylthioguanine are mutagenic in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bifeng; O'Connor, Timothy R; Wang, Yinsheng

    2010-11-19

    Thiopurines are effective immunosuppressants and anticancer agents. However, the long-term use of thiopurines was found to be associated with a significantly increased risk of various types of cancer. To date, the specific mechanism(s) underlying the carcinogenicity associated with thiopurine treatment remain(s) unclear. Herein, we constructed duplex pTGFP-Hha10 shuttle vectors carrying a 6-thioguanine ((S)G) or S⁶-methylthioguanine (S⁶mG) at a unique site and allowed the vectors to propagate in three different human cell lines. Analysis of the replication products revealed that although neither thionucleoside blocked considerably DNA replication in any of the human cell lines, both (S)G and S⁶mG were mutagenic, resulting in G→A mutation at frequencies of ~8% and ~39%, respectively. Consistent with what was found from our previous study in E. coli cells, our data demonstrated that the mutagenic properties of (S)G and S⁶mG provided significant evidence for mutation induction as a potential carcinogenic mechanism associated with chronic thiopurine intervention.

  14. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Echinodorus macrophyllus (chapéu-de-couro extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo S. Vidal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinodorus macrophyllus, commonly known as chapéu-de-couro, is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat inflammation and rheumatic diseases. In this work, we used short-term bacterial assays based on the induction of SOS functions to examine the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of an aqueous extract of E. macrophyllus leaves. Whole extract and an ethyl acetate fraction showed similar genotoxicity and caused an ~70-fold increase in lysogenic induction. The extract also gave a positive result in the SOS chromotest with an increase of 12-fold in β-Galactosidase enzymatic units. There was a strong trend towards base substitutions and frameshifts at purine sites in the mutations induced by the extract in Escherichia coli (CC103 and CC104 strains and Salmonella typhimurium test strains (22-fold increase in histidine revertants in TA98 strain. Since reactive oxygen species may be implicated in aging process and in degenerative diseases, we used antioxidant compounds as catalase, thiourea and dipyridyl in the lysogenic induction test. All this compounds were able to reduce the induction factor observed in the treatment with chapéu-de-couro, thus suggesting that the genotoxicity and mutagenicity were attributable to the production of reactive oxygen species that targeted DNA purines.

  15. [Mutagenic analysis on the polyhedrin gene (polh) of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Xiao, Q X; Huang, Y D; Ge, C B; Huang, Z R; Liu, L S

    2000-01-01

    In our early studies, the abnormal shape of the polyhedra of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) induced by chemical mutagens of MMC. 9-AA and EMS occurred, and the genome of the mutated BmNPV obtained from the successive test had some change in the restriction endonuclease partners of EcoRI, BglII and BamHI. The present studies showed that the arrangement of the crystal lattice of the polyhedrin was disorderly, and the SDS-PAGE electropherogram of the polyhedrin depicted distinct change in comparison with control group. The results of sequencing analysis showed that many point mutations with characteristics of the base substitution had occurred at some sites of the BmNPV polh gene in three mutated groups, and these results funther revealed molecular mutagenesis of the mutagens effective to BmNPV. It was not confirmable that the point mutations of polh gene in the mutated BmNPV have relationship to abnormal shape of the polyhedra.

  16. Mutagenic hazards of complex polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, C.L.; Lambert, A.B.; Lundstedt, S.; Tysklind, M.; White, P.A. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Safe Environment Program

    2008-04-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate hazard/risk assessment methods for complex environmental mixtures that involve a targeted, priority chemical approach based on the cumulative hazard/risk of known mixture components or analyses of sufficiently similar mixtures. Ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils were separated into nonpolar and semipolar fractions, and both fractions elicited positive responses on the Salmonella reverse mutation assay. Targeted and nontargeted methods of hazard prediction routinely overestimated mutagenic activities for the nonpolar soil fractions, suggesting nonadditive interactions of PAHs in complex mixtures. This suggests that current risk assessment methods for complex mixtures may provide conservative estimates regarding soils contaminated with priority PAHs alone. Significant underestimations of total risk, however, will be obtained if the soils also contain unidentified PAHs as well as polycyclic aromatic compounds and related compounds that contribute to the total mutagenic activity. Furthermore, estimates of excess lifetime cancer risk associated with the nondietary ingestion of the PAH-contaminated soils studied here indicate that a traditional risk assessment model based on identified priority PAHs and an assumption of additivity generally underestimates the risk associated with the nonpolar soil fractions (in comparison to bioassay-derived risk estimates). Additional cancer risk may be associated with the more polar compounds that also are found at these contaminated sites and that rarely are included in the standard risk assessment methodology.

  17. The impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples measured by the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The comet assay is frequently used in human biomonitoring for the detection of exposure to genotoxic agents. Peripheral blood samples are most frequently used and tested either as whole blood or after isolation of lymphocytes (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMC). To investigate a potential impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples, we exposed blood ex vivo to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action. The comet assay was performed either directly with whole blood at the end of the exposure period or with lymphocytes isolated directly after exposure. In addition to the recommended standard protocol for lymphocyte isolation, a shortened protocol was established to optimise the isolation procedure. The results indicate that the effects of induced DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites induced by ionising radiation and alkylants, respectively, are significantly reduced in isolated lymphocytes. In contrast, oxidative DNA base damage (induced by potassium bromate) and stable bulky adducts (induced by benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide; BPDE) seem to be less affected. Our findings suggest that in vivo-induced DNA damage might also be reduced in isolated lymphocytes in comparison with the whole blood depending of the types of DNA damage induced. Because only small genotoxic effects can generally be expected in human biomonitoring studies with the comet assay after occupational and environmental exposure to genotoxic agents, any loss might be relevant and should be avoided. The possibility of such effects and their potential impact on variability of comet assay results in human biomonitoring should be considered when performing or evaluating such kind of studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Molecular basis for the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Research accomplishments (1968 to present)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.

    1978-01-01

    Earlier work on the chemical basis of mutagenesis led to certain chemical generalities sufficient to explain how certain mutagens such as uv light and hydroxylamine functioned in information transfer systems (replicative, transcriptive and translational). When such modifications were applied to biologically active DNA in a controlled manner biological expression was non-stoichiometric because much of the damage was removed from the DNA by repair systems. Our efforts were then directed to these systems which led to: (1) the isolation, purification and characterization of endonucleases responsible for the first and controlling step in DNA repair - referred to as incision in both M. luteus and E. coli. The biological role of these enzymes was inferred in appropriate mutants; (2) the isolation, purification and characterization of exonucleases responsible for the removal or excision of damaged nucleotides in M. luteus and human placental trophoblasts; (3) the repair of uv damaged biologically active transforming and transfecting DNAs by purified endonucleases, exonucleases, DNA polymerase I and polynucleotide ligase from M. luteus and E. coli; (4) the characterization of the dual gene control for incision phenomenon in M. luteus and E. coli; and (5) isolation, purification and characterization of repair enzymes from human placenta

  19. Mutagenic activity of halogenated propanes and propenes: effect of bromine and chlorine positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Låg, M; Omichinski, J G; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D; Søderlund, E J

    1994-10-01

    A series of halogenated propanes and propenes were studied for mutagenic effects in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 in the absence or presence of NADPH plus liver microsomes from phenobarbital-induced rats as an exogenous metabolism system. The cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of the halogenated propane 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) has previously been studied in our laboratories. These studies showed that metabolic activation of DBCP was required to exert its detrimental effects. All of the trihalogenated propane analogues were mutagenic when the microsomal activation system was included. The highest mutagenic activity was obtained with 1,2,3-tribromopropane, with approximately 50-fold higher activity than the least mutagenic trihalogenated propane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane. The order of mutagenicity was as follows: 1,2,3-tribromopropane > or = 1,2-dibromo- 3-chloropropane > 1,3-dibromo-2-chloropropane > or = 1,3-dichloro-2-bromopropane > 1-bromo-2,3-dichloropropane > 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Compared to DBCP, the dihalogenated propanes were substantially less mutagenic. Only 1,2-dibromopropane was mutagenic and its mutagenic potential was approximately 1/30 of that of DBCP. In contrast to DBCP, 1,2-dibromopropane showed similar mutagenic activity with and without the addition of an activation system. The halogenated propenes 2,3-dibromopropene and 2-bromo-3-chloropropene were mutagenic to the bacteria both in the absence and presence of the activation system, whereas 2,3-dichloropropene did not show any mutagenic effect. The large differences in mutagenic potential between the various halogenated propanes and propenes are proposed to be due to the formation of different possible proximate and ultimate mutagenic metabolites resulting from the microsomal metabolism of the various halogenated propanes and propenes, and to differences in the rate of formation of the metabolites. Pathways are proposed for the formation of genotoxic metabolites of di- and trihalogenated

  20. Formation of mutagenic heterocyclic aromatic amines in fried pork from Duroc and Landrace pigs upon feed supplementation with creatine monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Wolfgang; Rosenvold, Katja; Young, Jette F

    2006-12-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) have been shown to induce tumours at various organ sites in experimental animal studies and high levels of dietary intake of HAA have been associated with increased cancer risk in humans. These HAA are formed in meat upon heating from precursors such as amino acids, reducing sugars and creatine or creatinine. Groups of ten Duroc and ten Landrace pigs received feed supplemented with creatine monohydrate (CMH) for five days prior to slaughter at dose levels of 12.5, 25 and 50 g per animal per day. Ten control animals of each breed received the non-supplemented feed. Meat from Duroc pigs had been shown to respond to CMH supplementation with regard to waterholding capacity, juiciness, post slaughter pH and colour parameters, meat from Landrace pigs was unaffected. Indeed, while creatine phosphate levels in meat from Duroc pigs increased in a dose-dependent manner with CMH supplementation, no effect was observed in meat from Landrace pigs. Meat slices from longissimus dorsi were fried and considerable mutagenic activity was detected in meat extracts in Salmonella typhimurium YG1019 in the presence of rat-liver homogenate. However, no effect of breed or CMH supplementation was observed in fried pork on the formation of HAA determined as mutagenic activity. It may be concluded that feed supplementation with CMH at levels up to 50 g per day for five days prior to slaughter does not increase the level of heterocyclic aromatic amines detected as mutagenic activity formed upon frying of pork.

  1. Effect of process distillation on mutagenicity and cell-transformation activity of solvent-refined, coal-derived liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelroy, R.A.; Frazier, M.E.; Later, D.W.; Wright, C.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-05-01

    Blended SRC-II process streams, representing a full boiling range distillate material, were fractionally distilled into non-overlapping 50 F cuts with bp between 300 and 850 C and another set with bp ranging between 138 and 1055 F. Distillate cuts were assayed for mutagenic activity using the histidine reversion assay with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537, as well as for mammalian-cell transformation (mct) activity in the Syrian hamster embryo test, and DNA damage in the prophage induction assay (pia). Samples were also separated into chemical class fractions by alumina column chromatography and analysed by high resolution gas chromatography. In the met and microbial mutagenicity assays, significant activity was found almost exclusively in cuts with bp> above 700 F, with the highest activity in the mct assay observed for cuts above 800 F. All of the cuts showed increased levels of DNA damage as expressed by lambda pia in Escherichia coli 8177. However, the greatest activity was associated with cuts with bp in the 800 F+ range. Chemical analysis of the 50 F cuts showed a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and amino-PAH compounds to be present in the cuts with bp> above 700 F and essentially absent from cuts with bp< 700 F. The sample set of non-overlapping (50 F) cuts were reblended according to the proportions of each cut found in the original blend material. These reblended composites were then assayed to compare their activity with that predicted from the activities of the component cuts. The results indicated the microbial mutagenicity response was essentially additive. Met activities were non-additive, indicating a compositional effect on the expression of transforming agents in the complex mixture. 18 references.

  2. The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to killing and mutation by agents which damage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, D.M.; Moseley, B.E.B.

    1976-01-01

    The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) light, ionising (γ) radiation, mitomycin C (MTC), nitrous acid (NA), hydroxylamine (HA), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG), ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) and β-propiolactone (βPL) has been compared with that of Escherichia coli B/r. M. radiodurans was much more resistant than E. coli B/r to the lethal effects of UV light (by a factor of 33), γ-radiation (55), NG (15) and NA (62), showed intermediate resistance to MTC (4) and HA (7), but was sensitive to EMS (1) and βPL (2). M. radiodurans was very resistant to mutagens producing damage which can be repaired by a recombination system, indicating that it possesses an extremely efficient recombination repair mechanism. Both species were equally sensitive to mutation to trimethoprim resistance by NG, but M. radiodurans was more resistant than E. coli B/r to the other mutagens tested, being non-mutable by UV light, γ-radiation, MTC and HA, and only slightly sensitive to mutation by NA, EMS, and βPL. The resistance of M. radiodurans to mutation by UV light, γ-radiation and MTC is consistent with an hypothesis that recombination repair in M. radiodurans is accurate since these mutagens may depend on an 'error-prone' recombination system for their mutagenic effect in E. coli B/r. However, because M. radiodurans is also resistant to mutagens such as HA and EMS, which are mutagenic in E. coli in the absence of an 'error-prone' system, we propose that all the mutagens tested may have a common mode of action in E. coli B/r, but that this mutagenic pathway is missing in M. radiodurans

  3. Characterization of a mutagenic DNA adduct formed from 1,2-dibromoethane by O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Hachey, David L; Valadez, Gerardo; Williams, Kevin M; Guengerich, F Peter; Loktionova, Natalia A; Kanugula, Sreenivas; Pegg, Anthony E

    2004-02-06

    It has been proposed that the DNA repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase increases the mutagenicity of 1,2-dibromoethane by reacting with it at its cysteine acceptor site to form a highly reactive half-mustard, which can then react with DNA (Liu, L., Pegg, A. E., Williams, K. M., and Guengerich, F. P. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 37920-37928). Incubation of Escherichia coli-expressed human alkyltransferase with 1,2-dibromoethane and single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides led to the formation of covalent transferaseoligo complexes. The order of reaction determined was Gua>Thy>Cyt>Ade. Mass spectrometry analysis of the tryptic digest of the reaction product indicated that some of the adducts led to depurination with the release of the Gly136-Arg147 peptide cross-linked to a Gua at the N7 position, with the site of reaction being the active site Cys145 as established by chromatographic retention time and the fragmentation pattern determined by tandem mass spectrometry of a synthetic peptide adduct. The alkyltransferase-mediated mutations produced by 1,2-dibromoethane were predominantly Gua to Ade transitions but, in the spectrum of such rifampicin-resistant mutations in the RpoB gene, 20% were Gua to Thy transversions. The latter are likely to have arisen from the apurinic site generated from the Gua-N7 adduct. Support exists for an additional adduct/mutagenic pathway because evidence was obtained for DNA adducts other than at the Gua N7 atom and for mutations other than those attributable to depurination. Thus, chemical and biological evidence supports the existence of at least two alkyltransferase-dependent pathways for 1,2-dibromoethane-induced mutagenicity, one involving Gua N7-alkylation by alkyltransferase-S-CH2CH2Br and depurination, plus another as yet uncharacterized system(s).

  4. Sensitivity to ehter anasthesia and to γ-rays in mutagen-sensitive strains of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamo, Sumiko; Nakashima-Tanaka, Eiji; Megumi, Tsuneo

    1990-01-01

    An ether-resistant strain of Drosophila melanogaster, Eth-29, has previously been found to be radiosensitive. Some mutagen-sensitive strains are known to be hypersensitive to X-rays in larvae. The correlation between sensitivities to ether anesthesia and to γ-rays was examined in adult flies of 12 mutagen-sensitive strains and 6 control strains. A wide variation in sensitivities to ether anesthesia, γ-ray knock-down and γ-ray lethality was demonstrated. No correlation between DNA-repaor capacity and ether sensitivity or γ-ray knock-down sensitivity was shown. Only mei-9 and mus201, which are deficient in excision repair, as well as Eth-29 were found to be sensitive to γ-ray lethality. These findings indicate that the targets for ehter anesthesia, knock-down and lethality may be different. Lethality appears to be caused by DNA damage, while the othe 2 endpoints appear not to be related to DNA damage. (author). 14 refs.; 3 tabs

  5. Characterization of urban aerosol: seasonal variation of mutagenicity and genotoxicity of PM2.5, PM1 and semi-volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchi, Clara; Bazzini, Cristina; Fontana, Federica; Pinto, Giancarlo; Martino, Anna; Cassoni, Francesca

    2016-10-01

    Urban particulate matter (PM) is an environmental public health concern as it has been classified by the IARC as carcinogenic to humans (group 1) and it's well known that pollutants are more associated with the finest fractions of PM. In this study we characterize urban aerosol in Bologna, county town of Emilia-Romagna in the north of Italy, collecting PM 2.5 , PM 1 and semi-volatile organic compounds using polyurethane foam. Samples were collected in three different seasons (winter, summer and autumn) and were extracted with acetone. On these three fractions we assessed mutagenicity using Salmonella reverse mutation test and genotoxicity by alkaline comet assay and micronucleus assay in human lung cancer cell line, A549. Organic extracts were also characterized for alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrated and oxygenated PAHs. We also evaluated associations between the physicochemical parameters of samples and their genotoxicity. The particulate samples, collected in autumn and winter, indicated the presence of both base pair substitution and frameshift mutagens using TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium and the mutagenicity was more associated with the finest fraction. Enhanced mutagenic response was observed in the absence of enzyme activation. Only a third of comet and a half of micronucleus assays gave positive results that, unlike Salmonella's ones, are not season-related. These results were compared with environmental chemicals concentrations and we found that Salmonella's data correlated with PAHs detected on PM filters and with mass concentrations, whereas the DNA damage correlate only with PAHs extracted from polyurethane foams. The use of different assays was sensitive to detect and identify different classes of airborne mutagenic/genotoxic compounds present in aerosol, showing that monitoring air quality using this methodology is relevant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pollen genetic markers for detection of mutagens in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilan, R.A.; Rosichan, J.L.; Arenaz, P.; Hodgdon, A.L.; Kleinhofs, A.

    1980-01-01

    To utilize and exploit pollen for in situ mutagen monitoring, screening and toxicology, the range of genetic traits in pollen must be identified and analyzed. To be useful for the development of mutagen detection systems proteins should be: (1) activity stainable or immunologically identifiable in the pollen, (2) the products of one to three loci; and (3) gametophytic and nuclear in origin. Several proteins, including alcohol dehydrogenase in maize, which meet these criteria are discussed. The waxy locus in barley and maize which controls starch deposition for pollen screening and mutant detection. Thirty waxy mutant lines, induced by sodium azide and gamma-rays are characterized for spontaneous and induced reversion frequencies, allelism, karyotype, amylose content, and UDPglucose glucosyltransferase (waxy gene product) activity. Twelve mutant alleles are being mapped by recombinant frequencies.

  7. Cloning of Salmonella typhimurium DNA encoding mutagenic DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.M.; Sedgwick, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli is encoded by the umuDC operon. Salmonella typhimurium DNA which has homology with E. coli umuC and is able to complement E. coli umuC122::Tn5 and umuC36 mutations has been cloned. Complementation of umuD44 mutants and hybridization with E. coli umuD also occurred, but these activities were much weaker than with umuC. Restriction enzyme mapping indicated that the composition of the cloned fragment is different from the E. coli umuDC operon. Therefore, a umu-like function of S. typhimurium has been found; the phenotype of this function is weaker than that of its E. coli counterpart, which is consistent with the weak mutagenic response of S. typhimurium to UV compared with the response in E. coli

  8. Counteracting quasispecies adaptability: extinction of a ribavirin-resistant virus mutant by an alternative mutagenic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Celia; Agudo, Rubén; Domingo, Esteban

    2009-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction promoted by mutagen-induced elevation of mutation rates of viruses, may meet with the problem of selection of mutagen-resistant variants, as extensively documented for standard, non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors. Previously, we characterized a mutant of foot-and-mouth disease virus that included in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase replacement M296I that decreased the sensitivity of the virus to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. Replacement M296I in the viral polymerase impedes the extinction of the mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus by elevated concentrations of ribavirin. In contrast, wild type virus was extinguished by the same ribavirin treatment and, interestingly, no mutants resistant to ribavirin were selected from the wild type populations. Decreases of infectivity and viral load of the ribavirin-resistant M296I mutant were attained with a combination of the mutagen 5-fluorouracil and the non-mutagenic inhibitor guanidine hydrocloride. However, extinction was achieved with a sequential treatment, first with ribavirin, and then with a minimal dose of 5-fluorouracil in combination with guanidine hydrochloride. Both, wild type and ribavirin-resistant mutant M296I exhibited equal sensitivity to this combination, indicating that replacement M296I in the polymerase did not confer a significant cross-resistance to 5-fluorouracil. We discuss these results in relation to antiviral designs based on lethal mutagenesis. (i) When dominant in the population, a mutation that confers partial resistance to a mutagenic agent can jeopardize virus extinction by elevated doses of the same mutagen. (ii) A wild type virus, subjected to identical high mutagenic treatment, need not select a mutagen-resistant variant, and the population can be extinguished. (iii) Extinction of the mutagen-resistant variant can be achieved by a sequential treatment of a high dose of the same mutagen, followed by a combination of another mutagen with

  9. Counteracting quasispecies adaptability: extinction of a ribavirin-resistant virus mutant by an alternative mutagenic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Perales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction promoted by mutagen-induced elevation of mutation rates of viruses, may meet with the problem of selection of mutagen-resistant variants, as extensively documented for standard, non-mutagenic antiviral inhibitors. Previously, we characterized a mutant of foot-and-mouth disease virus that included in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase replacement M296I that decreased the sensitivity of the virus to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Replacement M296I in the viral polymerase impedes the extinction of the mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus by elevated concentrations of ribavirin. In contrast, wild type virus was extinguished by the same ribavirin treatment and, interestingly, no mutants resistant to ribavirin were selected from the wild type populations. Decreases of infectivity and viral load of the ribavirin-resistant M296I mutant were attained with a combination of the mutagen 5-fluorouracil and the non-mutagenic inhibitor guanidine hydrocloride. However, extinction was achieved with a sequential treatment, first with ribavirin, and then with a minimal dose of 5-fluorouracil in combination with guanidine hydrochloride. Both, wild type and ribavirin-resistant mutant M296I exhibited equal sensitivity to this combination, indicating that replacement M296I in the polymerase did not confer a significant cross-resistance to 5-fluorouracil. We discuss these results in relation to antiviral designs based on lethal mutagenesis. CONCLUSIONS: (i When dominant in the population, a mutation that confers partial resistance to a mutagenic agent can jeopardize virus extinction by elevated doses of the same mutagen. (ii A wild type virus, subjected to identical high mutagenic treatment, need not select a mutagen-resistant variant, and the population can be extinguished. (iii Extinction of the mutagen-resistant variant can be achieved by a sequential treatment of a

  10. Mutagenicity of particle emissions from solid fuel cookstoves: A literature review and research perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guofeng

    2017-07-01

    Household solid fuel use is a major source of many air pollutants causing severe air pollution and adverse health outcomes. In evaluation of health impacts of household air pollution, it is essential to characterize toxic properties like mutagenicity of residential fuel combustion emissions and exposure assessments. Mutagenicity of emissions from solid fuel cookstoves were analyzed through a literature review. T98 and TA100 strains are two most widely used strains in mutagenic Ames test, and results for these two strains are generally positively correlated though they have different endpoints. Direct and indirect mutagenic activities are positively correlated, and statistically insignificantly different though indirect mutagenic emissions are apparently higher. Mutagenicity emission factors on the basis of fuel energy (MJ) or useful energy delivered (MJd) for solid fuel cookstoves vary in nearly 3 orders of magnitude, ranging from 3.0×10 4 rev./MJd to 1.8×10 7 rev./MJd (or 1.1×10 4 rev./MJ to 4.2×10 6 rev./MJ). Low mutagenic emissions are reported for high efficiency stoves such as a forced-draft one. Mutagenicity emission factors are positively correlated with emissions of PM 2.5 . Relationship between mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emissions is inconsistent among studies as PAHs are minor fractions of toxic organics contributing to the total mutagenicity. Generally, studies on mutagenicity of emissions from household cookstoves are very limited, and future studies are encouraged on mutagenic emissions from different fuel types and household stoves, evaluation of mutagenic activities of both gaseous and particulate emissions, and toxicology and exposure assessments of household air pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Examination of Alternaria alternata mutagenicity and effects of nitrosylation using the Ames Salmonella test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, T J; Cherry, W; Soper, K; Langlois, I; Vijay, H M

    2001-01-01

    Molds of the genus Alternaria are common food pathogens responsible for the spoilage of fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts. Although consumption of Alternaria alternata-contaminated foodstuffs has been implicated in an elevated incidence of esophageal carcinogenesis, the mutagenic potencies of several A. alternata toxins seem unable to account for the levels of activity found using crude mycelial extracts. In this study, the mutagenic effects of nitrosylation were examined with the major Alternaria metabolites Altenuene (ALT), Alternariol (AOH), Alternariol Monomethyl Ether (AME), Altertoxin I (ATX I), Tentoxin (TENT), Tenuazonic Acid (TA), and Radicinin (RAD) using the Ames Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100. In the absence of nitrosylation, ATX I was mutagenic when tested from 1 to 100 microg/plate in TA98 with rat liver S9 for activation, while AOH and ATX I were weakly mutagenic +/- S9 in TA100. Incubation with nitrite generally increased mutagenic potencies with ATX I strongly mutagenic +/- S9 in both TA98 and TA100, while ALT, AOH, AME, and RAD responses were enhanced in TA100 + S9. However, subsequent examination of three extracts made from A. alternata culture broth, acetone-washed mycelia, and the acetone washes showed a different mutagenic response with both broth and acetone washes directly mutagenic in TA98 and TA100 but with a reduced response + S9. The acetone-washed mycelial extract was found to have the lowest mutagenic activity of the three extracts tested. Nitrosylation had little effect on the mutagenicity of any of the extracts. Thus, while nitrosylation increases the mutagenicity of ATX I, and to a lesser extent that of several other Alternaria toxins, the results demonstrate that Alternaria produces a major mutagenic activity with a S. typhimurium response different from that found with the purified toxins. Efforts are currently underway to chemically identify this mutagenic species. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of Anti-HIV-1 Mutagenic Nucleoside Analogues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P.; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of “lethal mutagenesis” that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2′-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. PMID:25398876

  13. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 mutagenic nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-02

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of "lethal mutagenesis" that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Micronuclei frequency in children exposed to environmental mutagens: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neri, Monica; Fucic, Aleksandra; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2003-01-01

    Cytogenetic monitoring has been traditionally used for the surveillance of populations exposed to genotoxic agents. In recent years sensitivity problems emerged in surveys of populations exposed to low levels of mutagens, and therefore alternative approaches have been explored. Biomonitoring....... The limited number of published papers indicates that the conduct of properly designed studies on the effect of environmental pollutants in children may be difficult. This review confirmed the usefulness of MN assay in biomonitoring studies conducted in children, revealing that in many circumstances...

  15. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons; Antimutagenesis de moduladores quimicos contra el dano inducido por neutrones termicos de reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamentos de Materiales Radiactivos, de Biologia, del Reactor y Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  16. Mutagenic Effects of Potassium Dichromate as Evaluated by Means of Animal and Plant Bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Carlos; Cardoso, Plínio; Cunha, Lorena; Gomes, Cláudia; Júnior, Rubens Ribeiro; Pinheiro, Raul Henrique; Costa, Mary Helen; Burbano, Rommel

    2015-01-01

    Chromium typically occurs in two oxidation states in the natural environment, Cr(3+) [Cr(III)] and Cr(6+) [Cr(VI)]. Out of the two chromium species, Cr(VI) is the most mobile, labile and toxic. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogenic agents to humans. The main source of release of chromium in aquatic ecosystems is related to the industrial application of this metal in metallurgies, tanneries, and in the manufacturing of paints and dyes. The ecotoxicology of Cr(VI) is linked to its environmental persistence and the ability to induce adverse effects in biological systems. In the present study, we evaluated mutagenic effects of Cr(VI) in animal and plant bioindicators. We evaluated primary DNA damage and frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and morphological nuclear abnormalities (NA) in erythrocytes in peripheral blood of the fish Oreochromis niloticus exposed to potassium dichromate at 12 mg l(-1). The genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of Cr(VI) in the onion (Allium cepa) test were also assessed. The comet assay showed a significant increase of tailed nucleoids in the erythrocytes of fish treated with K2Cr2O7; MN frequency was also increased in the treatments; cytotoxicity of a low concentration of potassium dichromate, however, was not confirmed. The combination of both systems - animal and plant - is adequate and advantageous for mutagenicity evaluation. The findings indicate that at the concentration tested, the chromium compound is a clastogenic as well as an aneugenic. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Genotoxicity, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of carotenoids extracted from ionic liquid in multiples organs of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larangeira, Paula Martins; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera; da Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; de Moura, Carolina Foot Gomes; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-11-01

    The ionic liquid or melted salt 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium is an alternative process to extract natural pigments, such as carotenoids. Lycopene represents 80-90% of total of carotenoids presents in tomatoes and it has been widely studied due its potent antioxidant action. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotoxicity, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of carotenoids extracted from ionic liquid using experimental model in vivo. For this purpose, a total of 20 male Wistar rats were distributed into four groups (n=5), as follows: control group; received a corresponding amount of corn oil for 7days by intragastric gavage (i.g.), ionic liquid group, received 10mgkg -1 body weight for 7days by gavage; 10mg carotenoids group, received 10mgkg -1 bw dissolved in corn oil for 7days by gavage and 500mg carotenoids group, received 500mgkg -1 bw dissolved in corn oil for 7days by gavage. Rat liver treated with ionic liquid exhibited moderate histopathological changes randomly distributed in the parenchyma, such as cytoplasmic eosinophilia, apoptotic bodies, inflammatory infiltrate and focal necrosis. DNA damage was found in peripheral blood and liver cells of rats treated with ionic liquid or carotenoids at 500mg. An increase of micronucleated cells and 8-OhDG immunopositive cells were also detected in rats treated with carotenoids at 500mg. In summary, our results demonstrate that recommended dose for human daily intake of carotenoids extracted by ionic liquid did not induce genotoxicity, mutagenicity and cytotoxicity in multiple organs of rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability of mutagen sensitivity assay: an inter-laboratory comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Esther; Lee, Sang-Joon; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Li-E; Song, Yan-S; Bovbjerg, Dana; Berwick, Marianne

    2006-07-01

    Mutagen sensitivity is regarded as a genetic susceptibility phenotype for various cancers; it is cytogenetically based and probably involves a number of genes from different DNA repair pathways. This assay has been used in a number of laboratories in the field of epidemiology, where it has been investigated and appears to be a useful susceptibility biomarker for epidemiological studies assessing cancer risks at the population level. One concern about phenotypic assays, such as the mutagen sensitivity assay, has been that there could be wide variation in results depending on the timing of the assay (within individual variation), the individual performing the assay (within observer variation) and the laboratory where the assay has been performed (inter-laboratory variation). We conducted an inter-laboratory comparison study between the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and M. D. Anderson, in which we assessed all these concerns. We did not find any significant variation in any of the assays. The correlation was high for all tests. The good concordance rate between laboratories supports the continued use of the mutagen sensitivity assay by different laboratories, and demonstrates its potential to identify at-risk subgroups among normal individuals and cancer patients alike.

  19. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of Kevlar: an in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wening, J V; Marquardt, H; Katzer, A; Jungbluth, K H; Marquardt, H

    1995-03-01

    Toxicity and mutagenicity of Kevlar 49 (PPPT; poly-para-phenylene-terephthalamide) was tested in six strains of Salmonella typhimurium (Ames test; TA97, TA98, TA100, TA102, TA1535, TA1537) with and without an external metabolic activation system (S9), as well as in a mammalian cell mutagenesis assay using V79 Chinese hamster cells. For the Ames test, liquid preincubation, which is considered particularly sensitive, was used. The cells were incubated for 24 h at a temperature of 37 degrees C either directly with Kevlar49 or with ethanol- or chloroform-extracted Kevlar49. The experiments were performed at least twice. The Ames test with six different Salmonella typhimurium strains featuring either base pair substitution or frameshift mutations revealed no cytotoxic or mutagenic activity of Kevlar49. In the mammalian cell mutagenesis assay, using 8-azaguanine (AG) as a selective agent, Kevlar49 was also devoid of cytotoxic or mutagenic activity. Both tests have to be regarded as an initial exploratory screening due to the chosen testing conditions and should be supplemented by tests at different temperatures.

  20. Toxicological and mutagenic analysis of Artemisia dracunculus (tarragon) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Heibatullah; Galehdari, Hamid; Zaree, Zahra; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Varga, Balazs; Haines, David; Bombicz, Mariann; Tosaki, Arpad; Juhasz, Bela

    2013-01-01

    Mutagenicity and liver toxicity of the herb tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) were evaluated using single cell gel (comet) electrophoresis. Ten microlitres aliquots of peripheral venous human blood were incubated with tarragon extract, saline, or the mutagen sodium dichromate. Cell suspensions dispersed in low-melting agarose were electrophoresed in ethidium bromide. The resulting DNA migration trails were obtained using fluorescent microscopy at 400× magnification, and graded according to the mutagenicity index (MI) for each cell incubation condition. The in vivo liver toxicity of Artemisia dracunculus was assessed in the blood of mice treated orally with the extract of the herb, using alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as liver function indicators. Liver morphology was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining of liver tissue. The present study demonstrated a direct correlation between tarragon extract dosage and three major outcome variables: MI; serum liver enzyme activity; and liver histopathology. These outcomes are possibly due to the presence in tarragon of methylchavicol and other genotoxic compounds. These findings provide a preliminary guide for risk assessment of tarragon in diet and in possible therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutagenicity of some alkyl nitrites used as recreational drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Cameron, T.P. (National Institute of Health, Bethesda (USA)); Rogers-Back, A.M.; Lawlor, T.E.; Harbell, J.W. (Microbiological Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    When the AIDS epidemic was in its earliest stages, and prior to identification of HIV as the etiological factor, the use of volatile nitrites by the male homosexual community to enhance sexual activities appeared to have a significant role in this disease. Preliminary observations indicated that that portion of the male homosexual community which developed Kaposi's sarcoma were also heavy nitrite users. These nitrites had been demonstrated to be mutagenic in bacteria and thus it was postulated that they could be responsible for the appearance of the sarcoma. To evaluate further the genotoxic activity of these chemicals, six nitrites, including those most commonly used by homosexuals for sexual gratification, were selected for testing in the mouse lymphoma TK {plus minus} and Salmonell typhimurium mutagenicity assays. One chemical, n-amyl nitrite, was negative in the mouse lymphoma assay, while the other five chemicals, n-butyl, isobutyl, iso-amyl, sec-butyl, and n-propyl nitrite, were positive. All six compounds were positive in the Salmonella assay. The mutagenic and known toxic effects of these chemicals remain a concern because a large population of teenagers and young adults continue to abuse these substances.

  2. Quantum mechanical quantitative structure-activity relationships to avoid mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Andrew J; Ye, Lin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a quantum mechanically based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QMQSAR or QSAR hereafter) adequate to predict and explain Ames TA100-derived mutagenicities for a number of organic molecules. A set of 35 structurally similar molecules with epoxide (oxirane) functionalities and systematic, reliable experimental data were selected to construct a QSAR model. The SAM1 quantum mechanical method was used to perform conformational analysis and properties calculations. This QM information was used to compute a variety of descriptors. From this a two-descriptor regression model was constructed. The two descriptors are ESP-HACA-1/TMSA and HOMO-LUMO energy gap. Statistical results for the model: R(2)=0.857, R(adj)(2)=0.818,R(cv)(2)=0.848,s(2)=0.0618. The variance inflation factor and significance for both descriptors were 1.082 and design of non-mutagenic monomers that may be useful for dental restorative composites. The model also serves as a screening tool for rating the mutagenicity of new candidate materials.

  3. Preconception exposures to potential germ-cell mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation and other agents can cause germ-cell mutations in animal systems. No human germ-cell mutagen has been identified, but this does not mean that human germ-cells are not vulnerable to mutagenesis. There has been particular concern about the possible health effects on offspring following parental preconception exposure to ionizing radiation - both occupational and therapeutic. A strong association with preconception radiation exposure in the fathers of the cases was found in a case-control study of young people with leukaemia living near the Sellafield nuclear plant in the UK. Subsequent studies of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation have failed to confirm these findings. No statistically significant effects have been reported from studies of possible indicators of germ-cell mutagenesis in the A-bomb survivors. Studies of offspring of cancer survivors who receive radiotherapy and mutagenic chemotherapy have found no evidence of germ-cell mutagenesis. Failure to detect human germ-cell mutagenic agents may be a consequence of inadequate study sizes or insufficiently sensitive laboratory techniques. (authors)

  4. Inhibition of fried meat-induced colorectal DNA damage and altered systemic genotoxicity in humans by crucifera, chlorophyllin, and yogurt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Shaughnessy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary exposures implicated as reducing or causing risk for colorectal cancer may reduce or cause DNA damage in colon tissue; however, no one has assessed this hypothesis directly in humans. Thus, we enrolled 16 healthy volunteers in a 4-week controlled feeding study where 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing meat cooked at either low (100°C or high temperature (250°C, each for 2 weeks in a crossover design. The other 8 subjects were randomly assigned to dietary regimens containing the high-temperature meat diet alone or in combination with 3 putative mutagen inhibitors: cruciferous vegetables, yogurt, and chlorophyllin tablets, also in a crossover design. Subjects were nonsmokers, at least 18 years old, and not currently taking prescription drugs or antibiotics. We used the Salmonella assay to analyze the meat, urine, and feces for mutagenicity, and the comet assay to analyze rectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes for DNA damage. Low-temperature meat had undetectable levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs and was not mutagenic, whereas high-temperature meat had high HCA levels and was highly mutagenic. The high-temperature meat diet increased the mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine and feces compared to the low-temperature meat diet. The mutagenicity of hydrolyzed urine was increased nearly twofold by the inhibitor diet, indicating that the inhibitors enhanced conjugation. Inhibitors decreased significantly the mutagenicity of un-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed feces. The diets did not alter the levels of DNA damage in non-target white blood cells, but the inhibitor diet decreased nearly twofold the DNA damage in target colorectal cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that dietary factors can reduce DNA damage in the target tissue of fried-meat associated carcinogenesis.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00340743.

  5. Mutagenic screening of some commonly used medicinal plants in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintonwa, Alade; Awodele, Olufunsho; Afolayan, Gbenga; Coker, Herbert A B

    2009-09-25

    The uses of medicinal plants have always been part of human culture. The World Health Organization estimates that up to 80% of the world's population relies on traditional medicinal system for some aspect of primary health care. However, there are few reports on the toxicological properties of most medicinal plants especially, their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Therefore, this research is to determine the mutagenic potentials of Morinda lucida [Oruwo (Root)], Azadirachta indica [Dongoyaro (Leaf)], Terapluera tetraptera [Aridan (Fruit)], Plumbago zeylanica [Inabiri (Root)], Xylopia aethiopica [Erunje (Fruit)], Newbouldia laevis [Akoko (Leaf)], Alstonia boonei [Ahun (Bark)], Enantia chlorantha [Awopa (Bark)], and Rauvolfia vomitoria [Asofeyeje (Root)] using the Allium cepa Linn. model and the modified Ames assay. Allium cepa model was used to determine the mean root length, mitotic index and chromosomal aberrations effects of these plants on onion bulbs using 0.1, 1, 5 and 10mg/ml concentration of the plant extracts. The modified Ames test which is a modification of the standard Ames test as described by Ames et al. [Ames, B.N., McCann, J., Yamasaki, E., 1975. Methods for detecting carcinogens and mutagens with the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutation Research 31, 347-364] was done using Escherichia coli (0157:H7) that has the phenotypic characteristics of glucose and lactose fermentation, motile, urease negative, indole positive and citrate negative. The results obtained from Allium cepa assay showed increasing root growth inhibition with increased concentration, decreasing mitotic index with increased concentration and chromosomal aberrations. The modified Ames test showed an alteration in the biochemical characteristics of Escherichia coli (0157:H7) for all plants except Rauvolfia vomitoria and Plumbago zeylanica. Three of the medicinal plants altered at least three of the normal biochemical characteristics thus demonstrating mutagenic

  6. Radiation-induced mutagenicity and lethality in tryptophan-requiring auxotrophs of escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rong; Qian Hongwei; Yao Fenying; Gu Shuzhu; Xu Jiaxin; Bi Hekan; Liu Yuying

    1989-01-01

    Mutation and killing caused by X-ray radiation and 60 Co γ-ray radiation were studied in three different tryptophan-requiring auxotrophs (WP2, Wp2A, Cm 891) of Escherichia coli. These testers are sensitive to base pair substitution mutagens. Cm891 carries a R-factor and is more sensitive than WP2 and WP2A to radiation-induced mutation and lethality. The results of the study show that (1) ionizing radiation was mutagenic to E. coli, (2) the order of mutagenic sensitivity among three strains to ionizing radiation was Cm891 > WP2A > WP2, (3) the dose rate of γ-ray influences mutagenicity and lethalty of E. coli strain, (4) the toxicity and mutagenicity of γ-ray were similar to X-ray when Cm891 was tested, however, γ-ray was more toxic and mutagenic than X-ray to WP2A ang WP2

  7. Combined effects of a chemical mutagen and radiation sterilized diet in mutagenicity and reproduction studies in the same mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    The possible intensification of the mutagenic effect of cyclophosphamide (Endoxan) by the feeding of a radiation-sterilized diet (dose, 4.5 Mrad) was studied in 2000 NMRI/Han mice. In a dominant lethal test, males were pretreated with 100 mg Endoxan/kg body weight. The greatest sensitivity towards Endoxan was observed during the late-spermatid stage. No significant differences were detected between the control group (Endoxan plus non-irradiated diet) and the experimental group (Endoxan plus radiation-sterilized diet). In this test, radiation-sterilized feed showed no co-mutagenic effect when combined with Endoxan treatment. In a reproduction study of 7 months duration (continuous mating without lactation periods), the females were treated every 2 wk with 20 mg Endoxan/kg body weight. The decline in litter size with increasing number of litters (i.e. with advancing age of the females) was more pronounced after treatment with the chemical mutagen than in the untreated group. Increases in the frequency of abortions and in premature sterility resulted from Endoxan treatment. During the entire observation period, no effects from the intake of radiation-sterilized food were detected. (author)

  8. DNA damage, acetylcholinesterase activity and lysosomal stability in native and transplanted mussels (Mytilus edulis) in areas close to coastal chemical dumping sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Lehtonen, Kari K.; Strand, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers of genotoxicity (DNA damage, measured as tail moment in the Comet assay), neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase inhibition, AChE) and general stress (lysosomal membrane stability, LMS) were studied in native and transplanted blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in coastal areas of western Denmark...... of chemical pollution complex, as seen especially in the variability in results on DNA damage, and also in regard to AChE activity. These investigations further stress the importance of understanding the effects of natural factors (salinity, temperature, water levels, rain and storm events) in correct...

  9. Radiation genetic studies in garden pea. Part 2. Caffeine potentiation and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, M.L.H.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of 1.5x10 -2 M caffeine post-treatments over the chromosome damage induced by 4kR X-ray 1.5x10 -2 M Maleic hydrazide (MH) and N-Nitroso-N-urethane (NMU) treatments in the root top cells of a normal and trigenic leaf mutant of Pisum sativum was studied. While MH and NMU produced S-dependent effects, X-rays induced non-delayed S-independent effects. These effects got potentiated by caffeine treatments. With MH, the potentiation occurred when the cells got exposed to caffeine during S-phase and with X-rays, it occurred when the irradiated cells are treated in G 2 or prophase stage. The caffeine potentiation of chromosome damage produced by MH was similar in the roots exposed to caffeine at 16 and 31degC but with NMU, the potentiation was lower at 31 than at 16degC. If the inhibitory effect of caffeine on gap filling process of the damaged DNA is the molecular mechanism responsible for caffeine potentiation of reproductive death it may be the mechanism responsible for the observed chromosome damage in MH treated cells exposed to caffeine during G 1 and S phase. But the X-irradiated cells are insensitive to caffeine at such phases. In these cells caffeine probably acts as an inhibitor of the photoreactivating enzymes for binding sites or with the substrate in the irradiated cells post-treated during G 2 and prophase. However, temperature independence of caffeine potentiation is not compatible with eithr of the above two views. Compared to the normal genotype, the trigenic mutant exhibited an increased chromosomal damage, but not the potentiation. Probably mutant genes reduce the resistance of a genome against mutagenic action, consequently enhance the suseptibility to chromosome damage. (author)

  10. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  11. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  12. Mutagenic activity promoted by amentoflavone and methanolic extract of Byrsonima crassa Niedenzu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Cássia Regina Primila; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara; Bernardi, Caroline Cristiane; Sannomiya, Miriam; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2006-08-01

    Byrsonima crassa is a plant pertaining to the Brazilian central savannah-like belt of vegetation and popularly used for the treatment of gastric dysfunctions and diarrhoea. The methanol extract contains catechin, tannins, terpenes and flavonoids; both mutagenic potential and antioxidant properties have been ascribed to flavonoids. The mutagenicity of some flavonoids is believed to be associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species and seems to depend on the number and position of hydroxyl groups. In the present study the mutagenic activity of the methanol, chloroform and 80% aqueous methanol extracts, as well as acetate and aqueous sub-fractions, of this medicinal plant were evaluated by Salmonella typhimurium assay, using strains TA100, TA98, TA102 and TA97a, and in mouse reticulocytes. The results showed mutagenic activity of the methanolic extract in the TA98 strain without S9, but no mutagenicity to mouse cells in any of the extracts. The acetate fraction showed strong signs of mutagenicity without S9, suggesting that in this enriched fraction were concentrated the compounds that induced mutagenic activity. The aqueous fraction showed no mutagenic activity. The TLC and HSCCC analyses of the acetate fraction with some standard compounds permitted the isolation of the quercetin-3-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, amentoflavone, methyl gallate and (+)-catechin, of which only the amentoflavone exhibited positive mutagenicity to TA98 (+S9, -S9).

  13. Affinity for, and localization of, PEG-functionalized silica nanoparticles to sites of damage in an ex vivo spinal cord injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bojun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI leads to serious neurological and functional deficits through a chain of pathophysiological events. At the molecular level, progressive damage is initially revealed by collapse of plasma membrane organization and integrity produced by breaches. Consequently, the loss of its role as a semi-permeable barrier that generally mediates the regulation and transport of ions and molecules eventually results in cell death. In previous studies, we have demonstrated the functional recovery of compromised plasma membranes can be induced by the application of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG after both spinal and brain trauma in adult rats and guinea pigs. Additionally, efforts have been directed towards a nanoparticle-based PEG application. The in vivo and ex vivo applications of PEG-decorated silica nanoparticles following CNS injury were able to effectively and efficiently enhance resealing of damaged cell membranes. Results The possibility for selectivity of tetramethyl rhodamine-dextran (TMR dye-doped, PEG-functionalized silica nanoparticles (TMR-PSiNPs to damaged spinal cord was evaluated using an ex vivo model of guinea pig SCI. Crushed and nearby undamaged spinal cord tissues exhibited an obvious difference in both the imbibement and accumulation of the TMR-PSiNPs, revealing selective labeling of compression-injured tissues. Conclusions These data show that appropriately functionalized nanoparticles can be an efficient means to both 1. carry drugs, and 2. apply membrane repair agents where they are needed in focally damaged nervous tissue.

  14. Mutagens from the cooking of food. III. Survey by Ames/Salmonella test of mutagen formation in secondary sources of cooked dietary protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjeldanes, L F; Morris, M M; Felton, J S; Healy, S; Stuermer, D; Berry, P; Timourian, H; Hatch, F T

    1982-08-01

    A survey of mutagen formation during the cooking of a variety of protein-rich foods that are minor sources of protein intake in the American diet is reported (see Bjeldanes, Morris, Felton et al. (1982) for survey of major protein foods). Milk, cheese, tofu and organ meats showed negligible mutagen formation except following high-temperature cooking for long periods of time. Even under the most extreme conditions, tofu, cheese and milk exhibited fewer than 500 Ames/Salmonella typhimurium revertants/100 g equivalents (wet weight of uncooked food), and organ meats only double that amount. Beans showed low mutagen formation after boiling and boiling followed by frying (with and without oil). Only boiling of beans followed by baking for 1 hr gave appreciable mutagenicity (3650 revertants/100g equivalents). Seafood samples gave a variety of results: red snapper, salmon, trout, halibut and rock cod all gave more than 1000 revertants/100 g wet weight equivalents when pan-fried or griddle-fried for about 6 min/side. Baked or poached rock and deep-fried shrimp showed no significant mutagen formation. Broiled lamb chops showed mutagen formation similar to that in red meats tested in the preceding paper: 16,000 revertants/100 g equivalents. These findings show that as measured by bioassay in S. typhimurium, most of the foods that are minor sources of protein in the American diet are also minor sources of cooking-induced mutagens.

  15. Inhibitors of acid secretion can benefit gastric wound repair independent of luminal pH effects on the site of damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitrack, Elise S; Aihara, Eitaro; Kenny, Susan; Varro, Andrea; Montrose, Marshall H

    2012-06-01

    The authors' goal was to measure pH at the gastric surface (pH₀) to understand how acid secretion affects the repair of microscopic injury to the gastric epithelium. Microscopic gastric damage was induced by laser light, during confocal/two-photon imaging of pH-sensitive dyes (Cl-NERF, BCECF) that were superfused over the mucosal surface of the exposed gastric corpus of anaesthetised mice. The progression of repair was measured in parallel with pH₀. Experimental conditions included varying pH of luminal superfusates, and using omeprazole (60 mg/kg ip) or famotidine (30 mg/kg ip) to inhibit acid secretion. Similar rates of epithelial repair and resting pH₀ values (∼pH 4) were reported in the presence of luminal pH 3 or pH 5. Epithelial repair was unreliable at luminal pH 2 and pH₀ was lower (2.5±0.2, P pH 3). Epithelial repair was slower at luminal pH 7 and pH₀ was higher (6.4±0.1, PpH₀ increased adjacent to damage. At luminal pH 3 or pH 7, omeprazole reduced maximal damage size and accelerated epithelial repair, although only at pH 3 did omeprazole further increase surface pH above the level caused by imposed damage. At luminal pH 7, famotidine also reduced maximal damage size and accelerated epithelial repair. Neither famotidine nor omeprazole raised plasma gastrin levels during the time course of the experiments. Epithelial repair in vivo is affected by luminal pH variation, but the beneficial effects of acutely blocking acid secretion extend beyond simply raising luminal and/or surface pH.

  16. Lethal and mutagenic properties of MMS-generated DNA lesions in Escherichia coli cells deficient in BER and AlkB-directed DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Anna; Mielecki, Damian; Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Wrzesinski, Michal; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta

    2010-03-01

    Methylmethane sulphonate (MMS), an S(N)2-type alkylating agent, generates DNA methylated bases exhibiting cytotoxic and mutagenic properties. Such damaged bases can be removed by a system of base excision repair (BER) and by oxidative DNA demethylation catalysed by AlkB protein. Here, we have shown that the lack of the BER system and functional AlkB dioxygenase results in (i) increased sensitivity to MMS, (ii) elevated level of spontaneous and MMS-induced mutations (measured by argE3 --> Arg(+) reversion) and (iii) induction of the SOS response shown by visualization of filamentous growth of bacteria. In the xth nth nfo strain additionally mutated in alkB gene, all these effects were extreme and led to 'error catastrophe', resulting from the presence of unrepaired apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and 1-methyladenine (1meA)/3-methylcytosine (3meC) lesions caused by deficiency in, respectively, BER and AlkB dioxygenase. The decreased level of MMS-induced Arg(+) revertants in the strains deficient in polymerase V (PolV) (bearing the deletion of the umuDC operon), and the increased frequency of these revertants in bacteria overproducing PolV (harbouring the pRW134 plasmid) indicate the involvement of PolV in the error-prone repair of 1meA/3meC and AP sites. Comparison of the sensitivity to MMS and the induction of Arg(+) revertants in the double nfo alkB and xth alkB, and the quadruple xth nth nfo alkB mutants showed that the more AP sites there are in DNA, the stronger the effect of the lack of AlkB protein. Since the sum of MMS-induced Arg(+) revertants in xth, nfo and nth xth nfo and alkB mutants is smaller than the frequency of these revertants in the BER(-) alkB(-) strain, we consider two possibilities: (i) the presence of AP sites in DNA results in relaxation of its structure that facilitates methylation and (ii) additional AP sites are formed in the BER(-) alkB(-) mutants.

  17. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages.

  18. Assessment of estrogenic, mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana S. Camargo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a wide range of research involving natural products is focused on the discovery of new drugs in many different therapeutic areas. A great number of the synthetic compounds on the market were derived from natural products, especially plants. Nemorosone is the major constituent of the floral resin of Clusia rosea Jacq., Clusiaceae, and in Cuban propolis. In vitro studies have shown cytotoxic activity in this substance against various tumor cell lines, including those resistant to various cytotoxic drugs, whereas it has low cytotoxicity to non-tumoral cells. Therefore, in order to characterize the biological activity of nemorosone, a substance with potential antitumor activity, and in view of preclinical testing of the toxicity of drug candidate compounds, the main aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone by the Ames test, using the strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 of Salmonella typhimurium. Secondly, to characterize the estrogenic activity in an experimental recombinant yeast model (Recombinant Yeast Assay mutagenic activity was observed at in any of the concentrations in any of the test strains. To evaluate the antimutagenic potential, direct and indirect mutagenic agents were used: 4 nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD, mitomycin C (MMC and aflatoxin B1 (AFL. Nemorosone showed moderate antimutagenic activity (inhibition level 31%, in strain TA100 in the presence of AFL, and strong antimutagenic activity in TA102 against MMC (inhibition level 53%. Estrogenic activity was observed, with an EEq of 0.41±0.16 nM at various tested concentrations.

  19. The mutagenic, antimutagenic and antioxidant properties of Hypericum lydium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boran, Rukiye; Ugur, Aysel

    2017-12-01

    There is a growing market demand for Hypericum sp., a pharmacologically active plant that has been traditionally used to treat various ailments. However, there have been limited studies on the extract or essential oil of Hypericum lydium Boiss (Hypericaceae). This study investigates for the first time the antioxidant, mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of an ethanol extract of H. lydium. Ethanol extract from aerial parts of H. lydium harvested from Turkey were tested for this mutagenic and antimutagenic activities (2.0-0.002 mg/plate) using Ames Salmonella/microsome test system. 4-Nitro-o-phenylenediamine (4-NPD) (3 μg/plate) for the Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and sodium azide (NaN 3 ) (8 μg/plate) for the S. typhimurium TA100 were used as positive controls. The antioxidant activity, total antioxidant activity and phenolic constituent of the extract (2.0-0.002 mg/mL) was determined by the inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), β-carotene-linoleic acid model and by means of Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, respectively. The extract showed no sign of mutagenicity at the tested concentrations (0.002-2.0 mg/mL), and showed concentration-dependent antimutagenic activity against NaN 3 and 4-NPD ranging from 26.8 to 81.5%. The extract was found to be an efficient scavenger of DPPH (IC 50 0.165 ± 0.23 mg/mL) and to inhibit β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching (IC 50 0.39 ± 0.11 mg/mL). These findings indicate ethanol extract of H. lydium to be a safe and effective agent that may be incorporated into new strategies for the prevention of cancer and mutagenesis.

  20. Assessment of estrogenic, mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana S. Camargo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a wide range of research involving natural products is focused on the discovery of new drugs in many different therapeutic areas. A great number of the synthetic compounds on the market were derived from natural products, especially plants. Nemorosone is the major constituent of the floral resin of Clusia rosea Jacq., Clusiaceae, and in Cuban propolis. In vitro studies have shown cytotoxic activity in this substance against various tumor cell lines, including those resistant to various cytotoxic drugs, whereas it has low cytotoxicity to non-tumoral cells. Therefore, in order to characterize the biological activity of nemorosone, a substance with potential antitumor activity, and in view of preclinical testing of the toxicity of drug candidate compounds, the main aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of nemorosone by the Ames test, using the strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 of Salmonella typhimurium. Secondly, to characterize the estrogenic activity in an experimental recombinant yeast model (Recombinant Yeast Assay mutagenic activity was observed at in any of the concentrations in any of the test strains. To evaluate the antimutagenic potential, direct and indirect mutagenic agents were used: 4 nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD, mitomycin C (MMC and aflatoxin B1 (AFL. Nemorosone showed moderate antimutagenic activity (inhibition level 31%, in strain TA100 in the presence of AFL, and strong antimutagenic activity in TA102 against MMC (inhibition level 53%. Estrogenic activity was observed, with an EEq of 0.41±0.16 nM at various tested concentrations.

  1. Mutagenic potential assessment associated with human exposure to natural radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alexandre Endres; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe; Garcia, Anuska Conde Fagundes Soares; do Amaral, Viviane Souza; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Campos, Thomas Ferreira da Costa; Panosso, Renata; Quinelato, Antônio Luiz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo

    2017-01-01

    Lucrécia city, known to harbor a high cancer rate, is located in a semiarid region characterized by the presence of mineral reservoirs, facing a high exposure to metal and natural radioactivity. The present study aimed to assess the environmental scenario at a semiarid region located in Northeastern Brazil. Metal concentration, alpha and beta radiation, and cyanobacteria content in tap water along with indoor radon and gamma emitters (U, K and Th) concentrations were measured. In addition, mutagenic and nuclear instability effects were assessed using buccal micronucleus cytome assay. The study included five samplings corresponding to a period between 2007 and 2009. Drinking water from Lucrécia city presented levels of Mn, Ni and Cr along with cyanobacteria in concentrations one to four times higher than regulatory guidelines considered. Furthermore, high levels of all the tested radionuclides were found. A high percentage of the houses included in this study presented indoor radon concentrations over 100 Bq m -3 . The mean annual effective dose from Lucrécia houses was six times higher than observed in a control region. The levels of exposure in most of the Lucrécia houses were classified as middle to high. A significant mutagenic effect, represented as an increase of micronuclei (MN) frequency and nuclear abnormalities as nuclear buds (NB), binucleated cells (BN), and pyknotic cells (PYC) were found. The results obtained highlight the role of high background radioactivity on the observed mutagenic effect and could help to explain the exacerbated cancer rate reported in this locality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Formation of new heterocyclic amine mutagens by heating creatinine, alanine, threonine and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K; Knize, M G; Felton, J S; Jägerstad, M

    1992-08-01

    A mixture of alanine, threonine, creatinine and glucose was heated in diethylene glycol and water (5:1, v/v) for 15 min at 200 degrees C. The mutagens formed were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography using the Ames/Salmonella mutagenic activity to guide the purification. The structures of the purified mutagens were determined using UV absorption, mass and NMR spectrometry. A new mutagenic compound with a mass number of 217 was found and its mass spectrum did not correspond to any known mutagen derived from food. This new compound accounted for 4% of the total mutagenic activity. Other mutagenic compounds were identified as MeIQx (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline), 4,8-DiMeIQx (2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline), and a new mutagen 4,7,8-TriMeIQx (2-amino-3,4,7,8-tetramethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline) with a mutagenic activity of 73,000 TA98 revertants per microgram. The percentage of the mutagenic activity attributable to MeIQx, 4,8-DiMeIQx and 4,7,8-TriMeIQx was 10%, 70% and 3%, respectively. The yield of MeIQx, 4,8-DiMeIQx and 4,7,8-TriMeIQx was 10, 36 and 6 nmole/mmole creatinine. The formation of TriMeIQx from natural meat components suggests that this new quinoxaline mutagen may be present in cooked foods.

  3. Evaluation of DNA damage and mutagenicity induced by lead in tobacco plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gichner, Tomáš; Žnidar, I.; Száková, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 652, č. 2 (2008), s. 186-190 ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/05/0500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Comet assay * Nicotiana tabacum L. var. xanthi * Single-cell gel electrophoresis * Somatic mutations Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.363, year: 2008

  4. The photoreactivable component in the mutagenic action of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasnik, M.N.; Morozov, I.I.; Derevyanko, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of visible light on the lethal and the mutagenic effects of gamma-radiation on E. coli WP 2 uvrA + and E. coli WP 2 uvrA cells was studied. It was shown that visible light appears to reduce the yield of gamma-induced prototrophs in E. coli WP 2 uvrA cells while the yield of prototrophs in E. coli WP 2 uvrA + stays unchanged. Visible light did not change the survival of gamma-irradiated cells. (author)

  5. Mutagenic effects of irradiated glucose in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, M.B.; Rao, K.P.; Nandan, S.D.; Rao, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenic effects of irradiated glucose were studied using the sex-linked recessive lethal test in Drosophila melanogaster. Oregon K males of D. melanogaster reared on a medium containing 20 or 40% glucose irradiated with a dose of 0.02, 0.10, 0.20, 2 or 5 Mrad #betta#-rays were scored for the induction of sex-linked recessive lethals. The results showed no significant increase in the frequency of X-lethals in Drosophila at any of the dose levels. (author)

  6. Flavonoid fraction of Cajanus cajan prohibited the mutagenic properties of cyclophosphamide in mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Zeid, Mona A M; Abdel-Samie, Negm S; Farghaly, Ayman A; Hassan, Emad M

    2018-02-01

    Cajanus cajan (L.) is a Pigeon pea cultivated in tropical and subtropical areas. It contains many bioactive components. The present study aimed to assess the antimutagenic efficacy of a flavonoid fraction of Cajanus cajan (FFCC) to reduce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by cyclophosphamide (CP). We assessed genotoxic and cytotoxic effects using chromosome aberration, in mouse bone-marrow cells and spermatocytes, cell viability and DNA damage, in mouse bone-marrow cells. Animals received FFCC at concentrations 50,100 and 200 mg/kg b wt by oral gavage, and injected simultaneously with CP (20 mg/kg b wt) for 24 h. The results revealed that FFCC was safe and its effect was normal compared to control group. Moreover, we observed significant inhibition of CP-induced chromosome abnormalities in both, somatic and germ, cells (p ≪ 0.05) after concurrent administration of different concentrations of FFCC and CP. FFCC reduced chromosome aberrations by 14.29%, 25.21% and 28.57% in somatic cells, and 25.35%, 35.21% and 49.29% in germ cells after simultaneous treatment with CP respectively. Additionally, FFCC improved the cell viability of bone-marrow cells in a concentration-dependent manner when administered concurrently with CP. Similarly, FFCC diminished DNA damage (p ≪ 0.05) in CP-treated animals. The inhibitory index of tail DNA (%) reached 90.6% at the highest concentration of FFCC when administered simultaneously with CP. In conclusion, the flavonoid extract improved cell viability and protected animal cells from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects exhibited by CP. Cajanus cajan flavonoids might contain the antioxidant bioactivity that effectively lessened chromosome aberrations and DNA damage induced by mutagenic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of the Mutagenicity Potential of Supermint Herbal Medicine by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis in Rat Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivar Amanpour

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The increasing use of herbal drugs and their easy availability have necessitated the use of mutagenicity test to analyze their toxicity and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of Supermint herbal medicine in DNA breakage of rat hepatocytes in comparison with sodium dichromate by single cell gel electrophoresis technique or comet assay. Methods: Hepatocytes were prepared from male wistar rats and were counted and kept in a bioreactor for 30 minutes. Then cells were exposed to the Supermint herbal medicine at doses of 125, 250 and 500 μl/ml. Buffer 4 (incubation buffer and sodium dichromate were used as negative and positive control for one hour respectively. Then cell suspension with low melting point agarose were put on precoated slides and covered with agarose gel. Then lysing, electrophoresis, neutralization and staining were carried out. Finally the slides were analyzed with fluorescence microscope. The parameter under this analysis was the type of migration which was determined according to Kobayashi pattern. Results: With increased dose of Supermint herbal medicine the DNA damage was slightly increased (P<0001. Conlusion: In overall compared to the positive control significant differences is observed which convinced that the crude extract of Supermint in vitro did not have mutagenic effect.

  8. Determination of the mutagenic and genotoxic potential of simulated leachate from an automobile workshop soil on eukaryotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Okunola Adenrele; Omosebi, Omotoyosi; Chizea, Ifychukwwu

    2015-07-01

    Contamination of soil and water bodies with spent engine oil and petroleum products is a serious ecological problem, primarily in the automobile workshops and garages. This has potential short and chronic adverse health risks. Information is currently scarce on the potential mutagenicity and genotoxicity of such wastes. In this study, the potential mutagenic and genotoxic effects of simulated leachate from automobile workshop soil in Sagamu, Ogun state, Nigeria, were investigated. The assays utilized were bone marrow micronucleus (MN) and chromosome aberration (CA), sperm morphology and sperm count in mice. The physicochemical analysis of the leachate was also carried out. Experiments were carried out at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100% (volume per volume; leachate:distilled water) of the leachate sample. MN analysis showed a concentration-dependent induction of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes across the treatment groups. In the CA test, there was concentration-dependent significant reduction in mitotic index and induction of different types of CAs. Assessment of sperm shape showed a significant increase in sperm abnormalities with significant decrease in mean sperm count in treated groups. Heavy metals analyzed in the tested sample are believed to contribute significantly to the observed genetic damage. This indicates that automobile workshop soil-simulated leachate contains potential genotoxic agents and constitutes a genetic risk in exposed human population. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Mutagenicity of inhalation anaesthetics studied by the sister chromatid exchange test in lymphocytes of patients and operating room personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husum, B

    1987-06-01

    Retrospective studies have indicated that operating room personnel may have increased risks of spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations in offspring, and cancer (Cohen et al 1980, Buring et al 1985). Occupational exposure to waste anaesthetic gases may be responsible for these possible adverse health effects, but a cause-effect relationship has never been proved. Induction of changes in the DNA in the chromosomes leading to mutations may play a role in teratogenicity and carcinogenicity. Along with an increasing concern in society regarding occupational diseases and working and living environment in general, cytogenetic methods have been developed for rapid detection of potential mutagenicity in vitro of chemical agents. One such method is the SCE test, which is based on examination of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), i.e. exchanges of chromatid-segments between the two chromatids in a chromosome, during cell replication. SCEs are not mutations, but an increased frequency of SCE is a sensitive indicator of exposure to agents that are capable of producing damage to the DNA and thus possibly mutations. In vitro tests like the SCE test are very useful for evaluation of specific chemical agents, which may be added to the culture in known concentrations. In studies of possible hazards from chemical agents in the working or living environment, the exposure is often poorly defined. Also, biotransformation may be different in different species, and the duration and the level of the exposure may play a role. Examination of SCEs is, therefore, increasingly performed directly on human lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Thus, although the examination of SCEs is still performed in vitro, the exposure has taken place in vivo. Increased SCE levels are then regarded as a non-specific indicator that the donor has been exposed to potentially mutagenic agents in the environment. The author and his associates used the SCE test to investigate the possible mutagenicity of

  10. DNA polymerases κ and ζ cooperatively perform mutagenic translesion synthesis of the C8–2′-deoxyguanosine adduct of the dietary mutagen IQ in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Arindam; Pande, Paritosh; Jasti, Vijay P.; Millsap, Amy D.; Hawkins, Edward K.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Basu, Ashis K.

    2015-01-01

    The roles of translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases in bypassing the C8–2′-deoxyguanosine adduct (dG-C8-IQ) formed by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a highly mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amine found in cooked meats, were investigated. Three plasmid vectors containing the dG-C8-IQ adduct at the G1-, G2- or G3-positions of the NarI site (5′-G1G2CG3CC-3′) were replicated in HEK293T cells. Fifty percent of the progeny from the G3 construct were mutants, largely G→T, compared to 18% and 24% from the G1 and G2 constructs, respectively. Mutation frequency (MF) of dG-C8-IQ was reduced by 38–67% upon siRNA knockdown of pol κ, whereas it was increased by 10–24% in pol η knockdown cells. When pol κ and pol ζ were simultaneously knocked down, MF of the G1 and G3 constructs was reduced from 18% and 50%, respectively, to IQ. We conclude that pol κ and pol ζ cooperatively carry out the majority of the error-prone TLS of dG-C8-IQ, whereas pol η is involved primarily in its error-free bypass. PMID:26220181

  11. EFFECT OF THE DECHLORINATING AGENT, ASCORBIC ACID, ON THE MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED WATER SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    XAD resin adsorption has been widely used to concentrate the organic compounds present in chlorinated drinking waters prior to mutagenicity testing. Previous work has shown that mutagenic artifcats can arise due to the reaction of residual chlorine with the resins. Althrough the ...

  12. Investigating the mutagenic effects of three commonly used pulpotomy agents using the ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Asgary, Saeed; Farajzadeh, Malak; Bargahi, Nasrin; Abdolrahimi, Majid; Kananizadeh, Usef; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-03-01

    The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the presence and absence of enzymatic system found in rat liver S9 fraction. Negative controls were 1% dimethyl sulfoxide and water. The positive controls were sodium azide and 2-aminoanthracene. The number of colonies per plate was counted. The material was regarded mutagenic if the number of histidine revertant colonies was twice or more than the spontaneous revertant colonies (Ames mutagenicity ratio). Ferric sulfate was found mutagenic in the concentrations prepared by addition of 50 µL of its 1 in 100 and 1 in 1000 times diluted solutions to the culture medium in the absence of S9 fraction (Ames test ratios of 2.8 and 2.2, respectively). Formocresol showed strong toxicity toward TA100 strain of S. typhimurium up to the concentration as low achieved using 1000 times diluted solution of the original preparation, particularly in the presence of S9 fraction. Ames assay failed to detect significant reverse mutations in all the concentrations of CEM cement. In contrast to formocresol and ferric sulfate, CEM cement is a less toxic and non-mutagenic agent.

  13. Mutagenicity assessment of aerosols in emissions from wood combustion in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, B.; Alves, C.A.; Gonçalves, C.; Pio, C.; Gonçalves, F.; Pereira, R.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) extracts of fine particles (PM 2.5 ) collected from combustion of seven wood species and briquettes were tested for mutagenic activities using Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. The woods were Pinus pinaster (maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalypt), Quercus suber (cork oak), Acacia longifolia (golden wattle), Quercus faginea (Portuguese oak), Olea europea (olive), and Quercus ilex rotundifolia (Holm oak). Burning experiments were done using woodstove and fireplace, hot start and cold start conditions. A mutagenic response was recorded for all species except golden wattle, maritime pine, and briquettes. The mutagenic extracts were not correlated with high emission factors of carcinogenic PAHs. These extracts were obtained both from two burning appliances and start-up conditions. However, fireplace seemed to favour the occurrence of mutagenic emissions. The negative result recorded for golden wattle was interesting, in an ecological point of view, since after confirmation, this invasive species, can be recommended for domestic use. - Highlights: ► Both woodstove and fireplace, either with a cold or hot start, produce emissions with mutagenic potential. ► The high level of carcinogenic PAHs in combustion emissions was not correlated with mutagenicity. ► The golden wattle, an invasive species, produced no mutagenic emissions. - Wood smoke from fireplace burning of dominant forest species displayed strong mutagenic activity without a significant correlation with carcinogenic PAHs emission factors.

  14. Mutagenicity monitoring of urban air particles PM10 in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černá, M.; Pastorková, A.; Šmíd, J.; Binková, Blanka

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 33 (2002), s. 17 ISSN 0893-6692. [Environmental Mutagen Society Annual Meeting /33./. 27.04.2002-02.05.2002, Anchorage - USA] R&D Projects: GA MŽP SI/340/2/00 Keywords : urban air pollution * mutagenicity * PAHs Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality

  15. Effect of eugenol on the genotoxicity of established mutagens in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Evertz, S.J.C.J.; Bruijntjes-Rozier, G.C.D.M.; Heuvel, P.D. van den; Verhagen, H.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of in vivo treatment with eugenol on established mutagens was studied to determine whether eugenol has antigenotoxic potential. The effects of eugenol in rats was investigated in the unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay with established mutagens and the Salmonella typhimurium

  16. Phytochemical study and evaluation of cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, cell cycle kinetics and gene expression of Bauhinia holophylla (Bong.) Steud. in HepG2 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Diego Luis; Cilião, Heloísa Lizotti; Specian, Ana Flávia Leal; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; De Oliveira, Marcelo Tempesta; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida; Vilegas, Wagner; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Martínez-López, Wilner; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Cólus, Ilce Mara Syllos

    2018-04-01

    Bauhinia holophylla (Bong.) Steud. (Fabaceae) is a plant used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat diabetes and inflammation. This study evaluated the phytochemical properties, cytotoxic, apoptotic, mutagenic/antimutagenic effects and alterations in gene expression (RNAm) in HepG2 cells treated with the B. holophylla extract. The phytochemical profile highlight the presence of flavonoids isorhamentin and quercetin derivates. The MTT assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of different concentrations for different treatment times. Three concentrations (7.5, 15, 30 µg/mL) were chosen for assessment of apoptosis (AO/EB), mutagenicity (micronucleus), and cell cycle kinetics (flow cytometry). Thereafter, the concentration of 7.5 µg/mL was chosen to evaluate the protective effects against DNA damage induced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). At concentrations higher than 7.5 µg/mL (between 10 and 50 µg/mL), the extract was cytotoxic, induced apoptosis, and caused antiproliferative effects. However, it did not induce micronucleus and a reduction of apoptotic and micronucleated cells was observed in treatments that included the extract and B[a]P. The protective effect is attributable to the presence of flavonoids, described as antioxidants, inhibitors of DNA adduct and activators of detoxifying enzymes. The results of the present study such as absence of cytotoxic and mutagenic effects and protective effects against known carcinogens suggest that B. holophylla has potential for use soon as herbal medicine.

  17. Organic mutagens and drinking water in The Netherlands : a study on mutagenicity of organic constituents in drinking water in The Netherlands and their possible carcinogenic effects

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Several mutagenic and carcinogenic organic compounds have been detected in Dutch surface waters and in drinking water prepared from these surface waters. Although the levels of these compounds in drinking- and surface water are relatively low, in general below μg per litre, it appeared that organic concentrates tested in the Ames/microsome assay, showed mutagenic activity in 50 ml surface- and 500 ml drinking water.

    Such a result however was not expected based on the concentration of...

  18. The mutagenic potential of high flash aromatic naphtha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, C A; Edwards, D A; McKee, R H; Swanson, M; Wong, Z A; Schmitt, S; Beatty, P

    1989-06-01

    Catalytic reforming is a refining process that converts naphthenes to aromatics by dehydrogenation to make higher octane gasoline blending components. A portion of this wide boiling range hydrocarbon stream can be separated by distillation and used for other purposes. One such application is a mixture of predominantly 9-carbon aromatic molecules (C9 aromatics, primarily isomers of ethyltoluene and trimethylbenzene), which is removed and used as a solvent--high-flash aromatic naphtha. A program was initiated to assess the toxicological properties of high-flash aromatic naphtha since there may be human exposure through inhalation or external body contact. The current study was conducted partly to assess the potential for mutagenic activity and also to assist in an assessment of carcinogenic potential. The specific tests utilized included the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay, the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) forward mutation assay in CHO cells, in vitro chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays in CHO cells, and an in vivo chromosome aberration assay in rat bone marrow.

  19. Evolutionary Ensemble for In Silico Prediction of Ames Test Mutagenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    Driven by new regulations and animal welfare, the need to develop in silico models has increased recently as alternative approaches to safety assessment of chemicals without animal testing. This paper describes a novel machine learning ensemble approach to building an in silico model for the prediction of the Ames test mutagenicity, one of a battery of the most commonly used experimental in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests for safety evaluation of chemicals. Evolutionary random neural ensemble with negative correlation learning (ERNE) [1] was developed based on neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. ERNE combines the method of bootstrap sampling on training data with the method of random subspace feature selection to ensure diversity in creating individuals within an initial ensemble. Furthermore, while evolving individuals within the ensemble, it makes use of the negative correlation learning, enabling individual NNs to be trained as accurate as possible while still manage to maintain them as diverse as possible. Therefore, the resulting individuals in the final ensemble are capable of cooperating collectively to achieve better generalization of prediction. The empirical experiment suggest that ERNE is an effective ensemble approach for predicting the Ames test mutagenicity of chemicals.

  20. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic potential of UHT whole milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda de Lima CARVALHO

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the action at the cellular level of long life whole milk, full type of six renowned companies operating in the Brazilian market, as well as in other South American countries. The evaluation was performed using root meristem cells of Allium cepa L., at exposure times 24 and 48 hours, directly in milk products marketed. The results indicated that all the milk samples reduced root meristem cell proliferation, proving, in this study, a significant cytotoxic effect. Still, exposure to milk resulted in a significant frequency of mitotic spindle changes in meristem cells, characterizing these foods as genotoxic and mutagenic under the study conditions. It can be concluded that the long life milk samples caused significant genetic instability to cells of the examined tissue. The results obtained for cytotoxic, mutagenic and genotoxic action of these long life milks are of great relevance because, to date, there are no published toxicity studies on such foods and food additives present in the composition.

  1. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  2. The use of organic solvents in mutagenicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondandolo, A; Bonatti, S; Corsi, C; Corti, G; Fiorio, R; Leporini, C; Mazzaccaro, A; Nieri, R; Barale, R; Loprieno, N

    1980-10-01

    13 organic substances (dimethylsulfoxide, methanol, ethanol, n-propyl alcohol, sec-butyl alcohol, tert-butyl alcohol, dl-sec-amyl alcohol, ethylene glycol, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, 1,4-diethylene dioxide, acetone, methyl acetate and formamide) were considered from the standpoint of their use as solvents for water-insoluble chemicals to be tested for mutagenicity. First, the effect of these solvents on cell survival was studied in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and in V79 Chinese hamster cells. 8 solvents showing relatively low toxicity on either cell system (dimethylsulfoxide, ethanol, ethylene glycol, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, 1,4-diethylene dioxide, acetone, methyl acetate and formamide) were tested for their effect on aminopyrine demethylase. 4 solvents (ethanol, 1,4-diethylene dioxide, methyl acetate and formamide) showed a more or less pronounced adverse effect on the microsomal enzymic activity. The remaining 4 and methanol (whose effect on aminopyrine demethylase was not testable) were assayed for mutagenicity in S. pombe. They all gave negative results both with and without the post-mitochondrial fraction from mouse liver.

  3. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  4. Comparative mutagenicity of alkylsulfate and alkanesulfonate derivatives in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, D B; Forbes, N L; Hsie, A W

    1978-05-01

    Mutation induction and cell killing produced by selected alkylsulfates and alkanesulfonates have been quantitated using the Chinese hamster ovary/hypoxanthine--guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (CHO/HGPRT) system. Dose--response relationships of cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are presented for two alkylsulfates [dimethylsulfate (DMS), diethylsulfate (DES)] and three alkyl alkanesulfonates [methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), and isopropyl methanesulfonate (iPMS)]. Under the experimental conditions employed, cytotoxicity decreased with the size of the alkyl group. DMS was more toxic than DES, and MMS was more toxic than EMS and iPMS. All agents produced linear dose--response of mutation induction: DMS was more mutagenic than DES, and MMS was more mutagenic than EMS and iPMS based on mutants induced per unit mutagen concentration. However, the following relative mutagenic potency was observed when comparisons were made at 10% survival: DES greater than DMS; EMS greater than MMS greater than iPMS.

  5. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  6. Scanning electron-microscopic and X-ray-microanalytic observation of diesel-emission particles associated with mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, K.; Yoshitsugu, K.; Tokiwa, H.; Fukuoka Environmental Research Center

    1983-01-01

    The particles formed by diesel combustion, which may contain various mutagenic chemicals like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), are analyzed in their morphology by scanning electron microscopy; their sulfur content is detected by X-ray microanalysis, and mutagenicity is tested with a Salmonella typhimurium bioassay. The authors find a close correlation between sulfur content and mutagenicity of PAH. (Auth.)

  7. An analysis of the mutagenicity of 1,2-dibromoethane to Escherichia coli: Influence of DNA repair activities and metabolic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Patricia L.; Wilkinson, Wells G.; Miller, Judith K.; Sullivan, Amy D.; Barnes, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mutagenicity of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) to Escherichia coli was reduced by the UV light-induced excision repair system but unaffected by the loss of a major apurinic/apyrimidinic site repair function. At high doses, 70–90% of the EDB-induced mutations were independent of SOS-mutagenic processing and approximately 50% were independent of glutathione conjugation. The SOS-independent mutations induced by EDB were unaffected by the enzymes that repair alkylation-induced DNA lesions. EDB-induced base substitutions were dominated by GC to AT and AT to GC transitions. These results suggest that EDB-induced premutagenic lesions have some, but not all, of the characteristics of simple alkyl lesions. PMID:3054522

  8. Analysis of mutagenic DNA repair in a thermoconditional repair mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siede, W.; Eckardt, F.; Brendel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The time course of REV2 dependent recovery from prelethal UV damage and UV-induced locus-specific reversion of the his5-2 allele was determined in temperature-shift experiments by use of a thermoconditional allele of the rev2 gene (rad5-8, rev2sup(ts)). In UV-irradiated, exponentially growing rev2sup(ts) cells the REV2 dependent repair acitivity persists for up to 8 h at permissive temperature (23 0 C), while the REV2 dependent mutagenic process is mostly completed within 2 h. The REV2 dependent process in exponentially growing cells is highly impaired by inhibition of protein synthesis. However, a REV2 dependent repair activity independent of de novo synthesis is detectable, even in the presence of up to 200 μg/ml cycloheximide, a response not found in stationary phase cells. Thus, the REV2 dependent process seems to be partially constitutive in exponentially growing cells. Additionally, exponentially growing rev2sup(ts) cells were considerably more UV-sensitive at restrictive temperature (36 0 C) than were stationary phase cells. (orig.)

  9. Antigenotoxic properties of lactic acid bacteria in the S. typhimurium mutagenicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool-Zobel, B L; Münzner, R; Holzapfel, W H

    1993-01-01

    A high percentage of human tumors is reported to be related to dietary habits. One way to improve the nutritional impact is to increase the intake of protective factors, such as inhibitors of DNA damage and other types of anticarcinogens. Specific strains of lactic acid bacteria used to ferment milk are promising candidates that may be antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic. We have studied the antimutagenicity of 10 isolated strains of beneficial lactic acid bacteria. Four types of fermented milk products were also studied for their protective properties. The effect of these bacteria on the yield of revertants induced by nitrosated beef extract was investigated in the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay. Eight of 10 isolated Lactobacillus strains reduced the yield of his+ revertants almost back to the levels of the untreated controls. Different fermented fresh yogurts containing viable bacteria (probably Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacteria) showed protective effects as well. The degree of suppressing revertants was independent of the yogurt's fat content. In contrast, yogurt products that had been heat treated were not inhibitory. The other fresh fermented milk products (e.g., buttermilk, kefir, and "Dickmilch") were not antimutagenic in this study. The results imply that some bacteria used in milk processing have an antimutagenic potential and that this property is specific for the bacterial strain.

  10. Studies on mutagenic activity of 60Co γ-ray irradiated rape pollen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Weishun; Liu Aihua; Lin Shiying; Xiong Xikun

    1989-01-01

    In the present study on disinfection, the rape pollen was irradiated with 2.5 kGy 60 Co γ-ray. Micronuclei, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) of bone marrow cells and chromosomal aberrations of meiotic cells in mice were used as an indicater of chromosomal damage to study the mutagenicity of irradiated rape pollen. The results are as follows: (1) The frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes is 2.00 per mille; nucleated cells is 0.8 per mille in control group. In the numbers of polychromatic erythrocytes and nucleated cells with micronuclei, there is no obviously difference in irradiated and unirradiated groups. (2) SCE incidence of control group is 2.01 ± 0.12/cell. No significant difference in the frequency of SCE exists between non-irradiated rape pollen and the control groups. But the frequency of SCE in irradiated rape pollen group (3000 mg/kg/day x 7) is 2.36 ± 0.12/cell; high dose group (6000 mg/kg/day x 7) is 2.96 ± 0.14/cell. In comparison with control group, there is a significant difference. (3) The chromatid breaks, fragments, and univalents in primary spermatocytes have been obseved. The frequencies of chromosomal aberration showed no obviously difference among irradiated and non-irradiated rape pollen groups

  11. Mutagenic and epigenetic influence of caffeine on the frequencies of UV-induced ouabain-resistant Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Philipps, C.; Trosko, J.E.; Hart, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Caffeine, given as a post-treatment to UV-irradiated Chinese hamster cells in vitro, modified the frequency of induced mutations at the ouabain resistance locus. Mutation frequencies were increased when caffeine was added only for the DNA repair and mutation fixation period. When caffeine was added after the DNA repair and mutation fixation period, or immediately after DNA damage and for the entire repair and selection period, mutation frequencies were reduced. A hypothesis, given to explain both results, is that caffeine, by blocking a constitutive 'error-free' postreplication repair process, allows an 'error-prone' DNA repair process to produce many mutations. Moreover, caffeine, possibly by modifying C-AMP metabolism, causes a repression of induced mutations which, in effect, explains its anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties

  12. Cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity of 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene and 1-chloro-3-buten-2-one, two alternative metabolites of 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-Jie; Zeng, Fang-Mao; An, Jing; Yu, Ying-Xin; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2013-08-15

    The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity of 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene (CHB), a known in vitro metabolite of the human carcinogen 1,3-butadiene, have not previously been investigated. Because CHB can be bioactivated by alcohol dehydrogenases to yield 1-chloro-3-buten-2-one (CBO), a bifunctional alkylating agent that caused globin-chain cross-links in erythrocytes, in the present study we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of CHB and CBO in human normal hepatocyte L02 cells using the MTT assay, the relative cloning efficiency assay and the comet assay. We also investigated the mutagenic potential of these compounds with the Ames test using Salmonella strains TA1535 and TA1537. The results provide clear evidence for CHB and CBO being both cytotoxic and genotoxic with CBO being approximately 100-fold more potent than CHB. Interestingly, CHB generated both single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites on DNA, whereas CBO produced only alkali-labile sites. CHB did not directly result in DNA breaks, whereas CBO was capable of directly generating breaks on DNA. Interestingly, both compounds did not induce DNA cross-links as examined by the comet assay. The Ames test results showed that CHB induced point mutation but not frameshift mutation, whereas the toxic effects of CBO made it difficult to reliably assess the mutagenic potential of CBO in the two strains. Collectively, the results suggest that CHB and CBO may play a role in the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sram, Radim J., E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 14220 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with {gamma}-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 {mu}mol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  14. Vitamin C for DNA damage prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sram, Radim J.; Binkova, Blanka; Rossner, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The ability of vitamin C to affect genetic damage was reviewed in human studies that used molecular epidemiology methods, including analysis of DNA adducts, DNA strand breakage (using the Comet assay), oxidative damage measured as levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, and the induction of DNA repair proteins. The protective effect of vitamin C was observed at plasma levels > 50 μmol/l. Vitamin C supplementation decreased the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in groups with insufficient dietary intake who were occupationally exposed to mutagens, and also decreased the sensitivity to mutagens as assessed using the bleomycin assay. High vitamin C levels in plasma decreased the frequency of genomic translocations in groups exposed to ionizing radiation or c-PAHs in polluted air. The frequency of micronuclei was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in smokers challenged with γ-irradiation, and higher vitamin C levels in plasma counteracted the damage induced by air pollution. The prevalence of DNA adducts inversely correlated with vitamin C levels in groups environmentally exposed to high concentrations of c-PAHs. Increased vitamin C levels decreased DNA strand breakage induced by air pollution. Oxidative damage (8-oxodG levels) was decreased by vitamin C supplementation in groups with plasma levels > 50 μmol/l exposed to PM2.5 and c-PAHs. Modulation of DNA repair by vitamin C supplementation was observed both in poorly nourished subjects and in groups with vitamin C plasma levels > 50 μmol/l exposed to higher concentrations of c-PAHs. It is possible that the impact of vitamin C on DNA damage depends both on background values of vitamin C in the individual as well as on the level of exposure to xenobiotics or oxidative stress.

  15. Heavy Metal-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage in Earthworms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Hirano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms can be used as a bio-indicator of metal contamination in soil, Earlier reports claimed the bioaccumulation of heavy metals in earthworm tissues, while the metal-induced mutagenicity reared in contaminated soils for long duration. But we examined the metal-induced mutagenicity in earthworms reared in metal containing culture beddings. In this experiment we observed the generation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-Gua in earthworms exposed to cadmium and nickel in soil. 8-oxo-Gua is a major premutagenic form of oxidative DNA damage that induces GC-to-TA point mutations, leading to carcinogenesis.

  16. The C-terminal region of Rad52 is essential for Rad52 nuclear and nucleolar localization, and accumulation at DNA damage sites immediately after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Manabu, E-mail: m_koike@nirs.go.jp [DNA Repair Gene Res., National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yutoku, Yasutomo [DNA Repair Gene Res., National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Koike, Aki [DNA Repair Gene Res., National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •Rad52 might play a key role in the repair of DSB immediately after irradiation. •EYFP-Rad52 accumulates rapidly at DSB sites and colocalizes with Ku80. •Accumulation of Rad52 at DSB sites is independent of the core NHEJ factors. •Localization and recruitment of Rad52 to DSB sites are dependent on the Rad52 CTR. •Basic amino acids in Rad52 CTR are highly conserved among vertebrate species. -- Abstract: Rad52 plays essential roles in homologous recombination (HR) and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, in vertebrates, knockouts of the Rad52 gene show no hypersensitivity to agents that induce DSBs. Rad52 localizes in the nucleus and forms foci at a late stage following irradiation. Ku70 and Ku80, which play an essential role in nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ), are essential for the accumulation of other core NHEJ factors, e.g., XRCC4, and a HR-related factor, e.g., BRCA1. Here, we show that the subcellular localization of EYFP-Rad52(1–418) changes dynamically during the cell cycle. In addition, EYFP-Rad52(1–418) accumulates rapidly at microirradiated sites and colocalizes with the DSB sensor protein Ku80. Moreover, the accumulation of EYFP-Rad52(1–418) at DSB sites is independent of the core NHEJ factors, i.e., Ku80 and XRCC4. Furthermore, we observed that EYFP-Rad52(1–418) localizes in nucleoli in CHO-K1 cells and XRCC4-deficient cells, but not in Ku80-deficient cells. We also found that Rad52 nuclear localization, nucleolar localization, and accumulation at DSB sites are dependent on eight amino acids (411–418) at the end of the C-terminal region of Rad52 (Rad52 CTR). Furthermore, basic amino acids on Rad52 CTR are highly conserved among mammalian, avian, and fish homologues, suggesting that Rad52 CTR is important for the regulation and function of Rad52 in vertebrates. These findings also suggest that the mechanism underlying the regulation of subcellular localization of Rad52 is

  17. The dependence of natural regeneration of forest trees on upper soil conditions and acidity at damaged sites in the Black Forest, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littek, T.

    1993-06-01

    It was the goal of this study to investigate the influence of different upper soil conditions on the germination and establishment, as well as the growth, of young plants of various tree species. For this purpose, four test plots in the region of the Black Forest were laid out, in which, by various means of site preparation and fertilization, the upper soils were changed. Natural seeding of common spruce, European silver-fir, beech, sycamore maple, European mountainash, and grey alder was simulated by means of controlled sowing. For comparison, a greenhouse experiment was carried out, examining the germination and development of the same tree species in various soil substrata, using different fertilizers, and under the influence of artificial acid rain. The most important results - with a high level of variation depending on the tree species examined - can be summarized as follows: Based on the results of field and greenhouse experiments, as well as on the investigations of other authors, it can be concluded that natural regeneration of forest stands is considerably impeded under conditions of increasing soil acidity and by high acid depositions. This is seen directly as the result of unfavorable chemical conditions in the upper soil, as well as indirectly due to deteriorating competitiveness against other vegetation. Site preparation and lime or dolomite fertilization can be important measures in the practice of forestry, to encourage natural regeneration in highly acidic sites with an unfavourable humus layer and a high presence of competing vegetation. (orig./UWA). 2 figs., 85 tabs., 269 refs [de

  18. Assessment of Mutagenic Effect of G. acerosa and S. wightii in S. typhimurium (TA 98, TA 100, and TA 1538 strains and Evaluation of Their Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effect in Human Mononuclear Cells: A Non-Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Nisha Syad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The marine red algae (Gelidiella acerosa and Sargassum wightii possessing excellent antioxidant and anticholinesterase activity were subjected to toxicity evaluation for a deeper understanding of other bioprotective properties of seaweeds. Cytotoxic evaluation was done by trypan blue exclusion, and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays using human PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells and RBC (red blood cells lysis assay using human erythrocytes. Mutagenicity of the seaweeds was analyzed by Ames salmonella mutagenicity test with the histidine dependent mutant strains TA 98, TA100 and TA 1538. Genotoxic activity was verified in PBMC by comet assay. The results suggest that benzene extract of G. acerosa (BEGA and dichloromethane extract of S. wightii (DMESW did not show cytotoxic effect both in PBMC and erythrocytes. Evaluation of mutagenic activity suggests that the seaweeds did not cause any mutagenic effects both in the absence and the presence of S9 microsomal fraction in all the three Salmonella mutant strains. Results of genotoxic study showed that PBMC treated with seaweed extracts (1 mg/mL exhibit less or no damage to cells, thus proving the non-genotoxic effect of the extract. Since these in vitro non-clinical studies clearly demonstrate the non-toxic nature of the seaweeds, they could be exploited for further characterization, which would result in development of novel and safe therapeutic entities.

  19. Environmental mutagenicity and toxicity caused by sodium metabisulfite in sea shrimp harvesting in Piauí, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Machado Matos Carvalho, Ivana Mara; Cavalcante, Ana Amélia Melo; Dantas, Alisson Ferreira; Pereira, Danilo Leôncio Aguiar; Rocha, Francisco Cézar Costa; Oliveira, Francisco Massal de; Da Silva, Juliana

    2011-02-01

    Sodium metabisulfite is used in marine shrimp harvesting to prevent the occurrence of black spots. Shrimps are soaked in a sodium metabisulfite solution in ice, which is disposed of in sewages that run into marine canals, creating an environmental hazard. This study evaluates the toxicity and mutagenicity caused by sodium metabisulfite in sea waters and sediments collected in a shrimp farm in Cajueiro da Praia (Luis Correia), state of Piauí, Brazil, using the Allium cepa assay. Water and sediment samples were collected in the dry and in the rainy seasons, in three sites: upstream the shrimp farm (Site 1), at the point sodium metabisulfite is discharged (Site 2), and 100 m downstream the farm (Site 3). Three sample dilutions were used (50%, 25% and 10%) for all samples. A negative control (well water) and a positive control (copper sulfate 0.0006 mg mL⁻¹) were used in each experiment. At the end of the 72-h exposure period, onion roots were measured and removed. Mutagenicity analysis included the determination of mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations and the detection of micronuclei; analysis of root size and mitotic index were used as an index of toxicity. The A. cepa assay revealed that the water and sediments samples collected in the Piauí coast contaminated with sodium metabisulfite induce toxicity. The results demonstrate that the assay may be used as a regular tool in the analysis of water parameters in shrimp farms in the coast of Piauí state, and in strategies to preserve the region's marine ecosystem. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fecalase: a model for activation of dietary glycosides to mutagens by intestinal flora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, G.; Gold, C.; Ferro-Luzzi, A.; Ames, B.N.

    1980-08-01

    Many substances in the plant kingdom and in man's diet occur as glycosides. Recent studies have indicated that many glycosides that are not mutagenic in tests such as the Salmonella test become mutagenic upon hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkages. The Salmonella test utilizes a liver homogenate to approximate mammalian metabolism but does not provide a source of the enzymes present in intestinal bacterial flora that hydrolyze the wide variety of glycosides present in nature. We describe a stable cell-free extract of human feces, fecalase, which is shown to contain various glycosidases that allow the in vitro activation of many natural glycosides to mutagens in the Salmonella/liver homogenate test. Many beverages, such as red wine (but apparently not white wine) and tea, contain glycosides of the mutagen quercetin. Red wine, red grape juice, and teas were mutagenic in the test when fecalase was added, and red wine contained considerable direct mutagenic activity in the absence of fecalase. The implications of quercetin mutagenicity and carcinogenicity are discussed.

  1. Mutagenicity of Tween 80-solvated mild gasification products in the Ames salmonella microsomal assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-13

    The results of the Tween 80-solvated Ames testing of six mild gasification samples indicate significant mutagenic activity only in the composite materials (MG-119 and MG-120), previously suspected from the DMSO-solvated assays, which had shown some variable but ultimately insignificant mutagenic responses. The activity of these samples from the Tween 80-solvated assays was quite low when compared to either the positive controls or the SRC-II HD coal-liquefaction reference material. The class of mutagenic activity expressed by these samples solvated in Tween 80 was that of an indirect-acting, frameshift mutagen(s) since significant activity was found only on tester strain TA98 in the presence of the metabolic activation fraction (S9). Because DMSO and other solvents have been shown to affect the mutagenic activity of certain pure chemicals, the possibility of solvent/mutagen interactions in complex mixtures such as coal-derived liquids exists. Thus, the testing of the genotoxic activity of undefined, chemically complex compounds may require the use of at least two solvent systems to reduce the possibility of artifactual findings. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Combined anaerobic–ozonation process for treatment of textile wastewater: Removal of acute toxicity and mutagenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punzi, Marisa, E-mail: marisa.punzi@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Nilsson, Filip [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Anbalagan, Anbarasan [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Svensson, Britt-Marie [School of Education and Environment, Kristianstad University, SE-291 88 Kristianstad (Sweden); Jönsson, Karin [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mattiasson, Bo; Jonstrup, Maria [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • COD and UV absorbance were effectively reduced. • The treated effluents were non-toxic to Artemia salina and Vibrio fischeri. • The real textile wastewater was mutagenic. • Mutagenicity persisted after bio treatment and even more after a short ozonation. • Higher ozone doses completely remove mutagenicity. - Abstract: A novel set up composed of an anaerobic biofilm reactor followed by ozonation was used for treatment of artificial and real textile effluents containing azo dyes. The biological treatment efficiently removed chemical oxygen demand and color. Ozonation further reduced the organic content of the effluents and was very important for the degradation of aromatic compounds, as shown by the reduction of UV absorbance. The acute toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri and the shrimp Artemia salina increased after the biological treatment. No toxicity was detected after ozonation with the exception of the synthetic effluent containing the highest concentration, 1 g/l, of the azo dye Remazol Red. Both untreated and biologically treated textile effluents were found to have mutagenic effects. The mutagenicity increased even further after 1 min of ozonation. No mutagenicity was however detected in the effluents subjected to longer exposure to ozone. The results of this study suggest that the use of ozonation as short post-treatment after a biological process can be beneficial for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds and the removal of toxicity of textile wastewater. However, monitoring of toxicity and especially mutagenicity is crucial and should always be used to assess the success of a treatment strategy.

  3. Mutagenicity of edible palm oil on the Ghanaian market before and after repeated heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, George A; Okyere, Genevieve O; Asante, Matilda; Brown, Charles A; Santa, Sheila; Asiedu, Bernice

    2013-12-01

    Red palm oil produced in Ghana largely by village folks has never been tested for its mutagenic potential. The study aimed at determining the mutagenicity of high-energy heated red palm oil (RRPO) and refined, bleached imported palm oil (PO) on the Ghanaian market. Samples of RRPO and PO were 1× and 5× heated for 10 min at 180 °C with a cooling period of 5 h in-between. Unheated, together with heated samples, were tested for mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100 tester stains. Unheated PO was negative for the Ames mutagenicity test with TA 98 strain. However, 1× and 5× heated PO were mutagenic (P = 0.05, each). Testing PO, using TA 100 strain was negative. RRPO was mutagenic with TA 98 strain for heated oils (P = 0.05, each). Assays with TA 100 strain showed highly significant mutations (P = 0.001, each) that increased with increasing heating frequency. PO 1× and 5× heated samples caused significant frameshift mutation in the S. typhimurium TA 98 strain. RRPO caused highly significant point and frameshift mutations in heated samples. Furthermore, unheated RRPO mutagenic potential has serious health implications. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Micronuclei frequency in children exposed to environmental mutagens: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neri, Monica; Fucic, Aleksandra; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2003-01-01

    selected from the HUMN database. An effect of chronic and infectious diseases on MN levels has been reported by various authors. Most studies describing the effect of exposure to genotoxic agents (ionizing radiation, chemicals, drugs, environmental tobacco smoke) found an increase of MN in exposed children....... The limited number of published papers indicates that the conduct of properly designed studies on the effect of environmental pollutants in children may be difficult. This review confirmed the usefulness of MN assay in biomonitoring studies conducted in children, revealing that in many circumstances...... studies in children are a promising field, since because of evident differences in the uptake, metabolism, distribution and excretion of mutagens this population seems to be more susceptible than adults. Further, the effect of major confounders such as cigarettes smoking, occupation, life...

  5. Mutagenic effects of space environment and protons on rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Shen Mei

    1998-07-01

    Dry seeds of 5 rice varieties were carried by recoverable satellite for space mutation, and were irradiated by 4∼8 MeV protons with various doses. The mutagenic effects was studied. The results indicated that the space environment could cause chromosomal structure aberration and had stimulating mitosis action in root tip cells. As compared with γ-rays and protons, the effects of space environment flight were lower on chromosomal aberration but were significantly higher on mitosis index. Space environment and protons induce high frequency of chlorophyll deficient mutation and mutation in plant height and heading date in M 2 generation. Frequency of beneficial mutation induced by space environment and protons were higher than those induced by γ-rays

  6. Samplings of urban particulate matter for mutagenicity assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Zaiacono, T.

    1996-07-01

    In the frame of a specific program relating to the evaluation of mutagenic activity of urban particulate matter, an experimental arrangement has been developed to sample aerosuspended particles from the external environment carried indoor by means of a fan. Instrumentation was placed directly in the air flow to minimize particle losses, and consisted of total filter, collecting particles without any size separation; cascade impactor, fractioning urban particulate to obtain separate samples for analyses; an optical device, for real time monitoring of aerosol concentration, temperature and relative humidity sensors. Some of the samples obtained were analysed to investigate: particle morphology, aerosol granulometric distributions, effect of relative humidity on collected particulate, amount of ponderal mass compared with real time optical determinations. The results obtained are reported here, together with some considerations about carbonaceous particles, in urban areas mainly originated from diesel exhausts, their degree of agglomeration and role to vehiculate substances into the human respiratory

  7. Influence of the presence of B chromosomes on DNA damage in Crepis capillaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Kwasniewska

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of different plant species to mutagenic agents is related to the DNA content and organization of the chromatin, which have been described in ABCW and bodyguard hypotheses, respectively. Plant species that have B chromosomes are good models for the study of these hypotheses. This study presents an analysis of the correlation between the occurrence of B chromosomes and the DNA damage that is induced by the chemical mutagen, maleic hydrazide (MH, in Crepis capillaris plants using comet assay. The presence of B chromosomes has a detectable impact on the level of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage after MH treatment was correlated with the number of B chromosomes and it was observed that it increased significantly in plants with 3B chromosomes. We did not find evidence of the protective role from chemical mutagens of the constitutive heterochromatin for euchromatin in relation to DNA damage. The DNA damage involving the 25S rDNA sequences was analyzed using the comet-FISH technique. Fragmentation within or near the 25S rDNA involved the loci on the A and B chromosomes. The presence of B chromosomes in C. capillaris cells had an influence on the level of DNA damage that involves the 25S rDNA region.

  8. The relationship between mutagenicity and chemical composition of polycyclic aromatic compounds from coal pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornat, M J; Braun, A G; Hawiger, A; Longwell, J P; Sarofim, A F

    1990-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) produced from the pyrolysis of a bituminous coal at temperatures of 1125 to 1425 degrees K prove to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium, both in the presence and in the absence of postmitochondrial supernatant (PMS) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver. Mutagenicity of the PAC samples measured in the absence of PMS exhibits little dependence on pyrolysis temperature; that measured in its presence is higher at the higher pyrolysis temperatures. However, because of the decrease in PAC yield as the temperature is raised, mutagenicity per mass of coal consumed falls with an increase in temperature if measured without PMS (-PMS) and peaks at an intermediate temperature of 1378 degrees K if measured with PMS (+PMS). Using a new chromatographic technique, we have split each coal-derived PAC sample into two fractions: LC1, containing PAC with alkyl and O-containing substitutions and LC2, consisting of unsubstituted PAC. Substituted (LC1) fractions show no significant +PMS mutagenicity, indicating that, as a whole, the alkylated PAC in our coal pyrolysis products are not mutagenic. Only at the higher temperatures do the substituted fractions exhibit significant -PMS mutagenicity, attributed to PAC with carbonyl or etheric functionalities. The extremely low yields of the substituted PAC under the conditions where they show some activity, however, ensure that they contribute little to overall mutagenicity. In contrast to the substituted fractions, the unsubstituted (LC2) fractions display significant mutagenicity under all conditions and appear to be responsible for virtually all of the mutagenicity in these coal-derived PAC samples. In this fraction, -PMS activity is attributed to nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatics. PMID:2190813

  9. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis and detection of mutagenicity in ambient air of the coke oven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiás, L; Kůsová, J; Gajdos, O; Vidová, P; Gajdosová, D; Havránková, J; Fried, M; Binková, B; Topinka, J

    1999-09-30

    In the present study, we summarize the results of studies on the mutagenic potential of the main fractions and subfractions of extractable organic material (EOM) in the ambient air at the workplaces of the coke oven. The objective of our experiments was to apply the Bioassay-Directed Chemical Analysis (with the use of the Ames test) for the identification of the differences in the mutagenicity of these fractions, in relationship to the complex mixture of EOM in occupational air. From the evaluation of results, it is possible to deduce the following conclusions: (1) The comparison of the mutagenicity in the main fractions (basic, acidic, neutral) demonstrates the existence of differences in mutagenic potential. Of the total mutagenicity, 20.4% is in the basic fraction, 25.4% in the acidic fraction and 54.2% in the neutral fraction. (2) In general, 90.1% of the mutagenicity found in the basic, acidic and neutral fractions together was associated with the requirement of metabolic activation in vitro (+S9). In the case of the neutral fraction, it was 51.8%. (3) These results also suggest that frameshift mutations are the major component (53.8%) of the total mutagenicity of the main fractions. (4) With regards to the mutagenicity of organic compounds in the neutral fraction it appeared that genotoxicants of its subfractions (slightly and moderately polar and aromatic) play the main role. Carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and genotoxic nitrocompounds play an important role as determinants of the mutagenic potential of complex mixtures of harmful compounds in ambient air. This is confirmed first by the results of short-term bacterial tests.

  10. Survey of the mutagenicity of surface water, sediments, and drinking water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sarah H; Claxton, Larry D; Diliberto, Janet; Hughes, Thomas J; Swank, Adam; Kusnierz, Daniel H; Marshall, Valerie; DeMarini, David M

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) projects address the effects of environmental pollutants in a particular region on the health of the population in that region. This report is part of a RARE project that addresses this for the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN), Penobscot Island, Maine, U.S., where the Penobscot River has had fish advisories for many years due to high levels of mercury. We used the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with strains TA100, TA98, YG1041, and YG1042 with and without metabolic activation to assess the mutagenic potencies of organic extracts of the Penobscot River water and sediment, as well as drinking-water samples, all collected by the PIN Department of Natural Resources. The source water for the PIN drinking water is gravel-packed groundwater wells adjacent to the Penobscot River. Most samples of all extracts were either not mutagenic or had low to moderate mutagenic potencies. The average mutagenic potencies (revertants/L-equivalent) were 337 for the drinking-water extracts and 177 for the river-water extracts; the average mutagenic potency for the river-sediment extracts was 244 revertants(g-equivalent)(-1). This part of the RARE project showed that extracts of the Penobscot River water and sediments and Penobscot drinking water have little to no mutagenic activity that might be due to the classes of compounds that the Salmonella mutagenicity assay detects, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs (nitroarenes), and aromatic amines. This study is the first to examine the mutagenicity of environmental samples from a tribal nation in the U.S. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Updated synthesis of knowledge related to the impact of radioactive releases from the damaged nuclear site of Fukushima Dai-Ichi on the marine environment - 13 July 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Illustrated by tables, figures and graphs, this report first comments the evolution of the radioactive pollution of sea water: main radionuclides notices in sea water since the 21 March 2011 (with two main origins: atmospheric fallouts, liquid releases from the site), evolution of sea water contamination along the coast at the vicinity of the power station, simulation of caesium 137 dispersion in sea water off Japan. Then, it comments the evolution of the presence of radionuclides in sediments and in marine species (species with contamination level exceeding the admissible level for consumption, concentrations noticed by sea animals, expected evolution for marine species, other published data)

  12. Molecular basis for the mutagenic and lethal effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Progress report, December 1, 1977--November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.

    1978-07-01

    Our earlier work on the chemical basis of mutagenesis led to certain chemical generalities necessary to explain how certain mutagens such as UV light and hydroxylamine functioned in information transfer systems (replicative, transcriptive and translational). When such modifications were applied to biologically active DNA in a controlled manner biological expression was non-stoichiometric because much of the damage was removed from the DNA by repair systems. Our efforts were then directed to these systems which led to: the isolation, purification and characterization of endonucleases responsible for the first and controlling step in DNA repair referred to as incision in both M. luteus and E. coli; the isolation, purification and characterization of exonucleases responsible for the removal or excision of damaged nucleotides in M. luteus and human placental trophoblasts; the repair of UV damaged biologically active transforming and transfecting DNAs by purified endonucleases, exonucleases, DNA polymerase I and polynucleotide ligase from M. luteus and E. coli; the characterization of the dual gene control for incision phenomenon in M. luteus and E. coli; and isolation, purification and characterization of repair enzymes from human placenta

  13. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van 2,3-epoxypropylmethacrylaat met microorganismen

    OpenAIRE

    Voogd CE; van der Stel JJ; Verharen HW

    1984-01-01

    Glycidylmethacrylaat of 2,3-epoxypropylmethacrylaat bleek een mutagene werking uit te oefenen op Klebsiela pneumoniae (0,0002 mol en hoger), op Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535 (vanaf 0,004 mg per plaat) en Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (vanaf 0,04 mg per plaat). Met de Salmonella typhimurium stammen TA 98 en TA 1538 werd geen mutagene werking gevonden bij hoeveelheden tot 0,4 mg per plaat. Aanwezigheid van metabolische activering bleek nauwelijks invloed te hebben op de mutagene activiteit bij...

  14. Antimutagenic properties of lactic acid-cultured milk on chemical and fecal mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, A.; Kashina, T.; Kada, T.

    1986-09-01

    The antimutagenic properties of milk cultured with Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus were examined using streptomycin-dependent strains of Salmonella in an in vitro assay system. The mutagens utilized for testing included 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl) acrylamide, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, and fecal mutagenic extracts from cats, monkeys, dogs and other mammals. Both types of cultured milk exhibited antimutagenic activity on all mutagens used. Antimutagenic activities of the cultured milks with 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl) acrylamide and 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide increased with incubation time but were thermolabile beyond 55/sup 0/C for 10 min.

  15. Antioxidant and Antimutagenic Metabolites in Animals with Opposite Sensitivity to Tuberculosis Mycobacteria and Mutagenic Xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, V A; Kotomtsev, V V; Doronin, A I; Sabadash, E V

    2016-11-01

    Different sensitivity of guinea pigs and rats to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and membranotropic mutagenic xenobiotics is associated with differences in the metabolism of amino acid precursors of phospholipids. In turn, specific features of phospholipid metabolism are determined by differences in the level of sulfur-containing regulatory metabolites (methionine, taurine, and glutathione) in tissues. Taurine and methionine increase organism's resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (typical of rats), glutathione and its constituent amino acids improve resistance to the mutagenic effects of xenobiotics (typical of guinea pigs). These metabolites can be used for strengthening of natural resistance to tuberculosis and mutagenic and carcinogenic xenobiotics.

  16. Evaluation of the tickcide, genotoxic, and mutagenic effects of the Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vargas de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current analysis investigated the tickcide effects of the aqueous extract and chloroform fractions of Ruta graveolens L. (rue on engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus, as well as their genotoxic and mutagenic effects on human leukocytes. The best tickcide activity (non-dependent dose and genotoxic / mutagenic effects (dependent-dose were observed on exposure to chloroform fractions. Results suggest that extract fractions of R. graveolens L are efficient against R. microplus, although the fraction and the tested concentrations show genotoxic and mutagenic potential for human leukocytes.

  17. Responses of physiological and biochemical components in Gossypium hirsutum L. to mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthusamy, A.; Vasanth, K.; Jayabalan, N.

    2003-01-01

    The two tetraploid varieties of cotton were exposed to gamma rays, EMS and SA. Chlorophyll, carotenoids, sugar, starch, free amino acids, protein, lipids, DNA and RNA were estimated quantitatively. All the physiological and biochemical components were increased in lower dose/concentration of the mutagenic treatments and they were decreased in higher dose/concentrations. The stimulation of the biochemical contents was a dose/concentration dependent response. Among the two varieties, MCU 11 was found to be responsive to mutagens than MCU 5. Based on the study the lower dose/concentration of the mutagenic treatments could enhance the biochemical components which is used for improved economic characters of cotton. (author)

  18. SERIES: Genomic instability in cancer Balancing repair and tolerance of DNA damage caused by alkylating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dragony; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Samson, Leona D

    2013-01-01

    Alkylating agents comprise a major class of frontline chemotherapeutic drugs that inflict cytotoxic DNA damage as their main mode of action, in addition to collateral mutagenic damage. Numerous cellular pathways, including direct DNA damage reversal, base excision repair (BER), and mismatch repair (MMR) respond to alkylation damage to defend against alkylation-induced cell death or mutation. However, maintaining a proper balance of activity both within and between these pathways is crucial for an organism's favorable response to alkylating agents. Furthermore, an individual's response to alkylating agents can vary considerably from tissue to tissue and from person to person, pointing to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that modulate alkylating agent toxicity. PMID:22237395

  19. Evaluation of mutagenic potential of contaminated atmosphere at Ibirapuera Park, Sao Paulo - SP, Brazil, using the Tradescantia stamen-hair assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Maria Izildinha; Domingos, Marisa; Gomes, Heliana de A; Saldiva, Paulo H.N.; Assuncao, Joao V. de

    2007-01-01

    Trad-SHM assay was used to check mutagenic potential of atmospheric contamination at Ibirapuera Park, located in Sao Paulo city, Brazil, and variation of risk along the year, besides determining which Tradescantia clone, BNL 4430 or KU-20, better indicates risk. Thirty pots of both clones were exposed during one-year period (September, 2002-August, 2003). Twenty inflorescences were taken from each clone twice a month in the morning, in order to estimate the frequency of mutations in stamen hairs. Results were compared to air pollution and climatic data measured next to the exposure site. KU-20 showed stamen-hair mutations greater than BNL 4430. Greatest mutation rates in KU-20 were observed in condition of high monthly mean of NO 2 and average peak concentrations of NO during the day, indicating that mutagenic effects originated from vehicular pollution. Clone KU-20 revealed to be more appropriate for biomonitoring purposes at the Park. - Clone KU-20 showed to be more appropriate than clone BNL 4430 to indicate vehicular pollution mutagenic risks in Trad-SHM assay

  20. The mutation frequency of 8-oxo-7,8 dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) situated in a multiply damaged site: comparison of a single and two closely opposed 8-oxodG in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyarchuk, S.G.; Youngblood, R.C.; Landry, A.M.; Quillin, E.; Harrison, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A multiply damaged site (MDS) is defined as >= two lesions within a distance of 10-15 base pairs (bp). MDS generated by ionizing radiation contains oxidative base damage, and in vitro studies have indicated that if the base damage is less than 3 bp apart, repair of one lesion is inhibited until repair of the lesion in the opposite strand is completed. Inhibition of repair could result in an increase in the mutation frequency of the base damage. We have designed an assay to determine whether a closely opposed lesion causes an increase in adenine insertion opposite an 8-oxodG in bacteria. The double-stranded oligonucleotides (with no damage, each single 8-oxodG or the MDS) were ligated into the firefly luciferase coding region of a reporter vector and transformed into wild type or MutY-deficient bacteria. The MDS contained an 8-oxodG in the transcribed strand (T) and a second 8-oxodG immediately 5' to this lesion in the non-transcribed strand (NT). During two rounds of replication, insertion of adenine opposite the 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand results in a translation termination codon at position 444 or 445, respectively. In wild-type bacteria, we detected a translation stop at a frequency of 0.15% (codon 444) and 0.09% (codon 445) with a single 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand, respectively. This was enhanced ∼3 fold when single lesions were replicated in MutY-deficient bacteria. Positioning an 8-oxodG in the T strand within the MDS enhanced the mutation frequency by ∼2 fold in wild-type bacteria and 8 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria, while the mutation frequency of the 8-oxodG in the NT strand increased by 6 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria. This enhancement of mutation frequency supports the in vitro MDS studies, which demonstrated the inability of base excision repair to completely repair closely opposed lesions

  1. Assessment of DNA Damage in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Radiation Workers at Al-Tuwaitha Site by Using the Sister Chromatid Exchange and the Comet Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.K.; Muttar, A.J.; Khayon, S.K.; Haider, Y.L.; Ali, H.F.; Abdullah, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    The sister chromatid exchange was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 40 individuals of workers occupationally exposed to low ionizing radiation doses in Al-Tuwaitha site due to decommissioning to radioactive contamination then compared with 40 control individuals living in Baghdad. SCEs were scored in metaphase chromosomes were identified by fluorescent plus Giemsa staining (Figure 2).The mean frequencies of SCEs per cell differed significantly (p≺0 0.05) between individuals of radiation workers and control, being 7.78 0.45 SCE/cells and 6.28 0.22 SCE/cells , respectively. However SCE frequency was statistically significant (P≺0 0.05) among radiation workers as compared to control individuals.

  2. Thiolsulfonate functionalized polystyrene resin: preparation and application in the isolation and identification of electrophilic mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E; Carlson, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    A new approach for isolation and identification of elecrtophilic mutagens from complex matrix was developed. Thiosulfonic anion was immobilized onto polystyrene beads and used as separation media. Potassium polystyryl-thiosulfonate, prepared from polystyrylsulfonyl chloride and KHS, was observed to selectively react with model electrophilic mutagens such as alkyl halides, a-chloroketones and alpha-chloroesters to produce polystyryl-thiosulfonic esters. After separation from other nonreactive organic compounds, the beads then reacted with ethanethiol to produce unsymmetrical ethyl disulfides which are easily detected by GC/MS. For one mutagenic compound, only one unsymmetrical disulfide was found to contain its structure part. Thus, the structure of the parent mutagens could be deduced from that of the unsymmetrical disulfides. The degree of functionalization of the potassium polystyryl-thiosulfonate resin was 1.11 mmol/g. Its reactivity was discussed and its recycling method was reported here.

  3. An approach to quantitate and control the mutagenic hazards of environmental chemical and radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Human population, both at the occupational and non-occupational levels, is exposed to the environment polluted by man-made chemicals and radiation sources. The parameters required for quantitating mutagenic hazards of any agent are listed and it has been pointed out that though sufficient information of this nature is available in the case of radiations, it is almost impossible to collect similar information for chemical substances due to their number running into astronomical figures. A short-cut approach, therefore, is suggested to quantitate and control the mutagenic hazards of these pollutants. It is to express the mutagenic hazards of a chemical substance in terms of equivalent radiation units. The unit proposed for this purpose is called as Rem-Equivalent Chemical (REC). Total mutagenic burden to the society should take account of exposure from both chemicals and radiations. Advantages and limitation of this approach are discussed. (M.G.B.)

  4. The effect of γ-radiation on smoked fish using short-term mutagenicity assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, A.M.; Banzon, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of γ-radiation on the mutagenicity potential of wood-smoked fish was investigated. Smoked fish were irradiated with radiation doses of 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 kGy. The DMSO extracts of non-radiated and irradiated smoked fish were tested for mutagenicity using the Ames plate incorporation assay, host-mediated assay, and the micronucleus test. It was observed that γ-irradiation did not induce any significant increase in the number of revertants of TA98, TA100 and TA104 as compared with the non-radiated smoked fish. Results of the host-mediated assay and the micronucleus test showed no difference in the mutagenic response of non-radiated in irradiated smoked fish. The results indicate thet γ-radiation does not introduce mutagens in smoked fish. (author). 17 refs.; 6 tabs

  5. Mutagen Sensitivity, Apoptosis, and Polymorphism in DNA Repair as Measures of Prostate Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldman, Radoslav

    2006-01-01

    .... We also created a computerized database of the samples in Microsoft Access. We developed assays for mutagen sensitivity, comet assay, and apoptosis in white blood cells exposed to bleomycin and ionizing radiation to evaluate...

  6. Analysis of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and Dipicryethane (DPE) for Mutagenicity by the Ames/Salmonella Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Felton, J

    2007-10-12

    The Ames/Salmonella assay, developed by Professor Bruce Ames at the University of California, Berkeley, is a rapid and sensitive assay for detecting mutagenicity of various chemical compounds (Maron and Ames, 1983). It is a widely accepted short-term assay for detecting chemicals that induce mutations in the histidine (his) gene of Salmonella typhimurium. This is a reverse mutation assay that detects the mutational reversion of his-dependent Salmonella to the his-independent counterpart. Thereby, mutagenic compounds will increase the frequency of occurrence of his-independent bacterial colonies. The assay utilizes the specific genetically constructed strains of bacteria either with or without mammalian metabolic activation enzymes (S9), Aroclor induced rat liver homogenate to assess the mutagenicity of different compounds. In this study, we will use the Ames/Salmonella assay to investigate the mutagenicity of Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) from both Bofors and Pantex, and Dipicryethane (DPE).

  7. Improved mutagen-testing systems in mice. Progress report, 1 June 1975--31 May 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, T.H.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: detection of inversions; inversions produced by chemical mutagens and x radiation; phenotypic effects of inversions; linkage of inversions; cytology of inversions; Robertsonian metacentric translocations; and somatic crossing-over in mammals

  8. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  9. Cytotoxic and mutagenic evaluation of extracts from plant species of the Miconia genus and their influence on doxorubicin-induced mutagenicity: an in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara Serpeloni, Juliana; Mazzaron Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael; Prates Mori, Mateus; Yanagui, Karina; Vilegas, Wagner; Aparecida Varanda, Eliana; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2011-07-01

    The Miconia genus, a plant widely used for medicine, occurs in tropical America and its extracts and isolated compounds have demonstrated antibiotic, antitumoral, analgesic and antimalarial activities. However, no study concerning its genotoxicity has been conducted and it is necessary to determine its potential mutagenic effects to develop products and chemicals from these extracts. This study assessed the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity and the protective effects of methanolic extracts from Miconia species on Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell cultures (V79). The cytotoxicity was evaluated using a clonogenic assay. Cultures exposed to the extract of Miconia albicans up to a concentration of 30 μg/mL, M. cabucu up to 40 μg/mL, M. albicans up to 40 μg/mL and M. stenostachya up to 60 μg/mL exhibited a cytotoxic effect on the cells. The clonogenic assay used three non-cytotoxic concentrations (5, 10 and 20 μg/mL) to evaluate mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of the extracts. Cultures were treated with these three extract concentrations (mutagenicity test) or the extract associated with doxorubicin (DXR) (antimutagenicity test) in three protocols (pre-, simultaneous and post-treatments). Distilled water and DXR were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. In the micronucleus (MN) test, a significant reduction was observed in MN frequency in cultures treated with DXR and extracts compared to those receiving only DXR; a significant reduction was also observed for the presence of mutagenicity in all treatments. This study confirmed the safe use of Miconia extracts at the concentrations tested and reinforced the therapeutic properties previously described for Miconia species by showing their protective effects on doxorubicin-induced mutagenicity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Reversion to original phenotype and frequency of this reversion in the presence of different mutagenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovleva, I.A.

    1988-01-01

    Revertants with restored cell turgor have been obtained following treatment of seeds of the tomato wilty dwarf mutant exhibiting impaired cell turgor with different mutagenic agents. A hypothesis is presented for the possible mechanism of formation of the wilty dwarf mutant and differences in frequency of reversion to the original phenotype in relation to the type of mutagenic agent is discussed. Certain data are presented on the genetic analysis of the revertants

  11. Carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2011–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Pałaszewska-Tkacz; Sławomir Czerczak; Katarzyna Konieczko

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was the analysis of structure of carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and dusts occurring in Polish enterprises, 2011–2012, including the number of exposed employees reported to the “Central register of data on exposure to carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances, mixtures, agents or technological processes”, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. In the paper the aims, range and methodology of data collecting by the Central Regist...

  12. Strong mutagenic effects of diesel engine emissions using vegetable oil as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Jürgen; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schröder, Olaf; Emmert, Birgit; Westphal, Götz; Müller, Michael; Hallier, Ernst; Brüning, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Diesel engine emissions (DEE) are classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. In recent years every effort was made to reduce DEE and their content of carcinogenic and mutagenic polycyclic aromatic compounds. Since 1995 we observed an appreciable reduction of mutagenicity of DEE driven by reformulated or newly designed fuels in several studies. Recently, the use of rapeseed oil as fuel for diesel engines is rapidly growing among German transportation businesses and agriculture due to economic reasons. We compared the mutagenic effects of DEE from two different batches of rapeseed oil (RSO) with rapeseed methyl ester (RME, biodiesel), natural gas derived synthetic fuel (gas-to-liquid, GTL), and a reference diesel fuel (DF). The test engine was a heavy-duty truck diesel running the European Stationary Cycle. Particulate matter from the exhaust was sampled onto PTFE-coated glass fibre filters and extracted with dichloromethane in a soxhlet apparatus. The gas phase constituents were sampled as condensates. The mutagenicity of the particle extracts and the condensates was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Compared to DF the two RSO qualities significantly increased the mutagenic effects of the particle extracts by factors of 9.7 up to 59 in tester strain TA98 and of 5.4 up to 22.3 in tester strain TA100, respectively. The condensates of the RSO fuels caused an up to factor 13.5 stronger mutagenicity than the reference fuel. RME extracts had a moderate but significant higher mutagenic response in assays of TA98 with metabolic activation and TA100 without metabolic activation. GTL samples did not differ significantly from DF. In conclusion, the strong increase of mutagenicity using RSO as diesel fuel compared to the reference DF and other fuels causes deep concern on future usage of this biologic resource as a replacement of established diesel fuels.

  13. Mutagenicity of sediments along the Po River and genotoxicity biomarkers in fish from polluted areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Luigi; Camoirano, Anna; Izzotti, Alberto; D'Agostini, Francesco; Polesello, Stefano; Francisci, Chiara; De Flora, Silvio

    2002-03-25

    We monitored the mutagenicity of extracts of sediment fine particles collected, both in the cold season and in the hot season, from 10 reaches along the Po River, the main Italian watercourse. Each sample was representative of several kilometers of river stretch. At sub-toxic doses, the samples were not mutagenic to the Salmonella typhimurium his(-) strains TA98, TA100 and TA102, irrespective of the presence of S9 mix. However, they induced a mutagenic response in YG1024, which is typically reverted by frameshift mutagens that are metabolized in bacteria via acetyl-CoA:N-hydroxylamine O-acetyltransferase. Mutagenicity of sediments was higher during the cold season and had a spatial distribution consistent with the occurrence of pollution sources and confluence with polluted tributaries. Nevertheless, in the final stretch, near the Po delta into the Adriatic Sea, mutagenicity of sediments was low, comparable to that detected in the Po proximal reach, not far away from its springs. Genotoxicity biomarkers were evaluated in three cyprinid species, the "Italian nase" (Chondrostoma söetta), chub (Leuciscus cephalus), and barbel (Barbus plebejus), captured upstream and downstream of the confluence of a polluted tributary (Lambro River) with the Po River. There was no difference between the two areas concerning concentrations of fluorescent aromatic compounds in fish bile while, after metabolic activation, the bile of fish caught from the more polluted area became mutagenic to YG1024. Moreover, the levels of adducts to liver DNA were significantly higher in L. cephalus caught from the more polluted area, and the increase of micronucleated erythrocyte frequency was borderline to statistical significance, but only in C. söetta. Thus, certain biomarkers of exposure and effect in fish, as assessed under field conditions, correlate with the pollution of river sediments by mutagenic compounds.

  14. The hit principle and the mutagenic effect of ionizing radiations of different quality on bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavin, E.A.; Kozubek, S.; Amirtaev, K.G.; Tokarova, B.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the most important methodological principle - the hit principle, worked out by N.V. Timofeeff-Ressovsky, in recent understanding of the mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation of different quality on bacterial cells has been discussed. Experimentaol results are presented which allow that mutagenic effect of ionizing radiation is determined by the influence of factors of both physical nature (the parameters of radiation and the geometry of a target) and biological nature (repair systems in cells)

  15. Microplate Ames MPF™ test use in assessment of mutagenic properties of dust pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kozłowska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Highly industrialized Upper Silesia Region is particularly polluted by both anthropogenic and natural airborne particulate matters, which may lead to negative health effects in human. Materials and methods: The aim of the study was to assess the mutagenic properties of dust extracts which were collected in six cities in the Silesian Voivodeship. Dust samples were collected on glass fiber filters by the aspirator with air flow ca. 1 m3/min. Extraction of pollution was carried out using dichlorometane. The extracted samples were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. The mutagenic properties were assessed using microplate Ames assay MPFTM with the use of bacteria Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and TA100. Results: In microplate Ames assay MPFTM there was observed a linear dose-response relationship in both metabolic variants of TA98 strain. Similar relationship was observed for TA100 strain with metabolic activation (S9. Mutagenic activity (AM of 100% extracts for TA98 strain in both metabolic variants (S9 exceeded 2, what indicate highly mutagenic effects of dust extracts. There was no mutagenic activity observed in the assay with TA100 (S9, AM 1. In the variant with exogenous metabolic activation (S9 in TA100 strain AM values ranged from AM1,160,15 to AM9,671,02. Mutagenic activity varied between different cities. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that microplate Ames assay MPFTM is fast and complex method of assessing the mutagenic properties of dust pollution, which exert toxic effect on organisms. The use of microplate Ames assay MPFTM together with chemical analyses of air dust pollution may evaluate the level of exposure in the environment and enable to perform health risk assessment in populations exposed to mutagenic, toxic and cytotoxic substances.

  16. In vivo evaluation of the mutagenic potential and phytochemical characterization of oleoresin from Copaifera duckei Dwyer

    OpenAIRE

    Maistro, Edson Luis; Carvalho, José Carlos Tavares; Cascon, Vera; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora Coelho

    2005-01-01

    We characterized the chemical constituents of Copaifera duckei oleoresin and used dermal application to Wistar rats to evaluated its possible mutagenic and cytotoxic activities on peripheral blood reticulocytes and bone marrow cells. Chemical characterization of the oleoresin revealed the presence of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, an unidentified neutral diterpene and diterpene acids. To evaluate mutagenicity evaluation the rats were treated with 10, 25 and 50% of the LD50 dose of the oleoresin ...

  17. Health effects of soy-biodiesel emissions: mutagenicity-emission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Esra; Warren, Sarah H; Matthews, Peggy P; King, Charly; Walsh, Leon; Kligerman, Andrew D; Schmid, Judith E; Janek, Daniel; Kooter, Ingeborg M; Linak, William P; Gilmour, M Ian; DeMarini, David M

    2015-01-01

    Soy biodiesel is the predominant biodiesel fuel used in the USA, but only a few, frequently conflicting studies have examined the potential health effects of its emissions. We combusted petroleum diesel (B0) and fuels with increasing percentages of soy methyl esters (B20, B50 and B100) and determined the mutagenicity-emission factors expressed as revertants/megajoule of thermal energy consumed (rev/MJ(th)). We combusted each fuel in replicate in a small (4.3-kW) diesel engine without emission controls at a constant load, extracted organics from the particles with dichloromethane, determined the percentage of extractable organic material (EOM), and evaluated these extracts for mutagenicity in 16 strains/S9 combinations of Salmonella. Mutagenic potencies of the EOM did not differ significantly between replicate experiments for B0 and B100 but did for B20 and B50. B0 had the highest rev/MJ(th), and those of B20 and B100 were 50% and ∼85% lower, respectively, in strains that detect mutagenicity due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitroarenes, aromatic amines or oxidative mutagens. For all strains, the rev/MJ(th) decreased with increasing biodiesel in the fuel. The emission factor for the 16 EPA Priority PAHs correlated strongly (r(2 )= 0.69) with the mutagenicity-emission factor in strain TA100 + S9, which detects PAHs. Under a constant load, soy-biodiesel emissions were 50-85% less mutagenic than those of petroleum diesel. Without additional emission controls, petroleum and biodiesel fuels had mutagenicity-emission factors between those of large utility-scale combustors (e.g. natural gas, coal, or oil) and inefficient open-burning (e.g. residential wood fireplaces).

  18. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of particulate matter MP2,5, in Pamplona, North Santander, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Montañez, Mónica Liseth; Meléndez Gélvez, Iván; Quijano Parra, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the mutagenic and genotoxic activities of particulate material (MP2,5 collected in Pamplona, Norte de Santander, Colombia.Materials and methods: MP2,5 was monitored by means of a Partisol 2025 sequential air sampler with Plus Palmflex quartz filters. The latter were subjected to two extraction procedures: Soxhlet extraction using dichloromethane-acetone; and ultrasonic extraction using dichloromethane, acetone and dichloromethane/ acetone mix. The mutagenic and genotoxic a...

  19. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of aqueous and methanol extracts of Euphorbia hirta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Daphne Sue Yen; Er, Hui Meng; Chen, Yu Sui

    2009-12-10

    Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) is a weed commonly found in tropical countries and has been used traditionally for asthma, bronchitis and conjunctivitis. However, one of the constituents in this plant, quercetin, was previously reported to be mutagenic. This work aimed to determine the level of quercetin in the aqueous and methanol plant extracts and to investigate the mutagenic effects of quercetin and the extracts in the Ames test utilising the mutant Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. The antimutagenic activity of Euphorbia hirta aqueous and methanol extracts was also studied in Salmonella typhimurium TA98. HPLC analyses showed that quercetin and rutin, a glycosidic form of quercetin, were present in the acid-hydrolysed methanol extract and non-hydrolysed methanol extract respectively. The quercetin concentration was negligible in both non-hydrolysed and acid-hydrolysed aqueous extracts. The total phenolic contents in Euphorbia hirta were determined to be 268 and 93 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE) per gram of aqueous and methanol extracts, respectively. Quercetin (25 microg/mL) was found to be strongly mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in the absence and presence of S-9 metabolic activation. However, both the aqueous and methanol extracts did not demonstrate any mutagenic properties when tested with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains at concentrations up to 100 microg/mL in the absence and presence of S-9 metabolic activation. In the absence of S-9 metabolic activation, both the extracts were unable to inhibit the mutagenicity of the known mutagen, 2-nitrofluorene, in Salmonella typhimurium TA98. On the other hand, the aqueous extracts at 100 microg/mL and methanol extracts at 10 and 100 microg/mL exhibited strong antimutagenic activity against the mutagenicity of 2-aminoanthracene, a known mutagen, in the presence of S-9 metabolic activating enzymes. The results indicated that these extracts could modulate the xenobiotic metabolising

  20. Human urinary mutagenicity after wood smoke exposure during traditional temazcal use

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Alexandra S.; Lemieux, Christine L.; Yousefi, Paul; Ruiz-Mercado, Ilse; Lam, Nicholas L.; Orellana, Carolina Romero; White, Paul A.; Smith, Kirk R.; Holland, Nina

    2014-01-01

    In Central America, the traditional temazcales or wood-fired steam baths, commonly used by many Native American populations, are often heated by wood fires with little ventilation, and this use results in high wood smoke exposure. Urinary mutagenicity has been previously employed as a non-invasive biomarker of human exposure to combustion emissions. This study examined the urinary mutagenicity in 19 indigenous Mayan families from the highlands of Guatemala who regularly use temazcales (N = 32...

  1. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Asgary, Saeed; Farajzadeh, Malak; Bargahi, Nasrin; Abdolrahimi, Majid; Kananizadeh, Usef; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the presence and absence of enzymatic system found in rat liver S9 fraction. Negative controls were 1% dimethyl sulfoxide and water. The positive controls were sodium azide and 2-aminoanthracene. The number of colonies per plate was counted. The material was regarded mutagenic if the number of histidine revertant colonies was twice or more than the spontaneous revertant colonies (Ames mutagenicity ratio). Results: Ferric sulfate was found mutagenic in the concentrations prepared by addition of 50 µL of its 1 in 100 and 1 in 1000 times diluted solutions to the culture medium in the absence of S9 fraction (Ames test ratios of 2.8 and 2.2, respectively). Formocresol showed strong toxicity toward TA100 strain of S. typhimurium up to the concentration as low achieved using 1000 times diluted solution of the original preparation, particularly in the presence of S9 fraction. Ames assay failed to detect significant reverse mutations in all the concentrations of CEM cement. Conclusion: In contrast to formocresol and ferric sulfate, CEM cement is a less toxic and non-mutagenic agent. PMID:25789229

  2. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Samiei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the presence and absence of enzymatic system found in rat liver S9 fraction. Negative controls were 1% dimethyl sulfoxide and water. The positive controls were sodium azide and 2-aminoanthracene. The number of colonies per plate was counted. The material was regarded mutagenic if the number of histidine revertant colonies was twice or more than the spontaneous revertant colonies (Ames mutagenicity ratio. Results: Ferric sulfate was found mutagenic in the concentrations prepared by addition of 50 μL of its 1 in 100 and 1 in 1000 times diluted solutions to the culture medium in the absence of S9 fraction (Ames test ratios of 2.8 and 2.2, respectively. Formocresol showed strong toxicity toward TA100 strain of S. typhimurium up to the concentration as low achieved using 1000 times diluted solution of the original preparation, particularly in the presence of S9 fraction. Ames assay failed to detect significant reverse mutations in all the concentrations of CEM cement. Conclusion: In contrast to formocresol and ferric sulfate, CEM cement is a less toxic and non-mutagenic agent.

  3. Single thrombopoietin dose alleviates hematopoietic stem cells intrinsic short- and long-term ionizing radiation damage. In vivo identification of anatomical cell expansion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronik-Le Roux, Diana; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Vaigot, Pierre; Nurden, Paquita

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are essential for maintaining the integrity of complex and long-lived organisms. HSC, which are self-renewing, reconstitute the hematopoietic system through out life and facilitate long-term repopulation of myeloablated recipients. We have previously demonstrated that when mice are exposed to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation, subsets of the stem/progenitor compartment are affected. In this study we examine the role of thrombopoietin (TPO) on the regenerative capacities of HSC after irradiation and report the first demonstration of efficacy of a single injection of TPO shortly after in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation for reducing HSC injury and improving their functional outcome. Our results demonstrate that TPO treatment not only reduced the number of apoptotic cells but also induced a significant modification of their intrinsic characteristics. These findings were supported by transplantation assays with long-term HSC that were irradiated or unirradiated, TPO treated or untreated, in CD45.1/CD45.2 systems and by using luciferase-labeled HSC for direct bioluminescence imaging in living animals. Of particular importance, our data demonstrate the skull to be a highly favorable site for the TPO-induced emergence of hematopoietic cells after irradiation, suggesting a TPO-mediated relationship of primitive hematopoietic cells to an anatomical component. Together, the data presented here: provide novel findings about aspects of TPO action on stem cells, open new areas of investigation for therapeutic options in patients who are treated with radiation therapy, and show that early administration of a clinically suitable TPO-agonist counteracts the previously observed adverse effects.

  4. A descriptive mutagenicity assessment of tretinoin in Allium sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Llana, Jonamine M.; Reyes, Florence C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is primarily designed to assess the mutagenicity of tretinoin by applying the Allium test. Furthermore, it has the following objectives: to evaluate the macroscopic abnormalities caused by tretinoin based on root length and root form parameters; to investigate whether tretinoin can induce aberrances in cell division such as the formation of micronucleus, anaphase bridges, early anaphase, C-metaphase, sticky chromosome, stretched chromosome, vagrant chromosome and precocious chromosome; to determine the variation in the aberrations in the different concentration of tretinoin. Procedure: eight hundred equal-sized garlic bulbs were immersed in various concentrations of tretinoin and in tap water as control. These were divided into two groups. Six hundred bulbs were evaluated for macroscopic parameters while the remaining two hundred bulbs were fixed for microscopic observations. The Allium test set-ups were placed in the plant laboratory of UP-Manila. The were harvested on the third and on the fifth day. The fixed roots were examined in the Cytogenetics Laboratory of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The data gathered for macroscopic parameter was statistically tested using Complete Randomized Design and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference. The microscopic abnormalities were determined descriptively for every concentration. Findings: analysis of macroscopic and microscopic parameters showed that: according to the analyses of variances, the number of roots, the root length and the number of root forms such as straight, bent, bulbous and tapered were not equal in all concentrations. However, the difference in the number of curled roots was not significant.; the root length distinctly showed the toxicity effect of tretinoin. The growth or the length of roots decreases as the tretinoin concentration increases; the mitotic abnormalities observed in the garlic cells include micronucleus, anaphase bridges, early anaphase. C-metaphase, sticky

  5. Mutagenic activities in vitro and in vivo of five antischistosomal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzinger, R P; Bueding, E

    1977-01-01

    Five antischistosomal compounds--hycanthone, two of its chloroindazole analogs (IA-4 and IA-4 N-oxide), oxamniquine, and metrifonate--were tested for mutagenic activity, using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 under in vitro and in vivo (host-mediated) conditions. In all assay systems hycanthone exhibited by far the highest mutagenic potency. Although oxamniquine and metrifonate had low metagenic activity in vitro and although their administration resulted in urine of low metagenic activity, their host-mediated mutagenic activities on strain TA 100 were fairly high. Confirming earlier studies with a less sensitive Salmonella strain, TA 1535, IA-4 N-oxide was found to be less metagenic than IA-4. Orally administered IA-4 and IA-4-oxide were less mutagenic under in vivo conditions than an equal dose administered intramuscularly. By contrast, the antihistosomal activity of a given dose of each compound was the same, regardless of which of these two routes was used, suggesting that mutagenic and antischistosomal effects are produced by different metabolites. The observations reported in this paper provide additional evidence that mutagenic activities can be dissociated from desired chemotherapeutic effects by suitable structural modifications.

  6. Mutagenic atmospheres resulting from the photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbon and NOx mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Theran P.; DeMarini, David M.; Zavala, Jose; Warren, Sarah H.; Corse, Eric W.; Offenberg, John H.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Lewandowski, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Although many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated to limit air pollution and the consequent health effects, the photooxidation products generally are not. Thus, we examined the mutagenicity in Salmonella TA100 of photochemical atmospheres generated in a steady-state atmospheric simulation chamber by irradiating mixtures of single aromatic VOCs, NOx, and ammonium sulfate seed aerosol in air. The 10 VOCs examined were benzene; toluene; ethylbenzene; o-, m-, and p-xylene; 1,2,4- and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene; m-cresol; and naphthalene. Salmonella were exposed at the air-agar interface to the generated atmospheres for 1, 2, 4, 8, or 16 h. Dark-control exposures produced non-mutagenic atmospheres, illustrating that the gas-phase precursor VOCs were not mutagenic at the concentrations tested. Under irradiation, all but m-cresol and naphthalene produced mutagenic atmospheres, with potencies ranging from 2.0 (p-xylene) to 11.4 (ethylbenzene) revertants m3 mgC-1 h-1. The mutagenicity was due exclusively to direct-acting late-generation products of the photooxidation reactions. Gas-phase chemical analysis showed that a number of oxidized organic chemical species enhanced during the irradiated exposure experiments correlated (r ≥ 0.81) with the mutagenic potencies of the atmospheres. Molecular formulas assigned to these species indicated that they likely contained peroxy acid, aldehyde, alcohol, and other functionalities.

  7. Assessment of Cellular Mutagenicity of Americano Coffees from Popular Coffee Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Po-Wen; Wang, Jung-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is a popular beverage worldwide, but coffee beans can be contaminated with carcinogens. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test is often used for analysis of carcinogens for mutagenicity. However, previous studies have provided controversial data about the direct mutagenicity of coffee beans based on Ames test results. This study was conducted to determine the mutagenicity of popular Americano coffee based on results from the Ames test. Coffee samples without additives that were served by five international coffee chain restaurants were subjected to the analysis using Salmonella Typhimurium tester strains TA98, TA100, and TA1535. The levels of bacterial revertants in samples from coffee chains were lower than the twofold criterion of the control sets, and no significant dose-response effect was observed with or without rat liver enzyme activation. These data indicate that Americano coffees from the selected coffee chains possessed no direct mutagenic activity with or without enzyme activation. These findings suggest a low mutagenic risk from Americano coffees served by the selected coffee chains and support the use of other methods to confirm the nonmutagenicity of coffee products. These results are consistent with most recent epidemiological reports.

  8. [EVALUATION OF THE CYTOGENETIC AND MUTAGEN-MODIFYING ACTIVITY OF CAFFEINE IN MOUSE BONE MARROW CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnev, A D; Kulakova, A V; Zhanataev, A K; Oganesiants, L A

    2015-01-01

    The cytogenetic and mutagen-modifying activity of caffeine was studied with the method of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of mice hybrids F1 CBAxC57BL/6. Caffeine per se was administered intragastrically or intraperitoneally, and in combination with mutagens--intragastrically. Mutagens injected intraperitoneally. Caffeine at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg (single dose) and 10 mg/kg (five days) in parenteral administration and oral introduction failed to possess cytogenetic activity. In combination with mutagens caffeine (1, 10 and 100 mg/kg) had no effect on the cytogenetic activity of dioxydine (200 mg/kg/intraperitoneally) for a single coadministration, five-day pre or five-day coadministration. In combination with other mutagens under the same processing conditions caffeine at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg significantly increased cytogenetic effects of cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg) in the pretreatment of the animals and at the dose of 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated the cytogenetic effect of cisplatin (5 mg/kg) in single and repeated co-administration. Thus we have shown the absence of caffeine cytogenetic activity in vivo and showed the multidirectional effect of caffeine in doses far exceeding its daily consumption, to the manifestation ofcytogenetic effects of certain chemical mutagens in some modes of processing animals.

  9. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  10. Antigenotoxic activity of lactic acid bacteria, prebiotics, and products of their fermentation against selected mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Adriana; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Otlewska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Dietary components such as lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and prebiotics can modulate the intestinal microbiota and are thought to be involved in the reduction of colorectal cancer risk. The presented study measured, using the comet assay, the antigenotoxic activity of both probiotic and non-probiotic LAB, as well as some prebiotics and the end-products of their fermentation, against fecal water (FW). The production of short chain fatty acids by the bacteria was quantified using HPLC. Seven out of the ten tested viable strains significantly decreased DNA damage induced by FW. The most effective of them were Lactobacillus mucosae 0988 and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12, leading to a 76% and 80% decrease in genotoxicity, respectively. The end-products of fermentation of seven prebiotics by Lactobacillus casei DN 114-001 exhibited the strongest antigenotoxic activity against FW, with fermented inulin reducing genotoxicity by 75%. Among the tested bacteria, this strain produced the highest amounts of butyrate in the process of prebiotic fermentation, and especially from resistant dextrin (4.09 μM/mL). Fermented resistant dextrin improved DNA repair by 78% in cells pre-treated with 6.8 μM methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Fermented inulin induced stronger DNA repair in cells pre-treated with mutagens (FW, 25 μM hydrogen peroxide, or MNNG) than non-fermented inulin, and the efficiency of DNA repair after 120 min of incubation decreased by 71%, 50% and 70%, respectively. The different degrees of genotoxicity inhibition observed for the various combinations of bacteria and prebiotics suggest that this effect may be attributable to carbohydrate type, SCFA yield, and the ratio of the end-products of prebiotic fermentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutagenic efficiency of gamma irradiation in two soybean varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozbek, N.; Atak, C.

    1984-01-01

    Efficiency of gamma irradiation on certain characteristics such as seedling height and dry weight of Amsoy-71 and Calland soybean varieties has been measured considering to use this mutagen effectively in mutation breeding. A greenhouse experiment was conducted using different doses of gamma irradiation (0 to 70 krad) and two soybean varieties. All treatments were carried out in 5 replications and consisted of 50 seeds. Seeds were sown in pots and plants were grown under climatically controlled conditions. Seedling height measurements were made 14 days after the emergence when the first leaf has stopped its growth and dry weights were measured after 5 weeks of growth. ED 50 (Effective Dose) values were also calculated in order to find out the suitable irradiation doses to be used in mutation induction for both varieties. The results showed clearly that seedling height and dry weight were affected by γ-irradiation and, as compared with the control, both of them were reduced as the dose was increased with some differences between the varieties. The soybean varieties also showed differences in terms of ED 50 (Effective Dose) values and this value was found for Amsoy-71 as 16 krad, whereas for Calland as 20 krad. These results were in agreement with the literature values. (author)

  12. Mutagenic effects of nitrogen and carbon ions on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Shen Mei; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-06-01

    Dry seeds of stevia were implanted by 60∼100 keV nitrogen ion and 75 keV carbon ion with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure and inhibited mitosis action in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. Energy effects of mitosis were presented between 75 keV and 60, 100 keV. As compared with γ-rays, the effects of ion beam were lower on chromosomal aberration but were higher on frequency of the mutation. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of carbon ion was higher than those induced by implantation of nitrogen ion. Mutagenic effects of Feng 1 x Ri Yuan and of Ri Yuan x Feng 2 are higher than that of Ji Ning and Feng 2

  13. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  14. mei-9/sup a/ mutant of Drosophila melanogaster increases mutagen sensitivity and decreases excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Golino, M.D.; Setlow, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    The mei-9/sup a/ mutant of Drosophila melanogaster, which reduces meiotic recombination in females, is deficient in the excision of uv-induced pyrimidine dimers in both sexes. Assays were performed in primary cultures and established cell lines derived from embryos. An endonuclease preparation from M. luteus, which is specific for pyrimidine dimers, was employed to monitor uv-induced dimers in cellular DNA. The rate of disappearance of endonuclease-sensitive sites from DNA of control cells is 10-20 times faster than that from mei-9/sup a/ cells. The mutant mei-218, which is also deficient in meiotic recombination, removes nuclease-sensitive sites at control rates. The mei-9/sup a/ cells exhibit control levels of photorepair, postreplication repair and repair of single strand breaks. In mei-9 cells DNA synthesis and possibly postreplication repair are weakly sensitive to caffeine. Larvae which are hemizygous for either of the two mutants that define the mei-9 locus are hypersensitive to killing by the mutagens methyl methanesulfonate, nitrogen mustard and 2-acetylaminofluorene. Larvae hemizygous for the mei-218 mutant are insensitive to each of these reagents. These data demonstrate that the mei-9 locus is active in DNA repair of somatic cells. Thus functions involved in meiotic recombination are also active in DNA repair in this higher eukaryote. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestions that the mei-9 locus functions in the exchange events of meiosis. The mei-218 mutation behaves differently in genetic tests and our data suggest its function may be restricted to meiosis. These studies demonstrate that currently recognized modes of DNA repair can be efficiently detected in primary cell cultures derived from Drosophila embryos

  15. Organic mutagens and drinking water in The Netherlands : a study on mutagenicity of organic constituents in drinking water in The Netherlands and their possible carcinogenic effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Several mutagenic and carcinogenic organic compounds have been detected in Dutch surface waters and in drinking water prepared from these surface waters. Although the levels of these compounds in drinking- and surface water are relatively low, in general below μg per litre, it appeared that organic

  16. Quantitative mammalian cell mutagenesis and mutagen screening: study with CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsie, A.W.; O'Neill, J.P.; San Sebastian, J.R.; Brimer, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The CHO/HGPRT system has been developed and defined for quantifying mutation induced by various physical and chemical agents at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In all direct-acting chemical mutagens studied, mutation induction increases linearly as a function of the concentration, with no apparent threshold. Some chemicals induce mutation at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The mutagenicity of ethyl methanesulfonate has been quantified as a function of exposure concentration x treatment time. The sensitive and quantitative nature of the system enables studies of the structure-activity (mutagenicity) relationships of various classes of chemicals, including alkylating agents, heterocyclic nitrogen mustards, and platinum compounds. When rat liver S 9 -mediated metabolic activation is present, procarcinogens such as benzo(a)pyrene, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and dimethylnitrosamine are mutagenic, whereas their noncarcinogenic structural analogues pyrene, fluorene, and dimethylamine are not. The system has been shown to be useful in determining the interactive effects between physical and chemical agents, and in screening for mutagenicity of fractionated organic mixtures and industrial chemicals in both liquid and gaseous state. For the system to be used successfully in routine screening, further studies should be directed toward the development of a metabolic activation system suitable for a broad spectrum of chemicals, a sensitive and reliable statistical method, and an experimental design to determine compounds with low mutagenicity. The system has been expanded for determination of mutagen-induced chromosome aberration, sister-chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in addition to gene mutation and cytotoxicity; it can also be used to study inhibition of DNA synthesis

  17. Inhibition of mutagenicity of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea by ellagic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, R.; Gold, B.

    1986-01-01

    Ellagic acid (EA), a plant phenol present in a variety of soft fruits and vegetables, has been shown to possess antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties against bay region diol epoxide of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It is suggested that EA forms an adduct with diol epoxide of benzo (α) pyrene and thus prevents its binding to DNA. To better understand the mechanism of reactivity and inhibition properties of EA, we studied the effect of EA on mutagenicity and DNA alkylation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, including N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-Nnitrosoguanidine (MNNG). MNU and MNNG are direct-acting mutagens requiring no metabolic activation. MNU showed a linear dose response between the concentration range of 50 to 400 nmole in an Ames/Salmonella mammalian mutagenicity test. EA at concentrations of 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 nmole inhibited the mutagenicity of MNU (400 nmole) by 3, 13, 45,and 60%, respectively. MNNG produced a nonlinear dose response in mutagenicity between the concentrations of 0.5 to 4 nmole. EA showed no appreciable inhibition of MNNG mutagenicity. Inhibition of DNA alkylation by MNU and MNNG by EA was studied by preincubating 50 to 200 nmole of EA with 200 nmole of ( 3 H)-MNU or ( 3 H)-MNNG for 10 min at 37 0 c, followed by incubation of polymer deoxyguanosine: deoxycytosine (poly dG:dC) (1 unit) overnight. EA caused no inhibitory effect on MNNG alkylation of poly dG:dC. Experiments on the effect of EA on alkylation of DNA and formation of nucleoside adducts by MNU are in progress, and results will be discussed with reference to MNU and MNNG mutagenicity and EA inhibition

  18. Quantitative mammalian cell mutagenesis and mutagen screening: study with CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsie, A.W.; O' Neill, J.P.; San Sebastian, J.R.; Brimer, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The CHO/HGPRT system has been developed and defined for quantifying mutation induced by various physical and chemical agents at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In all direct-acting chemical mutagens studied, mutation induction increases linearly as a function of the concentration, with no apparent threshold. Some chemicals induce mutation at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The mutagenicity of ethyl methanesulfonate has been quantified as a function of exposure concentration x treatment time. The sensitive and quantitative nature of the system enables studies of the structure-activity (mutagenicity) relationships of various classes of chemicals, including alkylating agents, heterocyclic nitrogen mustards, and platinum compounds. When rat liver S/sub 9/-mediated metabolic activation is present, procarcinogens such as benzo(a)pyrene, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and dimethylnitrosamine are mutagenic, whereas their noncarcinogenic structural analogues pyrene, fluorene, and dimethylamine are not. The system has been shown to be useful in determining the interactive effects between physical and chemical agents, and in screening for mutagenicity of fractionated organic mixtures and industrial chemicals in both liquid and gaseous state. For the system to be used successfully in routine screening, further studies should be directed toward the development of a metabolic activation system suitable for a broad spectrum of chemicals, a sensitive and reliable statistical method, and an experimental design to determine compounds with low mutagenicity. The system has been expanded for determination of mutagen-induced chromosome aberration, sister-chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in addition to gene mutation and cytotoxicity; it can also be used to study inhibition of DNA synthesis. (ERB)

  19. Modulation of mutagenic activity in meat samples after deep-frying in vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, C; Lopez de Cerain, A; Bello, J

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have been carried out on the influence of frying fats on the formation of food mutagens, but most of them have been performed on model systems or under cooking conditions that are more frequent in northern countries. The objective of this work was to study the overall mutagenic activity generated in hamburgers and frankfurters deep-fried under cooking conditions that are normal practice in Spain and other Mediterranean countries, in order to determine if there was any modulation of the mutagenic activity with respect to other cooking conditions previously studied. Hamburgers were prepared from beef purchased in a butcher's shop. Frankfurters as well as the oils [olive, marc olive ('orujo'), sunflower and soya bean oil] and butter were purchased in a local supermarket. The samples were fried in a teflon-coated frying pan at 170-180 degrees C for 10, 20 or 30 min. The mutagens were extracted and the mutagenic activity evaluated using the Salmonella mammalian microsome assay with strain TA98. Two independent assays were carried out for each experimental condition. All the hamburgers showed a mutagenic activity that was more than four times higher than that of the controls. Frankfurters showed a lower mutagenic activity than hamburgers (fried under the same conditions) because they have a lower protein content and a higher fat content. Hamburgers fried in olive oil for 10 min showed a significant increase in the number of revertants with respect to the other oils, probably due to the fact that the temperature reached was approximately 10 degrees C higher. Longer frying times significantly increased the number of revertants in samples fried in oils, except in olive oil, probably due to its lower content of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  20. Modulatory effects of Cassia fistula fruits against free radicals and genotoxicity of mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Manish; Kaur, Paramjeet; Kaur, Varinder; Kaur, Satwinderjeet

    2016-12-01

    Cassia fistula L. (Fabaceae) fruits are highly recommended in folklore medicine for curing various ailments. In the current study, methanol (CaFM), hexane (CaFH), chloroform (CaFCl), ethyl acetate (CaFE), butanol (CaFB) and aqueous (CaFA) fractions of C. fistula fruits were investigated for their potential to inhibit the genotoxicity of mutagens and free radicals. The antimutagenicity of fractions was evaluated against the reactive carcinogenic ester generating mutagen, 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and frame-shift mutation inducing mutagen, 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NPD) in Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA98 tester strain. Among the fractions, CaFE showed strongest protective effect against the mutagenicity of both S9-dependent and direct-acting mutagen with an inhibitory percentage of 81% and 64% at the concentration of 1 × 10 3 and 2.5 × 10 3 respectively. All the fractions were analyzed for free radical scavenging activity using DPPH, nitric oxide, lipid peroxidation and superoxide anion assays. CaFE fraction showed maximum antioxidant activity in comparison to other fractions with an IC 50 of 97.01, 172.36, 144 and 264.79 μg/ml respectively. High performance liquid chromatography showed the presence of catechin, epicatechin and umbelliferone in appreciable amount which may account for its efficacy in combating free radicals and also showed protective effect against the mutagenicity of S9-dependent mutagen, 2-AF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between FTC 'tar' and urine mutagenicity in smokers of tobacco-burning or Eclipse cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Denise L; Smith, Carr J; Bombick, Betsy R; Avalos, Jerry T; Davis, Riley A; Morgan, Walter T; Doolittle, David J

    2002-11-26

    The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) classifies domestic cigarettes into one of three 'tar' categories based on 'tar' and nicotine levels. The objective of the present study was to determine urine mutagenicity in groups of smokers of ultra-low 'tar' (ULT), full-flavor low 'tar' (FFLT) and full-flavor 'tar' (FF) filtered cigarettes after switching to primarily tobacco-heating Eclipse cigarettes. Sixty-seven smokers maintained a specified diet and consumed ad libitum their usual brands of cigarettes, switched to Eclipse, and switched back to their usual brands. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected weekly, concentrated on XAD-2 resin, and tested in the Ames mutagenicity assay using bacterial strains TA98 and YG1024 with S9 metabolic activation. Daily consumption of cigarettes was not significantly different (at Pbrand smokers as measured by the more sensitive strain YG1024, although no significant differences (Pbrand FTC 'tar' categories as measured by strain TA98. The reduction in urinary mutagens in the more sensitive strain, YG1024, observed in ULT smokers as compared with higher 'tar' categories suggest reduced exposure to mutagens. Usual brand salivary cotinine in the ULT group was significantly lower (Pbrand. After switching to Eclipse, the following reductions in urinary mutagenicity were observed: ULT, 70.1+/-6.4% (TA98), 70.9+/-6.2% (YG1024); FFLT, 77.1+/-2.4% (TA98), 73.6+/-2.0% (YG1024); and FF, 76.1+/-3.5% (TA98), 71.4+/-4.0% (YG1024). Across all 'tar' categories, cigarette smokers experienced significant reductions (P<0.05) in urine mutagenicity, but not salivary cotinine, upon switching to Eclipse. The reduction in urine mutagenicity when smoking Eclipse provides supporting evidence that Eclipse may present less risk of cancer compared to cigarettes currently in the market.

  2. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mutagenicity by classification methods based on holistic theoretical molecular descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Marrocchi, Assunta; Minuti, Lucio; Taticchi, Aldo

    2007-03-01

    Various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are recognized mutagens and carcinogens. A homogeneous set of mutagenicity data (TA98 and TA100,+S9) for 32 benzocyclopentaphenanthrenes/chrysenes was modeled by the quantitative structure-activity relationship classification methods k-nearest neighbor and classification and regression tree, using theoretical holistic molecular descriptors. Genetic algorithm provided the selection of the best subset of variables for modeling mutagenicity. The models were validated by leave-one-out and leave-50%-out approaches and have good performance, with sensitivity and specificity ranges of 90-100%. Mutagenicity assessment for these PAHs requires only a few theoretical descriptors of their molecular structure.

  3. Quantification of the genetic risk of environmental mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehling, U.H.

    1988-01-01

    Screening methods are used for hazard identification. Assays for heritable mutations in mammals are used for the confirmation of short-term test results and for the quantification of the genetic risk. There are two main approaches in making genetic risk estimates. One of these, termed the direct method, expresses risk in terms of the expected frequency of genetic changes induced per unit. The other, referred to as the doubling dose method or the indirect method, expresses risk in relation to the observed incidence of genetic disorders now present in man. The indirect method uses experimental data only for the calculation of the doubling dose. The quality of the risk estimation depends on the assumption of persistence of the induced mutations and the ability to determine the current incidence of genetic diseases. The difficulties of improving the estimates of current incidences of genetic diseases or the persistence of the genes in the population led them to the development of an alternative method, the direct estimation of the genetic risk. The direct estimation uses experimental data for the induced frequency for dominant mutations in mice. For the verification of these quantifications one can use the data of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. According to the estimation with the direct method, one would expect less than 1 radiation-induced dominant cataract in 19,000 children with one or both parents exposed. The expected overall frequency of dominant mutations in the first generation would be 20-25, based on radiation-induced dominant cataract mutations. It is estimated that 10 times more recessive than dominant mutations are induced. The same approaches can be used to determine the impact of chemical mutagens

  4. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A. Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository.

  5. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository

  6. Effect of cadmium on genetic toxicity and protection of cortex acanthopanasia radicis against genetic damage induced by cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Pang Huimin; Chen Minyi

    1999-01-01

    Objective and Methods: The test of sperm aberration and micronucleus of bone marrow cells in mice were used to detect the mutagenicity of cadmium and anti-mutagenicity of Cortex Acanthopanasia Radicis (CAR) on germ cell and somatic cell. Kunming mice were divided randomly into four groups: normal saline control group (NS): MMC control group (MMC 1.0 mg/kg); Cd-mutate group (1/5 LD 50 ), 17.6 mg/kg); CAR anti-mutate group (CAR 1,2,4 g/kg + Cd). Ridit test and x 2 were used to evaluate the statistical significance of the date. Results: The experiment demonstrated that Chinese medicine CAR can significantly decrease sperm aberration and micronuclei frequencies induced by Cd (P<0.01). Conclusion: As an anti-mutagen CAR has practical value in occupational protection against genetic damage induced by Cd

  7. Mutagenicity of two species of the genus Alchornea measured by Salmonella microsome assay and micronucleus test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio V. dos Santos

    Full Text Available Some species of the plant genus Alchornea (family Euphorbiaceae are widely used in popular medicine, mainly in South America and in Africa. Several kinds of biological activity have been seen in the species: antioxidant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, cytotoxic against tumor cell lines and inhibitory to the replication of HIV-1 and HIV-2. In Brazil, the species Alchornea castaneaefolia Willd. A. Juss. and Alchornea glandulosa Poepp. & Endl. are used by the local population to treat rheumatism, arthritis and muscular pains. In view of the popular use of these plants as medicines and the potential risks from their consumption, we assessed the mutagenic potential of chloroform and methanol extracts of the leaves of these plant species, employing the in vivo micronucleus test and the Ames assay. The data obtained showed that the chloroform extracts were not mutagenic. The methanol extract of A. castaneaefolia was mutagenic to strain TA98 of Salmonella typhimurium and the methanol extract of A. glandulosa to strains TA98 and TA97a. The methanol extracts of both species of Alchornea were mutagenic in vivo at the largest dose employed. The probable mutagenic agents involved were the aglycone quercetin and amentoflavone, present in both species.

  8. Mutagenicity assessment of contaminated soil in the vicinity of industrial area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Reshma; Malik, Abdul

    2012-05-01

    In the industrial area of Chinhat, Lucknow (India) wastewater coming from pesticide manufacturing and other industries is used to irrigate the agricultural crops. This practice has been polluting the soil and pollutants might reach the food chain. Gas chromatographic analysis revealed the presence of certain organochlorine pesticides in soil samples. Samples were extracted using different solvents, i.e., hexane, acetonitrile, methanol, chloroform, and acetone (all were HPLC-grade, SRL, India). Soil extracts were assayed for mutagenicity using Ames Salmonella/mammalian microsome test. Mutagenicity was observed in the test samples and TA98 was the most responsive strain for all the soil extracts (irrigated with wastewater) in terms of mutagenic index in the presence (+S9) and absence (-S9) of metabolic activation. In terms of slope (m) of linear dose-response curve for the most responsive strain TA98 exhibited highest sensitivity against the soil extracts in the presence and absence of S9 fraction. Hexane-extracted soil sample (wastewater) exhibited maximum mutagenicity in terms of net revertants per gram of soil in the presence and absence of S9 mix as compared to the other soil extracts. Groundwater-irrigated soil extracts displayed low level of mutagenicity as compared to wastewater-irrigated soil. The soil is accumulating a large number of pollutants due to wastewater irrigation and this practice of accumulation has an adverse impact on soil health.

  9. Mutagenicity induced by the hydroalcoholic extract of the medicinal plant Plathymenia reticulata Benth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Della Torre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plathymenia reticulata Benth has an anti-inflammatory effect and is capable of neutralizing the neuromuscular blockade induced by Bothrops jararacussu or Crotalus durissus terrificus venoms, probably by precipitating venom proteins (an effect caused by plant tannins. The present study aimed to evaluate the mutagenic activity of P. reticulata by using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay (Ames test and the micronucleus test in CHO-K1 cells. P. reticulata extract concentrations of 2.84, 5.68, 11.37, and 19.90 mg/plate were assayed by the Ames test using TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102 bacterial strains, with (+S9 and without (-S9 metabolic activation. Concentrations of 5, 1.6 and 0.5 μg/mL of P. reticulata extract were used for the micronucleus test. P. reticulata extract was mutagenic to TA98 (-S9 and showed signs of mutagenic activity in TA97a and TA102 (both -S9 strains. Micronucleus test CBPI values showed that the endogenous metabolic system increased the number of viable cells when compared to the non-activated samples and the micronucleus frequency increased when the cells were treated in the absence of S9. We concluded that P. reticulata extract may present direct mutagenic properties.

  10. Ames Mutagenicity Assessment of Flavored Water Pipe Tobacco Products :A Cross Sectional Study in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Sadri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Waterpipe smoking has become a global youth trend especially in the Middle East countries and Iran . The aim of this study was to determine the mutagenic effects of three most popular flavored tobaccos by four different salmonella typhimurium strains and compare the possible mutagenic effects of the test samples. Ames mutagenicity assessment was conducted according to the OECD guideline using TA100, TA98 , YG1024 and YG1029 strains. Charcoal burned flavored tobaccos of three different flavors including Orange, Double Apple, and Lime Mint were filtered and exposed to all strains after strain identification tests and MIC ,MBC determinations. The Ames test results indicated significant mutagenic effects of tobacco samples in all four test strains when compared with negative control (p≤0.0001. The highest Mutagenic Factor (MF was seen in Double Apple samples using TA 98 (MF=11.5±3.3 . In all experiments, TA strains showed higher sensitivity to the samples than YG strains which suggest these two strains for further regulatory toxicity tests ,policy making purposes and tobacco control programs . Present results represents an important step in understanding the genotoxic potentials of three most popular flavored tobaccos samples of a famous brand in the global markets .

  11. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of six Brazilian Byrsonima species assessed by the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espanha, Lívia Greghi; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; de Sousa Lima Neto, José; Boldrin, Paula Karina; Nogueira, Catarine Haidê; de Camargo, Mariana Santoro; De Grandis, Rone Aparecido; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2014-06-05

    In various regions of Brazil, several species of the genus Byrsonima (Malpighiaceae) are widely used to treat gastrointestinal complications. This genus has about 150 species of shrubs and trees distributed over the entire Neotropical region. Various biological activities have been identified in these plants, especially antioxidant, antimicrobial and topical and systemic anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutagenicity and antimutagenicity of hydroalcoholic leaf extracts of six species of Byrsonima: B. verbascifolia, B. correifolia, B. coccolobifolia, B. ligustrifolia, B. fagifolia and B. intermedia by the Salmonella microsome assay (Ames test). Mutagenic and antimutagenic activity was assessed by the Ames test, with the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA100, TA98, TA97a and TA102, with (+S9) and without (-S9) metabolization, by the preincubation method. Only B. coccolobifolia and B. ligustrifolia showed mutagenic activity. However, the extracts of B. verbascifolia, B. correifolia, B. fagifolia and B. intermedia were found to be strongly antimutagenic against at least one of the mutagens tested. These results contribute to valuable data on the safe use of medicinal plants and their potential chemopreventive effects. Considering the excellent antimutagenic activities extracted from B. verbascifolia, B. correifolia, B. fagifolia and B. intermedia, these extracts are good candidate sources of chemopreventive agents. However, B. coccolobifolia and B. ligustrifolia showed mutagenic activity, suggesting caution in their use.

  12. A mutagenicity and cytotoxicity study of limonium effusum aqueous extracts by Allium, Ames and MTT tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Y; Ozata, A; Konuk, M; Akyil, D; Liman, R

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays plants or plant extracts have become very important for alternative medicine. Plants and their extracts have many therapeutical advantages but some of them are potentially toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic. Root, stem and leafparts of Limonium effusum were used in this study and this species is an endemic species for Turkey. Mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of root, stem and leaf aqueous extracts were observed with Allium, Ames and MTT tests. Allium root growth inhibition test and mitotic index studies showed that aqueous extracts have dose-dependent toxic effects. Chromosome aberration studies indicated that especially sticky chromosome, anaphase-telophase disorder and laggard chromosome anomalies were highly observed. Ames test performed with Limonium effusum root aqueous extracts, showed weak mutagenic effects in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain with S9. MTT test based on mitochondrial activity indicated that most of the aqueous extracts have cytotoxic effects. This study aimed to determine the possible mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of L. effusum aqueous extracts by using bacterial, plant and mammalian cells. This research showed that some low concentrations of the L. effusum extracts have inhibited cytotoxic effects but high concentrations have induced cytotoxicity. On the other hand only a weak mutagenic activity was identified by Ames test with TA98 S9(+).

  13. Assessment of diphenylcyclopropenone for photochemically induced mutagenicity in the Ames assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, M.G.; Connor, T.H.; Henkin, J.; Wilkin, J.K.; Matney, T.S.

    1987-10-01

    The photochemical conversion of diphenylcyclopropenone to diphenylacetylene has recently been reported. Diphenylcyclopropenone is used in the treatment of alopecia areata and is nonmutagenic in a limited Ames assay. We examined diphenylcyclopropenone and diphenylacetylene, as well as synthetic precursors of diphenylcyclopropenone--dibenzylketone and alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzylketone--for mutagenicity against TA100, TA98, TA102, UTH8413, and UTH8414. All compounds were nonmutagenic except alpha,alpha'-dibromodibenzylketone, which was a potent mutagen in TA100 with and without S-9 activation. The effect of photochemical activation of diphenylcyclopropenone in the presence of bacteria demonstrated mutagenicity in UTH8413 (two times background) at 10 micrograms/plate with S-9 microsomal activation. 8-Methoxypsoralen produces a mutagenic response in TA102 at 0.1 microgram/plate with 60 seconds of exposure to 350 nm light. In vitro photochemically activated Ames assay with S-9 microsomal fraction may enhance the trapping of short-lived photochemically produced high-energy mutagenic intermediates. This technique offers exciting opportunities to trap high-energy intermediates that may play an important role in mutagenesis. This method can be applied to a variety of topically applied dermatologic agents, potentially subjected to photochemical changes in normal use.

  14. Screening of mutagens by inhibition of DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The human cell DNA-synthesis inhibition test is based on the concept that lesions in human cell DNA cause an inhibition of DNA synthesis that can be detected for at least 1.5 hr after induction of those lesions. The mechanisms by which DNA-damaging agents inhibit DNA synthesis are three-fold: (1) the lesions induced by the agent may block the programmed initiation of replicating units (replicons), thus reducing with time after damage the total number of replicons in operation; (2) the lesions may block the progression of growing points already in operation, also reducing with time the number of replicons in operation; and (3) the lesions may slow the rate of chain elongation at some or all of the growing points. Most DNA-damaging agents seem to act primarily by either (1) or (2) or both. Irrespective of the mechanism, the result is a constantly decreasing overall rate of DNA synthesis until the cells repair or adapt to the lesions. DNA-damaging agents can be distinguished from those that inhibit DNA synthesis but do not damage DNA by examining the change in rate of DNA synthesis during the first 0.5 to 1.5 hr after removal of the suspected agent from the medium in which the cells have been exposed

  15. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camats, Nuria; Garcia, Francisca; Parrilla, Juan Jose; Calaf, Joaquim; Martin, Miguel; Caldes, Montserrat Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal cells

  16. Trans-generational radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the female enhances the action of chemical mutagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Calaf, Joaquim [Servei de Ginecologia i Obstetricia, Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, Miguel [Departament de Pediatria, d' Obstetricia i Ginecologia i de Medicina Preventiva, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caldes, Montserrat Garcia [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2008-04-02

    Genomic instability can be produced by ionising radiation, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability, and chemical mutagens. Radiation-induced genomic instability occurs in both germinal and somatic cells and also in the offspring of irradiated individuals, and it is characterised by genetic changes including chromosomal rearrangements. The majority of studies of trans-generational, radiation-induced genomic instability have been described in the male germ line, whereas the authors who have chosen the female as a model are scarce. The aim of this work is to find out the radiation-induced effects in the foetal offspring of X-ray-treated female rats and, at the same time, the possible impact of this radiation-induced genomic instability on the action of a chemical mutagen. In order to achieve both goals, the quantity and quality of chromosomal damage were analysed. In order to detect trans-generational genomic instability, a total of 4806 metaphases from foetal tissues from the foetal offspring of X-irradiated female rats (5 Gy, acute dose) were analysed. The study's results showed that there is radiation-induced genomic instability: the number of aberrant metaphases and the breaks per total metaphases studied increased and were found to be statistically significant (p {<=} 0.05), with regard to the control group. In order to identify how this trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability could influence the chromosomal behaviour of the offspring of irradiated rat females in front of a chemical agent (aphidicolin), a total of 2481 metaphases were studied. The observed results showed that there is an enhancement of the action of the chemical agent: chromosomal breaks per aberrant metaphases show significant differences (p {<=} 0.05) in the X-ray- and aphidicolin-treated group as regards the aphidicolin-treated group. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there is trans-generational, radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the foetal

  17. Replication of UV-irradiated DNA in human cell extracts: Evidence for mutagenic bypass of pyrimidine dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D.C.; Kunkel, T.A. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-08-15

    The authors have examined the efficiency and fidelity of simian virus 40-origin-dependent replication of UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA in extracts of human cells. Using as a mutational target the [alpha]-complementation domain of the Escherichia coli lacZ gene in bacteriophage M13mp2DNA, replication of undamaged DNA in HeLa cell extracts was highly accurate, whereas replication of DNA irradiated with UV light (280-320 nm) was both less efficient and less accurate. Replication was inhibited by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Nonetheless, covalently closed, monomer-length circular products were generated that were resistant to digestion by Dpn I, showing that they resulted from semiconservative replication. These products were incised by T4 endonuclease V, whereas the undamaged replication products were not, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers were bypassed during replication. When replicated, UV-irradiated DNA was used to transfect an E. coli [alpha]-complementation host strain to score mutant M13mp2 plaques, the mutant plaque frequency was substantially higher than that obtained with either unirradiated, replicated DNA, or unreplicated, UV-irradiated DNA. Both the increased mutagenicity and the inhibition of replication associated with UV irradiation were reversed by treatment of the irradiated DNA with photolyase before replication. Sequence analysis of mutants resulting from replication of UV-irradiated DNA demonstrated that most mutants contained C [yields] T transition errors at dipyrimidine sites. A few mutants contained 1-nt frameshift errors or tandem double CC [yields] TT substitutions. The data are consistent with the interpretation that pyrimidine dimers are bypassed during replication by the multiprotein replication apparatus in human cell extracts and that this bypass is mutagenic primarily via misincorporation of dAMP opposite a cytosine (or uracil) in the dimer. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Protective effect of DCTN (trans-dehydrocrotonin) against induction of micronuclei and apoptosis by different mutagenic agents in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poersch, Aline; dos Santos, Fabio Vieira; Maciel, Maria Aparecida Medeiros; de Câmara, Janaína Keila Pereira; de Castro Dantas, Tereza Neuma; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2007-04-20

    The use of medicinal plants to combat diseases has increased in the last years despite the little information available with regard to the possible health risks they represent. The aim of the present study was to determine in vitro the possible clastogenic, apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of the active principle of Croton cajucara, trans-dehydrocrotonin (DCTN), and determine its protective effect against three mutagenic agents using the micronucleus test (MN) and apoptosis index in CHO-K1 cells. Three DNA damage inducing agents were utilized in the clastogenicity and anticlastogenicity tests (methylmethane sulfonate (MMS), mitomycin C (MMC) and doxorubicin (DXR); a negative control (PBS) and solvent control were also included. DCTN at concentrations of 400, 320, 240, 160 and 80microM did not show clastogenic activity in cultured CHO-K1 cells in the micronucleus test, did not induce apoptosis and showed negligible cytotoxicity in all cases. DCTN at concentrations of 240 and 400microM was tested for protective activity using three treatment protocols in relation to positive controls: pre-treatment, simultaneous treatment and post-treatment. The micronucleus test showed a protective effect for DCTN which varied among the different treatment protocols and with regard to the different DNA damage inducing agents. In the apoptosis test, DCTN was seen to have a protective effect under the following conditions: (I) at both concentrations in relation to MMS, in all three treatment protocols; (II) at both concentrations against damage caused by MMC with pre-treatment and at the higher concentration with simultaneous treatment; (III) at both concentrations against DXR with simultaneous treatment. Therefore, DCTN itself is not a clastogenic or cytotoxic substance, and does not induce apoptosis the in vitro system used. These results together with findings reported for DCTN in vivo, support the indication of this active principle at these concentrations for therapeutic use.

  19. Cytotoxic and mutagenic properties of O4-alkylthymidine lesions in Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Amato, Nicholas J; Zhai, Qianqian; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-12-15

    Due to the abundant presence of alkylating agents in living cells and the environment, DNA alkylation is generally unavoidable. Among the alkylated DNA lesions, O(4)-alkylthymidine (O(4)-alkyldT) are known to be highly mutagenic and persistent in mammalian tissues. Not much is known about how the structures of the alkyl group affect the repair and replicative bypass of the O(4)-alkyldT lesions, or how the latter process is modulated by translesion synthesis polymerases. Herein, we synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides harboring eight site-specifically inserted O(4)-alkyldT lesions and examined their impact on DNA replication in Escherichia coli cells. We showed that the replication past all the O(4)-alkyldT lesions except (S)- and (R)-sBudT was highly efficient, and these lesions directed very high frequencies of dGMP misincorporation in E. coli cells. While SOS-induced DNA polymerases play redundant roles in bypassing most of the O(4)-alkyldT lesions, the bypass of (S)- and (R)-sBudT necessitated Pol V. Moreover, Ada was not involved in the repair of any O(4)-alkyldT lesions, Ogt was able to repair O(4)-MedT and, to a lesser extent, O(4)-EtdT and O(4)-nPrdT, but not other O(4)-alkyldT lesions. Together, our study provided important new knowledge about the repair of the O(4)-alkyldT lesions and their recognition by the E. coli replication machinery. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Een onderzoek naar het voorkomen van mutagene en/of carcinogene verbindingen in organische concentraten van Nederlands drinkwater alsmede naar de effecten van diverse zuiveringsstappen op de mutagene activiteit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool HJ; van Kreijl CF; Hrubec J; van Oers JAM; Persad S

    1987-01-01

    In drinkwater, bereid uit oppervlaktewater en grondwater werd in veel gevallen mutagene activiteit aangetoond. Duinfiltratie en actiefkool filtratie verwijderen de mutagene activiteit. Chloring verhoogt die activiteit aanzienlijk, chloordioxide in concentraties kleiner dan 1 mg/l C10-2 leidt tot

  1. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  2. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects of sewage sludge on Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa Martins, Maria Nilza; de Souza, Victor Ventura; da Silva Souza, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic potential of sewage sludge using Allium cepa bioassay. Solubilized and crude sludge from two sewage treatment stations (STSs), herein named JM and M, were tested. In addition, sanitized, crude and solubilized sludge were also analyzed from STS M. The treatments showed positive response to phytotoxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and/or mutagenicity. Despite negative results for MN F1 (micronuclei counted in F1 root cells, derived from meristematic cells), the monitoring of genotoxic and mutagenic activities of sewage sludge are recommended because in agricultural areas this residue is applied in large scale and continuously. Based on our results we advise caution in the use of sewage sludge in agricultural soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diesel exhaust particles are mutagenic in FE1-MutaMouse lung epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Cohn, Corey Alexander

    2008-01-01

    /ml DEP (NIST SRM 1650) in the FE1-MutaMouse lung epithelial cell line. We measured DEP-induced acellular and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and compared with ROS production induced by carbon black, which we have previously shown is mutagenic in this cell line [N.R. Jacobsen, A.......T. Saber, P. White, P. Moller, G. Pojana, U. Vogel, S. Loft, J. Gingerich, L. Soper, G.R. Douglas, H. Wallin. Increased mutant frequency by carbon black, but not quartz, in the lacZ and cII transgenes of mutamouse lung epithelial cells, Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 48(6) (2007) 451-461]. The mutant frequency...... to carbon black. These results show that DEP are mutagenic in a mammalian cell line in vitro and that additional pathways besides ROS production, such as those involving the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, likely are involved in the mutagenesis....

  4. Experimental study of mutagenous and mitosis modifying activity of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Kirbik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenous and mitosis modifying impact of silver nanoparticles has been studied on outbred mice. Nanoparticles were of round shape with dimensions of 5-50 nm, size of generated organic shell of 2-5 nm, the quantity in 1 mcm3 makes 120-270. Metaphasic analysis of mice bone marrow cells was used as a testing technique. The frequency of chromosome aberrations and mitotic index of preparations were accounted. During single intraperitoneal administration of the agent in the dose of 250 mcg/kg the silver nanoparticles demonstrated mitosis stimulating activity. No mutagenous effect of silver nanoparticles by daily administration for 4 days of 25 mcg/kg and single administration in the dose of 250 mcg/kg has been registered, but there is statistically insignificant tendency of aberrant metaphases increase. Consequently silver nanoparticles in the investigated doses demonstrated no mutagenous activity and can be considered safe for mammalian cells.

  5. [Mutagenic effect of the food-coloring agents tartrazine and indigo carmine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpliuk, I A; Volkova, N A; Okuneva, L A; Gogol', A T; Rybakova, K D

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied the mutagenic action of the food dyes, tartrazine (both Soviet and imported) and indigocarmine in a microbial model and in warm-blooded animals (linear mice). Determined the toxicity and mutagenic action of the dyes on E. coli, strain K-12, carried out chromosomal analysis of the bone marrow, examined the dominant lethals in CBA X C57BL/6 mice. The recommended daily dose amounts to 400 mg/kg for tartrazine and to 50 mg/kg for indigocarmine with regard to the safety factor equal to 100. The data derived as a result of studying the mutagenic activity of tartrazine manufactured in the USSR and CSSR and indigocarmine paste in 3 experimental models allow the conclusion to be made that the doses of these dyes applied in food industry are fairly safe.

  6. Role of aldehydes in the toxic and mutagenic effects of nitrosamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa A; Urban, Anna M; Vu, Choua C; Cummings, Meredith E; Brown, Lee C; Warmka, Janel K; Li, Li; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Patel, Yesha; Stram, Daniel O; Pegg, Anthony E

    2013-10-21

    α-Hydroxynitrosamine metabolites of nitrosamines decompose to a reactive diazohydroxide and an aldehyde. To test the hypothesis that the aldehydes contribute to the harmful effects of nitrosamines, the toxic and mutagenic activities of three model methylating agents were compared in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing or not expressing human O⁶-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT). N-Nitrosomethylurethane (NMUr), acetoxymethylmethylnitrosamine (AMMN), and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-4-acetoxy-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK-4-OAc) are all activated by ester hydrolysis to methanediazohydroxide. NMUr does not form an aldehyde, whereas AMMN generates formaldehyde, and NNK-4-OAc produces 4-oxo-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (OPB). Since these compounds were likely to alkylate DNA to different extents, the toxic and mutagenic activities of these compounds were normalized to the levels of the most cytotoxic and mutagenic DNA adduct, O⁶-mG, to assess if the aldehydes contributed to the toxicological properties of these methylating agents. Levels of 7-mG indicated that the differences in cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of these compounds resulted from differences in their ability to methylate DNA. When normalized against the levels of O⁶-mG, there was no difference between these three compounds in cells that lacked AGT. However, AMMN and NNK-4-OAc were more toxic than NMUr in cells expressing AGT when normalized against O⁶-mG levels. In addition, AMMN was more mutagenic than NNK-4-OAc and MNUr in these cells. These findings demonstrate that the aldehyde decomposition products of nitrosamines can contribute to the cytotoxic and/or mutagenic activity of methylating nitrosamines.

  7. Hydrogeologic characterization and evolution of the 'excavation damaged zone' by statistical analyses of pressure signals: application to galleries excavated at the clay-stone sites of Mont Terri (Ga98) and Tournemire (Ga03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatmi, H.; Ababou, R.; Matray, J.M.; Joly, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This paper presents methods of statistical analysis and interpretation of hydrogeological signals in clayey formations, e.g., pore water pressure and atmospheric pressure. The purpose of these analyses is to characterize the hydraulic behaviour of this type of formation in the case of a deep repository of Mid- Level/High-Level and Long-lived radioactive wastes, and to study the evolution of the geologic formation and its EDZ (Excavation Damaged Zone) during the excavation of galleries. We focus on galleries Ga98 and Ga03 in the sites of Mont Terri (Jura, Switzerland) and Tournemire (France, Aveyron), through data collected in the BPP- 1 and PH2 boreholes, respectively. The Mont Terri site, crossing the Aalenian Opalinus clay-stone, is an underground laboratory managed by an international consortium, namely the Mont Terri project (Switzerland). The Tournemire site, crossing the Toarcian clay-stone, is an Underground Research facility managed by IRSN (France). We have analysed pore water and atmospheric pressure signals at these sites, sometimes in correlation with other data. The methods of analysis are based on the theory of stationary random signals (correlation functions, Fourier spectra, transfer functions, envelopes), and on multi-resolution wavelet analysis (adapted to nonstationary and evolutionary signals). These methods are also combined with filtering techniques, and they can be used for single signals as well as pairs of signals (cross-analyses). The objective of this work is to exploit pressure measurements in selected boreholes from the two compacted clay sites, in order to: - evaluate phenomena affecting the measurements (earth tides, barometric pressures..); - estimate hydraulic properties (specific storage..) of the clay-stones prior to excavation works and compare them with those estimated by pulse or slug tests on shorter time scales; - analyze the effects of drift excavation on pore pressures

  8. Mutagenic and antimutagenic potentials of fruit juices of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... phenolic compounds have protective role against oxidative damage diseases, perhaps due to their reputed ... arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure, muscle aches and pains, menstrual difficulties, headaches, ... to treat oxidative stress related diseases in Malaysia,. South America and Africa (Eldeen et al., ...

  9. Mutagenicity of nicotine in Schistosoma mansoni - infected mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Biology ... This study deals with the induction of chromosomal damage assessed by bone marrow micronucleus (MN) and chromosome aberration (CA) tests, as well as the analysis of ... Schistosoma infection increased the percentage of micronucleated erythrocytes and total CAs in bone marrow cells.

  10. The mutagenicity of isoniazid in salmonella and its effects on DNA repair and synthesis in human fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wade, D.R.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Mattern, I.E.; Berends, F.

    1981-01-01

    A commercial sample of the tuberculostatic drug isoniazid (INH) was found to have a weak mutagenic activity towards Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA1535. The addition of a rat or mouse liver homogenate to the test system decreased the mutagenic effect of INH. Hydrazine, an impurity of the

  11. An Evaluation of the Mode of Action Framework for MutagenicCarcinogens Case Study II: Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to the 2005 revised U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a strategy is being developed to include all mutagenicity and other genotoxicity data with any additional information to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode...

  12. THE CASE FOR THE CONTRIBUTION OF CRISTAIS RIVER NITRO-AMINOBENZENE DYES TO THE MUTAGENICITY OF AMBIENT SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to verify if dyestuffs within an effluent of a textile industry was contributing to the systematic mutagenicity detected in the Cristais River, within the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, mutagenic samples of the industrial effluent, crude water, and treated silt of the...

  13. Contribution of PAH and some of their nitrated derivatives to the mutagenicity of ambient airborne particles and coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deraat, W.K.; Boers, J.P.; Bakker, G.L.; Demeijere, F.A.; Hooimeijer, A.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Mohn, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the chemical nature and diversity of the mutagens in ambient airborne particles (AAP) and coal fly ash (CFA), extracts of these particles were subjected to bioassay-directed fractionation. Open-column and high-pressure liquid chromatography were used as fractionation techniques. Extracts and fractions were tested with the Salmonella/microsome test using various tester strains and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some nitrated PAH. Seven distinct groups of mutagens could be discerned in AAP. Two of them were identified as PAH and mono-nitro PAH; the first accounted for about 5% of the total effect in TA98 and S9 and about 20% of the total effect in TA100 with S9. A significant contribution of dinitropyrene could be ruled out. Five more polar groups of mutagens could be isolated in AAP, which showed clearly nitroreductase-dependent direct mutagenicity. Besides direct-acting nitrocompounds, these groups also comprised indirect acting compounds (S9 dependent) which could also be nitro-compounds. The distribution of the mutagenicity over the various active chromatographical fractions was clearly strain and S9 dependent. The use of strains TA100 and TA97 pointed to the importance of indirect mutagens. PAH did not significantly contribute to the mutagenicity of CFA. These particles contained two groups of mutagens that were not found in AAP

  14. Contribution of PAH and some of their nitrated derivatives to the mutagenicity of ambient airborne particles and coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deraat, W.K.; Boers, J.P.; Bakker, G.L.; Demeijere, F.A.; Hooimeijer, A.; Lohman, P.H.M.; Mohn, G.R. (TNO, Rijswijk (Netherlands). Medical Biology Lab.)

    1994-08-15

    In order to investigate the chemical nature and diversity of the mutagens in ambient airborne particles (AAP) and coal fly ash (CFA), extracts of these particles were subjected to bioassay-directed fractionation. Open-column and high-pressure liquid chromatography were used as fractionation techniques. Extracts and fractions were tested with the Salmonella/microsome test using various tester strains and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and some nitrated PAH. Seven distinct groups of mutagens could be discerned in AAP. Two of them were identified as PAH and mono-nitro PAH; the first accounted for about 5% of the total effect in TA98 and S9 and about 20% of the total effect in TA100 with S9. A significant contribution of dinitropyrene could be ruled out. Five more polar groups of mutagens could be isolated in AAP, which showed clearly nitroreductase-dependent direct mutagenicity. Besides direct-acting nitrocompounds, these groups also comprised indirect acting compounds (S9 dependent) which could also be nitro-compounds. The distribution of the mutagenicity over the various active chromatographical fractions was clearly strain and S9 dependent. The use of strains TA100 and TA97 pointed to the importance of indirect mutagens. PAH did not significantly contribute to the mutagenicity of CFA. These particles contained two groups of mutagens that were not found in AAP.

  15. Evaluation of the butter flavoring chemical diacetyl and a fluorochemical paper additive for mutagenicity and toxicity using the mammalian cell gene mutation assay in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Paul; Clarke, Jane J; San, Richard H C; Begley, Timothy H; Dunkel, Virginia C

    2008-08-01

    Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a yellowish liquid that is usually mixed with other ingredients to produce butter flavor or other flavors in a variety of food products. Inhalation of butter flavoring vapors was first associated with clinical bronchiolitis obliterans among workers in microwave popcorn production. Recent findings have shown irreversible obstructive lung disease among workers not only in the microwave popcorn industry, but also in flavoring manufacture, and in chemical synthesis of diacetyl, a predominant chemical for butter flavoring. It has been reported that perfluorochemicals utilized in food packaging are migrating into foods and may be sources of oral exposure. Relatively small quantities of perfluorochemicals are used in the manufacturing of paper or paperboard that is in direct contact with food to repel oil or grease and water. Because of recent concerns about perfluorochemicals such as those found on microwave popcorn bags (e.g. Lodyne P208E) and diacetyl in foods, we evaluated both compounds for mutagenicity using the mammalian cell gene mutation assay in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Lodyne P208E was less toxic than diacetyl and did not induce a mutagenic response. Diacetyl induced a highly mutagenic response in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma mutation assay in the presence of human liver S9 for activation. The increase in the frequency of small colonies in the assay with diacetyl indicates that diacetyl causes damage to multiple loci on chromosome 11 in addition to functional loss of the thymidine kinase locus.

  16. Mutagenic effects of 3-carbethoxypsoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen plus 365-nm irradiation in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulo, D.; Sagliocco, F.; Averbeck, D.

    1983-01-01

    Cell survival, i.e. colony-forming ability, and the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant (6-TGsup(r)) mutants were determined in Chinese hamster V79 cells by using two photoreactive furocoumarins of photochemotherapeutic interest: the bifunctional compound 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and the monofunctional compound 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPs). To quantify the mutation induction in V79 cells mutants deficient in the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) were selected with the purine analogue 6-thioguanine (6-TG). Both compounds exhibited lethal and mutagenic activities but the monofunctional compound 3-CPs was less lethal and mutagenic than the bifunctional compound 8-MOP. (Auth.)

  17. Anti-Genotoxic Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Mutagenic Dose of Three Alkylating Agents

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    The antimutagenic effect of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) was investigated by using the Drosophila wing spot test. In this assay, 3-day-old transheterozygous larvae for the multiple wing hair (mwh, 3-0.3) and flare (flr, 3-38.8) genes were treated with 3 direct acting mutagens: ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-nitroso N-ethylurea (ENU). The results obtained from 3 reference mutagens were clearly genotoxic in the Drosophila wing somatic mutation and recombination t...

  18. Aquilide A, a new mutagenic compound isolated from bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, J C; Lagerweij, W J; Posthumus, M A; van Veldhuizen, A; Holterman, H A

    1983-12-01

    A mutagenic compound, designated aquilide A, was isolated and identified from bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn). Aquilide A was found to be responsible for greater than 50% of the mutagenic activity observed after incubation of the methanol extract at alkaline conditions. This compound was found to be a potent genotoxic compound in mammalian cells in vitro and therefore, may be responsible for at least part of the carcinogenic activity of bracken. The instability of aquilide A under conditions normally encountered during analytical chemical procedures may explain why so many efforts to elucidate the carcinogenic factor(s) present in bracken have been unsuccessful.

  19. Suppressive effects of coffee on the SOS responses induced by UV and chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Sei-ichi; Tanaka, Ryou-ichi

    1986-01-01

    SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens was strongly suppressed by instant coffee in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. As decaffeinated instant coffee showed a similarly strong suppressive effect, it would seem that caffeine, a known inhibitor of SOS responses, is not responsible for the effect observed. The suppression was also shown by freshly brewed coffee extracts. However, the suppression was absent in green coffee-bean extracts. These results suggest that coffee contains some substance(s) which, apart from caffeine, suppresses SOS-inducing activity of UV or chemical mutagens and that the suppressive substance(s) are produced by roasting coffee beans. (Auth.)

  20. Investigation of mutagenicity of extracts of hydrobionts from lake Drukshiai and water from its streamlets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekevichius, R.; Dagyte, B.; Sabaliuniene, I.; Shumyliene, I.; Mishkelevichiute, E.

    1995-01-01

    Rain-water samples from Ignalina NPP buildings and industry sewerage water samples collected in 1993-1994 induced statistically significant increase in levels of frameshift and and base-substitution mutations in Salmonella typhimurium Ames tester strains. It was found that mutagens originated not by Ignalina NPP get into lake Drukshiai from its streamlets. Extracts from 4 species of molluscs did not induce frameshift and base-substitution mutations in Ames tester-strains. Among extracts of liver, muscles and gonads from 4 fish species tested, the highest mutagenicity levels were induced by extracts of gonads from the largest fish. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs

  1. Investigation of the induction of oxidative DNA damage by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for thymine glycol containing DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlenz-Michel, C.

    1988-01-01

    The report explains an ELISA test system for the detection and quantification of toxic effects on genes, induced by mutagenic or carcinogenic chemicals introduced by way of reactive oxygen species. Sensitivity and reproducibility are defined, and the system's applicability to the detection of oxidative DNA damage as a result of the metabolism of chemicals in cellular systems is discussed. (TRV) [de

  2. Mutagenic activity of 2-(2',4'-diaminophenoxy)ethanol in strains TA1538 and TA98 of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, G; Bouter, S; de Knijff, P

    1982-12-01

    The mutagenicity of 2-(2',4'-diaminophenoxy)ethanol (2,4-DAPE) was compared with that of 2,4-diaminoanisole (2,4-DAA), a chemically related compound previously used in hair-dye formulations. Both chemicals were tested in standard procedures with the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test as described by Ames and colleagues. In several experiments, which extended over a total period of 2 years, 2,4-DAA exhibited definite, but variable mutagenicity toward strain TA1538 when S9 preparations of rat liver induced with Aroclor 1254 were present in the incubation mixtures. The compound 2,4-DAPE did not exhibit detectable mutagenic activity when tested concomitantly under the same experimental conditions. We conclude that 2,4-DAPE is not mutagenic for Salmonella under conditions of the standard mammalian microsome assay with strain TA1538 and TA98 as indicators.

  3. Modulatory effect of Byrsonima basiloba extracts on the mutagenicity of certain direct and indirect-acting mutagens in Salmonella typhimurium assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Walclecio de Moraes; dos Santos, Fabio Vieira; Sannomiya, Miriam; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2008-03-01

    Byrsonima basiloba A. Juss. species is a native arboreal type from the Brazilian "cerrado" (tropical American savanna), and the local population uses it to treat diseases, such as diarrhea and gastric ulcer. It belongs to the Malpighiaceae family, and it is commonly known as "murici." Considering the popular use of B. basiloba derivatives and the lack of pharmacological potential studies regarding this vegetal species, the mutagenic and antimutagenic effect of methanol (MeOH) and chloroform extracts were evaluated by the Ames test, using strains TA97a, TA98, TA100, and TA102 of Salmonella typhimurium. No mutagenic activity was observed in any of the extracts. To evaluate the antimutagenic potential, direct and indirect mutagenic agents were used: 4 nitro-o-phenylenediamine, sodium azide, mitomycin C, aflatoxin B(1), benzo[a]pyrene, and hydrogen peroxide. Both the extracts evaluated showed antimutagenic activity, but the highest value of inhibition level (89%) was obtained with the MeOH extract and strain TA100 in the presence of aflatoxin B(1). Phytochemical analysis of the extracts revealed the presence of n-alkanes, lupeol, ursolic and oleanolic acid, (+)-catechin, quercetin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, gallic acid, methyl gallate, amentoflavone, quercetin, quercetin-3-O-(2"-O-galloyl)-beta-D-galactopyranoside, and quercetin-3-O-(2"-O-galloyl)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside.

  4. Radiation damage to DNA: the effect of LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.F.; Milligan, J.R. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    Mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation induced damage are introduced into cellular DNA are discussed. The types of lesions induced are summarized and the rationale is presented which supports the statement that radiation induced singly damaged sites are biologically unimportant. The conclusion that multiply damaged sites are critical is discussed and the mechanisms whereby such lesions are formed are presented. Structures of multiply damaged sites are summarized and problems which they present to cellular repair systems are discussed. Lastly the effects of linear energy transfer on the complexity of multiply damaged sites are surveyed and the consequences of this increased complexity are considered in terms of cell survival and mutation. (author)

  5. Development and applications of Bacillus subtilis test systems for mutagens, involving DNA-repair deficiency and suppressible auxotrophic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.

    1977-01-01

    A mutagen-tester of Bacillus subtilis was constructed and tested with known carcinogens. The parental strain HA101 of Okubo and Yanagida carrying suppressible nonsense mutations in his and met genes was transformed to carry an excision-repair deficiency mutation. The constructed strain TKJ5211 showed a 20-30-fold higher sensitivity for His + reversion than the parental strain when treated with UV and UV-mimetic chemicals but unchanged mutation frequency with X-rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The tester strain was used in a spot test of 30 selected chemicals and also for testing with liver homogenate activation. The results showed an almost equivalent but somewhat broader detection spectrum than the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 system. Another test method used a pair of B. subtilis strains differing in their DNA-repair capacity, i.e. the most UV-sensitive mutant HJ-15 and a wild-type strain, to detect repair-dependent DNA damage produced by chemicals. Spores could be used in either test

  6. Acute and subchronic toxicity as well as mutagenic evaluation of essential oil from turmeric (Curcuma longa L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liju, Vijayasteltar B; Jeena, Kottarapat; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2013-03-01

    The present study investigated the acute, subchronic and genotoxicity of turmeric essential oil (TEO) from Curcuma longa L. Acute administration of TEO was done as single dose up to 5 g of TEO per kg body weight and subchronic toxicity study for thirteen weeks was done by daily oral administration of TEO at doses 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 g/kg b.wt. in Wistar rats. There were no mortality, adverse clinical signs or changes in body weight; water and food consumption during acute as well as subchronic toxicity studies. Indicators of hepatic function such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were unchanged in treated animals compared to untreated animals. Oral administration of TEO for 13 weeks did not alter total cholesterol, triglycerides, markers of renal function, serum electrolyte parameters and histopathology of tissues. TEO did not produce any mutagenicity to Salmonella typhimurium TA-98, TA-100, TA-102 and TA-1535 with or without metabolic activation. Administration of TEO to rats (1 g/kg b.wt.) for 14 days did not produce any chromosome aberration or micronuclei in rat bone marrow cells and did not produce any DNA damage as seen by comet assay confirming the non toxicity of TEO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Human hepatoma cells exposed to estuarine sediment contaminant extracts permitted the differentiation between cytotoxic and pro-mutagenic fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, M.; Costa, P.M.; Louro, H.; Costa, M.H.; Lavinha, J.

    2014-01-01

    Complex toxicant mixtures present in estuarine sediments often render contaminant screening unfeasible and compromise determining causation. HepG2 cells were subjected to bioassays with sediment extracts obtained with a series of progressively polar solvents plus a crude extract. The sediments were collected from an impacted area of an estuary otherwise regarded as pristine, whose stressors result mostly from aquaculture effluents and hydrodynamic shifts that enhance particle deposition. Compared to a reference scenario, the most polar extracts yielded highest cytotoxicity while higher genotoxicity (including oxidative damage) was elicited by non-polar solvents. While the former caused effects similar to those expected from biocides, the latter triggered effects compatible with known pro-mutagens like PAHs, even though the overall levels of toxicants were considered of low risk. The results indicate that the approach may constitute an effective line-of-evidence to infer on the predominant set of hazardous contaminants present in complex environmental mixtures. -- Highlights: • Estuarine sediment contaminants were extracted with different organic solvents. • More polar solvents contained the most cytotoxic contaminant fraction. • Non-polar solvents extracted the main genotoxic component of the mixture. • DNA base oxidation was detected through FPG/Comet assay. • The contamination pattern could be inferred from cytoassays with HepG2 cells. -- Polar/non-polar sediment fractions elicited differential cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in human HepG2 cells

  8. Structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.E.; Bruhn, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtually all structures show some signs of distress due to deterioration of the building components, to changed loads, or to changed support conditions. Changed support conditions result from ground movements. In mining regions many cases of structural distress are attributed to mining without considering alternative causes. This is particularly true of coal mining since it occurs under extensive areas. Coal mining is estimated to have already undermined more than eight million acres and may eventually undermine 40 million acres in the United States. Other nonmetal and metal underground mines impact much smaller areas. Although it is sometimes difficult, even with careful study, to identify the actual cause of damage, persons responsible for underground coal mining should at least be aware of possible causes of building stress other than mine subsidence. This paper presents information on distress to structures and briefly reviews a number of causes of ground movements other than subsidence: Mass movements, dissolution, erosion, frost action, shrinking and swelling, yield into excavations and compressibility

  9. Damaged Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  10. Dietary Exposure of Nigerians to Mutagens and Estrogen-Like Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyekhoetin Matthew Omoruyi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Food and drinking water are poorly delineated sources of human exposure to chemical food mutagens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In this study, we investigated the presence of mutagens and chemicals exhibiting estrogenic activity in the daily diet of Nigerians, using in vitro assays. Commercially processed foods or snacks and various brands of pure water sachets were extracted by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction, respectively. Mutagenicity was determined by the conventional Ames test and two complementary assays on two strains of Salmonella (TA 100 and TA 98, while the estrogenic activity was assessed by a yeast bioluminescent assay, using two recombinant yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMAEREluc/ERα and S. cerevisiae BMA64/luc. A third of the food varieties investigated (chin-chin, hamburger, suya and bean cake were mutagenic in all three assays, either in the presence or absence of S9 mix. Of the packed water samples, five out of the sixteen investigated (31%, were found to be estrogenic, with estradiol and bisphenol A equivalents ranging from 0.79 to 44.0 ng/L and 124.2 to 1,000.8 ng/L, respectively. Hence, although the current situation in Nigeria does not appear to be substantially worse than, e.g., in Europe, regular monitoring is warranted in the future.

  11. Paving asphalt products exhibit a lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyak, Katy O; McKee, Richard H; Minsavage, Gary D; McGowan, Claude; Daughtrey, Wayne C; Freeman, James J

    2011-10-01

    A paving asphalt and a vacuum residuum (derived from crude oil by atmospheric and subsequent vacuum distillation and used as a blend stock for asphalt) were tested in skin carcinogenesis assays in mice and in optimized Ames assays for mutagenic activity. In the skin cancer tests, each substance was applied twice weekly for 104 weeks to the clipped backs of groups of 50 male C3H mice. Neither the paving asphalt nor the vacuum residuum (30% weight/volume and 75% weight/weight in US Pharmacopeia mineral oil, respectively) produced any tumors. The positive control benzo[a]pyrene (0.05% w/v in toluene) induced tumors in 46 of 50 mice, demonstrating the effectiveness of the test method. Salmonella typhimurium tester strain TA98 was used in the optimized Ames assay to evaluate mutagenic potential. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) extractions of the substances were not mutagenic when tested up to toxic limits. Thus, under the conditions of these studies, neither the paving asphalt nor the vacuum residuum was carcinogenic or mutagenic.

  12. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS CONCENTRATION AND MUTAGENIC EFFECTS OF DUST IN OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENT IN SILESIAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kozłowska

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality and quantity of pollution depend on the combusted fuels and industrial technologies, the season of the year and meteorological conditions. Dust pollution of the air consists of diverse chemical organic and inorganic substances. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH mixture and their nitric, amin, oxidated and chlorated derivatives, which are found in all dust fractions, are particularly dangerous to human health and exert mutagenic effects. PAHs are measured and analyzed using liquid chromatography, which is one of the most popular technique in analytical chemistry. Standard Ames test on Salmonella strain TA98 and YG1041 was used to assess mutagenic properties of dust. Samples of dust were collected on glass fiber filters by aspiration instrument with air flow 1 m3/min. during the autumn in six cities in Silesian Region. Extraction of pollution was carried out in Soxhlet instrument using dichlorometane in the ventilated chamber. There was majority of indirect mutagenic substances (requiring metabolic activation in studied samples. Mutagenic activity of dust fractions in outdoor air was caused by the PAHs concentrations, and particularly by benzo(apyrene, what was confirmed by HPLC.

  13. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assessment of organomodified clays potentially used in food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Aucejo, Susana; Jos, Ángeles

    2015-09-01

    Modern food packaging has made great advances as result of global trends and consumer preferences, which are oriented to obtain improved food quality and safety. In this regard, clay minerals, and mainly Montmorillonite (Mt) are attracting considerable interest in food packaging because of the improvements developed in mechanical and barrier properties. Hence, the present work aim to assess the toxicity of four Montmorillonite-based clay minerals, an unmodified clay, Cloisite®Na+ (CNa+), and three modified Mt clays: Cloisite®30B (C30B), a commercial clay, and Clay1 and Clay2, two novel modified organoclays developed by the Packaging, Transport, & Logistics Research Institute (ITENE). First, the cytotoxic effects were studied in the Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). In addition, the potential mutagenicity of the clays was evaluated by the Ames test. Clay1 did not induce any cytotoxic effects in HUVEC, although it exhibited potential mutagenicity in TA98 Salmonella typhimurium strain. In contrast, Clay2 produced cytotoxicity in endothelial cells but no mutagenicity was recorded. However, CNa+ was not cytotoxic neither mutagenic. And finally, C30B showed positive results in both assays. Therefore, results showed that clay minerals have a different toxicity profile and a case by case toxicity evaluation is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED FRACTIONAL AND SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY OF AUTOMOBILE AND FORKLIFT DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Many pulmonary toxicity studies of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have used anautomobile-generated sample (A-DEP) whose mutagenicity has not been reported. In contrast,rnany inutagenicity studies of DEP have used a forklift-generated sample (SRM ...

  15. Carcinogenic and mutagenic risk associated to airborne particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: A source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Hofer, Angelika; Squizzato, Stefania; Piazza, Rossano; Rampazzo, Giancarlo; Pavoni, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Conventional risk assessment studies provide no detailed information about the role of specific sources determining the total carcinogenic and mutagenic potencies of PAH mixtures on humans health. In this study, the main emission sources of 11 particle-phase PAHs listed as carcinogenic and mutagenic agents by the IARC were identified by a risk apportionment method. The contribution of sources to the total concentration of PAHs in the study area was also quantified. A receptor model based on factor and multiple linear regression analyses was applied to estimate the source-specific risk associated to PAH inhalation in an urban background area of a large city (Venice-Mestre, Northern Italy). The proposed approach has discriminated the sources of mutagenic and carcinogenic congeners and their role in determining a serious hazard for human health. Results, interpreted on the basis of seasonal variations and atmospheric conditions, have shown that even though domestic heating is the main source of total PAHs in winter, a background pollution including traffic mainly accounts for the carcinogenic and mutagenic risk during the whole year. The findings of this work and the approach used can be easily applied to other geographic areas and provide useful information for local and regional air pollution control strategies.

  16. [Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczko, Katarzyna; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Czerczak, Sławomir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year) and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year) were reported. The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI) compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI) trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene, and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definition of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers.

  17. Carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2011–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pałaszewska-Tkacz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study was the analysis of structure of carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and dusts occurring in Polish enterprises, 2011–2012, including the number of exposed employees reported to the “Central register of data on exposure to carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances, mixtures, agents or technological processes”, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. In the paper the aims, range and methodology of data collecting by the Central Register are presented. Material and Methods: Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the data on occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances and technological processes reported by employers were carried out. Results: In 2011–2012 approximately 2600 plants reported more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances annually. The most common occupational chemical carcinogens/mutagens were: benzene, one of the unspecified gasoline, chromium(VI compounds, asbestos, chromium(VI trioxide, ethylene oxide and benzo[a]pyrene. The highest number of employees was exposed to particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Hardwood dust was the major occupational carcinogen listed in the technological processes inventory with approximately 11 000 employees exposed in about 650 enterprises annually. Conclusions: The amended legislation concerning occupational exposure to carcinogens has not significantly influenced the exposure structure in Poland. Nevertheless it permited to determine the actual total number of the occupationally exposed to carcinogens. Med Pr 2015;66(1:29–38

  18. Health Effects of Soy-Biodiesel Emissions: Bioassay-Directed Fractionation for Mutagenicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND:Soy biodiesel is the predominant biodiesel used in the U.S., but there is little understanding of the classes of chemicals responsible for the mutagenicity of the emissions.OBJECTIVE: We determined some of the chemical classes responsible for various categories of mut...

  19. Carcinogens, Teratogens and Mutagens: Their Impact on Occupational Health, Particularly for Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant women, especially those working in veterinary medicine, face occupational health/disease risks from mutagens, teratogens, and carcinogens. These hazards can be placed into three categories: physical, chemical, and biological. Each of these hazards is discussed with examples. (Author/JN)

  20. Mutagenicity assessment of aerosols in emissions from wood combustion in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, B; Alves, C A; Gonçalves, C; Pio, C; Gonçalves, F; Pereira, R

    2012-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) extracts of fine particles (PM(2.5)) collected from combustion of seven wood species and briquettes were tested for mutagenic activities using Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. The woods were Pinus pinaster (maritime pine), Eucalyptus globulus (eucalypt), Quercus suber (cork oak), Acacia longifolia (golden wattle), Quercus faginea (Portuguese oak), Olea europea (olive), and Quercus ilex rotundifolia (Holm oak). Burning experiments were done using woodstove and fireplace, hot start and cold start conditions. A mutagenic response was recorded for all species except golden wattle, maritime pine, and briquettes. The mutagenic extracts were not correlated with high emission factors of carcinogenic PAHs. These extracts were obtained both from two burning appliances and start-up conditions. However, fireplace seemed to favour the occurrence of mutagenic emissions. The negative result recorded for golden wattle was interesting, in an ecological point of view, since after confirmation, this invasive species, can be recommended for domestic use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Onderzoek naar de mutagene werking van 2,3-epoxypropylmethacrylaat met microorganismen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogd CE; van der Stel JJ; Verharen HW

    1984-01-01

    Glycidylmethacrylaat of 2,3-epoxypropylmethacrylaat bleek een mutagene werking uit te oefenen op Klebsiela pneumoniae (0,0002 mol en hoger), op Salmonella typhimurium TA 1535 (vanaf 0,004 mg per plaat) en Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (vanaf 0,04 mg per plaat). Met de Salmonella typhimurium stammen

  2. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of food compounds : Application of a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, Cyrille Anna Maria

    2001-01-01

    Exposure of humans to potential mutagenic and carcinogenic food compounds through the diet is unavoidable. On the other hand, there is epidemiological evidence for antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties of food as well (such as vegetables and fruit). The assessment of carcinogenic and cancer

  3. Evaluation of an Air Quality Health Index for Predicting the Mutagenicity of Simulated Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    No study has evaluated the mutagenicity of atmospheres with a calculated air quality health index (AQHI). Thus, we generated in a UV-light-containing reaction chamber two simulated atmospheres (SAs) with similar AQHIs but different proportions of criteria pollutants and evaluated...

  4. Mutagenic atmospheres resulting from the photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbon and NOx mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated to limit air pollution and the consequent health effects, the photooxidation products generally are not. Thus, we examined the mutagenicity in Salmonella TA100 of photochemical atmospheres generated in a steady-state a...

  5. An evaluation of the mode of action framework for mutagenic carcinogens: Chromium (VI): SOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to the 2005 revised U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a strategy is being developed to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode of action (MOA). This information is necessary for EPA to decide whether age-dependent ...

  6. An evaluation of the mode of action framework for mutagenic carcinogens: chromium (VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to the 2005 revised U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a strategy is being developed to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode of action (MOA). This information is necessary for EPA to decide whether age-dependent ...

  7. AZO DYES ARE MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY DETECTED IN THE CRISTAIS RIVER WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if compounds from a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a Drinking Water T...

  8. Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discerning the Chemical Composition and Mutagenic Effects of Soy Biodiesel PM David G. Nashab, Esra Mutluc, William T. Prestond, Michael D. Haysb, Sarah H. Warrenc, Charly Kingc, William P. Linakb, M. lan Gilmourc, and David M. DeMarinic aOak Ridge Institute for Science and Ed...

  9. A perspective ofGenes and Environmentfor the development of environmental mutagen research in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Two years have passed since the Japanese Environmental Society (JEMS) made the official journal Genes and Environment (G&E) open access. Current subjects on environmental mutagen research to further advance this field are described herein, and the roles of JEMS and G&E are discussed. Various important subjects are being investigated in current research fields such as severe environmental pollution in Asian countries; the identification of new hazardous substances and elucidation of mutation mechanisms using newly developed techniques; the development of new genotoxicity assays including in silico predictions using information technology and artificial intelligence as well as bioassays. International exchange by scientists is important for advancing these research fields through international conferences such as the 12th International Conference and 5th Asian Congress on Environmental Mutagens and the 7th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing that will be held in 2017. G&E provides a common platform for high quality environmental mutagen research, contributes to the dissemination of Asian environmental mutagen research, and potentiates the level of research being conducted.

  10. The inactivating and mutagenic effect of hydroxylamine on bacteriophage φX174

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J.H. van de; Arkel, G.A. van

    1965-01-01

    The inactivation of bacteriophage ΦXI74 by the mutagenic agents nitrous acid and ultraviolet irradiation proceeds according to a single-hit kinetics. However, treatment of purified ΦXI74 by hydroxylamine (HA) at pH 6 and 25° results in an inactivation that is not strictly exponential. The

  11. An investigation of the mutagenic activity of salamide - a major impurity of hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerce, Esra; Cok, Ismet; Sari, Sibel; Bostanci, Omur

    2016-11-01

    Hydrochlorothiazide is a widely used antihypertensive agent and one of its major impurities, salamide (4-amino-6-chlorobenzene-1,3-disulphonamide), has a chemical structure containing a primary amino group, a functional group that has previously been reported to be associated with carcinogenic activity. It is known that hydrochlorothiazide purity is a challenging problem for the pharmaceutical industry. As there were no prior mutagenicity data for the impurity salamide, the aim was to investigate its mutagenicity in this study. Salamide was tested for mutagenic potential in Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100, TA 1535, TA 1537, and E. coli WP2 uvrA + E. coli WP2 [pKM101] strains at six different concentrations, the highest concentration being the 5000 μg/plate. In both the presence and absence of the metabolic activation system, no mutagenic activity was observed. Results indicated that salamide should be classified as an ordinary impurity and controlled according to Q3A(R2) and Q3B(R2) guidelines.

  12. Mutagenic activation of CL64,855, an anti-Trypanosoma cruzi nitroderivant, by bacterial nitroreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morais Jr. Marcos Antonio de

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available CL64,855 is a nitroimidazole-thiodiazole derivate with high anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity. CL64,855-induced mutagenesis in the Salmonella/microsome test was detected by TA98 and TA98dnp6 strains, but not by the nitroreductase I-deficient TA98nr strain. The lack of mutagenic response of TA98nr was connected with its extreme resistance to the killing effect of the drug. Presence of S9 mix did not restore mutagenic activity of CL64,855 to the TA98nr strain. Additionally, CL64,855 was reduced in vitro by the nitroreductase I-proficient TA98 strain, mainly in the presence of oxygen, but not by the TA98nr strain. Mutagenic activity was detected in serum samples of treated guinea pigs by nitroreductase-proficient strains TA98 and TA98dnp6, but not by nitroductase-deficient strain TA98nr. In the case of urine, mutagenic activity was observed with all three tested strains, suggesting an in vivo metabolic activation of the drug by a distinct metabolic pathway.

  13. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.**

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  14. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  15. Intercellular distribution of mutations induced in oopcytes of Drosophila melanogaster by chemical and physical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1979-01-01

    When females of Drosophila melanogaster are treated with chemical or physical mutagens, not only in one but also in both of the two homologous X chromosomes of a given oocyte, a recessive sex-linked lethal mutation may be induced. A method is described that discriminates between such single and double mutations. A theory is developed to show how a comparison betweeen the expected and the observer frequency of double mutations yields an indication of the intercellular distribution (random or nonrandom) of recessive lethal mutations induced by mutagenic agents in oocytes and, consequently, of the distribution (homogenous or nonhomogeneous) of those agents. Three agents were tested: FUdR (12.5, 50.0 and 81.0 μg/ml), mitomycin C (130.0 μg/ml) and x rays (2000 R, 150 kV). After FUdR feeding, no increase in the mutation frequency usually observed in D. melanogaster without mutagenic treatment was obtained (u = 0.13%, namely three single mutations among 2332 chromosomes tested). After mitomycin C feeding 104 single and three double mutations were obtained. All of the 50 mutations observed after x irradiation were single mutations. The results obtained in the mitomycin C and radiation experiments favor the assumption of a random intercellular distribution of recessive lethal mutations induced by these two agents in oocytes of D. melanogaster. Reasons are discussed why for other types of mutagenic agents nonrandom distributions may be observed with our technique

  16. Influence of particulate trap oxidizers on emission of mutagenic compounds by diesel automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, R E; Devillez, G; Smith, L R

    1989-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are known to contain mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals. The aim of this study wa